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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Final Frontier

Goodbye to Occidental’s Ranger Rick BY FRANK DICE

I

n the summer of ’95, on my first morning living in Camp Meeker, I came upon a spindly little creature with a Rip Van Winkle beard and a thousand-mile stare. I quietly mouthed a hello, whereupon the man stopped, put up his dukes and cried, “Do you want a piece of me, fat man?!” This was my first human interaction as a resident of western Sonoma County. I continued to the Bohemian Cafe, made my way up the stairs, and who should I see again? “I’m not done with you!” he yelled, fists again at the ready. Quickly slamming the door behind me, I asked around if anyone knew a demented fairy-wood sprite who randomly accosted the citizenry. I was met with smiles and chuckles in equal measure, and was told that I had met the mayor of Occidental. Last Saturday, Ranger Rick departed this realm for parts unknown, and the true center of the Republic of Western Sonoma County, Occidental, was diminished. To those who knew him, the Range, born Rick Kaufman, was the embodiment of the Occidental secret handshake, proof of belonging to a community that best resembles Tolkien’s Rivendel crossed with a liberal dose (pun intended) of Easy Rider. To many, he was little more than an unbalanced vagrant with a greatly overestimated sense of self. In my estimation, his face belongs on Occidental’s Mount Rushmore, along with Larry Bustelo and Joe Negri. Ranger cleaned the town, completed the New York Times crossword puzzle daily and was to be approached with caution after 5pm. He seemed to live everywhere and nowhere, as likely to materialize out of a tree as from the back of a station wagon. He laughed like a Viking, and his stride carried him farther and quicker than his diminutive stature would seem to indicate. Ranger Rick was a trickmaster monkey, a mystical coyote and the crazy river all in one. If he was human, I’ll eat my fedora. The Range was some other category of creature altogether. I rarely understood him, I often seemed to anger him—and I can’t imagine Occidental without him. Frank Dice is a bartender at Underwood in Graton. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Way to Go, Mike

In regards to pastry chefs (“Just Desserts,” Feb. 15), a local Sonoman, Mike Zakowski, has been chosen to represent the U.S.A. at the Coupe du Monde de la Boulangerie in March 2012, which is an honor and a huge feat.

CHRISTY POWER Sonoma

Basic Courtesy While I may agree with the final suggestion in Barbara Stepka’s Open Mic (“Saying ‘Sorry,” Feb. 15)—namely, that “there are a lot of other people out there who really need to say it much more often . . . and mean it . . . and act on it. Hint: can you spell l-e-g-i-s-l-a-to-r-s?”—I think she misses the value of courtesy in our post-nice times. Like Champagne, you can have too much, but you can never have enough.

MICHAEL MCCAULEY Santa Rosa

Scary ‘Foreign’ Groups, Oh No

society they helped create.

The fact that we have an international group making plans and decisions for how the United States is supposed to be run—doesn’t this sound off any alarm bells to you? I repeat, an international group—that means “foreign,” not domestic—interfering with our national policies, implementing laws in our government. Well, if you don’t know, it is unconstitutional on principle alone. Please do some research on history, and see what it took to gain our independence and from whom. I have nothing against protecting natural resources and finding ways to lessen pollution, but not like this.

CARA CAPOLUPO Via online

Don’t Punish the Women Unplanned pregnancies result from unplanned sex. When will we change the conversation to include our men? Instead of arguing about restricting women’s reproductive health, why not have a discussion about regulating men’s sexual behaviors, and our failure to punish crimes against women and children? Abuses ignored do not fade, they flourish. We are all witness to this tendency with regard to rape in the military and child abuse in the Catholic church.

I would rather live in a “Post Sustainable World” any day than to live with this “sustainable” crap (“Hidden Agenda,” June 15). I’ll tell you what a post-sustainable world would look like. It would look like what we had in the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s—when the U.S. had one of the strongest industries in the world. We had more jobs and more local production than any other country.

In the Water

Other countries, the “sustainable” types, were impoverished, and that is why we have so many people flocking here from those places. They came here for a reason—to get away from that type of restricted living. Now we are subjected to the same “sustained” or “restricted” living with huge job losses due to our industries being shipped overseas by the same corporations that are pushing this “smart growth” on an uninformed

Thank you for your article (“Natural Riches,” Feb. 8) concerning restoring our aquifers. However, the actual name of the brochure mentioned is “Slow it. Spread it. Sink it!” This phrase was first coined by Brock Dolman, director of the WATER Institute at the Occidental Arts and Ecology Center and is a motto to prompt us to remember how nature actually works through lagunas, swamps and other wetlands to maintain healthy

It’s time to try a different approach.

J. T. YOUNGER Santa Cruz

Rants By Tom Tomorrow

GET SSMART SMA SMAR MAR RTT R

THE ALTERNATIVE ALTERNATIVE T TO TO HIGHW HIGHWAY WAY 101 Tired of sitting in traffic alon Tired along ng Highway 101? Looking for a gr een alternative? alternattive? green Looking to cr eate jobs in the e North Bay to help boost our ec conomy? create economy? Ther e’s one place to look: SM MART. There’s SMART. Y ou asked for it and you vote o d for it. You voted And we’r e working har d to make make it happen. we’re hard In 2008, almost 70% of the vo oters of Marin voters and Sonoma supported Meas sure Q to Measure cr eate a train that connects the th he two create counties. Despite headwinds of the worst rrecession ecession in 50 years, we’r till moving e st we’re still forwar d to make SMART SMART a reality. rea ality. forward

aquifers, rather than how we have “engineered” our landscapes to waste much of the water resulting in depleted aquifers, erosion and damaged riparian environments.

PHILIP TYMON Occidental Arts & Ecology Center

Built to Spill Contest Winner! Congratulations to Thomas Gonzalez, whose lovably bizarre version of “Carry the Zero” has won our contest. Gonzalez wins two tickets to see Built to Spill at the Uptown Theatre on Feb. 25, and his cover can be heard, along with the other contest finalists, at www.bohemian.com.

THE ED. Occupied with What Other Persons Are Occupied with and Vice Versa Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1 Santa Rosa Plaza to soon

charge for parking, continue being barrier to downtown

2 Brian Keegan of Keegan & Coppin releases Patrick Swayze hip-hop tribute CD

3 Chicken tikka masala at

Lotus Chaat in San Rafael is still the jam

4 Hugh Laurie, from

W e’re not stopping until we’v ve done what you asked us to do: cr ccreate eate an We’re we’ve ener gy-efficient, green green alternative alterna ative to sitting in traffic on Highwa energy-efficient, Highwayy 101. Once SMAR T is operational, you’ll be b able to ride the train along the tracks t or ride SMART next to the tracks on a new S MART bike-walk path. SMART T odayy, energy-efficient, o energy-efficient, clean diesel trains have been or dered. The T tracks, Today, ordered. bridges, crossings crossings and station ns ar e being renovated, renovated, built and pr p epared. stations are prepared. SMAR T’s Boar d of Directors Directors recently recently awarded awarded a $103 million con nstruction SMART’s Board construction contract that will cr eate 1,000 0 jobs and issued bonds to raise $1 71 million create $171 towar d constructing Phase I: the t rroute oute between North Santa Ro osa and toward Rosa San Rafael. W e’re also proposing propossing a SMAR T Connector bus to link lin nk Clover dale, We’re SMART Cloverdale, Healdsbur g and Windsor to Santa S Rosa and San Rafael to Larksp pur. T o ogetherr, Healdsburg Larkspur. Together, they will serve 70% of the pot tential riders. potential W e’re excited and we want yo ou to get excited with us. W e e’re inv vesting in the We’re you We’re investing futur e of the North Bay SMART, we can jump into the 21stt century by future Bay.. With SMART, getting out of our cars — and d riding a train or a bike. For mor more e information about SMAR SMART, T, website www.SonomaMarinTrain.org visit our websit te at www .SonomaMarinT Trrain.org

“House,” to appear in song at the Uptown Theatre May 29

5 (It’s hard to write “from

‘House’” instead of writing “from ‘Jeeves and Wooster’”)

THERE S A TR THERE’S TRAIN RAIN COMING O G TO TO TTOWN TO OWN O WN

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 22–28, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

Paper THE

NAILS & SCREWS Though Friedman’s has signed on as an anchor tenant, Petaluma can’t mitigate Deer Creek Village traffic.

Paving Petaluma Deer Creek Village: Traffic jams or home improvement? BY PETER BYRNE

T

o hear some tell it, the proposed Deer Creek Village center in Petaluma would seem to have it all: specialty stores, sales tax revenue and an agreement from local hardware supplier Friedman’s Home Improvement to sign on as an anchor tenant. Below the surface, however, the

Deer Creek project has more holes than a galvanized-steel pipe strap. In January, the Petaluma Planning Commission rejected the environmental impact report for Deer Creek. Members cited studies showing that adding another shopping center to the east side mall strip at McDowell Boulevard and Rainier Avenue would congeal traffic on roads already clogged by thousands of cars and trucks daily. On Feb. 27,

the Petaluma City Council is scheduled to accept or reject the planning commission’s veto of the project. Councilmembers Mike Healy and Chris Albertson each say that the burden of gridlock will be offset by the benefit of having a home-improvement store at the massive development. The Lowe’s home-improvement chain recently pulled out of a leasing deal with Deer Creek developer

Maria Tzouvelekis

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Merlone Geier Partners, although Friedman’s, which operates stores with lumberyards in nearby Santa Rosa and Sonoma, has reportedly signed a lease. But Friedman’s or no Friedman’s, the retail tenants of the 36-acre lot will create mostly part-time sales jobs with low wages. In addition to traffic jams, an increase in bike, pedestrian and car accidents is also projected. Importantly, the shopping center is projected by city economic studies to create blight by killing retail jobs at other locations; shuttering boutique stores; harming existing hardware and home-improvement stores; and duplicating pharmaceutical stores, office complexes and health clubs serving the outlying area around Deer Creek. Local businessman Jason Davies is concerned about this type of oversaturation destroying existing businesses. “Why does Petaluma need another shopping center,” he asks, “when the ones we have, especially downtown, are having such a hard time? Are we robbing Peter to pay Paul?” To assess the impact of Deer Creek, the Bohemian examined thousands of pages of public records and interviewed key players. The findings show that the city does not have the funds, now or in the foreseeable future, to mitigate its damage.

The Myth of Rainier At the heart of the Deer Creek project is a Rainier-Avenue-toPetaluma-Boulevard connector. The Deer Creek EIR states that this crosstown street will be operative in the near future, thereby relieving congestion. This falsehood in the report is one of the reasons for its rejection by the planning commission. For one thing, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) is fiercely opposed to the city’s current low-cost engineering plan for the Rainier connector, for safety reasons. But more importantly, the city cannot afford any version of the Rainier connector. The connector was to be paid for with redevelopment funds, and Gov. Brown has abolished California’s network of

Hole to Nowhere Last year, the council borrowed $15 million (with interest) in a private transaction with JPMorgan Chase bank, paid for by local property taxes. The unorthodox deal funnels $7 million to engineering design firm URS Corporation to design and construct a tunnel under Highway 101 that might someday be used as a part of a Rainier connector. The contract is for a tunnel, and only a tunnel. In short, the city is charging taxpayers for a hole to nowhere, connecting nothing but idle dreams. Suzanne Smith, director of the Sonoma County Transportation Authority, explains that the Rainier “hole” cannot be constructed unless Petaluma comes up with $100 million to complete the entire crosstown connector, including a Caltransapproved design for safely ramping Rainier onto Highway 101. According to city, county and state officials contacted for this story, Petaluma is not likely to ever

find the $100 million needed to construct the Rainier connector safely and properly. Strangely, this bleak reality has not kept Healy, Albertson or Councilmember Mike Harris from acting as if Rainier and Deer Creek are done deals. And at next week’ city council meeting, a fourth vote for Deer Creek could come from councilmember Gabe Kearney, who after his appointment to the council last year provided the lone vote in favor of the project as its representative on the planning commission.

No Money It is a circular truism of city planning that building more shopping centers means the city can extract more traffic-jammitigation fees for building more roads to reduce the gridlock caused by building more shopping centers. But the city’s general plan assesses the cost of mitigating traffic caused by all new development through 2025 at $257 million. Currently, the city has a mere $1.7 million available for traffic mitigation. To generate even $67 million in traffic-impact fees, which is not enough for Rainier, the city would have to permit the development of 4.5 million square feet in commercial, office and industrial development—a 40 percent increase over existing space of that type. It amounts to doubling the downtown area of 225 acres. Since redevelopment has been abolished, any increases in property taxes would go to the state, not the city. And retail sales tax cannot be used for traffic mitigation, but only for the extra cost of fire, police and city utilities servicing Deer Creek. Petaluma currently draws sales taxes from 15 other shopping centers and an auto mall, and, says Mayor David Glass, “Our sales tax basis is very healthy.” For his part, Glass questions the wisdom of building another traffic-heavy mall. And without a doubt, the funds for the Rainier connector to Deer Creek simply do not exist— the city doesn’t have the money. It brings to mind the old Friedman Brothers motto: “If we don’t have it, you don’t need it.”

Sex Wars Marty Klein has been thinking about sex professionally for 31 years. In one of his six books, Ask Me Anything: Dr. Klein Answers the Sex Questions You’d Love to Ask, the intrepid doctor answers questions on everything from arranged marriages to masturbation and foot fetishes. Lately, the licensed marriage therapist has been looking at connections between the federal government, religious groups, puritanical impulses and the moralism of Dr. Phil and Oprah, and how they all convolute and undermine healthy sexual relationships in the United States. See Dr. Klein speak about what he calls “America’s war on sex” on Tuesday, Feb. 27, at Sonoma State University’s Cooperage. 1801 E. Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 7pm. Free. 707.664.2815.

Eastern Connection The North Coast Coalition for Palestine is calling on the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors to cancel county bus system contracts with French multinational transportation company Veolia. “As residents of Sonoma County, we are asking the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors to reconsider Sonoma County’s transportation contract with Veolia, unless it stops aiding and abetting human-rights violations,” writes the coalition in an open letter. Most recently, Veolia was involved in the construction of a light railway line between the West Bank and Jerusalem. The U.N.’s Human Rights Council has called the railway “a clear breach of international law” for its location on a highway that until recently did not allow passage for Palestinians. Since 2008, Veolia has lost investments from the Dutch Triodos Bank and the Stockholm subway system for similar reasons.—Leilani Clark

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local redevelopment agencies. Last March, Caltrans district planning official Lee Taubeneck wrote in a letter to the city, obtained by the Bohemian from a former city employee, that “the Deer Creek EIR and the Petaluma General Plan 2025 EIR are inadequate and must be redrafted and recirculated. . . . With [the] demise of redevelopment agencies and what I also believe to be an unlawful traffic mitigation fee structure projected to fund the Rainer [project] . . . Petaluma cannot use [Rainier] as a feasible traffic mitigation in either document.” Two months ago, in a separate letter to the city, Caltrans district branch chief Gary Arnold reiterated the agency’s position that the final Deer Creek EIR is not supported by accurate traffic-impact data. The agency also has environmental concerns about flooding. City manager John Brown says the city has no record of the Taubeneck letter, but he confirmed receipt of Arnold’s letter. Taubeneck and Arnold were contacted for comment, but Caltrans employees are not allowed to talk to the press, Arnold said.

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A

s I was riding through a remote part of the Swedish countryside last summer, I was surprised to see a farmer working a plow drawn by a horse. The young man’s face sported a beard trimmed to Amish specifications, and his pastcentury clothing looked like it had come right out of a movie-set costume trailer. I stared in surprise. “I didn’t know you had Amish in Sweden,” I said. My friend at the wheel of the car, an ex-pat from Marin, said, “We don’t. Those are German back-to-earth farmers who’ve been immigrating to Sweden, part of the Rudolph Steiner movement.” So this was how some were taking the mystical agriculture path, I thought. While I know the costuming and the beard are optional, farmers following

the plow in Steiner’s footsteps do, in a way, have to leave their country—psychologically if not geographically—to follow in true spirit. Steiner never intended his philosophy of farming to serve as a marketing gimmick so that more wine, for example, might be sold because the words “biodynamically farmed” appear on the label. What he intended was that the farming experience be reintegrated as part of the human spirit. His was not a getrich scheme. Austria-born Steiner, a brilliant and radical thinker who authored over 300 works before his death in 1925, was a mystic and scholar. Known for his many social-reform ideas, including the Waldorf methods in education, Steiner believed that those tilling the soil must resurrect and honor ancient agrarian practices and combine them with a creative spirituality—a kind of farming-the-self ideal. For his vision, Steiner functions like a patron saint of alternative agriculture. Decades before scientist James Lovelock’s 1965 Gaia hypothesis, positing that the planet Earth is a living organism, Steiner was claiming the same principle—that the farm is a living organism and that the farmer is part of that organism. So biodynamic principles require a big shift in perspective, a life change for those who take them on with whole-hearted conviction. Many are attracted to Steiner’s ideologies—some sincerely, others superficially. But when the San Francisco Examiner claimed in 2010 that biodynamic farming was entering the mainstream based on the fact that a few hundred wine-industry folks attended a biodynamic workshop, I shook my head. I am still unconvinced. I’m not cynical, just aware that relatively few have the conviction (and the means) to go as far as that farmer I saw following his horse and Steiner’s plow. “Turn to the ancient principle,” Steiner wrote. “Spirit never without matter, matter never without spirit.”

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BUSY LOAVES COMPANY Gianna Banducci behind the counter at worker-owned Arizmendi.

By the People At Arizmendi Bakery, the workers call the shots BY LEILANI CLARK

E

very worker is an owner at Arizmendi Bakery. The young guy in the blue baseball cap pounding sticky lumps of dough into a pizza crust? Yep, he’s an owner. The twenty-something woman at the counter ringing up your coffee and scone? Yes, she owns it. And that woman there by the oven, the one

sweeping up underneath the baking counters, in a flour-covered apron and ponytail? Just hired help, right? Actually, no, she’s an owner, too. Arizmendi, in downtown San Rafael, is a worker-owned cooperative. Not only do the worker-owners behind the counter turn out addictively delicious focaccias, pizza, bread, cookies and scones, but by virtue of their work, they embody the phrases

“consensus,” “democratic” and “nonhierarchical”—all cultural buzzwords since the advent of the Occupy movement. But the Arizmendi Association of Cooperatives has been at this democracy thing for years, ever since spring-boarding off the Cheeseboard Collective, a Berkeley-based, worker-owned business founded in 1971, with which it’s still closely affiliated. “It’s my first experience with co-op anything, living or working,” says Franz Vandergroen, a worker-

owner who’s been at the bakery since October 2010, six months after its grand opening. “It’s an atmosphere that I haven’t seen in other places that I’ve worked.” Irene Contreras, an “owner candidate” with two months of training left before she’s voted in as an official owner, echoes the sentiment, saying that the environment at Arizmendi is markedly different from her previous experiences in the top-down hierarchy of typical restaurants. “You usually have an executive chef, a sous chef and a pastry chef, and they basically give the orders, and you just follow,” she says. “There’s no saying, ‘You know, I think it might be better if we do this.’” According to Tim Huey, cooperative developer for the Arizmendi Association, this is all part of the direct democracy practiced by the collective. “There are no managers,” he explains. “The bakery is democratically owned and operated by the people who work there. Members—which is the same as an owner in the parlance of cooperatives—have one equal vote each.” It’s definitely a model that seems to lead to strong employee satisfaction. Vandergroen calls it his second home, though he adds that this can be a doubleedged sword when things go awry. “When things go wrong, you have to be at the shop,” he says. “It’s really a personal investment.” The San Rafael bakery is one of six Arizmendi locations, including spots in Emeryville, Oakland and San Francisco. Arizmendi is named for José Maria Arizmendiarrieta, a Catholic priest who founded the Mondragón Worker Cooperatives in Spain in the 1950s. Without a boss maintaining quality control, one might imagine a hodgepodge of inconsistently baked wares. But on a busy Saturday afternoon, the self-serve bakery cases are loaded with a delectable looking pear coffee cake, focaccia with arugula and caramelized onions, muffins, cookies, cheese rolls and fresh-baked breads. ) 14

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 22–28, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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Dining

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Arizmendi ( 13

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My dining partner and I order from the rotating pizza-of-theday menu, sampling a triple mushroom, triple cheese topped with a sesame-ginger vinaigrette and parsley. With all the other tangy, fresh flavors loaded on the thin-crust pie, we don’t miss the pizza sauce. After the pizza, we devour a “Chocolate Thing,” a light, bready roll dotted with pieces of luscious dark chocolate. A fantastic corn-blueberry muffin holds up to the same standard, even when it’s squirreled away and eaten two days later as a Mondaymorning breakfast. Vandergroen says that the cooperative’s goal is to provide the best ingredients possible, including free-range eggs, organic flour and Straus organic milk. Ingredients and recipes are also agreed upon via consensus, voted upon at monthly meetings. “If it’s economically feasible,” says Vandergroten, “we try to get organic ingredients.” A focus on training plus shared recipes between the different locations leads to top-notch quality and selection. “In a restaurant, you might get a day of training, but after that you’re pretty much barked at,” Contreras says. At Arizmendi, she explains, bakers receive three days of bakery training, with the option of a fourth if they still feel unsteady on their feet. Each baker is trained on all positions, further dismantling the employee disconnect that often occurs in many kitchens. “I may have trained you,” says Contreras, “but if I’m not around on the day you’re mixing a muffin batter, you can go to almost anyone else in the kitchen and they can guide you through that.” In the perennial words of countless protests, this is what democracy looks like. “There’s such a sense of family, wanting to help and wanting everyone to do their best,” says Contreras. “Even if you take a vote, and the vote didn’t go your way, at least you got to voice it.” Arizmendi Bakery, 1002 Fourth St., San Rafael. 415.456.4093.

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Bluewater Bistro California cuisine. $$-$$$. Homey and rich seafood with warm service. Terrific specialoccasion spot. Dinner, ThursSat; lunch daily; breakfast, SatSun. 21301 Heron Dr, Bodega Bay. 707.875.3513.

Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $. Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

Hana Japanese. $$$-$$$$. An oasis of cool tucked away in the atmosphereless Doubletree Hotel complex. Reservations on the weekend a must. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 101 Golf Course Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.586.0270.

JhanThong BanBua Thai. $-$$. Sophisticated and delicate Thai cuisine. Fresh ingredients, packed with flavor. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8048.

Johnny Garlic’s California. $$. At Johnny’s, garlic is God–all dishes are infused with the glorious stinking rose. Lunch and dinner daily. 8988 Brooks Rd, Windsor. 707.836.8300.

Papa’s Taverna Greek. $$. Satisfying food in riverside setting. Sun afternoons, Greek dancing. Lunch and dinner daily. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545. Pazzo MediterraneanMoroccan. $$-$$$. Dishes from Spain, France, Italy, Greece or Morocco that are all excellent, like the chicken Marrakech, goosed with Moroccan spices, garlic, onions, tomatoes, eggplant and almonds. Lunch, Mon-Fri;

dinner daily. 132 Keller St, Petaluma. 707.763.3333.

Real Döner Turkish. $-$$. Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555. Sapporo Japanese. $$. An excellent choice when the sushi urge hits. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 518 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.0631. Scopa Italian. $$. For true Tuscan flavors. Can be crowded, but you get to see what the neighbors ordered. Dinner, Tues-Sun. 109-A Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.5282. Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Shangri-La Nepalese. $-$$. Authentic and enriching Nepalese cuisine. As its name suggests, a culinary paradise. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1708 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.793.0300. Willi’s Seafood & Raw Bar Seafood. $$. Delicious preparations of the freshest fish and shellfish. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 403 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.9191.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Avatar’s Indian-plus. $. Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect

) 16

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American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Open breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle

IL TA CK & IT CO ION EF UMA H T KA IT EN TAL 8

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

D T B A-PE CH VO PE G OM AR A M IN SON , M CO ASTATON SDA0YPM T ER R 9:0 SH HU TO T :00

Dining

palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Dining ( 15

16 NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103.

Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6540 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037. Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Buster’s Barbecue

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Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

C.C. Blue Japanese. $$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

SMALL BITES

Dining Deals Foodies who relish the crème da la crème of California cuisine but are too squeezed by the economic crunch to order from a gilded menu need hunger no longer. In its third annual run since 2009, Sonoma County Restaurant Week returns, running Feb. 27 to March 4, when more than 80 eateries, wineries and fine-dining hotspots serve up gastronomic portions of their best recipes at costs to keep your wallet as full as your belly. Scattered from Cloverdale to Petaluma and Bodega, participating restaurants offer specially selected dinners throughout the week at a fixed price of $19, $29 or $39 per person. Patrons can choose from romantic getaways like the Bay View Restaurant at the Inn at the Tides—serving steamed black mussels, grilled salmon and warm chocolate lava cake for $29—to less formal but no less mouthwatering eateries like El Coqui, preparing potato fritters, breaded sirloin Angus steak and coconut, pineapple and cheese flan for $19. Still other restaurants like Lisa Hemenway’s Fresh in Santa Rosa offer guests all three price sets, each with so many options it’s hard to digest. My suggestion: splurge a little, sample a few from the score of delicious options in the area and reserve seats before the crowds come. To see a full list of participating restaurants and menus, visit www.sonomacountyrestaurantweek.org. —Michael Shufro

Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

$$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656.

Californian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $.

Ubuntu Vegetarian.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Miguel’s Mexican-

Wineries

17

S O N OM A CO U N T Y

Meeker Vineyard You

Award-winning Cab, Pinot, Zin, Cab Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah. Their tasting room is located in Sonoma on the Plaza. 481 First St. W., Sonoma. 707.939.9099.

might expect Meeker to be more slicked-out, what with its big-time Hollywood origins (co-owner Charlie Meeker is a former movie executive). But that’s clearly not the case. 21035 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open Monday–Saturday, 10:30am– 6pm; Sunday, noon–5pm. 707.431.2148.

Arnot-Roberts Some

Siduri Winery A Pinot-

Adobe Road Winery

fresh pepper on that Syrah? Duo of chums craft spicy, savory lower-alcohol wines from cool climates in funky backstreet cellar. 6450 First St., Forestville. By appointment only. 707.820.1383.

Cellar No. 8 Historic Italian Swiss Colony at Asti revived as a rechristened timecapsule. Original woodwork, motifs, mementos and the marble wino carving are not to be missed; tasting-room only Sonoma County Zin and Petite Sirah have gobs of oldfashioned flavor. 26150 Asti Post Office Road, Cloverdale. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee, $5. 866.557.4970. Eric Ross Winery Just friendly folks pouring Pinot, Zin and Marsanne-Roussane; don’t ask about the rooster. Ask about the rooster. 14300 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday-Monday 11am– 5pm.707.939.8525. Hauck Cellars Peach-tree state wine fans on a mission to be the “best Bordeaux house in Sonoma County” doing fine so far. Tin-roofed, 1948 Quonset hut off the plaza sports a long bar with plenty of elbow room. 223 Center St., Healdsburg. Friday–Tuesday, 11:30am–5pm; until 7pm, Friday–Saturday. $10 fee; one taste free. 707.473.9065. Kendall-Jackson K-J produces the popular wines gracing most American tables. Amazing gardens, and great place to explore food and wine pairings. 5007 Fulton Road, Fulton. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.571.8100.

heavy slate. 980 Airway Court, Ste. C, Santa Rosa. By appointment. 707.578.3882.

Simi Winery Pioneered female winemaking by hiring the first female winemaker in the industry. The tastingroom experience is mediocre, but the wine is fantastic and worth the wait. Excellent Chard, Sauvignon Blanc and Cab. 16275 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.473.3213. Thomas George Estates Pinot pioneer Davis

of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tastings $15–$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Chateau Boswell Winery (WC) This small, boutique winery is open by appointment only, selling most its wine directly via post to club members. 3468 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.963.5472.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes; happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Bynum hung up the hose clamp and sold his estate, but the good wine still flows in remodeled tasting room featuring a long bar and vineyard videos. Russian River Chard, Pinot and Zin; sweet berry flavors and long-lasting finishes. Caves completed for tours in 2010. 8075 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11am–5pm, daily. Tasting fee, $5. 707.431.8031.

estate-grown Cabs are among the most highly regarded in the world. 5766 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2020.

Toad Hollow A humorous,

Vincent Arroyo Winery

frog-themed tasting room begun by Robin Williams’ brother Todd Williams and Rodney Strong, both now passed. Refreshing and fun. 409-A Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10:30am–5:30(ish)pm. 707.431.8667.

Small, tasting room is essentially a barn with a table near some barrels, but very friendly, with good wines. 2361 Greenwood Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.6995.

N A PA CO U N TY Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dust– Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars (WC) Their three

The Wine Garage Defunct filling station with a mandate: No wines over $25. Well chosen from Napa Valley and beyond, plus half-gallon house jugs for $29.99. 1020-C Foothill Blvd., Calistoga. Monday–Saturday 11am–6:30pm; Sunday to 4:30pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 707.942.5332.

Talisman Wine

W

hat does it take to make wine? A lot of beer, chuckle the home winemakers. More realistically, a lot of money, while for industry veterans like Scott and Marta Rich of Talisman, it takes years of experience and wellcultivated relationships with growers and mentors. But all can agree on one thing: it takes a lot of water.

When considering the whole process through bottling, wine lags just behind coffee as a water-hog, as any winery intern can attest to, having been instructed to wash a few errant grapes off the crush pad with a never-ending jet of water. So when Sonoma’s Eighth Street Wineries gathered to discuss adding a social-benefit factor to their biannual open house, water came to the top of the list. “Wine is the polar opposite of water,” says organizer Amy Tsaykel of Tin Barn Vineyards. “Wine is a luxury, while water is a necessity for life.” (Perhaps some would disagree with the severity of that dichotomy.) An intern at Tin Barn happened to have spent the past two years in the Peace Corps and helped direct them to a reputable water charity, Water.org. While the funds that the nine wineries raise from 10 percent of online ticket sales might not go far locally, in areas where some 900 million people lack access to safe water, it will go a lot further. Talisman occupies one efficiently organized space in this warehouse complex, specifically built with winery needs in mind. Scott Rich made his first 200 cases in 1993 while working his first job out of graduate school. Along the way, he was mentored by winemakers Merry Edwards and Tony Soter, but Pinot Noir had made an impression on him since growing up with his father’s Burgundy collection. Now Rich technically qualifies as a flying winemaker—during harvest, anyway, he flies to L.A. to consult a new winery—but he and Marta, who is sales manager for Calera, operate their 1,500-case brand out of a passion for Pinot. (Yeah, that phrase is nominally on my no-fly list, but when it fits, it fits.) The 2008 Gunsalus Vineyard, Green Valley Pinot Noir ($40) has lovely aromas of potpourri, fresh-baked ginger snap, bright red berries and finely textured tannins, while the 2008 Wildcat Vineyard, Los Carneros Pinot Noir ($45) has dark, feral, smoky aromas, and a fleshy palate of black cherry and leather. Don’t miss the taste test between the 2007 Red Dog Vineyard, Sonoma Mountain Pinot Noirs: the brooding Pommard Clone ($46) and the brighter Dijon Clones ($46). Eighth Street Wineries Open House, Saturday, Feb. 25, 11am–4pm. Includes food pairings. $30 online; $35 door. www.eighthstreetwineries.com. Talisman Wine, 21684 Eighth St., Sonoma. Limited tasting availability, by appointment. 707.996.9050.—James Knight

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 22–28, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FEBR UARY 22-28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

A Look Inside…

Special Menu for Restaurant Week, Feb 27 to March 4

North Bay Business Profiles

APPLEWOOD INN, RESTAURANT & SPA 13555 Rte. 116, Guerneville, CA Reservations:

707.869.9093 800.555.8509

The restaurant at Applewood has been awarded the prestigious Michelin Star for 2012. This Sonoma / Russian River Restaurant is highly regarded for its exquisite cuisine, soothing atmosphere, polished guest services, and its mellow earthy ambiance. In the words of Food & Wine Magazine: “Applewood Inn & Restaurant is an oasis of luxe!” www.dineatapplewood.com and www.applewoodinn.com

/2'!.)#s&!)2,9 42!$%$s3534!).!",9(!26%34%$ Our Mission is to steward and restore 200,00 acres of South American Atlantic rainforest and create over 1,000 living wage jobs by 2020 by leveraging our Market Driven Restoration business model.

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707-824-6644

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19

Ty Sowers and his dog, “Max”

Owner, Ty Sowers, credits Mad Max’s success to having friendly, knowledgeable staff, a welcoming family atmosphere, and his achievements as a prosperous business owner. Mad Max’s mission is to offer only products that work at the lowest prices available to make your dream harvests a reality. Ty has earned the reputation of sharing his years of learning a variety of growing techniques and only selling what you need to take your harvests to the next level.

Mad Max Hydro 353 College Ave, Santa Rosa 1 block East of Hwy 101

707.568.MAXX (6299)

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Our professional staff at Empire Eye Doctors would like to extend a warm welcome to all who want to experience a high level of family eye care, located in the heart of downtown Santa Rosa. Our practice is family owned and operated dating back to the early 1950’s when Vernon F. Lightfoot, M.D. began his practice in Santa Rosa, CA.

Empire Eye Doctors Medical Group Bringing your world into focus

When Vernon retired, the practice was then continued by his two sons Dan R. Lightfoot, M.D. and David V. Lightfoot, M.D who have special interests in retina, glaucoma, cataracts and intraocular implants. They soon established a reputation as leaders in the optometric community taking on the name Empire Eye Doctors Medical Group, Inc. and established an Optical Department that features Licensed Opticians, an in-house lab and hundreds of Designer Frames. In order to provide complete service to their patients and customers they have extended their practice to include:

Empire Eye Doctors

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Edward L. Feldman, M.D. Janet M. Caddell, O.D. Stewart I Wolfe, O.D. and Susan E.Hewlett, O.D.

THANK YOU to all of our Northbay supporters, we love you!

revive drinks, we are a sustainably driven and progressively minded kombucha company. We brew, ferment and bottle our deliciously refreshing kombucha in Sonoma County! Our kombucha is raw, live and full of love, hand crafted in small batches made with all organic ingredients and fair-trade teas. Our mission...to always be working towards a more sustainable future and progressive business culture. Our goal...to lovingly create drinks that make your body/mind/soul feel great and you can feel even better about buying/supporting. What does it mean to be a sustainably driven and progressively minded company? It means we are committed to lowering and eventually 100% offsetting our carbon footprint through innovative alternative energy solutions and becoming a zero landfill production facility. We will prove that by "walking the talk" with our daily business practices. The driving force of this mission is our bottle exchange program. A deposit is collected on each revive kombucha sold to ensure bottles are returned for reuse. As a manufacturer/distributor we are committed to achieving the goal of sustainably transporting all of our products and we think we are 99% there...what about the last 1%? Well, we are the first to admit we aren’t perfect and we know that there is always something we can learn to do better. What we are proud of...our bottles are delivered and collected in reusable milk crates on our “buch haulers”, which run on B100 biodiesel (100% local recycled vegetable oil), from Yokayo Biofuels (Ukiah, CA). We love creating for you the highest quality products, locally and sustainably. Cheers from the buch team!

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 22-28, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

The professional staff at Mad Max Hydro, Santa Rosa’s newest hydroponics store welcomes the novice to veteran grower and home gardener to their location at 353 College Avenue in Santa Rosa. Mad Max Hydro makes growing easy because they are knowledgeable about new trends and carry the latest, state-ofthe-art growing supplies and the dependable tried and true industry products.

20 NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Returned to Sender Local soldiers home from Iraq and Afghanistan struggle to readjust

Michael Amsler

BY JULIANE POIRIER

MERIT Conan Nunley, now on permanent disability, with his awards and medals for service in Iraq.

W

hen Conan Nunley, 39, returned from Iraq in 2005, being back in Sonoma did not comfort him, nor make the war in his mind disappear. “I knew I was home,” Nunley says, “but I didn’t feel home.”

Like others who experienced combat, Nunley found that no matter what he was doing, he couldn’t relax. “I was still on high alert. The stress was unbearable—the nightmares, the anxiety attacks. I kept checking for my weapon,” Nunley explains. “At war, you don’t even go to the bathroom without your weapon.” Nunley’s post-combat stress was keeping him from adapting to civilian life. As a consequence he felt isolated, considering himself a “lone wolf.” Six years and one military medical discharge later, sitting at an outside table in downtown Sonoma, the broad-shouldered Nunley still sports a boot-camp haircut and talks of leaving his hometown and starting over somewhere. He feels let down. Nunley is one of thousands of returning vets whose readjustment to civilian life has been hellish. Soldiers bond intensely during combat, yet plenty return from war to find themselves frustrated outsiders. Psychologists evaluating returnees from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan find that these veterans suffer relatively greater mental distresses because combat conditions are more stressful than before. In contrast to the combatrelated wounding of the body typical in previous wars, Iraq and Afghanistan veterans suffer greater psychological wounds. While only 10 percent of Vietnam veterans obtained mental-health services from the Veterans Administration, about 30 percent of returning veterans today are seeking this form of help. Sadly, the mental-health system was not prepared for a war that would last so long and inflict such a high degree of traumatic stress. As one mental-health worker interviewed for this story explains, “If you get in a bad car accident, you experience trauma. Imagine going back again and again every day and

D

isappointments come in all forms during war. Chauncey Webster, 21, of Santa Rosa, was a teenager when he joined the Marines as a tonic for boredom. When he deployed to Afghanistan in 2009, he was bored in a different geography. “I was one of the newest guys,” says Webster. “I sat on the sidelines while everyone else got to do what we went over there to do. One of my buddies shot a Mark 19 and killed three Taliban. They were the only ones who shot at us. The locals didn’t bother. They only came around to sell us goats or chickens.” The locals also peddled hash, which Webster bought for $20 a brick and smoked to pass the time. But all was not calm. Between Christmas and New Year’s Eve in 2010, Webster lost three comrades to the Taliban’s homemade

landmines, called improvised explosive devices, or IEDs. “They make their own explosives with household items and put screws or ball bearings in them, and they put it in a water bottle or a concrete roadblock,” Webster explained. “When it explodes from inside something, it will shoot everything out as shrapnel. Our sergeant major lost both legs when he stepped on one.” One of Webster’s friends stepped on an IED in the shape of a shampoo bottle and was killed from the blast. Webster was discharged from the Marines for drug use, and he now bears a tattoo in memory of his lost comrades: “Only the dead have seen the end of war.” Veteran readjustment difficulties were identified collectively as a “public health concern” as early as 2007 in the report Bringing the War Back Home, a study of mental-health disorders among roughly 104,000 veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan being treated by the Veterans Administration during the first five years of conflict. But that study didn’t include vets who don’t go for help, many of whom are resistant due to the stigma— particularly among troops— attached to therapy. Nunley says that while he was in Iraq, Army superiors advised him and his fellow soldiers that there was someone they could talk to if they were having problems. “But in the military, you’re trained to suck it up,” said Nunley. “You don’t want to be labeled as the guy with the mental problems, as someone who can’t be relied on.”

W

hile this wartime brotherhood may eschew mental-health services, it can be a part of the group healing process during the transition to civilian life, particularly in the residential treatment model created by Fred Gusman, director of the Pathway Home Program in Yountville. Gusman, a psychological social worker with a military background, has been building and operating trauma centers since the late 1970s. He was on the cutting edge when he created the treatment-center

21

INKED A tattoo on Chauncey Webster’s forearm memorializes fellow soldiers.

model for veterans returning from Vietnam, and is there at the forefront once again. “As the war winds down, there will be 30,000 vets returning over the next two years, just in California. After four to six years of military service, these veterans are getting out at age 26 and don’t know how to cope,” says Gusman, sitting in his office. “There were 23,000 California National Guard deployed. If one in three are coming back with adjustment issues, we have a public-health problem.” Three years ago, the military began posting signs on military bases to encourage servicemen and servicewomen to use mentalhealth services, but the stigma persists because the culture of the military will be slow to change, says Gusman. In 2008, the problem was so pronounced that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs changed its rule against using television advertising and launched a public service video starring Gary Sinise, encouraging veterans with suicidal thoughts to call a help hotline. There is a large amount of goodwill among civilians who want to help returning vets; the public push to provide veterans with jobs, however, fixes only part of the problem. “We should also be providing services for anger, fear, issues about being in crowds,” says Gusman. “We’ve got guys who’ve been back three years, and they’ve tried to go to school, they’ve tried to go to work.” Without the proper support,

veterans often fail in jobs and school. A veteran who has attended military training classes where no disruption is tolerated—and where learning the material can have life-ordeath consequences—will find the atmosphere much different and relatively less focused in a college classroom. A new job situation will bring separate challenges and require other kinds of adjustment. What’s needed for veterans, according to Gusman, is a collaboration in which schooling, employment and mental-health strategies are offered together. “We have a lot of good things going on for vets, but we don’t have collaboration,” says Gusman, who sees the need to cut red tape and smooth the path for returning vets. “We should be learning from the past. We don’t need to create a chronic population,” says Guzman, referring to Vietnam vets. “Vets need to practice with real people, not just mental-health people.”

A

visitor to the Pathway Home Program navigates the spacious grounds of the California Veterans Home in Yountville, stopping at crossings where white-haired veterans of WWII wave amiably from electric wheelchairs, to reach the two-story building leased to the independently operated Pathway Home, one of two PTSD treatment programs in the country that is not affiliated with the military. In the hallway, a whiteboard lists an activity menu that ranges from art therapy and bowling

) 22

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 22–28, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

re-experiencing that trauma. That’s what men and women in combat endure for months or years.” According to the RAND report Invisible Wounds of War, the 1.64 million troops deployed since October 2001 to Iraq and Afghanistan have sustained disproportionately high psychological injuries, primarily post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and traumatic brain injury. The report concludes that these returning veterans are at higher risk of partner abuse, divorce, suicide, substance abuse, heart disease and reduced job productivity that could lead to homelessness. For Nunley, homelessness was a temporary outcome of the heavy drinking and drugs he used as a coping device for his maladjustment. Now on permanent disability for cognitive impairment, traumatic head injury and other physical reasons, Nunley describes with a touch of bitterness the ineffectual drug treatment program he had to undergo while still in the Army. “I came up hot for pot on a random drug test, so to save my military career I took a demotion and went to rehab,” he says. “I was 12 days in what was supposed to be a 30-day program, and the VA gave me a certificate of graduation.”

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

Return to Sender ( 21 to yoga. Next to an old-fashioned hospital reception desk, a Murphy’s Laws of Combat poster lists dozens of sardonic reminders such as, “Keep in mind that your weapon was made by the lowest bidder.” Next to a miniature American flag in a desktop holder is the familiar black POW/MIA flag. Residential PTSD programs in the VA vary between 30 and 90 days, while Pathway Home adjusts the length of stay according to individual needs. “We’re the longest program,” explains unit manager Kathy Loughry. “You can’t do this in 30 days.” What’s more, the Pathway Home Program is free. “The guys don’t pay us to be here,” Loughry says. “And the members are exclusively vets of Iraq and Afghanistan. We don’t have any Gulf War or Vietnam vets in this program. That’s unusual, because if you go to the VA, you get all vets mixed together, which can create a kind of barrier for the group to open up.” The 32-bed program in Yountville, established in January 2008, has drawn vets with PTSD from all over the country. While in residence, program members take leaves. “A lot of their learning is about how to get back into the community,” says Loughry. The VA and the Department of Defense already fund four polytrauma centers at VA hospitals around the country, but the funders of Pathway Home wanted a startup, approaching Gusman due to his development of recovery programs

Where There’s Help Emergency Hotline

Veterans and their loved ones can call 800.273.8255 and press 1, chat online at www. VeteransCrisisLine.net or send a text message to 838255 to receive free, confidential support 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, even if they are not registered with the VA or enrolled in VA healthcare.

for returning Vietnam vets. Gusman told them that these new returning vets “were going to need what doesn’t exist.” Now it does exist. Residents of the Pathway Home Program make use of the recreational facilities on the Veterans Home grounds and participate in community activities in Yountville and beyond. Gusman’s idea of collaboration is working. The program works cooperatively with the VA in Martinez, which provides medications. Program vets have received visits from the Napa Community College, the Sheriff’s Department, the FBI and police, all reaching out to help. Many other community members, both individuals and businesses, have volunteered to assist. “If you go online, you can find hundreds of good things for veterans,” says Gusman. “There is goodwill, there is good intention, but there is a lack of strategically integrated planning. What we need are collaborators if we are going to be supportive of the returnees.” Gov. Brown recently formed a committee of state, federal, VA and county mental-health folks charged with developing a program for collaboration. If it works for the Pathway Home, the thinking goes, it can work elsewhere. For the sake of veterans like Conan Nunley—so frustrated by the system that he hired a lawyer to help him get his disability benefits, and who still feels disconnected and adrift— we all have a responsibility to make it work.

Local Help County veteran officers and their staff act as a go-between, answering any questions veterans have and directing them to the right services. Marin: Morton Tallen, 415.499.6193. Sonoma: Chris Bingham, 707.565.5960. Napa: Patrick Jolly, 707.253.6072.

—J.P.

23

Crush

NOTHING WRONG WITH LOVE Built to Spill, led by guitar heroes Doug Martsch and Brett Netson, create a blissful noise on Feb. 25 at the Uptown Theatre. See Concerts, p29.

P O I N T R E Y E S S TAT I O N

HEALDSBURG

S A N TA R O S A

SA N R A FA E L

Victorian Womp

Mr. Healdsburg

Hooting It Up

Vagina Dialogues

Do you have an appreciation for music that’s pure sound? Where when it’s played in a room, it becomes so overwhelming and entrancing that you can tune out all your other thoughts and lose yourself completely? No, it’s not dubstep—I’m talking about classical music! Remember? With real instruments and composers? Beethoven? Dvórak? Not sure? Well, maybe it’s time to freshen up your iTunes, or at least open up your musical tastes to the Ives Quartet, a four-person string quartet that integrates classical pieces and their own interpretations. Based in the Bay Area, the Ives Quartet plays annually in San Jose, San Francisco and the Peninsula, but also travels to festivals and performances both nationally and globally. See them on Saturday, Feb 25, at the Dance Palace. 503 B St., Point Reyes. 8pm. $33. 415.663.1075

Ladies and gentlemen, it’s back. Behold, the annual Mr. Healdsburg Pageant! One of the best known fundraisers in town, this pageant never disappoints, with competitions in beachwear, formalwear, talent and an onstage interview with gentlemen hopefuls. This year’s theme is the ’60s, so feel free to break out the love beads, tie-dye attire and peace signs while rooting in the battle for the plastic crown of glory. This year’s competitors include “Mr. Heartbreaker,” “Mr. Sexy and I Know It,” “Mr. Wrinkly Realtor,” “Mr. Thumbprint,” “Mr. Nick of Time” and “Mr. Six String.” (I’m rooting for Mr. Nick of Time, who says he’s “so hot that he spontaneously combusted and had to spend three weeks in the burn unit.”) Get the gang together for a hilariously unserious night out on Saturday, Feb. 25, at the Raven Theater. 115 North St., Healdsburg. 7:30. $40–$45. 707.431.8385.

Locals who caught Taylor Swift at the Grammys might have noticed a familiar aesthetic. Yes, with her raggy-looking dress, banjo and back-porch set, Swift’s performance was a dead ringer for the North Bay Hootenanny at the Arlene Francis Center this weekend. Though Swift herself won’t be attending (of that we’re sure), there’ll be at least 18 other local performers playing on two stages, including Les Bon Temps, Waters, Brothers Comatose, the Blushin’ Roulettes, the Timothy O’neil Band and many others. Jam sessions are included, so bring an instrument; in Hootenanny tradition, bringing a pie offers a discount on admission to a pure guitar-playin’, boot-stompin’, beer-drinkin’ time. Bring the whole gang on Saturday and Sunday, Feb 25 and 26, to the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 1pm. $10–$15. 707.326.5274.

There are two special words in the English language that can cause either intrigue or intimidation: “vagina” and “monologue.” Those on the side of intrigue are in luck, because this weekend, Vagina Monologues creator Eve Ensler is teaming up with Isabel Allende at Dominican College for an inspiring conversation together about activism, women and the power of storytelling. A benefit for V-Day, the global movement to end violence against women and girls, the evening includes a sneak peak of Ensler’s newest play, I Am an Emotional Creature, which opens in June. Join the dynamic duo on Friday, Feb. 24. at Angelico Hall at Dominican College. 50 Acacia Ave., San Rafael. 7pm. $35. 415.927.0960.

—Jennifer Cuddy

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CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

ArtsIdeas Peanuts Worldwide, LLC

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META-LIFE The new â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Peanutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; comic book includes a clever tutorial for readers on how to draw Charlie Brown.

Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Footsteps For the ďŹ rst time since Charles Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Peanutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is drawn by new cartoonists for comic book series BY LEILANI CLARK

I

magine that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a young saxophonist asked to compose and record a new album marketed as â&#x20AC;&#x153;John Coltraneâ&#x20AC;? 50 years after the jazz iconâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death.

Big responsibility, right? For a Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;based group of cartoonists, drawing new Peanuts material 12 years after the

death of its famed creator Charles Schulz carries a comparable cultural weight. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little intimidating,â&#x20AC;? says Alexis Fajardo, managing editor for the new Peanuts comic book series, which features new stories, new drawings and new situations for familiar characters like Charlie Brown, Linus, Snoopy and Lucy, all inextricably linked with Schulz and his daily comic strip. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For me, as a fan, that was the

biggest hurdle,â&#x20AC;? admits Fajardo, a successful comic book artist in his own right with the Kid Beowulf series. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The comic strip medium was sacrosanct. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s domain. We could never replicate that, but we always wanted to get Peanuts in front of kids again, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been trying to ďŹ gure out how to do that.â&#x20AC;? Diehards might remember the request by Schulz that no new newspaper strips be drawn after

his death, but the comic book format remains authorizedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, as Fajardo notes, reaches a new, young audience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t read the newspaper anymore,â&#x20AC;? says Fajardo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have access to Peanuts the way that we did.â&#x20AC;? The burden of carrying on a gigantic legacy such as Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s would be daunting to most, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to imagine a more appropriate group of cartoonists creating the Peanuts comic books, which are published and distributed by Kaboom! Studios. Along with creative director Paige Braddock, a longtime Schulz associate and creator of the award-winning comic strip Janeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World, Fajardo helped recruit Bob Scott and wife Vicki, both Peanuts devotees, to create new drawings and stories. Also on board is Matt Whitlock, an animator for Family Guy and a dedicated Peanuts fan who owns an original print given to him personally by Schulz. In a nod to Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artistic legacy, Braddock even inks the colors in some of the comics using pen nibs given to her by Schulz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky to have found Vicky, Bob, Paige and Matt to do really spot-on illustrations,â&#x20AC;? says Fajardo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even more important was ďŹ nding writers who could convey and understand the tone of the characters. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the magic Schulz had. He had this great cast, and he knew where to place them.â&#x20AC;? The key to the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success came from staying true to the authenticity of the characters, a task thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy, says Vicki Scott, given their â&#x20AC;&#x153;shockinglyâ&#x20AC;? threedimensional nature. Staying well within the boundaries of the Peanuts universe was also important; readers wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see Linus shooting off into outer space or piloting a submarine.

Refreshing R e fre s h i n g B Business u s i ne s s

The six creators of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Peanutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; comic books appear for a signing, Q&A and drawing workshops on Saturday, Feb. 25, at the Schulz Museum. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Events start at 12:30pm and continue through the afternoon. Free with admission. 707.579.4452.

Eat. E at. M Meet. eet. C onnect. Connect.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a lovely property, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to steer it off track too far,â&#x20AC;? explains Scott. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to turn it into The Smurfs,â&#x20AC;? adds Fajardo, referring to the CGI-laden, liveaction ďŹ lm released last summer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Smurfs is one of those classic European comics with beautiful line work. And it gets this 21stcentury update where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just kind of ugly.â&#x20AC;? Peanuts comic books have been released before, by Dell Comics in the early 1960s, but without much success. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The personality, the DNA hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been established,â&#x20AC;? says Fajardo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky now that we have 50 years of strips to play around with.â&#x20AC;? The ďŹ rst issue in the series contains a replica of one of those old Dell covers. In addition, original Peanuts strips bracket the new material. The response from fans has been good so far, says Braddock. Though no diehards have picked up the proverbial pitchfork and stormed the studio, there has been minor grumbling on message boardsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an expectation, given the task of replicating something held so dear by so many. But for the most part, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the response has been good,â&#x20AC;? says Braddock. The big question is: What would Sparky think? Braddock says that when Schulz ďŹ rst hired her in the late 1990s, he talked of revitalizing the Peanuts childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books. She believes he would see a venture into comic books as part of that dream. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never got to talk with him about the original comic [book] series, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure he liked them,â&#x20AC;? says Braddock. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He did covers for them. I think more than anything, he would love all the new artists working here in the studio. I think he would really get a kick out of that.â&#x20AC;?

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26

STILL LIFE Sonoma’s adult-friendly

series is no ordinary puppet show.

All Ages Puppet Playhouse series resurrects dormant genes BY DAVID TEMPLETON 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise Jazzercise Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club 5:30–7am; 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Jazzercise Circles N’ Squares Dance Club 8:45–9:45am: 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther presents MOTOWN, DISCO & ROCK ‘N ROLL Sat, Feb 25 8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise 11:30am–1:30pm Scottish Dance Challenge with Gary Thomas 7–11pm DJ Steve Luther presents THE TRI TIP TRIO Zydeco Sun, Feb 26 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:30am Zumba Gold with Toning 1:30–3:30pm Vintage Dance 5–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Feb 27 8:45–9:45am; 4:30–5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Feb 28 5:30–7am; 5:45–9:45am Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30–10pm African and World Music Dance Wed, Feb 22 5:45–6:45pm 7–10pm Thur, Feb 23 5:45–6:45pm 7:15–10pm Fri, Feb 24 7:30–11pm

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Come see us! Wed–Fri, 2–9 Sat & Sun, 11:30–8

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nanimate objects should never move, not all on their own. When they do, in stories and movies, our reaction ranges from visceral fear to astonished delight. Puppets fall somewhere along that spectrum.

The universal appeal of puppets has been chronicled for thousands of years, with puppetry making its magically odd mark in almost every culture, all across the globe. “I think puppetry is an incredible art form,” remarks Liz Treacy, arts education director and program manager for the Sonoma Community Center, which earlier this year launched the monthly Puppet Playhouse series. “There is a special kind of suspension of disbelief that’s involved when watching a puppet show. It’s really wonderful. Though our series is

definitely targeted at families, we do have a lot of adults who’ve been coming regularly—older people who always enjoyed puppets when they were younger and are now letting themselves enjoy puppets all over again.” For kids, of course, the suspension of disbelief Treacy talks about is part of everyday play life. In adults, it usually takes a moment or two to reenter such a youthful mindset—but once engaged, that mindset has a way of taking over. Maybe we all have a puppet-loving gene that goes dormant when not regularly exposed to foam-rubber creatures and papier-mâché figures dangling from strings. Since launching Puppet Playhouse in January, Treacy has been happy to see the audience grow every month. “The puppet shows,” she says, “have been very well attended. The series is definitely filling a need.” The series was developed in partnership with Sonoma’s own Images in Motion, a production company specializing in puppetry and video projects; in addition to other high-profile projects, Images in Motion created the marionettes used in the film Being John Malkovich. Three of the five shows in the Puppet Playhouse series were developed by Images in Motion, including the next presentation on March, the dragon-themed hand-puppet fantasy What in the World. Upcoming shows include the Fratello Marionettes, an innovative troupe based in Danville, performing Carnival of the Animals, three classic fairy tales set to the music of Saint-Saëns. The series ends with another Images in Motion production, Big Bad Bruce, based on the classic children’s book by Bill Peet. “The way these artists work, the craft and skill they bring to their productions, it’s always amazing,” says Treacy. “Every one of these shows is just so magical.” Puppet Playhouse takes place the first Sunday of each month through May 6 at the Sonoma Community Center. 276 E. Napa St., Sonoma. All shows 1:30pm. $10. 707.938.4626.

NEW MOVIES Act of Valor (R; 101 min.) Navy Seals rescue a hostaged CIA agent and blow away some terrorists on the way. (GB)

Hugo (PG; 127 min.) Hugo, a young boy sent

Gone (PG-13; 94 min.) Amanda Seyfried searches for her missing sister, suspecting her own abductor, a serial killer who kidnapped her in the past. (GB)

Good Deeds (PG-13; 111 min.) Tyler Perry plays successful businessman Wesley Deeds, dutiful son and fiancé, who finds himself tempted to change his life after helping out the cleaning lady at his office. (GB)

TUMULT AND BEAUTY Leila Hatami plays Simin in this Iranian breakthrough.

Family Planning

‘A Separation’ a brilliant film from Iran BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

A

nother brilliant movie from the land of brilliant movies, A Separation unfolds in layers. Set in Iran, the film follows a potential divorce that’s complicated by a criminal case: a pious nursemaid (Sareh Bayat) who tends to an aged member of the fractured family claims that she was made to miscarry. I mention Bayat first, but there isn’t a lead actor per se; the cast is more of a circle than a hierarchy. Director Asghar Farhadi is excellent here, and he’s also cast his daughter, Sarina, in an auspicious debut. The precious girl plays 10-going-on-11 Termeh, a student with no social life to speak of, since her life is all homework and tutoring. Termeh’s mother, Simin (Leila Hatami), yearns to take her family out of Iran, perhaps to the West. The film doesn’t explain why a Europeanized English teacher who drives a Peugeot would want to leave Iran, but the audience can hazard a guess or two. The significant glances and open-faced lies in the script make the film’s title a play on words; it’s actually about the split between the world of men and the world of women, exacerbated in an Islamic republic seeking to keep the two as separate as possible. Yet despite the subject matters of courtroom suspense, tragic divorce and a dead baby, A Separation is not overly melodramatic. You couldn’t ask for a more eloquent protest against the moral courts, seemingly engineered to complicate already painful situations. Farhadi’s astonishing drama shows the problems of legislated morality, but he seems to have his eye on a more metaphysical, ancient statute: the hidden laws of bad luck, and how that luck inevitably worsens because of the acts of desperate men and women. We have so many, many movies, and so few have a real reason to exist. A Separation was made with clear urgency, and with a grand reveal in the last 20 minutes of the film. ‘A Separation’ opens Feb. 24 at Summerfield Cinemas. 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

Haywire (R; 93 min.) A freelance operative is doublecrossed after a mission rescuing a hostaged Chinese journalist in the latest from Steven Soderbergh. (GB)

A Separation (NR; 123 min.) Gender inequality is explored in new import from Iran. See review, adjacent. Wanderlust (PG-13; 98 min.) The ubiquitous Judd Apatow produces new comedy starring Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston as an NYC couple forced to move in with the in-laws in Georgia after losing their cushy jobs in Manhattan. (GB)

ALSO PLAYING Albert Nobbs (R; 117 min.) Glenn Close stars in the adaptation of George Moore’s 1927 story about a woman living life disguised as a man. (GB) The Artist (PG-13; 100 min.) French romance and homage to silent film, The Artist stars Jean Dujardin (OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies) as a silent-film star in love with an aspiring actress during the rise of the talkies. In black-andwhite with French subtitles. (GB)

Big Miracle (PG; 123 min.) Drew Barrymore and John Krasinski co-star in the adaptation of Tom Rose’s book Freeing the Whales, about a 1988 international effort to rescue gray whales trapped under ice near Alaska. (GB)

to live with his uncle who maintains the clocks at a railway station, searches for the missing part, the key to the heart, of the automaton his clockmaker father had found before his death. Directed by Martin Scorsese in an adaptation of Brian Selznick’s novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret. (GB)

The Iron Lady (PG-13; 115 min.) Meryl Streep plays Margaret Thatcher in biopic costarring Jim Broadbent, Nick Dunning and Richard Grant. From the director of Mamma Mia! (GB)

Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG; 94 min.) The sequel to 2008’s Journey to the Center of the Earth stars Dwayne Johnson, Luis Guzman and Michael Caine (?). (GB)

Oscar Nominated Short Films This year’s live-action and animated shorts with an Oscar nod screen at the Rafael Center and Summerfield Cinemas. (GB)

Pina (PG; 106 min.) Wim Wenders’ glorious cinematic festschrift for German choreographer Pina Bausch, who passed away in 2009. The dancers deliver their memories of Bausch straight to the camera, and we can see why they fell in love, despite what Bausch demanded from them. However rarefied it seems in descriptions, Bausch’s art was all about hard work and ordinary pain. (RvB) Safe House (R; 117 min.) When a CIA safe house is attacked by Cape Town rebels, the paper-pushing agent must step up to transport the secured criminal to an even safer house. With Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds. (GB)

Chronicle (PG-13; 83 min.) Three teens develop superhuman abilities after stumbling on a mysterious substance in a crater. (GB)

The Secret World of Arrietty (G; 94 min.) The new film from Hayao Miyazaki’s Studio Ghibli features the voices of Bridgit Mendler, Will Arnett, Amy Poehler and Carol Burnett. (GB)

The Descendents (R; 94 min.) Matt King (George Clooney) is forced to reconnect with his kids after his wife suffers a boating accident in Hawaii. With Jody Greer, Matthew Lillard and Beau Bridges. (GB)

This Means War (PG-13; 98 min.) CIA buddies Tuck and Foster discover they’re dating the same woman (Reese Witherspoon) in this action-romcom from McG (Charlie’s Angels). With Chris Pine and Tom Hardy. (GB)

Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance

The Vow (PG-13; 104 min.) A young husband (Channing Tatum) tries to rekindle the affection of his wife (Rachel McAdams) after she wakes from a coma with no memory of her life with him. (GB)

(PG-13; 95 min.) Nicholas Cage returns in the sequel to the 2007 Marvel film. (GB)

Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (R; 158 min.) David Fincher directs the Englishlanguage version of the hit 2009 Swedish film, based on the first in Stieg Larsson’s “Millennium series.” Co-stars Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara, as Lisbeth. (GB)

The Woman in Black (R; 95 min.) Daniel Radcliffe plays a widowed lawyer processing a will in an eerie village where the sight of a spectre foretells the death of another child. From recently reborn Hammer Film Productions! (GB)

Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES

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Film

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Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

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Upcoming Events

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T he 2 The 2012 012 Oscar Osc ar N No minate t dS hor t Films Films Nominated Short ((Animated) Animated) NNRR Fri–Mon Fri–Mon & Weds(11:00) Weds (11: 00 ) 7:30 7: 30 TTuesday uesday 22/28 / 28 OOnly: nl y : (1 (11:00) 1: 0 0 )

T he 2 The 2012 012 Oscar Osc ar Nominated No minated S Short hor t Films Films ((Live Live Action) Ac tion) NNRR FFri–Mon ri–Mon & WWeds(12:45) eds (12: 45) 99:15 :15 TTuesday uesday 2/28 2 / 28 OOnly: nl y : (1 (12:45) 2: 45)

Tim O’Brien

Sunday, Feb. 26th, 7:30 pm

Accompanied by Bryan Sutton (guitar) and Mike Bub (bass)

The T he Iro Iron nL Lady ady PPG13 G13 (10:45, (10 : 4 5, 1:15, 1:15, 4:00) 4 : 00 ) 7:15, 7:15, 99:40 : 40

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R (10 : 30, 11:00, : 00 , 3:45) 3 : 4 5 ) 6:45, 6 : 4 5, 9:15 9 :15 (10:30, S t ar ting March March 1st, 1st , join join us us for for the the CCLASSIC L A S S IC Starting WOODY ALLEN A L L EN FILM F IL M SERIES! SER IE S ! Every Ever y Thursday T hur s d a y WOODY in M ar ch come come see see a different dif fer ent classic clas sic Woody Woody Allen A llen in March film on on the the big big screen! scr een ! For For more mor e info, info, call call our our box box film office of fice at at 5539-6773! 3 9 - 67 73 ! Join us us ffor or a special special performance per for mance of of CCendrillon endrillon l Join from fr om tthe he Royal Royal Opera Oper a House House in in London L ondon on on Tuesday Tuesday Febr uar y 28th 28 th at at 6:30pm. 6 : 3 0 pm. February

551 Summerfield 551 Summer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707-522-0719 707- 52 2- 0719

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Blues, Americana, Rockabilly, Zydeco 4:00pm / No Cover

Mar 16

Rancho WEST COAST RAMBLERS Debut! Western Swing 8:00pm / No Cover ancho LONE STAR RETROBATESRDebut! Roadhouse/Swing Fusion 8:00pm

Sat

St Patrick’s Day Celebration!

Fri

Mar 9 Fri

Mar 17 Sat

Mar 24 Fri

THE JERRY HANNAN BAND

Irish-American Singer/Songwriter/Actor Special St Patrick’s Day Menu 8:30pm

Mar 30

REVOLVER Plays the Beatles “Revolver” featuring Petty Theft’s Dan Durkin, Gary Blum, Michael Dudash and Friends 8:30pm CD Release! T HE LINDA IMPERIAL BAND

with Special Guest David Freiberg 8:30pm

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Girlyman

Friday, March 16, 8:00 pm Definition defying experience summed up in a word: ‘FUN’

Also Coming Soon Dervish – March 24

Tickets/Info: www.seb.org s   1511

GOLD IN CALIFORNIA A new work interpolating Kate Wolf’s songs in a choral composition premieres this week.

Great Divide

Kate Wolf’s life, 50 voices strong BY BRUCE ROBINSON

T

he homespun folkcountry songs of the late Kate Wolf form the basis for An Unfinished Life, a new choral work that premiered this week by the California Redwood Chorale. But not in the way fans are accustomed to hearing them.

“This is not a medley, not a series of songs that follow one another,” clarifies New York–based composer Randall Keith Horton. “It’s a choral setting that blends the songs—sometimes three or even four are happening at the same time—to help tell Kate’s story.” A former Sonoma County resident, Horton met Wolf when she agreed to sing his “Petaluma Suite” with a small local orchestra he led in 1980. “She refused to take what little money I was offering,” he recalls. “I never forgot that.”

After learning of Wolf’s 1986 death of leukemia at age 42, Horton set out to craft a musical appreciation, a project interrupted at length by his work as an arranger for the Duke Ellington Orchestra. He completed it in 2009. As he studied Wolf’s songs, Horton says he “started finding themes—of mountains, of dreams, of love, of rivers, of friendship.” One song provided the title for his 20-minute composition, and Horton freely admits to reinterpreting Wolf’s lyrics. “All the allegory that refers to nature I have taken as musical metaphor that tells her own biography,” he explains. Chorale founder Gerry Schulz describes Horton’s music as “a dreamlike state. It’s woven where the men may be singing part of one song and the women another, and then out of that texture will come Bonnie Brooks with her extraordinary voice.” The entire piece is accompanied by just mandolin and guitar, the latter played by Wolf’s one-time husband and musical collaborator Don Coffin. Brooks, a soprano, is featured as the solo voice of the songwriter. The 50 singers—all volunteers from throughout the Bay Area— have been rehearsing since before Christmas, says director Robert Hazelrigg, who found the new work unexpectedly difficult. “This,” he says, “has been a significant challenge for us.” Among the 13 songs threaded through Unfinished Life are such favorites as “Red-Tailed Hawk,” “Friend of Mine,” “The Lilac and the Apple,” Midnight on the Water” and, as a summary closing statement, “Give Yourself to Love.” Yet the lines Horton cites most often are drawn from “Across the Great Divide,” which he has recast not as a crest of mountain peaks, but the chasm separating life and death. “The line of the story is one of reconciliation,” Horton reflects, “but the story is love.” ‘An Unfinished Life’ runs Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 25–26, at the Glaser Center. 547 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $20–$25. 707.568.5381.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY California Redwood Chorale Directed by Robert Hazelrigg, chorale performs world premiere of Randall Keith Hortonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tribute to Kate Wolf, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfinished Life.â&#x20AC;? Feb 25, 8pm and Feb 26, 3pm. $25. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Growlers Long Beach rockers revisit beach-inspired, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s-era sounds. Allah-Las open. Feb 25, 8:30pm. $14. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Hairy Apes BMX Adventurous Austin alt/ Latin/funk trio performs with Doomfield and Radioactive. Feb 25, 9pm. $10-$12. Forestville Club, 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

Jolie Holland Inventive songwriter and founding member of the Be Good Tanyas sings from fourth studio album. Feb 22, 7:30pm. $10. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

The Jacka Pittsburg rapper and former member of Mob Figaz performs with old acquaintance Husalah. Feb 25, 8pm. $25. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

North Bay Hootenanny

Jim Brickman

Two days of over 20 performers in old-timey festival. Feb 25-26. $$10-$15. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.528.3009.

Romantic, elegiac pianist plays intimate show. Feb 28, 8pm. $40-$45. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Roland White Bluegrass Band Merry band of acoustic neotraditionalists led by Grammywinning mandolin player. Feb 24, 7:30pm. $22-$25. Sebastopol Community Center Annex, 350 Morris St, Sebastopol.

MARIN COUNTY Benefit Concert for Matthew Montfort Show to support Montfortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recovery from wrist surgery features acoustic guitarist Alex de Grassi,reed virtuoso Paul McCandless and others. Feb 29, 7:30pm. $10-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Scott Hamilton Jazz saxophone great returns to Bay Area. Feb 25, 8pm. $25-$50. Horizons Restaurant, 558 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.3232.

Ives Quartet Classical foursome presents underappreciated gems, neglected scores and specially commissioned new pieces. Feb 25, 8pm. $15-$33. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

NAPA COUNTY

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Feb 23, Beaucoup Chapeau. Feb 24, Valerie Orth and Michael Bolivar. Feb 25, Skater Fader with Mr Element. Feb 26, Irish Seisun with Riggy Rackin. Wed, 7pm, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

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Feb 25, Blue Hotel CD release party. 5450 Ross Rd, Sebastopol. 707.823.1335.

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Music

29

piece plays painstakingly crafted pieces, new and old. Feb 25, 8pm. $25. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30 Music ( 29

230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Mike Z. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Hotel Healdsburg

Mystic Theatre

Feb 25, Hairy Apes BMX, Doomfield, Radioactive. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

Feb 24, Peter Barshay and Ben Stolorow Duo. Feb 25, Stephanie Ozer Trio with Peter Barshay and Phil Thompson. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Feb 23, Malone Brothers, Buxter Hoot’n. Feb 25, Growlers, Allah-Las. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

French Garden

Jasper O’Farrell’s

Feb 24, Solid Air. Feb 25, Gypsy Cafe. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Wed, Brainstorm. Last Saturday of every month, Good Hip-Hop. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Feb 24, Smasheltooth vs the Pirate with Fa Show, Deckstir and Brothers of Gonzalez. Feb 25, Jacka, Husalah and J Stalin. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Last Day Saloon

Redwood Cafe

Feb 24, Nor Cal Live ‘n’ Loco featuring King Stackindoa, Rob Cervantes and others. Feb 25, Department of Rock with DJ Rob Cervantes. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenanny’s Pick-Me-Up Revue. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Feb 25, Choppin’ Broccoli. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

The Rocks

Main Street Station

Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Fourth Friday of every month, Kaleidoscope. Live art and DJs. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Alley. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club

Gaia’s Garden Feb 22, Da Fe. Feb 23, One World Jazz Band. Feb 24, Greenhouse. Feb 25, Kevin Russell Showcase. Feb 27, Neil Buckley Octet. Feb 29, Greg Hester. Tues, Jim Adams. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Sonoma Feb 24, Fat Opie. Feb 25, Black Cat Bone. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hopmonk Tavern Feb 22, Jolie Holland. Feb 23, Juke Joint with Decadance DJs and Lenkadu. Feb 24, Whiskerman. Feb 25, Wisdom “Full Spectrum” CD release. Feb 26, Sol Flamenco. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment.

Feb 22, Phat Chance Trio. Feb 23, Susan Sutton. Feb 24, Vernelle Anders. Feb 28, Maple Profant. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Feb 23, Sycamore Slough String Band. Feb 24, Cork Pullers. Feb 25, High Country. Feb 26,

Phoenix Theater

Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Society: Culture House

Tradewinds Feb 24, Hillside Fire. Feb 25, Weekend at Bernie’s. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Transient Lounge

San Francisco’s City Guide

Sleigh Bells Brooklyn buzz duo with a new, more aurally palatable album, “Reign of Terror.” Feb 23 at the Regency Ballroom.

Mac McCaughan Cofounder of Merge Records and Superchunk frontman plays sharp solo set. Feb 23 at Swedish American Hall.

Dave Holland Quartet

Feb 24, Battalion of Saints. Ashtray, Snag, Resilience, Violation, Hellbomber. 400 Todd Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.583.9080.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Feb 29, Benefit concert for Matthew Montfort. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Finnegan’s Marin

19 Broadway Club Feb 22, Gail ‘Mojo’ Muldrow and Eddie Neon and Blue Roux. Feb 23, Diamond Jazz. Feb 24, Don Carlos. Feb 25, Steppin’ Up Saturdays featuring Dr. Dylon and Foobz. Feb 26, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. Feb 26, Matty and the Arkites. Feb 29, Sticky’s Backyard. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Feb 22, Tip of the Top. Feb 23, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Feb 24, Swamp Thang. Feb 25, Dani Paige Band and Dr. Mojo. Feb 26, Beso Negro. Feb 28, Andre and friends. Feb 29, (W+T)J2. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Feb 24, Eddie Neon Blues. Feb 25, Petty Theft. Feb 26, Fred Eaglesmith. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Feb 23, Dave Crimmen. Feb 24, Lumanation. Feb 25, Freddy Clarke. Feb 26, Candela y Edgardo. Mon, local talent onstage. Tues, jazz jam. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. Thurs, 9pm, Texas Blues. Sat, 2pm, juke jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Feb 23, Anthony Bello. Feb 25, Swoop Unit. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Master bassist plays with Jason Moran, Eric Harland and Chris Potter. Feb 24 at Palace of Fine Arts.

Feb 23, Matt Bolton. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

DJ Krush

George’s Nightclub

Calistoga Inn

Feb 24, Mitch Woods and his Rocket 88s. Feb 25, Pride and Joy. Feb 29, Danny Click’s Texas Blues Revue. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, old-school DJ night. Sat, DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Horizons Restaurant

Napa Valley Opera House

Japanese hip-hop producer and creator of textural universes plays 20th Anniversary show. Feb 25 at Mezzanine.

The Dodos Hometown heroes fronted by Meric Long strum and hum up a melodic storm. Feb 26 at the Great American Music Hall.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

Feb 25, Scott Hamilton. 558 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.3232.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Feb 29, Dry Creek Rounders. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

NAPA COUNTY

Feb 23, Guitar Masters. Feb 25, Natalie Cole. Feb 28, Jim Brickman. 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Feb 22, Giants of Jazz. Feb 24, West Coast Song Writers

Dear Diary Shuteye Unison a whole new sound machine Before their breakup in 2007, the revered Cotati quartet the Rum Diary found a coveted sweet spot between catchiness and experimentalism that took in both ’90s emo-core and ’70s space rock. Though the group is but a memory now, three-fourths of the band forged on to form Shuteye Unison, who are if nothing else stranger than the Rum Diary. All the songs on Shuteye Unison’s debut album, Our Future Selves, are distinct enough to sound as if they had been written and recorded by entirely different bands. Think Fugazi-esque post-punk grooves, mellow piano-based pop ditties and quirky progrock jams, and that’s the tip of the iceberg. Our Future Selves is a handcrafted album resulting from what’s obviously a lot of work—this almost ridiculous amount of labor even extends to the packaging of the vinyl, with a custom bookmark and a library card. Most interesting about Shuteye Unison is that between all the instrumental layering and genre-tinkering, their songs have one thing in common: they ride the line of sounding both intimate and larger than life. Shuteye Unison play with Teenage Sweater and Survival Guide on Thursday, Feb. 23, at Christy’s on the Square. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 9pm. $5. 707.707.528.8565.—Aaron Carnes

Competition. Feb 25, Jan Wahl and the Oscars. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Feb 25, Built to Spill.

1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Uva Trattoria Wed, Gentlemen of Jazz. Sun, James and Ted. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

OPENINGS Feb 25 From 5 to 7pm. Sonoma County Museum, “The Tsar’s Cabinet,” porcelain, enamel and glassware from the Romanovs. Reception, Feb 25, 5pm-7pm. $15. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500.

Feb 26 At 4pm. Finley Community Center, National Arts Program Exhibition and Competition awards ceremony and reception. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737. From 3 to 5pm. Gallery Route One, “Retrospective, Evolution,” featuring the work of Eric Engstrom and “The Book of Remembrance,” featuring the work of Myong-Ah Rawitscher. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Feb 29 At 6pm. Petaluma Library, work by Tracy Bigelow Grisman and others. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

SONOMA COUNTY Charles M Schulz Museum Feb 25, 1pm, Meet the creators of “Peanuts”’ newest comic book series. Through Apr 2, “Hit the Road, Snoopy!” featuring the beagle’s most famous road trips. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Finley Community Center Through Mar 30, “National Arts Program Exhibition and Competition” encourages artistic growth and offers $4,000 in scholarships and awards. Awards ceremony and

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Apr 7, “Seventh Anniversary Exhibit,” with work by Hamlet Mateo, Mary Jarvis and Luke Damiani. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Feb 29-Apr 2, “Feathers and Fur,” featuring animal artworks. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Mar 4, “Clay and Glass Exhibit,” featuring sculpture and functional works in clay and glass by members of Association of Clay and Glass Artists of California. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Library Feb 24-Mar 8, Annual art show features work by Tracy Bigelow Grisman and others. Reception, Feb 29 at 6pm. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

RiskPress Gallery Through Feb 27, “Creative Illusions,” featuring the works of Kath Root, Chris Stover and Andrea Way. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Mar 4, “Living Life” paintings by Kathleen Deyo and “Color in Motion” photopaintings by Jerrie Jerne. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sonoma County Museum Feb 26-May 27, “The Tsar’s Cabinet,” porcelain, enamel and glassware from the Romanovs. Reception, Feb 25, 5pm-7pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Mar 18, “Undiscovered,” five dynamic artists from Sonoma County. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

University Art Gallery Through Mar 2, “New Work, New York,” featuring the work of Tomas Vu. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum Through Mar 11, woven photographs of constructed landscapes, by Julie V Garner. Through Mar 11, “Women in Print,” etchings from Paulson Bott Press. Through Mar 17, “Attic Treasures,” featuring artifacts from the history collection. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Gallery Route One Feb 24-Apr 1, “Retrospective, Evolution,” featuring the work of Eric Engstrom and “The Book of Remembrance,” featuring the work of MyongAh Rawitscher. Reception, Feb 26. Through Mar 4, “Photography: A Fine Art,” featuring the work of Tim Fleming, Alan Plisskin and Sister Adele Rowland. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. WedMon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Headlands Center for the Arts Through Mar 4, “Demobbing: Landscape, Structure and Bioform,” featuring 20 California artists reflecting on the idea and effects of demobilization. Bldg 944, Fort Barry, Sausalito. Sun-Fri, noon to 4. 415.331.2787.

Marin MOCA Through Feb 26, “Fresh,” featuring new work by resident artists. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4,. 415.506.0137.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Mar 3, “Swimming Fields,” featuring the work of Jane Hambleton. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 11 to 6, Friday-Saturday 11 to 7,. Sunday 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Napa Ongoing, “Momentum: Art that Moves (Us),” second annual

Yountville Community Hall Through Mar 12, “Mustard and More,” juried exhibit sponsored by Napa Valley Photographic Society. Feb 24, 5-8pm, Feb 25, 10am-5pm and Feb 26, 11am-4pm, “Meet the Artists” weekend featuring reception, silent auction, show and sale hosted by the Napa Valley Photographic Society. $5 for reception, other events free. 6516 Washington St, Yountville.

Comedy Comedy Night Show features Will Durst, Johnny Steele, Deb and Mike and others. Feb 24, 8pm $15$20. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.2343.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Dance Dance Palace Feb 26, 3pm, Chinyakare Ensemble Traditional dance, music and culture of Zimbabwe and Southern Africa. $12. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Events Mr Healdsburg Pageant Local gents compete in the beachwear, formalwear, talent and interview categories for a coveted plastic crown. Feb 25, 7:30pm $40-$45. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg, 707.433.3145.

Cheese, Please

Sonoma Valley celebrates all things cheese Cheese makers, mongers and lovers will descend on Sonoma this week for five days of rinds and wheels. The Ninth Annual Sonoma Valley Cheese Conference, running Feb. 25–29, attracts premier cheese makers from around the country and the North Bay. Founded and hosted by Sheana Davis of Sonoma’s Epicurean Connection, this year’s conference will honor the memory of the late Ig Vella, a pioneering Sonoma County cheese maker. The festivities begin in San Francisco on Feb. 25, with a winter artisan cheese fair showcasing top artisan cheese makers and Sonoma County wine and beer. The conference kicks off in earnest the next day in Sonoma featuring artisan cheese producers, wine, beer, guest chefs and a “winter mac and cheese cook-off” at MacArthur Place. Food writer Janet Fletcher will also host an afternoon cheese tasting. The next two days feature seminars and networking sessions, and conclude with a one-day retail training session aimed at retailers led by Ari Weinzweig of Zingerman’s, a celebrated retail food emporium based in Michigan. Tickets are available for each event. Call 707.935.7960 or see www.theepicureanconnection.com for more.—Stett Holbrook

Tattoos & Blues 21st annual fest is three days of tattooing, body piercing and live blues music; expect the world’s finest artists, competitions, seminars, music, circus acts and music. $20$35. Flamingo Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

Year of the Dragon Celebrated the Year of the

Dragon with the Redwood Empire Chinese Association with a buffet and traditional 250-foot dragon. Feb 25, 6pm $10-$25. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Film Academy Awards Telecast Party Dress in your finest, nibble

) 32

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 22–28, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Galleries

reception Feb 26 at 4. 2060 W College Avenue, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1. 707.543.3737.

31

CRITIC’S CHOICE James Fanucchi

Arts Events

interactive public art exhibition ARTwalk. Free. 707.257.2117. First Street and Town Center, Napa.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 22– 28 , 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

32 Arts Events on the goods of 25 local restaurants, sip vino and pray that James Franco stays well away from the mic. Feb 26, 5pm $99. Robert Mondavi Winery, 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville, 707.968.2203.

Awards Night Party Drink Champagne, eat local food and hope George Clooney gets drunk. Feb 26, 4pm Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.924.5111.

Awards-Viewing Party Sib wine, stroll the red carpet and gawk at Anne Hathaway’s dress. Feb 26, 4pm $75. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Bigger Than Life 1950s film about small town schoolteacher who moonlights at a cab company. Feb 24, 7pm Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2606.

Dying to Do Letterman Award-winning documentary about stand up comedian Steve Mazan and his one, seemingly impossible goal. Featuring post-show Q&A with Steve Mazan. Feb 22, 7:30pm.$15. 142 Throckmorton, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Film, Food & Love Series of foodie films benefits local celebrity chefs. February 23, “Big Night.” $30. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena, 707.963.3946.

Oscar Night America Appetizers, wine, dinner, silent auction and HD telecast of the awards. Feb 26, 3:30pm $50$60. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

( 31 Bay Area celebrity chef. Wed, Feb 22, 6:30pm. $39 per class plus $20 materials fee. Fresh Starts Cooking School, 1399 North Hamilton Pkwy, Novato, 415.382.3363.

Meet the Winemaker Meet Matt Smith, the man behind the winery’s Bordeaux varietals and blends. Feb 25, 11am-3pm. $10. KendallJackson Wine Center, 5007 Fulton Rd, Fulton.

Lectures Art of the Americas Feb 25-26, event features lectures by fashion and history experts, book launches and signings and a focus on the Native American jewelry resurgence. $15-$25. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

The Coded Language of Privilege A panel discussion facilitated by Dr. Brian Douglas Phifer, held in Room 4608 of the Bertolini Student Center. Feb 29, 1:30pm. Free. SRJC, Doyle Student Center Lounge, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4460.

Evolution of National Security Wiretapping David Kris, former official in the Department of Justice, talks about the National Security Agency terrorist surveillance program. Feb 24. $23-$25. La Gare Restaurant, 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa, 707.528.4355.

Iceland: Moments to Savor

Food & Drink

Join Jeff Davis, awardwinning PBS producer, for a photographic slide show of his northern travels. Feb 22, 7-8:30pm. Free. REI Corte Madera, 213 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera, 415.927.1938.

Crab Feed

Legacies as Lessons: Learning from the Past

Dungeness crab, pasta, salad, French bread, wine and dessert. Feb 25, 6pm. $40. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Avenue, Santa Rosa, 707.543.3737.

Knives with David Budworth Hone your mincing, boring and butterflying skills with

Holocaust and Genocide Lecture series featuring daughter of Holocaust survivor Claudia Stevens. Various times. “Lessons Learned From a Holocaust Childhood” with Hans Angress, Feb 28. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2880.

Laura Paulini North Oakland artist speaks on geometric work as part of the Visiting Artists Lecture Series. Held in the Art Department, Room 102. Feb 27, 12pm. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2880.

SSU Jazz Forums Ron Dziubla, lecture Feb 22 at the Green Music Center and concert on Feb 23 at 7:30pm in the Warren Auditorium. John Stowell and Mike Zilber Quartet on Feb 29 at Green Music Center. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2880.

This Is Not to Be Looked At A three-part series exploring the work of 20th century artists Robert Rauschenberg, David Ireland and John Baldessari taught by art historian Ann Wiklund. Thurs, Feb 23, 2-4pm. $75. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma, 707.939. SVMA.

Vitners,” with Katherine Cole 1330 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.1616.

Dominican College Feb 24, 7pm, “I Am an Emotional Creature,” with Eve Ensler with Isabel Allende. Two powerhouse ladies talk activism, women and the power of stories. $35. 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Masonic Center Feb 25, 6pm, “The Chinese Medicinal Herb Farm,” with Peggy Schafer 373 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Theater A Case of Libel A lively courtroom battle inspired by the trial between journalists Quentin Reynolds and Westbrook Pegler. Through Mar 11, 3 and 8pm. $12-$22. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato.

Fault Lines

Readings Book Passage Feb 23, 7pm, “A Theory of Small Earthquakes,” with Meredith Maran and Johnny Symons. Feb 24, 7pm, “Wild Thing,” with Josh Bazell. Feb 25, 1pm, “History of a Pleasure Seeker,” with Richard Mason. Feb 26, 12pm, “Conscious Order,” with Annie Rohrbach. Feb 26, 2pm, “Speaking Up Without Freaking Out,” with Matt Abrahams. Feb 26, 7pm, “Wild Mercy and Swimming the Eel,” with Donna Emerson and Zara Raab. Feb 29, 7pm, “Pineapple Grenade,” with Tim Dorsey 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Community Church Feb 25, 7pm, “In Thought and Action: The Enigmatic Life of SI Hayakawa,” with Gerald Haslam. Sponsored by Copperfield’s. 1000 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.823.2484.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Feb 25, 1:30pm, “The Whip,” with Karen Kondazion. Feb 28, 3pm, “Bliss,” with Kathryn Littlewood 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Calistoga Copperfield’s Books Feb 24, 5:30pm, “Voodoo

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Debut play of Santa Rosa native Rebecca Louise Miller inspired by Polly Klaas kidnapping. Thurs, Feb 23, 8pm, Fri, Feb 24, 8pm and Sat, Feb 25, 8pm. $15-$20. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

How I Learned to Drive Encore performance of SSU’s black comedy to benefit Glaser Center. Feb 24, 7:30pm $10-$20. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.568.5381.

Proof Winner of the 2001 Pulitzer Prize, “Proof” follows a troubled young woman as she discovers a revolutionary mathematical breakthrough. Through Feb 26, 2 and 8pm. $10-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Dishes of Drama

‘The Tsars’ Cabinet’ at Sonoma County Museum The historic dilemma of Russia—to look east or west—is reflected in the Sonoma County Museum’s exhibit “The Tsars’ Cabinet.” The show collects porcelain, enamel and glassware that belonged primarily to the Romanovs, who ruled in the 18th, 19th and very early 20th centuries. Through its delicate finery, the exhibit illustrates that before the Cold War, before work camps, before Khrushchev and his insatiable love of corn, the head-scratching giant that Winston Churchill called “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma” had identity problems, and on a chilly October day in 1917, that place would irreversibly shake the world. It’s perhaps difficult to see such drama in plates and soup tureens, but shifting ideas of nationalism and cultural identity make themselves known in the pieces’ devilishly fine details. Take the rounded, repetitive loops of green and gold painted on a dinner set belonging to Nicholas I. According to curator Jennifer Bethke, these Byzantine and Medieval Russian–style patterns were commissioned in the tumultuous, postNapoleon 1800s when militarism and conservative nationalism were on the rise. Conversely, only a short time after, Alexander II commissioned a set of plates decorated with Grecian figures that occupied the Vatican—a clear turn to the more romantic, Westernized side of Russian national identity, when the threat of Catholic countries (and short, ex-Catholic megalomaniacs) had somewhat decreased. An opening reception with Russian music, food and vodka takes place Saturday, Feb. 25, from 5pm to 7pm; $15. The Romanov treasures will be on display Feb. 26–May 27. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St., Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.—Rachel Dovey

33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 22-28, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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34

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of February 22

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ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) I invite you to identify all the things in your life that you really donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need any more: gadgets that have become outdated, clothes that no longer feel like you, once-exciting music and books and art works that no longer mean what they once did. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop there. Pinpoint the people who have let you down, the places that lower your vitality and the activities that have become boring or artiďŹ cial. Finally, Aries, ďŹ gure out the traditions that no longer move you, the behavior patterns that no longer serve you and the compulsive thoughts that have a freaky life of their own. Got all that? Dump at least some of them. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a woman, you could go to the perfume section of the department store and buy fragrances that would cause you to smell like Jennifer Lopez, Britney Spears, Eva Longoria or Paris Hilton. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a man, an hour from now you could be beaming an aroma that makes you resemble a celebrity like Antonio Banderas, Usher, David Beckham or Keith Urban. You could even mix and match, wearing the Eva Longoria scent on your manly body or Usher on your female form. But I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recommend that you do any of the above. More than ever before you need to be yourself, your whole self and nothing but yourself. Trying to act like or be like anyone else should be a taboo of the ďŹ rst degree.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try to take one day at a time,â&#x20AC;? says Ashleigh Brilliant, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but sometimes several days attack me all at once.â&#x20AC;? I think you may soon be able to say words to that effect, Geminiâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good thing. Life will seem more concentrated and meaningful than usual. Events will ďŹ&#x201A;ow faster, and your awareness will be extra intense. As a result, you should have exceptional power to unleash transformations that could create ripples lasting for months. Would you like each day to be the equivalent of nine days? Or would four be enough for you? CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

When actor Ashton Kutcher is working on the set of his TV show Two and a Half Men, he enjoys spacious digs. His trailer is two stories high and has two bathrooms as well as a full kitchen. Seven 60-inch TVs are available for his viewing pleasure. As you embark on your journey to the far side of reality, Cancerian, it might be tempting for you to try to match that level of comfort. But whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more important than material luxury will be psychological and spiritual aids that help keep you attuned to your deepest understandings about life. Be sure youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re wellstocked with inďŹ&#x201A;uences that keep your imagination vital and upbeat. Favorite symbols? Uplifting books? Photos of mentors? Magic objects?

long as you play with the perspective Shakespeare articulated in As You Like It: â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.â&#x20AC;?

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear Rob: For months Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a recurring dream in which I own a pet snake. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the problem: the only cage I have to keep the snake in is sadly inadequate. It has widely spaced bars that the snake just slips right through. In the dream, I am constantly struggling to keep the snake in its cage, which is exhausting, since itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible. Just this morning, after having the dream for the billionth time, I ďŹ nally asked myself, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so terrible about letting the snake out of its cage? So I gratefully wrote myself this permission note: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;It is hereby allowed and perfectly acceptable to let my dreamsnake out of its cage to wander freely.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Scorpio Devotee. Dear Devotee: You have provided all your fellow Scorpios with an excellent teaching story for the upcoming weeks. Thank you!

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) For million of years, black kite raptors made their nests with leaves, twigs, grass, mud, fur and feathers. In recent centuries, they have also borrowed materials from humans, like cloth, string and paper. And in the last few decades, a new element has become quite popular. Eighty-two percent of all black kite nestbuilders now use white plastic as decoration. I suggest you take inspiration from these adaptable creatures, Sagittarius. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an excellent time for you to add some wrinkles to the way you shape your home base. Departing from tradition could add signiďŹ cantly to your levels of domestic bliss. CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) There are many examples of highly accomplished people whose early education was problematical. Thomas Edisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst teacher called him â&#x20AC;&#x153;addled,â&#x20AC;? and thereafter he was homeschooled by his mother. Winston Churchill did so poorly in school he was punished. Benjamin Franklin had just two years of formal education. As for Einstein, he told his biographer, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My parents were worried because I started to talk comparatively late, and they consulted a doctor because of it.â&#x20AC;? What all these people had in common, however, is that they became brilliant at educating themselves according to their own speciďŹ c needs and timetable. Speaking of which, the coming weeks will be an excellent time for you Capricorns to plot and design the contours of your future learning.

Veterans of war whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been wounded by shrapnel often ďŹ nd that years later, some of the metal fragments eventually migrate to the surface and pop out of their skin. The moral of the story: the body may take a long time to purify itself of toxins. The same is true about your psyche. It might not be able to easily and quickly get rid of the poisons it has absorbed, but you should never give up hoping it will ďŹ nd a way. Judging by the astrological omens, I think you are very close to such a climactic cleansing and catharsis, Leo.

AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) Nigeria has abundant deposits of petroleum. Since 1974, oil companies have paid the country billions of dollars for the privilege of extracting its treasure. And yet the majority of Nigerians, over 70 percent, live on less than a dollar a day. Where does the money go? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a long story, with the word â&#x20AC;&#x153;corruptionâ&#x20AC;? at its heart. Now let me ask you, Aquarius: Is there a gap between the valuable things you have to offer and the rewards you receive for them? Are you being properly compensated for your natural riches? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to address this issue.

VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22)

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) According to my reading of the astrological omens, you are neither in a red-alert situation nor are you headed for one. A pink alert may be in effect, however. Thankfully, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no danger or emergency in the works. Shouting and bolting and leaping wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be necessary. Rather, you may simply be called upon to come up with unexpected responses to unpredicted circumstances. Unscripted plot twists could prompt you to take actions you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rehearsed. It actually might be kind of fun as

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22)

Distilled water is a poor conductor of electricity. For H2O to have electroconductivity, it must contain impurities in the form of dissolved salts. I see a timely lesson in this for you, Virgo. If you focus too hard on being utterly clean and clear, some of lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rather chaotic but fertile and invigorating energy may not be able to ďŹ&#x201A;ow through you. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I suggest you experiment with being at least a little impure and imperfect. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just tolerate the messiness. Learn from it, thrive on it, even exult in it.

Gawker.com notes that American politician John McCain tends to repeat himselfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a lot. Researchers discovered that he has told the same joke at least 27 times in ďŹ ve years. (And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a feeble joke, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not worth retelling.) In the coming week, Pisces, please, please, please avoid any behavior that resembles this repetitive, habit-bound laziness. You simply cannot afford to be imitating who you used to be and what you used to do. As much as possible, reinvent yourself from scratchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and have maximum fun doing it.

35

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Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center Offers ongoing classes for all levels of practice and interest. Eveyone is welcome. $10 donation requested per class. Prayers for World Peace: Sun, 10:30–11:45am Noontime Meditations: Tuesday–Saturday, 12:00 General Programs: Tues & Weds, 7:30–8:30 304 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma, 707.776.7720 www.meditateinnorcal.org Introduction to Reliance on the Spiritual Guide Special Meditation Day Course at Mahakaruna Buddhist Center Sat, Feb 25, 10am–1pm. Followed by Potluck lunch. $10 Donation requested. You are invited to participate in a day of teaching, meditation and ritual prayer. Everyone is welcome and there are no special requirements to attend. FREE: LEARN TO MEDITATE In this inspiring, practical course, you`ll learn all the basics to free yourself from daily stress and enjoy a calm, peaceful mind. Two Saturdays, February 18 & 25, 11am–1pm. Ongoing classes also available. Compassion Buddhist Ctr, 436 Larkfield Center, Santa Rosa, RSVP: 707.477.2264 Drop ins welcome. www.meditateinsantarosa.org

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The Coded Language of Privilege A panel discussion facilitated by Dr. Brian Douglas Phifer, held in Room 4608 of the Bertolini Student Center. Feb 29, 1:30pm Free. SRJC, Doyle Student Center Lounge, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4460.

Sonoma County Museum Feb 26-May27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tsarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cabinet,â&#x20AC;? porcelain, enamel and glassware from the Romanovs. Reception, Feb 25, 5pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500.

Built to Spill Iconic indie outfit led by guitar Gods Doug Martsch and Brett Netson. Feb 25, 8pm. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa, 707.259.0123.

Josh Guttig, email - jgutt7@yahoo.com or call 707.364.1540

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We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not (restrictions apply). Live operatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

Mr Healdsburg Pageant Local gents compete in the beachwear, formalwear, talent and interview categories for a coveted plastic crown. Feb 25, 7:30pm $40â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$45. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg, 707.433.3145.

Oscar Night America Appetizers, wine, dinner, silent auction and HD telecast of the awards. Feb 26, 3:30pm $50-$60. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Sebastopol Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books

Napa Meditation class: Universal Love and Compassion.

Feb 24, 6pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Theory of Small Earthquakes,â&#x20AC;? with Meredith Maran. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.2618.

Mondays from 7:00 to 8:30pm at Jessel's Studio Gallery. We will explore Buddhism and the spiritual path, and what it means in our lives. The classes are $10 drop in;

no commitment is needed, and they are open to both beginning and more experienced meditators. For information, call Mike Smith at 415.717.4943 or www.meditationinnorcal.org Jessel Gallery is at 1019 Atlas Peak Road, Napa, 707.257.2350 www.jesselgallery.com

A Bohemian approach to the web. The new Bohemian.com


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