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Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Stett Holbrook, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Juliane Poirier, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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5 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies The 51st State

An open proposal to Hillary Clinton BY STEPHEN GROSS

D

ear Secretary: What better way to solve the illegal immigration problem than to annex Mexico, give it commonwealth status and turn all those illegals into instant legals? No more surreptitious sneaking back and forth, no more sucking off our colonial teats, no more bitter, largely uneducated “second class” citizens depleting resources that are under another country’s stewardship, no more avoiding taxes and sneering in the face of the U.S. legal system by making a dash for the border. After all, if we’re truly the Land of Plenty, let’s accommodate the “tired, poor and huddled masses yearning to be free.” Mexico is largely a lush, sprawling land of rich diversity and tremendous natural resources. All we have to do is “adopt” Mexico and its citizenry; rid the country of its corrosives, toxins, gangsters, murderers, political corruption and unbridled mayhem; make it a bit more hygienic, ecologically responsible and less polluting; mandate that it take concepts such as civil liberties, women’s rights and kindness to other creatures more seriously; and reevaluate its national priorities. No more fences or slinking across the border via the Coyote Express. No more of this macho, bad boy Sureño vs. Norteño crap. No more greedy vicious cartels terrorizing folks with impunity. The Mexican people would gain legal status and all the benefits and responsibilities that go along with it. If English-speaking Canada can tolerate (and coexist with) Quebec, than we should be able to swing a deal with Mexico. After all, we’re already a bilingual country—look at much of our signage and packaging! And if you think the U.S. annexing Mexico isn’t such a great idea, perhaps Mexico would like to annex us. The turbulence that continues to churn up the Rio Grande foams with toxins, corrosives and heartache. Krazy Killer Kartels out of control, wholesale beheadings, murder, mayhem. NAFTA doesn’t work, Mexicans stream across the border, melt into the migratory menudo, cut your lawn, feed your kids . . . and become “virtual” citizens sans documentation. I think the best way to get control over these issues is to legalize marijuana and annex Mexico. We bring 100 million people under our beneficial national umbrella, make sure they’re fed, educated, repaired and happy, and we get to share in Mexico’s bountiful, largely untapped natural resources. We’ll have more room, more cultural wealth and geophysical diversity, cheaper ganja, and a greater world presence—and less hostility, divisiveness and poverty. Stephen Gross is a writer, editor and photographer from Guerneville.

Stuffed Up

Interesting article (“Opportunity Quacks,” June 27). I’m for anything that would diminish the consumption of fatty, arteryclogging foods that result in illness and medical expense. Slaughtering animals is also not high on my list of priorities for having a good time. The forcefeeding and limited exercise endured by ducks before their slaughter for this little treat is outrageous. I’m not aware of an underground market for veal, so I’m hoping the predictions along those lines regarding foie gras will prove unfounded. Kudos to Ms. Abrahams for an informative, thought-provoking article.

ROD HAMMERSLEY San Francisco

In the seven years that the California foie gras industry had the opportunity to explore alternative foul-stuffing methods, nothing was done. Shocking, the law went into effect anyway. It appears a lot of time and effort is being put into circumventing the law and developing a black market. Pshaw. That effort should have been put into exploring and researching more humane efforts of foie gras production. Eduardo Sousa in Spain raises his geese and lets them gorge themselves. At least one chef in New York is working to recreate that sustainable method. So stop sniveling and conniving, and get it together.

MARTI KRAMER Glen Ellen

Canal Vision Those who oppose the “Peripheral Canal” fail to include all of the facts in their arguments, because the facts do not support their position (“Delta Blues,” July 4). Claims that a canal would

“remove so much water” are just that—claims. Operational limits of a proposed canal have yet to be finalized, yet draft elements of the Bay Delta Conservation Plan already include limits on exports when natural river flows are lower.

There are a myriad of factors impacting salmon (and other fish) populations, including water quality, invasive species, predatory fish and ocean conditions. A recent report by the National Research Council stated that improving ecological conditions in the Delta will fail if they don’t target multiple stressors, contrary to the constant drumbeat calling for a reduced water supply for farms, homes and businesses. The Sacramento River fall Chinook escapement, ocean harvest and river harvest index clearly shows population (and harvest) peaks in 1988, 1995 and 2002 with corresponding dips in the intervening years. It is normal to expect a rise in salmon numbers now and in the next few years, and that’s exactly what we’re seeing. Blaming the pumps or deliveries of water that flow through the Delta as the primary cause of reduced salmon populations is simply an exercise in hiding the facts.

MIKE WADE California Farm Water Coalition

Thank you for sharing Alastair Bland’s article “Delta Blues.” As an employee with the Department of Fish and Game, I work closely with the state, the fish markets and fishermen (and women) who have studied these iconic species for decades. Many consumers and amateur fishers do not realize that hatcheries produce the majority of the Chinook populations, and that very few are in fact “wild salmon.” The DFG regulations and monitoring tactics for our salmon populations are impeccable. However, the requirements for sustaining a bountiful and economically dependable

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fishery for a species faced with ultimate habitat destruction can never make everyone happy, therefore the DFG is constantly accused of salmon tragedy. It’s an honest case of biting the hand that feeds. The true culprits are those mandating water rights to regions that had no viable sources to begin with. I encourage every consumer to turn her attention to the disastrous effect that rerouting waterways has already had on countless species, ecosystems and ultimately our local economies. Then perhaps we can start managing our resources, such as the beloved Chinook salmon, based on their needs for survival and not our own desires to manifest destiny.

BRIE BRAWLEY San Francisco

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1

Hopmonk Tavern to open another location at Vintage Oaks in Novato

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Emmylou Harris shows up at Lagunitas Brewing Co., plays intimate show

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Ike’s Place finally opens on Mendocino Avenue in Santa Rosa; lines out the door

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5 Obama: “I believe it’s

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Rants

CONGRATULATIONS

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Paper THE

TRHOUGH THE YEARS A flyer illustration from the first Bohemian Grove protest in 1980; the ‘1%’ exactly.

Bogus Bohemia Bohemian Grove encampment brings the 1% BY JAY SCHERF

E

very July, air traffic at the Sonoma County Airport jumps 10 percent. While private jets line the tarmac, caravans of limousines follow narrow roads along the Russian River as Sonoma County hosts 2,000 of the world’s richest and most powerful men at the Bohemian Club’s summer encampment.

This July 14, in the largest planned protests of the club’s gathering in a decade, Occupy Bohemian Grove will be there to greet them. Reinvigorated by the Occupy movement, protesters from as far away as Japan will head to Monte Rio this Saturday to take part in the mission to “expose the 1%.” Though various sensationalized reports and conspiracy theorist groups have piggybacked the protests, demonstrators gather

this year for the same reason they always have: to draw attention to the Bohemian Grove as a place where self-identified elites network and participate in off-therecord talks that affect the public. As evidenced by leaked camp programs, university research and testimonials of famous Bohemians, the protesters’ allegations aren’t far from the truth. Though the camp’s secrecy makes it hard to determine exactly

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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how much backroom dealing takes place, it’s safe to say that there’s more going on than gin fizzes with breakfast and piddling on redwoods in stop-and-go bursts. A few miles down the Bohemian Highway from the Grove, in the spindly network of single-lane roads of Camp Meeker, lives Mary Moore, face of the 33-year-old Bohemian Grove Action Network (BGAN). Moore, who stopped organizing the protest early in the last decade, decided to help resume it this year because of its relevance to the Occupy movement; the Bohemian Club’s summer encampment perfectly personifies Occupy’s concept of the 1%, she says. Though BGAN has long used terms like “movers and shakers” and “fat cats” to describe the Bohemian Club, Occupy’s rhetoric took the words off the tip of Moore’s tongue. “Now, ‘the 1%,’ if we’d invented that back in 1980—I slap myself—it could’ve been so much clearer over the years,” Moore says, who turns 77 the day of the protest. “After 33 years of us shouting from the rooftops, these young folks came up with this all on their own.��� Occupy complements BGAN not only in message, but by strengthening the local activist community. Lois Pearlman, another organizer of Occupy Bohemian Grove, says that the Occupy movement has “brought new blood and new ideas” to the Bohemian Grove protest. With 23 sponsoring groups ranging in scope from police accountability to Palestinian solidarity, Occupy Bohemian Grove seems less of an independently organized event as much as a product of a network of loosely connected groups. That’s just fine with Moore. “The coalition-building is really the most important piece because it helps us get the bigger picture, and we understand how connected all these issues are,” she explains. Still, one thing the protesters make clear is that they are not out to evict the elite campers, only to call attention to their presence. “We’re not trying to get them to close down. We’re not trying to get them to stop peeing on redwoods or whatever. The goal has always

‘I could care less if they’re running around in pink tutus.’ Moore’s claims appear sound. Studies by UCSC and SSU professors confirm that there exists a class of socioeconomic elites in the club, and that networking at the Grove offers its male members tangible professional advantages. Despite the club’s motto, “Weaving Spiders Come Not Here”— discouraging members from doing business—the camp’s daily Lakeside Talks are directly related to members’ professions. Past speeches—all off-limits to the public—have included Justice Antonin Scalia’s “Church, State, and the Constitution,” Rupert Murdoch’s “The Future of News,” Colin Powell’s “From Battlefields to Playing Fields: Economics, Energy, and Education,” and an untitled speech by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger while he was still in office. Richard Nixon, though once caught on tape calling the encampment “the most faggy goddamned thing you could ever imagine,” credits his own Lakeside Talk with marking “the first stone of [his] path to the presidency.” Additionally, at the same encampment, he described in his memoirs striking a deal with Reagan that the former California

governor would run for president only if Nixon faltered. Further back, Eisenhower’s Lakeside Talk also helped his candidacy, and even one of the club’s own leaked publications states that the Manhattan Project was conceived at the Grove’s clubhouse. Of course, there are those who believe far more serious offenses take place in the redwoods, and Moore and Occupy Bohemian Grove want nothing to do with them. “To my everlasting shame, in 2001 I helped Alex Jones get in. He’s a shock-jock on a national radio program; he comes out of Texas. He’s a libertarian. It made us all look silly,” Moore says, lamenting she had to follow Jones “with a pooper-scooper” explaining to the media that BGAN isn’t in on his conspiracies. Jones’ hours in the grove yielded key footage for his documentaries Dark Secrets: Inside Bohemian Grove and its follow-up, The Order of Death, in which he claims members are part of a new world order who worship Moloch, ancient Ammonite deity of child sacrifice. Jones is hardly alone. In the last decade, the entrance to the Bohemian Grove has become a soapbox for 9-11 conspiracy theorists, protesters of fluoridated water and SmartMeters, and those claiming club members are Illuminati or practice satanic worship. Despite the difficulty to disassociate themselves from fringe activists, Occupy Bohemian Grove’s protest this week features the Fukushima Mothers Delegation in an event that harks back to BGAN’s roots as an anti-nuke group. The event is named “Creation of Care,” in opposition to the Bohemians’ fire-and-hooded-figures opening ritual called the “Cremation of Care.” Standing up to a club containing directors of a quarter of America’s top corporations and every Republican president since Hoover, Moore arms herself only with information of the Grove’s goings-on. “The message is all we have,” she says. “We don’t have any other kind of power except to get a consistent, concise, clean message out there.”

Home Wreckers Mill Valley residents Patricia and John Goff received the eviction notice on Thursday, July 5. After months of wrangling with Wells Fargo mortgage specialists, the couple had lost the battle and consequently faced the prospect of losing their home of 33 years. In a video posted on YouTube, 60year-old Patricia Goff says that after becoming fully disabled in a car accident two years ago, soon after being given a modification loan by Wells Fargo, she became unable to work. That’s when the housing trouble began; foreclosure proceedings began last October. Despite an offer to pay $1,500 a month to stay in the home, and a promise from the bank to work in “good faith” to reinstate the loan process, the Goffs now must move. With this, they join thousands of Americans who’ve lost their homes during the worst foreclosure crisis since the 1930s. “I’m really just at the end of my rope, and feel that I am almost at the end of my life, because this is so destructive in every possible way,” says Goff. Occupy Marin argues that Wells Fargo should honor the original loan modification. Those who would like to support the Goffs are encouraged to make phone calls to Wells Fargo and elected officials to insist that they stop the process. Persons interested in becoming part of a rapid response team—which will, if necessary, occupy the home— should email occupymarin@gmail. com. Join an anti-foreclosure rally for the Goffs on Wednesday, July 11, at the Fourth Street Plaza, San Rafael. 5pm. For more, see www.occupymarin.org. —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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been to focus on the public, to get them to understand that the way the system works is not the way you learned it in civics class, that a lot of it goes on behind closed doors,” she says. “I could care less if they’re running around in pink tutus,” Moore adds, joking about the 99 percent white, 100 percent male club’s legendary onstage entertainment.

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Goods vs. Goodness Local fair trade stores give back

BY JULIANE POIRIER

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or anyone who’s hazy on how fair trade stores break old business models—and change things at the local level—one way is through cooperating rather than competing with one another.

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When Baksheesh store owner Candi Smucker was interviewed for this article, she made plugs for all five fair trade retail stores in Sonoma and Napa counties: Kindred in Santa Rosa, One World in Healdsburg and One Planet in Petaluma, as well as the two Baksheesh stores Smucker owns with her husband in Sonoma and St. Helena. “California doesn’t have its fair share [of fair trade retail outlets],” says Smucker. “There should be hundreds more.” But it takes a unique person to do it. Running a fair trade business requires sacrifice and transparency, according to Madeline Kreider Carlson of the Fair Trade Federation, an organization of fair trade

businesses in the United States and Canada. “Our business model includes a lot of sharing of information and practices that are unique and striking,” says Kreider Carlson. “These practices don’t always make sense from the MBA perspective, but they make human sense when you’re dealing with producers who are truly marginalized.” The fair trade movement grew out of a desire to help the poor, when Edna Ruth Byler, a Mennonite volunteer in Puerto Rico, noticed in 1946 that the impoverished women she met there made beautiful lace by hand. Seeing a way to help, Byler took some of their lace, sold it and gave the money to the lace makers. She then picked up more lace and began selling it out of her car trunk. Over the next 30 years Byler continued, spearheading a nonprofit that opened the first fair trade shop in 1958. The difference between shopping at a fair trade store and buying fair-trade chocolate at Safeway is big, from the perspective of business commitment. Supply chain items such as chocolates and coffee are fair-trade certified by quantitative analysis; businesses pay a minimum fair-trade price and agree to a premium they’re supposed to give back to the cooperative. A business like Starbucks can get do-gooder points by offering a token amount of fair-trade coffee while retaining corporate values. The fair-trade business culture, on the other hand, seeks to “create positive change for the poorest of the poor,” according to the Fair Trade Federation mission statement. Fair trade businesses also bridge go-local values with global social justice values, according to Kreider Carlson. Over 15 years, Baksheesh has donated to local nonprofits and created 10 full-time jobs in Napa and Sonoma. “The artisans benefit, the community benefits, and customers get to shop for beautiful handmade items at reasonable process,” says Smucker. 

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THE 2012 NORTH BAY MUSIC AWARDS AND 24-HOUR BAND CONTEST! SATURDAY JULY 14 AT THE ARLENE FRANCIS CENTER 99 SIXTH STREET, SANTA ROSA. 8PM. ALL AGES! FREE!

2012 NORBAYS • Winners announced! • Gold Records awarded! • Food by Casino chef Mark Malicki! • Beer and wine available! • Art by Bohemian cover artists! • Get your photo taken in a limo by Misha Miller! • Photography by David Korman! • Video by Burning Token! • Funk and Soul 45s by DJ Noah D! • A singing dog walking backwards on stilts! • John Coltrane resurrected! • It’s all happening at the 2012 NorBays!

SHORT & SQUAT In addition to growing olive trees, Brooke Hazen is installing a large mill for others to use for pressing.

Turn Another Leaf Wells Fargo heir grows olives, not wine, in Sebastopol BY STETT HOLBROOK

T

he Blucher Valley south of Sebastopol has historically been apple and cattle country, but, following recent trends, a growing number of vineyards now carpet the hills. So the appearance of the large olive orchard of 11,000 trees on a knobby hill off Canfield Road is a visual anomaly, as is the

Mediterranean-style villa on the apex of the hill. When 40-year-old Brooke Hazen planted 88 acres of former cattle pasture with olive trees 12 years ago, people told him the windy valley was ill-suited to the trees. But Hazen went ahead anyway, figuring if the trees do well in similar climates in Spain and Italy, they would do well here, too. He was right. This year, he entered his Olive Leaf Hills olive oil in the prestigious Yolo County Fair and

won four gold medals. Not bad for his first competition. “I thought I’d have just as good a chance as anyone,” he says, handling one of the award plaques he just got in the mail. The medals offered vindication for what has been a 20-year journey in sustainable agriculture—an unlikely road, given Hazen’s privileged roots. His father, Paul Hazen, was the longtime chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo. Hazen grew up playing soccer and hanging out on the beach in

Malibu, but a hike on Mt. Tamalpais as a young man convinced him he wanted to work in the sun and dirt. With help from his parents, he bought a parcel of land in the Blucher Valley and began growing vegetables. After eight years, he was able to purchase his current farm. Grapes would have been a natural choice for the property, but he was drawn to olives and apples, digging the holes and laying gopher baskets for most of the 75 kinds of apples and citrus himself. Looking at the thick trunks on the triple espaliered trees now, he’s amazed at the energy he had then. “What was I thinking?” he says, incredulous. Olive Leaf Hills makes single varietal olive oils and French- and Italian-style blends. Olives grown in cool, coastal climates like western Sonoma County produce spicy, herbaceous flavors. “[Cool climates] give it every possible nuance,” he says. “It offers the possibility to really see what olive oil can do.” Hazen’s complex-flavored oils work well in vinaigrettes or drizzled over ripe tomatoes or roasted eggplant. (I’ve even taken to downing a capful in between meals. It’s delicious stuff.) For the past three years, Hazen pressed his olives at Sonoma’s Olive Press, but he’s currently putting the final touches on his own olive mill that will allow him to process two tons of olives an hour. He says it’s the largest facility of its kind in North America, and he’s taking reservations now for pressing, storage and bottling. Hazen grows his olives without chemicals and uses an 80-foot-tall wind turbine to power his well. He strives to make the farm ecologically sustainable and hopes the new mill will help make it financially sustainable, as well. “If I can find a way to make it work,” he says, “what an accomplishment it will be.” Olive Leaf Hills olive oil is available at Whole Foods markets in Sonoma County. For pricing and more, see www.oliveleafhills.com.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Dining

13

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Clinical Research for

Dining Parkinson’s Disease

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

stiffness tremors

slowness of movement

We are conducting a clinical researchh study for an investigational medication for Parkinson’s Disease. To participate, you must be at least 30 years of age and taking medication to treat your Parkinson’s. Qualified participants will receive study-related care and investigational medication at no cost and may be compensated up to $700 for time and travel. Call C all for for m more ore iinformation nformation

707.542.1469 707.542.14 469

1221 Farmers Far mer s Lane, Suite 500, 5 , Santa Rosa, 500 Rosa, CA www.radiantresearch.com w w w. r a d i a n t r e s e a r c h . c o m

We Can't Cann't Do It Without YOU!

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Buckeye Roadhouse

S O N O MA CO U N T Y

fish and chips, hearty salads. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch, Fri-Sun; dinner, Tues-Sun. 145 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.9800.

American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Buck’s American. $$. Small

Mombo’s Pizza Pizza.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$.

$. The crust is thin and the toppings eclectic. Delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 1800 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.FAST. 560 Hwy 116 N, Sebastopol. 707.823.7492.

Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,” Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

plates complement classic fare at Guerneville staple. Prime rib weekend nights! Dinner, Wed– Sat; brunch and dinner, Sun. 16440 Fourth St, Guerneville. 707.869.3608.

Chinois Asian Bistro Asian. $$. Pan-Asian cuisine done delicious. Happy hour tapas and cocktails weekdays. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 186 Windsor River Rd, Windsor. 707.838.4667.

Chloe’s French Cafe French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

East West Cafe California cuisine. $$. All vegetarianfriendly. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 128 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2822.

Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491. Healdsburg Bar & Grill American. $-$$ Gourmet burgers and potent cocktails from the owners of Cyrus. It ain’t fancy, but it’s awfully good, with topnotch ingredients and low prices. Lunch and dinner daily. 245 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.3333.

Karma Bistro Indian. $$. A variety of flavorful regional specialties. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 7530 Commerce Blvd, Cotati. 707.795.1729. Maguire’s Pub Irish pub. $-$$. Pub food–burgers,

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600. Simply Delicious Italian/ Mediterranean. $-$$. Tiny cafe with huge flavors. All dishes are homemade, with lots of organics. Fantastic lasagna, margherita pizza and meatball or chicken parm sandwiches. Lunch and dinner daily. 2780 Stony Point Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2083.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818. The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

Brannanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Brassica Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700. Busterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destinationâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;for a reason. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot!â&#x20AC;? Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerratiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

FumĂŠ Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Miguelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service

15

SMALL BITES

The Beer Bible Northern California is home to over 150 breweries, more than a handful of which produce world-class, award-winning beers. This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t surprising, since Sonoma was home to the first microbrewery in the United States, New Albion Brewing Company, led by brewmaster Jack McAuliffe. But a recent boom is undeniably in effect. Thus, the time has never been better for a truly comprehensive guide to the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s craft beers. Thanks to intrepid beer writer (and frequent Bohemian contributor) Ken Weaver, that day has finally come. The Northern California Craft Beer Guide is the guidebook that craft beer lovers have been waiting for. Featuring gorgeous full-color photos by Anneliese Schmidt and a foreword by Sierra Nevada founder Ken Grossman, the book offers a veritable hops-packed tour of Northern Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best breweries, bottle houses, beer bars, festivals and more. A certified BJCP beer judge and frequent contributor to All About Beer, Weaver knows his subject well, and the book provides beer adventure inspiration to last for years. Separated into eight regions, beginning with San Francisco, the book provides an easy-to-read guide to exactly whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going in with craft beer in 2012. Sidebars offer explanations of beer styles, from steam beer to IPA to imperial stout, written in a witty, expert tone that appeals to the novice as well as those with previous beer smarts. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Five to Tryâ&#x20AC;? feature at the beginning of each chapter provides a quick â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; dirty list of the best beers in each area. Craft beer lovers: you want this book. Confirmed guests at the launch party for the Northern California Craft Beer Guide include brewmasters from Anchor Steam, Anderson Valley and Lucky Hand. On tap will be 30 regional craft beers, offering a â&#x20AC;&#x153;far-reaching tour of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beer scene.â&#x20AC;? The party happens Friday, July 13, at TAPS. 205 Kentucky St., Petaluma. 7pm. 707.769.1617.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

N A PA CO U N TY

Featuring New Executive Chefs

Matthew Howard & William Case Come in and enjoy our new cuisine! Bar: Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri 3â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm, Sat & Sun 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;2am Restaurant: Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri 3:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm, Satâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sun 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Champagne Brunch: Sat & Sun 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;2pm 26955 State Hwy. 1, Tomales, CA 94971

707.878.2403

www.williamtellhouse.com

Thai House

3883 Airway 3883 A ir way Drive Drive SSte te 1145, 45, SSanta anta R osa Rosa 70 7.52 8 . 309 5 707.528.3095 www w..ch loesco.co c m www.chloesco.com F, 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm Mâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;F,

pen  p peen n

belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Ubuntu Vegetarian.

$$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656.

astille  asti astil iilllllle ay a  ay! ay ! ay Saturday, JJuly Saturday, u ly 1 14, 4, 1 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3pm 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3pm Special Menu S pe cia l M enu & Live L ive Music Music 1 12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2pm 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2pm

Lunch specials start at $7.95 Includes soup or salad Mon-Fri only

Open 7 days a week Sun-Th 11:30-9:30 Fri-Sat 11:30-10:00 525 4th Street(Upstairs) 707.526.3939

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Arnot-Roberts Some fresh pepper on that Syrah? Duo of chums craft spicy, savory lower-alcohol wines from cool climates in funky backstreet cellar. 6450 First St., Forestville. By appointment only. 707.820.1383.

Claypool Cellars “They call me Mister Knowitall, I sup the aged wine.” Sup on Primus frontman’s Purple Pachyderm Pinot Noir and Rhone-style Fancí Blend in wine country’s cutest caboose, a must-see for rock and wine fans alike. 6761 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol. Open SaturdaySunday, 1–5pm. 707.861.9358.

Hart’s Desire Wines Brash Zinfandel and sensuous Pinot Noir from the label with the come-hither eyes. Brick walls plastered with art, participatory painting, and a jukebox also entertain in this old warehouse shared with Christi Vineyards and J. Keverson Winery. 53 Front St. (Old Roma Station), Healdsburg. Thursday–Monday, 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.3097.

Marimar Estate A great stop for locals on a Sunday drive. And the Pinot is fantastic. 11400 Graton Road, Sebastopol Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.823.4365.

Nalle Winery Rising above the vineyards like some kind of New Age bunker, the rosemary-shrouded winery houses a down-toearth father-and-son team dedicated to low-alcohol Dry Creek Zinfandel. Greeters Lila and Pella present soggy tennis balls. 2385 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Saturdays, noon– 5pm. No fee. 707.433.1040.

Portalupi Wine Husbandand-wife team went the distance, selecting Barbera cuttings from the Italian alps: their Barbera was named best in the world. You’ll also find Vermentino, Pinot, and rustic-

chic two-liter milk jugs of “vino di tavola” in comfortable downtown lounge; wine education classes for groups. 107 North St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10:30am–7pm. Tasting fee, $5–$12. 707.395.0960.

Selby Winery Regularly served at White House state dinners, Selby Chard has been through several administrations. 215 Center St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.431.1288.

Thomas George Estates Pinot pioneer Davis Bynum hung up the hose clamp and sold his estate, but the good wine still flows in remodeled tasting room featuring a long bar and vineyard videos. Russian River Chard, Pinot and Zin; sweet berry flavors and long-lasting finishes. Caves completed for tours in 2010. 8075 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11am–5pm, daily. Tasting fee, $5. 707.431.8031.

N A PA CO U N TY Bouchaine Vineyards Venerable producer of estategrown Burgundian style wine in the rustic wind-scraped hills of Carneros. Pinot Noir and Pinot Meuier with a coolclimate, cherry-skin crispness that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.” Patio service in fair weather, cozy hearthside tasting in cooler days; good-humored hospitality throughout. 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4pm; tasting fee $5. 707.252.9065.

Cuvaison Estate Wines (WC) Producing some 65 percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Krupp Brothers Estates The story of Stagecoach Vineyards is of extremes: two miles end-to-

end. One billion pounds of rock extracted. Seventy wineries buy the fruit; the Krupps release 2,000 cases including Black Bart Marsanne. 3265 Soda Canyon Road, Napa. Tours by appointment, $25. 707.260.0514. Tasting at A Dozen Vintners, 3000 Hwy. 29, St. Helena. Daily, 10am-5pm. 707.967.0666.

Madonna Estate Millennial contingent of multigenerational family winery, once known as Mount St. John, finds success running it old-school: touristy, oldfashioned, and wildly popular. Refreshing Gewürztraminer for summer picnics. 5400 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm; $5–$10. 707.255.8864.

Olabisi & Trahan Wineries In the fancy heart of downtown Napa, a low-budget “cellar” where wines are shelved, with clever economy, in stacks of wood pallets; vibes are laid-back and real. Carneros Chardonnay and fruity but firm and focused Cab and Merlot from Suisin Valley, Napa’s much less popular stepsister to the east. 974 Franklin St., Napa. Open daily, noon–5:30pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.257.7477.

Rubicon Estate Despite the celebrity hype, the wine is award-winning. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.782.4226.

Somerston Wine Co. Ambitious ranch and winery inclues utility-vehicle “buggy” rides by appointment. The cheese shop and grocery opens in April. All that and wine, too. 6488 Washington St., Yountville. Tasting room open noon-8pm Monday–Thursday; to 9pm, Friday–Saturday; to 10pm, summer. Tastings $15– $40. Ranch tours by appointment, $50. 707.944.8200.

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars (WC) Their three estate-grown Cabs are among the most highly regarded in the world. 5766 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2020.

17 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Robert Biale Vineyards Brood of the Black Chicken BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

t’s the same story under tent canopies as it is in vets halls or old military piers, at beer tasting events or those that gush fountains of wine: some lines are longer than others. Much longer. More often than not, when I finally slog through to sample the ballyhooed beverage, my response is: not bad, but why all the fuss? The tragically introspective person considers two possible conclusions: (a) for some reason, I have been singled out to not be able to appreciate the greatest wine in this hall; (b) I lack the effortless ability to transform expectation into delivery. Several years ago at the annual Zinfandel Advocates and Producers tasting, the longest line was at the Biale table. Was it the high Robert Parker scores that attracted this horde, or the excellence of the wine? It’s a chicken-and-egg type of question, but the “Black Chicken” is neither chicken nor egg; it’s a bottle of Zinfandel, code-named because it was originally made and distributed in jugs—along with farm-fresh eggs—by teenage Aldo Biale. Neighbors would order up a dozen eggs and “a Black Chicken” over the 1940s party telephone line, and since the operation went legit in 1991, this colorful backstory has served the family well in carving out a Zinfandel niche amid a sea of Cabernet. Aldo made it so far as to usher in the 2009 vintage, while son Robert continues to farm several dozen acres of the home ranch and vineyards around the valley. The new, barnlike winery, off quiet Big Ranch Road, is anything but rustic inside—you’ve got to have the best equipment to compete in this valley, says my guide—but the tasting room experience is kept unhurried and intimate with an appointment-only policy. The few keepsakes inside include aprons hand-embroidered with black chicken themes by 88-year-old Clementina Biale; tables outside offer a grand view of the lower east valley. No concession here is given to white wines, but Biale has branched out into other reds. The 2009 Nonna’s Vineyard, Oak Knoll Sangiovese ($39) is bright and racy; the 2007 Monte Rosso, Sonoma Valley Syrah ($62) has some of that grape’s signature blueberry fruit and animal aromas. The star of the show, the 2010 Black Chicken, Napa Valley Zinfandel ($42) balances black pepper with vanilla bean and blackberry liqueur on a dollop of warm olallieberry fruit. Selling this wine isn’t hard, my host says, it’s all in the tasting. The 95 point scores, well, they don’t hurt a bit. Robert Biale Vineyards, 4038 Big Ranch Road, Napa. By appointment, daily 10am to 4pm. Tasting fees $20–$35, refunded with case purchase. 707.257.7555.

Law School Informational Seminar Wednesday, July 25 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. Keynote Speakers: Benjamin Karpilow and Marla Keenan Attorneys at Law (Classes of 2009 and 1999) Call today to reserve your seat!

707-546-4000 www.empcol.edu

1

years

1961-2012

3035 Cleveland Avenue, Santa Rosa 95403

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Step by Step When Sonoma County’s courts sentence alcohol and drug offenders to rehab, a nonreligious option hasn’t always been clear—until one man’s crusade to change the process BY LEILANI CLARK

W

hen Richard S. was picked up for being “under the influence” earlier this year, his parole officer decided it would be better that, instead of jail, the 39-year-old Sonoma County resident attend a 90day rehab program. After two months in a drug-treatment facility, Richard says that he’s keeping out of trouble, but that he’s become frustrated by one thing in particular—the lack of secular options for support groups.

“All programs push the 12 Step,” says Richard by phone from the facility. “Supposedly, it’s the most successful, but it still pushes a lot of people away, because not everyone believes in what they believe in. They insist you pray before, and they insist you pray after. They’re bringing religion into it.” Recently, Richard began attending one off-site meeting offered by the secular recovery group LifeRing. Based in Oakland, LifeRing advocates “empowering” the sober self, whereas Alcoholics Anonymous insists on powerlessness over alcohol in the face of God. With a long history of drug and alcohol abuse, Richard says he likes LifeRing’s approach— no “war stories” (aka drunkalogues), no steps to work and no dogma. “I’m not going to put down AA,

because it’s helped millions of people,” says Richard. “They’ve inspired me and encouraged me. But I don’t think it should be shoved down people’s throat.” Byron Kerr, a culinary student at Santa Rosa Junior College and LifeRing member, would like to see more options for people like Richard. After moving to Santa Rosa from Santa Clara County in January, Kerr says he was shocked to discover how much the “dominant support group was somewhat entangled, or embedded, in the local government.” Kerr, independent of LifeRing, made it his mission to ensure that those sentenced for drug and alcohol offenses in Sonoma County are given secular options. The basis for his argument is the 2007 United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruling Inouye v. Kemna, which ruled that forcing someone to attend a 12 Step program, without offering alternatives, constituted a violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution—also known as separation of church and state. “This argument is not about whether 12 Step is good, bad or ugly,” says Kerr. “It’s about choice; it’s the law.” On April 6, Kerr sent letters to the Superior Court of California and the Office of the County Counsel. Here, he accused both the county and the court of violating the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment by exclusively referring drug and alcohol abuse clients to 12 ) 20

WANTS OPTIONS Byron Kerr’s correspondence with the county has reduced the seeming monopoly of 12 Step programs like AA in sentencing.

Michael Amsler

18

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

20 Step by Step ( 18 Step support groups. If the matter weren’t addressed in a timely manner, Kerr asserted that he would seek legal action. “If a county facility is hosting a faith-based support group, they must also offer their facility to a secular support group,” he wrote. “If the court is ordering substance-abuse clients into support groups, it must offer secular groups as an alternative, and must make their availability equally known to the public.” Kerr says he found one particularly egregious example in a document called the “Participant Guide to Drug Court,” which is made available through the Sonoma County Department of Health Services website. “There’s mandatory attendance in AA or NA meetings,” says Kerr. “And no hint of an option that anything is acceptable other than 12 Step.”

T

wo months later, Kerr received a response from Court Executive Officer José O. Guillén, who said that the court was in full compliance with the mandates of federal and state law. By phone, Guillén tells the Bohemian that individuals sentenced for drug or alcohol convictions are offered the opportunity to attend self-help meetings that “could” include 12 Step, but are not limited to just that. “There’s an array of self-help available within the county, and the court wants them to participate in them as part of drug or DUI treatment,” he explains. “I personally don’t know what’s out there, but the county and all of the service providers assemble a list of the things that are available, alternatives that are faith-based, non-faith-based, the full gamut. Our goal is to have individuals engage in some kind of self-help.” Guillén does acknowledge that there has been some ambiguous or incorrect language used in court and county documents up to this point. That’s being worked on, he says, and in some cases has already been changed. “Mr. Kerr identified areas that were incorrect or needed to be expanded, and we have started doing that, and working with the

county to ensure that participants know that there is an array of services available.” Guillén likens the choices in Sonoma County to a cafeteria menu, where defendants are encouraged to choose their mode of self-help. Consequently, the court has been meeting with the county to make sure that exclusive language is not used in any documents. “I’m confident that most of the paperwork has been corrected, but we’re in the process of making sure that any old documents are replaced by the new ones.” As of July, it does appear that changes are being made. At a recent meeting of the Sonoma County Advisory Board on Alcohol and Drug Problems, Derrick West, an administrator at the Department of Health Services Alcohol and Drug Services, said that the Participant’s Guide to Drug Court was currently being revised. The old document specifically required participants to attend “12 Step meetings such as Narcotics or Alcoholics Anonymous.” A look at the newly posted revised document on July 3 reveals that all references to 12 Step programs have been removed. Instead, participants are required to attend a “self-help group,” without any specifications. Kerr also received a response on May 30 from the Office of the County Counsel. According to Deputy County Counsel Phyllis Gallagher, the county had spent “considerable time” investigating county practices regarding referrals to self-help groups and did not find any violations of the Establishment Clause. (Calls to Gallagher for more detailed comment were not returned.) “All county personnel and outside treatment providers under contract with the county work with clients who object to participation in 12 Step programs on religious grounds in developing alternative treatment plans,” writes Gallagher to Kerr. Mike Kennedy, Sonoma County Behavioral Health Division director, says that clients should not have to attend 12 Step support groups if they aren’t comfortable with the spiritual aspects. He adds that it is important to respect clients’

sensitivities, needs and choices. “We support our client’s participation in the support group of their choosing, as part of their individually designed recovery and relapse-prevention plan,” Kennedy says by email. All contracted providers, and the county’s detox facility, the Orenda Center, must offer referrals and brochures to a variety of self-help groups, says Kennedy. In fact, at a recent visit to the Orenda Center, LifeRing brochures were visible and accessible in the facility’s waiting room.

‘It’s not whether 12 Step is good, bad or ugly. It’s about choice; it’s the law.’ But Richard S. says that at the facility where he has been courtordered to work on his recovery, there are signs in the dining hall touting the 12 Steps and the 12 Traditions, and that in a recent group meeting counselors suggested that residents get a sponsor—a decidedly 12 Step dominated approach to sobriety.

W

ith over 300 weekly meetings offered in Sonoma County, in comparison to sparse secular options, it might be that 12 Step has just become the default go-to option. As of July 2012, there are only three LifeRing meetings in the county—most in Santa Rosa. While other secular support groups like SMART recovery and Women for Sobriety have a strong online presence, they offer no face-to-face meetings in the area. The only other option is a weekly Wellbriety Talking Circle at the Indian Health Project in Santa Rosa, which focuses on Native American spiritual traditions on the road to recovery. Craig Whalley, LifeRing’s chairman of the board, says that

the relative size of these groups in comparison to AA is one reason for the lack of alternatives. “It’s common to run into people, including treatment providers, who are not familiar with us, and are closed-minded to the idea of alternatives to AA,” explains Whalley. “When we’re starting meetings, sometimes we can’t get meeting spaces from hospitals or treatment centers. That’s a generic problem. It’s because we are small, and many people aren’t aware of us, or they’re not drawn to the idea of an alternative group.” LifeRing supports Kerr as an individual in his fight with the county and courts, but Whalley says they can’t take an actual position on the matter of whether the Sonoma County Superior Court and the Department of Health Services are in violation of the law. “None of us has studied it, and we’re not lawyers. But you should have alternatives for people should they want them. It seems pretty sensible to me.” In an another sign of change, a meeting on July 2 between Kerr and the Drug Abuse Alternatives Center management ended with an agreement to provide space at the Orenda Center for a LifeRing meeting that will be open to the public. Qualified residents from Turning Point, one of 15 DAACrun facilities in the area, will be bussed to the meeting. Still, Kerr believes these are small changes in comparison to the massive system overhaul that would need to happen to truly make secular options a real alternative. “‘The Participant Guide to Drug Court’ is one document out of the entire county system,” he says. “There are many other areas within this issue where people are exclusively ordered and coerced into a 12 Step as a condition of their sentence. If the county begins to actually move towards giving choice pre-sentence, or as part of a sentence, that’s all that I care about. I’m not hell bent for leather on going to court; I’m hoping to avoid litigation. All I want is for the policy to change. I don’t really care about the past tense. I just care about policy changes in the future.”

The week’s events: a selective guide

NIGHTCLUBBING Michael Feinstein’s at the Napa Valley Opera House July 13. See Concerts, p27. C O TAT I

HEALDSBURG

S A N TA R O S A

N A PA

IN CAHOOTS

WATER SPORTS

PREPARE THYSELF

ACHTUNG!

If there’s one thing that Healdsburgers do well, it’s bringing parties to the water. Join them at the Healdsburg Water Carnival when the White Swan and other floats come down the Russian River. Live music, food vendors, sales booths and activities will follow—are those people paddling on wine barrels? Nothing finishes off this all-day event like a good dinner, drinks and live music by the fearless Jazz Mafia (an offer you definitely can’t refuse). And don’t forget the fashion! Be the best-dressed bather for the vintage bathing suit contest, and grow out those whiskers for the Whiskeroo Contest. It’s wet and wild on Saturday, July 14, at Memorial Beach, Healdsburg. 11am. Daytime activities, free; evening concert, $25. 707.565.2041.

If the recession’s taught us anything, it’s to maximize happiness rather than pursue economic growth, which is known to falter. But what if it’s faltering permanently? Richard Heinberg, the author of 10 books, including The Party’s Over, Peak Everything and The End of Growth, is regarded as one of the world’s most effective communicators of the urgent need to transition away from fossil fuels. He’s also a leading educator on Peak Oil—the point where we reach maximum global oil production—and works with the Post Carbon Institute. Come hear Heinberg speak on the economy of the future on Thursday, July 12, at Spring Lake Village Auditorium. 5555 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 7:30pm. 707.538.8899.

Powwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww weir weir weir weir wir wir wur wur wur wur whoah whoa pop chicka pop whoi wowwwwwwwwowoooweeeeeeiiii rrraaaaaaaaooowwwowowowowo [laser spinnen laser spinnen] pooooooooiiiiiiiiiiiiii [licht grün blau grün blau] tick ticka tick tik poooooooooouuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuu drumdrum dru drum drum zeuuuuuuzeeiiizeeeuzeeeuzoooooooo [blau blau blau blau] doooom, doom dom doom doom dom [lila lila blau lila] po-che-ka che pocke che-ka-che che che. Deutsch Elektronische / ProgressiveRock-Band Tangerine Dream spielt! Kommen und sehen sie Friday, July 13, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. $35. 7pm. 707.259.0123.

Dan Imhoff, editor of the graphic coffeetable book CAFO: The Tragedy of Industrial Animal Factories, doesn’t only call for the reform of food production in his free time—he also plays jazz! Like their 2012 album’s namesake, Dan Imhoff and the Cahoots live off the Fat of the Land, blending country, rock, blues and jazz in original compositions titled “Drill Baby Drill,” “The Sun Shines for All,” and “Long Lonely Road.” Who knows what else Imhoff has up his sleeve? No cahoots about it, Imhoff takes us back to the farm with band mates Eric Neilson, Mike Brunson, Craig Anderson, and Dru Rodgers in a rollicking, intimate show on Wednesday, July 11, at the Redwood Cafe. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy., Cotati. 8pm. 707.795.7868.

—Catherine Zaw and Jay Scherf

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 1 1-17, 20 1 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Crush CULTURE

21

ArtsIdeas Jared Bradshaw

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22

BROADWAY IN THE VALLEY With views like this, who needs box seats and a chandelier?

Act Two for Park Transcendence Theatre Co.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Broadway sizzle helps keep Jack London State Park open BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

n 1906, when Jack London set up his ranch in the Valley of the Moon near Glen Ellen, he had huge plans for the land. But he probably never imagined that one day the ranch would include a 900-seat, open-air theater featuring Broadway performers singing and dancing under the stars. That idea is now springing to

life, thanks to the Transcendence Theatre Company, a troupe of Broadway-trained singers, dancers and actors inspired, in part, by efforts to save Jack London State Park from closure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jack London had a dream,â&#x20AC;? says artistic director Amy Miller, acknowledging a large sign with that same observation, posted near the ruins of the old winery not far from the parking lot. With executive director Stephan Stubbins, Miller is at the park this morning, finalizing plans

for the summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first series of shows. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He had a dream, and so do we. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amazing that after years of dreaming, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finally starting to happen.â&#x20AC;? Beginning this weekend, Transcendence launches â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broadway Under the Stars,â&#x20AC;? a series of splashy musical revues that take place inside the ruins, featuring a rotating cast of performers with Broadway and Hollywood experience. A portion of ticket sales go directly to Jack London State Park,

providing monies necessary to keep programs operating at the sprawling institution, and between now and September, the company will stage 14 performances, beginning with a show appropriately titled To Dream the Impossible Dream. Just over a year ago, it seemed likely that the park would be shut down by the state of California as part of its cost-cutting measures to balance the budget. Now, with the help of numerous community sponsors, donors, nonproďŹ t groups and volunteersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;boosted by last monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision in Sacramento to keep the parks open for nowâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Transcendence hopes to make Jack London State Park its home, with a full theatrical season featuring Broadway musicals and other types of entertainment. As Stubbins leads the way through the archway of the ruins and onto the vast rectangular lawn surrounded by an old stone wall, he points beyond the west wall to the vineyards and up at the bright blue sky. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that sky, with its legendary views of the moon, that London immortalized in his 1914 novel The Valley of the Moon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On some nights,â&#x20AC;? Stubbins says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the moon will be the star of the show.â&#x20AC;? Originally based in Los Angeles, the members of Transcendence had a vision four years ago of establishing a spot where they could present outdoor theater in a gorgeous natural environment. During a months-long crosscountry tour, driving from one end of the States to the other, the company discovered a number of promising possibilities for its future home base. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We targeted the Napa-Sonoma area as a strong possibility,â&#x20AC;? Miller says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because of its beauty, of course, and because of all the destination travel, which was an important part of our vision.

SPONTANEOUS JOURNEYS with TERI SLOAT

FOR GOOD Stars from Broadway make up the cast at Transcendence.

Companies like the Oregon Shakespeare Festival thrive because they’re planted in a community, but draw a lot of their audience from destination travel.” After setting their sights on Napa and Sonoma, the troupe— while still headquartered in L.A.— began looking for an outdoor spot to fit their needs. “We didn’t know anybody at first, so it was a real adventure,” says Stubbins. “We knew we wanted to be here, but we had no idea how we were going to make it happen.” At the same time, California announced its intentions to close several state parks, including a number of them in Northern California. Inspired by an online podcast featuring a speech by Ruth Coleman, director of California State Parks, calling for innovative ideas to keep the parks open, Miller, Stubbins and company decided that establishing a performance space at a threatened state park could be beneficial for everyone involved. That was Memorial Day weekend of 2011. In true “let’s put on a show” tradition, several members of the company jumped in a car, drove to Sonoma County and started visiting the area’s state parks, beginning with Annadel. “It was crazy,” laughs Stubbins. “We got out and found a ranger and said, ‘We’d like to talk to you about the park closures, because we’d like to start a theater company in one of your parks.’ And the rangers at Annadel told us we should go check out Jack London State Park. So we came

out here and started walking around, and when we stepped into the ruins of the old winery, we all went, ‘Wait a minute. This is it. I think we found our land.’” Immediately, they began negotiations with the state, and were told that if they’d proposed the idea a week prior, they’d have been told no. But with the parks on the verge of closing, the concept of holding events that would channel money back to the parks had a whole new appeal. To gauge if there was actually an audience for the kind of performance the troupe envisioned, Transcendence staged a one-night-only event at the park last October. The show drew 900 people, selling out every seat. “We didn’t know if we’d get a hundred people or what,” Miller says. “We know a lot of the draw was the part about money being raised to save the park. People are connecting with that.” With good word-of-mouth and the continued support of the community, Stubbins and Miller believe that Transcendence will have a longtime home here in the North Bay. “We really want to make our presence and our commitment to the community known,” says Stubbins. “We are here, and we want to help build something wonderful.” ‘To Dream the Impossible Dream’ runs July 14–22, ‘Fantastical Family Night,’ Aug. 3–4, and ‘What a Wonderful World,’ Aug. 16–26 at 2400 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. 8pm. $25–$117. 877.424.1414. For tickets and more info, see www.transcendencetheatre.org.

The Artist’s Search

JuneApril 24 through August 29 to June 24 12

Sebastopol Gallery 150 North707-823-4256 Main Street 150 N. Main St. Sebastopol 707-829-7200 www.sebastopol-gallery.com

Exhibiting a diverse selection of unusual antique, modern and contemporary artworks.

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma 707.781.7070 calabigallery.com

Call today to advertise! 707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

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Art PAID ADVERTISING SECTION

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San Jose

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San FFrancisco rancisco

Film

J ly 119th July Jul 9th – July 229th 9th 22012 012 George Georg ge Cleve Cleve Music Director

mozart mo ozart ozar midsummer f es t i val

PICKUP GAME Eight-year-old Quvenzhané Wallis steals the film as Hushpuppy.

Sink or Swim

‘Beasts’ an apocalyptic swamp fantasy BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

Audrey Vardanega piano

Seymour Lipkin piano

Christopher Bengochea tenor Purchase tickets through

Christina Major soprano

Rebecca Davis soprano

Kirk Eichelberger bass

midsummermozart.org or call 800.838.3006

Food & Wine Issue JULY 25, 2012

A

gumption-crazed little girl survives what looks like post-industrial living in Beasts of the Southern Wild, and she’s so cute that she’s even named Hushpuppy. Hushpuppy (Quvenzhané Wallis) lives in a waterside squatters’ camp called “the Bathtub.” A hardnosed teacher in a makeshift classroom schools her in the facts of life. It’s a dog-eat-dog world, and “every animal is made of meat—your ass is made of meat.” The teacher in this swamp town hitches up her clothes to display a $200 tattoo on her thigh depicting some kind of mythical whangdoodle. That’s all the proof Hushpuppy needs that ice-locked beasts of the Stone Age could rise again. She has reveries of glaciers melting, and foresees tusked, piglike monsters slowly advancing and treading on miniature buildings like Godzilla. Hushpuppy tries to bond with her ailing dad, Wink (Dwight Henry), who has come back to the Bathtub just in time. The muddy waters are rising. The government orders the villagers to go to a shelter. That’s when a storm hits and inundates the town. After some flooding, Wink and Hushpuppy go for a float using a boat made of the butt end of a pickup truck, with some plastic barrel pontoons and a motor. The sights they see aren’t pretty; a drowned, bloated steer, headfirst and twisted along the littered bank, stands in for the human dead who would be scattered after a disaster. First-time feature director Benh Zeitlin takes a studiously precious approach to all of this lower-depths life. Too often, Beasts of the Southern Wild is a low-budget, marsh-staged version of Spike Jonze’s Where the Wild Things Are—relentlessly, self-consciously elemental. Wallis is an appealing young actress, but her character is a daughter of the swamp in the same simplistic sense that old movies featured sons of the soil.

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‘Beasts of the Southern Wild’ opens Friday, July 13, at the Rafael Film Center.

Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG; 94 min.) Saber-toothed squirrel Scrat precipitates the breakup of Pangaea through a search for acorns in the fourth installment of animated fave. With the voices of Wanda Sykes, Ray Romano, Queen Latifah, Denis Leary and Peter Dinklage. (GB)

ALSO PLAYING Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (R; 105 min.) Latest example of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ailing state of literature makes it to the big screen. Co-produced by Tim Burton. (GB)

The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13; 136 min.) Purposeless reboot from director Marc Webb ((500) Days of Summer) co-stars Andrew Garfield (The Social Network) as Peter Parker and Emma Stone as Gwen Stacy. Martin Sheen plays Uncle Ben! (GB)

The Avengers (PG-13; 142 min.) Marvel Studios rounds up characters from recent hits for an ensemble superhero thriller directed by Joss Whedon. Stars Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man), Chris Evans (Captain America), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Samuel L . Jackson and Scarlett Johansson. (GB) Bernie (R; 104 min.) Richard (Slacker, School of Rock) Linklaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest stars Jack Black as Texas mortician, choir leader and murderer Bernie Tiede. Based on a true story. Co-stars Shirley MacLaine and Matthew McConaughey. (GB)

Magic Mike (R; 110 min.) Steven Soderberghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest stars Channing Tatum as a veteran male stripper teaching the ropes to newcomer Alex Pettyfer. With Matthew McConaughey. (GB)

Medeaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Witness Protection (PG-13; 114 min.) One-man film industry Tyler Perryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest brings Medeaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New York family down South, where they go in hiding after Uncle Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ponzi scheme defrauds the mob. (GB)

Men in Black 3 (PG-13; 106 min.) Agent J (Will Smith) travels back in time to 1969 to save a young Agent K (Josh Brolin)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the planetâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in third installment of hit sci-fi comedy. Also stars Tommy Lee Jones. (GB) Moonrise Kingdom (PG-13; 94 min.) In September 1965, gifted 12-year-olds Suzy and Sam head off to the wilderness of a fictional New England island, not knowing Hurrican Maybelline is heading for them. Directed by Wes Anderson (Rushmore, Fantastic Mr. Fox) with dollhouse aesthetics and New Yorker cartoon punch lines. (RvB)

People Like Us (PG-13; 95 min.) Drama stars Chris Pine and Elizabeth Banks as siblings who discover each other after the death of their wealthy father in the directorial debut from the co-creator of Fringe. (GB)

Prometheus (R; 124 min.) Ridley Scott directs this (sort of) sequel to the Alien franchise about the link between the aliens and humanityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s origins. Co-stars Charlize Theron, Guy Pearce and Noomi Rapace (Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). (GB)

Savages (R; 113 min.) Nice-guy pot growers

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG-13; 124 min.) John Madden (Shakespeare in Love) directs an all-star cast playing British

go toe-to-toe with a Mexican drug cartel who kidnapped their hippie girlfriend in crime thriller directed by Oliver Stone. (GB)

retirees in India in adaptation of Deborah Moggachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel These Foolish Things. (GB)

Seeking a Friend for the End of the World (R; 101 min.) Romcom set against the

Brave (PG; 93 min.) In Pixarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest, a

destruction of the planet co-stars Steve Carrell and Keira Knightley. (RvB)

young princess in ancient Scotland must use her skills as an archer to reverse a curse put on her family. With the voices of Kelly Macdonald (Gosford Park), Emma Thompson and Billy Connolly. (GB)

Hysteria (R; 100 min.) Maggie Gyllenhaal and Hugh Darcy star in romantic comedy set in Victorian England about the invention of the vibrator. (GB)

Katy Perry: Part of Me (PG; 97 min.) Documentary of the popular singer follows her on- and offstage, and features interviews with handsome young people Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m too old to care about. Also in 3-D, for reasons unknown. (GB)

Madagascar 3: Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted (PG; 85 min.) Still trying to get back to New York, the gang find themselves in a traveling circus show in Europe. With the voices of Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, Martin Short and Frances McDormand. (GB)

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Film

25

Take This Waltz (R; 116 min.) Actress Sarah Polleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second film as director stars Michelle Williams as a happily married woman who must come to terms with her growing feelings for the neighbor. With Seth Rogen, Luke Kirby and Sarah Silverman. (GB)

Ted (R; 106 min.) John Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) finds the teddy bear he wished for in childhood cramping his attempt to embrace adulthood in comedy from the creator of Family Guy. (GB)

To Rome with Love (R; 102 min.) New

TM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

RIVER THEATER MUSIC SHOWCASE

FEATURING: MELVIN SEALS

Show: 1 pm - 2 am

Doors: 12 noon

SATURDAY AUGUST 25 2012

Tickets; $40 www.g-a-entertainment.com

RIVER THEATER 16135 MAIN STREET, GUERNEVILLE, CA (707)869-8022

= F F ;ÝD L J @ :Ý8 I KÝ: F D D L E @ K P

Gaia’s Garden Wed, Jul 11 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Jul 12 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Jul 13 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30–10:25pm SALSA LESSON and a BALLROOM, LATIN & SWING DANCE hosted by California Ballroom Sat, Jul 14 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:25am–1:30pm SCOTTISH CHALLENGE DANCE with Gary Thomas 7–11pm CIRCLE N’ SQUARES HOEDOWN with Caller Lawernce Johnstone and Cuer Jeanne VanBlarcom Sun, Jul 15 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 1–4pm SUSAN G KOMEN 3 day Walk For the Cure Square Dance 5–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Jul 16 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Jul 17 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30–10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Music

International Vegetarian Buffet

Wed, July 11, 7-9pm Unplugged, Traditional Folk Music

The French Session Thur, July 12, 8–9:30pm Eclectic Americana

Roger Bolt Fri, July 13, 9–11 pm $ 5 cover, $ 4 min Hosted by Mike Olson

Monkey Fight Comedy Night Sat, July 14, 8–10pm Legendary Sonoma County Band!

The Sorentinos Sat, July 21, 8–10pm Doug Jayne Presents Woodie Guthrie 100th Birthday Celebration

Doug Jayne and Clusterfolk Wed, July 25, 7:30–9pm World Music Duo on Tour

David Helfand &INE"EERS7INESs$ 5 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Mon–Sat 11:30am–9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

707.544.2491 www.gaiasgardenonline.com

RELEASE Frank Ocean’s honesty hasn’t clouded his immense talent.

Sea Change Frank Ocean and the tides of love BY GABE MELINE

I

t starts with a sound unmistakable to a certain generation, the power-up of a Sony PlayStation. To the album’s target audience, this sound is intertwined with youth, triggering an immediate sensation of innocence.

It says much about Frank Ocean, a 24-year-old singer and songwriter whose excellent album Channel Orange is released this week, that he chose this particular sound effect to open his official debut album. These days, the sweetness of innocence is elusive for Ocean. Sure, he’s famous; he’s written for Beyoncé, Justin Beiber, Jay-Z, Kanye West and John Legend, and his mixtape Nostalgia, Ultra became an earbud staple in 2011 for both critics and fans, buoyed by sharp hooks and honest lyrics.

Then the Fourth of July rolled around, and honesty got the best of him. At 1am, Ocean posted to Tumblr a long, touching account of falling in love with another man. “There was no escaping, no negotiating with the feeling,” he wrote. “It was my first love, it changed my life. . . . I don’t have any secrets I need kept anymore.” Within days, some funny things happened. Ocean was widely hailed as the first rapper to come out as gay, even though he is not a rapper, and he did not come out as gay, precisely; even so, he would not have been the first. Also, in the media frenzy, Ocean tweeted about the hate he was receiving—“If only people would stop judging. . . . Looks like I’m finding out who my true fans are”—but from where I stood, he was getting nothing but love. This could be that we’re in the Bay Area. (The cheapest price online for scalped tickets to Ocean’s sold-out show in San Francisco on July 14 immediately jumped to $125, higher than anywhere else in the nation.) But it’s also because of a worldwide imminent fact of modern times. If you are gay, people born after 1984 totally, absolutely and completely do not care. On Channel Orange, a few songs wrestle with loving men, most don’t. Sonically, it blends synthesizer sounds from the 1980s with low-frequency bass rumbles. John Mayer and Andre 3000 are guests, as well as Earl Sweatshirt, an associate of Ocean’s in their shared L.A. collective Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All—whose members, despite liberally using the word “faggot” in their songs, all came forward in unwavering support of Ocean last week. Channel Orange was self-leaked by Ocean’s label Def Jam a week early, on Monday, at midnight. Within an hour, young music listeners, who allegedly don’t listen to full albums and don’t pay for music, grabbed their parent’s credit cards and made it No. 1 on iTunes. Independence Day, indeed. Frank Ocean plays July 14 at the Regency Ballroom in San Francisco.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY NorBay Awards & 24Hour Band Contest This is what happens when you take complete strangers and give them 24 hours to write and rehearse two original songs and one cover tune. Part of the Bohemianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NorBay Awards, with live music, DJs, food by Mark Malicki, beer, art and more. Jul 14, 8pm. Free. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Earth, Wind & Fire Elaborate stage show, a big dynamic sound and all your favorite hits. Jul 13, 8pm. $60$100. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Friday Night Live Cloverdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer-long series features Melvin Seals and JGB on Jul 13. 7pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Kevin Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Live Music & Dance Party Rhythm Rangers, Doug Jayne, Solid Air, Uncle Wiggly and many others celebrate the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 30 years of service. Jul 14, 5:30pm. $5-$15. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Live at Juilliard Evening shows in Santa Rosa park feature Pat Jordan Band on Jul 15. 6pm. Free. Juilliard Park, 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa.

Mariachi Vargas de TecalitlĂĄn Quintessential mariachi band has appeared in more than 200 films and numerous recordings. Jul 14, 8pm. $30$85. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Reverend Horton Heat The Rev appears with Supersuckers and Goddamn Gallows. Jul 15, 8pm. $23-$26. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Summer Nights on the Green Outdoor summer shows in Windsor include Son de Kali on Jul 12. 6pm. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

Tuesdays on the Plaza Summer concert series in Healdsburg plaza features Johnny Rawls on Jul 17. 6pm. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg.

MARIN COUNTY

Calistoga Summer Concert Series Featuring Kingsborough on Jul 12. 6:30pm. Free. Pioneer Park, Cedar and Elm streets, Calistoga.

Ray Davies The former Kinks frontman plays with the 88. Jul 17, 7pm. $52. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Michael Feinstein Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been dubbed â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Ambassador of the Great American Songbook.â&#x20AC;? Supported by Tori Anna. Jul 13, 8pm. $85-$95. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Festival del Sole International superstars of opera, dance, music and acting including Joshua Bell, Angel Romero, HÊlène Grimaud and others. Jul 13-22. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Willie Nelson Did you know heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recorded over 200 albums? I bet he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, either. Appearing with Pegi Young & the Survivors. J ul 18, 7pm. $95-$110. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Ruthie Foster

Tangerine Dream

Drawing comparisons to Aretha Franklin and Ella Fitzgerald isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t easy to live up to, but with songs and a voice like this itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right on the mark. Jul 13, 8pm. $21-$24. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Founded in 1967, this seventime Grammy nominated synth band has stood the test of time. Jul 13, 7pm. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Modern English The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s UK group proves they will still melt with you and return to their 4AD roots. Jul 14, 10pm. $15-$18. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

NORT H BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

27

NAPA COUNTY

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31

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary

Bay Area Playback Theater Improvisational theater based on true stories from audience members. Sat, Jul 14, 8pm. $8$10. Open Secret, 923 C St, San Rafael. 415.457.4191.

Scott Capurro

Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Events

Gallery Bergelli

Brews & Bites for Bounty

Jul 14-Aug 22, “Duende: Junkyard Melodies,” paintings by Tim Weldon. Artist demo Aug 4, 4pm. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Aug 5, Group show of member artists, with Mimi Abers, Candace Loheed and others. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA Through Jul 15, Summer National Juried Exhibition judged by Lucinda Barnes. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Jul 30, Group show featuring work of local photographers. Reception, Jul 14, 2pm. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Jul 31, first of this two-part series brings together works in clay, glass, stone, porcelain, wood and more. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Smith Anderson North Gallery Through Aug 4, “Williams, Waits” features the work of Franklin Williams and Kellesimone Waits, who share a playful obsession for acquiring and incorporating discarded relics. 20 Greenfield Ave, San Anselmo. 415.457.8847.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Through Sep 23, “Entering the Wild” featuring the work of Trish Carney, Adriane Colburn and others. Panel discussion, Aug 1. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Napa Valley Museum Through Aug 5, “Modern” features the abstract expressionist paintings of Ira Yeager. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Robert Mondavi Winery Through Sep 6, “Land, Sea and the People Within,” oil paintings by Dorallen Davis. free. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.968.2203.

Westin Verasa Hotel Through Jul 31, “Stories on Canvas,” still life, animals and

WEEKLY W EEK KLY E EVENT VENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

BURLESQUE/CABARET/VARIETY BUR LESQUE/ C ABARET/ VARIET Y

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Lisa Lampanelli

‘JACK FORD’ Work by Brian Shuck (above), Laurel Begley, Vanessa Davis and others opens July 14 at Side Street Gallery. See Openings, adjacent.

T THUR HUR – JJUL UL 1 12 2

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Pushing the boundaries of comedy in his return to Mill Valley. For ages 18 and up. Jul 12, 8pm. $18-$28. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. You might want to wash out your own mouth with a bar of soap after seeing this “Queen of Mean.” Jul 14, 7pm. $55-$70. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR S INGLES TO M E ET SINGLES MEET B EST BAR BAR HHONORABLE BEST ONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HONORABLE HONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC M US I C V VENUE ENUE HONORABLE HONOR ABLE

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+ FRANKIE FRANKIE B BOOTS OOTS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+

MON M ON – JUL JUL 1 16 6

Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

Brewery Tours Daily at 3!

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT EDUTAINMENT EDUT TAINMENT

1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

$3 $ 3 RED RED STRIPES STRIPES & $4 $4 JAMESON JAMESON ALL ALL NIGHT NIGHT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FFREE REE B B44 111/DOORS 1/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM/21+ T TUES UES – JUL JUL 17 17 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT BILL B ILL DECARLI DECARLI PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

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Pizza from Rosso, beer from Lagunitas, music from Highway Poets, art from Douglas Gayeton. Jul 17, 5:30pm. $20. Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

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WED W ED – JUL JUL 18 18

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Bring blankets and snacks to the family fun day campfire in the meadow of the Napa Valley Museum. Jul 14, 7pm. Free. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

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Chinese in Napa Discovery Day for Kids Camp. Learn about the contributions of the Chinese who came to the Napa Valley in the 1860s. Jul 12, 1-3pm. $7. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Gem Faire All the sparkly things you’ve ever wanted from over 70 gem dealers. Jul 13, noon-5pm. $7. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Healdsburg Water Carnival & Concert Parade on the river begins at 11am, followed by a carnival. Jazz Mafia plays at 5pm. Jul 14, 11am. Carnival free; ) concert $25.

32

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Comedy

Veterans Memorial Beach, Russian River, Healdsburg.

Laguna Fest Reskilling workshops, tours, music, movement and fun. Music by Jug Dealers and Black Sheep Brass Band. Jul 14, 11am11pm. $10-$20. Laguna Farm, 1720 Cooper Rd, Sebastopol.

2012 Norbay Awards Winners of the Bohemian’s annual music awards contest are revealed at a party unlike any other. Food, art and music to be consumed merrily. Jul 14, 8pm. Free. Arlene Francis Theater, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Film Across the Universe Film night in the park presents this movie with dialogue set entirely as Beatles songs. Jul 13, 8pm. Donation. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

Fixing the Future Documentary focused on building local jobs, income and sustainability. Jul 18, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

The Great Mass Big-screen presentation of this ballet by Uwe Scholz, music by Mozart (from his unfinished Mass in C Minor). Jul 14, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

The Sound of Music Sing-Along Belt out your favorite tunes with this classic. Jul 14, 7pm. $15. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Starbuck Comedy about sprem donor, presented by Sonoma International Film Festival. Jul 16, 6pm. $20. Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

West End Summer Movie Night Movies in the barn include “The Muppets” on Jul 13. 8:30pm. DeTurk Round Barn, Decker and Prince streets, Santa Rosa.

Yellow Submarine Newly restored Beatles classic is back on the big screen. Sat, Jul 14, noon. $7-$9.50. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

( 31

Food & Drink Bastille Day Girl and the Fig caters this French celebration with music by the Haute Flash Quartet and more. Jul 14, 11am-4pm. $50. Chateau St Jean, 8555 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.833.4134.

Jazz It Up Ferrari-Carano’s Seasons of the Vineyard invites guests to sip wine and enjoy series of Saturday jazz concerts, featuring Benny Barth Trio, Judi Silvan’s “Indigo Moods” trio and many others. Sat, Jul 14. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg.

Northern California Craft Beer Guide Launch Party 30 regional craft beers on hand for tour of area’s beer scene to celebrate Ken Weaver’s book release. Jul 13, 7pm. Taps, 205 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.763.6700.

Lectures Jim Barnett Warriors TV broadcaster chats with radio broadcaster Bruce Macgowan. Jul 11, 7:30pm. $12$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

The End of Growth Richard Heinberg asks if the convergence of financial instability, the end of cheap oil and climate change usher in an era of contraction. Jul 12, 7:30pm. $5. Spring Lake Village Auditorium, 5555 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa.

Stephanie Syjuco San Francisco-based conceptual artist believes politically engaged art can also be fun, speaks in conjunction with KQED’s Spark series. Jul 12, 7pm. $5-$10. di Rosa, 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Readings Book Passage Jul 11, 7pm, Brian Doyle and

Gerald Asher. Jul 12, 7pm, “The Prisoner of Heaven” with Carlos Ruiz Zafón & Isabel Allende. Jul 13, 1pm, “The World Without You.” Jul 13, 7pm, “A Bolt from the Blue: An Epic Story of Danger, Daring, and Heroism at 13,000 Feet” with Jennifer Woodlief. Jul 14, 1pm, “The Bliss Experiment: 28 Days to Personal Transformation” with Sean Meshorer. Jul 14, 7pm, Left Coast Writers Book Launch: Amanda McTigue. Jul 14, 7pm, “Night Watch” with Linda Fairstein. Jul 15, 1pm, “The Gathering Table: Defying Multiple Sclerosis With a Year of Pasta, Wine & Friends” with Ronda Giangreco. Jul 15, 3:30pm, “Cronkite” with Douglas Brinkley. Jul 15, 4pm, “It’s Your Money So Take it Personally” with Valerie Coleman Morris. Jul 15, 7pm, “Home Is a Roof Over a Pig: An American Family’s Journey in China” with Aminta Arrington. Jul 16, 7pm, “King John: The Best Shakespeare Play You’ve Never Seen?” with Lesley Currier and Barry Kraft. Jul 17, 7pm, “The Age of Miracles” with Karen Thompson Walker. Jul 18, 12pm, Literary Luncheon with Chris Cleave. $55. Jul 18, 7pm, “Run to Failure: BP and the Making of the Deepwater Horizon Disaster” with Abrahm Lustgarten. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Theater

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

The Lion in Winter

Jul 13, 7pm, “The Prisoner of Heaven” with Carlos Ruiz Zafón. 2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jul 11, 7pm, “172 Hours on the Moon” with Johan Harstad. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Jul 14, 7pm, “The Book of Life” with Alicia Ostriker. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Point Reyes Books Jul 14, 7:30pm, “Season of the Witch: Enchantment, Terror and Deliverance in the City of Love” with David Talbot. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1542.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Jul 14, 7pm, “The Book of Life: Selected Jewish Poems 1979-2011” with Alicia Ostriker. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol 707.829.4797.

CRITIC’S CHOICE Jan Sturmann

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 11–17, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32 Arts Events

Dream the Impossible Dream Picnic in the park while Broadway performers belt tunes from your favorite musicals. Fri-Sun, 5pm, through Jul 22. $25-$35. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Greater Tuna The show focuses on small town Southern life. Dates and times vary. Jul 12-Aug 12. $17$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Gutenberg! The Musical Authors of a musical about Johannes Gutenberg (printing press inventor) pitch their show to producers. Times vary. Fri-Sun through Jul 22. $20. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

King John Marin Shakespeare Company’s rendition under the stars is sure to strike a romantic chord. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 12. $20 to $55. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, Dominican University, San Rafael. Made famous by Peter O’Toole and Katherine Hepburn in the 1968 film, this play keeps audiences on the edge of their seats. Dates and times vary. Through Jul 22. $20 to $25. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Peaseblossom A farce based on Shakespeare’s most beloved comedy, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Part of Sebastopol Shakespeare Festival. Dates and times vary. Jul 12-28. Free-$20. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

The Producers Craig Miller directs this classic Mel Brooks musical in which a fledgling producer tries, and fails, to create a gigantic Broadway flop. Various dates, times and prices. Through Jul 15. $15$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Bridge of Sighs Stephanie Syjuco throws shade on consumer culture Should you find yourself in a San Francisco gift shop where every single stock item is orange —tote bags, aprons, key chains, postcards, dishware, pennants, even wraparound tops—you won’t need to search for the checkout stand. You are in fact not in a store, but rather “The International Orange Commemorative Store (A Proposition),” an art installation by San Francisco–based artist Stephanie Syjuco. Syjuco, who appears at di Rosa in Napa on July 12, is a mixed-media artist with a knack for cultural-statement art; International Orange Commemorative Store takes a sly dig at the commercialization of the Golden Gate Bridge’s 75th anniversary and its attendant plastic memorabilia. Known for these types of politically driven installations and sculpture, Syjuco’s art reflects cultural, social and economic structures around the world, often created with up-cycled materials. Her art has been termed “bootleg” and ���counterfeit” as she utilizes pre-existing items, re-appropriating them to establish a different point of view. In an ongoing collaboration with KQED’s Spark, Stephanie Syjuco appears in an artist talk on Thursday, July 12, at di Rosa’s Gatehouse Gallery. 5200 Sonoma Hwy., Napa. $5–$10. 7pm. 707.226.5991.—Holly Abrahams

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BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of July 11

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) During an author tour a few years ago, I was a guest on San Francisco radio station KFOG. For a while, the host interviewed me about my book and astrology column. Then we moved into a less formal mode, bantering about psychic powers, lucid dreams and reincarnation. Out of nowhere, the host asked me, â&#x20AC;&#x153;So who was I in my past life?â&#x20AC;? Although Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not in the habit of reading peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous incarnations, I suddenly and inexplicably had the sense that I knew exactly who he had been: Savonarola, a controversial 15th-century Italian friar. I suspect you may soon have comparable experiences, Aries. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised if you are able to glean new revelations about the past and come to fresh insights about how history has unfolded. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) Tease and tempt

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American political leaders who have never been soldiers tend to be more gung-ho about sending U.S. ďŹ ghting forces into action than leaders who have actually served in the military. So said former Marine captain Matt Pottinger on TheDailyBeast.com. I recommend that you avoid and prevent comparable situations in your own life during the coming weeks, Gemini. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put yourself under the inďŹ&#x201A;uence of decision-makers who have no direct experience of the issues that are important to you. The same standard should apply to you, too. Be humble about pressing forward if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re armed with no more than a theoretical understanding of things. As much as possible, make your choices and wield your clout based on what you know ďŹ rsthand.

CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hypothesize that there are two different kinds of freedom possible for you to pursue. One is simplistic and sterile, while the other is colorful and fertile. The ďŹ rst is characterized by absence or emptiness, and the second is full of rich information and stimulating experiences. Is there any doubt about which is preferable? I know that the simplistic, sterile freedom might be easier and faster to attain. But its value would be limited and short-lived, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m afraid. In the long run, the tougher liberation will be more rewarding.

VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The soul should always stand ajar,â&#x20AC;? said 19-century Emily Dickinson poet in one of her poems, â&#x20AC;&#x153;That if the heaven inquire, He will not be obliged to wait, Or shy of troubling her.â&#x20AC;? Modern translation: You should keep your deep psyche in a constant state of readiness for the possible inďŹ&#x201A;ux of divine inspiration or unexpected blessings. That way, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re likely to recognize the call when it comes and respond with the alacrity necessary to get the full beneďŹ t of its offerings. This is always a sound principle to live by. But it will be an especially valuable strategy in the coming weeks. Right now, imagine what it feels like when your soul is properly ajar.

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GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20)

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Some people believe that a giant sea serpent lives in a Scottish lake. They call it the Loch Ness monster, or Nessie for short. The evidence is anecdotal and skimpy. If the creature actually lurks in the murky depths, it has never hurt any human being, so it canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be considered dangerous. On the other hand, Nessie has long been a boon to tourism in the area. The natives are happy that the tales of its existence are so lively. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to propose using the Loch Ness monster as a template for how to deal with one of your scary delusions. Use your rational mind to exorcise any anxiety you might still be harboring, and ďŹ gure out a way to take advantage of the legendary story you created about it.

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and tantalize, Taurus. Be pithy and catchy and provocative. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go on too long. Leave â&#x20AC;&#x2122;em hanging for more. Wink for dramatic effect. Perfect your most enigmatic smile. Drop hints and cherish riddles. Believe in the power of telepathy. Add a new twist or two to your body language. Be sexy in the subtlest ways you can imagine. Pose questions that no one has been brave or smart enough to ask. Hang out in thresholds, crossroads and any other place where the action is entertaining.

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22)

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Some people wonder if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m more like a cheerleader than an objective reporter. They think that maybe I minimize the pain and exaggerate the gain that lies ahead. I understand why they might pose that question. Because all of us

are constantly besieged with a disproportionate glut of discouraging news, I see it as my duty to provide a counterbalance. My optimism is medicine to protect you from the distortions that the conventional wisdom propagates. Having said that, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like you to know that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not counterbalancing at all when I give you this news: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re close to grabbing a strategic advantage over a frustration that has hindered you for a long time.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life always gives us exactly the teacher we need at every moment,â&#x20AC;? said Zen teacher Charlotte Joko Beck. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This includes every mosquito, every misfortune, every red light, every trafďŹ c jam, every obnoxious supervisor (or employee), every illness, every loss, every moment of joy or depression, every addiction, every piece of garbage, every breath.â&#x20AC;? While I appreciate Beckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advice, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m perplexed why she put such a heavy emphasis on lessons that arise from difďŹ cult events. In the weeks ahead, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be proof that this is shortsighted. Your teachers are likely to be expansive, benevolent and generous.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) A lathe is a machine that grips a chunk of metal or wood or clay and rotates it so that someone wielding a tool can form the chunk into a desired shape. From a metaphorical point of view, I visualize you as being held by a cosmic lathe right now. God or fate or whatever youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d prefer to call it is chiseling away the nonessential stuff so as to sculpt a more beautiful and useful version of you. Although the process may be somewhat painful, I think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be happy with the result.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping you will take maximum advantage of the big opportunity thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ahead for you, Capricorn: an enhancement of your senses. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right. For the foreseeable future, you not only have the potential to experience extra vivid and memorable perceptions. You could also wangle an upgrade in the acuity and profundity of your senses, so that your sight, smell, taste, hearing and touch will forevermore gather in richer data. For best results, set aside what you believe about the world, and just drink in the pure impressions. In other words, focus less on the thoughts rumbling around inside your mind and simply notice whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on around you. For extra credit, cultivate an empathetic curiosity with everything youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to perceive better. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) What kind of week will it be for you? It will be like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re chewing gum while walking down a city street and then suddenly you sneeze, catapulting the gooey mess from your mouth onto the sidewalk in such a way that it gets stuck to the bottom of your shoe, which causes you to trip and fall, allowing you to ďŹ nd a $100 bill that is just lying there unclaimed and that you would have never seen had you not experienced your little ďŹ t of â&#x20AC;&#x153;bad luck.â&#x20AC;? Be ready to cash in on unforeseen twists of fate, Aquarius. PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Having served as executive vice-president of the Hedonistic Anarchists Think Tank, I may not seem like the most believable advocate of the virtues of careful preparation, rigorous organization, and steely resolve. But if I have learned anything from consorting with hedonistic anarchists, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not necessarily a clash between thrill seeking and self-discipline. The two can even be synergistic. I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s especially true for you right now, Pisces. The quality and intensity of your playtime activities will thrive in direct proportion to your self-command.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Miscellaneous LAPTOP, Computer, LCD Panel $249, $99, $55â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Like New! CRC Computer Repair Center, 3227 Santa Rosa Ave, 95407. FREE checkup, expert laptop repair, tune-up, spyware removal. 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm, Tuesâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat. 707.528.8340.

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ruary 28, 2011 and filed for bankruptcy on May 2, 2011. GGCH operated health centers at the following locations: (a) 815 Eddy Street, San FranTO:ALL PATIENTS AND cisco, CA; (b) 2211 Palm Avenue, San Mateo, CA; (c) 2 H FORMER PATIENTS OF Street, San Rafael, CA; (d) 482 GOLDEN GATE COMWest MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland, CA; (e) Eastmont MUNITY HEALTH, Mall, 7200 Bancroft Avenue, formerly known as Suite 210, Oakland, CA; (f) PLANNED PARENT1370 Medical Center Drive, HOOD GOLDEN GATE Rohnert Park, CA; (g) 1866 B Street, Hayward, CA; (h) 1230 Re: Golden Gate Community Hopkins Avenue, Redwood Health, Case No. 11-31703 DM City, CA; (i) Good Samaritan U. S. Bankruptcy Court, N.D.CA Health Center, 1294 Potrero YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED Avenue, San Francisco, CA; that Golden Gate Community and (j) Novato Youth Center, Health, formerly known as 1767 Grant Avenue, Novato, CA . Planned Parenthood Golden IF YOU WERE a GGCH PATIENT, Gate (collectively â&#x20AC;&#x153;GGCHâ&#x20AC;?) ceased its operations on Feb- you or your current health care

Legal & Public Notices

provider may request a copy of your medical records by submitting a written request for your medical records. You may download an Authorization for Release of Medical Records (â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARMRâ&#x20AC;?) from GGCH at www.ggch2012.com. Please submit the completed, signed ARMR to GGCH Patient Records at: GGCH-Patient Records 2370 Market Street, PMB 502 San Francisco, CA 94114 -orFax: 415.373.4466 -orEmail: ggch2012@gmail.com Please read and fill out the form carefully. If you have any questions, please contact us via email at ggch2012@gmail.com or tele-

phone 415.518.5716. IF YOU DO NOT REQUEST A COPY OF YOUR PATIENT RECORDS ON OR BEFORE AUGUST 31, 2013, GGCH will request that the United States Department of Health and Human Services and the California Department of Health and Human Services take possession of your medical records. However, these agencies are not obligated to do so and you should not assume that they will. If these agencies decline to take possession of and responsibility for the records, the patient medical records will be destroyed, pursuant to Order of the Bankruptcy Court

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PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

Josh Guttig, email: jgutt7@yahoo.com or call 707.364.1540

BraveHeart Women Sonoma County Chapter Meeting Way Beyond Networking! Be. Create. Collaborate!

Move In Specials

Saturday July 21st, 11:00, Dhyana Center, Sebastopol Local Leader, Laurie Allen 707.318.9865

5 X 10…

starting as low as $ 30 per month

BECOME A YOGA TEACHER in 6 extended weekends at Ananda Seva ashram in Santa Rosa, Oct–March. Visit: www.anandaseva.org/yoga/yoga-teacher-training or call Gayatri 707.239.3650.

3205 Dutton Ave | 1435 Sebastopol Ave Santa Rosa | Locally Owned & Operated

Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

707-546-0000 707-578-3299

NATURAL HOME DESIGN’S NEW LOCATION!

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS

We have moved next to Costco in R.P: 5833 Redwood Dr. Rohnert Park,CA 94928 707.585.2343 naturalhomeproducts.com

Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

HEALTH FAIR SAMPLER Wellness Practitioners Wanted

•Led by Dr. Hanya Barth •Real Care—Real Doctors •24/7 Safe Verification •Totally Confidential

Promote Your Business – Create More Visibility in your Community - Contact Lynn Kwitt @ 707.280.5449 or email: healthfairsampler1@gmail.com

1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 — Great Prices! Visit our online menu at – www.PeaceinMedicine.org

starting as low as $ 75 per month

We sell boxes, packaging and other moving supplies

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxycontin, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal!

PEACE IN MEDICINE IS NOW OPEN IN SANTA ROSA

10 X 10…

Donate Your Auto 800.380.5257 We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not (restrictions apply). Live operators—7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

Smith Anderson North Gallery Jun 16-Aug 4, “Williams, Waits” features the work of Franklin Williams and Kellesimone Waits, who share a playful obsession for acquiring and incorporating discarded relics. 20 Greenfield Ave, San Anselmo. 415.457.8847.

We’ll Match Any Local Price

1.707.568.0420

www.GREEN215.com

Downtown Santa Rosa: 741 5th St @ E St

2012 BEST OF AWARDS ARE NOW ONLINE 1. Go to www.bohemian.com and click Best of 2012 Legends 2. Scroll down to ‘2012 Winners! Claim Your Awards here’ at the bottom of the page 3. Download, print, frame, and voila!

Quality ID Cards


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