Issuu on Google+

Napa Cycling Trail p12

THE

HOUSE THAT RUBEN BUILT The long journey to this week’s opening of the Green Music Center at SSU p20

Eight-Dollar Tacos p15

The Levi Effect p26

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26- O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Ŵ

ŵ NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26- OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Locally-Made, Custom-Blended Herbal Tinctures Highest Quality Nutrients Acupuncture & Bodywork Health Consultations on the Floor and by Appointment

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

YOUR TRUSTED SOURCE

Monday–Friday 10–6 707.528.4372 95 Montgomery Drive Ste 90 Santa Rosa

Tues-Fri 7:30-6:00 321 Second Street

769-0162

Petaluma

HONDA TOYOT A M AZ DA NI S SAN SUBARU

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

4

Bohemian

COPPERFIELD’S COPPER RFIELD ’ S BOOKS B BOOK S OC OCTOBER T OBER

FEATURED EVENTS Wednesday, October 3, 7pm

Tuesday, October 9, 7pm

ZACHIAH MURRAY DON LATTIN Mindfulness in the Garden PETALUMA

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

Pure Vanilla

NAPA STORE AT WHOLE FOODS CULINARY CENTER

INITIATING CHANGE WITH

Sunday, October 7, 4pm

JON KATZ Dancing Dogs

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

Design Director

The Casual Vacancy

Kara Brown

A webcast of her onstage conversation hosted by critically acclaimed author Ann Patchett. Tickets $10.

Production Operations Coordinator

RIALTO CINEMAS

Senior Designer

WELLS FARGO CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Wednesday, October 17, 6pm

JAVA JIVE

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

RISIBISI RESTAURANT

COPPERFIELD’S COOKS WITH

LUDO LEFEBVRE LudoBites

NAPA STORE AT WHOLE FOODS CULINARY CENTER

Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Dolan

Advertising Director

Tuesday, October 16, 7pm

Lisa Santos, ext. 205

MARC ALLEN

Advertising Account Managers

The Paris Deadline

The Magical Path

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE

SEBASTOPOL

Lynda Rael Jovanovski, ext. 204 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher

Wednesday, October 17, 7pm

Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor

CARLOS ANDRÉS GÓMEZ

BARBARA SHAPIRO

BOB JOHNSON

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating

MONTGOMERY HIGH SCHOOL PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

HEALDSBURG STORE, reception to follow at BOB JOHNSON ART GALLERY

Tuesday, October 16, 7pm

Man Up Saturday, October 13, 1pm

Mercy Perez

Wednesday, October 17, 7pm

The Dangers of Proximal Alphabets

A Place Called Armageddon

Rock Bottom

ANN PATCHETT

KATHLEEN ALCOTT

C.C. HUMPHREYS

SARAH ANDREWS

IN CONVERSATION WITH

JACQUELINE’S HIGH TEA

DEBUT DINNER WITH

Tuesday, October 9, 7pm

Tuesday, October 9, 7pm

J.K. ROWLING

Peaches for Father Francis

Friday, October 12, 6pm

SEBASTOPOL

PETALUMA

JOANNE HARRIS

Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur Taylor, Nicolas Grizzle, James Knight, Jacquelynne Ocaña, Juliane Poirier, Sara Sanger, Elizabeth Seward, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

STEVEN JOHNSON MAX BYRD Future Perfect COMMUNITY CHURCH OF SEBASTOPOL

Contributors

Tuesday, October 16, 5pm

Tickets available through the Wells Fargo Center. Call (707) 546-3600 or visit www. wellsfargocenterarts.org.

Thursday, October 11, 7pm

PETALUMA

Copy Editor

HIGH TEA WITH

JAMES CARVILLE & MARY MATALIN

SHAUNA SEVER

One Last Strike

Saturday, October 13, 7pm

Monday, October 15, 8pm

COPPERFIELD’S COOKS WITH

Signing passes available in Petaluma store.

Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 200

Rachel Dovey, ext. 200

Among the Silent Giants:

TONY LA RUSSA

Staff Writers

Calendar Editor

SEBASTOPOL

SHARON MOXLEY & SUSAN DREGÉY

Thursday, October 4, 7pm

Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Distilled Spirits

Wednesday, October 10, 7pm

Saturday, October 6, 1pm

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

IN CONVERSATION WITH The Art Forger

Ticketed events: Purchase tickets online at www.copperfieldsbook.com/boxoffice or in our Box Office stores: Sebastopol, Montgomery Village, and Petaluma (unless otherwise noted).

TEXT ““Copperfields” Copperfields” to 55 55411 5411 and rreceive eceive text te xt alerts for featured featuredd author events! events!

VISIT T OUR STORES: ST TORES:

4&#"45010- p 1&5"-6." p )&"-%4#63( 4&#"45010-p1&5"-6."p)&"-%4#63( $$"-*450("p/"1"p.0/5(0.&3:7*--"(& "-*450(" 0 p /"1" p .0/5(00.&3: 7*--"(&

WWW.COPPERFIELDSBOOKS.COM WWW W..COPPERFIELDSB O BOOKS.COM

Dan Pulcrano

the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of Ruben Arminaña by Michael Amsler. Cover design by Kara Brown.

FALL F ALL FLOWER FLOWER

BULBS BU LBS

nb ‘TANDEM HARES’ Watch for

these cutthroat participants in this week’s Granfondo, running through West Sonoma County. Bring a bag of carrots.

This painting is by Sharon Eisley of Santa Rosa, www.sharoneisley.com. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘I know your son has talent. But this is not it. Why destroy your pocketbook, and my ears?’ COVER STORY P20

See us See us at at tthe he Sonoma County Harvest Fair

Animal Nutrition and Supply Locally Owned and Operated for 45 Years

Western W estern Farm Farm Center Center 7EST3EVENTH3TREETs3ANTA2OSA.ORTH2AILROAD3QUARE   7E ST 3 EVENTH 3TRE ET s 3 A NT A 2OS A . OR TH 2 AILROAD 3 QU A RE sWWWWESTERNFARMCENTERCOM      s W W WWE STER NFA R MC ENTERC OM

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

Release the Hounds! T H E PAP E R P 9

Atelier One’s 25th Anniversary A RTS & IDEAS P 25

Orgone, the Dusty Groove Robbers MUS IC P 2 9 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p9 Green Zone p12 Dining p15 Wineries p18

Swirl p19 Cover Story p20 Culture Crush p24 Arts & Ideas p25 Stage p27

Film p28 Music p29 A&E p33 Astrology p38 ClassiďŹ ed p39

 %URRNZRRG $YH 6DQWD 5RVD  0RQ6DW DPSP 6XQ DPSP † ZZZZEXFRP

%LUGVHHG  )HHGHUV  %LUGEDWKV  2SWLFV  1DWXUH *LIWV  %RRNV

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 –OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Shop S hop o our ur n new ew sselection electi off

5

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies I Lost My Son That Night BY ADRIANNE DESANTIS or several years, I have measured my words, constantly self-protecting because of my family’s suit against the Santa Rosa police who killed my son, Richard DeSantis. It took five years to at last have our day in court. Five years of hopes dashed and repeated spells of sinking back into depression. All the while, in the mental health field, so much progress was being made, so many beautiful recovery options from which Richard will never benefit.

F

Over the course of our three-week trial, I got what I needed—to face all six officers who responded that night, hear their explanations and have them hear who Richard was to us. Along with this, we endured the other price that families pay—the villainization of the victim. I wondered what it was like for Richard to willingly relinquish his protection, only to face alone six uniformed police training their weapons on him. In the past, when he heard voices the rest of us did not hear, just a little reassurance let him know he had help, and he came along to receive that help. If only it hadn’t happened the way it did that night, if only his last moments weren’t spent that way, I could rest easier at night. It’s hard for a mother to erase that image, those sounds. As the verdict was about to be read in court, we braced ourselves. It’s a tall hurdle to overcome, the bias that police are always justified in their actions. The crisis on April 9 was an opportunity for everyone. The police could have used their training to help a man in mental distress. When they arrived, there was no longer any danger. Even after the approach they chose amped him up again, they were well equipped with “less lethal” options. In the aftermath, had Richard survived this encounter, he could have worked through the trauma at the heart of his fears and recovered. We have all learned from this. It is imperative that we learn and become more compassionate people. I am so grateful to the jury for the job they did. All of Richard’s life I wanted him to have the kind of strong, male support he finally got in our lawyers, John Burris, Ben Nisenbaum, John Houston Scott and Eric Safire. By bringing this suit, we have reminded the police that all lives have value. In allowing officers to use deadly force, we must examine that use, or else there can be misuse of power unchecked. Without honestly naming it and correcting it, the tension between communities and their police may continue to grow. Adrianne DeSantis is the mother of Richard DeSantis, who was killed by Santa Rosa police in 2007.

Endorsement Outrage

Our biggest local newspaper is being censored by its conservative corporate owners. The Press Democrat is being told that it is not permitted to make political endorsements anymore! All the other newspapers owned by this corporate conglomerate, Halifax Media Group, are muzzled as well. Their recent acquisition of Freedom Media, whose CEO has Fox News CEO credits, makes a curious connection. Regardless of the very real merits for either the PD endorsing or not endorsing candidates, the bottom line was buried in its iron-fist-clothed-invelvet-glove editorial: “The company [that owns the PD] has decided to adopt a no-endorsement policy for all its member newspapers.” That is the story and should be the editorial as well: that there is no choice in this decision, no matter how one sugarcoats it. The PD should have resisted and made endorsements, because it has been ordered not to. In this time of homogenized, conservative and corporate “news,” Watergate would not have been exposed today. Now this “media group” is telling the editorial board what it can and cannot endorse, prohibiting it and the stable of other papers from making editorial decisions? Tell them to shove it. Then if the PD decides not to make endorsements, it is its decision, not another corporate policy preventing the public from getting real information. Why not write about the $78 billion oil companies are getting as U.S. subsidies between now and 2015? Let’s talk real issues. Nah, can’t do it, our hands are tied, the PD whimpers. Have some guts, folks. Make the endorsements. I may not agree with them, but at least you have the freedom to present your thoughts.

Now you don’t, and you don’t even resist it! Make the PD newsworthy. Let the national press write about this censorship. Take a stand for what is right. Endorse the candidates. Also, let’s read articles on who really owns the PD. And the rest of the media. Over 90 percent of talk radio is conservative. Fox is propaganda. The corporate media is extending its tentacles to our backyard. I am canceling my subscription to the PD. Do the same and tell them why.

STUART KIEHL Santa Rosa

In Defense of Organics I think farmworkers would prefer not to work among poisons (“Cargill’s Way,” Sept. 19). Higher incidences of health problems, in particular birth defects, are one of the reasons Cesar Chavez spoke out in favor of organics. Their working conditions should be better in many ways, but the benefit of working in organic fields was ignored by the Stanford study and New York Times article. After reading the Times article, my first question, as it should always be in this age of budget cuts to desperate universities, was “Who funded it?” Thanks for letting me know.

JANE TAYLOR Mill Valley

The Real Terror While both presidential candidates seem to want to impress voters with their “tough on terror” stance, neither has mentioned a looming terror coming, not from the Mideast, but from the shores of one of our closest allies, Japan. I refer to Fukushima Daiichi, the nuclear power plant we all know was hit by the double whammy of an earthquake and tsunami in March of 2011. But isn’t that under control? A thing of the past? Well, no, it isn’t. The Reactor No. 4 building was shattered

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

LOWEST L OWEST P PRICE. RICE. L LOCAL OCAL A ADVICE. DVICE.

10AM --toto3PM

UKIAH: Fri., UKIAH: Fri., Sept Sept 28 28tthh SANTA S ANTA R ROSA: OSA: S Sat., at., S Sept ept 29 29tthh SONOMA: S ONOMA: Sun., Sun., Sept Sept 30 30tthh

JCC Presents

Top Five by a hydrogen explosion and teeters on the brink of collapse. It contains 1,535 spent-fuel-rod assemblies cooled by a pool of water several stories off the ground. Should this building be toppled by an earthquake, an enormous amount of radioactivity would be released and picked up by ocean and air currents headed for our West Coast. Scientists say another major earthquake in the near future is inevitable. So why don’t we know about this? In a word, money. The nuclear power industry gives generously to politicians, and candidates who pose as John Wayne when it comes to nonexistent bombs in Iran turn into total wimps when it comes to protecting us from a very real danger. Shame on both their houses.

JACKIE BRAUN Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

1

Congratulations to Paul Harris of Santa Rosa for guessing last week’s photo

Jewish Community Center SONOMA COUNTY

2012 JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL

David OCT 4, 1 & 7:30 PM

The Day I Saw Your Heart OCT 18, 1 & 7:30 PM

Kaddish For a Friend

2 (It was the towering

OCT 25, 1 & 7:30PM

A-frame church on Pacific Avenue in Santa Rosa)

God’s Fiddler OCT 30, 7:30PM

3

Former Tyler Florence restaurant in Napa to open as southern bistro the Pear

Tickets/Information www.jccsoco.org or call 707.528.4222

4

SCREENINGS Rialto Cinema 6868 McKinley St. Sebastopol

Water-taxi service OK’ed for Sausalito, estimated fees to S.F. run from $65 to $95

5 “Yoo Can Doo Eeiit!”

Rob Schneider to party at Fabiani’s in S.R. on Sept. 30

Photo ©Jenny Jimenez

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 –OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Rants

me Home H Ho Hom o om me Expo E Ex x xp po p o

7

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 26- O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ź

He Was Bad News From The Start. You know the type.The kind of guy you just get a bad feeling from. For this year's Jive writing contest, we're asking for a 400-words-orless piece of fiction themed around the wrong sort of man. He could be a boyfriend, a politician, a supermarket checker, a drifter. Something happens, and it isn’t even always his fault. We want to read what your sharp fictionwriting minds have to say about this guy. Just make sure that your story at some point includes the phrase "He was bad news from the start." Our favorite bad-news entries will be published in our Fall Lit issue, and we'll have a party and reading with the winners that very night, Oct. 17, at Copperfield's Books in Montgomery Village at 6pm! Send your entries to: javajive@bohemian.com. Deadline is Wednesday, Oct. 10, at 5pm.

Paper GIT ‘EM Local hunters say a dog’s ability to ‘tree’ an animal helps ensure that the wrong animal doesn’t get killed.

Thirst and Howl

Unusual state bill would ban use of hound dogs in some hunting—but not hunting itself BY ALASTAIR BLAND

T

he hunt will go on—but will the dogs get to come along?

That depends on whether Gov. Jerry Brown signs or scraps a proposed state law that would prohibit bear and bobcat hunters from using hounds to chase and tree their quarry. Animal rights activists have been backing the bill (SB 1221) since it was

introduced early this year by a Southern California senator. Some hunting groups, on the other hand, are firmly opposed to what they say is a bill that could strip them of a traditional way of life. Hound hunting involves unleashing a group of trained hunting dogs to chase bears, big cats, raccoons, foxes and other mammals, and usually run them up a tree or into a confined space. The sport is perhaps best known

in its stodgy English form, in which horseback riders trail their howling hounds as they chase red foxes to exhaustion. The United Kingdom banned hound hunting last decade. In California, black bears are a primary target for hunters and their hounds. Licensed sport hunters in California kill as many as 1,700 bears each year, about half of which are taken with the assistance of hounds, ) 10 according to Patrick Foy,

Ross Valley’s sanitation district is no stranger to drama. The public agency has so far been associated with a million-gallon sewage spill, an EPA investigation, three Grand Jury reports, claims of eco-terrorism, five lawsuits and enough local shit-slinging to clog its already overflowing pipes. The latest chapter in these annals of waste is no less bizarre. After a Marin newspaper revealed in June that district general manager Brett Richards may have misspent a $350,000 publicly funded housing loan that he received on top of his $197,000-a-year salary, the disputed official resigned and reportedly left the Bay Area. Now, however, a blog that appears to be Richards’ has bubbled up from the depths of the internet, titled Ross Valley Sewer Truth. With archives dating back only a month, Truth details the board members, “Key Players,” places and reporters that made this notorious drainpipe saga what it is, according to Richards. It also features a very nifty section called “Sewer Stuff,” which will eventually be “a page dedicated to what sewer systems are,” but which, sadly, is still under construction. If readers and incensed taxpayers flock to Richards’ blog trying to figure out what the hell happened beneath the quiet bathrooms of Ross, they should be warned— this could be an example of telling the truth, but telling it with a slant. Although the ex-manager offers resounding statements like “There is truth and it isn’t subjective,” along with plenty of information on who is a “belligerently hostile human” and who likes to fish, his cyber-pages should probably be treated as opinion rather than solid fact. As Richards himself points out, “This blog is an invitation for you to be the jury.”—Rachel Dovey

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

9 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 –OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

THE

Sewer Truth

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

10

Dr. D r. Downing Downi ow n i ng ng h has a s been be e n practicing Bay Area p r ac t ici ng iin n tthe he B ay A r ea over ffor or o ver 40 4 0 years. yea r s. He He is is Free F ree IInitial nitia l iinternationally nter nat iona l ly known k now n for for C Consultation onsu ltation h i s innovative i n novat ive w ork iin n his work Holistic H ol i st ic Optometry, Optomet r y, the t he d ev ve lopment o he D ow n i ng development off tthe Downing Technique T ec h n ique of of Light L ig ht Therapy T her apy and a nd the t he L u mat ron Light L ig ht Stimulator. St i mu lator. Lumatron

Optimize O ptimize Eye Eye & B Brain rain Performance Performance Holistic H olistic Eye Eye C Care are Brain Brain Care Care with witth Light L ight Therapy Therapy sStress s St r ess Free Fr e e Eye Eye Exams E xa ms sLight s Li g ht T Therapy h e rap y iimproves: mp r o ve s : sL Brain B r a i n Injuries I nju r ie s s Learning ear ni ng sM Memory e mor y sFa sD sSA A DH D s t ig ue s e pr e s sion s D ADHD Fatigue Depression SAD sIn sP H ead ac he s s somn ia s T SD Headaches Insomnia PTSD sV sC B rain F og s i sion s olor Blindness Bl i n d n e s s Brain Fog Vision Color

s Nat u r a l Vision Vi sion sNatural Improvement I mprovement sIn-Office Tested s I n- Of f ic e T e ste d Prescriptions P r esc r ipt ion s

707.827.3664 707 70 7..8 827 27.366 366 4 SM

E A CARE A E EYE EY BR C ARE YE & BRAIN R AIN

JJohn oh n Downing, oh Dow ning Do n i ng, O.D., O.D. O. D., Ph.D. Ph . D. Ph.D 506 5 06 S South ou t h M Main ain S Street t r eet Sebastopol, S e b a s t o p ol , C CA A9 95472 5472 www.eyeandbraincare.com w w w.e yeea ndbr a i nca r e.com

PRESENTS:

GREEN G R EEN O OFFICE F F IC E Ecof r ie ndly, Ecofriendly, non-toxic, n on-tox ic, h healing ea lin g eenvironment. nvironm n e nt.

OCTOBER 7, 2012 11AM – 5PM MARIN CENTER, SAN RAFAEL

WORD UP!

VISIT OUR 4 LEARNING LOUNGES GREEN UP!

A COMMUNITY

All the dirt on how to live sustainably on the planet

LEARNING FAIR

HEALTH UP! A how-to guide to health and happiness.

  đ     đ F U N

MARIN CENTER

EXHIBIT HALL

VILLAGE UP! Community adventures for families and individuals.

TECH UP! Science, Math, Space, and real live Astronauts.

STEM PANEL - INSPIRING AND ENCOURAGING GIRLS IN THE SCIENCES Dr. Jill Tarter, outgoing Director, SETI Institute and others. 2:00pm – 3:15pm – Ticket Price $10

IAN MORRIS IN CONVERSATION WITH JANE SMILEY

MARIN SHOWCASE THEATER

In conjunction with the Word UP! Fair, Literacyworks presents the Know Speakers Series in the Marin Center Show Case Theater.

Author, Why the West Rules—For Now: The Patterns of History, and What they Reveal About the Future 4:00pm – 5:15pm – Ticket Price $20.00

JANE SMILEY IN CONVERSATION WITH MICHAEL KRASNY Pulitzer Prize winning author of A Thousand Acres and KQED Forum Host 5:30pm – 7:00pm – Ticket Price $ 30.00 Special Pricing for both Jane Smiley Talks $40.00

WITH SUPPORT FROM:

SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR A COMPLETE SCHEDULE AND TICKETS:

www.wordupfair.org

Hound Hunting ( 9 a Department of Fish and Game warden. In 2010, 61 black bears were killed by sport hunters in Mendocino County, 12 in Lake County and one in Napa County. But for many hunters, simply treeing the quarry is the pinnacle of the hunt, according to Josh Brones, president of the California Houndsmen for Conservation. Brones frequently hunts bears with his dogs in the Sierra foothills, but he does so for the thrill of the chase alone, he says, and usually does not even bring a gun. He says that catch-andrelease hunting is popular among many hunters. Still, some activists consider the activity, whether the target animal is shot or released, to be wildlife harassment. Jennifer Fearing, the California director of the Humane Society of the United States, notes that most pet owners are either prohibited from bringing their animals into public lands or are required to keep them leashed. “So this bill would just bring these hunters under the same umbrella of law that the rest of the state’s dog owners have been under for years,” she said. The Marin Humane Society’s director of communications, Carrie Harrington, points to other states that have already outlawed the practice. “California is generally considered a pretty progressive state, and the fact that this has already been banned in places like Montana, where hunters are esteemed, makes it seem like it’s time to do the same here,” she said. But in the Northern Rockies, houndsmen and their dogs face another element of the wild that does not occur in present-day California: grizzly bears. Brones says that when Montana outlawed hound hunting of bears in 1921, state officials were considering the fact that grizzly bears will often choose to fight a pack of dogs rather than flee, as black bears usually do. “They weren’t concerned with whether it was a fair chase or not,”

he explains. “They were basically trying to protect dogs from getting killed by grizzly bears. That’s why they still allow houndsmen to hunt other species [like bobcats and cougars].” Wade Derby is an East Bay hunter who helps arrange guided hound hunts for wild pig in Sonoma County. He opposes Sen. Ted Lieu’s bill, arguing that hound hunting allows hunters to more selectively harvest bears. “Hunters don’t want to kill just any bear, and rather than just shoot a bear through the trees in a forest, hunters using dogs get to see the bear first and look at it and decide if they should shoot it,” said Derby, who adds that some hunters prefer not to shoot male bears in the prime of their reproductive years and instead aim for older animals. “[Hound hunting] is a humane and effective way to make sure we’re taking the right animal.” Senate Bill 1221 makes specific exemptions for the retriever dogs used in bird hunting, as well as the use of hounds in depredation hunts of problematic or dangerous wild animals and for research purposes. Still, Chris Wilmers, a field scientist at UC Santa Cruz who specializes in mountain lion research, sent a letter to the State Senate and Assembly last May 8 expressing his concern that the bill could disrupt ongoing research projects. If the bill becomes law, he writes, “where will the next generation of hounds-men and women come from to help us with our research and conservation efforts?” Other issues remain the unresolved fuel of fiery verbal battles between sides. Hounds are abused or neglected by their owners and injured in fights with their quarry, hunting opponents argue. They also say that bear cubs and cougar kittens are occasionally mauled by dogs, though documentation of such incidents is iffy beyond the YouTube videos showing such skirmishes in graphic detail. Gov. Jerry Brown is expected to decide on the bill by Sept. 30.

A Local Bike Shop for Road Cyclists, MTB’ers, and Triathletes

Colnago Bianchi Kestrel Breezer

Hands-On and Personalized Attention from Owners

Mavic

Expert Service and Top Industry Brands

Hed

Come by and visit!

Castelli

We Care!

Northwave And many more…

FREE WATER

Jonathan or Stephanie 707.523.1246 170 Farmers Lane, Suite 11, Santa Rosa, CA 95405

BOTTLE

www.jonathansbikeshop.com jonathan@jonathansbikeshop.com

MENTION

IF YOU

Shop Owner Jonathan Barber

chateaustjean.com ch ateaustjeeaan.com om

THIS AD

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26- OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Now Open!

ųų

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12 ;IHRIWHE] 3GXSFIVXL TQ 7STLME,EPP

Green Zone

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

/EXLMI7GLQMHEGPEWWMGEPP]XVEMRIHEGXSVLEWTIVJSVQIHMRXIVREXMSREPP]MR XLIEXIVTVSHYGXMSRWJMPQZMHISERHMRQYPXMQIHMETIVJSVQERGIW7LILEWGVIEXIH SVMKMREPQSZIQIRXFEWIHGSPPEFSVEXMZIXLIEXIVTMIGIW7LIXLIEXVMGEPP]I\TPSVIW GSRXIQTSVEV]MWWYIWKMZMRKZSMGIXSXLSWIRSXYWYEPP] LIEVHJVSQMRSYVGSQQYRMX],IVMRXIVIWXMRLIEPXL LEWMRWTMVIHGSRWMHIVEFPITVMZEXIWXYH]SJ MRXIKVEXMZIQIHMGMRI

4PIEWIQEVO]SYV GEPIRHEVJSV;IHRIWHE] 2SZIQFIVTQ 7STLME,EPP &VYGI%MHIPPWMRGSRZIVWEXMSR [MXL(YWOM)WXIWJSVXLIVIPIEWI SJ8,)+6)%81)%8'33/&33/ 7EYWEKIW[MPPFIWIVZIH

Plea for the Trail

Especially for Richard Becker’s son BY JULIANE POIRIER

I

have a photograph of Richard Becker, grinning as his son and mine sit in respective high chairs, vigorously gumming the “health cake” I concocted for my son’s first birthday party. It was an exclusive celebration—just the boys and both sets of parents. The boys are 11 now, and Richard’s name is suddenly attached to a memorial fund for the Napa Valley Vine Trail, a cause endorsed in this column before, but never with such sad and fierce resolve. One month ago, Richard—a smart, funny, fully experienced cyclist—was killed by a car while riding his bike near St. Helena, where he and his wife, Jennifer, and their son, Nathan, have lived many years. Richard didn’t have the option of riding a dedicated bike trail. There isn’t one. Compared to Bay Area

communities of equal affluence, the Napa Valley, where I live, is impoverished for its lack of a cyclist-pedestrian refuge. Touted globally for wine and food and picturesque beauty, Napa draws visitors from around the world, some of whom insist on renting bikes and touring. Typically, they select from the north-south arteries flanking each side of the valley; both are two-lane highways shared with cars driven by winetasting visitors, some trying to remember the correct lane to occupy and possibly feeling the effects of a Zinfandel that tops out at over 16 percent alcohol. Napa, for locals and visitors alike, is not a safe place to ride or walk very far. Just a few truncated paths exist. Efforts to change this have been underway for four years. When the Napa Valley Vine Trail overcomes financial and various other land-use obstacles, there will be a 47-mile dedicated bike and walking path from Calistoga to Vallejo, giving visitors and locals alike the option to enjoy the outdoors safely. Chuck McMinn, spearheading efforts to complete the trail, calls Richard’s death a terrible tragedy. “We’ve been overwhelmed with the outflowing of support in honor of Richard,” McMinn tells the Bohemian. “At the end of the day, it’s about community,” McMinn adds. “We need this trail, and it’s been gratifying to me over the last four years how many people support it, including the 27 organizations on our board of directors.” Donations in Richard’s honor have exceeded $10,000 at this writing. Next year, construction begins on a new section of path, closing the gap between Yountville and Napa, and bringing the trail miles closer to completion. I’ll celebrate the day Richard’s son, Nathan, rides 47 miles on a safe trail, built in part to remember his kind father. For more, see www.vinetrail.org.

ųž

CONSIGNMENT STORE

LIVE AUCTION September 29, 2pm

Preview: Fri 28 10–6pm, Sat 29 10–2pm Specializing in home furnishings, home decor, garden, seasonal items, and collectibles Something for everyone!

WELLNESS

CENTER Health Starts Here! Friday, September 28th 6:00 - 8:00 pm

707.792.2300

WHOLE FOODS MARKET & The Gluten Intolerance Group of Sonoma County

kennygsshowcase@yahoo.com

invite you to spend an evening with

New & Quality Used Merchandise 7950 Redwood Dr, Suite 15 & 16, Cotati

Fri, Noon–6 ~ Sat, 10–6 ~ Sun, 10–4

Dr. Thomas O’Bryan to discuss

The Conundrum of Gluten Sensitivity Dr. Thomas O’Bryan is an internationally recognized speaker and workshop leader specializing in gluten sensitivity and Celiac Disease.

QFSQFSTPO register at: www.conundrumofgluten.eventbrite.com Wellness Center events are free unless otherwise noted.

$PEEJOHUPXO.BMMt4BOUB3PTB

4UPSFPQFOEBJMZBNQN   calendar: wholefoods.com/coddingtown

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26- OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Kenny G’s Showcase

.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 26- O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ųŶ

TTaking aakingg Chole Cholesterol esterol Medic M Medication? dication? If you take cholesterol medication, you may qualify for a clinical research study of an investigational cholesterol medication.

Qualified f participants p p will rreceive eceive all study-r sstudy-related elated caree and st study car tudy medication at no cost. Compensation Compensat tion up to $900 and ffor time an nd travel is available who to those wh ho qualify. qualify.

40 years training experience

Doggie Day Care 2nd Day FREE! (a $25 value) $

100 off Boot Camp

10 acres of safe, country training grounds

3 Private Sessions for $240 (save $45) exp. 10/31/2012

Realtor Coldwell Banker

Exceptional for Fear & Aggression issues Strong leadership skills taught

See Us for for owners Doggie Day Care

707-322-3272 www.incrediblecanine.com

Suzanne Wandrei

Eco Green Certified

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com

FREE/Zd,KEdZK>

Knitting K n it ti ng &C Crochet ro c Classes C lass e s

Women’s Health Specialists confidential compassionate nonjudgmental More Than Just Health Care...

707.537.1171

Call C all ffor or more more information information

DŽƌŶŝŶŐŌĞƌWŝůů͕WƌĞŐŶĂŶĐLJdĞƐƟŶŐ͕ ďŽƌƟŽŶ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ͕,ĞĂůƚŚĚǀŝĐĞ>ŝŶĞ

707.542.1499 707.542.14 499

1221 Farmers Far mer s Lane, Suite 500, 5000, Santa Rosa, Rosa, CA w w w. r a d i a n t r e s e a r c h . c o m www.radiantresearch.com

Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream.

Obedience training the natural way

We Can't Cann't Do It Without YOU!

1111 11 4 4th th S Street, t ree t , R Railroad a i l roa d S Square q ua re Santa Rosa 707.546.YARN S anta R osa 7 0 7. 5 4 6 .YA R N CastAwayYarn.com C a s t Awa yYa r n . com

ATION!3317 Chanate os a LOC Road , #2C, Santa R NEW www.cawhs.org

Woman Owned & Operated! Best Costume Shop Best Erotica Shop Marin

Order Your (ALLOWEEN #OSTUMES.OW

"ROWSEOURCOSTUME selection or place no-obligation special orders Join our email list pleasuresoftheheart.com

415.482.9899 1310 Fourth St. @ C, San Rafael

Find us on facebook: www.facebook.com/oftheheart

,OVERS0LAYTHINGSs3ENSUAL,INGERIE 'IFT#ERTIFICATESs*EWELRY

Sebastopol California

Join us, and see Napa Valley from a different viewpoint. NEW! VIP Ballooning/Limo Packages Now Available! Call for details!

$ Fast results for busy women Camps offered: 5:15am & 9:00am

FALL BACK TO BOOT CAMP begins Oct 15

707.217.3795 www.SebastopolBootCamp.com

199

Ballooning Excursion Gift Card Special ($219 value) Offer ends 9/30/12 Official Ballooning Company of the 2012 Napa Valley Film Festival RESERVATIONS > 888.995.7700 www.calistogaballoons.com DEPARTURE DEP ARTURE & B BOOKING OOKING LOCATION N> 1458 Lincoln Lincoln Ave, Railcar#15 Railcar#15

BEYOND THE POLLO Hey, you, taco-truck guy—how much would you pay for a rotisserie-duck taco?

Tortilla Flats Eight dollars and the truth at C Casa

T

he best taco in wine country, in my opinion, is a $1.50 steak taco from Loncheria Emily, a dinged-up taco truck that’s usually parked on the corner of Dunbar Road and Sonoma Highway. While it’s true that I haven’t thoroughly surveyed all the tacos of our land in order to arrive at this opinion, I have noted that people who hold opinions often garner more

social approval than those who don’t, and concluded that the cost of not holding this or that taco in high esteem could potentially be high. How high? More than a buck-fifty, but I’m only guessing. This is not the story of that taco. This is the story of an $8 taco. I did say “$8 taco.” Settle down. We’re in Napa now, and besides, it’s normal for a taco plate with a side of rice and beans to cost upwards of $8. It’s normal for an $8 hamburger

BY JAMES KNIGHT to come with a side of fries. It had better. But am I speaking of a taco plate with a side of rice and beans? No, I am not speaking of such a taco combo. Chips and salsa cost extra. Hang in there. They’re good chips. C Casa is a homegrown business opened by Napa food entrepreneur Catherine Bergen in 2010 but set up on a fast-paced, franchise model. Customers make their choice at the counter, pay, get a plastic “buzzer” and get lost. You can put it in your pocket and wander around Oxbow Public

Market. A friendly vibration tells you that your taco is ready. The C Casa schtick is the dream of the bleeding-heart foodie come true. Why, oh why can’t simple taqueria fare be made without fear and feedlots? It’s here, friends, it’s here. Sustainable, grass-friendly and earth-fed taco fillings are C Casa’s stock-in-trade. The menu features a menagerie of beasts, from the proud buffalo to the scuttling crab, with roasted fingerling potatoes for our vegetarian friends. My C Casa experience began with the more moderately priced, spiced lamb taco ($5.75), with tender slivers of lamb, goat cheese, mint and avocado crema, topped with a medley of microgreens. Rule of thumb: the smaller the greens, the higher the price. I was so put off by the very preciousness of the thing, I came back on three, maybe four occasions for more. A grove of microgreens also shades the last resting place of the king of the prairie, the seasoned ground buffalo taco ($6.50) on a base of creamy black beans. The grilled garlic citrus prawn taco ($7.75) features tasty prawns splayed like rude little icons, rambunctiously resisting the rolling of the taco. Indeed, the generous portions subvert the very utility of the taco, and are best treated like a salad until such time as it may be folded. The key fact is that the housemade tortilla, fresh, pliable and glutenfree, holds up every time. But I promised an outrage, an $8 taco. The rotisserie duck taco ($8) is laden with an embarrassment of waterfowl, moist strips of duck breast encrusted with spicy chile sauce, hearty yet unexpectedly charming. Putting things into perspective, if it was termed a “small plate” instead of a taco and served in a wine bar instead, it’d be a bargain. And besides, it turns out that there’s an even pricier taco on the menu—oh yes, there is: fresh crab taco ($9). Damn you, C Casa. It’s probably worth every goddamn bite. C Casa, Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St., Napa.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 –OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

James Knight

Dining

15

16

Dining

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Celebrate H Celebrat Harvest! r est!

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Baci Cafe & Wine Bar Italian $$-$$$. Creative Italian and Mediterranean fare in casual setting, with thoughtful wine list featuring local and Italian wines. Lunch, ThursSat; dinner, Thurs-Mon. 336 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8111.

October 5-7,2012

Caffe Portofino Italian. $$-$$$. Great flavors and some eclectic dishes at this Santa Rosa institution. 535 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.1171.

Hang Ah Dim Sum

Wine Ta Tasting asting . F Food ood P Pairing airing Gr ape Stomp Stomp . Liv e Mus sic Grape Live Music Microbrews Micr obrews . Pumpkin Pumpkinss Pr PreeArt Sho Show w & Sal Sale e.F Family amily F Fun! un! av harvestfair.org harv estfairr..org . 707.545.4200 707.545.4 4200

WEDNESDAY W EDNESDAY BY B Y THE T HE W WAVES A AVES S TA RT E R S STARTERS Grilled G r illed Flat F lat Bread Bread or P Paprika apr ika G Grilled r illed Me Mexican x ic a n White Shrimp W h it e S h r i mp MAIN M A I N PLATES P L AT E S Rocky Chicken Cacciatore R ock y JJr. r. C h i c ke n C acc i at o r e & Hand-Made H a nd-Made Pasta Pasta orr F Fall Cassoulet o a ll Vegetable Vegetable C assoulet DESSERT D E S SE RT Apricot Cherry Bread Pudding A pr icot aand nd C he r r y B read P udd ing orr JJeff’s Cake o eff ’s Mom’s Mom’s Chocolate Chocolate C a ke $

29 pper er p person e r son

Excludes Taxes Excludes Taxes and and Gratuity. Gratuit y. C Corkage orkage iiss waived w aived on on Wednesday Wednesday nights nights ffor or aall ll Sonoma S o no m a C County ount y Wines W ines

Sant

Wednesday Wednesday O ctober 33,, 22012 0 12 October 55pm pm iin n Drake’s Drake’s 66pm pm in in The The Duck Duck Club Club

T ON IGH T ’S $ 5 F TONIGHT’S FEATURES E AT U R E S Sauza Hornitos S au z a H or n itos Reposado Reposado and a nd Patrón Pat rón Citrónge C it r ó n g e M Margarita a r g a r it a Mauritson Mau r itson Sauvignon Sauv ig non Blanc, Bla nc, Dry Valley D r y Creek C r eek V a lley Balletto Ba llet to Pinot Pinot Noir, Noi r, Russian Russia n River R iver Valley Va lley

BVS2 cQY1ZcP@SabOc`O\b BVS2cQY1ZcP@SabOc`O\b !1]Oab6WUVeOg=\S0]RSUO0Og1/'"' !1] O a b6 WU VeOg= \ S0 ] R S U O0 Og1 /' "' ! 4 ]`2 cQY1ZcP`SaS` dObW]\a  4]`2cQY1ZcP`SaS`dObW]\a ^^ZSOaSQOZZ%%&%#!# ZSOa SQOZZ%% &%# !# #

Chinese-dim sum. $. Low prices and good variety make it pleasing. Buffet-style quality and greasiness can be a letdown. Lunch and dinner daily. 2130 Armory Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7873.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Pub fare. $. Casual, homey place serving no-nonsense pub grub like shepherd’s pie. Lunch and dinner daily. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600. Papa’s Taverna Greek. $$. Satisfying food in riverside setting. Sun afternoons, Greek dancing. Lunch and dinner daily. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

Lily Kai Chinese. $$. An

Peter Lowell’s

extensive array of bistro-chic dishes like mild curry lamb, spicy basil prawns and roast duck with steamed lotus buns. Hot and sour soup is stellar. Lunch and dinner daily. 3100 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.782.1132.

California. $-$$. Casual, organic cuisine with a healthy twist. Italian-inspired cafe, deli, wine bar. All food offered as takeout. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7385 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.1077.

Lynn’s Thai Thai. $$.

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly,

A taste of real Thailand in convivial atmosphere. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 8492 Gravenstein Hwy, Ste M (in the Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. 707.793.9300.

plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Mombo’s Pizza Pizza.

Syrah California-French.

$. The crust is thin and the toppings eclectic. Delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 1800 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.FAST. 560 Hwy 116 N, Sebastopol. 707.823.7492.

$$$. Sophisticated cuisine in restaurant or indoor courtyard. Seasonally changing menu and inventive desserts. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4002.

Monti’s Rotisserie & Bar California cuisine. $-$$.

$-$$. Excellent food in Petaluma’s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick.Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

Small plates and a few larger entrĂŠes with emphasis on house-roasted meats. Lunch and dinner daily. 714 Village Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4404.

Tres Hombres Mexican.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic dĂŠcor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Open breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Casa Maùana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Chez Pierre FrenchItalian-American. $$. A former Denny’s turned Parisian bistro, with surprisingly competent cozy French favorites like escargot and chicken Cordon Bleu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7330 Redwood Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4233.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N TY Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Brassica Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place

17

SMALL BITES

In with the New What do successful restaurants do once they’ve satisfied the public’s palate? Like TV shows, they often create spin-offs, bringing just enough of the old to anchor the new. Eight, the new restaurant from the owners of Sushi Tozai and Peking Chef, has all the culinary mastery of its predecessors, but with a fresh take on Asian fusion. Though the name refers to the eight regional cuisines of China, from the wellknown Hunan to the lesser-known Anhui, the menu also offers Southeast Asian street food. Standards like kung pao chicken ($13) and Mongolian beef ($14) are delicious, but even more exciting are the surprising hits, like the walnut prawns with pineapple ($14) and Malaysian gado-gado salad ($10). Diners can choose between three distinct eating areas—the dining room, bar area or outdoor patio—where old world décor meets modern flare, with sleek fireplaces and a digital playlist. Meanwhile, the folks behind Healdsburg’s Spoonbar just opened a new eatery, Pizzando, located a block down the road in the former Cafe Newsstand. Pizzando has all the clean lines and minimalist style that makes Spoonbar so appealing, but with a smaller, cozier seating area and a menu devoted to homemade pastas ($14), hearty meat dishes ($16) and, of course, pizza ($11–$13).—Jessica Dur

707.536.1193

facebook.com/revivedrinks facebook.com/revivedrinks

revivedrinks.com re vivedrinks.com

TM

deliciously refreshing kombucha for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch

at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633. Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656.

16oz/500ml 64oz/1.89l 5gal/kegs

sustainably created, brewe brewed, ed, fermented and bottled in Son Sonoma oma County

rrevive evive drinks fa facts act s Company Size - 8 and g growing rowing Wind Windsor, dsor, CA Sustainability Commitment Working on a Progressively Sustainab Sustainable ble Future

Bottle Reuseability Label Reuse Lid Reuse Bottles Saved ffrom rom Landfill Ene rgy Saved vs. Recycling Energy Local Jobs for Washing Washing Bottles Delivery Crate Reuse Ingredients Ing redients Composted Promoting Promoting Industry Change B100 BioDiesel Delivery Local Fuel Renewable Energy Energy Independence G reen House Gases Green W ars Needed Wars

∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ P Priceless ∞ 100% Needed

national go goal oal

100% 100% 100% 100% 0% 0%

Buch Crew “Monday Funday” Jiro (Movie) & Biryani (Meal)

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 –OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

Grand Opening!

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY D’Argenzio Winery

$10 Gift Certificate One certificate per table. Minimum purchase of $25 or more. Cannot be combined with other special offers. Not valid for taxes or tips. Expires 11/30/2012

'00%50(0t$"5&3*/(t13*7"5&1"35*&4

707.823.6688t(SBWFOTUFJO)XZ4PVUI 4FCBTUPQPM behind McDonald’s

Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

Francis Coppola Winery A Coney Island of the wine that candidly promises fun for the whole family, from Rosso table wine to Director’s Cut Pinot Noir; from poolside cabanas to an Argentinean-Style grill, plus movie memorabilia from The Godfather, Apocalypse Now, and more. 300 Via Archimedes, Geyserville. Tasting daily, 11am–6pm; restaurant till 9pm. 707.857.1400.

Hartford Family Winery Tucked away on a

“Where Lowcountry meets Wine Country”

Award Winning Dog Training ~ Dog Boarding Doggie Day Care 707.542.2066 2404 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa

www.olivetkennel.com

winding backroad, manicured lawns, sunshine and the shade of sycamores. Sample a classic Sonoma-style Burgundian suite: Chard, Pinot and Russian River old vine Zin. 8075 Martinelli Road, Forestville. Daily 10am– 4:30pm. Fees vary. 707.887.8010.

Nalle Winery Rising above the vineyards like some kind of New Age bunker, the rosemary-shrouded winery houses a down-toearth father-and-son team dedicated to low-alcohol Dry Creek Zinfandel. Greeters Lila and Pella present soggy tennis balls. 2385 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Saturdays, noon– 5pm. No fee. 707.433.1040. Paradise Ridge Winery

2097 Stagecoach Road Suite 100, Santa Rosa 707.595.3935 www.sweettssr.com

A gorgeous, provocative sculpture garden with annually changing exhibits set amid a pygmy forest. Stay for sunset Wednesday evenings April–October. 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Drive, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.528.9463. Paradise also offers its food-friendly wines at an accessible little shack in

the heart of Sonoma Valley. Try structured clarets from the estate’s high-elevation Rockpile vineyards; do some time with “the Convict” Zinfandel. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 8860 Sonoma Hwy., Kenwood. 707.282.9020.

Rued Winery Dry Creek Valley grape growers since 1957, or since 1882 if you count great-great-grandfather’s Russian River Valley vineyard. Good folks offer their best product skimmed from 160 acres at comparatively farmstand prices. 3850 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Daily 11am to 4:30pm. $5. 707.433.3261. Simi Winery Pioneered female winemaking by hiring the first female winemaker in the industry. The tastingroom experience is mediocre, but the wine is fantastic and worth the wait. Excellent Chard, Sauvignon Blanc and Cab. 16275 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.473.3213.

N A PA CO U N TY Cuvaison Estate Wines (WC) Producing some 65 percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Eagle & Rose Estate (WC) Tours of this small winery are led either by the winery owner or the winemaker himself. 3000 St. Helena Hwy. N., Napa. By appointment. 707.965.9463.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

On the Edge A key stop for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

Rubicon Estate Despite the celebrity hype, the wine is award-winning. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.782.4226.

St. Supéry Expect to find the tasting room crowded with a harrassed staff, but St. Supéry features an interesting art gallery with changing exhibitions. 8440 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 800.942.0809.

Truchard Vineyards (WC) No matter how attentive you are to the directions, no matter how much you study the quaint, hand-drawn map found online, no matter how vigilantly you watch the street addresses numerically climb along Old Sonoma Road, you will inevitably miss Truchard Vineyards. What follows is a three-point turn on a blind, two-lane road, with a single thought in your head: “This wine had better be worth the insurance deductible.” But with Cabernet this good, it is. 3234 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.253.7153.

Velo Vino Napa Valley Cycling-themed bungalow is filled with enough gear to outfit a peloton, plus wine and espresso, too. Tastings include spiced nuts and dried cherries, but sample-sized Clif and Luna Bars are readily available for your impromptu energy bar and wine pairings. 709 Main St., St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 6pm. $10–$25. 707.968.0625.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

19

TRA RADITIONAL R A DITIONA IT I O NA L + U NI NIQUE N IQUE

Station 1870

GRATIS SCOOP WHEN YOU ORDER TWO!

Where Lost Canyon finds itself BY JAMES KNIGHT (0 (,( JfefdX ?n p› (0(,(JfefdX?np ›J JfefdX fefdX ›J JXekXIfjX XekXIfjX ,''J\YXjkfgfcI[ ,''J\YXjkfgfcI[› CCfZXc`j9\jk#=Xd`cpFne\[`j9\kk\i fZXc`j9 \j k#=Xd`cpFne\[`j9\k k\i

"EST2ESTAURANTS " ES T 2 ESTAURAN EST ES T AUR ANTS TS

      -ENDOCINO!VE 3ANTA2OSA   -ENDOCINO! !VE 3ANT A 2 OSA

WWWELCOQUIEATCOM W W WELCOQUIEAT COM

LLunch unch $899 Gourmet Go urmet LLunch unch Buffet Buf fet

Dinner Din ner 225% 5% O Off f f* 25th Anniversary 25th Anniversary Special Sp ecial *Off * O f f ffood ood bill bill eexp. x p. 1 10/31/12 0 /31/12

W NTO N JOE W

O rder O Order Online nline for for FFREE REE Delivery Deliver y ( $5500 min.) min . ) SizzlingTandoor.com Siz zlingTandoor com

The First and Last Place to Meet 902 MAIN ST, NAPA 707.258.2337 | downtownjoes.com

BR E ERY W

photo: Marilee Koll

’S

So what’s new? Healdsburg’s Fritz Underground Winery reopened the space as a tasting room for its Lost Canyon label (purchased from the Oakland original in 2008) back in November. You’ll find the spartan tasting room, framed by floor-to-ceiling black metal wine racks, behind Door #1, while Door #2 leads to Station 1870, a more comfortable lounge where Fritz’s whole lineup of Sonoma County plus imported Italian wines—more than 30 in all—may be sampled or had by the glass. Recently, Fritz brought in new tasting room manager Zachary Gold, who had logged a few years in hospitality-heavy joints like Domaine Chandon. With new management energy and expanded hours, this welcome Railroad Square wine bar is a snoozer no more. On a recent Saturday evening, a musical trio is bouncing out the door with a mix of flamenco guitar and classical viola. Young women are engaged in conversation at the bar, which is backdropped by a Giants game on wide-screen TV, sound muted, while curious couples of all ages drop in, attracted by the lively scene. All are acknowledged without much delay by Gold and his one other employee, while they dash between kitchen and bar to serve small plates of crostini with house-made tapenade and stuffed pepperoncini ($10). A flute of Loriella Prosecco ($8) is rich and bubbly enough to satisfy the casual drop-in, perhaps while waiting for a table at neighboring Lococo’s Cucina Rustica. The Fritz Estate Sauvignon Blanc ($25 bottle) has a full, uplifting palate, in surprising contrast to its New Zealandish, terpene-studded aroma, and the 2008 Widdoes Vineyard Pinot Noir ($45) drifts in an out of the weeds, with tempting chocolate liqueur aromas in between its moods. The selection of Super Tuscan, Chianti and Brunello wines are a toothsome treat. And if you you’d like to trade in the atmosphere for your own scene at home, no problem. All wines are available offsale. Chilled! Lost Canyon Winery and Station 1870, 123 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. Open Wednesday–Saturday, 10am–10pm; early closing Sunday and Monday. Tasting fee, $15. Flights, $8–$12. 707.623.9621.

7E˜REPROUDTO 7 E˜REPR E˜R E PROUD OUDT D TO BEVOTEDONEOF BE BEVOTE VOT E DO D ONE NEO E OF 3ONOMA#OUNTY˜S 3ONOM 3O NOM A# A # OUN OUNTY T Y˜S TY˜

nnn%]ifq\eXik`Z\Zi\Xd%Zfd n n n%]ifq\eXik`Z\Zi\Xd%Zfd

DO

T

he first thing to understand about this new Santa Rosa wine bar is that it isn’t particularly new at all. Careful readers of the Bohemian might recall that we visited this space in 2006, then run by Wine Spectrum, finding the small plates delectable but very dear. A year later, our reviewer was won over, but Spectrum subsequently chucked the small plates and seemed to fizzle out with the rest of the economy in short order. Anecdotal evidence suggested that it was dead and done for the better part of a year, but no. It was just sleeping.

NORTH NO ORTH BAY’S BA AY Y’S BEST BEST INDIAN RS FOOD, 22 YEARS

409 Mendocino Ave, Downtown Santa Rosa 40 sa 707.579.5999 707 .579.5999 ccross ros s sstreet t re et 5th 5t h 1280 1 280 Healdsburg Healdsburg Ave, Ave, Healdsburg H e ald sb u r g

707.433.2954 7 07.433.2954 ccross ros s sstreet t re et D Dry ry C Creek re ek RRoad oad

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 –OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

IICE C E CREA CREAM C R E A M & PALETAS P PA PALET A LE ET TAS TA

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

Symphonie Fantastique This weekend’s opening of the Green Music Center is Ruben Armiñana’s most improbable milestone yet—a dazzling jewel with a long road to realization BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

F

ive days before the grand opening of the building that is to be the pinnacle of his career, Sonoma State University president Ruben Armiñana leans back in his office chair, breathes a reflective sigh and tells a story made for Hollywood. “I made a promise to a 14-year-old boy,” Armiñana says, “on Nov. 6, 1961. His name was Ruben. And he was leaving his country that day, he was leaving his parents. At that moment, he didn’t know if he would ever see his parents or his brother again. He had a lot of wealth with him—he had a dime and he had a change of underwear. But he had this ability to be determined that nobody, be it government or individuals, would ever intimidate him. And he would never retreat in the face of intimidation. And I have kept that promise for 50 years.” It’s difficult to overstate the magnitude and impact of the Green Music Center, opening this weekend at Sonoma State University. No project has more greatly tested Armiñana’s promise to himself, over 50 years ago, as he was shipped on a boat from Cuba to the United States. The $145 million performing arts and music education center has taken almost 20 years to arrive at its current state, and is still not entirely finished. The main hall, however, which opens this weekend, has already garnered worldwide attention for its stunning acoustics and dazzling first-season lineup of stars like Yo-Yo Ma, Lang Lang, Michael Tilson Thomas, Alison Krauss and Wynton Marsalis. There are few concert halls comparable, let alone ones on a college campus. But to say it was a bumpy road to this weekend’s opening is like saying this one guy named Mozart wrote a few good tunes. Just like the works of the famous 18th-century composer, it will only be with the passing of time that the legacy of the Green Music Center—and the legacy of Ruben Armiñana—is truly realized. Is this the president’s Spruce Goose? His Hearst Castle? On the cusp of opening night, it’s looking a lot more like Carnegie Hall.

Opus One

Ruben Armiñana: ‘By nature, I’m not a quitter.’

21

THE BEGINNING The SSU Wind Ensemble performs at the 2001 groundbreaking

in the spot where the Green Music Center now stands.

completed, it will also boast a 10,000-seat outdoor concert venue and an intimate, 250-seat student recital hall with a full pipe organ. When conceived, the Green Music Center was, in Armiñana’s own words, “a crazy idea.” Even from the start, detractors pointed out its high cost and questioned how it would benefit the university—criticism that continues to this day. But against all odds, the 65year-old’s dogged persistence, carried to America along with the dime and a change of underwear, prevailed. “The toughest time,” he says, “is when it’s just an idea.”

Intonation “I know that we started fundraising before the tech bubble crashed,” remembers Chris Fritzche, a former voice instructor at Sonoma State who later toured with the male vocal ensemble Chanticleer. With only small spaces for music at the time, large performances were relegated to places like the gymnasium, which sounded like—well, a gymnasium. “I don’t know what was in their minds,” Fritzche recalls, “but the impression I got was for SSU to have a choral hall for the choral program to have a place to perform with a good acoustics.” Indeed, this was the vision of Don and Maureen Green, who were members of Bob Worth’s Bach Choir in the mid 1990s. Recalled Armiñana in a recent

email, Don Green “mentioned that he was planning to take his company, Advance Fibre Communications, public, and if that was successful [he] hoped to make a contribution, about $1 million, to build a choral room for the choir to rehearse and perform on campus. We did not have such a facility.” At the same time, Armiñana visited Massachusetts with his wife for a concert at Tanglewood’s Seiji Ozawa Hall, which had been finished in 1994. “I came back from that visit with the idea of creating an inspired facility like Ozawa Hall at SSU which would combine education, music and performance,” he says. After their company went public, the Greens had dinner with Armiñana and decided to give $5 million toward the project. The next summer, the Greens themselves visited Tanglewood, and committed another $5 million. That landmark $10 million donation all but assured the $22 million acoustic masterpiece would be open by the early 2000s. But costs began to rise like the sound of a Prius accelerating onto the freeway. Estimates hit $29 million in 2003. Then $39 million in 2004. It was $60 million in 2005, and by 2007 it had cracked triple digits with a $100 million price tag. But Armiñana never gave up his dream, even after a vote of “no confidence” by the

) 22

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 –OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

HE ACTUALLY DID IT

At age nine, living in Santa Clara, Cuba, the young Armiñana found himself enrolled in a violin class; his mother believed all educated people should learn to play an instrument. “Halfway through the class,” he tells, “the teacher called my father and said, ‘Why don’t you come and pick up your son? I know he has talent. This is not it. Why destroy your pocketbook, and my ears?’ And that was the end of my musical career.” Somewhere, the camera is cutting to an image of that violin, engulfed in flames, with the word “Rosebud” on it. If Armiñana is making up for being kicked out of the class by building a grand hall for classical music, then, based on the scope of the Green Music Center, he must have really felt bad. The main hall alone has rightly been declared an acoustic marvel. Featuring six different kinds of wood, the room can be “tuned” for resonance using panels in the ceiling and on the walls. The stage can be pulled out in different tiers for the orchestra or pushed back to maximize performing floor space. Even the chairs, with a total price tag of $1.2 million, have unique, individual bevels corresponding with the slope of the floor, designed for maximum acoustic transparency. Pushing the space into the upper echelon of concert halls is the HVAC system, oversized for its needs, silently keeping the room at a constant temperature for both the comfort of the audience and the tuning of instruments. The back of the hall opens to a terraced lawn, allowing for over 3,000 additional seats. And though they’re technically unnecessary, because the design of the hall shoots sound out the opening at a perfectly audible volume, speakers amplify the audio outside, and 18 downfiring subwoofers shoot sound into the ground for a natural low-end feel. This main hall is only one piece of the Green Music Center, which currently includes a music education wing and toptier restaurant. When finally

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22 Green Center ( 21

one time and then called back saying, ‘How much do you need?’” The reverberations of Weill’s involvement were wide. Weill’s financial connections led to a $15 million donation from Mastercard to name the as-yetunfinished 10,000-seat outdoor performance space. But it also led to some activists vowing to speak the newly christened words “Weill Hall” in the original German pronunciation.

university’s faculty in 2007, tied in part to concerns that the GMC was sucking sorely needed funds away from other areas of academia. “I thought [the vote] was unfair,” responds Armiñana, somberly. “But it clearly pointed out that we needed to be better communicators about the role of the university,” adding that “it was part of the politics at that time of very strained relations with the faculty union.”

‘It really looked like a gem. I spoke to Lang Lang and said, “You gotta do me a favor.”’

Accelerando Armiñana says his lowest point, personally, came in 2008 when construction bids began to skyrocket. The price of steel was rising by 5 to 10 percent each month. Estimates were coming in higher than expected. Then, the economy suddenly took a nosedive. The university seemed to be chasing a rainbow. But still, “Cabeza Dura,” or “Hard Head,” as his mother called him, persisted. After $47 million in state bonds helped complete the music education hall, it was decided the rest of the Green Music Center would be funded privately. In nearly every public appearance over the next four years, Armiñana pled his case and asked for money. Thousands of individuals came forward with small amounts, but it was the large donors that propelled the project forward when fundraising efforts stalled. Notable donations included $5 million from Jean Schulz, wife of cartoonist Charles Schulz; just over $3 million from telecom pioneers John and Jennifer Webley; $3 million from former Press Democrat publisher Evert Person and wife, Norma; $1.4 million from the GK Hardt Foundation; $1.2 million from former OCLI CEO Herb Dwight and wife, Jane; $1 million from the Henry Trione Foundation and $1 million from winery owners Jacques and Barbara Schlumberger. The most notable donation, after the initial $10 million given by the Greens, came from former

Dissonance

THE FINE WAY A nine-foot Steinway concert grand piano arrived

at the hall via anonymous donor in 2009.

Citigroup chairman and CEO Sandy Weill and wife, Joan. Weill heard about the project from a neighbor after the couple moved from New York into a $31 million estate on Sonoma Mountain. “I knew we had horses, lambs, sheep, and a lot of land,” he said at a press conference in March, “but nothing about a music center.” Weill’s musical background was limited to playing bass drum in a military band, but his curiosity was piqued. “It really looked like a gem,” he said. “I spoke to Lang Lang, and said, ‘You gotta do me a favor.’” Soon, Lang Lang, the globally

acclaimed concert pianist who opens the Green Music Center this Saturday, visited Sonoma State at midnight to be silently ushered into the main hall for a trial run. At 1:30am, after an hour and a half at the piano, the pianist gave the hall his blessing. Subsequently, Weill gave the hall $12 million. The thing that was once just an idea was becoming more and more tangible. As Armiñana is fond of saying, the tires on the car were finally able to be kicked. “If we had not built it to the point we had,” says Armiñana, “I don’t think the Weills would have come in, visited

Weill, who did not respond to a request for an interview for this story, is a board member for Carnegie Hall and a noted philanthropist with a history of donating to the arts and to universities. Yet many assert his responsibility in the financial meltdown of 2008, beginning with his flouting of regulatory laws in merging Citicorp and Travelers Group in 1998. Weill then lobbied successfully to repeal the GlassSteagall act, which opened the doors for other banks to follow his lead and grow too-big-to-fail. He was named one of the “25 People to Blame for the Financial Crisis” by Time magazine, and there was even a minor protest at 2012’s commencement ceremony at SSU, at which Weill and his wife, Joan, were presented with honorary degrees from the university. Armiñana understands why people felt the need to demonstrate. “There is not a great deal of love at this moment, nationally, toward big banking,” he says. But he feels that Weill is

donated $12 million, is the center’s largest personal donor.

not to blame. Citing the House’s passage and President Clinton’s signing of the Gramm-LeachBliley Act of 1999, Armiñana says laying blame solely on Weill for the repeal of Glass-Steagall “shows a great deal of lack of knowledge of how the legislative executive process works in the United States.” For his part, Weill has since reexamined his position, stating this July that government regulations are necessary to prevent economic collapse. (“I have found him very nimble in his mind,” notes Armiñana.) Weill’s history aside, some faculty believe the GMC has diverted funds and attention away from other areas of the university. In a study released this year by SSU sociology professor Peter Phillips, 14 of 16 department heads interviewed under condition of anonymity said they felt “GMC development efforts directed funds away from the quality of education throughout Sonoma State.” Overall, those interviewed felt that the GMC “might not have been the best venture,” the study says. “The university has no business being in the concert business; we’re in the education business,” says Phillips. “All these resources are being put into this music hall, which is essentially for the Sonoma County upper crust.” Armiñana has not read the report, but allows that he is familiar with it. “I have had encounters in the past that Peter’s

Coda Though he exudes a sense of modesty about it, Armiñana is, by all accounts, the person who took the idea for a small choral hall and turned it into a world-class performing arts facility. He persevered in the face of adversity, both financial and personal. “By nature,” he says today, “I’m not a quitter.” Even when a large donor

23

CUBAN RHYTHM Chucho Valdés swings the Steinway on Nov. 11.

Grand Opening Weekend Sept. 29 Lang Lang, piano, in program of Mozart and Chopin. 7pm. Indoor seating sold-out; $20–$55 lawn tickets available. Sept. 30 Sunrise Choral Concert, community and university choral ensembles. 7am. Free; advance tickets required. Sept. 30 Santa Rosa Symphony, with Corrick Brown, Jeffrey Kahane and Bruno Ferrandis. 2pm. Indoor seating sold-out; $10 table and free lawn tickets available. Sept. 30 Alison Krauss & Union Station. 7:30pm. Indoor and lawn seating sold-out. Upcoming performances include Bill Maher (Oct. 20), John Adams (Oct. 27), Aziz Ansari (Nov. 4), Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony (Dec. 6, Mar. 7), Yo-Yo Ma (Jan. 26), AnneSophie Mutter (Mar. 2), Wynton Marsalis (Mar. 21) and others. See www.gmcsonoma.edu for full schedule and ticket information.

suggested otherwise, Armiñana would not stray from his vision. “I had a conversation with somebody who is no longer on earth,” he says, declining to name names, “who said, ‘Here, you have my money, why don’t you just build a tent to do summer things, et cetera. You can build a really nice tent with the money you’ve got.’” But straying from the original plan was not an option. “We were never willing to compromise,” says Armiñana. “There were chances, and requests, to compromise the quality, and the answer was absolutely no. Once we made the decision of what the full scope of

the project was, there was never a doubt to do it all.” Does the controversy bother him? “Not at all,” he responds, matter-of-factly. The Green Music Center and other capital improvements made under Armiñana’s tenure (the Schulz Information Center, the Salazar and Darwin Hall renovations and student recreation facilities, among others) will remain integral parts of the educational experience far after he retires, and “if people think I did this to create a legacy, I just don’t operate that way,” he says. “I think soon, someday,” he says, “they will forget Ruben Armiñana.”

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 –OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

MAJOR SCALE Sandy Weill, who

methodologies have been very biased,” he says, choosing not to comment further. Additionally, students and faculty in Sonoma State’s music department are eager to see the completion of the 250-seat Schroeder Hall. A medium-sized, acoustically pleasing cousin of the 1,400-seat main hall, Schroeder Hall is the closest thing to the Green’s original vision, yet remains unfinished, needing $5 million for completion. In the meantime, most student ensembles meet and perform in GMC 1028 or 1029, which are boxy rooms with odd acoustics. “I believe when Schroeder Hall opens, it will be mostly academic focused,” says administrative coordinator Caroline Ammann. “We can get students in there, it’s the perfect place.” University CFO and executive director of the GMC Larry Furukawa-Schlereth understands the criticism, but doesn’t feel it will stick in the long run. “It’s difficult when a project is in the planning stage or building stage for people to fully understand its impact,” he says. “Once a thing is completed, people become more aware of the importance of a project.” He adds that the controversy surrounding the Green Music Center has not been any greater than any he’s experienced on campus, including the Schulz Information Center, which was completed in June 2000, one month after the CSU Board of Trustees approved a master plan adding the 48 acres for the GMC. “Now,” says Furukawa-Schlereth, “people can’t imagine the university without the operations of the Schulz Information Center. I think the same is true with the music center.”

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 26- O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

WHERE YOU LIVE

Outlaw Rock

Tampa may now be known as the site of Clint Eastwood’s bizarre “Empty Obama Chair” speech, but in the late ’60s, it was the breeding ground for the Outlaws. Getting signed after opening for Lynyrd Skynyrd, the Southern rock band had success with “Green Grass and High Tides,” which in a live setting stretched from a 10-minute album track to a 20- or 30-minute guitar-heavy wankfest. With two original members, wish for “There Goes Another Love Song” when the Outlaws play Monday, Oct. 1, at the Sweetwater Music Hall (19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley; 8pm; $42; 415.388.3850) and Wednesday, Oct. 3, at the Uptown Theatre (1350 Third St., Napa; 8pm; $35; 707.259.0123).

SA N R A FA E L

IDEASx The future is here, and it involves speakers standing onstage with a headset microphone and a PowerPoint remote. TED conferences, in which interesting people talk about interesting things for a $6,000 price tag, are embraced by CEOs, venture capitalists and YouTube view counters. TEDx talks, on the other hand, can be sponsored by just about anybody. (A TEDx talk in Corpus Christi last month advocated the attainment of “swag.”) TEDx Marin features an impressive lineup, including neurobiologist Mohammed El Majdoubi, astronaut Ed Lu, author Lynne Twist, futurist Andrew Hessel and others. Be there on Thursday, Sept. 27, at the Osher Marin Jewish Community Center. 200 N. San Pedro Drive, San Rafael. 5:30pm. $75. 415.444.8000.

SEBASTOPOL

War Is Over Heather Courtney returned to her snowy Michigan hometown to make the documentary ‘Where Soldiers Come From,’ which follows a group of friends who are lured into the Army by signing bonuses and college-tuition support. After a mission in Afghanistan sweeping for roadside bombs, the young men return disillusioned in their commitments and plagued by PTSD. That’s when their true challenges begin—as returning veterans,

at just 23 years old. See Where Soldiers Come From on Friday, Sept. 28, at the Sebastopol Center for the Arts. 6780 Depot St., Sebastopol. 4:30pm and 7pm. $10. 707.829.4797.

S A N TA R O S A

Puglia Party It was always there, every year, hanging on the small brown building just a block away from the Bohemian offices. ‘FESTA ITALIANA,’ read the large banner. Italian festival? Hmm. Finally, last year, I went. Good heavens! A room full of food, another room with a Sinatra impersonator and yet another room detailing the rich history of turn-of-the-century immigrants in Santa Rosa’s Little Italy neighborhood. A hell of a time, this Festa Italiana. Among this year’s entertainment are the Don Giovannis, Zighi Baci with Michael Van Why, Damiani Duo, the Roman Gladiators and Coro Allegro, and it all gets cooking on Sunday, Sept. 30, at the Veterans Memorial Building. 1351 Maple Ave., Santa Rosa. 11am–6pm. $6–$10. 707.591.9696.

—Gabe Meline

BEYOND AND BACK John Doe plays with Ramblin’ Jack Elliott Sept. 29 in Bolinas. See Concerts, p 30.

HONORING LIFE Twenty-eight different artists and one founding architect occupy space at Atelier One, home of Funeria, above.

Apples to Art Atelier One celebrates 25 years of creativity BY JESSICA DUR

L

ong before the tiny hamlet of Graton was known for its art galleries, antique stores and Zagatrated bistros, locals packed the community center to protest reconstruction plans for an old apple-drying building in town. The year was 1980, and the project, led by architect J. Lamont Langworthy, involved turning the long-sinceabandoned building into a collection of artist studios.

“People were against it,â€? Langworthy tells me with a chuckle, “as they often are against things that are good for them.â€? Originally built in 1918, the condemned building still bore the evidence of a time when apples reigned as a major cash crop. During the ’20s and ’30s, a conveyor belt of water oated the fruit across Bowen Street to be cut, peeled and left to drip their juices onto the oor. By the time Langworthy discovered it, the building had been abandoned for a decade. “The place was a mess,â€? he says,

“full of old, greasy, apple-peeling machines.â€? The architect spent the next six years transforming the drying rooms into artist studios, sparking a renaissance that breathed life into Graton, which he says was “a ghost town.â€? The refurbished building (named Atelier, French for “workshopâ€?) began renting out its studio spaces in 1987. Twenty-ďŹ ve years and countless creative ventures later, Atelier One hosts its ďŹ rst open studio with a weekend-long anniversary celebration that kicks off on Friday, Sept. 28.

Vintage collectable sculptor Monty Monty occupies a corner workshop that would bring any steampunk to his knees, using everything from old ďŹ shing rods to ďŹ lm reels. Also sharing the roof are a smattering of painters, including SRJC instructor Lisa Beerntsen, Robert Breyer, Cindy Cleary and Charles Becker, who does for fruit what Marvin Gaye did for ďŹ rst dates—never has there been a sexier strawberry. Fashion designer Emily Melville rents a studio, as does the Spiral Foods Co-op, which is 300 members closer to bringing the only member-owned food cooperative to Sonoma County. “I’m grateful to have found a comfortably weathered place where no one worries about tromping down the halls in wet boots,â€? says Maureen Lomasney, who’s rented studio space for 16 years and currently curates the gallery at Funeria, the ďŹ rst of its kind in the country. Devoted exclusively to crematory vessels, Funeria asks artists to honor death by thinking outside of the pine box. The resulting urns, resplendent in their whimsy and craftsmanship, are not to be missed. As evidence of what Lomasney calls their “philanthropy,â€? Langworthy and co-owner Bruce Stephen are dedicated to keeping the rents low. The result? “We’re always full,â€? Langworthy points out, “and have no need to advertise.â€? “Affordability helps buy time for shapes to reveal themselves and ideas to mature,â€? Lomasney tells me. “For all of us here, having time to grow is the greatest luxury of all.â€? Atelier One’s 25th Anniversary Open House opens with a party Friday, Sept. 28, from 6pm to 9pm; studios are open throughout the weekend, Sept. 29–30. 2860 Bowen St., Graton.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 –OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

ArtsIdeas

25

Breathe Easy

=^bW[c[`WRS Q]\RWbW]\a aOTS`]cbSaO\R <=E4@3A6/7@  SdS`geVS`S g]cU]

^V]b]a(eee[WbQV`WQSQ][ 

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

:7D3B=@723 7<A=<=;/ 1=C<BG

Film

WHAT A YEAR A broken leg, Lanceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

doping scandal and, man, what else?

13:30@/B3A;=934@33A=<=;/1=C<BG    C

Roll On

/ZZ]cbR]]`RW\W\UO\R`SQ`SObW]\OZO`SOa / ZZ]cbR]] Z ]cbR]]`RW\W\ ` RW\W\UO\ U O\R` R `SQ` `SQ`SObW]\O ObW]\OZO`SO Z O `S O a O`S\]ea[]YST`SS O `S\] S \]ea[]YST`SS e a [ ] YS  T ` S S 

Film on Levi â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;not a promotionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

1]c\bg]TA]\][O=`RW\O\QS<]#'#! 1 ] c \b g]T A ] \ ] [ O = `R W \ O \ QS < ]  # ' # !

BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

99/28 / 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10/4 10 /4

The Th eM Master aster R (1 (10:15, 0 :15, 11:10, :10, 5:00) 5 : 00 ) 8:00 8 : 00

Stars S tars in in Shorts Shorts NR (1 (10:15, 0 :15, 12:45, 12: 45, 3:30) 3 : 30 ) 6:30, 6 : 30, 9:00 9 : 00

Samsara S amsara PPG13G13 (10:30, (10 : 30, 1:00, 1: 00, 3:45) 3 : 45 ) 6:45, 6 : 45, 9:00 9 : 00

Arbitrage A rbitrage R

(10:45, (10 : 45, 11:30, : 30, 4:25) 4 : 25) 6:45, 6 : 45, 99:05 : 05

Searching for Searching for Sugar S ugar Ma Man n PPG13G13 (1:15, (1:15, 4:00) 4 : 00 ) 7:15, 7:15, 9:15 9 :15

Robot a Robot and nd Fr ank PPG13G13 (1(10:45) Frank 0 : 45) Summer field C Summerfield Cinema in e ma 551 5 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707-522-0719 7 07- 52 2- 0719

TM

0F.LQOH\6WÂ&#x2021;6HEDVWRSROÂ&#x2021; Â?Â?Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â?iVĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;}>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x2022;iĂ&#x192;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;fĂ&#x2021;Ă&#x160;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; -VÂ&#x2026;i`Ă&#x2022;Â?iĂ&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;-iÂŤĂ&#x152;iÂ&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;nĂ&#x160;qĂ&#x160;/Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;]Ă&#x160;"VĂ&#x152;Â&#x153;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;{ Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Âş Â?iĂ&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160; Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}tÂťĂ&#x160;qĂ&#x160;HR Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule for Fri, Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for Fri, April â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thu, April 22nd Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;iÂŤÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;`Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;iĂ&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;ViĂ&#x160;7Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192; Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th

Academy Award â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance Best Foreign Language Film! In Years!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Box OfďŹ ce ­£\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\Ă&#x201C;äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;,Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;*>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raw and Riveting!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rolling Stone Demi Moore David Duchovny WALTZ WITH BASHIR Âş Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;1Â&#x2DC;Li>Ă&#x152;>LÂ?iĂ&#x160;VĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}tÂşĂ&#x160; Ă&#x160; A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) THE 3:00 5:00 qĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Los Times9:15 JONESES (12:30) 2:45 Angeles 5:00 7:00 7:20 9:45 RR

""* ,

Â&#x153;>ÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Ă?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;-iĂ&#x17E;Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vvÂ&#x201C;>Â&#x2DC; (12:30) 2:40 Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award BestRActor!

/ Ă&#x160;-/ ,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Triumph!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; New â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER ­£Ă&#x201C;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\ääŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;, Painterly Work Of Decades Past!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE >}}Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â?Â?iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2026;>>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â?>Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192; (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! vĂ&#x160;9Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;½Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x201C;°°° Â&#x2026;>Â&#x2DC;}iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152; (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE â&#x20AC;&#x153;ä&#x2013;&#x;ä&#x2013;&#x;ä&#x2013;&#x;ä&#x2013;&#x; â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Really, Truly, Deeply â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This (1:15) 7:10 R Believable One of­£\Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\ÂŁxÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;\xäĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;* This Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best!â&#x20AC;?9:40 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Newsday If It Were Fiction!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; San Francisco Chronicle

7" ½/Ă&#x160;  Ă&#x160; "7 ONCE

Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x153;`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;`>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Â?>Â&#x17D;i 8 Academy Award Noms Including PRODIGAL SONS R (1:00) 3:10 5:20 Best Picture, Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director! (2:20) 9:10 Best NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu ­£\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\Ă&#x201C;xÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x17D; MILK â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rolling Stone â&#x20AC;&#x153;Haunting and Hypnotic!â&#x20AC;? ÂşÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;,>Ă&#x152;itĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x192;V>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2021; >Â?Â&#x2C6;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x2026;>Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x160;iĂ&#x20AC;itÂťĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;qĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;RS â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!â&#x20AC;? 9:30 R â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Newsweek

/,"1  Ă&#x160;7/Ă&#x160;/ Ă&#x160; 1,6

THE GIRL THE TATTOO PleaseWITH Note: No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No 6:45 Show Thu , /, WAITRESS

(1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR ­£\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;\ÂŁxĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;x\Ă&#x201C;xÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\xäĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;, (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms Including â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;ŤŰşŰşŰşâ&#x20AC;Ź1/2! AnFROST/NIXON Unexpected Gem!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; USA Today

"/ Ă&#x160;/, -96 Ă&#x160;

(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG â&#x20AC;&#x153;SwoonlyĂ&#x201C; \Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;­£\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;x\£äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;* Romatic, Hilarious!â&#x20AC;? (12:00) 9:50 R â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Slant5:00 Magazine Ă&#x17D; \Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;­Ă&#x17D;\£äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;*>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x192; REVOLUTIONARY ROAD â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deliciously Unsettling!â&#x20AC;? PARIS, JE Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50â&#x20AC;&#x201C; RLA Times (1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 R THE ­£\xäĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\{xÂŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;, Kevin Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x160;7/ 

PURE: A BOULDERING FLICK  Thu, /"1   Michael Mooreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feb 26th at 7:15 THE ­£\{xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;{\£äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\Ă&#x201C;xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;, MOST DANGEROUS SICKO MOVIES MORNING MANIN INTHE AMERICA

 ,Ă&#x160;"

Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box OfďŹ ce! ­£\ääĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17D;\£äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;x\Ă&#x201C;äŽĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;\Ă&#x201C;xĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;\{äĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;

Â&#x2021;ÂŁĂ&#x2021; 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00 10:00 Â&#x2122;\{äÂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x160;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;]Ă&#x160;"VĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;{ 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! National Theatre Live10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Streep Glenn Close CHEECH RACHEL GETTING MARRIED Sunday Telegraph 10:40 AM â&#x20AC;Ť۝۝۝۝۝â&#x20AC;Ź AM HEY WATCH THIS 2009 ACTION SHORTS (Fri/Mon Only)) EVENING JulieLIVE Walters Helen McCrory Rory 10:45 Kinnear 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

THE LAST OF THE HAUSSMANS Oct 11 7pm Oct 20 10am

Â?Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;>Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;VÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iÂ&#x201C;>Ă&#x192;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;/Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x192;

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

I

f you get too emotional about everything, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just too hard,â&#x20AC;? says Levi Leipheimer in the trailer for The Levi Effect: The Untold Story of Cyclist Levi Leipheimer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re like a salmon swimming upstream against your emotions.â&#x20AC;? The documentary, which premieres Sept. 28 in Santa Rosa on the eve of Leviâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Granfondo, faced its ďŹ rst hurdle with its very own subject. When longtime friends and Bike Monkey duo Greg Fisher and Carlos Perez approached him with the idea, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Levi actually tried to talk us out of it,â&#x20AC;? says Fisher. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Why would you want to make a ďŹ lm about me? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m boring.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Indeed, Leipheimer looks, acts and talks like a regular guyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that is, until he gets on a bike, at which point he transforms into an unstoppable beast. Even after breaking his leg earlier this

year, Leipheimer was back on a stationary bike in training less than a week later, shots of which are in the ďŹ lm. But the ďŹ lmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t to deify the cyclist, says Fisher. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rather than make a documentary about a linear reďŹ&#x201A;ection of the guyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, [Perez] wanted to focus more on the impact, largely unwittingly, that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had on the community.â&#x20AC;? But it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all roses, especially lately. The recent doping scandal surrounding Leipheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former teammate Lance Armstrong that has rocked the cycling world is part of the ďŹ lmâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leipheimer has been rumored to be involvedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the editing room was revisited several times with updates, making the ďŹ lm feel as current as possible. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t easy to fund the ďŹ lm, says Fisher, which cost about $300,000 to make. A Kickstarter campaign that failed to reach its goal meant the ďŹ lm will be distributed in a one-time theatrical event in cities around the country on Oct. 23, followed by a taped panel discussion with the ďŹ lmmakers, Leipheimer, actor Patrick Dempsey and pro cyclist Tom Dempsey. (The discussion will be taped inside the main theater following the Santa Rosa premiere.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;We leveraged a bunch of resources to get it started,â&#x20AC;? says Fisher. But not one dime came from Leipheimer himself, because â&#x20AC;&#x153;it would have then become a promotion of him,â&#x20AC;? says Fisher. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a promotion of Levi, but a depiction of a particular context.â&#x20AC;? Sprouting some salmonesque ďŹ ns himself, Fisher isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as concerned with making money as he is with spreading the ďŹ lmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s message of community-building through cycling. The Granfondo, taking place Sept. 29, is the best manifestation of that idea. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone who participates in the Granfondo,â&#x20AC;? says Fisher, â&#x20AC;&#x153;this is their movie.â&#x20AC;? Tickets for the 5pm premiere at Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roxy Theater on Sept. 20 are $20. For info, see www.levieffect.com. Leviâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Granfondo kicks off at 8am on Sept. 29, with a free FondoSonoma Festival with live music, food and more from 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm at Finley Park. 70 Stony Point Road, Santa Rosa. 707.560.1122.

Jeff Thomas

NEW DECADE Napaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production

examines the aftermath in Laramie.

Tough Talk

Following up on â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Laramie Projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY DAVID TEMPLETON

S

hame is a hard thing to live with.

In The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later, the lingering shame of an entire community comes into focus. Created by the same team that crafted the gamechanging documentary-theater piece The Laramie Projectâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;about the murder of gay student Matthew Shepardâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;this sequel takes place a full decade after the events of the original. In 1998, two local men kidnapped Shepard, a student at the University of Wyoming, tied him to a fence and savagely beat him to death. That event sparked national attention and eventually led to federal hate crime legislation that now bears Shepardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name. In the town of Laramie, Wyo., where the crimes took place, many townsfolk are desperate to forget what happened, angry at

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Laramie Project: 10 Years Laterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday through Oct. 7 at Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center. 2277 Napa-Vallejo Hwy., Napa. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays. $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$20. 707.256.7500.

27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

the fresh attention brought with every anniversary of the murder. Others have been changed forever by those events, dedicating themselves in various ways to keeping Shepardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story aliveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; whether some folks want it that way or not. At Napa Valley College, the play has just opened a three-weekend run. Under the direction of Jennifer King, with a remarkably strong cast of experienced and student actors, the play unfolds in the round, staged in the intimate black box theater inside the collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state-of-the-art performing arts center. A project of the experimental Tectonic Theater Company of New York City, The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later is an extended â&#x20AC;&#x153;epilogueâ&#x20AC;? to the original, once again created by company members MoisĂŠs Kaufman, Leigh Fondakowski, Greg Pierotti, Andy Paris and Stephen Belber. The elegant, brilliantly constructed play is built entirely from interviews with the people of Laramie. Ten Years Later revisits many of the characters from the ďŹ rst, who bring us up to speed on what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been doing for 10 years, and then it introduces us to several new onesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;most notably Shepardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother, Judy Shepard, and one of his two murderers, Aaron McKinney, who refused to be interviewed for the ďŹ rst play. This time, he agreed. The scene in which he is interviewed is easily one of the most gripping and intense moments Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen onstage all year. At times, Ten Years Later unfolds like a thriller, riveting and raw. But there is humor here, too, along with moments of jawdropping beauty and insight. If shame can eat into a townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soul and tear it apart, perhaps it can also be the catalyst that leads to healing and even a new, more tolerant view of the world.

Spreckels Performing Arts Center 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park 6SUHFNHOV%R[2IÂżFHÂ&#x2021;VSUHFNHOVRQOLQHFRP MAINSTAGEWEST

OTHER PEOPLE $ lay MONEY P by Jerry Sterner A presents

THE TH E ULTIMATE UL LTIMA LT TIMA ATE AT SEDUCTION... SED DUCTION... TION...

directed by Elizabeth Craven

SEP 28, 29 @ 8:00 OCT 3, 4, 5 @ 8:00 SEP 30 @ 5:00 (MAT)

Fun nny.... Funny... Sexxy.... Sexy... Sm mart... Smart... TThe he he epic story storry of our o time time.. Starrring: Starring: Lau ura LLowry* owry* Laura KKeith eitth Baker Baker JJohn ohn Craven Craven Lar ry W illiams Larry Williams JJoan oan Hawley Hawley

*member Actors Equity itty

707.823.0177 823 3.0177 104 N MAIN S STREET, TREE T, SEBASTOPOL SEBASTOPOL

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

WELLS W E SF ELL FARGO ARGO C CENTER ENTER FOR THE ARTS F OR TH EA RTS S

Film

SUPREME BEING Philip Seymour Hoffman plays large-scale fraud Lancaster Dodd.

For the Cause

Stunning cult correlation in ‘The Master’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

Tickets Tick kets 707.546.3600 70 07.54 46.3600 (Sun-Sat, noon-6pm) noon n-6pm) O Online wellsfargocenterarts.org wells sfargocenterarts.org

D

on’t expect a specific rebuke to L. Ron Hubbard in The Master, Paul Thomas Anderson’s exciting and bewildering new film. Occasionally, highly tolerant people will argue that the Church may be bad scifi, but at least it’s a discipline for extremely out-of-control people. And there is something of that argument here. Anderson’s most accomplished film to date tells of the partnership between a shell-shocked Navy vet of 1950 named Freddie (Joaquin Phoenix) and a dapper, bigger-than-life fraud, Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman). In his grand, self-amused and patronizing way, this fraud likes Freddie’s company and sees him as the perfect subject for experiments, a man to be broken and remade. At a compound in Philadelphia, “writer/adventurer/nuclear physicist” Dodd conducts quasi-psychiatric sessions with the help of his pregnant wife, played by an impressive Amy Adams, showing how much eroticism there can be in frost and poisonous disappointment. Dodd’s new crusade, the Cause, develops as his gang of family and entourage head West. The storyline is meant to rattle viewers, dropping us into scenes, locations and times, which seems to reflect our view of Dodd as seen through Freddie’s disordered state of mind. Phoenix’s kaleidoscopic acting is as unpredictable a performance as we’ve seen in the movies. It’s very original, even as Phoenix shows facets that recall the best of Brando, Connery and Robert Ryan. The Master includes some straight-faced mockery of the paranoia of cults as when Dodd makes his friendly lab-Rhesus Freddie swear he’s not actually an agent of extraterrestrials. What’s underneath, however, is about as funny as a malignant virus. Dodd’s stirring of Freddie’s soft brains heralds bigger things: the rise of the intelligence apparatus, the think-tank, Cointelpro, the dawn of rising ruthlessness, the lies of World War II furthered by new means. The bigger picture looms like Hoffman’s screen-filling head, demanding obedience in sickeningly insinuating tones. The voice echoes against the background of postwar America, a nation about to get gigantic. ‘The Master’ is in wide release.

GET LIFTED Niki Crawford heads up

L.A.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rawest, dustiest dectet.

CaliFever Orgoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musical funk accumulator

Ë&#x153; BY JACQUELYNNE OCANA

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

T

hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mojo in the dust,â&#x20AC;? says Orgone guitarist Sergio Rios, calling from Boise, Idaho, just after soundcheck. Orgone (pronounced with a long o) pride themselves on that dustâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a raw, organic style like the â&#x20AC;&#x153;gritty, warm sounding recordingsâ&#x20AC;? of oldschool funk and classic soul.

After studying greats such as the Meters, Parliament and Booker T., Orgone have honed their craft of live funk instrumentation, heavily inďŹ&#x201A;uenced by the breakbeat hiphop scene of 1990s Los Angeles. When recording, though, Rio says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;we were dissatisďŹ ed when weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d go into studios. The kind of sound weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d end up getting always sounded kinda glossy and too shiny.â&#x20AC;? Subsequently, Killion Studios emerged out of necessity. Named for the L.A. street where Rios

Get down with Orgone on Saturday, Sept. 29, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8pm. $10. 707.829.7300.

29

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

"REAKFASTs,UNCHs$INNER 4(52s0-$//23sNO COVER s INDIE/ALT COUNTRY

ROCK THE VOTE 2012

FREE

featuring

EVEREST & FREE FEAR THE FEW

&2)s7PM DOORSss

MEIKO & BOBBY LONG 35.s7PM DOORSs!$6$/3s BLUES/ROCK

JIMMIE VAUGHAN & THE TILT-A-WHIRL BAND

3!4s0-$//23s!$6$/3s PINK FLOYD TRIBUTE BAND

AN EVENING WITH

HOUSE OF FLOYD 7%$s0-$//23ss ALTERNATIVE/INDIE

HOWLIN RAIN

.O#HILDREN5NDERTO!LL!GES3HOWS 0ETALUMA"LVD 0ETALUMA

7 WWWMCNEARSCOM

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW Sat

Sept 29

DANNY CLICK AND THE HELL YEAHS!

Americana/Blues 8:30pm Sun

Sept 30 Sat

Oct 6

THE NEW CROSSECTION

JOHN CROSS and voca list CHRIS SAUNDERS 5:00pm/No Cover FEATURI NG

Beatles and Beyond

REVOLVER AND BONNIE HAYES

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Early Set Tribute to CAROLE KING 8:30pm

Sun

Oct 7

Singer/Songwriter

ALI MARCUS HENHOUSE

4:00pm / No Cover FOXES IN THE

Foxy Four-Part Harmonies 7:00pm / No Cover

LONE STAR RETROBATES Oct 13 Roadhouse/Western Swing 8:30pm Sat Sat

Oct 20

CD/DVD Release Party

MITCH WOODS AND HIS

ROCKET 88S

Blues Beyond Borders/Live in Istanbul 8:30pm Fri

Oct 26

THE GOLDEN STATE/ LONE STAR REVUE

MARK HUMMEL, LITTLE CHARLIE, ANSON F UNDERBURGH

The Real Deal Blues 8:30pm

Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3!

Reservations Advised

1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

415.662.2219

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

lived, the old two-bedroom apartment became Orgoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s private recording facility. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We use a lot of vintage instruments, like Rhodes piano [and] vintage drum kits. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something of a soul in that,â&#x20AC;? Rios says. After several albums, and after welcoming vocalist Niki Crawford, Orgone have found perfection in those gritty do-it-yourself details. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to emulate a lot of those older recordings while live,â&#x20AC;? Rios adds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are honoring the stuff we love and all the reasons why we love it.â&#x20AC;? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also a highly soughtafter backing band, having recorded or toured with Alicia Keys, Cee-Lo Green and the Roots, although these days, there isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much time to collaborate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been touring hard for the last three years, pretty relentlessly, so we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had much time to get involved with other artists,â&#x20AC;? says Rios. So what is an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Orgoneâ&#x20AC;?? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was kind of a lark. Our original bass player had seen a documentary on the history of sexuality in the 20th century. It had this box called the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Orgone Accumulator,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; which you could collect energy with and was claiming to heal people. The word literally comes from the combination of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;orgasmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hormoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;,â&#x20AC;? says Rios of the 1930s Freudian-era device made famous by the Beat generation. (William Burroughs claimed it helped relieve â&#x20AC;&#x153;junk sicknessâ&#x20AC;? along with inspiring artistic and sexual creativity.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;What was funny was how we were toying with it,â&#x20AC;? continues Rios. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two weeks after trying it on for size, we were playing a gig up in Fresno. The same bass player went to have a cigarette by the poolâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;mind you, Fresno is kind of a Twilight Zoning placeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and he looks over on the patio table and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s this 1950s hardcover library copy of the theory of Orgone energy. So it kinda chose us. Over time, it has become intertwined with the essence of what we do.â&#x20AC;?

Music

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Alison Krauss & Union Station Legendary bluegrass group in opening weekend for new venue in Rohnert Park. Sep 30, 8pm. $55. Green Music Center, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Art.Beer.Music Benefit for Petaluma Arts Center features Beso Negro and Shovelman. Oct 1, 5:308:30pm. $20. Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Daniel Bedingfield San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nova Albion (formerly Music for Animals) co-headlines with BRIT Award-winner. Sep 28, 6pm. $15. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Coyote Grace West Coast Americana threesome plays with Fast Rattler. Sep 29, 8pm. $15-$20. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Jimmie Vaughan & the Tilt-A-Whirl Band Renowned blues guitarist plays retro hits. Sep 30, 8pm. $27-$31. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Lang Lang Historic grand opening for the Green Music Center featuring top-rated pianist in solo performance. Sep 29, 8pm. Indoor seating sold-out; outdoor seating $20-$55. Green Music Center, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

A Little Street Music Taft Street Winery closes summer music series with an encore visit by Bottleshock. Sep 30, 3pm. Free. Taft Street Winery, 2030 Barlow Lane, Sebastopol. 707.823.2049.

Santa Rosa Symphony Santa Rosa Symphonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season premiere features Corrick Brown, Jeffrey Kahane and Bruno Ferrandis together, and free lawn seating for 2,700 people. Copland, Beethoven, and Ravel are on the program. Sep 30, 2pm. Indoor seating sold out; lawn seating free. Green Music Center, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

MARIN COUNTY John Doe & Ramblinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jack Elliott Two of the baddest cats on the West Coast. Alison Harris and the Barn Owls open the show. Three-course dinner before the show with purchase of dinner ticket. Sep 29, 6pm. $30-$80. Bolinas Community Center, 14 Wharf Rd, Bolinas.

Left Coast Chamber Ensemble Ensemble performs â&#x20AC;&#x153;Portraits in Sound,â&#x20AC;? an interplay between music and visual art. Sep 30, 7pm. $15, $30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Aimee Mann Instead of cleaning houses, balladeer will sing selections from her latest, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Charmer.â&#x20AC;? Sep 30, 8pm. $35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

The Outlaws Southern rock legends play favorites from their platinumand-gold collection with Lansdale Station. Oct 3, 8pm. $35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Roma Roasters Sep 28, Collaboration with David Scott. Sep 29, Now & Zen. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe Sep 28, the Smart Fellers. Sep 29, Hill Williams. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Theater Sep 27, Highway Poets. Sep 29, Fly to North Carolina. Sep 30, 100,000 Poets

44.005)+";; 3# '6/, . 0 0 5 ) + " ; ; 3  # ' 6 / ,

'3 '3* 3* 44&15 &115 &&15 5 

+&''&%8**/4 +&''&%8*/4 ##"/% "/% XXXNZTQBDFDPNKFGGFEXJOT X X XNZTQBDFDPNKFG GFE X JOT

4"5 44" "5 "5 44&15 &15

))*1)01 3# *1 ) 0 1 3  #

##%"8/#"/%  %"8/ #"/% ''&"563*/(5&33*&-0/%&& & "563*/( 5&33*& -0/%&&



$ 0 7 & 3 $07&3 '3* ' 3 * 4"5/*()54 4 "5 /* ( ) 5 4

XXXCEBXOCBOEDPN X X XCEBX OCBOEDPN

))"11:)063.POÂ&#x;'SJ Â&#x;QN "11:)063.POÂ&#x;'SJ Â&#x;QN 4JOHMF-JRVPS8FMM%SJOLT %SBGU#FFS  4JOH MF-JRVPS8FMM%SJOL T %S B G U#FFS  ))PVTF8JOF PVTF8 JOF  )BQQZ)PVS'PPE.FOV  )B QQZ)PVS'PPE.FOV %%"/$& "/$&44BMTB4VO 4XJOH5VFT B MT B4VO 4 X JOH5VFT 888'-".*/(03&4035$0.&95 8 8 8' - " .*/( 03 & 4 03 5$ 0.           & 9 5   

THE SHOW Coyote Grace play a CD release show Sept. 29. See Concerts, above.

for Change with music by Dubtown Dread. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

31

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Sep 27, Shook Twins, Stephanie Salva. Sep 28, Free Peoples, David T. Carter, Trailer Park Rangers. Sep 29, Dream Farmers and Church Marching Band. Sep 30, Intuitive Compass. Oct 2, Joni Davis. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR S INGLES TO M E ET SINGLES MEET B EST BAR BAR HONORABLE BEST HONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HONORABLE HONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC M US I C V VENUE ENUE HHONORABLE ONOR ABLE

THUR T HUR – S SEP EP 27 27

WEEKLY W EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS AFRO A FRO / WORLD WORLD / FFUNK UN K

AFROFUNK AFROFUNK EXPERIENCE EXPERIENCE

Doc Holliday’s Saloon Sep 28, Terry Sanders and the Black Market Blues. Mon, DJ Mixxxa. 138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.623.5453.

Flamingo Lounge Sep 28, Jeff Edwin’s Dance Band. Sep 29, B4 Dawn. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Sep 28, Pisma Trova. Sep 29, Honey B and the Pollinators. Sep 30, Chris Webster and Nina Gerber. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden Sep 26, Celtic Session. Sep 27, Wine Country Swing. Sep 28, Greenhouse. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Green Music Center 1029 Sep 26, Cliff Hugo. Oct 3, SSU Faculty Jazz Ensemble. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2122.

Hopmonk Tavern Sep 27, Juke Joint with Afrofunk Experience. Sep 29, Orgone. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Sep 27, Jon Gonzales. Sep 28, DJ Konnex. Last Saturday of every month, Good HipHop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Sep 26, Royal Dueces. Sep 27, Mike Compton. Sep 28, Jenny Kerr. Sep 29, David Thom Band. Sep 30, the Mighty Chiplings. Oct 1, Beso Negro and Shovelman. Oct 3, Blue Ribbon Healers. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

+A ACOUSTIC COUSTIC MINDS MINDS

Under the Sun

+S SUMMER UMMER FFIRE IRE D DANCE AN CE S SERIES ERIES FFINALE' I N ALE ' W WITH ITH SPACE SPACE PIRATES PIR ATES & RASA R ASA VITALIA VITALIA $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

Agent Orange, pre-retro

FRI F RI – S SEP EP 28

WEST W EST COUNTY COUNT Y & LLLLE LLE PRESENT PRESENT ROOTS R OOTS / SO SOUL UL / R ROCK O CK

By now, the effects described in Simon Reynolds’ much-discussed book Retromania: Pop Culture’s Addiction to Its Own Past have such omnipresence, they’re practically invisible. From retro soul to retro fashion to retro porn, we live in an era of perpetually living in the wrong era.

DANIEL D ANIEL BEDINGFIELD BEDINGFIE ELD &N NOVA ALBION OVA A LBION +M MALARKEY AL A R K E Y

$$15 15 A ADV/$18 DV/$18 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 66PM/21+ PM /21+

SAT S AT – SEP SEP 29 29

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS FFUNK UNK / BLUES BLUES / ROCK R O CK

ORGONE OR GONE

+D DJJ BIG BIG G (808 ( 808 B BAND) AN D ) $$10 10 //DOORS DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

S SUN UN – S SEP EP 30 30

When was the last time you saw a vintagefilter Instagram photo and thought, “Wow, that looks just like a photo from the 1960s,” instead of, “Looks like it was taken this afternoon”? Exactly. In the 1980s, though, everything was about the future. Near the end of the decade, a man even flew via jetpack at the Superbowl halftime show. Which made it all the weirder that at the beginning of the decade, a punk band, Agent Orange, had decided to excel at surf guitar instrumentals. Opening in dive clubs for bands like the Germs, the Circle Jerks and Black Flag, the band performed surf chestnuts like “Misirlou,” “Pipeline” and “Secret Agent Man.” Retro as we know it wasn’t a thing yet, especially in the punk scene, and many a mosh pit was started to music that was almost 20 years old. Agent Orange are still kicking, and play with Resilience, Bobby Adopted & the SelfInflicted Wounds, Killroy and Falcon A on Saturday, Sept. 29, at the Phoenix Theater. 201 E. Washington St., Petaluma. 8pm. $12. 707.762.3565.—Gabe Meline

HOPMONK H OPMONK + S SHMALTZ HMALTZ B BREWING R E WI N G C CO O PR PRESENT ESE NT

SHMALTZ S HMALTZ B BEER EER DINNER DIN NER6PM/21+ D DINNER INNER $$65/DOORS 65/ DOORS 6PM/21+

MON M ON – OCT OCT 1

WEEKLY W EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S REGGAE/DANCEHALL R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL

MONDAY M ONDAY N NIGHT IGHT EEDUTAINMENT DUT TAINMENT

DJ JACQUES DJ JACQUES & DJ DJ GUACAMOLE GUACAMOLE

$3 $ 3 RED RED STRIPES STRIPES & $4 $4 JAMESON JAMESON ALL ALL NIGHT NIGHT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+ TUES TUES – OCT OC T 2 WEEKLY W EE EK KLY E EVENT VENT HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT HOSTED HOSTED BY BY E EVAN VAN FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES THUR T HUR – OCT OCT 4 W WEEKLY EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS AFROBEAT A FROBEAT / FUNK FUNK / EELECTRO L EC T R O

WILL W ILL MAGID MAGID TRIO TRIO + CHANGO CHANGO B & MALARKEY MALARKEY $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

FRI F RI – O OCT CT 5

NORTH N O R TH B BAY AY H HOOTENANNY O OT E N A N N Y P PRESENTS R E SE NT S ROOTS R OOTS / SOULFUL SOULFUL / ROCK R O CK

PAT P AT JJORDAN ORDAN BAND BAND

+M MATHEW ATHEW ZELPZER ZELPZER & GIRLS GIRLS & BOYS BOYS $$10 10 //DOORS DOORS 8:30PM/21+ 8 : 30PM /21+

SAT S AT – OCT OCT 6

Last Day Saloon Sep 27, ‘Sonoma Songbirds’ with Jill Cohn, the Bootleg Honeys and Beautiful Weirdos. Sep 28, Tainted Love. Sep 29, Unauthorized Rolling Stones with Rudy Colombini Band. Sep 30, Bill Kirchen and Too Much Fun. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenanny’s Pick-Me-Up

Revue. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Sep 27, Three on a Match. Sep 28, Tonewoods. Sep 30, Kith and Kin. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS

Mystic Theatre Sep 27, Rock the Vote with Everfest and Fear the Few. Sep 28, Meiko and Bobby Long. Sep 30, Jimmie Vaughan & the Tilt-A-Whirl Band. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121. )

32

FOLK FO LK / BLUEGRASS BLUEGRASS / COUNTRY COUNTRY

HOUSTON HOUSTON JJONES ONES +S STEVIE TEVIE COYLE COYLE

$$13 13 ADV/$15 ADV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

UPCOMING U PCOMING EVENTS EVENTS Fri F ri S Sep ep 2 28 8

21+, 2 1+, 9–11:30pm 9 –11:30pm $10 $10 TTribute r ibu t e to t o aann EEra–60’s r a – 6 0 ’s B British r itish IInvasion n v a si o n

IINVASION NVASION Sat S at S Sep ep 2 29 9

18+ 18 + $ $10, 10, 21+ 21+ $5 $5

Country Co untry & T Top op 4 40s 0s Dance D anc e L Lesson e s son 8 8:30 :30

Sun S un Sep Sep 30 30 AAllll AAges, ges, 7–10pm, 7–10pm, FREE F RE E Blues/Acoustic B lues /Acoustic c o u s t ic P Pop/Southern op / S ou t her n A Alternative l t er na t i v e

LED

EL CY AN RICKY R ICC KY K ALAN ALA A L AN R RAY AY

Mon M on Oct Oc t 1

7 7–10pm, –10 p m, 1 18+ 8+

ULTIMATE U LTIMAT TE K KARAOKE ARAOKE LLive ive B Band and K Karaoke araoke 7 7-10 -10 ppm m aand nd

MONDAY NIGHT MONDAY NIGHT t h e bar bar FOOTBALL FO O TBA LL aatt the Tues T ue s Oct Oc t 2

1 18+ 8+

LGBT L GBT N Night i gh t

Coming C o m ing S Soon oon

Wed W ed O Oct c t 3 18+ 18 + $ $10, 10, 21+ 21+ $5 $5

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC WEDNESDAYS W EDNESDAYS One O ne L Love ove P Prod r od p presents r esen t s

DJ R DJ Relly e ll y R Rel el & Wine W ine Country C o un t r y P Pong ong $200 $ 20 0 G Guaranteed u a r a n t e e d Pot Po t

Thur T hur Oct O c t 4 118+ 8+ $ $10, 10, 21+ 21+ $5 $5

Country Co untry & T Top op 4 40s 0s Dance D anc e L Lesson e s son 8 8:30 :30

Fri F ri O Oct ct 5

2 21+ 1+ $5 $5 O Original r ig in al S Songs o ngs & C Classic la s si c R Rock’N ock ’N R Roll o ll

HARVEST H A RV ES T BAND B A ND D Sat S at Oct O c t 6 118+ 8+ $ $10, 10, 21+ 21+ $5 $5

Country Co untry & T Top op 4 40s 0s Dance D anc e L Lesson e s son 8 8:30 :30

Sun S un Oct Oc t 7 Country C ount r y R Rock, ock, A Americana meric ana & JJazz azz

NEW N EW S SKYE K YE Our O ur a awesome we s o me s sound ound s system, ystem, sprung and and s pacious dance dance ffloor, loor, sprung spacious unique iinternationally nternationally iinspired ns pi red p izzas, unique pizzas, 30 b ee rs o n ttap, ap, and and VIP VIP bottle bo t tle 30 beers on service are a re s ure to to give give you you and and your y ou r service sure party a great great night night out! out! party

Come C o me a and nd jjoin oin u us! s!

707.544.1562 7 0 7.5 4 4.15 62 397 3 97 A Aviation v ia t i on B Blvd. lvd. Suite Sui t e E Santa S an t a R Rosa osa ((Next Next to to Airport Airport C Cinema) inema)

www.maverickssantarosa.com w w w.maverickssant ar osa.com ffacebook.com/maverickssantarosa acebook.com/maverickssan t ar os o a Ma v e r i c k s N i gh t s L i ve: Mavericks Nights Live: facebook.com/MavericksNightsLive facebook.com/Maver icksNigh t sL i ve

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 –OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Aubergine

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

32

Music ( 31

Sculpture

Occidental Center for the Arts Sep 29, the Skerries. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Charles Fahlen

Phoenix Theater Sep 29, Agent Orange, Resilience, Killroy, Falcon A and Bobby Adopted & the Self-Inflicted Wounds. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

September 28– November 11, 2012 Artist Reception: September 29, 4–6pm

Quincy’s

Thick Night (detail) Metal & mixed media,43” X 39” X 5”, 2007

Quicksilver Mine Co. The

Sep 28, Citizen Flannel. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079. FIne Art Rotating Exhibitions Cultural Events

6671 Front Street/Hwy 116rDowntown Forestviller707.887.0799rquicksilvermineco.com

Redwood Cafe Sep 26, Prairie Sun. Sep 29, Kazamoze. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Russian River Brewing Co Sep 29, Gypsy Trio. Sep 29, Ian Scherer Birthday Bash featuring Gypsy Trio. Sep 30, Brothers of Siren. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Society: Culture House Thurs, Casa Rasta. Fourth Friday of every month, Kaleidoscope. Live art and DJs. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

George’s Nightclub Sep 28, 9pm, Johnny Allair & the Windshield Cowboys. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Stinson Beach Community Center Sep 28, Audrey Auld. 32 Belvedere Ave, Stinson Beach.

19 Broadway Club

Studio 55 Marin

Sep 26, Sonny Walker’s Tao of Rock. Sep 28, Trainwreck plus special guests. Sep 30, Cathey Cotten’s Allstar Evil Plan. Sep 30, Eddie Neon. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Sep 29, Paul McKenna Band and Comas. Sep 29, Loretta Lynch. 1455 East Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Old Western Saloon

Sep 27, Mustache Harbor. Sep 28, Zigaboo Modeliste. Sep 29, BlackHawk. Oct 1, Outlaws. Oct 3, Tracorum. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Sep 28, Agency El 84. Sep 29, Staggerwing. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Rancho Nicasio Sep 28, The New Crossection. Sep 29, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sleeping Lady Sep 27, Finch and friends. Sep 29, Tam Family featuring Greg Loiacono. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s

NAPA COUNTY Billco’s Billiards Sep 27, Me as an Island. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Sep 27, Brian Cline. Sep 28, Jinx Jones. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Sep 28, Elephant Listening Project. Sep 29, Savannah Blue. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Silo’s

Station House Cafe

Uptown Theatre

Sep 30, Nearly Beloved. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Sep 30, Aimee Mann. Oct 3, the Outlaws. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Sep 28, Mary Jenson. Sep 29, Revolver. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Spancky’s Sep 28, JD Bauman and the Boot Band. Sep 29, Trial by Combat, Mudface and Hellfire. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Sep 28, Joe Valley Band. Sep 29, Suk my Pepper. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Toad in the Hole Pub Sep 29, Flyover States. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds

@kËj c`b\ EGI¿ @kËjc`b\EGI¿ fe8Z`[ f e8Z`[ ) GFC@K@:J) G F C @K@ : J) C C@M<DLJ@: @M < D LJ @ : ) : :FD<;P) FD<;P) G GFG:LCKLI< FG:LCKLI< ) N NFIC;=8DFLJ>L<JKJ FIC;=8 8DFLJ>L<JKJ

*KF-#N<<B;8P * KF -#N<<B;8P # N<<B;8P 8=K<IEFFEJ 8=K<IEFFE 8= K<IEFFEJ FE(*,'8DBJIF F E (*, E( *,'8DBJIF ' 8D BJIF Kf Y \Zfd\ X ; i`m\ jg fejfi KfY\Zfd\X;i`m\jgfejfi ZfekXZk:Xk_pIXkkfXk Zf ekXZ k:Xk_pIXkkfXk ZXk_p%iXkkf7pX_ff%Zfd Z Xk_p% iXk kf7pX_ff%Zfd

@]>\fi^\:Xic`eXe[ @]>\fi^\:Xic`eXe[ ?lek\iJ%K_fdgjfe_X[ ? lek\i J% K_fdgjfe _X[ X YXYp#Jk\m\ AXofe nflc[ XYXYp#Jk\m\AXofenflc[ Y\k_Xkd`jZ_`\mfljb`[ÇXj Y \k_Xkd`jZ_`\mfljb`[ÇXj Zlii\ek Xj k_\ [Xpj _\X[$ Zlii\ekXjk_\[Xpj_\X[$ c`e\j#]leepXj_\cc#n`k__`j c`e\j#]leepXj _\ccc#n`k_ _`j Y\dlj\[flkiX^\Zfee\Zk\[ Y\dlj\[flkiX^\Zfee\Zk\[ kf Xe ldY`c`ZXc Zfi[ f] kfXeldY`c`ZXcZfi[f] Zfddfej\ej\% Zfddfej\ej\% ÇN`cc;lijk Ç N`cc ` ;lijk  &&A8OFE;I@M< A8O 8 OFE;I@M< F E; I@M<

Sep 26, Timothy O’Neil Band. Sep 28, Hellhounds. Sep 29, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band.

MARIN COUNTY

San Francisco’s City Guide

Beach House Floating in space and strumming instruments, Baltimore duo peddles in sonic landscapes. Sep 28 at the Fox Theater.

Harmony By the Bay Harmony Festival presents Shins, Alison Krauss, Jimmy Cliff, others in day-long fest. Sep 29 at Shoreline.

Hot Water Music Reunited punk band from Florida plays with Dead to Me and Heartsounds. Sep 30 at Slim’s.

Sonny Rollins

142 Throckmorton Theatre

Tenor saxophone colossus still playing live, soaring with ideas at age 82. Sep 30 at Davies Symphony Hall.

Sep 28, Tommy Igoe Big Band. Sep 29, Tom Rigney and Flambeau. Sep 30, Left Coast Chamber Ensemble. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Grouplove

Bolinas Community Center

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Sep 29, John Doe and Ramblin’ Jack Elliott. 14 Wharf Rd, Bolinas.

After Green Day canceled their show so Billie Joe could go to rehab, this is the second-best thing at the Fillmore. Oct 1 at the Fillmore.

33

Galleries OPENINGS Sep 26 At 5pm. Windsor Library, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Layers of Self,â&#x20AC;? fall art show from Windsor High School students. 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. 707.838.1020.

Sep 27 From 1-4pm. Finley Community Center, work ranging from amateur to professional local seniors. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Sep 29 At 4pm. Quicksilver Mine Co, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lyrical Complexities,â&#x20AC;? sculpture by Charles Fahlen, who died in 2010. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799. From 2-5pm, also on Sep 30, Gallery 1870, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tuscany Twilightâ&#x20AC;? features the works of Steven Quartly. 6525 Washington St, Yountville. 800.322.1870.

SONOMA COUNTY Corrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Through Oct 22, Art of over 50 ARTrails-participating artists on display. 637 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2424.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Oct 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Culture Shock!â&#x20AC;? with works by Becoming Independent and community artists. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Nov 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invitational Anniversary Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? featuring 25 international artists. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Sep 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Second Nature,â&#x20AC;? paintings and collages of Jenny Honnert Abell, reflects

on the abundance of the natural world. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

artists offers satirical slant on recession. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

University Art Gallery

Through Sep 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;All Things Orangeâ&#x20AC;? explores how artists purposefully incorporate orange into their medium. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Lavish Hi-Fi Sep 27, 5-10pm, Collection of Rolling Stonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rare recordings, concert films, art and other sundries. Free. 402 Moore Lane, Healdsburg. 707.433.9199.

Quercia Gallery Oct 1-29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fleeting Spaces,â&#x20AC;? pastel paintings by Jan Thomas and oil paintings by Cynthia Jackson-Hein. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

Quicksilver Mine Company Sep 28-Nov 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lyrical Complexities,â&#x20AC;? sculpture by Charles Fahlen, who died in 2010. Reception, Sep 29, 4pm. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Nov 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Going Going Gone,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Christine Kierstread. Through Nov 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invitational Show,â&#x20AC;? featuring work from 16 different artists. Through Nov 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vintage Portraits Tell Their Stories,â&#x20AC;? contemporary vintage photography by Stephanie Hamilton-Oravetz. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Slaughterhouse Space Through Oct 27, The slaughterhouse is the subject, with work by over 20 photographers and video artists made over the past month. 280 Chiquita Rd, Healdsburg. Sat, noon to 5, and by appointment. 707.431.1514.

Sonoma County Museum Through Nov 4, Offerings and shrines for DĂ­a de los Muertos on display. Through Nov 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Death and Taxes in Fantasylandia,â&#x20AC;? 2D work by Enrique Chagoya. Through Nov 4, Exhibit by Bay Area

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Events Through Oct 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sound Image Object,â&#x20AC;? 20 artists who make reference to music and sound in their work. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Windsor Library Sep 26-Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Layers of Self,â&#x20AC;? fall art show from Windsor High School students. Reception, Sep 26, 5pm. 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. Mon-Sat, 1 to 5. 707.838.1020.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Oct 1-31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Assemblages and Laddersâ&#x20AC;? features paintings by David Geisinger. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Gallery Bergelli Through Oct 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fall Group Showâ&#x20AC;? featuring work be gallery artists Alexandra Eldridge, Allen Wynn and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

The Hannah Gallery Through Nov 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Architects, Activists and Avengers: The Black Panther Party 1968,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Pirkle Jones and Ruth-Marion Baruch. 170 Donahue St, Marin. ThursSat, 1-5pm. 415.419.1605.

Osher Marin JCC Through Nov 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You Did What to My Comics!?!â&#x20AC;? papercuts by Isaac Brynjegard-Bialik. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Sep 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Journeys,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Claudia Marseille. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

Best Music Venue / Best Place for Singles to Meet THUR )SEPT 27 )10PM

4TH THURSDAYS HIP-HOP NIGHT FRI )SEPT 28 )9PM

TRAINWRECK

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS! SAT )SEPT 29 )9:30PM

ECHO Gallery Through Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Creatures,â&#x20AC;? sculptures, paintings, photos and drawings by six artists. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201. )

34

6SHFLDO*XHVW7KH)LHOG5HSRUW

:HG2FWREHU

7KH2XWODZV

 )UL2FWREHU HGWR 0RYLG \ $QHYHQLQJZLWK )U D

-DVRQ%RQKDP©V /HG=HSSHOLQ([SHULHQFH 6XQ2FWREHU

6WHYH9DL

STEPPIN UP SATURDAYS

6SHFLDO*XHVW%HYHUO\0F&OHOODQ

FRI )OCT 5 )9PM

5HQRZQHG3V\FKLF 6SLULWXDO7HDFKHU 6XQ2FWREHU

CAPLETON SAT )OCT 6 )9PM

BUCKETHEAD HOT UPCOMING ACTS

NAPA COUNTY

6XQ6HSWHPEHU

$LPHH0DQQ

10/19 MICHAEL LANDAU GLEN MATLOCK OF THE SEX PISTOLS SOUL PIE 10/20 IRISH FEIS 19BROADWAY.COM MUSIC HOTLINE 415.459.1091

TICKETS AVAILABLE WWW.19BROADWAY.COM

6DW2FWREHU

6\OYLD%URZQH

'DUN6WDU2UFKHVWUD 6XQ2FWREHU

6WDUV

7KXU2FWREHU

&ODQQDG

)UL2FWREHU

-RKQ0D\DOO

6SHFLDO*XHVW'-+DUU\'XQFDQ

3ODQQLQJDQHYHQW"&RQWDFWXVIRUUHQWDOLQIR

7KLUG6W1DSD_ ZZZXSWRZQWKHDWUHQDSDFRP

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 – O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

34 A E

( 33

Girls’ Day

The Queen of Versailles

Sep 29-30, 2-5pm, “Tuscany Twilight” features the works of Steven Quartly. 6525 Washington St, Yountville. 800.322.1870.

Event matches up local girls with female community leaders for activities and mentoring. Sep 29, 10am2pm. $25 per woman. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 1.800.564.SRJC.

Grand Hand Gallery

Sukkot

Spellbound

Through Oct 29, “Drawn from Nature,” drawings and sculptures by Maash Pascal and Patti Wessman. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Experience activities at the center all day, commemorating Jewish agricultural roots. Sep 30, 11:30am. Free. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Movie night in the park featuring Alfred Hitchcock’s classic thriller. Sep 28, 8pm. Donation. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

Sustainable Fairfax Benefit

Where Soldiers Come From

Advocacy group celebrates 11 years of community building with evening of dance, silent auctions, libations and music by the Treblemakers. Sep 29, 7-11pm. $15 advance, $20 at the door. Fairfax-San Anselmo Children’s Center, 199 Porteous Ave, Fairfax. 415.454.1811.

Documentary about returning veterans screens on Sep 28. $10. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Gallery 1870

Napa Valley Museum Through Sep 29, “Secret Life of Paper,” celebrating paper as an art medium. Includes work by Patti Brown, Deborah Donahower and others. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Robert Mondavi Winery Through Nov 4, “Metal Still Matters,” sculptures by Gordon Huether. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.968.2203.

Film

Laugh Local Funny Fest Sixth Street Improv and World’s Biggest Comedy Duo, comic magician Ken Garr and cabaret duo Sandy and Richard Riccardi. Sep 29, 8pm. $10$14. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

SF Comedy Competition Annual fest of laughs comes to Santa Rosa for elimination round. Sep 29, 8pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Colleen Watson Featuring Marco Antonio Alvarez, Matt Gubser, Duat Mai, Helen Pachynski. Sep 29, 8pm. $10. Christy’s on the Square, 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707-508-7220.

Events

Food & Drink Festa Italiana

Four police officers face uncertain danger every day, then come home to their families where true courage is needed. Sep 28, 7pm. Free. Shiloh Church, 170 Andrieux St, Sonoma.

With a focus on Italy’s Puglia region, this year’s festival features food, folk music and dancing, an auto show and bocce ball. Sep 30, 11am-6pm. $6 advance, $10 at the door. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Don’t Change the Subject

Redwood Empire Farmers Market

Darkly comic look at what happens when one man dares to ask questions about the dirtiest word in any language– suicide. Director Mike Stutz lectures afterward. Sep 26, 7pm. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Russian Tea & Music

Courageous

Comedy

Award-winning film documents billionaire family trying to cut back in the wake of an economic crisis. Sep 29, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows, Part 2 Movie night in the park featuring the conclusion of the Potter saga. Sep 29, 8pm. Donation. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

I Lost it at the Movies Series hosted by Mort Sahl features “Junior Bonner.” Sep 26, 7:30pm. $15 suggested donation. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Boat Rides & Barbecue

The Immature

Fundraiser and community builder with live music by the Waterfront Pickers. Thurs, Sep 27, 4:30pm. Free. Dunphy Park, Napa and Bridgeway, Sausalito.

Foreign comedy screens as part of the Italian Film Festival. Sep 29, 5:30 and 7:45pm. $14. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Sat, 9am-noon and Wed, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. Enjoy tea prepared in antique samovars, view heirloom Russian artifacts and listen to the music of Gradina. Sep 30, 10am-5pm. $9.50. Russian River Rose Company, 1685 Magnolia Dr, Healdsburg. 707.575.6744.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Candidate Forum Congressional candidates for the 2nd District Jared Huffman (D) and Dan Roberts (R) address voter concerns. Sep 26, 7pm. Free. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Frank Romano Author of “Storm Over Morocco,” “Love and Terror in the Middle East,” and more in conversation with columnist Chris Smith. Sep 26, 7pm. Free. Santa Rosa High School, 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

French Presidential Elections UC Berkeley professor Jonah Levy speaks on what France’s election of a socialist president means for the United States. Sep 27, 7:30pm. $5. Spring Lake Village Auditorium, 5555 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa.

Opera Preview Lecture

‘QUIBBLE’ Mixed-media sculpture by Charles Fahlen is Sonoma County Chapter at Quicksilver Mine Co. through Nov. 11. See Openings, p33. of San Francisco Opera Guild hosts preview lecture on Bellini’s opera “Capuletti e Montecchi” by Dr Mary Ann to Settle Down” with Andrew including synthetic biology, Smart. Wine, coffee and McCarthy. Sep 28, 7pm, “Dark shamanistic culture in the refreshments. Sep 27. $10. Companion” with Marta Acosta. rainforest, digital technology’s Charles M Schulz Museum, Sep 29, 4pm, “Unknown World: impact on the brain and more. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Notes on the Meaning of the Sep 27, 5:30pm. $75. Osher 707-539-1220. Earth” with Jacob Needleman. Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, Positive Aging Sep 29, 7pm, “Gods Like Us: On San Rafael. 415.444.8000. Training Movie Stardom and Modern Tell Midlife Body Discussion on how the Fame” with Ty Burr. Oct 2, 7pm, Blues to Take a Hike convergence of the longevity “Bamboo Women: Stories Women-only seminar revolution and the boomer-age from Ming Quong, a Chinese encourages women over 50 wave is changing our world. Orphanage in California” with to feel good about themselves Sep 30, 10:30am. Free. Council Nona Mock Wyman. Oct 3, 7pm, and their body image. Sep on Aging Conference Room, “Reinventing Bach,” with Paul 27, 6pm. Meadowcroft Wines, 30 Kawana Springs Rd, Santa Elie. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte 23574 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. Rosa. Madera. 415.927.0960. 707.934.4090. REBECC Forum

Second annual event for the Redwood Empire Built Environment Collaborative Committee focuses on design engineering and construction. Sep 28, 11:30am-2:30pm. $25. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Stars: Same, Yet Different

Lectures Acting in Animation Pixar Animation Studios’ animator Austin Madison shows the work that goes into bringing an animated character to life. Sep 29, 10am.

Explore what stars have in common and how they differ. Through Sep 30. $5-$8. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall 2001, 1502 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

TEDx Marin Very smart, passionate people speak on range of topics

Coffee Catz

Readings Robert Hass Marin Poetry Festival, Celebration features acclaimed poet with Gillian Conoley and Giovanni Singleton, among others. Oct 3, 7pm. $10 suggested donation. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Book Passage Sep 27, 5:30pm, “Japanese Farm Food” with Nancy Singleton Hachisu. Sep 27, 7pm, “The Longest Way Home: One Man’s Quest for the Courage

Fourth Thursday of every month, 6pm, Sebastopol Great Books discussion group. 707.829.5643. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Sep 26, 4pm, “Llama Llama Time to Share” with Anna Dewdney. Sep 26, 7pm, “San Miguel” with T. C. Boyle. Sep 27, 7pm, “Because You Have To” with Joan Frank. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Sep 27, 7am, “The Casual Vacancy” breakfast release (Ms.

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Sebastopol Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books

35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Sep 26, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fire Monksâ&#x20AC;? with Colleen Morton Busch. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.2618.

Ftubuf!Kfxfmsz F tu buf!Kf xfmsz

Petaluma Library Sep 29, 1pm, 100 Thousand Poets for Change. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma 707.763.9801.

X F!CVZ!ZPVS!HPME!'!EJBNPOET

Ofx!Usfbtvsft!! Xfflmz

Share Exchange

!!41.61&

Sep 29, 11am-12pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Journey to Oneâ&#x20AC;? with Kristi Bowman. 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa 707.393.1431.

100 Thousand Poets for Change makes its mark â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poetry is not a luxury,â&#x20AC;? Audre Lorde once wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a vital necessity of our existence.â&#x20AC;?

Rowling will, sadly, not be in attendance, but there will be pastries and coffee). Sep 27, 10am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Llama, Llama, Time to Shareâ&#x20AC;? with Anna Dewdney. Sep 28, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Throne of Glassâ&#x20AC;? with Sarah

J. Maas. Oct 3, 2pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Great Unexpectedâ&#x20AC;? with Sharon Creech. Oct 3, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mindfulness in the Gardenâ&#x20AC;? with Zachiah Murray. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Event features reading and discussion of Ika HugelMarshallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s autobiography â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invisible Woman: Growing Up Black in Germanyâ&#x20AC;? and screening of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years 1984-1992.â&#x20AC;? Sep 27, noon-7pm. Free. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park 707.664.2880.

Whole Foods Market Sep 29, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Plats du Jourâ&#x20AC;? with Sondra Bernstein. 3682 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa 707.224.6300.

Theater The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Musical comedy featuring six adolescents and three adults in a spelling bee. Features the unforgettable song, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Unfortunate Erection.â&#x20AC;? Times vary. Fri-Sun through Sep 30. $30. Napa Valley Playhouse, 1637 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.5483.

Bad Penny Site-specific play unfolds as characters interact over the lake. Oct 3-14, 11am, 12, 2 and 5pm. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Do You Know the Secret? Evening of Broadway tunes performed by Napa Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most talented singers. Oct 1, 7pm. $75. Napa Valley Playhouse, 1637 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.5483.

YPsjhjobm!Boujrvf!up!Npefso!Eftjhot ! YXfeejoh!'!Boojwfstbsz!Cboet YMpdbmmz!Pxofe 

498!Ifbmetcvsh!Bwfovf 2!cmpdl!Opsui!pg!uif!Ifbmetcvsh!Qmb{b 818/4:6/1966 xxx/tipqEFK/dpn ! Tbo!Gsbodjtdp! Ifbmetcvsh!

s FURNITURE s FRUIT LABELS s GARDEN ANTIQUES s

Friends donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let friends miss this place!

A huge place to browse! Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Fido friendly!

Coffee, tea & bakery, here too!

Antique Society 100 dealers! Our 23rd year!

On Sebastopolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Antique Row (Hwy 116) 'RAVENSTEIN(WY3s

TOYS & DOLLS s ARTS & CRAFTS s POST MODERN

100 Thousand Poets for Change, which started last year as the brainchild of Guerneville-based poets Michael Rothenberg and Terri Carrion (pictured), takes Lordeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s words to heart. Spanning the globe and transcending cultural boundaries, the second annual event brings together poets, musicians and artists across the world for a simultaneous demonstration of â&#x20AC;&#x153;poetry, music and art to promote social, environmental and political change.â&#x20AC;? Thus far. 800 events and 115 countries have been conďŹ rmed for happenings all over the world on Sept. 29. In New York, there will be an Occupy Wall Street poetry reading at St. Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place. Greece, Afghanistan, Egypt, England and Jamaica are among the participating countries. The headquarters in Santa Rosa is the Arlene Francis Center. Running all weekend, the festival features a mix of poetry and live performance from the likes of Dubtown Dread, Jim Corbett, iHOP Slam poets, Sol Flamenco, Steve Pile Band, Moss Henry, the Crux, Ed Coletti and the Hubbub Club. There will be group meditations, workshops, and hip-hop ďŹ&#x201A;amenco, salsa and folk dancing. 100 Thousand Poets for Change happens Sept. 28â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sept.30 at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Free. 305.753.4569. For a full list of events, see www.100TPC.org.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

Audre Lourde Legacy Festival

LIGHTING s KITCHEN TOOLS s ARCHITECTURAL s GLASS

Poetic Justice

Pgg

Wed, Sep 26 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SINGLES & PAIRS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Thur, Sep 27 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Sep 28 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther presents MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK 'N ROLL

Sat, Sep 29 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance

www.ANTIQUESOCIETY.com

@cdlV \VniZZc4 Hjeedgi^c\ndji] V\Zh&'Ă&#x201E;')

Sun, Sep 30 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30-5:30pm; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING

Tues, Oct 2 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Mon, Oct 1

The Elephant Man

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

Alive Stage Productions presents version of the )

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

36

,%,#*+-#*-(% lll#edh^bV\Zh#dg\

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Art PAID ADVERTISING SECTION

Gallery

36

7),$02!9%2 !UGUSTTHROUGH3EPTEMBER

7ATERCOLORSAND!CRYLICSBY3ANDY%ASTOAK The Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Search

A E

( 35

David Lynch classic. Sep 28Oct 14, 2 and 8pm. $25. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Geezer Geoff Hoyleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 75-minute exploration of what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like to grow old and face mortality. Sep 29, 8pm. $12-$26. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

The Great American Trailer Park Musical When Pippi, the stripper on the run, comes between the Dr Phil-loving, agoraphobic Jeannie and her tollbooth collector husband the storms begin to brew. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Sep 30. $15-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Laramie Project: 10 Years Later

April 29 to June 24 4HROUGH3EPTEMBER

Epilogue focuses on the longterm effects of the murder of Matthew Shepard on Laramie and on the nation as a whole. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Oct 7. $15-$20. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500.

150 N. Main St. Sebastopol 707-823-4256 829-7200 Sebastopol Gallery 150 North Main Street

Exhibiting a diverse selection of unusual antique, modern and contemporary artworks.

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma 707.781.7070 calabigallery.com

A Midsummer Nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dream Robert Currier directs outdoor production set in Hawaii where the scent of hibiscus and twang of ukuleles will permeate Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story of lunatics, lovers and poets. Dates and times vary. Through Sep 30. $20-$35. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Tapas Short Play Festival

)\LMFMXMSR SJ%RXMUYI 1I\MGER 4VMRXW %RH 'MX][MHI %PXEVWERH )ZIRXW 4)8%091%%687')28)6

,SYVW ÂŚTQ 'PSWIH  [[[TIXEPYQEEVXWGIRXIVSVK 8YIW ;IH 0EOIZMPPI7X4IXEPYQE

Call today to advertise! 707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Plays include: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clowns,â&#x20AC;? by Conrad Bishop and Elizabeth Fuller; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gail and Peter,â&#x20AC;? by Carol S. Lashof; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Standing Room Only,â&#x20AC;? by Aren Haun; and others. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Oct 21. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Topdog / Underdog 2002 Pulitzer winner follows brothers Lincoln and Booth, trapped in a dangerous sparring match fueled by poverty, face, family history and even their names. Sep 27-Oct 21, 1, 2, 7, 7:30 and 8pm. $36-$57. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Occupy Theater â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Other Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Moneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; a timely Wall Street tale

Lawrence GarďŹ nkle is a monster. Crude, lascivious, avaricious and greedy, the chief antagonist in Jerry Sternerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sharp-sighted play Other Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Money (played by Keith Baker, in one of the best performances of the year) is also playful, fun-loving and brutally honest. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a likable monster, which makes Other Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Money such a complex and entertaining ride. Directed by Elizabeth Craven, the play is a cynical fable for the Occupy generation, the story of a New England company ďŹ ghting to avoid takeover by the ruthless GarďŹ nkle, a Wall Street businessman known as Larry the Liquidator. Chomping on doughnuts and cackling like a randy rooster, GarďŹ nkle goes head-to-head with the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s principled president, Andrew Jorgenson (John Craven, excellent), and the ďŹ ery-sexy lawyer (Laura Lowry) he hires to outsmart GarďŹ nkle at his own game. The high-stakes cat-and-mouse action takes place on a clever turntable set that spins from Jorgensonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cramped New England factory to GarďŹ nkleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s upscale New York office. Timely and troubling, Other Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Money is wickedly funny, savagely realistic and monstrously good. It runs Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday through Oct. 6 at Main Stage West. 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol. Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday, 8pm; Sunday, 5pm matinee. $17â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.823.0177.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;David Templeton

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH

BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

ŵŹ

›`dgifm\pfli ]c\o`Y`c`kp ›`eZi\Xj\ pfli\e\i^p

MARGERY SMITH , CMT 707.544.9642

> Personal Service > New everyday discounts > Widest selection of edibles > Bonus for new members and referrals M, T, F 10am–5pm; W, Th 10am–7pm Highway 101 at Steele Lane 2425 Cleveland Ave, Suite 175

707.526.2800

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26- OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

THAI MASSAGE

Astrology

ŵź NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 26- O CTO BE R 2, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of September 26

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Here’s the curious message I derived from the current astrological configurations: It’s one of those rare times when a wall may actually help bring people together. How? Why? The omens don’t reveal that specific information. They only tell me that what seems like a barrier might end up serving as a connector. An influence that in other situations would tend to cause separation will in this case be likely to promote unity. Capitalize on this anomaly, Aries! TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

In my first dream last night, I gave you a holy book that you left out in the rain. In my second dream, I cooked you some chicken soup that you didn’t eat. My third dream was equally disturbing. I assigned you some homework that would have helped you discover important clues about tending to your emotional health. Alas, you didn’t do the homework. In the morning, I woke up from my dreams feeling exasperated and worried. But later I began to theorize that maybe they weren’t prophecies, but rather helpful warnings. Now that you’ve heard them, I’m hoping you will become alert to the gifts you’ve been ignoring and take advantage of the healing opportunities you’ve been neglecting.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) There’s a good chance that your rhythm in the coming days will resemble a gentle, continuous orgasm. It won’t be stupendously ecstatic, mind you. I’m not predicting massive eruptions of honeyed bliss that keep blowing your mind. Rather, the experience will be more like a persistent flow of warm contentment. You’ll be constantly tuning in to a secret sweetness that thrills you subliminally. Again and again you will slip into a delicious feeling that everything is unfolding exactly as it should be. Warning! There are two factors that could possibly undermine this blessing: (1) if you scare it away with blasts of cynicism; or (2) if you get greedy and try to force it to become bigger and stronger. So please don’t do those things! CANCER (June 21–July 22)

ArtQuest Shadowing Program Begins Oct. 10 By Appointment Only 707.535.4842

Philosopher Jonathan Zap (zaporacle.com) provides the seed for this week’s meditation: “Conscious reflection on the past can deepen the soul and provide revelations of great value for the present and future. On the other hand, returning to the past obsessively out of emotional addiction can be a massive draining of vitality needed for full engagement with the present.” So which will it be, Cancerian? One way or another, you are likely to be pulled back toward the old days and the old ways. I’ll prefer it if you re-examine your history and extract useful lessons from the past instead of wallowing in dark nostalgia and getting lost in fruitless longing.

LEO (July 23–August 22) Picture a TV satellite dish on the roof of a peasant’s shack in rural Honduras. Imagine a gripping rendition of Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata played on the mandolin. Visualize the Dalai Lama quoting Chris Rock a bit out of context but with humorous and dramatic effect. Got all that? Next, imagine that these three scenes are metaphors for your metaphysical assignment in the coming week. Need another hint? OK. Think about how you can make sure that nothing gets lost in the dicey translations you’ll be responsible for making. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

Here are some ways to get more respect: 1. Do your best in every single thing you do—whether it’s communicating precisely or upholding the highest possible standards at your job or taking excellent care of yourself. 2. Maintain impeccable levels of integrity in everything you do—whether it’s being scrupulously honest or thoroughly fair-minded or fiercely kind. 3. On the other hand, don’t try so compulsively hard to do your best and cultivate integrity that you get self-conscious and obstruct the flow of your natural intelligence. 4. Make it your goal that no later than four years from now you will be doing what you love to do at least 51 percent of the time. 5. Give other people as much respect as you sincerely believe they deserve. 6. Give yourself more respect.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) The German poet and philosopher Friedrich von Schiller liked to

have rotting apples in his desk drawer as he worked; the scent inspired him. Agatha Christie testified that many of her best ideas came to her while she was washing dishes. As for Beethoven, he sometimes stimulated his creativity by pouring cold water over his head. What about you, Libra? Are there odd inclinations and idiosyncratic behaviors that in the past have roused your original thinking? I encourage you to try them all this week, and then see if you can dream up at least two new ones. You have officially entered the brainstorming season.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

It’s expensive for the U.S. to hold prisoners at its Guantanamo Bay detention camp in Cuba: $800,000 per year for each detainee. That’s 30 times more than it costs to incarcerate a convict on the American mainland. According to the Miami Herald, Guantanamo is the most expensive prison on the planet. How much do you spend on locking stuff up, Scorpio? What does it cost, not just financially but emotionally and spiritually, for you to keep your secrets hidden and your fears tamped down and your unruly passions bottled up and your naughty urges suppressed? The coming weeks would be a good time to make sure the price you pay for all that is reasonable—not even close to being like Guantanamo.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) What time is it, boys and girls? It’s Floods of Fantastic Gratitude Week, a perfect opportunity to express your passionate appreciation for everything you’ve been given. So get out there and tell people how much you’ve benefited from what they’ve done for you. For best results, be playful and have fun as you express your thanks. By the way, there’ll be a fringe benefit to this outpouring: by celebrating the blessings you already enjoy, you will generate future blessings. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Telling the whole deep truth and nothing but the whole deep truth isn’t necessarily a recipe for being popular. It may on occasion provoke chaos and be disruptive. In an institutional setting, displays of candor may even diminish your clout and undermine your ambitions. But now take everything I just said and disregard it for a while. This is one of those rare times when being profoundly authentic will work to your supreme advantage. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) “Show me the money” is a meme that first appeared in the 1996 movie Jerry Maguire. It has been uttered approximately a hundred trillion times since then. Have you ever said it in earnest? If so, you were probably demanding to get what you had been promised. You were telling people you wanted to see tangible proof that they valued your efforts. In light of your current astrological omens, I propose that you use a variation on this theme. What you need right now is less materialistic and more marvelous. Try making this your mantra: “Show me the magic.” PISCES (February 19–March 20)

My acquaintance Jacob fell for a woman who also professed her ardor for him. But in the midst of their courtship, as the mystery was still ripening, she suddenly left the country. “I’ve got to go to Indonesia,” she texted him one night, and she was gone the next day. Jacob was confused, forlorn, dazed. He barely ate for days. On the sixth day, a FedEx package arrived from her. It contained a green silk scarf and a note: “I wore this as I walked to the top of the volcano and said a five-hour prayer to elevate our love.” Jacob wasn’t sure how to interpret it, although it seemed to be a good omen. What happened next? I haven’t heard yet. I predict that you will soon receive a sign that has resemblances to this one. Don’t jump to conclusions about what it means, but assume the best.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

ŵŻ

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1.800.405.7619 EXT 2450 www.easyworkjobs.com

Miscellaneous

Experienced Caregiver LAPTOP, Computer, LCD Panel to Elderly. Live-In. Background check available & references. 15 years experience, excellent cook, good driver, skilled care, reasonable rates.aelinorluick.wordpress.com 207.585.2018.

$249, $99, $55- Like New! CRC Computer Repair Center, 3227 Santa Rosa Ave, 95407. FREE checkup, expert laptop repair, tune-up, spyware removal. 9am–5pm, Tues–Sat. 707.528.8340.

Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1.800.925.7945

g Adult Entertainment

Place your Health & Well-Being ad here.

Adult Massage

A Wild Irish Rose Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No calls from blocked phone #. Kara, 415.233.2769.

Call 707.527.1200 x215 today!

Alternative Health&Well-Being g Chiropractic

NOW OPEN Therapeutic Massage Center Body Massage $55/hr Open 7 days 9-10pm

g g 707.578.3088

Foot Massage $19.99/45 min 2460 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa

SPIRITUAL

Connections

Finding inspiration and connecting with your community Unity of Santa Rosa presents: An inclusive, spiritually-minded community. All are welcome. Workshops and events. Sunday School & Service 10:30 a.m. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy tel:707.542.7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

Massage & Relaxation

Healing & Bodywork

Therapeutic Healing Massage & Energy Awakening

*Custom Massage*

Certified Therapist Kneads You! Private incall. Blondie. 707.322.7230.

Allow yourself the gift of deep A Safe Place relaxation and energy reTo Be Real newal. Good for the heart, soul, mind, and physical vital- Holistic tantric masseuse. ity. 18 yrs exp. Rachael, LMT, Unhurried, private, heartfelt. Mon–Sat. Summer Discount. 707.824.0894 Please call after 10:30am. 707.793.2232.

STRONG/THOROUGH/ HEALING 30 yrs. experience. $25/1/2hr. back/shoulder/neck, $50hr Full Body. INFO: www.colingodwin.blogspot.com 707.823.2990

Guilty Pleasure? NOT!!! “Your pleasure, my business.” Women, men, couples,..by a gentleman. Since 1991. Aft/eve appts. 707.799.4467(C) or 707.527.9497 (L) Jimmy.

RELAX! Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 12 yrs. experience. 707.542.6856.

Great Massage By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883.

VIVI

MASSAGE STUDIO FOOT REFLEXOLGY THERAPEUTIC BODY MASSAGE

707.981.7128

620 E. Washington St. Suite 208, Petaluma

LILY’S CHINESE MASSAGE 8Vaa[dgHeZX^VaD[[Zgh

,%,#,'%#,+*, ).',HdcdbV=ln&' HiZ#9!HVciVGdhV DeZc9V^an&%Ä.

;ddiBVhhV\Z  '*$&]g ,%,#)((#*---(,=ZVaYhWjg\6kZ =ZVaYhWjg\

Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Visa/MC accepted. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount.

Workshops Rocks and Clouds Zendo – Rohatsu Sesshin

Man of Your Dreams

Seven Day Meditation Retreat. Sat Dec 1–Sat Dec 8. Email us with any questions: dterra@sonic.net. Find us on the web: www.rocksandclouds.org or call 707.824.5647

Men, women, couples. TLC, massage, Tantra, nurturing mutual touch. William 707.548.2187

Rocks and Clouds Zendo Zazenkai One Day Meditation Retreat

g Psychics

PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

Sun. Oct 21 at 6:00am to 4:00pm Email us with any questions @ daterra@sonic.net Find us on the web @ www.rocksandclouds.org ]www.rocksandclouds.org Or call 707.824-5647

Win Free

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 26- OCTOBE R 2, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Employment

Family Services

REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGR AM

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxycontin and Vicodin using Methadone.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to help you help yourself.

â&#x20AC;˘ Subutex/Suboxone available â&#x20AC;˘ Confidentiality assured

1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 â&#x20AC;˘ www.srtp.net

www.Stand-UpComedyWorkshop.com SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Local classes & coaching, plus over Internet Safe Oxycontin, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal! Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

â&#x20AC;˘ Providing Treatment since 1984 â&#x20AC;˘ MediCal accepted

Guitar Lessons w/ Hank Levine formerly w/Collins & Levine Band All ages. Super patient, fun, creative, positive & nurturing 707.583.6386

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BUY, SELL, TRADE 707.546.4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

Move In Specials

LAW OFFICE OF HEATHER BURKE Crime and DUI Defense, Local, Aggressive Call 707.820.7408 or www.hburkelegal.com

Donate Your Auto 800.322.4234 We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not. Live operatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; 7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

&OUFS UP 8JO B   7PMDBOP 7BQPSJ[FS 5FYU 1FBDFQJQF UP  CZ  .VTU CF  ZFBST XJUI WBMJE *%

5 X 10â&#x20AC;Ś

starting as low as $ 30 per month

10 X 10â&#x20AC;Ś

starting as low as $ 75 per month

We sell boxes, packaging and other moving supplies

3205 Dutton Ave | 1435 Sebastopol Ave Santa Rosa | Locally Owned & Operated

Horti-Tech LLC, Specializing in Master Light Control, Ballast and Fluorescent Repair Josh Guttig, email - jgutt7@yahoo.com or call 707.364.1540

707-546-0000 707-578-3299

1FBDFQJQF  4BOUB 3PTB "WF 4BOUB 3PTB  *O UIF #SJHIU #MVF #MEH

BECOME A YOGA TEACHER in 6 extended weekends at Ananda Seva ashram in Santa Rosa, Octâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;March. Visit: www.anandaseva.org/yoga/yoga-teacher-training or call Gayatri 707.239.3650.

PEACE IN MEDICINE IS NOW OPEN IN SANTA ROSA 1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Great Prices! Visit our online menu at â&#x20AC;&#x201D; www.PeaceinMedicine.org

 (SBWFOTUFJO )XZ $PUBUJ

 UIFQFBDFQJQFTNPLFTIPQDPN

Plant Sale-Oct. 13th- CA Native Plant Society 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1pm Santa Rosa Veteran`s Memorial Hall Trees, shrubs, perennials, bulbs, seeds & books for sale!

MJLF VT PO

Golden Star Grafix Need a quality designer? business cards, brochures, flyers, posters, digital collage, cd covers, photographic restoration & collages general marketing materials. Mark Schaumann 707.795.0924 schaumann1@earthlink.net

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

â&#x20AC;˘Led by Dr. Hanya Barth â&#x20AC;˘Real Careâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Real Doctors â&#x20AC;˘24/7 Safe Verification â&#x20AC;˘Totally Confidential

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Match Any Local Price

Quality ID Cards

1.707.568.0420

www.GREEN215.com

Downtown Santa Rosa: 741 5th St @ E St

It just clicks. The new Bohemian.com


1239_BO