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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

APRIL EVENTS

Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers

Thanks

For Voting BERNSTEIN ORTHODONTIC GROUP Sonoma County’s Best Orthodontist!

Sunday, April 1, 2pm

MADELEINE ROBINS The Sleeping Partner: A Sarah Tolerance Mystery SEBASTOPOL

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Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo by Gabe Meline. Cover design by Tabi Dolan.

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nb YEA, THE TREE OF LIFE

Be it known, its ways are ways of pleasantness, and all its paths lead to Chicken Dumbo Burritos.

We’re upgrading our outsides, while you work on your insides!

r0GY.QDD[ r0GY5JQYGTU r0GY&GEQT Come see for yourself!

This photo was taken at El Capitan in Santa Rosa. Submit your photo for publication to photos@bohemian.com.

‘All these people have all this money, and I’d think, ‘God, I don’t want anybody to know I’m homeless.’� COVER STO RY P29

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Three-Point Plan

Let’s all pitch in and help to get America back on track BY BILL FELLER

T

he Occupy Wall Street movement and media outlets on the left have placed an undue amount of blame onto banks and corporations for causing the 2008 financial crisis. While millions of Americans may have lost their life savings, their homes, or their jobs as a result of this, will blaming the people who caused it really help? Right or wrong, we will never be able to climb out of the hole we’re in unless corporations are holding the ladder, or, at the very least, sell us a ladder manufactured overseas.

Those of us fortunate enough to be employed during these tough economic times owe a debt of gratitude to our employers and an obligation to do everything within our power to keep them as strong and profitable as possible. Therefore, please consider doing the following: 1. Employees should send their children to live in corporate re-education camps where they will learn to dedicate themselves to a monastic lifestyle in which they live humble, quiet lives performing tasks that cannot be billed to clients. This will allow the company to fire the employees who previously performed those tasks, which will reduce out-of-pocket expenses. As an added bonus, since the children will have been taught to forego possessions, they will have no need of pockets, which will end outof-pocket expenses entirely. 2. Employees should donate 40 percent of their annual salary to their company’s political action committee to help fund lobbyists; 20 percent toward the cost of maintaining the corporate re-education camps; 20 percent toward the purchase of office supplies and field equipment; and 40 percent for corporate executive bonuses. Since this will leave the employee 20 percent short of their donation obligations, they should work an extra eight hours per week to make up for it. 3. Winter heating costs should not exceed the heating allowance used by Ebenezer Scrooge. Is this really too much to ask? After all, America is a nation built on sacrifice. There is no “I” in team, but there is in sacrifice. Please do your part. Bill Feller is a geologist for an environmental consulting firm and drummer for the instrumental surf band Voodoo Court. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Jazzercise Lives!

I am a Jazzercise Instructor at Monroe Hall and I have owned the business for over five years. Jazzercise is not an old-fashioned leotard workout (“Best Leotard-Clad Olivia Newton-John Workout,” March 21). In fact, Jazzercise is very hip and incorporates lots of the new trends, like Pilates, yoga, and kickboxing. It consists of great moves choreographed to new, hip music, including Rihanna, Kelly Clarkson, J-Lo, Timbaland, Chris Brown, Usher, etc. Jazzercise has evolved over the years. It is a great workout—you should come try us out.

PATTI JOHNSON Santa Rosa

Seriously, They Don’t Eat Babies Thanks for the coverage you gave last week to the ongoing disputes regarding the 1990 bombing of Judi Bari (“A Tangled Web,” March 21). I would just add that if Darryl Cherney really wants to find out who bombed Judi Bari, he has the resources and legal standing to start a real investigation. That would be most welcome. Speaking of disputes and misunderstandings, I’d like to address a letter by Angie Marlowe who wrote of the “Bohemian Conspiracies” in your March 14 edition. It may surprise Angie to know that I couldn’t agree with her more regarding the many conspiracy theories that are circulating out there about the Bohemian Grove, as they are indeed “silly.” From Satanic cults to underground sex chambers to burning babies at the Cremation of Care, I’ve heard them all—and have denounced them as has anyone else paying attention. Angie may not have followed the protests out there for the past 32 years, but with the exception of last year when

several real conspiracy types had a small presence, our focus over the years has been on the daily Lakeside Talks which are often major public policy talks without any public scrutiny. Our purpose has always been to simply expose this two-week gathering of the military, governmental, financial and corporate elite. In other words, the 1 percent.

I would urge Angie and others to look into the history of both this annual encampment and the protests which began in 1980 at the beginning of the Reagan Administration. You can start at the Sonoma County Free Press website, and click on ’25 Years of Lakeside Talks.’

MARY MOORE Camp Meeker

Trayvon: A Victim of Racist America The murder of Trayvon Martin doesn’t raise new questions, it highlights old ones. Had the killer, George Zimmerman, been a black vigilante who killed a white child, he would have been arrested, quite likely beaten or shot for “resisting arrest” and jailed without bail, assuming he wasn’t already dead. Racism in this country continues unabated, fueled by ignorance, arrogance and fear, the fire stoked by the rhetoric of white superiority. Genocide directed at Native Americans, slavery, lynchings, Chinese Exclusion Laws, the internment of JapaneseAmericans, Jim Crow and the antiimmigrant sentiment now flooding our airwaves all point to this hatred of the “other.” Now add Muslims to the list. And when these “others” die or suffer, their lives are not valued as much as the lives of white people. This is madness, ugly racism, toxic to everyone. The land of the free, the home of the brave? Hardly. My heart goes out to the family and friends of Trayvon Martin, a child like any other. Our child.

MOSS HENRY Santa Rosa

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THIS MODERN WORLD

Andrew Carnegie said, “A library outranks any other one thing a community can do to benefit its people.” In June of 2011, when we learned that the Sonoma County Libraries were closing on Mondays and reducing branch hours uniformly, we formed Sonoma County Save Our Libraries (SOCOSOL). Our purpose is to get the library to restore public service hours. We need people who are willing to go to meetings to make the needs of the community known. If you are interested in joining the committee, please go to www.socosol.org. After all, “libraries will get you through times with no money better than money will get you through times with no libraries.”

VIRGINIA R. HARRIS

Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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Paper

On April 5, Sebastopol celebrates its entrance into the Cittaslow International Network as a designated “slow city.” But what exactly does that mean? Is it officially decreed that all residents must forevermore do everything in slow motion? Although that would actually be kind of cool, it’s not exactly true. Rather, Sebastopol joins 140 small towns (with a population under 50,000) in 24 countries already in the network, including Fairfax and Sonoma. To be approved, cities must support local products, promote “slow travel,” create human-friendly infrastructure and preserve the environment. With origins in Italy, and with principles borrowed from the Slow Food movement, the network pays close attention to the infrastructure of daily life. Join Mayor Guy Wilson to celebrate on Thursday, April 5, at Guayaki Mate Bar. 6782 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol. 7pm. Free. 707.824.6644.

Worker’s World HENHOUSE BLUES Vague egg-carton promises like ‘animal friendly’ and ‘free roaming’ can be extremely misleading.

Eggs-actly A new bill before Congress would ensure accurate labeling practices for commercial and free-range eggs BY ALASTAIR BLAND

C

all a bubbly wine made in California “champagne,” and you’re asking for legal trouble from the captains of the global wine industry. And if you call a conventionally grown potato “organic,” the enforcement branch of the U.S. Department of Agriculture

will be at your door as soon as it unearths the fraud. But raise a chicken in a cage, and you’re free to make almost any claims you want to sell the bird’s eggs. That’s because federal laws that regulate animal-welfare terminology on egg cartons leave some gaping loopholes while basically allowing producers to make their own interpretations of

just what “free-range,” “cage-free” and “pasture-raised” really mean. “There’s no standardization of the cage-free regulations,” says Lesley Brabyn, who farms a free-ranging flock of 450 organic ducks for meat and eggs at Salmon Creek Ranch near Bodega Bay. “Some people are putting chicken cages in their pasture and calling their eggs ‘pasture-raised.’ You ) 10

For those interested in learning more about worker ownership and entrepreneurship, the Praxis Peace Institute hosts an evening titled “Models for a New Economy.” With a mind toward alternative business models, the event focuses on businesses that are “living principled commitments to both customers and workers,” while creating “participative democracy and social transformation.” After opening remarks by Congresswoman Lynn Woolsey, speakers include Joseph Tuck, CEO of Alvarado Street Bakery; Kasper Koczab of the Network of Bay Area Worker Cooperatives; students and professors from Mondragón University and Gayle McLaughlin, mayor of Richmond. Find out more on Sunday, April 1, at Dominican University’s Guzman Hall. 50 Acacia Ave., San Rafael. 7pm. $15–$20. 707.939.2973. —Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Eggs ( 9 really have to be careful.” Federal law assures that poultry and chicken eggs billed as cage-free or free-range did not originate in cages. However, producers of poultry and eggs who raise their birds in the cramped dwellings called battery cages are not required to reveal their farming methods to consumers. Worse, these producers may use meaningless terms—such as “animal-friendly,” for one—that can easily mislead consumers. “The lack of federal oversight allows producers to use unregulated claims all they want,” says Erica Meier, the executive director of Compassion Over Killing. Her organization, based in Washington, D.C., has been urging the Food and Drug Administration since 2006 to enforce regulations over language and imagery used on egg cartons. The administration, she says, has shown little interest in taking action. However, a federal bill introduced to Congress in February proposes to ban battery cages in America while also requiring that every egg carton be clearly labeled to assure that consumers know without uncertainty just where and how their eggs were grown. Currently, numerous labeling terms appear on egg cartons, including “animal welfare–approved,” “free-roaming,” “vegetarianfed” and many others. The new laws, according to Josh Balk, a spokesperson with the Humane Society of the United States, a major backer of the Congress bill, would offer egg producers four clear labeling options: eggs from caged hens, eggs from enriched cages, eggs from cage-free hens and eggs from free-range hens. Meanwhile, there is some level of industry oversight from retailers. Whole Foods, for one, conducts its own inspections of vendors who claim that their eggs are pasture-raised, which is an unregulated term. “They want to see the chickens outside in the grass,” says Don

Gilardi, who owns and operates RedHill Farm in West Marin. Here, Gilardi keeps about 5,000 hens on his family’s 100-year-old property, where he says the birds “have access to the outdoors 24-7.” Gilardi says that price can be a telling indicator of how an egg was produced, and he assures there is no way to produce pasture-raised eggs cheaply. His RedHill eggs, which he gathers by hand, go for more than $8 a dozen. In Sebastopol, farmer Marc Felton bills his chicken eggs as “pasture raised,” and in local retail stores they go for $7 a dozen. “They’re expensive, and I have to educate my customers and explain why these eggs are better and healthier and worth the price,” Felton says. His 1,500 hens roam freely over 30-plus acres of land, he says. They lay about a thousand eggs per day, and at night he leaves the doors to their coops open. Electric fencing protects them from predators. But most hens in America live less picturesque lives. About 280 million egg hens live on farms across the country, including 1.8 million in Sonoma County. (The American poultry industry, meanwhile, consists of about 9 billion birds.) About 95 percent of these laying hens live in cages, according to the industry group, United Egg Producers, which states in its online cage guidelines for farmers that a single caged hen needs only 67 to 86 square inches of living space. The same website also defends the standard industry practice of slicing off a chicken’s beak at birth. “Scientific evidence,” the site states, “shows that beak trimming rarely compromises animal well-being. In fact, beak trimming actually helps reduce pecking, feather pulling, cannibalism and decreases mortality.” After about two years of laying eggs, most factoryfarmed egg hens are euthanized when their productivity begins to wane. Male chicks, roughly one for every female born at commercial hatcheries, are killed at birth. In February, the Marin Humane

Society participated in a hen rescue at a farm in Turlock, where the owner had abandoned the facility and left 50,000 chickens without food or care for two weeks. Roughly 17,000 hens had starved by the time authorities arrived on Feb. 21, and almost 30,000 more birds were later euthanized. About 4,600 were saved, of which 400 went to the Marin Humane Society. Here, according to chief operating officer John Reese, the chickens are up for adoption. Reese says that adopters are screened to assure that the chickens aren’t used for commercial egg production. “We’re adopting them out as companion animals, but of course [the hens] offer the benefit of laying eggs,” Reese says. At the commercial level, incoming state regulations pose to brighten the lives of California’s egg chickens. Proposition 2, passed by voters in 2008, will take effect in 2015 by banning battery cages, as well as veal cages and gestation crates, in which female pigs may spend months or years virtually unable to move. Animal-welfare advocates have applauded Proposition 2, but not Brabyn at Salmon Creek Ranch. “To say that every egg in California is going to be pastureraised isn’t even possible,” she says. Brabyn says the new rules will create a significant decrease in the state’s egg-producing capacity. Many farms, she thinks, will raise their prices, while others may leave the state. Meier, whose organization promotes a vegan diet and lifestyle, also doubts that pastureraised hens on the available land could meet the demand for eggs in America. And that, to her, leaves one easy solution to alleviating the suffering of caged birds. “There are alternatives to eggs, and we would need to cut back on how many we eat,” she says. “If we were to take all hens out of cages, I think we’d need to modify our eating habits.”

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WELLNESS

CENTER Health Starts Here! Gluten Intolerance Group of Sonoma County 3/29/12 - 6:00 – 7:00pm Led by Dr. Justin Hoffman, discuss chalenges of gluten intolerance while sharing ideas & recipes. Nature’s Dirty Needle - Lyme Disease 3/31/12 - 1:00 – 2:00pm Discuss Acute and Chronic Lyme Disease, the co-infections, and how to get better. Nutrient Dense Eating Through Living Foods 4/4/12 - 1:00 – 3:00pm Breakfast Delights with Mary Kern, Living Food Culinary Instructor. $35 Fee and Registration required. 5 Step Animal Welfare Lecture & Tour 4/4/12 - 6:30 – 7:30pm Come learn how the Global Animal Partnership’s 5 Step Animal Welfare rating system is a pivotal piece to sustainable, livestock consumption. Wellness Center events are free unless otherwise noted.

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Hovering in Limbo An Alaskan village and sustainability’s complex terrain BY JULIANE POIRIER

I

n the middle of the Aleutians, that long tail on the map that curves down and away from Alaska, a settlement called King Cove sits on a spit of low land between towering volcano ranges.

The 800 or so Americans living there wake up each day to stunning views, and, during fishing season, anglers can select among the five salmon species that thrive there between the Pacific Ocean and the Bering Sea. But residents can’t be certain they’ll get to a doctor in an emergency because of heavy snows, gale force winds—at times over 100 miles per hour—and “whiteout” fogs that make travel life threatening at times. King Cove wants a road, a one-lane gravel road to the allweather airport seven miles away. But a road would pass through the Izembek National Wildlife

Preserve, where no roads are allowed. And herein lies a perfect example of why the terrain of sustainability is so complex to navigate, when human need is pitted against what other life forms need to survive—and when lawyers are watching the contest. Roads are detrimental to wildlife habitat. So conservation groups are campaigning for public comments of protest on the environmental impact report. No road, they insist. King Cove folks are isolated because a wilderness preserve was created without their input—ironically, the public meeting was held in a town they could not get to easily, held without their knowledge (by mistake) and scheduled during fishing season, when they would have been unable to attend even if they knew about it and had a way to get there. To compensate, the federal government gave King Cove $37.5 million to improve their clinic (still with no doctor) and buy a hovercraft as a waterambulance. The hovercraft works, but King Cove’s mayor says it’s too expensive to sustain. Tens of thousands of additional acres will be donated to Izembek Preserve in exchange for the road right-of-way. At least one oildrilling company has sided with conservationists and opposed the road in this case, because the trade would close off so many acres from drilling. But major environmental groups oppose the road because it would set a precedent for lifting federal protections from pristine wildlife areas, making fossil-fuelcorporation lawyers salivate. King Cove’s hovercraft has made more than 30 successful emergency transports. If it were sustainable to operate, no road would be necessary, so money— and not gravel—could pave the way to the all-weather airport. But where will the money come from? If King Cove gets a road, and federal law gains a precedent, what happens to all our federally protected lands?

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Gr azie Amici! Best Italian Restaur ant Marin County

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Strip Mall Surprise Tavola Italian Kitchen serves worthy Italian in Novato BY STETT HOLBROOK

T

avola Italian Kitchen is an aberration. It shouldn’t be here. By it I mean a small, wellcrafted, reasonably priced Italian restaurant that draws heavily on local and sustainably sourced ingredients. By here I mean the Hamilton Marketplace, a Novato shopping center of yellow stucco buildings and

red-tiled roofs just off Highway 101. The setting is well suited to the Olive Garden, but a restaurant that breaks down whole hogs for pork terrine and sausage, makes its own pasta and has great service to match? What’s that doing here? Walking in the door, you’re greeted by an open kitchen and the yellow glow of a furnace-like gas-fired oven from which the cooks pull superb, thin-crust

pizzas. At the top of my list is the salsiccia pizza ($14), made with house-made fennel sausage, broccoli rabe, creamy crescenza cheese and a sprinkling of Calabrian chiles. The pizza margherita goes for just $11, and that includes real buffalo-milk mozzarella. For openers, my favorite starter was the coppa di testa ($13)— that’s “headcheese” to you. But forget about disturbing packages of shrink-wrapped pig parts, this is something totally different and

Tavola Italian Kitchen, 5800 Nave Drive, Novato. 415.883.6686.

15 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 28 –AP R I L 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

delicious. As mentioned, Tavola buys whole pigs and attempts to use every bit of the animals. Wonderful pork bits and pieces end up in the coppa, served alongside chilled and marinated beets and a lightly dressed salad of peppery upland cress. I almost didn’t order the arugula and radicchio salad ($9.50) because of its pears and hazelnuts, but the kitchen has a light touch and I was not disappointed. Those going to Tavola for lunch should try the Kitchen Sink salad ($12), a hillock of whatever fresh greens and vegetables are available that week from Greenleaf, Tavola’s produce vendor. I’ve got a soft spot for any place that serves sardines, and Tavola offers a puttanescaesque dish made with Monterey Bay pilchards, a larger variety of sardine in a spicy sauce of tomatoes, Gaeta olives and lemon oil and paccheri, a rough-cut, tubular pasta ($14). It would be better with in-season tomatoes rather than canned, but it’s a simple dish with big flavors. For something even more substantial, the pork Milanese ($24) combines breaded cutlet of pork with roasted Brussels sprouts and a rather waxy cannelini bean stew. Desserts include standard items gelato ($5), buttermilk panna cotta ($6) and an insanely dense and chocolately chocolate tart ($6) dusted with flaky salt and a dribble of olive oil. Or go for the zeppole ($8), Italian doughnuts filled with house-made Nutella or strawberry jam. The inner strength of Tavola is due in large part to coowner John Paul Pirraglia, an East Coast transplant who’s a welcoming and knowledgeable presence. Ask for a food or wine recommendation, and expect a thoughtful conversation to follow. He adds the attention to detail and enthusiasm that one expects from an owner-run restaurant. What I didn’t expect was to find it in a shopping mall, but like the restaurant, it’s definitely a welcome find.

Dining

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | MAR C H 28 –AP R I L 3, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Abyssinia Ethiopian/ Eritrean. $. Authentic and filling, and a welcome culinary addition. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 913 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.6455.

Cape Cod Fish & Chips Fish and chips. $. A dingy hole in the wall–just like a real chippy! This popular lunch spot offers perfectly cooked fish and chips to eat in or take out. Open daily. 548 E Cotati Ave, Cotati. 707.792.0982.

Carmen’s Burger Bar American. $. Excellent and innovative burgers with a Mexican flair. Beef comes fresh daily from Pacific Market next door. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 1612 Terrace (in Town and Country center), Santa Rosa. 707.579.3663.

2 for for 1 ENTREE ENTREE or or LLUNCH UNCH B BUFFET U UF with pur purchase chase of 2 drinks. drinks. Exp. Exp. 3/31/12 3/31/12

Flavor California cuisine. $-$$. Fresh and organic white-tablecloth food at paper-napkin prices. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9695. French Garden French. $$$-$$$$. The French Garden serves classic French and California cuisine focusing on seasonal and sustainable foods, much of it grown on its own farm; also, a casual bar with small plates. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

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Hopmonk Tavern Pub

4409 09 M Mendocino end o cino Ave, Av e , DDowntown o w n t o w n SSanta a n t a RRosa osa 707.579.5999 70 7. 5 79. 5 9 9 9 cross cr o s s sstreet t r ee t 55th th 11280 2 8 0 HHealdsburg e a l d s bur g AAve, v e , HHealdsburg e aldsbur g 7707.433.2954 07. 4 3 3. 2 9 5 4 ccross r o s s sstreet t r e e t DDry r y CCreek r eek RRoad oad On Online line M Menu: enu : w www.SizzlingTandoor.com w w. S i z z linggTa n do or.c om

fare. $$. More than serviceable bar food with a menu that hops the globe. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jennie Low’s Chinese. $-$$. Light, healthy, and tasty Cantonese, Mandarin, Hunan, and Szechuan home-style

cooking. Great selection, including vegetarian fare, seafood, and noodles. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. Two locations: 140 Second St, Ste 120, Petaluma. 707.762.6888. Vintage Oaks Shopping Center, Rowland Ave, Novato. 415.892.8838.

Lynn’s Thai Thai. $$. A taste of real Thailand in convivial atmosphere. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 8492 Gravenstein Hwy, Ste M (in the Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. 707.793.9300.

Washoe House Roadhouse. $$. Since 1859, serving straightforward roadhouse grub and Italian fare. Canned green beans, buffalo burgers, amazingly satisfying pies. The bar alone is worth a trip. Lunch and dinner daily. Stony Point and Roblar roads, Cotati. 707.795.4544.

Water Street Bistro Eclectic. $$. Homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and entrées. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.9563.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh

Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Portelli Rossi Italian. $$. Tasty and affordable fare in a cozy setting. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner, Tues-Sun. 868 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.892.6100.

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y

Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be found. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.) 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.

Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and

Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly

flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/California.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Brassica Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700. Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

17

SMALL BITES

To Market, to Market Look out, Whole Foods Sebastopol— Santa Rosa’s workerowned Community Market is planning to open a 10,000-squarefoot store just down the street in the Barlow, a retail development in the works off Highway 12. The tentative opening is set for Oct. 1. Community Market plans to hire about 50 people for the new store. The new store has plans for a deli with pizzas, sandwiches and salads. Because of competition from nearby Whole Foods, the market will also begin selling beer, wine and meat, something the store has never done, says Nica Poznanovich, Community Market’s outreach manager. Poznanovich relishes the idea of going head-to-head with Whole Foods. “We do something very different than what they do,” she says, citing the store’s stringent product purchasing policies and community donations. “This will provide the community with a choice.” While standards for meat products are still being worked out, Poznanovich says the meat will be “the highest quality in Sonoma County” with everything either organic, grass-fed or sustainably produced. She’s pushing for an all-local, all sustainably produced selection of wine, too. The new store will also have a bar on the side of the building which will open onto an outdoor patio. The patio will be adjacent to a stage, fire pit and community space that the market will manage. Also, in order to alleviate traffic congestion in the already vehicle-choked downtown, Poznanovich says the store is exploring the idea of a fleet of bicycles to deliver lunch to nearby businesses. For more, see www. srcommunitymarket.com.—Stett Holbrook

Easter Sunday Buffet

Grilled Australian Rosemary Leg of Lamb with mint jelly Roasted New York Sirloin with horseradish cream sauce Fresh Eggplant Parmesan • Penne Pesto Pomodoro Vegetable Tart • Roasted Fingerling Potatoes Wild Alaskan Salmon with champagne beurre blanc Spring Vegetables grilled and roasted April 8th, 2012 Nicasio’s Cow Track Ranch Red Merlot Lettuce Salad 10am–4pm Farm Fresh Scrambled Eggs Potato Latkes with applesauce and sour cream Norwegian Smoked Salmon with bagels & cream cheese Buttermilk Pancakes On the Town Square Hickory Smoked Bacon & Applewood Sausage Nicasio Assorted Pastries and Breads Reservations Advised: Fresh Fruit and Strawberries with crème frâiche Lemon Bars, Double Chocolate Brownies Coffee, Tea, & Hot Chocolate Take D St to Pt. Reyes–Petaluma Rd $2695 ADULTS / $2295 SENIORS (65+) Left on Nicasio Valley Rd



415.662.2219

www.ranchonicasio.com S

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Thank you for your vote of confidence! 4 years in a row Best Italian Restaurant Sonoma County Lunch & Dinner, now offering a full bar

114 Petaluma Blvd. North Petaluma, CA 94952 (707) 782-1130 www.cucinaparadisopetaluma.com

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Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable specialoccasion dining. Dinner, WedSun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service

belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

www.simply-vietnam.com

Simply Vietnam

Traditional Vietnamese Restaurant

966 North Dutton Ave. Santa Rosa, CA 95401 Mon–Sat 10–9 ~ Sun 11–8 707.566.8910

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 28 –AP R I L 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

$-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and highend ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Wineries

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | MAR C H 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;AP R I L 3, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

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Camellia Cellars Like owner Chris Lewand, the wine is just so darned approachable and easy-going. Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon are most consistently strong. 57 Front St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm. 888.404.9463.

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percent of Spann wines are distributed out of state, leaving a little aside for this off-thePlaza tasting room. Malbec, Mourvedre and Mayacamas Cab; the take-home bargain is a $20 blend. Photography gallery adds visual interest. 111 E. Napa St., Sonoma. Open daily, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm. Tasting fee. 707.933.8343.

Unti Vineyards Very Enjoy a FREE one month membership with this ad

Call 707.546.BUDO (707.546.2836)

friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590.

Valley of the Moon Winery This winery was G[he4ce\_(q@hf\VA\Z[g 7Ti\WG!6TegXeq*-&#c` JXW4ce\_$$qF\XeeTAXiTWTĂ&#x201A;6TaĂ&#x192;EX_XTfX

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"We have all come to this life on a soul errand to complete and fullfill our golden purpose"

Journey True North www.journeytruenorth.com

Jullianna Brooks LCSW

In these current times the culture and social climate is loaded with material expectations and misleading guidance which can waylay our purpose JOURNEY TRUE NORTH provides practical tools to recalibrate the internal compass and support the continued journey towards a personal north star and golden purpose.

once owned by Sen. George Hearst. Perhaps instead of the epochal utterance â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rosebud,â&#x20AC;? we could dub in â&#x20AC;&#x153;RosĂŠ.â&#x20AC;? 777 Madrone Road, Glen Ellen. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. 707.996.6941.

Wind Gap Wines Onetime vintner of big, opulent Pax Syrah refocuses on coolclimate locales that yield a more savory, European style. 6450 First St., Forestville. By appointment only. 707.887.9100.

Windy Hill Estate Like a

riddle bottled up in a mystery, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all but hidden in plain sight above the 101 freewayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cotati Grade. Impressive view; mixed bag of low-alcohol, low-priced Pinots from quirky winery. 1010 W. Railroad Ave., Cotati. Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. $5 fee. 707.795-3030.

Woodenhead Damn good wine. Pinot, Zinâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;yum, yum, yum. 5700 River Road, Santa Rosa. Open Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Monday, 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. 707.887.2703.

MA R I N CO U N TY Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noonâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7pm. 415.331.2001. Point Reyes Vineyards The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

Brown Estate Vineyards (WC) A beautifully restored and converted stone and redwood barn is the winery and tasting room facility at Brown Estate. And the construction of a 6,500square-foot subterranean wine cave was completed in 2005. Visitors are currently limited to wine club members by appointment only. 3233 Sage Canyon Road, Napa. 707.963.2435.

Del Dotto Vineyards (WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

Grgich Hills Mike Grgichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chardonnays famously beat the competition at the 1976 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Judgment of Parisâ&#x20AC;? and the allestate winery is solar-powered and practices organic and biodynamic. 1829 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 9:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. 707.963.2784.

Ross Valley Winery In existence since 1987, the Ross Valley Winery produces Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc and Zin port wines. 343 San Anselmo Ave., San Anselmo. Open Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday, 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm. 415.457.5157.

PlumpJack Winery

N A PA CO U N TY

Quixote There is a sense

Bennett Lane Winery The old trope â&#x20AC;&#x153;beer-drinking NASCAR fans vs. Chardonnaysipping highbrowsâ&#x20AC;? runs out of gas at a winery that sponsors an annual NASCAR race and has its own car, emblazoned with grapes. A Roman emperor who appreciated hearty vino as much as a good chariot race inspired Maximus White and Red â&#x20AC;&#x153;feasting wines.â&#x20AC;? 3340 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. 707.942.6684.

Part of the huge empire in part helmed by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom. Syrah, Merlot and more. 620 Oakville Crossroad, Oakville. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4pm. 707.945.1220. of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stagâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heyday was in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

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[honorable mention]

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Best Breakfast

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Winner, W in n e r,

Best B e Chocolatier, est Chocolatier, S Sonoma o n o m a County Count y

Honorable H o n o r a b l e Mention, Mention , B Best est C Candy/Chocolate a n d y/C h o c o l a te S Shop hop

Winner, W in n e r,

Best B e WiFi est WiFi Hot Hot Spot, Spot , Sonoma S o n o m a County Count y

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28-DAY CHALLENGE .0/%":4t"13*-oto1. 8&%/&4%":4t.":oto1. Modeled after Rip Esselstynâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Plant Strong Engine 2 Diet

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Thank You Sonoma County! 5 years of wins

BEST DOGGIE CARE BOARDING Â&#x2021; DAYCARE ÂĽ GROOMING Â&#x2021; TRAINING DOGS & CATS 707.595.3834Â&#x203A; 2120 Bluebell Dr, Santa Rosa 707.206.9000Â&#x203A;5800 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park www.paradisepetresorts.com

Big Gay Wine Train

O

n any given weekend, dozens of wineries festoon their driveways with gaily colored balloons, hoping to attract curious travelers. So where, pray tell, are the rainbow flags? When native son Mark Vogler returned to manage online business for a wine company, he began to ask that question. Unwittingly, he had become the point man for a far-flung network of wouldbe gay wine tourists. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would get calls almost daily, from L.A., from New York, from friends of friends: Where can we go where weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll feel comfortable? Where can I bring a date?â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I realized almost no one was targeting the gay market. Beer and spirits were there years ago. Wineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not even on their radar.â&#x20AC;?

He started talking with Gary Saperstein, former hospitality manager at the Girl & the Fig. At first, he laughed off the idea, but eventually cofounded Out in the Vineyard with Vogler. They found a ready accomplice in Julie Atwood, who offered to host events at high-priced Atwood Ranch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But why are you doing this?â&#x20AC;? they asked. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be blunt,â&#x20AC;? Vogler recalls her saying. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a wedding destination, gays are getting married, and I want to be in on it. And I spent 20 years in New York as a designerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I miss my gays!â&#x20AC;? Next, the two approached Napa Valley Wine Train, which loved the idea. Afterward, the staff said it was the most fun theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d had. Greg Bjornstad has been on board since last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event. In his role as an international winemaking consultant, Bjornstad says his personal life is a non-issueâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;although it was a first when he put â&#x20AC;&#x153;gayâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bjornstad Cellarsâ&#x20AC;? together in the same place. At the sales and marketing end, the atmosphere is as accommodating as the entertainment industry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been my anecdotal experience that the gay winemaker is allowed to be a little bit more expressive,â&#x20AC;? says Bjornstad, who himself has a quiet, down-to-earth demeanor. Out in the vineyards, â&#x20AC;&#x153;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where there are some people who are not as accommodating.â&#x20AC;? Tensions between growers and wineries can already run high during harvest, but Bjornstad recalls only one experience that involved unpleasant language. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The perception of the gay lifestyle is all bars and circuit parties,â&#x20AC;? says Vogler. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the whole picture.â&#x20AC;? This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three-hour tour features a sparkling wine reception, winemaker talks and a five-course menu paired with a rainbow of varietals from winemakers gay, lesbianâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and straight. The Big Gay Wine Train leaves the station Saturday, March 31. Tickets, $160â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$175. LGBT and their friends welcome. 800.427.4124. Gay Wine Weekend 2012 kicks off June 15 with winemaker dinners, drag queen opera, T-dance and wine auction benefit for Face to Face. For more, see www.outinthevineyard.com.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;James Knight

www.twinhillsusd.org w ww.twinhillsusd.org

21 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 28-AP R I L 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

SOLAR ' GARDEN N ' MUSIC C ' ART Twin Hills School District ' The Art of Academic Excellence GA EN GA EN GA ENCE G R ' ' GARDEN EN          USIC U S  SCIENCE NCE NnGrU LAR LA A R ' l l o E GARD RD SNIC IC SCICI ! ow' Apple pple ENC N G ' A Blossom lossom GA A - B School chool K-5 K-5 ENC N ' S  We W en nurture urture our our sstudents’ tudents’ ccreative reative and and critical critical thinkthinkGARDEN RDE ' M T ' MUSIC SIC iing, ng, academic academic proficiency, proficiency, global g lobal awareness, awareness, s appreapprediversity cciation iation ffor or d iversity and and 'LANGUA AGE E ' GARDEN ' G rrespect espect for for themselves themselves and and others o thers iin n a ccontinually ontinually MUSIC 'L LANG NG SCIENCE ' cchanging S hanging ttechnological echnological world. w orld. Our Our program’s program’s foundation f o u n d a t i o n is i s based based on on ART 'MU USIC ' 'S AR R 'G GARDEN hhigh igh academic academic sstandards tandards areas. n all all subject subject a reas. 'MUSIC 'GA RD DE E 'SCIE EN ENCE ' iinUÊ> UÊ>ÀÌ ÀÌ Get G et a Jump Jump mp S Start tart with with our our Free Free 4 W Week eek UUʓÕÈV “ÕÈV LA ASSummer AN N G GUA UA U A G GE E ' S O OL L A R ' ' G GA A R RD EN ' ummer Kinder Kinder Academy! Academy! UÊ}>À`i˜ˆ˜} UÊ} >À`i˜ˆ˜} ÊÃVˆi˜Vi or all n newly-enrolled ewly-enrolled ki ergarten students udents at Apple Blossom lossom School chool MU Ufoffor SFalIC IallC ' A RT ' Rkindergarten Tnd' A RT RstT 'at Apple ' L ABN GUA USA GE UUÊÃVˆi˜Vi 2012 ffor fo or Fall l2 012 UÊ«…ÞÈV>Êi`ÕV>̈œ˜ UÊ« …ÞÈV>Êi`ÕV>̈œ˜ or a personal personal g guided uided ttour our ccontact ontact A Apple pple B Blossom lossom UÊÓ>ÊV>ÃÃÊÈâi UÊà “>ÊV>ÃÃÊÈâi ' FFor S O OL L A R ' ' G A R RD D E EN N ' M MUSIC ' Principal P rincipal J Jill ill R Rosenquist, osenquist, 7 707.823.1041 07.823. 3 1041 707.823.1041 70 7.823.1041 C CREATIVE RG E AT I VA EA ARTS RTE S 'GARDEN ' GAE R DNC E NC 'MUSIC 'E M U S IC' ' 'SCIENCE S C IL E NA CE N ' ' 'LANGUAGE LG A NUA GUA E E LA NG N U G N U AGG

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10 Rick’s Wine Cellar 11 Crepevine 12 California Film Institute–Mill Valley Film Festival 13 Theresa and Johnny’s

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19 Downtown Pilates 20 Arts Council Napa Valley 21 Bounty Hunter 22 Butter Cream Bakery 23 Napa Valley Museum 24 Auction Napa Valley 25 1313 Main 26 Carpe Diem Wine Bar

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86 Gabe Meline, Bohemian Editor 87 Jon Lohne, Photographer jblaze@sonic.net 88 Bohemian staff

All photos by Jon Lohne: jonlohne.com

A Bohemian approach to the web. The new Bohemian.com

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SAFE AT HOME Faced with a lack of available housing, Kathleen Burkland lived in a homeless shelter before moving to her low-income studio apartment in Novato.

Gabe Meline

For Richer or for Poorer? In wealthy Marin, opposition to low-income housing is high—and so are the numbers of the county’s poor, aged and disabled who need it most BY RACHEL DOVEY Note: This is the second part in a series on senior care in Marin County.

K

athleen Burkland prays the Rosary, has a master’s degree in psychology and, before arthritis forced her to quit, earned her living as a counselor for at-risk teens.

A year ago, she was also homeless. The 61-year-old grandmother

wears a dark blazer and white pendant when I enter her studio apartment in Novato’s Next Key transitional housing on a recent Thursday. Straight, neatly combed gray hair falls to her shoulders. She leans heavily on a cane—the result of six knee surgeries—as she leads me to a table by a window overlooking the green fields and clear morning skies of idyllic Marin. Now enrolled in a Ph.D. program that will allow her to teach online, Burkland says the

stigma of transience kept her from sharing her situation when she was shelter-bound—especially in one of the wealthiest census tracts in the United States. “I could never really say where I was when I was [in the shelter],” she says, resting her right hand on the cane. “It was humiliating—all these people have wonderful places to live and all this money, and I would think, ‘God, I don’t want anybody to know I’m homeless.’” Burkland may seem like

an unlikely candidate for homelessness, but in Marin, she’s not. She’s over 50 and physically disabled; according to the county’s 2011 homelessness survey, she fits right in. “We’ve noticed that the homeless population is aging,” says Paul Fordham, deputy director for the county’s main network of shelters, Homeward Bound. He references the fact that roughly one-fourth of the total homeless population ) 30

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 28 –AP R I L 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

SAFE AT HOME Faced with a lack of available housing, Kathleen Burkland lived in a homeless shelter before moving to her low-income studio apartment in Novato.

Gabe Meline

For Richer or for Poorer? In wealthy Marin, opposition to low-income housing is high—and so are the numbers of the county’s poor, aged and disabled who need it most BY RACHEL DOVEY

K

athleen Burkland prays the Rosary, has a master’s degree in psychology and, before arthritis forced her to quit, earned her living as a counselor for at-risk teens.

A year ago, she was also homeless. The 61-year-old grandmother wears a dark blazer and white pendant when I enter her studio

apartment in Novato’s Next Key transitional housing on a recent Thursday. Straight, neatly combed gray hair falls to her shoulders. She leans heavily on a cane—the result of six knee surgeries—as she leads me to a table by a window overlooking the green fields and clear morning skies of idyllic Marin. Now enrolled in a Ph.D. program that will allow her to teach online, Burkland says the stigma of transience kept her

from sharing her situation when she was shelter-bound—especially in one of the wealthiest census tracts in the United States. “I could never really say where I was when I was [in the shelter],” she says, resting her right hand on the cane. “It was humiliating—all these people have wonderful places to live and all this money, and I would think, ‘God, I don’t want anybody to know I’m homeless.’” Burkland may seem like

an unlikely candidate for homelessness, but in Marin, she’s not. She’s over 50 and physically disabled; according to the county’s 2011 homelessness survey, she fits right in. “We’ve noticed that the homeless population is aging,” says Paul Fordham, deputy director for the county’s main network of shelters, Homeward Bound. He references the fact that roughly one-fourth of the total homeless population

) 30

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Marin Housing ( 29 (287 of 1,220) was over 51 in last year’s count, and offers several explanations. “Anecdotally, I can say that a lot of things catch up with folks later in life: PTSD from the military, putting aside an amount for retirement that then isn’t enough, disabilities. And then market-rate housing is so high.” It’s not just high; for renters, Marin tops the list of the least affordable markets in the United States, according to an annual study by the National Low Income Housing Coalition. And while the median county rent of $1,523 shouldn’t be a problem for the median county household earning $89,268, other residents, such as seniors and the disabled, are struggling with one of life’s most basic necessities: where to live.

I

n some communities, this is where low-income housing would come into play, but for a variety of reasons—landuse restrictions, zoning policies and neighborhood opposition among them—Marin is lacking in below-market-rate units. According to a Novato-based advocacy group, this has forced 60 percent of the local workforce to live outside the county. But the shortage is also affecting Marin’s disproportionately large population of seniors—21.2 percent over 62, compared to 14.2 percent California-wide—many of whom live on fixed incomes and struggle with age-based disabilities. And the numbers say it’s a big shortage. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) considers a one-person household “low-income” in Marin at $62,200, meaning that below that householders will have to pay more than 30 percent of their income on rent. An American Community Survey (ACS) from 2006-2010 examining age and ratio of income to the poverty level indicates that over half of Marin’s residents over 65 fall into this bracket. According to a housing inventory released by the county in 2008, Marin is home to only 1,032 low-income units

designated for seniors and 196 units for people with disabilities, a rough ratio of just one unit rented per 17 who qualify. Of course, many aging adults may not want or even need subsidized housing. Some live in homes bought and paid off years ago. But wait lists tell another story.

For renters, Marin tops the list of the least affordable markets in the United States. Few senior developments listed in the county roster have any openings at all. None are available in the subsidized complexes provided by the county housing authority, which, as of early 2012, had a cumulative wait list approximately 2,000 strong. Wait lists often range several years and, according to a 2011 county inventory, at least 18 complexes accepting seniors have closed them entirely. For the Maria Freitas Senior Housing in San Rafael, this closure means the complex can’t guarantee even one spot within the next five years. Burkland attests to the damning power of wait lists. As her arthritis worsened, full-time work in an emotionally and physically draining job became impossible. After her partner’s death in 2008, she moved in with her daughter in Novato. Living primarily on Social Security Disability by then, she couldn’t afford a market-rate apartment. Being over 55 and disabled, she could have qualified for a subsidized studio or onebedroom. But she couldn’t find one to rent, and her daughter eventually moved. “All the senior and disabled places were filled, and there was something like a two-year waiting list,” she recalls. She could have stretched her income further if she wasn’t

March 4 to April 29 The Artist Talks: March 28, 6:30pm

Pastel Paintings by Bert Kaplan SEBASTOPOL GALLERY 150 N. Main St. Sebastopol

TOUGH CHOICES Former RN Vivian Terry spends so much on rent in Marin City that she once had to go without her blood pressure medication for over a month.

paying off her car, but knowing how precarious her situation was, she held on to it. “I didn’t want to lose my car, because, especially if you’re homeless, your car means so much to you,” she says. Without a place to live, she entered the shelter. Mental illness, PTSD, alcohol and drug abuse play a role in Marin’s older transient community, as in any other. Burkland acknowledges this, but also says she was surprised by how many “normal” people she’s met in the shelter system. “There are more people homeless that you would call your neighbors than just ‘those lazy druggies and alcoholics,’” she says. Now an advocate for affordable housing herself, Burkland points to the region’s larger, systemic issues when speaking about her situation. “Marin is just . . . ” She pauses. “It supports the people who have money.”

O

n the most basic level, Marin’s shortage of lowincome housing and its expensive market-rate units can both be tied to the county’s lack of developable land. But that’s not the whole story. A report completed by the county for HUD—the Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice, or AI—states: “Traditionally the County resisted urban sprawl and preserved open space, which has helped push housing prices higher since few subdivisions have been built in the area since 1930.” Between agriculture, parks and open space, the document estimates that only 16 percent of the county’s total mass is suitable for building, mostly spanning the 101 corridor, and 11 percent has already been developed. And while parts of Marin have tried to remain forest-encircled hamlets, the county’s

) 32

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location across the Golden Gate from San Francisco has given it something of an identity crisis. Though towns like Novato, Ross and Corte Madera look suburban, Marin is considered â&#x20AC;&#x153;metropolitanâ&#x20AC;? by the state department of Housing and Community Development (HCD), meaning itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supposed to zone land for multi-family housing at a higher density than counties like Sonoma or Napa. So when it comes time to update their citiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; housing elementsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;part of the general plan that zones land for population growthâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;local officials say theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re often frustrated. As Novato mayor Denise Athas puts it, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We throw up our hands and go, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Where?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? This process is governed by state Housing Element Law, enacted in 1969, which recognizes that although development generally belongs to the private market, land-use and zoning patterns can get in its way. The law includes Code § 65589.5, an â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anti-NIMBY Statute,â&#x20AC;? and instructs local governments to create housing opportunities for all economic segments of the community. But that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always happen. In 1998, Marin Family Action ďŹ led a lawsuit against Corte Madera, charging that its housing element didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t adequately plan for lowincome units. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Opposition to development goes way back here,â&#x20AC;? says Mary Murtagh, who since 1986 has served as executive director of EAH Housing, a low-income housing development and management nonproďŹ t founded in Marin. Murtagh likens the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slow-growth tendencies and desire to preserve small-town character with other regions across the Bay Area. But the nonproďŹ t director articulates another layer of opposition to affordable housing: fear of who might come with it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In general, Americans think poverty is a character ďŹ&#x201A;aw,â&#x20AC;? she says. City hall dialogue in Novato between 2010-11 uncovered

virulent assumptions about the type of person who might apply to rent low-income housing. As the city tried to update its housing element, public comment exploded with characterizations of low-income residents as criminals, gang members, sex offenders and â&#x20AC;&#x153;high-maintenance individualsâ&#x20AC;? who would decimate police resources and shuffle under-performing students into public schools. Existing affordable complexes were said to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;riddled with meth dealers and coke dealers and weed and everything else,â&#x20AC;? ghettoizing a town that â&#x20AC;&#x153;used to be a nice place to live.â&#x20AC;? (Meanwhile, statistics from 2010 show that violent crime was roughly half of what it was in the early 1990s.) One woman concluded that, while cities risk litigation by failing to update their housing elements, she â&#x20AC;&#x153;would rather see the lawsuit.â&#x20AC;? Fifth District supervisor Judy Arnold, a former Novato city council member, was on the committee that drafted the AI. Though she advocates preserving open space and believes Marin should zone its housing at lower densities than the state mandate, she says sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen some dialogue where the notion of preserving community character masks outright racism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want a whole lot of diversity in this county,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They want seniors if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their mom or dad, but if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s someone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mom or dadâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;well, if theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re white, OK, but they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to see a lot of wheelchairs or crutches or black or brown people.â&#x20AC;?

O

pposition to low-income housing is certainly not unique to Marin, but if the county is serious about caring for its poorer population, low-income housing is a must. And updated housing elements are important for its eventual construction. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Current zoning ordinances impose onerous restrictions on the development of high-density, multifamily housing,â&#x20AC;? according to the AI. But while every surrounding county has updated the majority of its housing elements, only ďŹ ve

Gabe Meline

33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 28 –AP R I L 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

DIRECT SOLUTIONS Ruth Schwarz and Curt Kinkead operate out of their mobile home to distribute food to Marin’s poorer population seven days a week.

of Marin’s 12 municipalities have housing elements approved by HCD. And they’re running out of time—the current planning period spans 2007-14. Marin County’s housing element was rejected by HCD for, among other things, zoning below the 30 units per acre mandated by the state for lowincome housing in metropolitan areas. Last summer, Novato’s City Council chose five affordable housing sites, but decided to zone them at the same rejected density. Additionally, two of the sites chosen for rezoning were existing businesses, at least one of which said at the time that it didn’t intend to sell. Mayor Athas acknowledges that the elected body listened to public input on density, but says it simply wanted to accurately represent the neighborhoods it served. “The community has a tolerance. It didn’t feel—and council agreed—that that met the needs of our town, which is more like Petaluma than San Rafael,” she says, adding that several of the sites seemed particularly viable for senior housing. But Katie Crecelius, a Novato activist, believes the council’s

site choice had more to do with pressure from the public than with the parcels’ actual potential as low-income housing. “The city council seemed to be mostly interested in sites that would have the least amount of community opposition,” she says. “They came up with five sites and each of the sites is unlikely to be viable for a multi-unit housing development of 40 or 50 units.” As Supervisor Arnold points out, affordable housing and affordable senior housing often meet different levels of public opposition. EAH’s Murtagh puts it bluntly: “Senior housing is just less threatening.” But at least one developer of senior housing was caught in the Novato conflagration. Eden Housing is currently building 60plus very-low income senior units on Diablo Avenue in Novato, and project developer Faye Blackman remembers the initially smooth process of working with the design review board becoming rough in 2011, after community debate over the housing element ignited any issue related to affordable housing. Before 2011, she says, “there were some vocal

) 34

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opponents, but it was nothing like it ended up becoming, where there was this crazy outcry against affordable housing that our project got dragged into. If that outcry had happened while we were trying to get approved, we might not have gotten approved.” While housing debates rage, wait lists stay full. And though most Marin seniors aren’t becoming homeless, many are paying rents and mortgages far beyond their means. So what’s getting cut? For Vivian Terry, it’s food.

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ven seated in a folding chair at the Margarita C. Johnson Senior Center, Vivian Terry has perfect posture. The 62-year-old former RN folds her hands and enunciates each syllable as she speaks—evidence of years singing mezzo-soprano in her church choir. Faith plays an important role in Terry’s life, not just for worship and community, but also for basic survival. Due to a lifealtering stroke, she now lives on a combination of income from Social Security and part-time maintenance work for her Marin City apartment complex. And her market-rate rent of over $1,000 a month is a major problem. “I’ve tried to cut down on my expenses so I can pay most of what I need to with disability [benefits],” she says. “But there are medications and food that sometimes have to go wanting.” Medicine is usually the priority, and then, she says, “I take whatever food I can get.” Sometimes her pastor gives her a Safeway gift card. Other times, she’s been able to get food at another local church’s food pantry. But once, she was unable to purchase her blood pressure medication for hypertension—for over a month. “I have to have that, otherwise I might have another stroke,” she says. Terry’s searched for other housing options. When she first moved to Marin to be close to

friends seven years ago, she looked into the county’s Section 8 program, but was deterred by a 10-year waiting list. She’s inquired into other below-market-rate apartments close to transit—she doesn’t drive—but they’ve either been closed to applicants or asked for up-front deposits out of her price range. Currently, she’s on a waiting list for a subsidized apartment in San Francisco. If she gets in, she plans to take a bus out of the city and across the Golden Gate Bridge every Sunday to attend the church she loves. But though she may relocate, others won’t. And Terry’s not the only local senior forced to choose between shelter and basic necessities like food and medicine. Hers is a dilemma that Hamilton couple Ruth Schwarz and Curt Kinkead see nearly every day.

I

t’s 10am, half an hour before the food pantry opens, and already people are parked outside Iglesia Nueva Jerusalem, waiting in their cars. By 10:20, a large group has gathered around a picnic table near the church—a brown, twostory structure in Novato about a hundred feet from Hwy 101. There are too many people to sit at the table, and some mill around, including a man with a walker. At least half of them are seniors, along with families and young children. Though I’m invited to share in the food that’s coming, several people tell me the same thing—I should stand back from the table, because there’s about to be a rush. Several minutes after 10:30, a Kia minivan drives into the parking lot; the crowd hurries over to help unload it. Box after cardboard box full of produce and grain is stacked on the tables and benches, until no surface space remains. Recipients crowd the boxes so that it’s hard to see what’s in them. When I finally do, I’m surprised. This is no Wonderbreadsandwich-with-iceberg-lettuce fare. One table is piled with basil and fresh endives. Another is heaped with flax tortillas, granola and whole grain bread. Schwarz

of America’s food is ending up in landfills, I refuse to be the least bit niggardly with this stuff.” Though Schwarz says many who receive food from them live in market-rate housing, she adds, “There’s one premise that there’s not enough affordable housing, and another that some of what is available isn’t really all that ‘affordable.’” Some days, the couple holds a food day like the one I witnessed; others, they’ll deliver it to lowincome senior complexes. In wealthy Marin, they say, hunger is everywhere.

M

any of the social issues plaguing Marin County’s lower-income seniors certainly aren’t unique to this upscale region. Stagnating social security, evaporating pensions and a bankrupting medical system are problems that transcend Marin in a society that systematically says to its elderly: You no longer work. You don’t matter. But though affordable housing is merely a scratch on the economic surface, it’s a resource that could make a vital difference in the lives of those like Burkland and Terry, and its lack is only going to be felt more strongly as the Boomers age. While housing debates rage and future development gets tangled in red tape, the county Department of Aging projects that by 2025, the portion of Marin’s residents over 60 will increase to more than 30 percent of the total population. With fixed-incomes and agebased disabilities making shelter an economic burden, some, like Terry, will probably try to leave this supremely unaffordable county. But with long-standing networks made of family, friends and church communities, many won’t. Unless something changes, the landscape of need— set against the pristine hills and hiking trails of beautiful Marin— will only get worse.

This article was produced as a project for the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, a program of USC’s Annenberg School for Communcation & Journalism.

35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 28 –AP R I L 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

and Kinkead, the pantry’s founders, say that on some days they’ll have boxes of sushi. This Friday’s “Open Food” day is the result of a process Kinkead calls “revolutionizing dumpster diving.” At 8:45 this morning, he drove the minivan up to a back entrance at one of the county’s many gourmet markets—Whole Foods, Paradise Market, Trader Joe’s—and loaded it with “expired” edibles, which usually means they’ve been on the shelf or in the deli for 24 hours. This process is part of his nonprofit, Respecting Our Elders, which aims to feed local seniors and free up their money for rent. As Kinkead puts it, they’re “getting food from the very best stores in Marin and bringing it the very poorest people.” A week before, I was seated in the living room of Kinkead and Schwarz’ mobile home, decorated with Christmas lights and embroidered hangings, at the Los Robles mobile home park in Hamilton. The 66- and 69-year-old couple sit next to each other and speak as a unit, interrupting and finishing each other’s sentences. She’s articulate and professional: he’s casual, abrupt and unafraid to drop the occasional “bullshit.” Every once in a while, she’ll hold a cautioning hand up to him and look warily in the direction of my recorder. Around the time they started the program, Schwarz recalls, they heard about a Hamilton woman who could only afford to eat three potatoes a day. “People have to have medication and they have to have a roof over their head,” she says. “Food gets compromised more than medicine; at least twothirds of our recipients come to us because that is literally their choice,” Kinkead adds. “And they’re tickled to death that they’re getting food of this quality.” He estimates that Respecting Our Elders distributes roughly $4 million of discarded food a year. “We’re dealing with garbage. Garbage has zero value—it can’t affect anyone’s social security,” he says. “As long as 40 percent

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36

CULTURE

The weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events: a selective guide

STONE BLIND LOVE Raul Midon plays the Dance Palace on March 31. See Concerts, p43.

HOOP DREAMS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Boundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; follows Analy High grad Robert Johnson as he tries to make it in the NBA.

What â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Up, Doc?

The ďŹ fth annual Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival BY MICHAEL SHAPIRO

I

n 1996, a young man named Robert Johnson moved from a shootingravaged neighborhood in San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fillmore district to Sebastopol, where he became a star basketball player at Analy High School. He went on to play a lead role for the University of Oregon team that reached the Elite 8 in the NCAA tournament in 2002. He dreamt of making it to the NBA. Sebastopol ďŹ lmmaker Brenden Hamilton

chronicles Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s journey in his fascinating full-length ďŹ lm Bound, featured in the ďŹ fth annual Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival, running March 29 to April 1. In its most ambitious program to date, the festival is screening 53 ďŹ lms over the course of four days, including an opening-night showing on March 29 of the aptly titled The First Movie in the 600seat theater at Analy High School. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never had a venue larger than 100,â&#x20AC;? says program director Jason Perdue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have

done it if we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the perfect ďŹ lm.â&#x20AC;? Several of the ďŹ lms being shown this weekend are by local ďŹ lmmakers, a hallmark of the festival. Leap of Faith (April 1, 3:30pm) by Lina Hoshino, who owns Petaluma Pie Company, is a paean to those who saved Sebastopolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Enmanji Buddhist Temple. In the 1940s, shortly after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, vandals tried to burn down the temple but were thwarted by determined locals. Built as an exhibit for the 1933 Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fair in Chicago,

the temple was dismantled, transported to Sonoma and rebuilt. During World War II, when many of its JapaneseAmerican members were forcibly removed from their homes and taken to internment camps, their white friends volunteered for nightly watch-keeping vigils to repel arsonists. Burn marks remain on the temple to this day, a reminder of past trials. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the story of young people taking a leap of faith to help members of their community,â&#x20AC;? Hoshino says in the ďŹ lm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It reminds us that it is possible to stand by those who are endangered and victimized by the prevailing political climate.â&#x20AC;? Mr. Cao Goes to Washington (April 1, 1pm) looks at the political climate of post-Katrina New Orleans. San Francisco ďŹ lmmaker Leo Chiang follows the campaign of Joseph Cao, a Vietnamese Republican, against an incumbent African-American Democrat. The demographic odds are stacked against Cao, but this pro-life, exâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Jesuit seminarian manages to get elected. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ďŹ lm is ultimately about the loss of innocence of an idealistic politician who tries to take on the partisan politics of D.C. and racial politics in New Orleans,â&#x20AC;? says Chiang. A handful of the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ lms are beguiling shorts. Penultimate (April 1, 1pm) is a tribute to Forestvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pen Guy,â&#x20AC;? Costas Schuler, who aimed to collect a million pens and plastered thousands of the most unusual ones to his art car. Living Tiny (March 31, 4:30pm) is a short ďŹ lm about the 100square-foot home of Jay Shafer, founder of Tumbleweed Tiny House Company in Graton, who proves one can live well with few possessions and little space. And Hamiltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bound (March 31, 11:30am), shows ) 38

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ArtsIdeas

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38

What’s Up, Doc? ( 37 what happens to Robert Johnson who, like most college athletes, doesn’t get drafted by an NBA team. We see Johnson adrift after his final season at the University of Oregon, and watch as he squanders a chance to impress the Portland Trail Blazers because he hadn’t stayed in playing shape. But Johnson gets a shot with the Lakers, and Hamilton follows him to Los Angeles for a summer training camp, where he takes on pros such as Luke Walton and appears to get the better of them. “We said we were going to L.A. to make a movie, and we did it,” said Hamilton, who made the film for $30,000 and managed to get interviews with basketball legends Danny Ainge and Jerry West. “We were in the right place

at the right time so many times. The magic of the film is we really captured a moment in time that’s still relevant today.” Bound isn’t just about basketball; it shows the difficult relationship between Johnson and his parents, as well as his struggles when he returns to San Francisco after completing his collegiate career. “The important part of the film is the family dynamic; that’s what sets this film apart,” Hamilton says. “It’s not just a sports documentary. It’s about life.” Ultimately, says Hamilton, Bound is about the legions of players who just miss making it to the NBA. The takeaway, he says, is that today there are many places to play pro basketball, such as Europe, and that “if you follow your dreams, you’re going in the right direction.”

A-Frames In addition to the films mentioned above, here are festival director Jason Purdue’s don’t-miss picks. In ‘The First Movie,’ director Mark Cousins shows films to kids in a Kurdish village in Iraq. For some, it’s the first time they’ve ever seen video—and then Cousins hands them cameras and shows them how to make their own movies. March 29, 7pm, Analy High School Auditorium; $20, film and reception. ‘Where Soldiers Come From’ presents a personal view of a group of close friends deciding to sign up for military service. The film chronicles the changes they go through overseas and the struggles they face as 23-year-old vets returning home. March 30, 7pm, Sebastopol Cinemas. ‘Big in Bollywood’ traces the rapid transformation of struggling Hollywood actor Omi Vaidya to Bollywood sensation. But life isn’t all kheer and lassi for this Indian-American actor, who’s torn between capitalizing on his success and returning to his wife in Los Angeles. March 30, 7pm, Sebastopol Veterans Building. ‘Girl Model’ is a poignant look into the lives of teens shipped from Siberia to Japan and the United States. We follow Nadya, a 13-year-old model, as she leaves home to try to ease her family’s financial hardship, and we see the cost Nadya ends up paying. March 31, 7pm, Sebastopol Center for the Arts. ‘Granito: How to Nail a Dictator’ is a passionate quest to bring justice to a genocidal general. The film is part of the festival’s Latino program. April 1, 1pm, Main Stage West. ‘Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone’ closes the festival. The film charts the rapid rise and rough crash of this edgy punk-funk African-American band, who will perform live after the film. April 1, 6pm, Hopmonk Tavern. Film, $10; concert, $20–$25. Advance tickets, $10 for most films, may be purchased at the Sebastopol Center for the Arts or www.sebastopolfilmfestival.org. —Michael Shapiro

ALL THAT JAZZ The Raven Players

are headed to Rohnert Park.

Roxie’s Rerun ‘Chicago’ gets an encore weekend BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

he last performance of a show is a bittersweet time for the actors and crew who’ve worked so hard—often for weeks or months—to make three or four fleeting weekends of theater possible. It is the point that, at last, the show must not go on.

But at the cast party for the Raven Players’ hit production of the musical Chicago—which played to raves and full houses last February in Healdsburg—director John Degaetano made a speech to his cast and crew that somewhat allayed the sense of sadness. “In my speech, after the last show,” Degaetano recalls, “I remember saying, ‘The sad thing is that we’re were closing this show we all love so much. The good

‘Chicago’ runs Friday–Sunday, March 30–April 1, at the Spreckels Center. 130 Snyder Ave., Rohnert Park. Friday– Saturday at 8pm, Sunday at 2pm. $22–$26. 707.588.3400.

39 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 28 –AP R I L 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

thing is, I’ll be seeing you again in a few weeks—and we get to do it all over again.’” This weekend, the original cast and crew of the Raven Players’ Chicago present a rare encore performance to the show, transporting the entire production from the Raven Theater to the larger, somewhat fancier environment of the Spreckels Performing Arts Center, in Rohnert Park. The three encore performances begin Friday, March 30, and continue through Sunday, April 1. “It’s very exciting to have the opportunity to present the show again, and to bring it to a new audience,” Degaetano says. “Making it happen was a matter of coordinating a date, and cast availability, which wasn’t easy. It’s a big cast, and a big show. We’re making a few changes to adapt to the larger stage at Spreckels, but everything we’re changing is just making the show better.” One of the elements Degaetano looks forward to during the upcoming weekend’s performances is a significantly better lighting system than what the Players are used to at the Raven. “Yeah, we had some limitations,” he laughs. “Certain areas of the Raven stage can’t be lit at all, because of the way the lighting system is, and we have some lighting instruments that have a life of their own. They decided for themselves when they want to come on and go off, so we sometimes had to deal with that.” Asked what the most rewarding part of this production has been for him, Degaetano first dutifully mentions the strength and talent of his cast, before settling on the number-one thing he feels the most satisfaction from. “Getting the licensing!” he laughs again. “Only five percent of the companies who ask for licensing rights to Chicago get them. We did!”

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Film

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2011 20 011 & 2012

VVoted ot o ed Best Best Dentistt EEsthetic sthetic t Dentis Sonoma in So onoma County County ttwo wo yyears ears in a row. row. T Thank yyou! ou!

LAST CALL Tom Hiddleston and Rachel Weicz experiment with hopelessness.

After the Affair

Creating Cr eating Healthy Beautiful Smiles

Terence Davies resurrects the restrained romantic drama BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

F

ew have illuminated English desperation as well as director Terence Davis, but not many do so as sporadically. The Deep Blue Sea is the director’s first feature film in eleven years.

In grim 1950’s England, a judge’s wife, Hester (Rachel Weisz), is on the verge of suicide because of her hopeless love for former RAF pilot, Freddie (Tom Hiddleston). We enter the story at what seems like its endgame: Hester is stuffing towels into the door frames of her room and swallowing pills, just to make sure she won’t wake up. She’s still pale from the attempt when her husband, Sir William (Simon Russell Beale), shows up for a visit. The old man asks his wife, “How could you throw away so much for so little?” In fact, Hester is “throwing it away” for physical passion, which surprises her as much as it does her husband. The affair is essentially over, though Hester is still struggling. She’s taunted by memories of an early sight of Freddie standing on a country club terrace, looking handsomely uncomfortable and weakly attractive in a double-breasted suit and an ascot. Davies shuttles in time to the night of the last confrontation with Freddie at a dimly lit pub. Hiddleston is successful at sinister roles, but Freddie isn’t a onedimensional cad, even though he’s not above taunting Hester about her class. Because Davies and his superior cast have such a handle on this material, the humor doesn’t break the frame. Bedroom-bound, Hester says, “They can’t ration everything.” Plus, there is a definite figure for contempt in Sir Williams’ gorgon of a mother (Barbara Jefford), who has it in for Hester. One must agree with Hester when she says that “tragedy is too big a word” for her suffering. The Deep Blue Sea has a well-developed cerebral side, but the film is a reminder of the futility of out-thinking a case of being in love with the wrong person. ‘The Deep Blue Sea’ opens March 30 at the Rafael Film Center in San Rafael.

7707.578.7424 07..578.7424 98 Montg Montgomery omery Dr., Drr.,. Santa RRosa, osa, CCAA 95404

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Join us Join us for for the the CLASSIC CL A S SIC WOODY WOODY ALLEN A L L E N FILM F IL M SSERIES! E R IE S ! Every Ever y Thursday T hur sday in in April A pr il come come see see a different di f f er en t cclassic las sic Woody Woody Allen A llen film f ilm on on the the big big screen! scr een ! For For more mor e iinfo, nfo, call call our our box box office of f ice at at 707.539.6773 707.5 39.6773 JJoin oin us us for for an an encore encor e performance per for mance of o f RRomeo omeo & JJuliet ulie t ffrom r om tthe he RRoyal oyal Ballet B allet in in LLondon ondon oonn SSunday unday 44/1 / 1 aatt 11pm. pm. TTickets icket s aare r e oonn ssale ale nnow ow aatt oour ur bbox ox ooffice f fice oorr www.movietickets.com! w w w. m o v i e t i c k e t s . c o m ! JJoin oin uuss ffor or a sspecial pecial ppresentation r esent ation ooff SSteinbeck t einbeck CCountry oun t r y Monterey M onter ey ttoo BBig ig SSur, ur, rrunning unning ffrom r om 44/13 / 13 ttoo 44/19 / 19 aatt 11pm pm aand nd 66pm! pm ! JJoin oin us us ffor or a ddouble ouble ffeature eature of of RRemembering emembering Playland P la y la nd aatt tthe he BBeach each aatt 11pm pm aand nd SSutro’s: utro’s : TThe he Palace Palace aatt LLand’s and’s EEnd nd aatt 22:30 : 30 oonn SSaturday aturday 44/7. / 7. TTwo wo ffilms ilms ffor or tthe he pprice rice ooff with with oone ne w ith QQ&A’s & A’s w ith tthe he ffilmmaker ilmmaker aafter f ter eeach ach sshow! ho w !

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ON THE REAL Harris, left, finds musical inspiration in farm lore.

Ain’t No Ho-Ho Arann Harris likes it raw

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ust like his farmspun songs, Petaluma songwriter Arann Harris is raw and exuberant. In conversation, the hornrimmed glasses-clad Oakland transplant is all over the map—if the map spanned from the East Bay to a farm teeming with lambs, new babies, kids on field trips and music. “I’m just a big sweaty mess of exuberance,” says Harris about his stage presence. As frontman for Arann Harris and the Farm Band, farm “hoke” is something that the tall, gangly musician says he embraces; it’s not about being cool, but about being “raw,” a style drawn on the simplicity of growing vegetables, what comes from the earth, the rawness of life. “I come from a summer camp

Paige Green

Music

42

background of call-and-response,” explains Harris. “It’s all about entertaining. We’re campy.” For example, the song “Shelf,” from the band’s latest album Consolation Prize, opens with the refrain “I’m raw, yes, I’m raw.” He says the song’s chorus, “I ain’t no ding-dong, I ain’t no ho-ho,” was written with a call-and-response audience sing-along in mind. The band plays a form of hybrid hootenanny country blues that always gets a crowd stomping. Originally the Green String Band (their first album, Schoolhouse, was recorded on the Green String Farm), they’ve played benefits, barns, and stages across Sonoma County. They’ve survived an exit by the original drummer, who decided to devote himself to chicken farming. And most seriously, they’ve survived a brush with near-disaster in 2010 when Harris was hit head-on by a drunk driver while driving home from the family farm. The accident sent Harris to the hospital and left him with permanent scars, but he says it hasn’t much affected his energy. It did inspire a couple of songs, though: “Heidi” tells the story of his fate intertwining with the 35-year old drunk driver on that rural Petaluma road. “Basically, it kind of provided material,” says Harris. “When something shakes your world so much, it’s what you sing about.” For now, with a baby boy at home and a live schedule including the Spring Roots benefit for the STRAW Project on March 30, the inveterate performer is keeping his eye on the possibilities rather than what might have been. After playing the Outside Lands Festival last summer in San Francisco, he’s says he’s ready for whatever’s next. The only guarantee is that whatever it is, it will be fun, it will be wild, and it will be raw. “None of this has been planned, you know?” says Harris. Arann Harris and the Farm Band play with Brothers Comatose and others on Friday, March 30 at the Sebastopol Community Center. 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 7:30pm. $12–$15. For more, see www.thestrongsauce.com.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Babatunde Lea & Friends Jazz group with Azar Lawrence, Geechi Taylor, Adam Theis and others, sponsored by the Healdsburg Jazz Festival. Mar 30, 7:30 and 9pm. $25. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg, 707.431.1970.

Borromeo Quartet Redwood Arts Council sponsors renowned foursome playing Beethoven, Bach and Jaffe. Mar 31, 8pm. $25. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Rd and Bohemian Hwy, Occidental, 707.874.9392.

Cinnabar Chamber Singers Mixed male and female voices explore a variety of musical styles. Tuesdays, 7:15pm through May 22. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.763.8920.

Cinnabar Womensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Chorus All-women chorus harmonizes to a variety of tunes. Wednesdays, 7:15pm through May 23. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.763.8920.

Dave Alvin Grammy-winning singersongwriter-guitarist headlines Nonesuch School benefit concert. Mar 31, 5:30pm. $25. Masonic Center, 373 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.6603.

Fishbone Pioneers of LA ska perform followed by documentary about the band hosted by Sebastopol Film Festival. Apr 1. $10-$25. Film 6pm, concert following. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.7300.

Spring Roots Brothers Comatose, Arann Harris and the Farm Band, Huckle and Dirt Floor play fundraiser for PRBO/Straw Project. Mar 30, 8pm. $12. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol, 707.823.1511.

A World Transformed The American Philharmonic presents a program of resplendent music. Apr 1, 3:30pm. $5-$30. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

43

Maria Muldaur Pop and roots music vet sings favorites of blues and jazz. Mar 31, 8pm. $25. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.924.5111.

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR S INGLES TO M E ET SINGLES MEET B EST BAR BAR HONORABLE BEST HONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HONORABLE HONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC MUSIC VENUE VENUE HONORABLE HONOR ABLE

Raul Midon Soulful tenor sings with percussive guitar style. Mar 31, 8pm. $12-$24. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station, 415.663.1075.

Francisco Herrera Local singer, songwriter and political activist sings songs of solidarity as part of program dedicated to Raramuri people in northern Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Copper Canyon. Mar 30, 7pm. $5-$10. First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Dr, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Ani Difranco The person Jewel tried to be. Mar 29, 8pm. $47.50. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa, 707.259.0123.

Branford Marsalis An evening with the worldrenowned jazz saxophonist. Mar 29, 8pm. $60-$65. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.226.7372.

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David Lindley Multi-instrumentalist with Bo Carper (New Monsoon) and Dan (Lebo) Lebowitz opening.

Five of the original nine stars of famed Cuban ensemble. Apr 1, 7pm. $30-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.226.7372.

) 44

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CUBAN SON Legendary Cuban group Sierra Maestra play April 1 at the Napa Valley

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Music

Mar 29, 7pm. $25-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Music ( 43

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TAP ROOM

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Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

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Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aubergine Mar 30, Kelly the Singer. Mar 31, Beso Negro and Jonny Keigwin. Tues, 7pm, ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; limelight open mic. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern

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Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental, 707.874.9037.

PRIDE & JOY

Centre du Vin

3!4s0-$//23ss DANCE HITS/PARTY BAND

Mar 31, 6:30pm, Jess Petty. 480 First St East, Sonoma.

POP FICTION

Doc Hollidayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Saloon

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Mar 28, Vickie Guillory and Sugar Cats. Mar 30, North Bay Blues Revue. 138 Calistoga Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.623.5453.

Come see us!

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Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

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Flamingo Lounge

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

Mar 30-31, Crossfire. Tues, 8pm-12am, swing night with lessons. Wed, Thurs, 9pm-12am, karaoke. Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.8530.

French Garden

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Wed, Mar 28 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Mar 29 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7am; 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Dance Club Fri, Mar 30 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am: 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 7:15pm DJ Steve Luther hosts a NIGHTCLUB TWO-STEP PARTY $10 Sat, Mar 31 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9am; 9:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:15am Jazzercise 8pm North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance presents THREE FIFTHS OF SCOTCH Challenging, not for beginners Sun, Apr 1 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:30am Zumba Gold with Toning 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Apr 2 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Apr 3 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7am; 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE Brazil Night with the band SAMBA FREESTONE

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Reservations Advised

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri

Mar 30

CD Release!

T HE LINDA IMPERIAL BAND

with Special Guest David Freiberg 8:30pm

MOONLIGHT RODEO Apr 1 Roots-Rock, Americana Sun

NORTH BAY BLUES REVIEW o Apr 6 Dance to These Blues! 8:30pm Ranch Fri

Debut!

STOMPY JONES Apr 7 The Coolest Swing 8:30pm Sat

JOIN US FOR OUR ANNUAL Eas te r Su nd ay B uf fe t APR 8, 10AMâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4PM

Apr 13

TOMMY CASTRO

& THE PAINKILLERS

Mar 29, Roger Bolt. Mar 30, Greenhouse. Mar 31, Country Train Wrecks. Tues, Jim Adams. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.544.2491.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

5:00pm / No Cover

Fri

Mar 29, Hopkin and Winge. Mar 30, Youngblood and Company. Mar 31, Honey B and the Pollinators. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol, 707.824.2030.

Mar 30, Babatunde Lea and friends (see Concerts). 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg, 707.431.1970.

Hopmonk Sonoma Mar 30, Black Cat Bone. Mar 31, Robin Galante. 691 Broadway, Sonoma, 707.935.9100.

Hopmonk Tavern 8:30pm

DANNY CLICK Apr 14 Blues Rock 8:30pm Sat

I SEE HAWKS IN L.A. Apr 15 Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Finest Country Rock Sun

5:00pm

THE MUDDY ROSES Apr 20 Harmonious, Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Country Fri

8:00pm / No Cover

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

MITCH WOODS AND HIS ROCKET 88S Apr 21 Boogie Woogie and Swing 8:30pm

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Sat

415.662.2219

Mar 30, Ghosts of Electricity. Mar 31, Dirty Diamonds. Apr 1, Fishbone (see Concerts). Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.7300.

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wed, Brainstorm (dubstep). Mar 31, Good Hip-Hop with DJ Noah Deezlee spinning classic hip hop and funk vinyl. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.2062.

Hair of the Dog Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil and the long, hard morning after Being hungover sucks. Not only does it hurt physically, it also ruins your whole day. At least the Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band can find some sort of humor in the inevitable aftereffects of a long night of whiskey. Right from the opening line in their song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hangovers and Hospitals,â&#x20AC;? the protagonist tells of falling face-first to the ground and smelling blood everywhere. Maybe thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hangover experience, but stillâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an accurate description of the mindnumbing pain so often accompanied by tomato juice and a raw egg. This might seem like enough to stop a person from going out and doing it all again. But letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not be drastic, here. The Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil band isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily the cure for a hangover, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re definitely a good time. Their â&#x20AC;&#x153;power-folkâ&#x20AC;? music keeps an upbeat atmosphere from start to finish, as last nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s debauchery fadesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or plays out all over again. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss songs like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dignity in Vegas,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;So Impossible,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boyâ&#x20AC;? on Friday, March 30, at Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub. 464 First St., Sonoma. 8pm. Free. 707.935.0660.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jennifer Cuddy Last Day Saloon Mar 28, Baby Loves Disco. Mar 29, Dunwells and David Luning. Mar 30, Ray Charles Project featuring Tony Lindsay, Kenny Washington and Glenn Walters. Mar 31, James Garner and the Cash Tribute Show. Apr 1, Gold Coast Jazz Band. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Mar 28, Phat Chance Quartet. Mar 29, Susan Sutton. Mar 30, Vernelle Anders. Mar 31, Greg

Hester. Apr 3, Maple Profant. 16280 Main St, Guerneville, 707.869.0501.

Monroe Dance Hall Mar 31, Three Fifths of Scotch. Thurs, Sun, Circles â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;n Squares Dance Club. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.529.5450.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub Mar 29, Dan Martin and friends. Mar 30, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Mar 31, Penny Hens. Wed, 7:30pm, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma, 707.935.0660.

Nickel Rose

Thurs, 7pm, Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio, 707.865.2454.

Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael, 415.454.5551.

Olive & Vine Cafe

19 Broadway Club

Every other Sunday, Songwriter Sessions. 14301 Arnold St, Glen Ellen, 707.996.9150.

Mar 28, Eddie Neon and Blue Roux. Mar 28, Gail â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Mojoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Muldrow Blues Wednesdays. Mar 29, Cup Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Joe. Mar 30, Stymie and the Pimp Jones Luv Orchestra. Mar 31, Steppin Up Saturdays. 19 Broadway, Fairfax, 415.459.1091.

Phoenix Theater Mar 30, Long Beach Rehab, M Section, My Last Line, Decent Criminal, Jokes for Feelings. Mar 31, Iamsu and the HBK Gang, Starting Six, Bobby Brackins, Mann,Ty Dolla, Clyde Carson, Kool John, Problem, Ya Boy, Show Banga, Young Bari. 201 Washington St, Petaluma, 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe Mar 30, The Hoovers. Mar 31, Andre Theirry and Zydeco Magic. First Sunday of every month, Music and Mimosas. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati, 707.795.7868.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma, 707.782.0592.

Society: Culture House Apr 1, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Evan Phillips Bares Allâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; striptease show to the music of Limp Bizkit. Wed, Gallery Wednesday, DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Mar 29, Finch and Friends. Mar 30, Cole Tate Band. Mar 31, Danny Clickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Texas Blues Night. 23 Broadway, Fairfax, 415.485.1182.

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Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mar 29, Harper and the Midwest Kind. Mar 30, Sage. Mar 31, This Old Earthquake. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas, 415.868.1311.

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NAPA COUNTY

No Name Bar First Monday of every month, 8:30pm, Kimrea. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito, 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino Mar 28, Oak Street Trio. 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Mar 28, Lorin Rowan. Mar 29, Kurt Huget. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael, 415.457.3993.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Brannanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill Fri-Sun, Herb Gibson. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga, 707.942.2233.

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Calistoga Inn

Napa Valley Opera House Mar 29, Branford Marsalis. Apr 1, Sierra Maestra. 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.226.7372.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Sleeping Lady

Mar 29, Ani Difranco. 1350 Third St, Napa, 707.259.0123.

Mar 28, Giants of Jazz. Mar 31, Renegade. 530 Main St, Napa, 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre

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Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, old-school DJ night. Sat, DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga, 707.942.4101.

Mar 28, Continentals. Mar 29, Rough Waters. Mar 30, King City. Mar 31, Whiskey Thieves. 29 Broadway, Fairfax, 415.459.9910. Mar 28, Jack Irving and friends.

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Toad in the Hole Pub Mon, open mic with Phil the Security Guard. First Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Mar 28, Timothy Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil Band. Mar 30, Dave Sparks Band. Mar 31, Levi Lloyd and the 501 Band. Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati, 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Mar 29, David Lindley. Mar 30, Kingston Trio. Mar 31, Tom Rigney and Flambeau. Apr 1, EOS Ensemble April Fools. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Tyga The newest and least interesting Young Money signee rides his inexplicable buzz. Mar 29 at the Warfield.

Woman Owned & Operated!

1310 Fourth St. @ C, San Rafael (415)482-9899

Join our email list & find out about Upcoming Events & Classes pleasuresoftheheart.com

,OVERS0LAYTHINGSs3ENSUAL,INGERIEs'IFT#ERTIFICATESs*EWELRY

Alice Russell Other UK blue-eyed soul singers top the charts; Russell, one of the best, remains obscure. Mar 29 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SF.

Chuck Prophet Local raconteurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new album, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Temple Beautiful,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; is an ode to San Francisco. Mar 30 at Great American Music Hall.

Hot Snakes I know, I know. Printing the words is torture for those who didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get tickets. Craigslist, sigh. Mar 30 at Bottom of the Hill.

The Wedding Present

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

The miraculously-voiced David Gedge performs his Albini-produced album â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Seamonstersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in its entirety. Apr 1 at the Independent.

Mar 30, Luvplanet plus Frobeck. Mar 31, Randy Couvillonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rock Fest for BBQ Frank. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.226.0262.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

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Arts Events Galleries

Graton Gallery

OPENINGS Apr 1 At noon. Calistoga Art Center, “Fools for Art,” exhibit and sale for April Fools Day. 1336 Lincoln Ave, 2nd Floor, Calistoga. Also at noon, reception and sale featuring mixed-media works that showcase whimsy at Napa COunty Fairgrounds. 1435 N Oak St, Calistoga. 707.942.2278. At 1pm. Church of Make-Out, Julia Davis showcases new portraits inspired by lifelong love of Joey Fatone from N’Sync. 1 April Way, Santa Rosa. 707.555.7865. At 2pm. Riskpress Gallery, works by Laurie Palmer. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Apr 3 At 6pm. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Photo Phantasies,” featuring photos of the strange, unfamiliar and unexpected. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Through Apr 15, “Textures,” featuring paintings, prints and drawings by Susan R Ball and Rik Olson. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery

SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery Through May 20, “100 Years of Bay Area Art,” featuring art from 1910-2010. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through May 26, “Birds of a Feather,” featuring Becoming Independent and artists at Studios on A. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Apr 22, “Two Points of View,” featuring works of Jennifer Jaeger and Michele

University Art Gallery Through Apr 8, student work on exhibit chosen by Rob Ceballos and Chandra Cerrito. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY

Through Apr 7, “Seventh Anniversary Exhibit,” with work by Hamlet Mateo, Mary Jarvis and Luke Damiani. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Art Works Downtown

Pelican Art

Gallery Route One

Through May 9, retrospective of the works of painter Susan Adams. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Open Tues-Thurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; Sun-Mon by appointment only. 707.773.3393.

Through Apr 1, “Retrospective, Evolution,” featuring the work of Eric Engstrom and “The Book of Remembrance,” featuring the work of MyongAh Rawitscher. Closing Party, Apr 1 at 3pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Petaluma Historical Museum and Library Through Apr 15, “Roma: Crossing the Borders,” featuring Romani art, music and culture. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Apr 8, “One Another One,” featuring the work of Chris Beards. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery

3410 3 4 1 0 Guerneville Guerneville R Road o a d SSanta a nta R Rosa, osa, C CA A 95401 95401

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Rosett. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Apr 1-27, works by Laurie Palmer. Reception, Apr 1 at 2pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through May 5, “Showin’ on the River,” juried photography exhibit. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Apr 28, “The Art of Light,” a juried exhibition of work in a variety of media that uses, applies, handles and utilizes light as a primary attribute. Through Apr 28, “Still Scratching,” scratchboard still lifes, by Diana Lee. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Through Apr 27, “The Elements,” featuring 32 Bay Area artists working in a variety of media and styles. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Marin MOCA Through Apr 15, “Indexical Makers,” presents work by three Bay Area artists, Modesto Covarrubias, Ali NaschkeMessing and Angie Wilson. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4, 415.506.0137.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Mar 29, “Fleurs,” juried show with floral theme. Apr 3-26, “Photo Phantasies,” featuring photos of the strange, unfamiliar and unexpected. Reception, Apr 3 at 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Red Barn Gallery Through Apr 4, California Art Club celebrates 50 years of the Pt Reyes National Seashore. 1 Bear Valley Rd, Pt Reyes Station. 415.464.5125.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Apr 15, “Figures in Abstract,” featuring the work of six California artists. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY Calistoga Art Center Apr 1, noon-5pm, “Fools for

April Fools

47

Art,” exhibit and sale for April Fools Day. 1336 Lincoln Ave, 2nd Floor, Calistoga. 707.942.2278.

Gatehouse Gallery Through Jun 10, new work by Hung Liu. $10. Di Rosa Preserve, 5200 Carneros Hwy 121, Napa. Wed-Fri, 9:30am to 3; Sat, appointment only. 707.226.5991.

Napa County Fairgrounds Apr 1, noon-5pm, “Fools for Art,” reception and sale featuring mixed-media works that showcase whimsy. Free. 1435 N Oak St, Calistoga.

Westin Verasa Hotel Through Mar 31, natureinspired exhibit by Jocelyn Audette. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.1800.

Comedy Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Events Cesar Chavez Health Fair Over 50 healthcare providers offer free screenings and

vital health information for the community, focusing on promoting healthy eating and active living. Mar 31, 10am2pm. Meadow View Elementary School, 2665 Dutton Meadow, Santa Rosa. 707.541.3715.

Mill Valley Art Walk First Tues monthly, 6 to 8, downtown area galleries and businesses showcase local artists. First Tues of every month, 6-8pm. Free. Downtown Mill Valley, Throckmorton Avenue, Mill Valley, 415.721.1856.

A Night to Remember Society of Single Professionals sponsors meet and greet. Mar 30, 8pm. $20. Servino Ristorante, 9 Main St, Tiburon, 415.435.2676.

Occidental Fools Day Parade A processor through town followed by rides, refreshments and entertainment. Apr 1, 1pm. Free. Occidental Community Center, 3920 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

Film Classic Woody Allen Series A mix of the urbane sadsack’s best. Mar 29, “Crimes and Misdemeanors.” $10. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.528.4222.

Bronsky New short film from Donksonology collective. Mar

30 at midnight. Free. Roxy Theater, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.ROXY.

Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival Fifty-three films screen over the course of four days at various venues. See Arts, p37. Mar 29-Apr 1. 707.829.4797.

FRIDAY, APRIL 6

ON SALE NOW

Tickets available at Wells Fargo Center For The Arts Box Office Charge By Phone: 707-527-7006 or online at wellsfargocenterarts.org

She Stoops to Conquer National Theater Live production of Oliver Goldsmith’s comedy of errors. Thurs, Mar 29, 7:30pm and Sat, Mar 31, 1pm. $30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.924.5111.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael, 800.897.3276.

Meet Randy Ullom Meet the winemaker behind the wines of Kendall-Jackson. Mar 31, 11am. $10. KendallJackson Wine Center, 5007 Fulton Rd, Fulton.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Oakmont Drive and White Oak,

) 48

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NORTH BAY HOG-ENANNY Chris Coursey, who has transmogrified into a small pig, gives an inter-species Steely Dan poetry tribute on April 1. See Hoedowns, p89.

A Raven Players Production

Arts Events Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Sat, 9am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.522.8629.

Totally Truckinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Thursdays Four food trucks park in the Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly parking lot, provide you with local goodness and donate 10 percent of sales to a monthly selected non-profit. Thurs. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly & Associates, 1005 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol, 707.827.7190.

Lectures A-List Series Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi in conversation with Jane Ganahl on love, sex and and relationships as relating to American Muslim women. Apr 4, 7:30pm. $12-$15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

March 30, 31, and April 1

Divorce Options Volunteer group of attorneys, financial specialists and mental-health professionals offer four-hour workshops on divorce. Last Sat of every month, 9am. $45. Family Service Agency, 555 Northgate Dr, San Rafael, 415.492.9444.

Home Energy Workshop

Spreckels Perfo Performing P rming Arts Cent Center er BBOX OX OFFICE 707 588-3400 5

Learn about utility improvements to save money. Fourth Wed of every month, 6pm. Free. Sonoma Mountain Village Event Center, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park.

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( 47 She Built Ships During WWII Powerpoint lecture about women shipbuilders, welders and riveters. Mar 28, 7pm Free. Healdsburg Library, 139 Piper St, Healdsburg, 707.433.3772.

Suicide Prevention Kevin Hines, who survived jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge, talks about his experience with bipolar disorder. Mar 28, 5:30pm Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4372.

This Is Not to Be Looked At Three-part series exploring the work of 20th century artists Robert Rauschenberg, David Ireland and John Baldessari. Tues, Apr 3, 2-4pm. $75. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma, 707.939.SVMA.

Washi Egg Classes Drink tea, snack on treats and learn the ancient art of crafting decorative washi eggs with handmade Japanese mulberry paper. Mar 29, 7pm $35. Village Bakery, 7225 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.8101. Learn the ancient art of crafting decorative Washi Eggs with handmade Japanese mulberry paper. Mar 31, 1-3pm $35. Share Exchange, 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.393.1431.

Readings Book Passage Mar 28, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elegy for Eddie: A Maisie Dobbs Novel,â&#x20AC;? with Jacqueline Winspear. Mar 29, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any Day Now,â&#x20AC;? with Terry Bisson and Peter Coyote. Mar 31, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Science of Yoga: The Risks and the Rewards,â&#x20AC;? with William J Broad. Mar 31, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Professionals,â&#x20AC;? with Owen Laukkanen. Mar 31, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Behind Photographs: Archiving Photographic Legends,â&#x20AC;? with Tim Mantoani. Apr 1, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Whole Food Guide for Breast Cancer Survivors,â&#x20AC;? with Helayne Waldman. Apr 1, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Georgia in Hawaii,â&#x20AC;? with Amy Novesky. Apr 2, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hot Cripple: An Incurable SmartAss Takes on the Health Care System and Lives to Tell the Tale,â&#x20AC;? with Hogan Gorman. Apr 3, 12pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Literary Luncheon: One Hundred Names for Love,â&#x20AC;? with Diane Ackerman. Apr 3, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glow,â&#x20AC;? with Jessica Maria Tuccelli. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960

Center for Spiritual Living Mar 29, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;All Is Well 2,â&#x20AC;? with David Bruner. 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.4543

Petaluma Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Mar 30, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women, Spirituality and Transformative Leadership: Where Grace Meets Power,â&#x20AC;? with Kay Lindahl. Apr 3, 10am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet Me at the Moon,â&#x20AC;? with

) 50

Models for a New Economy Lecture on worker ownership and entrepreneurship. Apr 1, 7pm Dominican College, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

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Drum workshop with guest musicians Jay Hesterly, Mike Brunson and Pat Armstrong. Mar 28, 7pm Free. First Street Gallery, 105 E First St, Cloverdale, 707.894.4410.

Real Time Ridesharing Learn about Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Real-Time Ridesharing Project, which builds social networks for ridesharing using computers and smartphones. Mar 28, 12pm Free. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4372.

LOVE, ACTUALLY Authors Ayesha Mattu and Nura

Maznavi discuss issues of love and sexuality for American Muslim women April 4 in Mill Valley. See Lectures, adjacent.

49 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 28-AP R I L 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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50 A E

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

Gianna Marino. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563

For the week of March 28

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

ARIES (March 21–April 19) A few months after America invaded Iraq in 2003, soldier Brian Wheeler wrote the following to help us imagine what it was like over there: “Go to the worst crime-infested place you can find. Go heavily armed, wearing a flak jacket and a Kevlar helmet. Set up shop in a vacant lot. Announce to the residents that you are there to help them, and in the loudest voice possible yell that every Crip and Blood within hearing distance is a pansy.” As a characterbuilding exercise, Aries, I highly recommend you try something like this yourself. APRIL FOOL! I was just kidding. What I just said is not an accurate reading of the astrological omens. But this is: get out of your comfort zone, yes, but with a smart gamble, not a crazy risk.

Apr 1, 2pm, “The Sleeping Partner: A Sarah Tolerance Mystery,” with Madeleine Robins. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618

River Reader Mar 30, 7pm, “Poetry, Politics and Passion,” with Jennie Orvino. 16355 Main St, Guerneville 707.869.2242

TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Theater Chicago Encore performance of the Raven’s hit take on the Broadway favorite. Mar 30Apr 1, 2 and 8pm. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park, 707.588.3400.

Don Giovanni The young and handsome nobleman Don Giovanni is an arrogant, womanizing cad. Various dates and times. Through Apr 15. $25-$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.763.8920.

Othello Aldo Billingslea plays Othello and Craig Marker plays Iago in intimate staging. Various dates and times. Mar 29-Apr 22. $34$55. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

The Tennessee Menagerie Peek into the real life of Tennessee Williams and remeet his most memorable female characters. Various dates and times. Through Apr 7. $10-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

Twentieth Century Ross Valley Players present adaption of 1934 film starring John Barymore and Carole Lombard. Various dates and times. Through Apr 15. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. Mail items to calendar@bohemian.com, or

The F-Word Adam Mansbach brings vulgar vogue to Healdsburg Sparked by the frustrations shared by parents of sleep-avoiding kids everywhere, Adam Mansbach’s Go the Fuck to Sleep was a hugely bestselling book in 2011. And though its phenomenon could be written off as an internet-propelled bag of hot air, the book’s publication has a cool side story: it was published by Akashic Books, an indie publishing house run by Johnny Temple, former bassist for ’90s altrock band Girls Against Boys. Since Mansbach’s book didn’t fit with the company’s urban literary fiction ethos, Temple acquired the rights reluctantly. But after the book sold massively, Akashic ended up with a hefty financial windfall. Subsequently, in a darkly unjust literary landscape where mainstream publishers won’t touch innovative writing with a 10-foot pole, Akashic now has more funds than ever to publish stellar writing. Mansbach appears this week in Healdsburg, but parents, leave your kids at home for this event. Although in theory it revolves around children’s books, the word “fuck” will no doubt be tossed around like balloon animals at a kid’s birthday party. Adam Mansbach cusses his way through parenthood on Thursday, March 29, at h2hotel Healdsburg. 219 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. 7:30pm. Free. 707.433.2202. —Leilani Clark

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65

may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

According to a recent poll, God’s approval rating has dipped below 40 percent for the first time on record. My research suggests the new low is due in part to a disproportionate amount of dissatisfaction by those born under the sign of Taurus. Can you fix this please? If you’re one of the discontent, please see if you can talk yourself into restoring some of your faith in the Divine Wow. APRIL FOOL! The real truth is, I encourage you to be skeptical in regards to all authorities, experts and topdogs, including God. It’s an excellent time in your cycle to go rogue, to scream “I defy you, stars!” Be a rabble-rousing, boat-rocking doubter.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Photographer Darrin Harris Frisby doesn’t think people should smile in photographs. He regards it as “superficial and misleading.” In the greatest portraits ever painted, he says, the subject’s gaze is almost always neutral, “neither inviting nor forbidding.” Did Rembrandt ever show people grinning from ear to ear? No. Did Vermeer, Goya, Titian, Sargent or Velasquez? Nope. Make that your guiding thought in the coming week, Gemini. Be a connoisseur of the poker face. APRIL FOOL! I lied. The truth is, in the coming week you will have more than ample reasons to be of good cheer. You should therefore express delight extravagantly. CANCER (June 21–July 22) Back in 1835, a newspaper known as The New York Sun resorted to an extreme measure in order to boost readership: it ran a story about how the renowned astronomer Sir John Herschel had perfected a telescope that allowed him to see life forms on the moon, including unicorns, twolegged beavers that had harnessed fire and sexually liberated “manbats.” If I’m reading the astrological omens correctly, Cancerian, you temporarily have license to try something almost equally as wild and experimental to “boost your readership.” APRIL FOOL! I lied about the unicorns. Don’t refer to cliched chimeras like them. But it’s fine to invoke more unexpected curiosities like fire-using beavers and sexually liberated manbats. LEO (July 23–August 22) In his documentary film Prohibition, Ken Burns reports on the extreme popularity of alcohol in 19th-century America. He says that the typical person over 15 years of age drank 88 bottles of whiskey a year. In light of the current astrological omens, Leo, I suggest you increase your intake to that level and even beyond. APRIL FOOL! I lied. It’s not literal alcoholic spirits you should be ingesting in more abundance, but rather big ideas that open your mind, inspirational sights and sounds that dissolve your inhibitions, and intriguing people who expand your worldview. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

A woman in Euclid, Ohio, claims her house is haunted by randy ghosts. “They have sex in my living room,” Dianne Carlisle told a TV news reporter. “You can see the lady’s high-heeled shoes.” I suspect you may soon be dealing with a similar problem, Virgo. So consider the possibility of hiring an X-rated exorcist. APRIL FOOL! The naked truth is that you will not be visited by spooks of any kind, let alone horny ones. However, you would be smart to purify and neutralize old karma that might still be haunting your love life or your sex life. Consider performing a do-it-yourself exorcism of your own memories.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) In Karley Sciortino’s NSFW blog Slutever.com, she announces that “this blog is intended to trick strangers into thinking my life is more exciting than it actually is.” I

highly recommend you adopt that approach, Libra. Do whatever it takes—lying, deceiving, exaggerating, bragging—to fool everyone into believing that you are a fascinating character who is in the midst of marvelous, high-drama adventures. APRIL FOOL! I wasn’t totally sincere about what I just said. The truth is, your life is likely to be a rousing adventure in the coming days. There’ll be no need to pretend it is, and therefore no need to cajole or trick others into thinking it is.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low selfesteem,��� said author William Gibson, “first make sure you are not, in fact, just surrounded by a––holes.” This is a good time to check in with yourself, Scorpio, and see if Gibson’s advice applies to you. Lately, the jackass quotient seems to have been rising in your vicinity. APRIL FOOL! I was half-joking. It’s true that you should focus aggressively on reducing the influence of jerks in your life. At the same time, you should also ask yourself rather pointedly how you could reduce your problems by changing something about yourself.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Do not under any circumstances put on a frog costume, go to a shopping mall and ride around on a unicycle while reciting erotic poetry in German through a megaphone. APRIL FOOL! I lied. That wouldn’t be such a terrible use of your time. The astrological omens suggest that you will be visited by rather unusual creative surges that may border on being wacky. Personally, though, I would prefer it if you channeled your effervescent fertility in more highly constructive directions, like dreaming up new approaches to love that will have a very practical impact on your romantic life.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby, Daisy Buchanan is stirred to the point of rapture by Jay Gatsby’s silk shirts. “I’ve never seen such beautiful shirts before,” she sobs, burying her face in one as she sits in his bedroom. I sincerely hope you will have an equivalent brush with this kind of resplendence sometime soon, Capricorn. For the sake of your mental and even physical health, you need direct contact with the sublime. APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. It’s true that you would profoundly benefit from a brush with resplendence. But I can assure you that plain old material objects, no matter how lush and expensive, won’t do the trick for you. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Last December a woman in Tulsa, Okla., made creative use of a Wal-Mart. She gathered various ingredients from around the shelves, including lighter fluid, lithium and drain cleaner, and set up a meth lab right there in the back of the store. She’s your role model for the coming week, Aquarius. APRIL FOOL! I lied, kind of. The woman I mentioned got arrested for illegal activity, which I don’t advise you to do. But I do hope you will ascend to her levels of ingenuity and audacity as you gather all the resources you need for a novel experiment. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A Filipino man named Herbert Chavez has had extensive plastic surgery done to make himself resemble Superman. Consider making him your role model, Pisces. I hope he inspires you to begin your own quest to rework your body and soul in the image of your favorite celebrity or cartoon hero. APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, you’d be wise to avoid comparing yourself to anyone else or remolding yourself to be like anyone else. The best use of the current cosmic tendencies would be to brainstorm about what exactly your highest potentials are, and swear a blood oath to become that riper version of yourself.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

51

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Miscellaneous l Services LAPTOP, Computer, LCD Panel $249, $99, $55—Like New! CRC Computer Repair Center, 3227 Santa Rosa Ave, 95407. FREE checkup, expert laptop repair, tune-up, spyware removal. 9am–5pm, Tues–Sat 707.528.8340

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1.888.420.3808 www.cash4car.com Class: Autos Wanted

g Volunteers

NEW LIVING EXPO Is Looking For Volunteers To Assist With This Premier Show!

When: April 27 – 29th 2012 Where: The Concourse 8th & Brannan Streets, SF You will have an opportunity to experience what goes on behind the scenes, meet and network w/ fascinating people, & have fun! In exchange for your time, professionalism, and energy — you’ll receive a 3Day gen. admission pass to attend the Expo, which incl. Exhibits, Panels, Free Lectures & free workshops! Please call 415.382.8300 or email Volunteer@newlivingexpo.com

Real Estate Services

Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: www.Roommates.com.

For Rent Therapist offices in lovely Craftsman building near downtown SR. On-site tenant parking. Rents from $400750/month+ utilities. Call for appointment 707.538.7772

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Adult Services A Rare Irish Rose Mature, Independent in Marin. Call for photos. Please call before 11pm. No blocked calls, No texts. Kara, 415.233.2769

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Great Massage By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883

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Pampering Foot Treatment $25 Women love Jessie Jing`s Pampered Feet Center. 1 hr. only $25. 707.526.1788. jessiejingsmassage.com

Professional male massage therapist; strong, deep healing bodywork. $60 for 60 Provider of Pleasure mins, $80 for 90 mins 707.536.1516 Women, men, couples. Enjoy www.CompleteBodyBalance.com the moment! Relaxing, private massage since 1991 by a gentleman with good virtues. In NW Santa Rosa, Bearhands4u Massage for men, Sebastopol. 707.799.4467 (C) or Mature, strong, professional. 707.527.9497 (L) Jimmy. 707.291.3804 Days, evenings, weekends $60/hr. A Safe Place Outcalls available.

To Be Real RELAX! Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 12 yrs experience. 707.542.6856

STRONG THOROUGH 30+ yrs. Experience. 25/50/75. SPECIAL: Free 15 min. massage to experience my work. Colin Godwin, CMT 707.823.2990 www.colingodwin.blogspot.com

Holistic tantric masseuse. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. Mon-Sat. Spring Discount. Call after 10:30am. 707.793.2232

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Connections

Finding inspiration and connecting with your community

PRAYERS FOR WORLD PEACE Sundays, 10:30-11:45a.m., Please join us in creating a peaceful world. Led by meditation teacher Minnie Marroquin. FREE. Compassion KBC, 436 Larkfield Center, Santa Rosa. 707.477.2264. www.meditateinsantarosa.org. Everyone is welcome!

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New Psychic Skills and Healing Classes forming April 2nd 516 Sonoma Ave. Santa Rosa. 707.545.8891 See Web site for more information: ww.santarosabpi.com Seminary of the Church of Divine Man Offers ongoing classes for all levels of practice and interest. Eveyone is welcome. $10 donation requested per class. Prayers for World Peace: Sun, 10:30–11:45am Noontime Meditations: Tuesday–Saturday, 12:00 General Programs: Tues & Weds, 7:30–8:30 304 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma, 707.776.7720 www.meditateinnorcal.org

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Resources for your spiritual journey (contemplative prayer/meditation practices, workshops/retreats, spiritual direction, art gallery, reading room, bodywork). 1601 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa www.journeycenter.org 707.578.2121

The Enneagram: A Tool for Transformation Free introduction to an ancient tool for personal and relational transformation. (5 week group to continue) Wed, Apr 4, 6:30-9:00p, Journey Center, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org.

Unity Church of Santa Rosa Sunday School & Service 10:30am, Non-tradi-

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Self Realization Fellowship Santa Rosa Meditation Group 795 Farmers Lane #22 Schedule: 24/7 VM 707.523.9555 www.srf-santarosa.org

Rocks and Clouds Zendo - Buddha`s Birthday Celebration Potluck: Sunday April 8, 2:30pm– 5:00pm (after half day retreat). Bring some food, your family (kids are welcome) and friends. Buddha’s Birthday: Half Day Sit and Work Practice, Sunday April 8, 10:00am to 2:00pm. Email us with any questions: daterra@sonic.net Find us on the web @ www.rocksandclouds.org Or call 707.824.5647

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Family Services

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Wiccan Priestess, Cerridwen Fallingstar, author, The Heart of the Fire, offers her 20th year-long apprenticeship program beginning Mid-May. Call/email for brochure/interview. tel:415.488.9641 c.fallingstar@gmail.com www.cerridwenfallingstar.com

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commitment is needed, and they are open to both beginning and more experienced meditators. For information, call Mike Smith at 415.717.4943 or www.meditationinnorcal.org Jessel Gallery is at 1019 Atlas Peak Road, Napa, 707.257.2350 www.jesselgallery.com

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