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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Whoopee!

We saved the parks—now what? BY BRUCE ROBINSON

E

ven as the myriad nonprofits, “Friends of” and surviving park rangers and administrators wrestle with the long-term issues involved in keeping the gates open at California’s long list of endangered state parks, we the public users of these facilities need to adjust our expectations. Because even before the revelations of the past weekend surfaced, the seams were visibly starting to unravel.

A recent weekend visit to Armstrong Grove (which was not one of the parks on the governor’s hit list) found the park bustling with visitors, but revealed a dispiriting series of cutbacks. • A popular group picnic area was closed, its access bridge missing the railing on one side. • The only urinal at one men’s room was wrapped in plastic, awaiting repairs. • Trash and recycling bins quickly filled to overflowing. • Notices were posted in all the restrooms, explaining that “California’s state parks are experiencing budget cuts and will no longer be able to supply paper towels.” • Access roads and trails to the Austin Creek Recreation area were posted with warnings that the campground there was closed. None of this is enough to spoil the experience of walking beneath the soaring canopy of the ancient and magnificent trees. But it does tarnish the awe and reverence that this natural cathedral evokes. And it underscores the obvious: that auctions, bake sales, benefit barbecues and concerts, no matter how well-intentioned and enthusiastically supported, simply cannot back fill the gaping budgetary crater into which our beloved parks are slowly disappearing. And an unreported $53 million tucked away in a misguided bureaucrat’s rainy-day fund won’t—can’t—change that. What it will change is the overamped political rhetoric around the November ballot measures that seek to boost income for vital public service needs across the state, parks among them. The acolytes of Grover Norquist adhere to his call to “starve the beast” of government. Another beast, California’s Golden Bear, is the symbol for out parks. Look carefully and you can see the bony ribs poking through its tattered fur. It’s not a pretty sight. Bruce Robinson is news director at KRCB. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Knives and All

I live in Sausalito and I love the character that anchor-outs bring to this area (“The Anchor-Outs,” July 18). The author of this article did an excellent job showing the perils, humor and grit of this group of people.

MARIA FINN Sausalito

Another Path In regard to “Not About God” (“Rhapsodies and Rants,” July 18), the writer claims that ending a monopoly held by 12 Step programs as the only form of “treatment” available to courtordered drunk drivers and victims of drug law “justice” is somehow unfair and counterproductive. The new approach allows choice in a variety of treatment options. 12 Step programs are still an option, just not the only one. The writer states that the “12 Step process has proven itself for many years as the most successful recovery tool there is today.” This myth is as pervasive as the many slogans and platitudes that circulate endlessly and exclusively as answers to all of life’s problems among the more absolutist, cult-minded members. To them, abstract critical thought and existential doubts are simply manifestations of “stinkin’ thinkin” or “the disease.” Others in the program read between the lines, take things with a grain of salt and are open to and practice critical thought, including rational criticism of the program. If lifelong abstinence from recreational drug use—coffee and tobacco greatly excepted—is the measure of success, the program is a dismal failure statistically. This is how the program measures itself, lifelong total abstinence. Secular programs may avoid both the “spiritual” and “disease theory” approaches entirely. These programs have a statistical success rate, I believe, as high at least as does NA/AA. So does

no treatment at all.

Many people have gone to or through AA/NA and benefited, and in more ways than just achieving drug/ alcohol abstinence. Some have remained abstinent after discovering they enjoyed life to its fullest that way. It works great for some people, but not for everyone. It kills some people. I have witnessed this. At least one study suggests that AA members are more likely to engage in binge drinking upon cessation of abstinence than are those outside of AA. It is suggested that this is a result of the promotion of all alcoholism as “terminal disease” in AA. I was a drug-abstinent member of NA for eight years. I chose a more crooked path after that. My experience in NA was very good overall. And the crooked path I have walked since is tempered with more maturity, self-respect and self-restraint than before I kicked a long-term heroin, methadone, heroin again and then speedball (heroin and cocaine) habit 26-plus years ago. I kicked on my own, at home and work, with a full-time job. I went to NA on my own. I was not court-ordered. The NA literature alluded to people like me in stating that the success of NA should not be judged entirely on its numerical or statistical achievement of individuals maintaining complete lifelong drug abstinence, but also on the positive effect “spiritually” NA also had on some of those who “relapsed.” Some who took up drug use again no longer exhibited the negative or antisocial behavior previously associated with their using. A “kind of honesty” had permeated their characters. This was written by NA’s founder, Jimmy Kinnon, based on empirical observation.

In the 1980s, this politically and therapeutically incorrect observation was removed from NA literature and replaced with absolutism. A rational criticism of 12 Step programs and 12 Step history, information about objective studies of 12 Step efficacy, statistical success rates and a list of alternative secular recovery programs can be found at www.orange-papers.org.

NAME WITHHELD BY REQUEST Healdsburg

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Water-Thirsty in the Apocoplex Southern California shouldn’t get any more water from anywhere else until there is a moratorium on lawns for new houses. There is almost no effort to conserve water there. I was born in SoCal, and as far back as the early ’70s I was troubled by the waste. L.A. has plenty of water already, and it is cheap. People worry about gas prices and electric bills, but no one worries about their water bill, so conservation is practically nil, both at the personal and public level (though I do meet a few mindful people there). When you y over the L.A. apocoplex, you can’t ignore the tens of thousands of unused pools evaporating away and the water-hungry perfect lawns. We’ve seen Chinatown. History is repeating.

TIM ZIESMER Graton

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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Paper NEED HELP OUT? Abandoned shopping carts along Santa Rosa Avenue underscore the need for closer grocery stores.

Express Lane Santa Rosa aims to speed approval of grocery stores in ‘food desert’ BY JAY SCHERF

M

ark Moose walks quickly. He’s got to; since his truck was stolen a while back, his legs and rides from friends have been his only transportation, including to and from work as a tree trimmer. But Santa Rosa Avenue is long, and Moose lives far from the strip malls to the north.

For Moose, then, getting groceries means walking to Santa Rosa Liquor and Deli and seeing what’s in stock. “There’s not much variety, that’s for sure,” Moose says, hinting at understatement. And Moose is by no means alone. The USDA calculates that inside the area roughly formed by Petaluma Hill Road, Highway 101, Highway 12 and Mountain View Avenue, 2,600 people have poor access to affordable, healthy

food; 400 of those are low-income, according to the census. The USDA defines the area as a “food desert,” the poorest of three such designations in the North Bay, meaning many besides Moose rely on gas stations and liquor stores for provisions. Brittany Thompson of Santa Rosa Liquor and Deli sees customers buying their daily necessities all the time, adding, “Pretty much everyone who ) 10 shops here is a regular.”

Be My Neighbor

Gabe Meline

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

After years of sitting behind curtained windows, cloistered by the televisionaddled nuclear family, it seems that people are starting to actually care about honest-to-goodness neighborhoods again. For those who wish that the obnoxious family living next door would take a long walk off a short pier, this might be bad news. But for those who love bike parades, block parties, neighborhood-watch enthusiasm and the open opportunity to borrow sugar and eggs, the renewed popularity of good, oldfashioned ’hoods is welcome. To celebrate this renewed spirit, the Neighborhoods Summit Partnership hosts the Festival of Neighborhoods this weekend. Booths, games and chances to meet your neighbors abound at the Festival of Neighborhoods on Sunday, July 29, in Courthouse Square. Fourth Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. Noon–4pm. Free. 707.483.5730.

Charred & Feathered Biochar is a relatively simple and inexpensive technology that might just have hugely positive effects. Basically a soil enhancer, biochar is the end result when agricultural waste is processed into a fine-grained, highly porous charcoal that helps soil retain nutrients and water, according to the International Biochar Initiative. This month, the 2012 U.S. Biochar Conference, featuring speakers on food security, climate change and environmental degradation, takes place on the SSU Campus. The conference runs from July 29 to Aug. 1 at Sonoma State University. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. Ticket prices range from $95 to $225; a movie, Symphony of the Soil, screens for free on Monday, July 30. See www.biochar.us.com. —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Grocery Stores ( 8 In a rare respite from intercouncil bickering, the Santa Rosa City Council unanimously agreed to amend Santa Rosa’s general plan to ease grocery-store development last month, and the city planning commission meets July 26 to decide the fate of large grocery stores inside the food desert; the changes could mean an inux of chain stores to the area. Meanwhile, the Sonoma County Department of Health Services takes a grassroots approach to the problem, interviewing residents and working with grocers and schools to increase access to cheap, healthy food in the area. “The choices that people make are usually shaped by the choices that they have,â€? says Anthony Taylor, health program manager with the Department of Health Services. And in southeastern Santa Rosa, choices are scarce. County research ďŹ nds that unhealthy food sources—fast food restaurants and liquor stores— outnumber healthy food sources seven to one. In the rest of the county, the ratio is three to one. The proposed changes include temporarily relieving community shopping centers of the requirement to develop residential buildings together with retail; conditionally allowing grocery stores to move onto Santa Rosa Avenue; and simplifying the terms the city uses to describe grocery stores. Additionally, at this week’s planning commission meeting, senior city planner Erin Morris will recommend allowing large grocery stores—20,000 square feet and more—to move into existing buildings within the area by permitted use. This would allow large grocery stores to skip the expensive process of a conditional use permit (CUP) and “just go for it,â€? says Morris, although the design review and environmental review processes would remain. Keegan & Coppin real estate agent Tom Laguero is interested in developing the large building Circuit City once occupied on

Santa Rosa Avenue, and has asked city council to drop the CUP requirement for grocery stores in southeast Santa Rosa. “Maybe we could help each other out,� Laguero writes in a letter to the council, mentioning that he has a grocery client interested in the site but that a CUP would kill the deal. Laguero’s client, Smart & Final, is a large 250-store chain. Large chain stores concern councilmember Susan Gorin, who grilled Morris at the June 19 council meeting about the probability of retailers like WalMart taking advantage of the loosened restrictions and moving in. But Morris says chain-store politics aren’t in a city planner’s jurisdiction. “We don’t zone by brand name,� she explains . “We zone by land use.� Still, California grocers remain worried about the introduction of Wal-Mart Neighborhood Markets, a much smaller grocery version of the big-box store. As of February, 13 Wal-Mart Neighborhood Markets are planned in the state, set to open by early 2013, with four in the southeast Bay Area. Beyond the immediate future, Santa Rosa’s 2030 general plan includes two proposed neighborhood shopping centers inside the food desert and one larger community shopping center on its border that, when developed, would put a grocery store a mile away at most from every resident of the area. When the USDA eventually declares southeast Santa Rosa a verdant grocery oasis, the CUP exemption will expire. And when the housing market improves, community shopping centers will have to tack on forgone residential units. Until these policy changes begin affecting the food desert, shoppers at Santa Rosa Liquor and Deli only see three types of fruit, and there isn’t much produce at the nearby Shell station either. Santa Rosa Liquor and Deli, then, with nearly as many aisles stocked with alcohol as with grocery, with a smoke shop in the back half of the building, will have to suffice for the larger stores the city council hopes to attract. For now, “this is their only option,� says Thompson.

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Gold Rush Hands-on sustainability in the Sierra foothills BY JULIANE POIRIER

O

ne of the many scars left by California gold miners up near Nevada City is a huge ditch. Whether or not the effort paid off ďŹ nancially, miners managed to chew their way around a 230-acre chunk of earth that has since produced—perhaps most richly for high school and college students— treasure no gold can buy: experiential education in peace, justice and sustainability. The ditch-bordered site belongs to the Sierra Friends Center, established by Quakers; it now houses a residential community, a working farm and garden surrounded by woods, and a hands-on learning establishment called the Woolman Semester School. “It’s for teens who care passionately about the environment,â€? says head of school Dorothy Henderson. “And it’s for students who want to activate their education, make a difference in the world and experience living independently before they ďŹ nish high school or go off to college.â€?

Founded in the 1950s as a four-year residential high school known as the John Woolman School, this farm and garden in the Sierra foothills has evolved with the times while retaining its core values of social equality. (One of the founders, 96-year-old Mary Jorgensen, did civil rights work with Martin Luther King Jr. in 1961.) Leaders suspended the John Woolman School in 2001 and, with the needs of the 21st-century student in mind, launched the Woolman Semester School in 2004. Students, Henderson says, “work, learn and eat with others. If they aren’t learning in a classroom, they’re involved in local sustainability, off on a research trip or on this land someplace. It’s full immersion in community experience.� Students have tended vegetable crops, visited UC Davis to observe the butchering of pigs, built garden boxes for a local food bank, backpacked on the Yuba River and made public presentations in the community. Earlier this year, the Woolman Semester School was honored by Green Voices Bay Area with an award for outstanding commitment to educating youth. For some students, that education includes a subjective quality in the realm of the heart, which Jenny Davis, of the Chapin School in New York, described in her Woolman commencement speech: “At Woolman, everything we do is centered around love, for both our own inviolate space and that of the community. It can really be that simple.� Perhaps some love of the land will aid the $10,000 grant received last month by Woolman’s environmental science teacher, Jacob Holzberg-Pill, for an ambitious land-stewardship project. Holzberg-Pill plans to reclaim that abandoned mining ditch encircling the school property, regaining the gold of an unscarred landscape.

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Mon to Wed Thursday

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Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Bistro 29 Bistro. $$-$$$. Get an honestly prepared plate of excellence, reasonably priced, at this veritable palace of crepes. Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sat. 620 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2929.

Carneros Bistro & Wine Bar Californian. $$$$. As fancy as foie graschestnut froth parfait for dinner, as simple as huevos rancheros for breakfast, and all superb. Bre0akfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 1325 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.931.2042.

Dempseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alehouse Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

JhanThong BanBua Thai. $-$$. Sophisticated and delicate Thai cuisine. Fresh ingredients, packed with flavor. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8048.

Hwy (in Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. 707.665.9628.

Nonniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600. Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly, plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Royal China. Chinese. $$. Smart dĂŠcor, professional service, very solid wonton soup. Lunch, Mon-Fri and Sun; dinner daily. 3080 Marlowe Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2911. Thai Issan Thai. $$. Popular full-spectrum Thai restaurant. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 208 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.762.5966.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MA R I N CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Avatarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be found. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.) 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Kirin Chinese. $$.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$.

Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

The Underwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

$. Big burritos a stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Vineyards Inn Spanish.

Drakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beach Cafe

Lynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thai Thai. $$.

$$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Sun; dinner, Fri-Sat. 1 Drakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Yao-Kiku Japanese.

Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a California-cuisine )

A taste of real Thailand in convivial atmosphere. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 8492 Gravenstein Hwy, Ste M (in the Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. 707.793.9300.

Mai Vietnamese Cuisine Vietnamese. $. Fresh and authentic, with a warm and breezy atmosphere. Lunch and dinner daily. 8494 Gravenstein

$$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from

15 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dining

Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Get whisked away to Hawaii!

Casa MaĂąana Mexican.

Fradelizioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Italian. $$.

16

Woodenhead

5700 River Road, Santa Rosa Tickets: $ 65 wine club / $75 General www.woodenheadwine.com / 707. 887. 2703 or e-mail zina@woodenheadwine.com

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16

Dining ( 15

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Au Revoir, Syrah

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly

After undergoing a personal transformation of his own, chef Josh Silvers this fall will close his downtown Santa Rosa restaurant, Petite Syrah, and open a new restaurant in its spot. “I’m a different person than I was 13 and a half years ago,” says Silvers. Having a child seven years ago and losing 40 pounds with a personal trainer changed his perspective. “I want to be able to go out to dinner and eat healthy,” he says. The new restaurant will offer a more healthful menu, though not strictly. “We will have a fried chicken night once a week,” says Silvers. The restaurant will also be open for breakfast, lunch and dinner as opposed to dinner only. The menu will also offer gluten-free and whole-wheat options. “It’s not that I have to do this,” says Silvers. “I want to do this.” Silvers adds he is taking a cue from Jackson’s Bar and Oven, his more casual, comfort-food-oriented restaurant down the street. “It will be easier on everything,” he says, “the wallet included.” Silvers says the name and phone number will change in early September, and should only require closing the space for a few days.—Nicolas Grizzle

authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500. Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

N A PA CO U N T Y Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Bounty Hunter Wine

North Bay’ ’s largest open-air ĨƌĞƐŚĨĂƌŵƉƌŽĚƵĐĞŵĂƌŬĞƚ

country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Brassica Mediterranean.

“We support local, organic producers “ ĮƌƐƚĂŶĚĨŽƌĞŵŽƐƚ͘͟   –Pancho, buyer – 707.823.8661 1691 Gravenstein Hwy Sebastopol www.andysproduce.com

$$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the

SMALL BITES

sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

C.C. Blue Japanese.

Miguel’s Mexican-

$$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Californian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Checkers California. $$.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Perfect casual spot for dinner before the movie. Try the panéed chicken and butternut squash ravioli. Lunch and dinner daily. 1414 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9300.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting

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ųŹ NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25-31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Voted V oted Best Best Italian Italian re staurant of of the the restaurant North Bay. Nor th B ay.

Wineries

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Bella Vineyards (WC) Specializing in Zinfandel, Bella Vineyards farms three vineyards in Sonoma County: Big River Ranch in Alexander Valley, and the Lily Hill Estate and Belle Canyon in Dry Creek Valley. 9711 W. Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 866.572.3552.

Cotati Corner Fine Wines What a funky college town like Cotati needs in a wine shop is friendly, unpretentious, with a small but unique selection of under $20 wines. And that they have. Thursday tastings. 1818 La Plaza, Ste. 106, Cotati. Open Tuesday–Saturda; tastings, Thursday–Friday, 5–8pm. 707.793.9357.

Fritz Underground Winery Partly underground

Happy Hour Daily Cocktails & Dining with Sweeping Ten Mile Views Traditional Sunday BrunchÊUÊHandcrafted Ramos Fizzes 850 LAMONT AVENUE, NOVATO s 415.893.1892 s hilltop1892.com

tasting room overlooks the hill country north of Dry Creek Valley at this familyowned estate. Sauvignon Blanc, Zinfandel, Cabernet Sauvignon plus Lost Canyon wines (formerly of Oakland). 24691 Dutcher Creek Road, Cloverdale. Tasting 10:30–4:30 daily; $5 fee. 707.894.3389.

Gary Farrell The namesake is gone but the quality remains. Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 10701 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.473.2900.

Little Vineyards All of the Little’s wines are made from their 15-acre estate vineyards, and they’re serious about their product. Zin and Syrah are stars here. 15188 Sonoma Hwy., Glen Ellen. By appointment. 707.996.2750. Medlock Ames Tasting Room Low-key urban aesthetic meets selfconscious sustainable land stewardship, with home-grown food pairings–plus a dark and stylish, full bar in the back. Make this your last stop of the day. 6487 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Daily 10am–5pm.

$12.50 fee. Alexander Valley Bar opens at 5pm. 707.431.8845.

Red Car Wine Co. Lay some track to the “Gateway to Graton” and take your palate on a ride with Boxcar Syrah and Trolley Pinot from Sonoma Coast vineyards. Next stop: Côte-Rôtie on the way to Beaune. 8400 Graton Road, Sebastopol. Thursday-Monday 10am-4:30pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.829.8500.

Talisman Wine Wineindustry husband-and-wife team play out their passion for Pinot in unassuming warehouse space. Don’t miss the taste test between the Dijon and Pommard clones. 21684 Eighth St., Sonoma. Limited tasting availability, by appointment. 707.996.9050.

Windy Hill Estate Like a riddle bottled up in a mystery, it’s all but hidden in plain sight above the 101 freeway’s Cotati Grade. Impressive view; mixed bag of low-alcohol, low-priced Pinots from quirky winery. 1010 W. Railroad Ave., Cotati. Saturday–Sunday noon–5pm. $5 fee. 707.795-3030.

N A PA CO U N TY Acacia Vineyard Acclaimed Pinot and Chardonnay; their biggest client is Costco, but the tasting room is a hole-in-the-wall in a drab beige facility. 2750 Las Amigas Road, Napa. Monday through Saturday, 10am–4pm; Sunday, noon–4pm. $15. 707.226.9991.

Cuvaison Estate Wines (WC) Producing some 65 percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345.

Hagafen Cellars There shall be no wine before it’s certified kosher. Wide variety of varietal wines, the go-to choice for many a White House state dinner. 4160 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am to 5pm (yes, they’re open Christmas). $5–$15. 707.252.0781.

Mumm Cuvée Napa Californian-style fizz factory, all barn and no chateau, offers a robust account of how the bubbles get in the bottle. Sparkling winetastings offered on the patio, or take it to the next level in plush love seats on the Oak Terrace. Sparkling red is novel; DVX Brut among the best in the valley. Photography gallery includes Ansel Adams prints and other exhibits. 8445 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–5pm daily. Tasting $6–$20; Oak Terrace $30. 707.967.7700.

Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery that’s been in the family for generations. See the only Roman wine press in the Western Hemisphere. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10am–5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

Schramsberg (WC) Sparkling wine at its best. The “tasting room” is a branch of the cave illuminated with standing candelabras. 1400 Schramsberg Road, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4558.

Summers Estate Wines Excellent Merlot and that rarest of beasts, Charbono. Small tasting room and friendly staff. 1171 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.5508.

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

19

Francis Ford Coppola is practically his own wine group BY JAMES KNIGHT

F

rancis Ford Coppola’s Geyserville winery, the former Chateau Souverain, was devised as a something-for-everyone wine fun camp (“Swirl,” June 29, 2011); surely his manic roster of wines, from Alicante Bouschet to Zinfandel, belies a desire to not leave anyone out, from palates seeking the heart of darkness to those who simply want to pop a cork when Peggy Sue gets married. Here’s a small sampling: Sofia 2011 Blanc de Blancs, Monterey County ($19) A tribute to daughter Sofia, this frilly-labeled, pink-cellophane-wrapped bubbly has a clean, fresh laundry aroma with chemical overtones. The hue of a greyhound cocktail, with grapefruit flavors to match. The fizz and the acidity are a bit more aggressive than the packaging, but excellent mimosa material. Director’s Cut 2010 Russian River Valley Chardonnay ($21) Butterscotch candy aroma and baked apple flavor; crisp core cleans up the syrupy palate. Francis Coppola Reserve, 2009 Dutton Ranch Pinot Noir ($36) A toasty Pinot, like an incense of baked rhubarb, chicory coffee and dark raspberry. Fairly brisk in the mouth, but finishing with overt, grainy tannins. Your barbecued tri-tip kind of Pinot. Director’s Cut 2009 Cinema, Sonoma County ($32) A Zin, Cab and Petite Sirah blend with warm aromas of berry jam, mu shu plum sauce and a dash of purple pigment. Gushing with pie-eating contest levels of blackberry flavor, a music-swelling, palate-tugging crowd-pleaser with a bittersweet finish. Director’s Cut, Dry Creek Valley 2009 Zinfandel ($25) Thick, jammy, growly Zin with furry tannins. Diamond Collection, Magenta Label 2008 California Alicante Bouschet ($18) A historical curiosity, the kind of grape that Italian immigrants vinted in their Brooklyn basements during Prohibition. Odd aroma of dried fig, bicycle tire air and neutral flavor. Who knows, might be a surprise with hearty pasta. Diamond Collection, 2009 Black Label Claret ‘1910 type’ ($21) The gold netting over the bottle seems to be an homage to Gustave Niebaum’s prudent packaging practices. Charred wood, briquettes, fig, soil-encrusted blackberry granola bar. Deep, frankly grapey flavor, broadly tannic but reasonably supple. Archimedes, 2007 Sonoma County Cabernet Sauvignon ($58) Named for Coppola’s uncle, with a tribute to the Greek mathematician. Deep, dark wine with aromas of ultra-high cacao chocolate, orange zest and composted dark fruit. Chocolaty, rich, lush, intensely tannic, with a mouth-numbing finish for now; destined to pay handsomely in residuals for years to come.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25-31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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1961-2012 Thanks RIVERTOWN REVIVAL and a all the VOLUNTEERS for another another great event

21 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Between the Bread Sorting simple and singular sandwiches to send synapses sailing

F

or what’s basically a pile of stuff smashed between two pieces of bread, sandwiches sure are a huge part of our lives. And why not? They’re compact, manageable, easy to eat and offer endless variations for a quick lunchtime grab. But something’s been happening to sandwiches lately. There’s been a rush

of innovation between the bread that nobody, not even John Montagu, Fourth Earl of Sandwich himself, could have expected. Especially here in the North Bay, where fresh, local ingredients are simply grace notes in a chef’s sonata, sandwiches have undergone a makeover that’s caused the rest of the country to put down their PB&Js and take notice. For this year’s Food & Wine issue, we’ve rounded up some of our favorites out of the literally thousands of sandwiches in

the North Bay. You’ll notice we haven’t forgotten the turkey-and-swiss corner store creations, but we’re glad to share plenty of new discoveries, too, geared to inspire special out-of-the-way detours with friends. The funny thing about all this is that once we got going, we could have written about five times as many sandwiches, easily. All for a pile of stuff smashed between two pieces of bread!

—Gabe Meline ) 22

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22 Sandwiches! ( 21 Ray’s Deli The Chickabacon; $7.50 A sandwich is just a pile of stuff between bread. But it really becomes a sandwich when sliced in half to reveal its layers of hidden goodness. This cross-section view should always be a visually stunning work of art, and Ray’s Deli in Petaluma showcases that ideal. There are many reasons to visit this off-the-strip deli and tavern, but the sandwiches could be number one. A variety of staples created by a couple of Cotati foodies who took their culinary curiosity out of the kitchen and into the storefront continuously elevates the sandwich to the level of gourmet cuisine. Take, for example, the Chickabacon. Seemingly simple: diced chicken breast, bacon, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato and cheese. But when each ingredient is pushed to its best, the results are phenomenal. Free-range chicken, real, thick-cut bacon, red pepper aioli, fresh lettuce, ripe tomato and fresh-sliced cheese. The Ray’s roll, baked each morning, is soft and light, highlighting the flavors it is sworn to protect. This is no five-dolla footlong, because unlike a certain corporate chain deli’s flavorless dreck, it actually tastes like something (and it’s a little more than $5). These sandwiches are a treat, a reward for a job well done or just a congratulations for making it halfway through the workday. Isn’t that what a sandwich should do? Ray’s Deli, 900 Western Ave., Petaluma. 707.762.9492.—Nicolas Grizzle

Redd Wood

is made from sliced pork belly. Reddington cranks up the pig factor by stacking well-crisped chunks of wonderfully fatty pork belly along with a tart-sweet tomato marmalade and a buttery, crunchy handful of pale green inner romaine leaves between a perfectly toasted ciabatta roll amply covered with mayonnaise. Now that’s a BLT. Redd Wood, 6755 Washington St., Yountville. 707.299.5030.—Stett Holbrook

Willow Wood Market Roasted Eggplant; $11.95 The hot eggplant sandwich at the Willow Wood looks like a veritable vegetarian’s delight. After all, it’s made with eggplant, skinned and roasted red peppers, feta, walnut pesto and homemade roasted-garlic mayonnaise. The kicker is the anchovy. Still, it’s the eggplant that makes this sandwich a legend beyond Graton. Sliced and tossed with olive oil, it’s roasted on a cookie sheet in a hot oven until caramelized. The bread, from the Village Bakery in Sebastopol, is fresh and thinly sliced. The chef spreads pesto on one slice, the garlic mayonnaise on the other, with the eggplant and red peppers layered one on top of another with French feta as the final addition. Then it’s roasted in the oven on a pizza stone until the cheese melts and the flavors combine. Matthew Greenbaum, its creator, says, “I usually don’t like eggplant, but I love this sandwich.” Potato salad, olives and pickles come with the plate. Willow Wood Market, 9020 Graton Road, Graton. 707.823.0233.—Jonah Raskin

Pork Belly BLT; $15

Noodle Bowl

Redd Wood in Yountville is the new restaurant from Richard Reddington, owner of Redd, also in Y-Town. The restaurant serves wood-fired pizzas and other Italian-inspired dishes, but on a recent visit, it was the pork belly BLT that caught my eye. Bacon, as I’m sure you know,

Where do legends live? Tucked next to a Laundromat in the back of a grimy strip mall on an awkward side street near the family courthouse? If you’re talking about the legend that is Noodle Bowl’s banh mi, then look no further. There are plenty of

Banh Mi; $4.95

A PERFECT EGG The Farmer’s Wife took top honors at a recent contest.

Cambodian dishes at play here, but the banh mi’s the thing. A staple of Vietnamese street food, banh mi are compact and filling, and Noodle Bowl’s version hosts carrots, cilantro, cucumber, daikon, mayonnaise and your choice of BBQ pork, beef, chicken or tofu. A Cousteaux Bakery roll is the perfect finishing touch, and even as we’ve watched its price rise from $3 to $4, and now $5, it’s still a worthy lunchtime detour. Bring your friends who’ve never heard of banh mi, and blow their minds. Noodle Bowl, 821 Russell Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.843.5256.—Gabe Meline

The Farmer’s Wife Farm Egg, Bacon & Cheese Lyonnaise; $10 The absolute best part of the 2012 Battle of Brews, held recently in Santa Rosa, was the thrill of getting to discover the farm fried egg, bacon and blue lyonnaise grilled cheese sandwich from the Farmer’s Wife. Made on perfectly grilled Full Circle organic sourdough bread, this

French-inspired sandwich features an addictive mix of organic egg and craft bacon stacked on a rich, melted blend of Point Reyes Farmstead toma cheese, Irish Dubliner and Strauss cheddar. (Not surprisingly, the sandwich ended up being voted “Best in Show” by a panel of judges out of 21 entries at the Battle of the Brews “’Wich Hunt.”) Owner Kendra Kolling says that her catering and food business started as an offspring of Nana Mae’s Organics, the well-loved Sonoma County heirloom apple juice company that she runs with her husband. But this year, the Farmer’s Wife has started making a name for itself, successful enough to be asked to cater a family birthday party for Tyler Florence at his Mill Valley home, where the farm egg sandwich, naturally, was a huge hit. For now, folks can pick up the award-winning grilled cheese along with a rotating cast of seven to nine sandwiches at the Sonoma farmers market, the San Rafael Civic Center Farm Market and the Marin Country Mart in Larkspur. “I’m making sandwiches in parking lots to help finance my

Christina Julian

23

Gabe Meline

IT TAKES A VILLAGE Turkey gets a dressing-up at Village Bakery.

dream,” says Kolling, who has been working steadily to secure a spot for a craft cannery and kitchen in Sebastopol’s new food and wine center, the Barlow.—Leilani Clark

Model Bakery Breakfast Sandwich; $6.25–$7.25 Say the words “English muffin” and for most, images of plasticsack, grocery-bought Thomas’ muffins come readily to mind. Model Bakery threatens to redefine the category. This particular take is no ordinary muffin, starting at the roots of this buttery delight. It’s concocted from focaccia dough riddled with olive oil, yeast, flour and even a pinch of vitamin C to rouse the health-conscious crowd. The dough drops are plopped on a cornmeal-lined tray and griddled on a stovetop, delivering a muffin that’s airy and butter-soft. Michael Chiarello went as far as bowing down to this muffin on Food Network’s The Best Thing I Ever Ate, and dubbed it “super airy and

as light as a cloud,” and we can’t disagree. The goodness keeps on rolling, with fluffy scrambled eggs sandwiched between layers of Canadian bacon and sealed with cheddar cheese. For those looking to overindulge, avocado and tomato are available as add-ons. And, yes, maybe the vitamin C doesn’t exactly counter some of the more gluttonous aspects of this not-so-innocent sandwich, once you chomp your first bite you’ll no longer care. Model Bakery, 1357 Main St., St. Helena, 707.963.8192. Also at 644-B First St., Napa. 707.259.1128.—Christina Julian

Village Bakery Calistoga Turkey & Red Pepper Panini; $7.95 Turkey could be accused of being one of the most overexposed sandwich meats in the country, the rise of bacon aside. So not just any turkey sandwich could make the cut, but this one does, and here’s why—the confluence of ingredients. Start with the

You can’t get much more central in downtown Santa Rosa than the intersection of Fourth and Mendocino, which makes Pete Mogannam’s Fourth Street Market a cultural hub of the city. While waiting in line at the always-busy sandwich counter, I’ve witnessed political rivals engaged in debate; business deals being negotiated; reporters talking about tomorrow’s front-page story; policemen complaining about downtown’s homeless population; downtown’s homeless population complaining about the police; and everybody complaining about parking. If downtown is Santa Rosa’s heart, Fourth Street Market is its aortic valve. In the midst of all this hustle and flow are Lisa Mogannam, Katie Smith and Marissa Morabe, three familiar faces behind the deli counter who manage the fast-paced balancing act of chatting with regulars, executing evasive dance steps around each other and making roughly 300 sandwiches a day for the lunchtime crowd. “When I first started, I freaked out,” says Morabe, who sees so many sandwiches a day she’s even had dreams about them. At the height of the lunch hour, staying calm is key. Mogannam has been here since her father opened on the corner in 1996, and “the newbies always have to be broken in,” she says. But with the bustle comes rewards. Going through ingredients so quickly means they’re always fresh, and there are the notably unusual orders that break up the day—tuna and egg salad mixed together, maybe, or the guy who orders just pickles, cheese and Dijon on dark rye. But the best part, all agree, is getting to personally know the customers, from all walks of life. “We see everybody,” Mogannam says. “We hear what’s going on in their lives.” “Sometimes we hear a little more than that,” Morabe adds, but stops there, honoring the sandwich maker’s unspoken confidentiality agreement. “A lot of them, I know their sandwiches and not their names. It’s like, ‘Hi, how are you? Tuna on light rye?’” Fourth Street Market, Fourth and Mendocino, Santa Rosa, 707.573.9832.—Gabe Meline focaccia bread. While buttery in flavor, it’s not oozing with olive oil. Bread should be bread, after all, not a soggy alter-ego of its former self. This light, slightly crisp bread has just a touch of salt on top, which really works to its advantage. Add to that a roasted

red pepper aioli spread, and then comes what we think is the heart of this sandwich: a layer of fresh, roasted poblano chilies packing a flavorful punch. Melted together with roasted turkey and a hefty dose of provolone cheese, this baby dances down ) 24

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Fourth Street Market

Gabe Meline

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

Underwood Bar & Bistro Moroccan Lamb; $12.75

Oakville Grocery Aubrey McMinn was raised in Healdsburg, so she’s seen a lot of changes in its once-sleepy downtown. Now with more Lexuses than pickup trucks, the streets around the plaza will soon see the dive bar John & Zeke’s sold to new owners and a foundation for Seghesio Vineyards’ pizzeria and salumeria poured on the site of the old post office before the end of the year. “It’s changed quite a bit,” she says. McMinn is the catering manager at Oakville Grocery, which itself supplanted the old Healdsburg City Hall and police station on the plaza, and where the sandwich menu is on the cusp of changing, too—10 brand-new sandwiches already on the menu in the original Oakville location will come to Healdsburg this fall. “We have our core sandwiches. The turkey pesto, the Mediterranean grilled chicken, the smoked turkey cranberry—those are always our staples,” says McMinn. “And then we’ve added a couple over the years, taken some off, and changed them seasonally.” But one thing won’t change, and that’s the Mezzaluna, a glorious cult favorite that inspires long drives from faraway towns. Essentially a thin pizza crust baked on-site folded over a baby spinach or club salad, the Mezzaluna is prepared with such precision and freshness that there’d probably be a riot were it ever taken off the menu. Everything is made in-house at Oakville Grocery, excluding the breads, which come from Cousteaux Bakery just down the street. For McMinn, the perfect sandwich is all about proper layering (“Start with the meat, then put the tomatoes on it so it’s not soggy, then cheese, make sure you have enough greens on there, salt and pepper”), and she confesses that, yes, it’s hard not to simply eat all day at her job. Keeping busy with out-of-towners helps. “All day long, questions!” McMinn reports—everything from giving directions to consulting on which winery to visit. “In the off season,” she says, “we have to keep our consistency and try to cater to the locals. The tourists leave, and it’s just us. Our town.” Oakville Grocery, 124 Matheson St., Healdsburg, 707.4333200. 7856 St. Helena Hwy., Oakville, 707.944.8802.—Gabe Meline

Sandwiches! ( 23 the throat. In case you���re feeling guilty over eating a not-so-square meal, the sandwich comes with organic greens and an heirloom tomato slice topped with asiago, or you can glam it up with your pick of gourmet salads (pictured with

the Calistoga couscous). “This panini-styled sandwich is a locals’ favorite. Enjoy it in our bakery, or as a delicious ‘to go’ meal at one of our neighboring wineries,” says manager Jason Theobal. Village Bakery, 1353 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. 707.942.1443.—Christina Julian

The elegant Underwood Bar and Bistro, across the street from Willow Wood Market, features a hefty Moroccan lamb sandwich served on homemade flatbread. In part inspired by the popular Greek gyros, it’s also made with harissa, a hot chili sauce that originated in North Africa. Hence, it’s a Moroccan-style lamb sandwich, and it’s spicier than any gyros this side of Athens. Matthew Greenbaum created it after visiting the Greek island of Tilos, then tweaked it to suit his own taste buds. Lamb sirloin is sliced, marinated and grilled until crispy and tender, then placed in warm flatbread that’s as easy to fold and hold as a slice of pizza. Juicy tomatoes, arugula and red onion are added, along with tzatziki, the traditional Greek mix of yogurt and cucumber that provides a clean, fresh taste. Bite into this sandwich and you think you’re eating in a cafe in Tangier or Marrakesh. It’s been on the menu since the day the Underwood opened, and customers won’t let the restaurant retire it. Underwood, 9113 Graton Road, Graton. 707.823.7023.—Jonah Raskin

Hopmonk Tavern Grilled Cheese & Ham; $11.50 Few things are better than the childhood delicacy that is grilled cheese and ham. Mom probably made it with a couple of Kraft American Singles and prepackaged deli meat, but Hopmonk Tavern does the grilled cheese and ham one better. Their version, which comes with tomato soup, has a Sonoma County edge— meaning it has some seriously upgraded ingredients. The sandwich starts on a high note with toasted, Parmesan-crusted sourdough. Inside, the eater discovers yellow cheddar, white cheddar and Gruyère, melted together in a rich, balanced cheese combination. (Not that anyone’s counting, but that’s four cheeses right there.) Ham, not always the

favorite of the meat family, can lean toward dry or overly salty, but this grilled ham intends to change that, with the grill marks to prove it. The sandwich is finished with a dijonaisse, once a lesser-known condiment that’s now a staple among gourmet sandwiches of the area. “The people who know about the grilled cheese and ham come back for it all the time,” says Hopmonk manager Bill DeCarli. While DeCarli says the hamburger still wins the popularity contest, the grilled cheese and ham is a close second. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 707.829.7300. Also in Sonoma at 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.—Holly Abrahams

The Fremont Diner Reuben; $11.99 Sonoma’s Fremont Diner has perfected a retro, Southerninspired menu sourced from literally backyard ingredients and sustainably minded local purveyors. Close your eyes and point, and you’ll pick a winner, but the top choice in the sandwich category is the Reuben. I challenge you to find thicker, juicier corned beef anywhere. The restaurant layers on the in-house sliced meat, tangy sauerkraut and a generous smear of remoulade sauce (just fancy mayo, really) between two slices of well-griddled rye bread. A ramekin of spicy whole grain mustard completes the deal. Fremont Diner, 2660 Fremont Drive, Sonoma. 707.938.7370. —Stett Holbrook

Sol Food Bistec; $8.45–$10.45 It seems that every week I discover a new person who regularly crosses county lines for Sol Food along with someone who has never had the pleasure of San Rafael’s addictive Puerto Rican culinary phenomenon. Whenever I send the latter directly to the lime green building at the corner of Fourth and Lincoln, I urge him to order the Bistec sandwich. Thin, succulent slices of all-natural steak mingle with avocado, sautéed onions, garlic

Gabe Meline

(Dine-in only. Valid with purchases of 2 beverages. Not valid on holidays. Cannot combine offers.) Exp. 8-31-12

707.829.8889 707.575.9296 In Downtown 2478 W Third St Sebastopol Santa Rosa thaipotrestaurant.com

Thai House

25

ward-Winning weets

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

2 for 1 Entreès

Special Occasion Cakes & Desserts Custom Gift Baskets Fresh Fruit Pies & Tarts & Champagne Cakes Wedding Cakes

SOL TO SOL In addition to the Bistec, Sol Food’s Cubano is a five-star, too.

East West Rrestaurant

Falafel Pita, $11.50 Yeah, I know what you’re thinking. “Oh, here’s the token vegan sandwich, I guess they had to throw one in here for inclusion’s sake.” Well, there would’ve been more on our list if any of the

Zazu on the River The ‘U-Pick’ BLT; $10 When Duskie Estes and John Stewart closed their

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

Chocolates C ho co lates & D Dessert e sse r t C Cafe afe 110 1 10 Petaluma Pe t a l u m a Blvd B l vd North N or th Downtown D ow ntow n P Petaluma et aluma

www.vivacocolat.com w w w.v i v aco co lat .co m

707.778.9888 7 07.778 .9888

The First and Last Place to Meet 902 MAIN ST, NAPA 707.258.2337 | downtownjoes.com

BR E ERY W

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

The Healthier Choice

Grass-Fed Beef Burgers Premium Humboldt County Beef OPBEEFEIPSNPOFTtOPBOUJCJPUJDT WFHFUBSJBOEJFUtMFTTGBU MPXFS DIPMFTUFSPMBOEGFXFSDBMPSJFT 0QFO%BZTtBNoQN 3135 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa

) 26

W NTO N JOE W

707.526.4878 www.brodysburgers.com

ummer elebrations Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Roasted Mushroom Gruyere Tartelette Petit Four Platter Full Catering Menu Available

photo: Marilee Koll

Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

DO

other vegan sandwiches I’ve tried were half as good as the falafel pita—this thing made the cut on its own merit. If you’ve ever dissed sandwiches that didn’t satisfy for want of meat and cheese, then this is the vegan’s revenge. Ditch soggy bread; forget those kinda-but-not-really-filling veggie sandwiches from the deli. The falafel pita is a crispy, hearty, colorful Mediterranean dream that adding a dead animal to would only screw up. Overflowing with toasty falafel patties, lettuce and tomatoes and dripping with tangy tahini sauce, this sandwich is portioned enough to fill a hiker hungry after romping around nearby Spring Lake or Annadel. Eat it outside on a sunny day— enjoy its Mediterranean taste in our Mediterranean climate—and get fries on the side instead of the salad. A heads up, though: this thing’s served in a bowl for a reason; i.e., it would prefer to fall apart and become falafel salad. East West Restaurant, 557 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.546.6142.—Jay Scherf

’S

mayo and swiss on a mildly toasted French roll that’s flat-pressed to tasty perfection. Before I stopped eating beef, I enjoyed my Bistecs (way too many of them each month) without the onions and with a generous drizzle of Sol Food’s famous hot sauce. These days, I usually settle on the Veggie Deluxe or the Nine Pobre sandwich, which are both excellent alternatives. But the Bistec is the one. The season of neighborhood barbecues is always hard on me, with the permeating smells of burgers and ribs and all types of other treats I no longer eat. But that small torture is nothing compared to watching everyone besides me enjoy the best sandwich in all of Marin County. My willpower has gotten me through so far, but it’s a struggle every single time. Carnivores, enjoy. Vegetarians, beware. Sol Food, 901 Lincoln Ave., San Rafael. 415.451.4765.—David Sason

7225 HEALDSBURG AVE SEBASTOPOL • 707.829.8101 1445 TOWN & COUNTRY DR SANTA ROSA • 707.527.7654 1353 LINCOLN AVE CALISTOGA • 707.942.1443

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26 Sandwiches! ( 25 Bovolo restaurant in the back of Copperfield’s Books and opened Zazu on the River, it did wonders for the restaurant’s ambiance: it’s a pork-themed snack shack on the grounds of Davis Family Winery, overlooking a wide bend of the Russian River. As for the sandwiches, there’s a pulledpork sandwich on a soft bun, recommended, and the “World’s Greatest BLT.” The boast is a bit much—I’d toast the bread and swap out the romaine lettuce for the retro crunch of iceberg, personally—but the housemade Black Pig bacon, thick, ripe tomato and outstanding surroundings (river, bocce ball, outdoor seating) still make this a sandwich that’s hard to resist. Even better, once the tomatoes in the adjacent tomato garden are ripe, the restaurant plans to offer “U-pick” BLTs, where diners can actually pick the tomato for their sandwich. Hands-on, dining, indeed! Zazu on the River, 52 Front St., Healdsburg. 707.569.0171.—Stett Holbrook

KC’s Downtown Grill Crispy Buffalo Chicken; $11.50. Buffalo wings can be such a mess, such a hassle. Who can really be bothered? If only they could take the same principles— spicy sauce, hot chicken and cool blue cheese dressing—and apply them to a sandwich. But wait a minute! KC’s Downtown Grill makes a crispy buffalo chicken sandwich that will satiate your need for wings and then some, without the need for 13 wet-naps. Almost as large as two sandwiches, it contains a helping of crispy fried chicken breast bathed in spicy buffalo sauce. But there’s more. Served on a big “fluffy French roll” with lettuce, tomato, onion and mayo, the sandwich is big on flavor and comes with a chilled cup of blue cheese or ranch—your preference—to quell the spiciness. Of course, the sandwich is served

with fries—it wouldn’t be right to eat a crispy chicken sandwich with anything else. The only other recommended component to this meal might be one of KC’s ice cream milkshakes, but you may want to consult your physician first. KC’s Downtown Grill, 9501 DuVander Lane, Windsor. 707.838.7800.—Holly Abrahams

Michael’s Sourdough Basically any sandwich on a sourdough roll; $7.49–$7.79 There’s a moment when you’re waiting in line for sandwiches at Michael’s when you realize you’re about to experience something special. Yes, Michael’s sourdough rolls are so fresh, warm, sweet and crispy that they put any French bakery to shame. Perhaps the tastiest this side of the Seine, Michael’s incredible rolls perfectly complement the ingredients of their nearly 30 specialty sandwiches. Standards like the tuna salad are given new life with every bite, while creations like the basil cream chicken have made it difficult for the lunchtime crowd to spend their precious 30minute break on any other local bite. How many delis have to put up signs saying that they’ve sold out of their bread for the day? It’s unheard of, but thankfully it’s also a reproducible formula, with locations now in Rohnert Park and Petaluma exposing Sonoma citizens to the wondrous addiction that is Michael’s Sourdough bread. If Jean Valjean really existed, he’d be stealing from Michael’s right now. Michael’s Sourdough, locations in Novato, San Rafael, Petaluma and Rohnert Park. www.michaelssourdough.com. —David Sason

Mac’s Deli Sardine; $6.45 There’s a customer at Mac’s who is on a mission to eat all 49 sandwiches on the menu, which sounds like an easy feat until one considers sandwich No. 24, made

GETTIN’ DOUGH Michael’s Sourdough: believe in the power of great bread.

with tongue, chopped chicken liver and onions. “The other weird one is the sardine sandwich,” says waitress Courtney Carretta on a recent weekday, “but I won’t make you eat that one.” Oh, really? I take this as a challenge, and order it. Carretta visibly winces, but five minutes later plops the plate in front of me, offering Pepto-Bismol if needed. But when I heave a mighty bite into my mouth, I’m surprised when the sardine sandwich is in fact completely delicious. Its construction is simple—just fish on bread, no fixin’s—and the soft roll balances any salty or oily features of the sardines. After a second bite, owner Toraj Soltani sidles up. “Can you take it?!” he asks. Take it? I devour the whole thing, and, heck, I might even order it again. Here’s to adventure! Mac’s Deli, 630 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. 707.545.3785.—Gabe Meline

this diddy, soft and chewy on the inside, lightly crisp on the out. As you sink down further, you’ll come tongue-to-mouth with prosciutto from Zoe’s Meats. It’s flavorful with just the right amount of salt—no gamey aftertaste here. The bread is swathed in Jimtown’s own figgy-olive spread that’ll cause your taste buds to roar. No sandwich would be complete without cheese, and this one delivers with just the right touch of Point Reyes blue, ever so slightly melted. “The Jimtown is one of our most requested sandwiches to eat on the patio or take on a picnic for winetasting,” says owner Carrie Brown. Jimtown packs people in on weekends, many who are vying for this deceptive delight with the deliciously daffy flavor profile, but trust us, every finger-licking bite is worth the wait. Jimtown Store, 6706 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. 707.433.1212.—Christina Julian

Jimtown Store

Big John’s Market

The Jimtown; $8.75 There’s no such thing as a simple sandwich anymore, and maybe that’s a good thing. The “Jimtown” looks unassuming on the outside, yet it’s anything but on the inside. Start with the baguette bread. In the wrong hands, baguette can slice open the roof of your mouth in a jiff, but not

The Grove Street; $6.99. Turkey sandwiches can be pretty ho-hum. Turkey, mayo, lettuce, bread and cheese—they often lack the emulsion of flavors we crave in a sandwich. However, there’s an exception to every rule, and that’s Big John’s Market and their Grove Street sandwich, a turkey sandwich ) 28

Gabe Meline

27 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Ike’s Place “I rememeber when I first realized that I needed to hire more employees,” says Ike Shehadeh, founder of the hugely popular sandwich shop Ike’s Place. “I had five people, and we were serving 200 people a day, and the line was two hours out the door.” To afford a larger staff, Shehadeh didn’t pay himself for 19 months, but adding more employees only solved part of the problem. “We went from 200 sandwiches a day with a two-hour wait,” he remembers, “to 600 sandwiches a day with a two-hour wait.” Thankfully, the wait isn’t quite that long at Ike’s new Santa Rosa location. But even for Ike’s first day on Mendocino Avenue, with only a Facebook post as an announcement, the line was out the door. What’s the secret? “I always say what works best for me is layering flavors,” Shehadeh explains. “When you’re able to add different types of flavors that touch different areas of the tongue—and also with texture, when you get crunchy or squishy or chewy—the more you can distract the brain and the tongue, the deeper you’re getting in the experience.” So what’s new at the Santa Rosa spot? Customers will notice the local touches on the menu—the “Luther Burbank” sandwich, the “Charles Schulz,” the “Deep Throat,” the “Natalie Wood.” A good, simple starter with roast beef, salami, turkey and provolone is the “Matt Cain” (the Giants have a heavy presence at Ike’s), and there are copious vegan options, as well. But for the truly adventurous, there’s the five-pound Kryptonite, one half of which is pictured on this week’s cover of the Bohemian: roast beef, turkey, pastrami, ham, salami, bacon, avocado, pesto, mozzarella sticks, jalapeno poppers, onion rings, pepper jack, lettuce, tomato, onions, pickles and banana peppers. At this week’s grand opening party on July 25, the person who downs it the fastest gets free sandwiches for a year—provided they’re still standing. Ike’s Place, 1780 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 707.293.9814. —Gabe Meline

“Where Lowcountry meets Wine Country”

2097 Stagecoach Road Suite 100, Santa Rosa 707.595.3935 www.sweettssr.com

Sandwiches! ( 27 Gabe Meline

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

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with elevated ingredients that are both simple and tasty. The ďŹ rst standout is the garlic-herb turkey, a pleasant departure from the alltoo-abundant mesquite or honeysmoked turkeys. This herbaceous meat is juxtaposed with light, creamy Havarti cheese and garlic aioli. Holy aioli, this stuff is good! It adds a needed richness and at the same time builds the already present garlic ďŹ&#x201A;avor. Finally, the Grove Street is topped with tomato and spring mix greens, which adds a fresh, crisp element, and Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s has a nice selection of fresh breads to customize the perfect sandwich. Big Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market, 1345 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. 707.433.7151.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Holly Abrahams

Big Bottom Market The Independent; $9.50 Guernevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Bottom Market has been a big boon to this small Russian River town, and the marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s picnic fare tops the list. The deli offers a menu of regular sandwiches, but the changing â&#x20AC;&#x153;celebrity sandwich,â&#x20AC;? an edible ode to local personalities of note, is different each month. For July, however, the sandwich celebrates our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birth with the â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Independent.â&#x20AC;? You know, like Independence Day? Named chieďŹ&#x201A;y in honor of Becoming Independent, the local organization helping those with disabilities live on their own, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

a ďŹ recracker of a combo featuring Black Forest ham, Point Reyes blue-cheese spread and cherryshallot chutney with mixed greens on a soft French roll. Mmm. Big Bottom Market, 16228 Main St., Guerneville. 707.604.7295. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Stett Holbrook

Lombardiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Deli Killer Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; $7.99 Lombardiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is set 50 yards back from the road, but that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop the Petaluma institutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pungent BBQ aroma from wafting into the fast lane and causing near-misses as drivers yank their steering wheels westward toward the source. Inside, the small deli oozes old-world Petaluma; ďŹ&#x201A;yers for livestock dot the bulletin board, and tractors are sometimes even parked out front. The menu peers down over an always-busy counter, and though the Mama Lilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sandwich with peppers is a solid second choice, those who want some serious slop should go for the Killer Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. A full half-pound of tri-tip hot from the front-porch smoker would be enough to justify the eight-dollar price tag, but add not only melted horseradish cheddar but horseradish mayonnaise, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a sandwich that bites back. Comes with tomatoes, onions, and 245 napkinsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need â&#x20AC;&#x2122;em. Lombardiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Deli, 3413 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 707.773.1271. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

29

Healdsburg: Sonoma County’s most dynamic dining destination BY STETT HOLBROOK

I

s Healdsburg the most dynamic restaurant town in Sonoma County? Based on recent events, it sure gets my vote.

The big news this month came when the owners of Cyrus announced they’re closing the twoMichelin-star restaurant in October after a long-running dispute with their landlord, the Hotel Les Mars. No word yet where owners Nick Peyton and chef Douglas Keane will land, but Crossroads Winery LP, an affiliate of the hotel, will take over the restaurant space and thereby join ownership of the restaurant and hotel. Bovolo recently closed its cafe in Copperfield’s books and morphed into Zazu on the River on the grounds of the Davis Family Winery at 52 Front Street. It’s a snack shack, basically, but

the snacks are definitely above average (pulled-pork sandwiches, BLTs, maple bacon popcorn and sautéed peppers from the nearby garden). The views of the Russian River, bocce ball and outdoor seating are pretty nice, too. Now that Mateo’s Cocina Latina is up and running, chefowner Mateo Granados has fired up his popular Tendejon de la Calle restaurant-on-wheels again. Instead of rolling up to farms and wineries like it once did, however, now it’s rolling up in the appealing patio behind his restaurant on Wednesday and Thursday nights though the summer. Just off the Healdsburg square is four-week-old Campo Fina, a restaurant from Scopa’s Ari Rosen that’s the most buzzworthy new restaurant in town, with a line queuing up each day before it opens. Like Scopa, it’s a narrow sliver of a restaurant, but out back

OUTDOOR/INDOOR Zazu on the River,

large; and Campo Fina, inset.

there’s a spacious patio with a bar, a bocce ball court (what’s with all the bocce in Healdsburg?) and the restaurant’s wood-fired pizza oven. Inside and out are very nice. Not all the action is happening in downtown Healdsburg. Copain Winery is soon to host a series of exclusive “supper club dinners” with visiting chefs; the first one featured Ken Tominaga of Hana Japanese Restaurant in Rohnert Park. Corey Lee, owner of San Francisco’s Benu and ex-French Laundry chef de cuisine, cooks Sept. 2. Lachlan MackinnonPatterson of Boulder’s Frasca mans the stove Sept. 30. And celebrated chef David Chang of New York’s Momofuku takes the stage Dec. 14. Seating is limited, and tickets are expensive. They start at $300 for wine club members, and it’s $400 for everybody else. Meanwhile, winemaker Pete

Seghesio has submitted plans for a wood-fired pizza and salumeria at 440 Center St., the site of the old downtown post office, which burned down in 2010. Jackson Family Wines, aka KendallJackson, is moving into the Healdsburg Avenue space vacated by Shimo Modern Steak with plans for the K-J Cafe and a menu of small plates, pastries, charcuterie and locally sourced products. Pizzando, a new restaurant from Spoonbar executive chef Louis Maldonado and consulting chef Liza Shaw, is set to open next month down the street in the space formerly occupied by Cafe Newsstand. And work is progressing on SHED, a 9,700square-foot, multi-use space that will house retail shops, a cafe, a wine bar, a gardening store and an event center on North Street. That’s a lot to digest.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Gabe Meline

Bustling ’Burg

One Grape At a Time

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Single-vineyard wines: Why make anything else? BY ALASTAIR BLAND

I

n many ways, Paul Gordonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Syrah tastes like a Zinfandel. But that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bother him.

Gordon, owner with wife, Valerie, of Halcon Vineyards in Mendocino County, grows his grapes on a ridgetop 2,500 feet above sea level in a location baked by the summer sun and cooled most nights by frigid breezes from the PaciďŹ c Ocean, not 20 miles away. The Yorkville Highlands location, one of the loftiest vineyards in the state, is unique and rugged, and Gordon believes there may be no better way to preserve and express his propertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s idiosyncrasiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the uncharacteristic taste of his wineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; than by leaving his Syrah as the land makes it, and putting it into the bottle as a single-vineyard wine. Also called vineyard designates, single-vineyard wines are exactly what they sound likeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;wines made solely from grapes grown in a single location. Of course, this was once the default way to make wine. But as long-distance shipping became viable with the advent of motor transport, many wineries began adding grapes from faraway regions into their own fermenting vats. Over time, interregional blends became the norm in winemaking, and today, only in the best of locations do winemakers bother making singlevineyard wines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A vineyard has to be special, or else a vineyard designate just isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worth doing,â&#x20AC;? says Mendocino County winemaker Alex MacGregor, whose Saracina Vineyards uses grapes from the upper Russian River valley. At Ravenswood Winery, founder and winemaker Joel Peterson says that blending,

though an art form in itself, can come at a perceived cost. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By blending, you get a more homogeneous product,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These large blends may taste ďŹ ne, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll only represent the state or nation that theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re from.â&#x20AC;? Peterson, well known for his Vintners Blend series, began his winemaking career in the 1970s with a commitment to making vineyard-designate Zinfandels. Among these is his Old Hill Vineyard Zinfandel, made from vines planted in the 1860s and notable for its ďŹ&#x201A;avors of cherry, mint and raspberry. Ravenswoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dickerson Vineyard Zinfandel is another favoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a dark wine strongly redolent of blackberry jam with vague scents of vanilla, bacon and pepper. These vineyards and others represent microclimates and speciďŹ c locations worthy of recognition on the bottle. But beyond grape quality, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also ďŹ nancial incentive for a grower to see his or her propertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name go onto a bottle of wine. So says Sierra foothills winemaker Marco Cappelli. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I bought my property, I knew that [the vineyardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s] reputation would allow me to get a higher price for the fruit, and that my customers would be able to sell their wine at a higher price because of the designation,â&#x20AC;? says Cappelli, whose Herbert Vineyard produces some of El Dorado Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more esteemed Zinfandel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All my customers use the Herbert Vineyard designation, and it helps them sell their wine.â&#x20AC;? Even when a vineyard is planted on upstanding, grape-friendly real estate, there will always be years of lesserâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even badâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;quality harvests. Following such problematic

31 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

vintages, winemakers often, if reluctantly, choose to suspend their vineyard-designate programs and, instead, use the failed wines anonymously for blending. Two thousand eight was such a year on the North Coast. That summer, huge forest fires set a layer of ash upon thousands acres of vines, and as a result, much of the region’s wine that fall was almost unpalatable. “We used reverse osmosis to clean out the smokiness of the 2008, and then we used the wine in a blend,” says Jeff Cichocki, assistant winemaker at Bonterra Winery. Bonterra’s McNab and Butler vineyards are points of particular pride for the Ukiahbased biodynamic winery. Most years, these two locations are made into vineyard designates, of which bottles go for roughly $50. “But not every season is worthy,” Cichocki says. “We produce vineyard designates when they deserve it.” Most winemakers work by a similarly selective approach. But occasionally, the historical value of capturing a vineyard in a bottle takes precedence over just how fine its crop is each year. At the Scholium Project, a small winery near Vacaville, owner Abe Schoener makes vineyard designates from 10 small vineyards around Northern California. Schoener takes particular pride in using relatively unknown, off-the-map vineyards, sometimes no bigger than a backyard. In some years, Schoener sets aside subpar harvests for use in blends, but for one small block of grapes, the McDowell Vineyard on Glos Lane near Yountville, Schoener has bottled up every vintage since 2004, good or bad. “Even when the Glos vineyard doesn’t measure up, I bottle it every time,” Schoener says. “The owners have told me it’s going to be torn out soon, and I’m pretty sure that 2012 will be its last harvest.” In 2006 and 2007, the Glos vineyard’s wines “were more interesting than they were excellent,” Schoener says, “but I bottled them anyway, because I think it’s important that I preserve the historical record of that vineyard.”

ONE LOVE Halcon Vineyards makes Syrah from a single vineyard 25,000 feet above sea level.

Makers of vineyard-designate wines tend to acknowledge that their job as winemaker is to exert a minimal influence on the wine and, instead, do their best to showcase the land and its grapes. Winemakers attempt to do this in varying ways. At Halcon Vineyards, Gordon doesn’t filter or refine his single vineyard wines, and he points out that his Syrah touches nothing but steel tanks before going to the bottle. At Bonterra, vineyard manager Chad Boardman believes that biodynamic farming is the key. In biodynamic farming, no fertilizers or nutrients produced offsite are ever introduced to the life cycle of the vines. “Our McNab and Butler wines are the truest possible expression of those sites,” he explains. “We

aren’t trying to add or mask anything.” MacGregor at Saracina Vineyards believes commercially made yeasts will homogenize the nuances of a wine, and that the best vineyard designates are made with native airborne yeasts. Also, the addition of grape concentrate to boost final alcohol levels and the use of artificial coloring agents—both common winemaking tactics—“can mitigate the whole point of a singlevineyard wine,” he says. But winemakers also must intervene at times as their wines ferment and age. “I’m trying to showcase the vineyard more than anything else in the winemaking process,” says Judson Hale, who makes a vineyard designate of Yorkville

Highlands Pinot Noir. “I try my hardest to stay out of the process, but I’m also a UC Davis [wine program] graduate. I know where things can go wrong, and I know how to fix them and keep a wine palatable.” Hale’s chief wine is a buttery, chocolatey Pinot Noir, a popular variety for use as vineyard designates—but at the Scholium Project, grape names are irrelevant. In fact, Schoener doesn’t even put them on his bottle labels. “I want the focus to be on the vineyard, not on the grape,” he says. “The grape variety brings too many expectations with it. I don’t want people to look at my wine and say, ‘Oh, another Syrah.’ It doesn’t matter that it’s a Syrah. It’s the Hudson Vineyard wine.”

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32

Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

P E TA L U M A

Mothers’ Mother

Who’s more original than Frank Zappa’s Mothers of Invention? Probably nobody, but the Grandmothers of Invention sure come close. The Grandmothers—Napoleon Murphy Brock, Tom Fowler, Don Preston, Miroslav Tadic and Christopher Garcia—formed in 2002 when four alumni from Zappa’s band were invited to perform classic Zappa material. Since, they’ve been living, breathing and truly reincarnating Zappa’s eclectic and tricky musical scores, and doing more than just playing the same notes all over again. Help them keep Zappa’s music alive Friday, July 27, at the Mystic Theatre. 23 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 8:30pm. $22–$25. 707.765.2121.

N A PA

Flamenco Renaissance As if the energetic staccato rhythms of flamenco didn’t already have the power to drag you into dance, “nuevo flamenco” transforms the traditional music and fuses it with hints of jazz, rumba and salsa to produce a contemporary derivative. Displaced in its homeland of Spain by rock-’n’-roll in the ’60s, the “new” flamenco is made possible by five-time Grammy nominee and Zen monk Ottmar Liebert. Meditate on the strums of his acoustic guitar on Wednesday, Aug. 1, at the Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. 8pm. $30-$35. 707.226.7372.

SA N R A FA E L

Pickin’ First: George Cole, the guitarist who’s performed with jazz legend Keely Smith and was guitar instructor to Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong. Second: Mathias Minquet, the multiinstrumentalist who’s performed with Enrique Iglesias, Laura Pausini and the Pussycat Dolls. Add Echae Kang, Korean star violinist at Berklee College of Music, and Kaeli Earle, a rising star from Washington playing piano, cello and acoustic bass, and what’s the sum of this fateful grouping? The math isn’t hard to do: George Cole and Eurocana bring out a celebration of American classics with Gypsy-fueled jazz on Saturday, July 28, at Studio 55 Marin. 1455 East Francisco Blvd., San Rafael. 8pm. $13–$15. 415.453.3161.

S A N TA R O S A

Fair Game Ahoy, matey! All aboard for the 2012 Sonoma County Fair. Fairgoers will be met with a mass of fried and sugared foods, wild carnival rides and games, horse races for those jonesin’ for gambling and the ever crowdpleasing Grace Pavilion “Hall of Crap,” as my dad eloquently calls it. This year’s theme is “Ports of Call,” and depending on the day of your “cruise,” you may be able to catch one or some of the headlining acts for this year. Martina McBride, Third Eye Blind and Miranda Cosgrove are a few of this year’s attractions, but don’t forget these performances require special tickets. The fair runs almost three weeks, so there’s no excuse for missing this sailing-good time from July 25 through Aug. 12 at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. 1350 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. $5–$10. 707.545.4200.

—Holly Abrahams and Catherine Zaw

SHARP DRESSED MAN John Pizzarelli exemplifies jazz elegance on the guitar at the Napa Valley Opera House July 27. See Concerts, p37.

WACKY MAGIC Lauryn Hochberg

as Moth in ‘Peaseblossom.’

Pease Porridge

‘Peaseblossom’ at Sebastopol Shakes BY DAVID TEMPLETON

L

overs to bed. ’Tis almost fairy time.”

Of Shakespeare’s numerous plays, none is as loved and adored as A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The bard’s bawdy little love story about hapless humans caught in the middle of an epic battle of the sexes in two clans of warring fairies is extremely well-known, and its primary characters have become household names: Puck the mischievous right-hand man of Oberon, king of the fairies; Titania, the fiery fairy queen who falls under a magic spell and chooses a donkey-eared oaf named Bottom as her mutant love slave. Less familiar, though, mainly because they have very few lines, are the other fairies: Moth, Mustardseed, Cobweb and Peaseblossom, not to mention the even less remembered Fairy One and Fairy Two.

‘Peaseblossom’ runs Thursday– Saturday through July 28. Showtimes 7pm; park opens at 5:30. Low-backed chairs preferred. $15–$20; kids under 12 free. www.mainstagewest.com.

33 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Stage

In Peaseblossom—Patrick Devon’s goofy and gracefully outrageous spin on the themes from A Midsummer Night’s Dream—all of those lesser known fairies finally get the spotlight, as Devon imagines the events of the play from the fairies’ points of view. Peaseblossom, running through July 29 in Sebastopol’s Ives Park, opens the annual Sebastopol Shakespeare Festival, taken over this year by Main Stage West theater. Directed by Thomas Chapman (who published an early draft of the play under a pseudonym), this is a supremely silly endeavor, crafted to cater to an actor’s most outlandish impulses. Indeed, one of the chief pleasures of Peaseblossom is the lunatic antics of its large and energetic cast. As Peaseblossom, the resident peacemaker among the fairies, Paul Huberty is agile and elastic, mugging elegantly through the script, which essentially follows Shakespeare’s story with a few supernatural subplots. As Titania and Oberon, Mary Gannon Graham and Eric Thompson are hilarious, and Bronwen Shears, as Titania’s bodyguard Thistle (who’s having a bit of a “thing” with Peaseblossom), is somehow both grounded and delightfully over-the-top. Allison Rae Baker, playing against type as the grumpy, sarcastic Mustardseed, is a wonder, matched in silliness by Lauryn Hochberg as the dotty Moth, David Yen as the slightly wise elder fairy Cobweb and Kelly Brandeberg as the lovestruck, sweetly scheming Dewdrop. The costumes, courtesy of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, are stunning, all color and whimsy. Though the play itself feels a bit like a workshop production by being slightly overlong and a tad repetitious, Chapman’s cast attacks the two-and-a-half hour enterprise with such delirious enthusiasm, sinking their collective teeth into the twistyturny language, that Peaseblossom works, unleashing a storm of weird and wacky magic.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

34

D I S C OV E R T H E M O S T

MAGICAL

Film

FI L M OF T H E Y EAR “A BLAST OF

SHEER IMPROBABLE JOY.” A.O. SCOTT

WOE IS HER Timeshare wife Jackie Siegel steals this incisive film.

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n the documentary The Queen of Versailles, “Versailles” is a 17-bathroom, 26,000-square-foot mansion erected in the Florida swamps—the same location of Citizen Kane’s unhappy Xanadu. When they began construction, timeshare magnate David Siegel and wife Jackie intended their Louis XIV–style pile to be the largest private house in America. Documentarian Lauren Greenfield records what befell that lofty goal. Greenfield is a noted nonfiction photographer, best known for her candid photos of girls, and you can see how the surgically enhanced girliness of Jackie drew Greenfield. This former beauty queen from working-class Binghamton, N.Y., is profoundly Botoxed, with implants the size of cantaloupes. (“The hostess with the two mostest,” snipes her stepson.) Jackie’s woes take over the film. Meanwhile, the moping David walls up in his study, watching his real estate value plummet and hearing the banks howl for their money. The Queen of Versailles becomes most damning when we see the nature of David Siegel’s Westgate Resorts. They depend on the seduction of vacationers besotted by Vegas, as well as boiler-room collection agents. (“Greedy” is the term Siegel’s people use to describe “Johnny Lunchbucket” vacationers who try to get those free Cirque du Soleil tickets without indenturing themselves for life to a timeshare.) Of course, The Queen of Versailles’ subject is bigger than the Siegels. It condemns our nation’s faith in greed, in gargantuan pelf. What comes true here is as savory as any melodrama about the spoiled rich: familial shellshock, instant ruins and the special kind of decadence that lets dog turds accumulate on the floor of a million-dollar mansion. David Siegel is now distancing himself from this documentary. Siegel has the audacity to boast onscreen that he was the one who fixed Florida for W’s election. If that’s true, he deserves everything he gets in this film. ‘The Queen of Versailles’ opens Friday, July 27, at the Rafael Film Center.

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36

Music

SPINS A YARN Ask Ramblin’ Jack

how it’s going at your own risk.

Ramblin’ Man Ramblin’ Jack celebrates Woody Guthrie centennial BY JAY SCHERF

A

rtists are often defined in the context of their city, with much discussion on how the particulars of the area influence their sound. Then there’s Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, a true product of the open road.

Born from the cowboy songs he learned on the rodeo, the blues he learned in the South, and the folksy storytelling he learned while traveling with mentor Woody Guthrie, Elliott’s music embodies American folk music as a whole. On July 29, Elliott headlines “This Train,” a festival honoring Woody Guthrie’s would-be 100th birthday. As Guthrie’s personal student, Elliott is the perfect choice: Guthrie once quipped that Elliott

“sounds more like me than I do.” I spoke with Elliott over the phone as he drank coffee in Shasta City. Though a seasoned traveler, Elliott’s nickname “Ramblin’ Jack” refers not to his adventures but to his storytelling. My “How ya doin’?” prompts a long yarn from Elliott about how he’d snuck out of his friends’ house at 4 that morning, how Bend, Ore., is the exact midpoint between a friend’s place in Washington and his house in Marin (“Four hundred and 90 miles from door to door!”) and his evening plans; he tells it all so well that I don’t want to interrupt him with another question. I’d expected Elliott, 81, to have tired of talking about his mentor sometime in the 40 years after his death. But he’s surprisingly open about Guthrie and his centennial, saying he’s “been lookin’ forward to it for a hundred years now.” Though many refer to Elliott as Guthrie’s most important protégé, Elliott describes himself simply as Guthrie’s “sidekick,” and says he knew what he was getting into when they began playing together. “I knew that he was profoundly good at what he did,” he says. “I figured I’d probably be hearing about him the rest of my life, and I have been.” But Elliott means more to music than keeping Guthrie’s legacy alive. Elliott’s won a Grammy, has been nominated for four more, and Johnny Cash once claimed he knew no one who had “covered more ground and made more friends and sung more songs” than Elliott. Elliott’s own protégé Bob Dylan put it clearer, crowning him “king of the folksingers.” Despite his success, Elliott has survived the music industry without selling his soul to it— possibly at the expense of greater fame. Refusing set lists in concert, he only plays songs that matter to him—punctuated, always, by his ramblin’ storytelling. Ramblin’ Jack Elliott headlines ‘This Train,’ a Woody Guthrie centennial celebration benefiting the Graton Day Labor Center, on Sunday, July 29, in Railroad Square. 135 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. Free. 11am. 707.326.5274.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Bobby Joe Ebola & the Children MacNuggits Ready to help with all your dragon slaying needs, bone dagger in hand. Jul 28, 9pm. Russian River Brewing Co, 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Jason Bodlovich CD release for the North Bay guitar maestro. Jul 27. Free. Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Dave Koz with BeBe Williams The former bandleader of the Emeril Lagasse show brings his smooth jazz sound to the North Bay. Jul 28, 5pm. $60$90. Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Freq Nasty Fijian breakbeat artist has worked with Fatboy Slim, Michael Franti and many others. $10-$20. Jul 27, 9pm. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Friday Night Live Cloverdale’s summer-long series features New Monsoon on Jul 27. 7pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Peacetown Summer Concert Series Featuring music from Country All Stars on Jul 25. 5pm. Free. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Sabertooth Zombie Plenty of yelling and loud guitars. Appearing with Hides, Strike to Survive, Still Ill and DCOI. Jul 26, 8pm. $7. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Summer Nights on the Green Outdoor summer shows in Windsor include Wonderbread 5 on Jul 26. 6pm. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

This Train

Calistoga Summer Concert Series Featuring Cassidy Crowley on Jul 26. 6:30pm. Free. Pioneer Park, Cedar and Elm streets, Calistoga.

Leo Kottke As comfortable with pop and folk as he is with jazz and classical. Jul 25, 8pm. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Ottmar Liebert

Son of reggae legend Bob touring in support of his new album, “Wild and Free.” Jul 27, 7pm. $40-$50. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

John Pizzarelli

Tuesdays on the Plaza

Small roots groups take over historic porches throughout downtown. Take a walking tour and hear dozens of different bands. Jul 29, 2-5pm. Free. Various locations in and around downtown Napa. www.napaporchfest.org.

World-renowned guitarist and singer supporting latest album, “Double Exposure.” Jul 27, 8pm. $30-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Porchfest

) 38

Three members of the Mothers of Invention (Don Preston, Napoleon Murphy Brock and Tom Fowler) perform music of Frank Zappa. Jul 27, 8pm. $22-$25. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Jazz It Up Ferrari-Carano’s Seasons of the Vineyard with Saturday jazz concerts, featuring Benny Barth Trio, Judi Silvan’s “Indigo Moods” trio and many others. Jul 28. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg.

Live at Juilliard

HE’S A FREQ Freq Nasty plays Hopmonk July 27.

See Clubs, p38.

Saturday, August 4, 2012

JACKIE GREENE Pimps of Joytime  Poor Man’s Whiskey

Ziggy Marley

Grandmothers of Invention

Evening shows in Santa Rosa park feature Detroit Disciples on Jul 29. 6pm. Free. Juilliard Park, 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa.

keeping music in the schools

One of the foremost players of nouveau flamenco. Aug 1, 8pm. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Festival celebrating Woody Guthrie’s would-be 100th birthday features Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, Easy Leaves, Old Jawbone and more musicians and speakers. Jul 29, 11am6pm. Free. Railroad Square, Santa Rosa.

Summer concert series in Healdsburg plaza features Poor Man’s Whiskey on Jul 31. 6pm. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

37

NAPA COUNTY

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

38

Music ( 37

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Jul 27, Due Zighi Bacci. Jul 29, Real Jazz Quartet. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Jul 26, Avi Wisnia. Jul 27, Boo Radley’s House, the Helen Kellers, Over the Falls. Jul 28, Dirty Dub Band, Dubtown Dread. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Doc Holliday’s Saloon Jul 27, Third Rail. Jul 28, Blues Burners. Mon, DJ Mixxxa. Tues, Family Karaoke. Wed, Country Music Wednesdays. 138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.623.5453.

Flamingo Lounge Jul 27, Groove Foundation. Jul 28, Valley Rhythm Section. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Jul 27, Da Puna Bruddahs. Jul 28, Honey B & the Pollinators. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden Jul 25, David Helfand. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Tavern Jul 26, Hamsa Lila. Jul 27, 9pm, Freq Nasty. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Jul 26, Jen Tucker. Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jul 25, Lauralee Brown. Jul 26, Michael Bloch. Jul 28, Deep Chatham. Jul 29, Sacred Profanities. Jul 29, WTJ2. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Porch Swings Napa Porchfest a community hootenanny From sea to shining sea comes the Porchfest, an assortment of live music played on—well, of course—porches. This year’s Napa Porchfest, on July 29, features 77 musical acts over the course of three hours performing on the front porches of Napa. According to Juliana Inman, committee chair for the free event, the concept of Porchfest started in Ithaca, N.Y., a few years ago. The informal event eventually spread to other communities throughout the Northeast, jumping into Ohio and Canada, but Napa is proudly the first West Coast city to host one. “Last year, our total expenditure was $270,” explains Inman, adding that the event was largely a volunteer effort. “This year, we solicited a mini-grant from the local Napa city tourism district.” (The funds will be used in part for maps to guide attendees to houses.) Twice as big as its predecessor, and with many artists and homeowners returning from last year, Porchfest is perhaps best experienced on a bike, riding from home to home to catch it all. Don’t miss it on Sunday, July 29, at various homes in and around downtown Napa. 2–5pm. Free. For details, see www.napaporchfest.org.—Catherine Zaw

Last Day Saloon Jul 27, the Donna Jean Godchaux Band & Mark Karan. Jul 28, Sopwith Camel. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Jul 26, Susan Sutton. Jul 27, Frankye Kelly. Jul 28, Pat Wilder. Jul 29, Cazadero Jazz Project. Aug 1, Hand Me Down. M16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mavericks Jul 27, Moonshine Bandits. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jul 26, Two Friends. Jul 27, Timothy O’Neil Band. Jul 28, Joyride. Jul 29, Duffy’s Tavern

Dinner Theatre. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Jul 27, Grandmothers of Invention. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. ) 707.765.2121.

40

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Saturday, July 28

Wed, Jul 25 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Jul 26 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther presents MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;N ROLL

Fri, Jul 27 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

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8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING $10

DIN N E R & A SHOW

NORTH BAY BLUES REVUE July 27 Dance to these Blues! 8:30pm Sat D CLICK AND ANNY July 28 THE HELL YEAHS! Fri

Sun

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BEAUSOLEIL QUARTET AVEC MICHAEL DOUCET & TOM RIGNEY AND FLAMBEAU

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Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

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Mon, Jul 30 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25-31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

GATOR BEAT

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Thur, Jul 26 X$350 for all beer on tap 6pm, Sign-ups at 5pm XOPEN MIC Fri, Jul 27 X5:30pm XWILD IRIS 9pm XREGGAE AT THE REDWOOD Thur, Aug 2 X$350 for all beer on tap 6pm, Sign-ups at 5pm XOPEN MIC Fri, Aug 3 X5:30pm XDAVE HAMILTON 9pm XDJIIN French/Flamenco/Gypsy Sat, Aug 4 X5:30pm XBRIAN FRANCIS 9pm XCHOPPINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BROCCOLI 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dance Party Sign up for our newsletter & like us on facebook to receive special offers! 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868 www.redwoodcafe.com

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Wed, Gallery Wednesday. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Fourth Friday of every month, Kaleidoscope. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone. Jul 27, the Revelators. Jul 28, Savanah Blue. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Tracy Blackman. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Osteria Divino

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Jul 25, Piro Patton Duo. Jul 26, Noam Lemish Trio. Jul 27, Passion Habanera. Jul 28, Suzanna Smith. Jul 29, Amanda Addleman. Jul 31, James Moseley. 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Jul 26, Sofi Rox. Jul 27, the Continentals. Jul 28, Cole Tate Band. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jul 25, Bob Gordon & the Ohana Ukelele Band. Jul 26, Ann Brewer & Jorge Castellanos. Jul 31, Triple Point with Felipe Gomez. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Studio 55 Marin Jul 28, George Cole & Eurocana. 1455 East Francisco Boulevard, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Taste of Rome Jul 28, Andoniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quartet. 1000 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7660.

NAPA COUNTY

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Jul 25, Swoop Unit. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Jul 26, Johnny Smith. Jul 27, Captain Crunch. Jul 28, Hard Traveling Band. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Sausalito Seahorse Jul 26, John Allair. Jul 27, La Fuerza Gigante. Jul 28, Fely Tchaco. Jul 29, Paâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l Bailador. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Jul 25, Dyllan Hersey. Jul 26, Finch & Friends. Jul 27, Matt Vrba. Jul 28, Fenton Coolfoot and the Right Time. Jul 29, Tommy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Mahoney Trio. Jul 31,

Napa Valley Opera House Jul 25, Leo Kottke. Jul 27, John Pizzarelli. Aug 1, Ottmar Liebert. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Uptown Theatre Jul 27, Ziggy Marley. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Tradewinds Jul 25, the Hots. Jul 27, Ron Thompson and His Resistors. Jul 28, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Jul 29, Noah Gabriel. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY Ali Akbar College of Music Jul 25, Peter van Gelder & Swapan Chaudhuri. Jul 28, Debasish Chaudhuri & Ken Zuckerman. 215 West End Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6264.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

+ JAZ JAZ SUFI SUFI

$$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 7:45PM/ALL 7: 45PM /ALL AGES AGES MON M ON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; AUG AUG 6 W WEEKLY EE EK KLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

Society: Culture House

Jul 29, Smilinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Iguanas. 2030 Barlow Lane, Sebastopol. 707.823.2849. Cover May Apply

$$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

Jul 28, Hoytus & One Heart. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Taft Street Winery

880â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S/GALM 0â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S/ GALM ROCK R O CK

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River Theatre

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

POP FICTION

BOOGIE B OOG IE NIGHTS NIPARTY) G HTS S ((80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CO COSTUME STUM E P AR T Y )

Jul 27, Ill Repute, Resilience, Slandyr, Violation, M-Section. Mon, 7pm, young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Fourth Thursday of every month, writers workshops. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Mamou Playboys. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

St. Lucia Hailing from Johannesberg, Jean-Philip Grobler makes bright, rhythm-doused pop music. Jul 26 at Rickshaw Stop.

Dirty Projectors Brooklynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quirkiest yelping quintet with new album in tow, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swing Lo Magellan!â&#x20AC;? Jul 27 at the Fox Theater.

Henry Butler Trio Wildly versatile New Orleans pianist with a singular feel for the music of his hometown. Jul 27 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oakland.

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Jul 27, Ray Obiedo & Mambo Caribe. Jul 28, Petty Theft. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

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Jul 25, Gail Munrow & the Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Blues Band. Jul 27, Norrisman. Jul 29, Cathey Cottenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Allstar Evil Plan. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

The interminably captivating songwriter tours on new album with title far too lengthy to fit here. Jul 28 at the Fox Theater.

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Fiona Apple Big K.R.I.T. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;King Remembered in Time,â&#x20AC;? for this Mississippi nativeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;who remembers older R&B, too. Jul 27 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Old Western Saloon Jul 28, Mike Maxwell. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Osher Marin JCC Jul 28, Steve Riley & the

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

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International Vegetarian Buffet

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Wed, July 25, 7:30–10pm World Music Duo on Tour

David Helfand & Justin Lader Thurs, July 26, 8–10pm Guitar and Pedal Steel

Wine Country Swing Fri, July 27, 8–10pm Celtic with a Kick!

Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Food ~ Wine & Hot Air Ballooning! from $199

Greenhouse 7ED !UG nPMsSmooth Jazz

Shade Fri, Aug 3, 7:30–10pm Activist Lounge

100,000 Poets for Change 3AT !UG nPMsR&B and Soul

The Harvest Band Now Mon, Aug 6, 7–9pm Latin America and the Caribbean

De Corazon a Son Wed, Aug 8, 9–10:30pm Helen Pachynski, emcee

Comedy Open Mic &INE"EERS7INESs$ 5 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Mon–Sat 11:30am–9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

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Gaia’s Garden

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

42

Arts Events Galleries OPENINGS Jun 26 At 6pm. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Face Meâ&#x20AC;? captures likeness, personality and mood of a person in a self-portrait or portrait. Ninety-one pieces. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Jul 28

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From 2 to 7pm. Studio 950, results of work completed during past year in ink, pencil, watercolor, mixed watermedia, collage and papier mache. 950 Clover Dr, Santa Rosa.

Jul 29

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For accessble For acces sble iinformation, nfo r m atio n, c a ll call 7 07.5 43 .3929 / 707.543.3929/ T DD 7 07.5 43 .3289 TDD 707.543.3289 ((Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;F, M â&#x20AC;&#x201C; F, 8amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm) 8am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5pm )

From 11am to 6pm. Isis Oasis, local artists exhibit their creations amid live music and zoological sanctuary tours. Free. 20889 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville.

SONOMA COUNTY ARThouse Gallery Through Jul 31, Etching tools and India ink create intricate scratchboard works. Free. 13758 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.3513.

Beer B eer & Wine W ine s sold old by by M Mrr Music Music

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Through Jul 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pointillism,â&#x20AC;? the work of Mary Jarvis. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Graton Gallery Through Aug 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dog Treatsâ&#x20AC;? work by Mylette Welch, including guest artists Susie Peterson, Richard Moore, Linda Schroeter and Gen Zorich. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Jul 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Landau, Miller and Vogelâ&#x20AC;? features the work of Frank J Miller, James Vogel and Natasha Landau. Through Sep 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Second Nature,â&#x20AC;? paintings and collages of Jenny Honnert Abell, reflects on the abundance of the natural

world. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Phantom IV Gallery Through Jul 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Connect,â&#x20AC;? by recent SSU grads Chris Beards (sculpture), Mary Black (encaustic) and Ben Lastufka (painting). 9077 Windsor Rd, Windsor. 707.527.5447.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Aug 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Collectaneaâ&#x20AC;? features the accumulations, agglomerations and assortments of many local artists. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery Through Jul 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;She Eats Cheetos with Chopsticks,â&#x20AC;? the work of painter Naomi Murakami. Reception, Jul 26, 5pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Jul 26-Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Face Meâ&#x20AC;? captures the likeness, the personality or even the mood of a person in a self-portrait or portrait. Ninety-one pieces. Reception, Jul 26, 6pm. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Pollination,â&#x20AC;? the art of painter Lawrence Ferlinghetti. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Studio 950 Jul 28, 2-7pm, results of work completed during the past year in ink, pencil, watercolor, mixed watermedia, collage and papier mache. 950 Clover Dr, Santa Rosa.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Through Jul 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sounds of Summer,â&#x20AC;? curated by Milla Ruane and Joanne Harwood. Through Aug 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Still Lifes,â&#x20AC;? curated by Jennifer Farris and Rab Terry, features 42 artists in different media. Through Aug 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tropical Punch,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Deanna Pedroli. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Aug 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Journeys: Chronicles in Clay,â&#x20AC;? featuring the work of Terra Linda ceramic artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Aug 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duende: Junkyard Melodies,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Tim Weldon. Artist demo Aug 4, 4pm. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Sebastopol Gallery

Gallery Route One

Through Aug 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spontaneous Journeysâ&#x20AC;? features Teri Sloatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landscapes and folk art. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Through Aug 5, Group show of member artists, with Mimi Abers, Candace Loheed and others. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 12, 11am-5pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chinatown,â&#x20AC;? exhibition explores how Chinese communities developed in Sonoma County, with special attention on Santa Rosa. Curator tour, Aug 3, noon. Through Sep 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treesâ&#x20AC;? featuring the large-scale oil paintings of Chester Arnold. Through Sep 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonoma Oaks: Points of Viewâ&#x20AC;? featuring Hugh Livingstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s multimedia installations on the patterns and sounds of California oak habitats. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Sep 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cross

Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond Landscapeâ&#x20AC;? features artwork focused on sustaining nature and taking care of the planet. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through Aug 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Horizons,â&#x20AC;? an artist members exhibition runs concurrent with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jeffrey Sully: Poetic Contours.â&#x20AC;? Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jul 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fathom: The Essence of Water,â&#x20AC;? open house exhibition featuring water in all its forms and essences.

Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

43 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Events Festival of Neighborhoods Bike parade from your ‘hood to downtown, where entertainment and kids activities await. Jul 29, noon4pm. Free. Old Courthouse Square, Downtown, Santa Rosa.

Pacific Islander Festival Polynesian cuisine, kids activities, music and dancing all day. Jul 28, 10am-8pm. Free. City Center Plaza, 500 City Center Dr, Rohnert Park.

Petaluma Art and Equestrian Festival

Smith Anderson North Gallery Through Aug 4, “Williams, Waits” features the work of Franklin Williams and Kellesimone Waits, who share a playful obsession for acquiring and incorporating discarded relics. 20 Greenfield Ave, San Anselmo. 415.457.8847.

Through Sep 6, “Land, Sea and the People Within,” oil paintings by Dorallen Davis. free. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.968.2203.

Westin Verasa Hotel Through Jul 31, “Stories on Canvas,” still life, animals and portraits by Vernon Valine. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa.

Comedy

Hess Collection Winery

Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Napa Valley Museum Through Aug 5, “Modern” features the abstract expressionist paintings of Ira Yeager. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Political satirist and writer. Appearing with Myles Weber. Jul 28, 8pm. $25-$30. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Tuesday Evening Comedy

Dance

What the Robin Knows Jon Young leads a nature walk focusing on birds using his four decades of experience. Jul 28, 10am. $10-$30. Pt Reyes National Seashore, Bear Valley Road, Olema.

Food & Drink

Les Filles Rouges Polaris Dance Troupe presents burlesque show, 21 and over. Jul 28, 8:30pm. $20-$25.

Mercato di Vino Food and wine pairing with live

) 44

a tribute to Etta James

LYDIA PENSE & COLD BLOOD plus RAY CHARLES PROJECT plus

Deszon Claiborne Dave Mathews

Clifford Coulter DeWayne Pate

Friday, August 3 8 PM Doors open 7PM. $30 general seating; ages 21+ only TICKETS: (online) raventheater.org; (cash/check) Copperfield’s in Healdsburg or Last Record Store in Santa Rosa www.raventheater.org

Tony Lindsay Glenn Walters

433-6335

Will Durst

Includes an introduction to organic gardens and bordering wildlands, educational programs and resident intentional community. Jul 29, 10am. $10. Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 15290 Coleman Valley Rd, Occidental. 707.874.1557.

www.raventheater.org

Through Sep 23, “Entering the Wild” featuring the work of Trish Carney, Adriane Colburn and others. Panel discussion, Aug 1. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

www.raventheater.org

Field Trips Garden Tour

di Rosa

Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by Franz Gertsch, Robert Motherwell and other modern masters. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 707.255.1144.

Drag racers on the top pro circuit make as much noise as possible throughout the weekend. Jul 27-29. $20-$125. The “Raceway in Sonoma,” Highways 37 and 121, Sonoma. 800.870.RACE.

433-6335

NAPA COUNTY

Robert Mondavi Winery

433-6335

616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Sonoma NHRA Nationals

www.raventheater.org

Abell is up at Hammerfriar Gallery through Sept. 8.

433-6335

‘BOOK COVER NO.110’ Work by Jenny Honnert

Horse-related demos, arts and crafts and beer and wine available. Jul 29, 11am-4pm. San Francisco Polo Club Ranch, 7650 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma.

Arts Events

44 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

music. Jul 28-29, noon-5pm. $25-$35. Deerfield Ranch Winery, 10200 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood.

Midsummer Garden Tea Traditional tea service and a loveliest hat contest in this charming reminder of bygone days. Sun, Jul 29, 1-3pm. $50. Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, Santa Rosa Avenue at Sonoma Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.524.5445.

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Summer BBQ Food by Jeff Mall of ZIN restaurant, music by Business Casual. Jul 28, 3pm. $55-$65. Little Vineyards, 15188 Sonoma Highway, Glen Ellen. 707.996.2750.

Singles 116 Wine and food pairing for singles. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like speed dating meets speed tasting! Jul 27, 5:30pm. $10-$30. Russian River Vineyards, 5700 Hwy 116, Forestville.

( 43 Northern California: Hiking Inn to Inn.â&#x20AC;? Jul 31, 7pm. REI Santa Rosa, Southside Shopping Center, 2715 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.9025.

Mathematics, Music & Instruments Science Buzz Cafe series features luthier Harry Fleishman. Jul 26, 7pm. $4. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

These Walls Can Speak Visual presentation and discussion in recognition of GLBTQ physical spaces contributing to American history, culture and community by Gerry Takano. Jul 28, 6pm. River Reader, 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

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Bicentennial Weekend Saturday, July 28, 10am - 7pm Sunday, July 29, 10am - 4:30pm Come join us in commemorating our 200-year anniversary at Fort Ross State Historic Park

located 12 miles North of Jenner. Program includes Moscowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pyatnitsky Russian Folk Choir, Limpopo, historic ÂżUHDUPV+XGVRQ%D\&RPSDQ\ kayaks in the cove, Russian food, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities, marketplace â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and much more. A weekend to remember! For more information please visit our website or call us. www.fortross.org 707-847-3437 $35 per car/van; $30 with senior (Entrance fee is per car, per day)

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Constitutional lawyer and former Green Party presidential candidate is working to amend the Constitution to declare that corporations are not people and money is not speech. Jul 26, 7pm. Free. Old Courthouse Square, Downtown, Santa Rosa.

Fukushima: Denial or Awareness Yastel Yamada, founder of the Skilled Veterans Corps for Fukushima and Carol Wolman MD, Psychiatrist, speaks on the ongoing crisis in Fukushima. Jul 29, 7pm. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Richard Heinberg Headliner of the Biochar Conference and author of 10 books speaks about biochar as it relates to climate, soil and commerce. Jul 31, 7pm. $95-$275. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2880.

Hiking Inn to Inn Tom Courtney talks about some of the remarkable multiday hiking adventures in his new guidebook, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walkabout

Theater And Then There Were None Silver Moon Theatre presents the Agatha Christie play directed by Nellie Cravens. Times vary. ThursSun through Aug 12. $18$22. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

Avenue Q Sesame Street-style puppets acting very much like adults. This show is not for kids, but it is hilarious. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 11. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Bat Boy: The Musical

Readings Book Passage

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Jul 25, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life After Murder: Five Men in Search of Redemptionâ&#x20AC;? with Nancy Mullane. Jul 26, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kingdom of Strangersâ&#x20AC;? with ZoĂŤ Ferraris. Jul 26, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mount Tamalpais and the Marin Municipal Water District â&#x20AC;&#x153; with Jack Gibson. Jul 27, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond DiMaggio: Italian Americans in Baseballâ&#x20AC;? with Lawrence Baldassaro. Jul 28, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Desert Reckoning: A Town Sheriff, a Mojave Hermit, and the Biggest Manhunt in Modern California Historyâ&#x20AC;? with Deanne Stillman. Jul 29, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fire Monks: Zen Mind Meets Wildfireâ&#x20AC;? with Colleen Morton Busch. Jul 31, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Putneyville Fablesâ&#x20AC;? with Marianne Gage. Aug 1, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Teach Your Children Well: Parenting for Authentic Successâ&#x20AC;? with Madeline Levine. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Napa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jul 31, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Malice, Quite Closeâ&#x20AC;? with Brandi Lynn Ryder. 3900-A Bel Aire Plaza, Highway 29 and Trancas Street, Napa. 707.252.8002.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jul 29, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poetry, Politics and Passionâ&#x20AC;? with Jennie Orvino. 3850 Doris

Dark comedy about a bat boy discovered in a cave and brought to live with a family in rural West Virginia. Based on a true story? Times vary. Fri-Sun through Aug 5. $14-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Greater Tuna The show focuses on small town Southern life. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 12. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

King John Marin Shakespeare Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rendition under the stars is sure to strike a romantic chord. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 12. $20 to $55. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Legally Blonde: The Musical Roustabout Theater presents this production of the TonyAward winning musical. Times vary. Jul 27-29. $16-$26. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

A Midsummer Nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dream Robert Currier directs outdoor production set in Hawaii where the scent of hibiscus and twang of ukuleles will permeate Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story of lunatics, lovers and poets. Dates )

46

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46 Arts Events NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 25–31, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

( 44

CRITIC’S CHOICE

BY ROB BREZSNY

and times vary. Jul 28-Sep 30. $20-$35. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael.

For the week of July 25

The Music Man Music to My Ears and the Rohnert Park-Cotati Children’s Chorus present the classic musical about a con man who changes his ways. Times vary. Jul 27-29. $10-$15. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Passion Play Three communities attempt to stage the Easter Passion in three different eras: 1575 northern England, 1934 Bavaria, and Spearfish, South Dakota, from Vietnam through Reagan. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 5. $15-$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Peaseblossom A farce based on Shakespeare’s most beloved comedy, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Part of Sebastopol Shakespeare Festival. Dates and times vary. Through Jul 28. Free-$20. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Pinky When a sweetly romantic teenager named Pinky appears at the local bowling alley, nerdy highschooler David is instantly smitten. Dates and times vary. Thurs-Sun through Aug 11. $10-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Sister Cities Dark comedy written by Colette Freedman, directed by Jacquelyn Wells. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sun through Aug 19. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Rings and Strings Burlesque show to aid sex-trafficking victims Q: What do child prostitution in India and burlesque dancing in Petaluma have in common? A: Melinda Miller-Klopfer, a native of Mendocino County and a former ballet dancer who’s melded her love of dance and its healing powers with an extraordinary experience abroad. When Miller-Klopfer quit her job of coordinating and teaching at a small dance company, she moved to Bihar, India, to teach dance and movement therapy to child prostitutes between the ages of six and 16. This profound and dangerous experience inspired her current burlesque project, Polaris Dance Troupe, and their show Les Filles Rouge. The show, coming to the Mystic Theatre July 28, focuses on the empowerment of women. “The ironic juxtaposition between working with victims of sex-trafficking and teaching women how to take their clothes off for an audience is not lost on me,” she writes, “but I think they are the same issue at heart: empowerment, ownership, feminism, self-love and self-respect.” A portion of all proceeds from the show go to an educational fund to give Miller-Klopfer’s former students access to higher education. Witness dazzling dance and support a good cause when Les Filles Rouge hits the Mystic Theatre on Saturday, July 28. 21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 8:30pm. $20–$25. 707.765.2121.—Holly Abrahams

Sweet Charity This tender, poignant and funny look at the adventures in the ways of love features songs like “Hey Big Spender.” Dates and times vary. Through Aug 19. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Xanadu In this musical comedy Greek muse Kira descends from the heavens to Venice Beach, 1980,

Astrology

FREE WILL

to inspire the first roller disco. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 5. $15-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the

community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication

ARIES (March 21–April 19) In your personal chart, the planet Uranus symbolizes those special talents you have that are especially useful to other people. Which aspects of your soulful beauty are potentially of greatest service to the world? How can you express your uniqueness in ways that activate your most profound generosity? If you learn the answers to these questions, you will make great progress toward solving the riddle that Uranus poses. I’m happy to report that the coming years will provide you with excellent opportunities to get to the bottom of this mystery. And now would be a good time to launch a concerted effort. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

In the coming weeks, I’m afraid there’s only a very small chance that you’ll be able to turn invisible at will, shapeshift into an animal form and back, or swipe the nectar of immortality from the gods. The odds of success are much higher, though, if you will attempt less ambitious tasks that are still pretty frisky and brazen. For example, you could germinate a potential masterpiece where nothing has ever grown. You could legally steal from the rich and give the spoils to the poor. And you could magically transform a long-stuck process that no one thought would ever get unstuck.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Are there are any weaknesses or problems in your approach to communication? They will be exposed in the coming weeks. If you’re even slightly lazy or devious about expressing yourself, you will have to deal with the karmic consequences of that shortcoming. If there’s more manipulativeness than love in your quest for connection, you’ll be compelled to do some soulsearching. That’s the bad news, Gemini. The good news is that you will have far more power than usual to upgrade the way you exchange energy with others. In fact, this could be the time you enter into a golden age of communication. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

If you narrow your focus now, the world will really open up for you in the second half of October and November. To the degree that you impose limitations on your desire to forever flow in all directions, you will free up creative ideas that are currently buried. So summon up some toughminded discipline, please. Refuse to let your moodiness play havoc with your productivity. Dip into your reserve supply of high-octane ambition so you will always have a sixth sense about exactly what’s important and what’s not.

LEO (July 23–August 22) The state of Maine has a law that prohibits anyone from leaving an airplane while it is flying through the air. This seems like a reasonable restriction until you realize how badly it discriminates against skydivers. Legal scholars will tell you that examples like this are not at all rare. Laws tend to be crude, one-size-fits-all formulations. And as I’m sure you’ve discovered in your travels, Leo, onesize-fits-all formulations always squash expressions of individuality. In the coming weeks, be extra alert for pressures to conform to overly broad standards and sweeping generalizations. Rebel if necessary. You have license to be yourself to the 10th power.

grace period when it’s possible to experience at least some of the glory we’re normally cut off from. The veil opens, and previously undetected beauty appears. The weeks ahead will be the closest you’ve come to this breakthrough in a long time.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Can you guess which European country has the best military record in the last eight centuries? It’s France. Out of the 185 battles its soldiers have engaged in, they’ve won 132 and lost only 43. Ten times they fought to a draw. Of all the signs of the zodiac, Scorpio, I think you have the best chance of compiling a comparable record in the next 10 months. Your warrior-like qualities will be at a peak; your instinct for achieving hard-fought victories may be the stuff of legends years from now. But please keep in mind what the ancient Chinese military strategist Sun-tzu said in his iconic text The Art of War: the smart and powerful warrior always avoids outright conflict if possible, and wins by using slyer means.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) After consulting the astrological omens, I’ve concluded that during the next three weeks, you will deserve the following titles: (1) Most Likely to Benefit from Serendipitous Adventures; (2) Most Likely to Exclaim “Aha!”; (3) Most Likely to Thrive While Wandering in Wild Frontiers and Exotic Locales; (4) Most Likely to Have a Wish Come True If This Wish Is Made in the Presence of a Falling Star. You might want to wait to fully embody that fourth title until the period between Aug. 9 and 14, when the Perseids meteor shower will be gracing the night skies with up to 170 streaks per hour. The peak flow will come on Aug. 12 and 13. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) You may have to travel far and wide before you will fully appreciate a familiar resource whose beauty you’re half-blind to. It’s possible you’ll have to suffer a partial loss of faith so as to attract experiences that will make your faith stronger than it ever was. And I’m guessing that you may need to slip outside your comfort zone for a while in order to learn what you need to know next about the arts of intimacy. These are tricky assignments, Capricorn. I suggest you welcome them without resentment. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) My daughter Zoe has been writing some fine poetry these last few years. I regard it as professional-grade stuff that has been born of natural talent and developed through discipline and hard work. You might ask, quite reasonably, whether my evaluation of her literary output is skewed by fatherly pride. I’ve considered that possibility. But recently, my opinion got unbiased corroboration when her school awarded her with the “All-College Honor” for her poetry manuscript. I predict you will soon have a comparable experience. Your views or theories will be confirmed by an independent and objective source. PISCES (February 19–March 20) The critic

I propose that you try to accomplish the following clean-up projects in the next four weeks: 10 bushels of weeds yanked out of your psychic landscape; 25 pounds of unused stuff and moldering junk hauled away from your home; 10 loads of dirty laundry (especially the metaphorical kind) washed free of taint and stains—and not blabbed about on social media; at least $5,000 worth of weird financial karma scrubbed away for good; a forgotten fence mended; and a festering wound tended to until it heals.

Dorothy Parker didn’t think highly of Katherine Hepburn’s acting skills. “She runs the emotional gamut from A to B,” said Parker. I realize that what I’m about to suggest may be controversial, but I’m hoping you will be Hepburn-like in the coming week, Pisces. This is not the right time, in my astrological opinion, for you to entertain a wide array of slippery, syrupy, succulent feelings. Nor would it be wise to tease out every last nuance of the beguiling vibes rising up within you. For the time being, you need to explore the pleasures of discerning perception and lucid analysis. Get lost in deep thought, not rampant passion.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Philosopher William Irwin Thompson says that we humans are like flies creeping along the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. We literally cannot see the splendor that surrounds us. As a result, we don’t live in reality. We’re lost in our habitual perceptions, blinded by our favorite illusions and addicted to beliefs that hide the true nature of the universe. That’s the bad news, Libra. The good news is that every now and then, each of us slips into a

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

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formerly known as PLANNED PARENTHOOD GOLDEN GATE

submit the completed, signed ARMR to GGCH Patient Records at: GGCH-Patient Records 2370 Market Street, PMB 502 San Francisco, CA 94114 -orFax: 415.373.4466 -orEmail: ggch2012@gmail.com Please read and fill out the form carefully. If you have any questions, please contact us via email at ggch2012@gmail.com or telephone 415.518.5716. IF YOU DO NOT REQUEST A COPY OF YOUR PATIENT RECORDS ON OR BEFORE AUGUST 31, 2013, GGCH will request that the United States Department of Health and Human Services and the California Department of Health

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When a sweetly romantic teenager named Pinky appears at the local bowling alley, nerdy highschooler David is inConstitutional lawyer and former Green Party presidential stantly smitten. Dates and times vary. Thurs-Sun through candidate is working to amend the Constitution to declare Aug 11. $10–$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, that corporations are not people and money is not Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185. speech. Jul 26, 7pm. Free. Old Courthouse Square, Downtown, Santa Rosa.

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Fukushima: Denial or Awareness Yastel Yamada, founder of the Skilled Veterans Corps for Fukushima and Carol Wolman MD, Psychiatrist, speaks on the ongoing crisis in Fukushima. Jul 29, 7pm. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

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Sick, demented stimulating radio…at its finest!

$

30 per month

10 X 10…

starting as low as

75 per month

$

—Michael Markowitz, Santa Rosa

The Drive runs over with laughter, entertainment, and news!

We sell boxes, packaging and other moving supplies

—Mario L Pimentel, Sebastopol

I would never get there if I didn’t have The Drive. —Dylan Brody, Los Angeles After starting your crazy day on the go, try relaxin’ with Jaxon on KSRO. —Dan Schloss, Santa Rosa

3205 Dutton Ave | 1435 Sebastopol Ave Santa Rosa | Locally Owned & Operated

707-546-0000 707-578-3299


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