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Contributors Michael Amsler, Trevor Alixopulos, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur, Nicolas Grizzle, Stett Holbrook, Scott Barry Kaufman, Sergio Lopez, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Juliane Poirier, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver

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Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover illustration by Sergio Lopez. Cover design by Kara Brown.

5

This photo was submitted by Ruthie Jansen of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘It turned out she was infertile and probably always had been. All that worry for nothing!’ SEX & VALENTINE’S P20 When a Man Talks to a Woman P8 Succumbing to Love’s Randomness P1 8 SoďŹ a’s Elegant Valentine’s Day Box P22 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Green Zone p10 Dining p13 Wineries p17

Sex & Valentine’s p18 Culture Crush p23 Arts & Ideas p24 Stage p26 Film p27

Film Caps p28 Music p29 A&E p33 Astrology p38 ClassiďŹ ed p39

ABOUT THE COVER ARTIST Sergio Lopez is a Santa Rosa native, born in 1983. A graduate of the Academy of Art in San Francisco, he cites the Golden Age illustrators, Bravura painters, contemporary artists, concept designers, graffiti writers, and photographers as some of his strongest inuences. When he’s not painting, he’s usually being a total smartass on his Twitter account, @MainLoop. See more of his oil paintings at www.themainloop.com.

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6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies His First Ride

Three months, two wheels, one perfect day BY SARAH HADLER

I

t is a sunny, lovely, cool-and-warm-at-the-sametime kind of day, auspicious in its possibilities. A perfect day for our three-month-old son’s first bike ride, I think as I wake up that morning. I have been waiting for this day for a long time. I figured I would know it when it felt right. My husband and I excitedly strap him into his special bike trailer, and my husband pulls him as I ride along beside, making sure he’s OK. We ride on quiet neighborhood streets and the Santa Rosa Creek Path; all the while he smiles delightedly. My mind drifts back to being pregnant and riding everywhere, right up to two days before he was born. I hoped then, as I pedaled, that he was learning to love the gentle swaying as my body moved in rhythm with the bicycle. Now, as he rides out of the womb for the first time, I am so pleased that he enjoys it, watching the world gently drift by. This definitely marks a rite of passage for him, as he will be spending a lot of time on the bicycle. It is a gift I wish to give him, this love of fresh air, muscle power and going at a speed which allows us to soak in all of the sights, sounds and smells around us. I yell up to my husband, “He loves it!” and we grin at each other gleefully, so happy that his first bike ride is a good one. I have not been on the bike much lately myself, and my whole body is singing as we pedal together as a family for the first time. I begin to daydream about all the bicycle trips we will take, my mind racing with possibilities. Even rides to the store and rides around town will seem like grand adventures with my son in tow. I look over at him as he sits there contentedly, and I tell him, “Welcome to the beautiful world, little one. This is how we live.” Sarah Hadler works for the Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition as the Safe Routes to School Program manager in Sebastopol. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Letting the Stats Be Known

Thanks for the incredibly detailed analysis of a very complex problem (“The Big O,” Feb. 1). It appears that if the powers that be were as intent on uncovering facts as is Mr. Edmonds, the citizens of Santa Rosa would be far better served.

JIM TULIP Pacific Grove

Going Rogue I was glad to see the Open Mic in the current Bohemian (“The Police Log,” Feb. 1). I really think the attention of the public needs to be called to the increasing tendency of law enforcement agencies everywhere to “go rogue,” and literally take the law and its interpretation into their own hands. I find it very disturbing, for instance, to see example after example of people who can’t remotely be considered dangerous handcuffed as a matter of course prior to arrest. All this is a bad sign in what was once a conspicuously democratic country. Keep blowing the whistle, and thanks.

ROLAND JACOPETTI Santa Rosa

Houses, Not Buses As a transit advocate, I read “Waiting for the Bus” by Rachel Dovey (The Paper, Feb. 1) with great interest. I feel compassion for Ms. Byrne’s predicament, but she has misdiagnosed its source. Hard as it may be to hear, her problem is not the lack of public transportation in remote rural Marin. Such locations will never be served by public transportation, because it simply is not feasible. Her need for public transit can only be met in more populated areas.

While Marin could certainly use a lot more transit, meeting Ms. Byrne’s needs will require something else: truly affordable housing and adequate income for people with disabilities.

DAVID SCHONBRUNN San Rafael

Giving Care The labor laws exploit caregivers (“Maid in America,” Dec. 21). Believe it or not, in Sonoma County, in 2012, I worked three days per week at my agency’s client’s home—three 24-hour sleepover shifts—and by law was only getting paid for 13 hours of it per day, with no overtime after eight hours and no double time after 12 hours. This, even though you can’t leave at any time, even to go for a 10 minute walk during those 24-hour shifts, to stretch your legs and (slightly) maintain your cardio health. If the client likes to stay up late, you get less than eight hours sleep (but more than the five hours required by law for caregivers). How are we supposed to give good care to the elderly when we’re dragging around on five hours of sleep, and work 72 hours per week but are only paid for 39 hours of it, at $10–$11 an hour, with no overtime for our long days? In reality, that works out to around $6 an hour. All caregiving agencies can do this because it is allowed under state and federal law. The entire time you’re at the employer’s, you can’t check email, call a friend, go out to dinner with your partner, go to the gym or a movie or have any involvement with your partner at all. But you’re not getting paid for that time after 12 or 13 hours. It’s treating the caregiver like a mule or a slave. This article says these laws date back to Southern lawmakers making these laws, and Obama said this is a vestige of slavery. But it isn’t so much a vestige specifically of black slavery, as it is the slavery of women. After all, caregiving work is an extension

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

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of what women have always been expected to do, for many hundreds of years or more: take care of kids, the elderly or disabled at no pay, because the woman was her husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s property. This has got to change, beginning with hired caregivers. Please support the strongest domestic workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; labor laws possible.

NAME WITHHELD BY REQUEST Sonoma County

Dept. of Article V Last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s letter by Abraham Entin erroneously attributed incomplete facts about the constitutional amendement process to SSU professor David McCuan. In fact, the omission was ours.

THE ED.

Rooting for a 34-State Convention

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1 State court rules Prop. 8

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Paper THE

HOW DUMB ARE YOU? Talking to girls reduces most men’s cognitive acumen to the level of Lloyd from ‘Dumb and Dumberer.’

Hi There, Uh . . . Duh How interacting with women makes men stupid BY SCOTT BARRY KAUFMAN ‘Some people think having large breasts makes a woman stupid. Actually, it’s quite the opposite: a woman having large breasts makes men stupid.’ —Rita Rudner

I

remember a time I was chatting with a woman in whom I was very interested. My heart was racing, I was sweating profusely and the

room was spinning uncontrollably. Suddenly, a group of friends came over and asked me to introduce them to the girl I was talking to. With all eyes on me, I remember turning to look at my best friends in the entire world and realizing, much to my horror and embarrassment, that I couldn’t remember any of their names.

I have discussed this phenomenon with my male and female friends, who report similar experiences. Why do I suddenly turn into a completely different person, unable to think clearly? And more importantly, why does this only happen when I talk to females? A press article in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology may finally shed some light on these questions.

Johan C. Karremans and colleagues at Radboud University Nijmegen, in the Netherlands, tested the prediction that mixedsex interactions temporarily cause a decline in cognitive functioning. In two studies, they had participants interact with a stranger of either the same or opposite sex and complete a cognitive task both before and after the interaction. In their first study, 40 male participants tended to perform worse on a cognitive task following the interaction with a woman compared to the samesex interaction. Interestingly, this effect held independent of whether the participants were romantically involved or single. Also, this effect was even stronger when the male participant reported higher attraction to the woman. In other words, talking to women made men stupid. In their second study, the researchers had 53 male and 58 female college participants interact with each other, instead of using a confederate for the interactions as in the first study. The men likewise displayed a decline in performance on a different, very cognitively demanding task, requiring both task-switching and inhibition— but not the women. Also, just as in the first study, this effect held independent of whether the participant was currently in a relationship. Additionally, men, but not women, reported higher levels of impression management in mixed-sex interactions relative to same-sex interactions. Altogether, these results suggest that there may indeed be something special about mixedsex interactions that impair cognitive functioning. But what’s driving these effects? The authors suggest that it may be due to self-presentational concerns when interacting with someone of the opposite sex compared to the same sex. As for why effect was most pronounced in men, the researchers cite

9

Home Bound In mid-February, a 68-year-old wheelchairbound woman, along with her disabled daughter, will be evicted from their Petaluma home, says Tim Nonn, a member of Occupy Petaluma. Their story is one of many, as 3 million American homeowners face foreclosure in 2012. “She’s spent her whole life in the healthcare industry helping people,” says Nonn, who attends church with the woman and her daughter, and who is choosing to respect her privacy by not giving her name. “She didn’t come forward in time, just like I didn’t come forward, because you feel ashamed.” Nonn lost his home in 2010 after his job was outsourced and his wife’s store closed. The experience drove him into activism in foreclosure prevention. The North Bay’s foreclosureprevention effort is gaining support from surprising allies, including Greg Morgan, president of Wells Fargo’s North Coast Valley region. Morgan told the San Francisco Chronicle that he has a “constructive, respectful” relationship with Occupy Petaluma. In December, the Petaluma City Council passed a temporary moratorium on foreclosures for the holiday season. Nonn says that with recent lawsuits filed by New York attorney general Eric Schneiderman against Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase and Wells Fargo for wrongful and illegal foreclosures, the movement is swiftly growing. For now, Occupy Petaluma will hold a series of public weekly vigils beginning on Feb. 19. Nonn explains a key purpose is to “take the shame and blame out of the process.” Weekly vigils for people facing foreclosure and evictions begin on Sun., Feb. 19, at Walnut Park. D Street and Petaluma Boulevard, Petaluma. 2–3pm. 707.364.3795..—Leilani Clark

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research that suggests that “compared to women, men are more likely to consider mixed-sex interactions in terms of a mating game.” Indeed, research cited in their paper shows that men are more likely than women to gauge sexual interest, overestimate that sexual interest and activate mating goals when interacting with women. The researchers do offer some alternative explanations for their findings: traditional sex roles emphasizing a man’s role to take the initiative in mixedsex interactions, for example, could cause men to exert more resources to act in accord with these expectancies. Another possible explanation is that more cognitive control may be required based on limited experience in interacting with people of the opposite sex. Are there practical implications of these findings? The researchers think so. A perennial debate concerns the merits and disadvantages of single-sex vs. coed schools. According to the researchers, it is possible that cognitive abilities may decline in mixed-sex settings, since “part of boys’ valuable cognitive resources may be spent on impressing their female class members.” The researchers also see implications for sexual harassment, which is usually seen as the result of men’s biased perception of sexual interest of the female. Their results raise the intriguing suggestion that sexual harassment may also be partly caused by the cognitively depleted effects of a mixed-sex interaction. Indeed, cognitive depletion may cause individuals to distort reality and fail to take in all the cues necessary to accurately gauge sexual interest. Whatever the causes of the effect, the practical implications or the future directions, add this note to self: next time you chat with a desired romantic partner, don’t plan on doing much afterwards that involves your brain.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 8-14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

10

Green Zone

Natural Riches

Slowing, storing and sinking stormwater BY JULIANE POIRIER

S

ixties folk icon Donovan lyrically observed that you can’t catch the wind. But you can catch rain, and if you harvest it, you are doing a job Mother Nature can’t do alone anymore.

Earth’s oldest reliable aquifers— those underground cavities that fill with rain over time—include stores of water that once fell as rain tens of thousands of years ago. They are among our water supplies being siphoned far too aggressively to be recharged naturally to meet human demands. Satellites measuring global groundwater supplies have identified, according to a Jan. 14 Science News report, six regions of greatest loss around the world—and the short list includes California. Most of the draining is attributed to agriculture, and the water-loss hotspot of the state is in the farming belt of the Central Valley. But here in the North Bay, groundwater is also receding and water rights excite powerfully contentious debate.

To take a positive and active role in sustaining and controlling local groundwater resources, a rainwater capture strategy can be a powerful tool. It not only helps preserve water and reduce water bills, but helps prevent flooding and erosion damage, which affects creek beds and riverside embankments and increases fishchoking silt. Not everybody’s living situation allows them to harvest and store rainwater, but those who can and do are getting formal recognition, in particular from the Sonoma Valley Groundwater Management (SVGM) basin advisory panel, a group of public and private stakeholders who voluntarily, and well ahead of pending legislation, devised a groundwater management plan for the Sonoma Valley watershed. They recently gave Sonoma resident Cathy O’Neill an award for “extraordinary levels of water conservation” for the 610-gallon rainwater capture system she built as part of her firstin-the-U.S. certified passive retrofit (a house so well insulated that it takes almost zero energy to heat and cool). To encourage other efforts, the SVGM has created a how-to brochure titled “Slow It. Store It. Sink It: A Homeowner’s and Landowner’s Guide to Beneficial Stormwater Management.” Krishna Kumar of the Valley of the Moon Water District says the brochure emerged from the SVGM planning process, which was successful “because we did not shed one drop of blood or water.” Kumar stressed that water is always a scarce commodity. “We don’t rely on snow melt from the Sierras,” he said. “But we sometimes forget that we live in a very arid region and every drop counts. That is the honest truth. If a few landowners are willing and able to harvest rainwater, that is great. Others can do other water conservation efforts. Collectively, we are all saving precious water resources.” For more, see www.sscrcd.org.

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

Informational Seminar Wednesday, February 15 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. Keynote Speaker:

Richard C. Koman, Esq. Solo Practitioner Empire Class of 2008 Since 1973, Empire College School of Law has prepared more than 800 graduates for careers as attorneys. Alumni now comprise approximately 25% of the Sonoma County Bar and include members of the judiciary in Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino, Lassen and Merced Counties.

Call today to reserve your seat!

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SOOO-EEEE! Tony Najiola on his Petaluma farm, with his pigs. ‘I’ve just fallen in love with them,’ he says.

Pigs in Petaluma Central Market chef Tony Najiola realizes a lifelong dream: farming BY STETT HOLBROOK

T

he farm-to-table movement has given way to the chef-as-farmer. It’s not enough to serve local and seasonal produce these days—for an increasing number of chefs, growing it is just as important as cooking it.

The kitchen garden, or potager, is a well-established tradition

in Europe, but it’s a relatively new phenomenon in the United States. Chefs Dan Barber of New York City’s Blue Hill Restaurant and David Kinch of Manresa in Los Gatos are probably the most well known chefs with farms. St. Helena’s Restaurant at Meadowwood and Yountville’s French Laundry both source produce from their own gardens now as well. It sounds so idyllic: a chef trots down to the farm with a basket in hand to pluck and

snip dewy produce for the night’s menu. But the reality can be much different. Just ask chef Tony Najiola. Najiola is chef and owner of Central Market, an eclectic, Mediterranean-meets-the-world restaurant in downtown Petaluma. The shaggy-haired, 50-year-old chef always wanted a small farm of his own; his great grandfather was a Sicilian immigrant who had a farm in New Orleans where he grew up, and visiting the farm

had a lasting effect on him. Also, as a chef, the prospect of his own source of produce was enticing. And another thing. He really wanted to raise pigs. Najiola’s career has taken him from New Orleans and New York City to San Francisco and, now, Sonoma County. After working as a chef at Ravenswood Winery, he set out on his own with the backing of Ravenswood founder Joel Peterson and opened Central Market. That was eight years ago, and finally, last year, Najiola fulfilled his dream. He bought a threeacre farm just two miles from the restaurant, something that makes the Petaluma area special, he says. He named it Muleheart Farms, because “you had better have the heart of mule to own a restaurant and a farm.” He lives on the property, a beautiful patch of land with a weathered redwood barn, a flock of chickens, vegetable rows and his beloved pigs, Gloucestershire Old Spots, mixed with a little Duroc. “I knew I always wanted to raise pigs, but I didn’t know how much I’d enjoy it,” he says. “I’ve just fallen in love with them.” Plans are in the works to add stone fruit trees, build cooking facilities in the barn and to host outdoor dining events. But the farm doesn’t supply all the restaurant’s needs—far from it. Najiola says it’s impossible to compete with big agriculture in price and availability. Right now, wild nettle, various winter greens and squash are featured on his menu. (The hand-cut linguini with clams, green beans and nettle pesto is a winner.) But even with help via early-rising interns from Green String Farm across town, the economy of scale just isn’t there. He still has to purchase additional produce from wholesalers. “I knew it was going to be a losing proposition when we started,” he says. “We’re competing with big ag, and you’re done even before you get started.” What’s more, he notes, ) 14 running a restaurant

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Sara Sanger

Dining

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Tony Najiola ( 13

AFTER

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is very different than running a farm. They work on different cycles. When a chef needs 100 pounds of potatoes, he needs it now. A small farm doesn’t work that way, and Najiola says the experience has been deeply humbling, but rewarding, too. The best part is the pigs, he says, kneeling down and scratching a lounging sow behind the ear. His affection for the swine doesn’t inhibit him from eating them; the first time he sent his pigs off to slaughter, he felt like “a kid on Christmas morning.” Raising pigs, it turns out, provides the greatest economic return for any part of the farm. Buying a whole animal on the wholesale market would be costprohibitive, and anyway, he says, his pigs taste better. Because he raises less than a dozen pigs at a time, they’re not always available in the restaurant. When they are, diners come running. Regular customers sign up to receive email notification when the pork comes in, and when people hear the meat was raised on his farm a stone’s throw away, they can’t resist. “They love it,” Najiola says. “Any time you say it’s from the farm, it sells. Immediately.” He believes the pork has a different quality than anything available on the market, adding his firm belief that “you feel better after you eat meat like that.” Najiola uses every part of the animal, and also intercepts food and paper waste generated by his restaurant and turns it into compost, something that he feels good about. “Restaurants are incredibly wasteful,” he says. “If nothing else, the farm gives us a place to put that waste.” But in spite of the challenges, Najiola sees his farm as more than a green-waste recycler. “It’s kind of circle for me,” he says, citing the example of his great grandfather. “As a chef, this is what I always wanted.” Central Market, 42 Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma. 707.778.9900.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Bear Republic Brewing Co Brewpub. $-$$. Award-winning ales and pub fare. Hearty portions and friendly service. Casual dining, outside patio. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.2337.

Dempseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alehouse Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

French Garden French. $$$-$$$$. The French Garden serves classic French and California cuisine focusing on seasonal and sustainable foods, much of it grown on its own farm; also, a casual bar with small plates. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

JhanThong BanBua Thai. $-$$. Sophisticated and delicate Thai cuisine. Fresh ingredients, packed with flavor. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8048.

Larry Vitoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s BBQ Smokehouse Barbecue. $-$$. Southern-style and slow-cooked from a chef whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worked with Wolfgang Puck and Alice Waters. Zing! 6811 Laguna Park Way, Sebastopol. 707.575.3277.

Starkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steakhouse Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ever have. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Other than steakâ&#x20AC;? menu changes seasonally. Happy hour Mon-Fri, 3 to 6. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Thai Taste Restaurant Thai. $-$$. Lovely ambiance

and daily specials showcase authentic Thai flavors. A hidden gem in Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Montecito neighborhood. Lunch and dinner daily. 170 Farmers Lane #8, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3888.

Tres Hombres Mexican. $-$$. Excellent food in Petalumaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick.Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Wolf House Californian.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Finneganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Nickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cove Seafood/

$$$-$$$$. Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sun; brunch, SatSun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401.

contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Yao-Kiku Japanese.

Poggio Italian. $$-$$$.

$$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Portelli Rossi Italian. $$.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and

Robata Grill & Sushi

flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic dĂŠcor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Chez Pierre French-

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Italian-American. $$. A former Dennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turned Parisian bistro, with surprisingly competent cozy French favorites like escargot and chicken Cordon Bleu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7330 Redwood Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4233.

Tasty and affordable fare in a cozy setting. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner, Tues-Sun. 868 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.892.6100. Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch )

16

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and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500.

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

s 3–4 COUR SE PRI X F I XE MENU s

A LA C ARTE AT BAR s

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6540 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037. Brassica Mediterranean.

now available on draft at Ol Oliver’s iver’s Marke Market et hand crafted in small batches with organic/fair trade ingr ingredients redients

$$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Compadres Rio Grille The Healthier Choice

Grass-Fed Beef Burgers Premium Humboldt County Beef OPBEEFEIPSNPOFTtOPBOUJCJPUJDT WFHFUBSJBOEJFUtMFTTGBU MPXFS DIPMFTUFSPMBOEGFXFSDBMPSJFT

deliciously refreshing kombucha

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707.526.4878 www.brodysburgers.com

sustainably created, brewed, fermented, bottled in Sonoma County

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Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

facebook.com/revive facebook.com/revivedrinks edrinks

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

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Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

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707-829-8889 In Downtown Sebastopol

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow

SMALL BITES

Good vs. Evil Eric Ripert and Anthony Bourdain, in a show billed as Good vs. Evil, are coming to Santa Rosa’s Wells Fargo Center on Feb. 10. The mini-tour features Bourdain, the American chef of French descent turned writer and TV host, and Ripert, the French-born chef on his way to becoming a TV personality, in a night of bon mots, ripostes and bonhomie. The profane Bourdain, bestselling author and host of The Layover, will play the role of evil, while the courtly Ripert, chef at New York’s celebrated Le Bernardin and occasional host of Top Chef, will represent for good. “I try to resist [the dark side] and I try to bring him to the light side,” Eric Ripert tells me in a recent phone interview. The “good vs. evil” bit is, of course, an act. The two have become good friends since Bourdain first interviewed Ripert for his former show No Reservations. Ripert also reportedly introduced Bourdain to his wife. “The relationship is personal,” says Ripert. “We have a lot of fun together.” After the back-and-forth, the two will discuss sustainability in food service, the restaurant business, the media and other meaty issues before taking questions from the audience. No word on where the two plan to eat, but when Ripert was here last he said he had a “very good meal” at Cyrus in Healdsburg. Keep your eyes peeled at restaurants around town before the show on Friday, Feb. 10, at the Wells Fargo Center. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. 8pm. $35–$65. 707.546.3600.—Stett Holbrook

Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the

pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1 260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Bella Vineyards (WC) Specializing in Zinfandel, Bella Vineyards farms three vineyards in Sonoma County: Big River Ranch in Alexander Valley, and the Lily Hill Estate and Belle Canyon in Dry Creek Valley. 9711 W. Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 866.572.3552.

Clos du Bois With picnicking area, friendly staff and knickknacks galore, Clos Du Bois is a reliable treasure. 19410 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 800.222.3189.

Dutcher Crossing Winery Barnlike room offers fireplace to warm the mitts on winter days; owner Debra Mathy leads monthly bike rides in better weather. Try the Maple Vineyard Zinfandel; ask the well-informed staff about the Penny Farthing bicycle. 8533 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 866.431.2711.

Iron Horse Despite the rustic tasting room, Iron Horse produces sparkling wine and Pinots for the elite. A brilliant view for winetasting. 209786 Ross Station Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10am–3:30pm. 707.887.1507. Marimar Estate A great stop for locals on a Sunday drive. And the Pinot is fantastic. 11400 Graton Road, Sebastopol Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.823.4365. Martin Ray Focus is on mountain Cab. And continuing the old tradition, folks can pick up a gallon of hearty Round Barn Red for $13. 2191 Laguna Road, Santa Rosa. Summer hours, daily, 11am–5pm. 707.823.2404.

Meeker Vineyard You might expect Meeker to be more slicked-out, what with its big-time Hollywood origins (co-owner Charlie

Meeker is a former movie executive). But that’s clearly not the case. 21035 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open Monday–Saturday, 10:30am– 6pm; Sunday, noon–5pm. 707.431.2148.

Ty Caton VineyardsMuscardini Cellars Ty Caton is both a hands-in-thedirt winegrower, who planted much of the vineyard himself, and savvy entrepreneur. Michael Muscardini is a neighbor who comes from the building trade and focuses on Italian varietals. 8910 Sonoma Hwy. (in the Kenwood Village Plaza), Kenwood. Open daily, 10am– 6pm. 707.833.0526.

N A PA CO U N T Y August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Beringer Vineyards (WC) This historic winery offers some seven daily tours for nominal fees, most of which end gratefully with a glass and a spin through the underground wine-aging tunnels. Open daily, 10am– 6pm (summer hours). 2000 Main St., Napa. 707.963.7115.

Folie à Deux A good picnic or party wine, the Ménage à Trois–white, red and rosé–are tasty blends. 3070 N. St. Helena Hwy, St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 1.800.473.4454.

Freemark Abbey In 1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley. Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am-5pm. 800.963.9698.

Monticello Vineyards Thomas Jefferson had no success growing wine grapes;

happily, the Corley family has made a go of it. Although winetasting is not conducted in the handsome reproduction building itself, there’s a shaded picnic area adjacent. 4242 Big Ranch Rd., Napa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. $15. 707.253.2802, ext. 18.

Peju Province Vineyards Talented staff, terrific food pairings and fantastic Cab. 8466 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–6pm. 707.963.3600.

Chocolate Oblivion Mousse Cake Red Velvet Sweetheart Cakes for Two

The Bay View Restaurant at The Inn at the Tides

Valentine Princess Cake

Tuesday, February 14, 2012 Served 5pm–10pm

Chocolate dipped Strawberries Assorted Valentine Cookies and Cupcakes

FIRST COURSE Dungeness Crab, Mango and Avocado Tower citrus-herb oil

Chilled Prawn Cocktail avocado, diced tomato, aurora sauce

Phifer Pavitt Wines Lots of cowgirl sass but just one wine: “Date Night” Cabernet Sauvignon. Hale bale seating. 4660 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4787.

Raymond Vineyards Burgundy scion Jean-Charles Boisset has put his stamp on staid Napa producer. See the Theater of Nature, depicting biodynamics; feel the Corridor of the Senses; luxuriate in the members-only Red Room, party in the gold-plated JCB Room; or just taste good Cab in the club-like Crystal Cellar. 849 Zinfandel Lane, St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 4pm. Fees vary. 707.963.3141.

Somerston Wine Co. Ambitious ranch and winery inclues utility-vehicle “buggy” rides by appointment. The cheese shop and grocery opens in April. All that and wine, too. 6488 Washington St., Yountville. Tasting room open noon-8pm Monday–Thursday; to 9pm, Friday–Saturday; to 10pm, summer. Tastings $15– $40. Ranch tours by appointment, $50. 707.944.8200.

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Happy Valentine’s Day

Blue Point Oysters on the Half Shell champagne mignonette 7225 HEALDSBURG AVE SEBASTOPOL • 707-829-8101

Sonoma Goat Cheese Tart roasted eggplant, artichokes, forest mushrooms, tomato confit, micro greens

1445 TOWN & COUNTRY DR SANTA ROSA • 707-527-7654

garlic croutons, Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

1353 LINCOLN AVENUE CALISTOGA • 707-942-1443

brandy, lobster garnish

Traditional Caesar Salad Lobster Bisque MAIN COURSE Papardelle with Duck Ragù Paupiettes of Petrale Sole

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8–5pm Now Open for Lunch on Saturdays 11am–3pm

stuffed with crab and salmon mousse, chive-butter sauce lemon-scented risotto, string beans

Chicken Parmigiana breaded breast of chicken, tomato sauce, mozzarella cheese, angel hair pasta

Grilled Veal Chop brandied wild mushrooms, garlic-scented rapini, garlic-mashed potatoes

Grilled Filet of Beef

LES SALADES

béarnaise sauce, garlic mashed potatoes, string beans

Orchard Harvest Quinoa & Roasted Carrot Garden Nicoise Poached Chicken Salad Duck Confit

DESSERT Chocolate Lava Cake blackberry sauce

Amaretti & Orange Cheesecake berry medley

Strawberries Romanoff in Almond Tuille vanilla ice cream, Grand Marnier JXW9XU+qAXj5X_Z\h`EX_XTfX

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reservations: 707.875.2751 or email: reservations@innatthetides.com

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800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 8–14, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Wineries

or your weetheart

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 8 –14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

Is Love Random? Absolutely, according to bestselling author Dr. Leonard Mlodinow BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

H

ow did you meet your lover? Your spouse? Your date from last Friday night? Was it love at first sight, a predetermined order or something out of your control entirely? Questions like this may keep obsessive compulsives up at night, but the true answer can be boiled down to randomness. At least according to Dr. Leonard Mlodinow. “One of the most profound effects of randomness is how it affects who we meet,” says Mlodinow, who appears at the Santa Rosa Junior College on Feb. 9. “Sometimes we tend to assume there is a cause for everything—not that there isn’t a cause for everything, but the cause can be unrelated to the event.” His book The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives is not about the stumble between downtown watering holes, as one might think, but about how our lives are affected by chance and random occurrences. These factors may play a more prominent role than we realize, he argues. Sometimes the strongest relationships begin by chance. You lingered longer than normal for that second cup of coffee or took the elevator on a whim instead of the stairs, and in the process met someone special. If more people accepted randomness as playing a large part of shaping our lives, Mlodinow asserts, it could affect their outlook on life. “You would judge people differently,” he says. “You wouldn’t judge people on results. You’d have to look deeper.” Results, he says, are simply potential plus randomness. Even dating sites can be influenced by randomness. A certain phrase or word can contain the potential to attract someone or turn someone off, no matter how high-tech the filtering program. “There are different degrees of

Trek: The Next Generation and MacGyver. After crafting primetime scenarios for Richard Dean Anderson to escape from using only some lighter flint, a ketchup bottle and some duct tape, how did he wind up writing two books with the esteemed Dr. Hawking? It’s sort of a random story. Hawking happened to come across one of Mlodinow’s books, that’s all. Soon he got in contact with his agent, suggesting they work together. Though Mlodinow’s work doesn’t focus specifically on relationships, it can be easily and directly applied to romantic endeavors. In mathematics, optimal stopping theory— also known as the marriage problem—solves the question of diminishing returns. In dating, it’s not always easy to ask a previous lover to take you back, so the problem is finding the most suitable match without having to wait too long. When should you stop looking? (There is an actual solution for this, believe it or not, and singles who understand calculus might want to Google “optimal stopping theory parabola.”) It is a giant world, and Mlodinow recognizes that not everyone has found his or her soul mate—yet. For those looking for love, he says understanding and accepting randomness can lift one’s spirits. “You shouldn’t despair,” he says, “there’s somebody for everybody out there. “Thomas Watson said, ‘If you want to succeed, double your failure rate,’” laughs Mlodinow. “To me, it’s a hopeful message. It’s comforting to know that if you just keep trying you’ll succeed.” Leonard Mlodinow speaks on randomness on Thursday, Feb. 9, in the Newman Auditorium at Santa Rosa Junior College. 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. 7pm. Free. 707.527.4372. And who knows? The woman who steals your parking spot may just become your partner for life—or maybe you’ll never see her again.

La musique de Paris

Special Valentine’s Day Dinner & a Show Tuesday, Feb 14

Reservations Advised 415.662.2219 On the Town Square, Nicasio, California www.ranchonicasio.com

The Core Project : Sebastopol International Design Competition

30+entrants awardsreception februaryeleven

Saturday, February 11, 6:00-9:00PM Come view and vote on over 30 submissions for vitalizing Sebastopol’s downtown core. RS Basso Building,176 North Main St. Ground floor, formerly Copperfields used books Admission is free ; open to the public www.the-core-project.org

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 8–14, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

happiness with different people,” Mlodinow says. “The question is, do you find the right one for your life or not? There’s no real triedand-true way of discovering that person—you happen to bump into them or not.” He breaks down the concept scientifically: “You’re an atom, and they’re an atom, and do you actually combine to form a molecule?” A physicist at Cal Tech, Mlodinow has authored several books, including two with Stephen Hawking and one, last year, with Deepak Chopra. It is his opinion that we as misjudge the world around us and don’t take into account that some things simply happen. Throughout the world, there are varying opinions on just how much randomness affects us. “Some cultures think everything is controlled—fate, everything is predetermined,” says Mlodinow. Conversely, some believe everything happens by luck. His personal belief? “I believe it’s something in between.” Some ancient cultures believed they held the fate of their romantic lives in their own hands. Balinese men believed that feeding a woman a certain kind of leaf with the image of a well-endowed god would make the woman fall in love. The Aztec chief Montezuma drank 50 cups of chocolate one day before visiting his harem of 600 women. And in one version of the myth, the Greek god of love, Eros, supposedly arose out of chaos to represent sexual desire. The adorable cherubic version we know today with the bow and arrow is the Roman incarnation Cupid, who often accompanies Aphrodite, the goddess of love. Science and popular culture have different opinions on love, too. Studies suggest most people will fall in love about seven times before marriage, while the fairy-tale notion of love at first sight is rampant in books, films and pop songs. In addition to several books, Mlodinow has written for television, including Star

Bring your Sweetheart for a Romantic Evening with

Do You Remember the First Time?

Trevor Alixopulos

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 8 –14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20 Sex &Valentine’s ( 19

Wherein we ill-advisedly reveal our losing-our-virginity stories BY BOHEMIAN STAFF AND CONTRIBUTORS

I

t’s something that everyone remembers. Losing one’s virginity may not be the most important rite of passage in life, but it’s undoubtedly the most ingrained with importance. “Losing it” is something almost everyone’s been through— for some, it was great; for many more, it was awkward, ungraceful, even traumatic.

For this Sex & Valentine’s issue, we present to you, the reader, a collection of stories about our first time. All stories are by the same Bohemian staff and regular contributors who create this paper every week, and no, we’re not telling whose story is whose. But hopefully, by reading about the perils and road-bumps in our stories, you’ll be able to look back at whatever fumbling and bumbling constituted your own experience, realize you’re not alone and with any luck, laugh. Without further ado, then, on with the doin’ it.

Rocky Horror I was, in comparison to many my age, a late bloomer. When my virginity finally shuffled off its long-delayed coil, I was 21, having legally voted and consumed alcohol before getting it on with an actual girl. Not that I hadn’t had opportunities. I had my own apartment, I had a new

temperature-controlled waterbed, I’d even had a couple of girlfriends, but a combined fear of both the unknown and of eternal damnation (too much Sunday School) always kept me from stepping across the line. In fact, just a few weeks before meeting the young lady who would claim my virtue, I’d narrowly escaped seduction at the hands of an older woman named Kitten. Seriously. That summer, I was working at the Renaissance Faire in Southern California, hawking cookie cutters for a trio of elderly craftswomen. (They’d also employed Kitten—her Faire name—a thirty-something one-time porn actress who set her sights on me the moment she heard my Faire name: Rat.) One day, while standing on the cookie-cutter counter extolling the glories of hand-made cookiecutting devices, I locked eyes with a young lady out in the listening crowd. She had long reddish hair, was dressed in a hand-made outfit, wore purple ribbons in her hair—and seemed very interested in cookie cutters. One of her friends shouted out that she’d be the first to buy a cookie cutter if I promised to kiss her. It was a joke, but afterward she came up, leaned forward and asked what she’d get if she bought a half-dozen. What she got was my phone number. Two nights later, she called me up. We went on a few movie dates, and a couple weeks later, while killing time before a midnight screening of The Rocky Horror

Picture Show (still four hours away), she took off all her clothes and climbed under the covers. I took the hint. Damnation be damned. It was my first time—and her first time . . . in a waterbed. We did it three times that night and still made the midnight screening.

Ballin’-Ass Rims “So do you want to?” asked the older 17-year-old boyfriend of mine. It all seemed perfect. We were dating for about three months—in high school time, that’s about a year—he was my first real boyfriend and he was so in love with me. Well, that’s what he said. There I was, on a casual summer evening in June at my boyfriend’s house. His parents had just gone to bed, so we wasted no time in taking advantage of our alone time. We were making out before his mom and dad could even say “Good night.” Yes, I am ashamed to admit it was here, on a couch

in the living room, when he asked me. The TV was on for background noise in case anyone suspected anything. I don’t remember what was on, but I remember I was looking back and forth from his face to the TV while I pondered my answer. I think it was about motorcycles or Xtreme sports or something mildly intriguing. “I really want to,” he insisted. At that point, he didn’t have to tell me, I could already feel it. “Ummm . . .” I said, not really sure what to say. “Maybe?” I was 15. I had just gotten my driving permit, and he let me drive his truck sometimes. It was a really cool truck, too—black exterior with some ballin’-ass rims, 22s, or something that meant something cool. And it was

21

The VW Bus

All That Worry Teenage sex is bad for you. It can lead to unwanted pregnancy, STDs, moral decline and emotional wreckage. But it was sure great for me. I was 15. My girlfriend was 14. So young, I know. It was summer. I remember her tan skin and the smell of suntan lotion after swimming in my pool. Our affection for each other was great, but until then things hadn’t gone too far. “Do you want to?” I asked during a post-swim make-out session. In the past, she had said she wanted to wait. Of course that didn’t stop me from asking again. This time, on a languid August afternoon, she just looked at me with burrowing, fervent eyes and nodded her head once. I confess that the first time was less than momentous for me, but it got better. We stayed together for two more years, but weren’t always careful. I remember many panicked nights worrying about what we’d do if she got pregnant. Thankfully for both of us that never happened. We’re still friends. Years later, after we had each gone on our separate ways and gotten married, she told me she was adopting a child because she was unable to get pregnant. She was infertile and probably always had been. All that worry for nothing!

started making out. And then “it” happened, and that was that. After a viciously awkward breakfast at a Greek food hut, the German dropped me off in front of my house, reminding me that our “interlude” the evening before didn’t mean that he was my boyfriend now. Gotta love those European boys.

Sehr Romantisch He was half-German, half-Italian, a head shorter than me and cute as a little brown puppy. Honestly, my memory is spotty, though I do know that my friends and I swooned over him and liked to say his German name over and over with an exaggeratedly pronounced accent. I do know that he taught beginning Italian classes at the local Catholic university. Maybe he was a grad student? Maybe he’d come from Hamburg? I do remember that he had a jean jacket that he wore often, that his hair was slightly feathered and brown, and he was tan in a European way, not in a Golden-Glow-tanning-salon kind of way. A mutual friend threw a Sun Ra party that night. The house was draped in red, disguised to look like an Egyptian spaceship. A Joyful Noise and clips from other Sun Ra films played on televisions in every room, including the kitchen. We quoted

from his movies—“It’s another place in the universe, under different stars!”—and listened to The Heliocentric Worlds of Sun Ra while getting tipsy on cheap alcohol. Who knew “Space Is the Place” could conjure up such feelings of romance, such an urge to descend from Mt. Maidenhead once and for all? I drank many beers. I’m not ashamed. In a fit of youthful, drunken impulse, the German and I walked the five miles back to my house through the warm city night. We walked slowly, talking about World War II and communism and the Worker’s Revolution and probably David Bowie, and somehow it got us all worked up enough to only make it as far as the house that he shared with an eccentric and brainy mutual friend. I seem to remember that we sat on milk crates in the living room, zealously discussing war and history, until we just dropped the pretense and

Maybe it was the Cuervo Gold. Maybe it was the fine Columbian. Maybe it was because it was a full week after my 15th birthday. Maybe it was because it was Halloween, when all kinds of wild weird and wonderful things can happen. Maybe it was the costume. “Amazon Queen,” I called it, consisting of two small triangles of leopard-skin fabric tied in a knot to form a halter top and short-short frayed brown corduroy cutoffs, no underwear. Brown flip-flops and a tangled vine crown completed the outfit. Or maybe it was the cozy atmosphere of his olive-green VW bus, outfitted with a pull-out bed and black-out curtains. We met when I was 13 and he was 18, the friend of my older brother. We had attended the same church and school for years. We started going out together the next year, despite the misgivings of my timid mother. Statutory rape never entered our minds. Birth control never entered the conversation, nor did STDs, whatever those were. AIDS wasn’t around yet. At 14, I knew it all and wondered what was taking him so long. After all, my best friend had lost it the previous year to a guy we met while walking home from Venice Beach. He offered us some homemade rye bread, and she offered him her virginity. I decided to wait until it was someone I loved. We never made it to my brother’s Halloween party, though we did get as far the street outside his apartment building. The act itself? Meh. Making out was nice, the pain and mess afterward not so much. I faked a few gasps, then we both fell asleep. We broke up five years ) 22

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Trevor Alixopulos

a stick, which made me feel even more badass. “Come on,” he cooed. At this point I don’t think I cared if we did or not, I just wanted to stop being asked about it. He was persistent, though. “OK yeah, but I’m scared. Your parents are right there,” I said finally. “It’s OK, don’t worry about that,” he said confidently. I wonder if he even heard what I had just said. And so, after a hop, skip and a jump, it was over. Party because I said to stop and possibly party because, well, he might have been done. I never asked. I’m pretty sure I went home that night wondering when he was going to let me drive his truck again.

8ZLUO

later, after moving away for college and living together. I did love him, and although he lives in Hawaii now, I still do.

Anatomy Lesson I’d had enough. I felt like Sylvia Plath, my virginity a lead weight that I couldn’t wait to shed. After all, by junior year of high school, it seemed like everyone else had. The jocks with their chin pubes and swagger. My best friend Amelia. Even the most pious girls—the ones who crossed themselves when a siren wailed— even they’d gotten rid of it. I knew, because like good Catholics, they demurely skipped communion at school mass. Since the high school boys mostly thought I was weird—was it my dyed black hair with the orange stripe? the smell of Camel Lights on my fingertips?—it only seemed fitting that it should be someone older, more sophisticated. He was 22, had done a year of college somewhere in Florida and played “Wish You Were Here” on guitar. We sat on his bed, a black light lending an eerie glow to his white jeans. The way he held my gaze reminded me of how a priest fixes you with his sober expression just as he hands over the communion wafer. I was reaching for a cigarette, unsure of what else to do with my hands, when he guided them to his nipples. Now I was really confused. It occurred to me that being a virgin wasn’t that bad after all. I did my best to paw at him the way I imagined I was supposed to, but then he said, “Kiss me here,” pointing to just below his Adam’s apple. This was even weirder. Next up were his ankles. I found myself praying for a natural disaster, but hurricane season was months away. By the time it was all over, my head swimming with male anatomy, he excused himself to the shower. I spied a Cosmopolitan magazine poking out from under the bed and started flipping through it, my fingers happily grasping something familiar. And then I nearly dropped my

cigarette. The headline read “How to Touch Your Man,” and promised to reveal his six pleasure points. His nipples. The front of his neck. The dip under his ankle. He emerged dripping from the bathroom just as I got to the perineum. I exhaled a thick cloud of smoke and vowed to spend some time with my dictionary as soon as I got home.

Go Outside She lived in Utah. Not a Mormon, mind you, but not a skeez, either. The first time we made out, I remember, she made sure to turn out the lights, light a few candles and dial her bedside radio to the love-jam station. Everything was proper, in its right place. A couple years later, we were woefully less prepared. Not “less prepared” in the matters of the body. We’d done just about everything we could do without doing the actual doing of it. But “less prepared” in an altogether different sense. The “doing it outside in public on the side of the road with no condom” sense, if you will. The “wish we could have washed off the dirt and twigs and scent before having dinner with parents right afterward” sense. The “it will be awkward in three weeks when she is crying in the snow and blubbering that ‘I can’t believe you’re leaving me for a girl named Boof’” sense. See? Very unprepared. Being separated by two states was tough, and after two years of making it work, the autumn wind began robbing us of our young, wild, carefree first love. It only made sense to finally roll through the big rite of passage together. We walked up the road, found a semi-secluded spot roadside, made ourselves an ersatz bed in the bramble and . . . It was fervent, passionate, wonderful, ridiculous and short. When we were done, we looked up and standing around us, watching all along, was a group of very beautiful and confused deer. Read more stories we didn’t have room to print online at www.bohemian.com.

Valentine’s Day Wines

O

n the untenable premise that all things pink and/or bubbly would be a welcome treat on everybody’s favorite and/or despised February holiday, here’s a small sample of eye-catching, pink and/or bubbly wines. Of course, you can’t go wrong with a good red wine—unlike, say, flowers and chocolates. Who knew? Yeah, it hurts when you go wrong with flowers and chocolates. Wines were not blind tasted; they were drunk alone, in the dark with the shades drawn.

From a sparkling house with an austere rep, the deep pink 2006 Iron Horse Brut Rosé ($50) has unexpectedly fruity, full cranberry and cherry flavors, a tart squeeze of lime and a lasting, delicious and dry finish. Recommended, especially with cheesecake. J Vineyards Brut Rosé NV ($32) gets points for presentation: that simple swoop over salmon-egg pink. Clean aromas of ocean breeze, a hint of yeast; light guava fruit flavor over assertive bubbles. Try making crab cakes—a project made for two—to pair with this salty sparkler. The Sofia 2010 Blanc de Blancs, Monterey County ($19) looks rosy in its pink cellophane gift-wrapping. But it’s straw-yellow, with sweet, Muscat-like and Riesling-like honeysuckle aromas. First impressions are often correct: Francis Ford Coppola Winery says the blend has dashes of Muscat and Riesling, with the balance in Pinot Blanc. Very foamy, with sweet flavors of apple crisp, white raisin, offset by bitter herb. Save this über-girly bubble-potion for a baby shower populated with sweet-toothed aunties. Nothing says “be mine” like wine in a can. Although the Sofia minis ($20 per four-pack, 187 ml cans) contain the same wine as the Blanc de Blancs, the cans tasted comparatively innocuous (although not put to a side-by-side comparison—alas, packaged in a shiny, metallic-red, hexagonal box, the little cans are just irresistible). With “bubbles” die-cut in the box for easy toting, and one short pink straw thoughtfully attached to each can, the handy Sofia says, “I’d love a hike-and-picnic date.” Gallons of ink have been spilled, billions of bytes squandered defending “dry rosé” against its treacly past, and now here comes a little problem called Sofia 2010 Rosé, Monterey County ($19). The sassy, curvy bottle promises unabashed sweetness, but dishes out dusty Pixy Stix aromas, and flavors of sour cherry, unripe pear. A nice enough, dry and tart sipper for warmer weather, perhaps, but for our purposes here, something of a tease. J Vineyards & Winery features treats from Miette Pastry Shop on Saturday, Feb 11 (noon–4pm; 11447 Old Redwood Hwy., Healdsburg; 888.594.6326). Iron Horse Vineyards pairs chocolates with their Wedding Cuvée on Sunday, Feb. 12 (11am–1pm; 9786 Ross Station Road, Sebastopol; 707.887.1507). And Francis Ford Coppola Winery offers complimentary Sofia tastings on the big day, Feb. 14 (300 Via Archimedes, Geyserville; 707.857.1400). —James Knight

Elizabeth Seward

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22 Sex &Valentine’s ( 21

CULTURE

GRAZING ON THE BEACH Hugh Masekela brings his African-roots jazz to the Napa Valley Opera House Feb. 12. See Concerts, p29.

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Crush The weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events: a selective guide

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ArtsIdeas Leilani Clark

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EARLY MEN Hamlet Mateoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s imaginary country, Mongo, is home to natives, colonialists and humanoids.

Hammering Home Hamlet Mateo explores colonialism at Hammerfriar Galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anniversary Show BY LEILANI CLARK

O

ne shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect calm stilllifes or landscapes in Hamlet Mateoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest work at Healdsburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hammerfriar Gallery, which opens a seventh-anniversary exhibit on Feb. 11 running

through April 7. InďŹ&#x201A;uenced by bawdy 17th-century English broadsheets, the multimedia artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work steers toward the tumultuous, provocative and even sinister. In the living room of his

Graton home, holding his teacup Chihuahua, Doris, in one hand, Mateo ďŹ&#x201A;ips through the pen-andink drawings that make up his new series, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Early Man.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I became obsessed with drawing these little ďŹ gures that were holding a little document in their handsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it was very elaborate,

almost royal-looking,â&#x20AC;? says Mateo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d bring the document to all of these places, where there were natives that they thought were culturally and spiritually inferior. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d tell the natives, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We are in charge now.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? The series tells the story of colonialism, opening with depictions of stiff militaryjacketed colonialists standing before a ďŹ&#x201A;owered background. The drawings grow progressively wild, morphing into orgies of animals, naked â&#x20AC;&#x153;natives,â&#x20AC;? writhing colonialists and shadowy humanoids whispering nefariously into the ears of Mateoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s half-men, half-ape creatures. Mateo, 38, says he was driven to create the pieces after becoming immersed in studies of cavemen and early human culture. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have an imaginary country called Mongo,â&#x20AC;? he explains. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I started to think, here are these people coming in their big boats, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re taking over certain parts of Mongo. What are they thinking? How can they more or less justify the type of erasure that will take place once they get there?â&#x20AC;? Originally from the Dominican Republic, Mateo and his family immigrated to the Bronx in 1987. He swiftly experienced harassment, racism and homophobia, he saysâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not just from other kids, but from his own family membersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which informs his work to this day. In addition to pen-and-ink drawings, Mateo creates zines, live performance pieces, conceptual installations and short ďŹ lms, and remains interested in subverting narratives and creating environments that challenge what is and what isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t real. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I create a narrative thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s completely untrustworthy,â&#x20AC;? Mateo says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I create these types of environments where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not

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JJTCO!:89.2.:42113.85.6 TCO!:89.2.:42113.85.6 The anniversary exhibition also features â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wood Grains,â&#x20AC;? a series of paintings by Mary Jarvis, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Narrative of Elements,â&#x20AC;? sculpture by Luke Damiani. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My vision deals with time, space, humanity, philosophy,â&#x20AC;? says Plamann on the phone from her gallery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a horribly strong passion for educating people in Sonoma County about art.â&#x20AC;? Plamann wears a visionary zeal for conceptual art. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purchased several pieces by Mateo, and speaks enthusiastically about bringing him into the â&#x20AC;&#x153;museum arena,â&#x20AC;? to places like SFMOMA. And looking ahead, Plamannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy is boundless. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re moving fast here,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m on the outlook for good, conceptual artists around the North Bay. I have so much space. I need to ďŹ ll and I want to grow.â&#x20AC;? The Seventh Anniversary Exhibition opens with a reception featuring live painting by Mary Jarvis on Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Hammerfriar Gallery. 132 Mill St., Ste. 101, Healdsburg. Reception, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm; exhibit runs through April 7. 707.473.9600.

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Gallery

ever really sure if the text is a joke or if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s real.â&#x20AC;? Mateo credits Hammerfriar founder Jill Plamann for consistently being open to work that is more provocative than her contemporaries. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Often, my experience is that there are drawings and types of art that I want to do,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and that I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been able to do in other places because they were too strange.â&#x20AC;?

Stage

The Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s W rldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wo Most

Beloved Belo ve ed MUSICAL L

Eric Chazankin

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

Book & Lyrics by TOM JONES Music by HARVEY SCHMIDT Directed by MATTHEW TEAGUE MILLER Music Direction by LUCAS SHERMAN

KEEPING BUSY Dana Scott and

Alan Kaplan in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Proof.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Proofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of Life Actors relish intimacy in black-box drama

February 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 19

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

Photo: Adria Swan, Gabriel Stephens

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his play is partly about madness and the effect that madness has on a family,â&#x20AC;? observes actor Alan Kaplan of David Auburnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tonyand Pulitzer-winning play Proof, opening this weekend in the Studio at Sixth Street Playhouse.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also about work,â&#x20AC;? continues Kaplan, who portrays unstable mathematical genius Robert, a legend whose mental illness has sent shockwaves that still reverberate through the choices and fears of his two adult daughters, Claire and Catherine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This guy keeps busy,â&#x20AC;? Kaplan observes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;he encourages his daughter to keep busy, to ďŹ ght off those feelings of madness and craziness.â&#x20AC;? Out in the studio, where the impressive set is being constructed, a noisy quartet of drills, hammers, voices and sound-

cue tests has sent Proofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own quartet of actors into this tiny dressing room. Joining Kaplan are Dana Scott (Catherine), Jill Zimmerman (Claire) and Mark Bradbury (Hal, one of Robertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former math students). With the sounds of carpentry underscoring the conversation, the cast attempts to explain what, exactly, Proofâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; part family drama, part love story, part mysteryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is all about. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about family dynamics and the roles that we play in our families,â&#x20AC;? offers Zimmerman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have one role with our parents and maybe a different role with our siblings. Those roles are our identities, and sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very hard to break out of those identities.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;For me, the title of the play has a lot to do with what this work is about,â&#x20AC;? adds Scott, raising her voice to be heard above an electric drill just outside. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The title is indicative of so much more than just a mathematical proof. This is a story of how we show our love, how we prove our love to others.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The word â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;proofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; has a lot of different meanings,â&#x20AC;? Bradbury chimes in, â&#x20AC;&#x153;so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great title for the play. This play is about trust. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about vulnerability, about being willing to share what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve created, to share yourself, to share your love with someone else.â&#x20AC;? Directed by David Lear, this production takes full advantage of the close quarters inside the studio, and the cast is clearly energized by the opportunity to perform so intimate a play in so cozy an environment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love working in the studio theater,â&#x20AC;? says Bradbury. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an intimacy here thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very special.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;David has described this space as being very â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cinematic,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? adds Zimmerman, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good way of putting it.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can take each scene really deep,â&#x20AC;? agrees Scott. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We can take every moment right down to the bones.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Proofâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, Feb. 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;26, at Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sunday and on Feb. 25. $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.523.4185.

Film

27

wo ie ni ti amo

konoronhkwa

s’agapo Bahibik

Je t’aime

Doostat d aram

miluji te

Just say... I Love You, BOOKISH Oscar favorite ‘Morris Lessmore’ pulls liberally from Buster Keaton.

Short Shorts This year’s quickies

BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

F

or your Oscar betting pool on animated short subjects, note that the big nominations this year went to backward-looking films (Hugo, The Artist, et al.). Thus Moonbat Studios, creators of The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore, should be clearing some mantle space. Not that I want to jinx this Shreveport-made nonesuch, with its nods to Buster Keaton. In it, the straw-hatted hero is transported to a land of living books that fly like birds, with a fantasy appeal on par with the Burgess Meredith Twilight Zone about the man who finally found time to read.

With the exception of Pixar’s fatally cute La Luna, the competition is first-rate. Two Canadian cartoons remind us that the National Film Board used to make some of the finest animation in the world. Dimanche observes a little boy of the early 1960s, being bored halfway to death on a provincial Sunday. He’s diverted by the oversized trains that rattle his town, which looks spindly and angular, like a Paul Klee drawing. Fortunately, he has a pal in the form of a bear— taxidermied, but still alive. The film is wordless save for the semihuman sounds of aged relatives nattering through their family visit, and the rasps of their snores in church pews and overstuffed chairs. The remarkable Wild Life has Egoyan-worthy indirect storytelling and matching swirling paint graphics that recall the work of that giant among Canadian animators Caroline Leaf. Set in 1910, it’s about what they used to call a “remittance man,” a British expatriate with inherited money and little sense. He is bewitched by the Alberta prairie, where the foolish don’t survive. If the Oscar were mine to give, it’d go straight to A Morning Stroll, though it’s probably too ghastly for the Borgnine-aged voters on the Academy. A glimpse of 200 years in the life of a phenomenal urban chicken, the short film is funny, stylish and imaginative. And, yes, it has zombies. The 2012 Oscar Nominated Short Films screen at the Rafael Film Center (1118 Fourth St., San Rafael; 415.454.1222) and Summerfield Cinemas (551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa; 707.522.0719).

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2 /10 – 2/16 2/10 2 /16 The T he 2012 2012 Oscar Osc ar Nominated No minated S Short hor t Films Films ((Animated) Animated) NNRR (1 (11:00, 1: 00 , 3:00) 3 : 00 ) 7:00 7: 00 SSunday unda y 2/12 2 /12 Only: Onl y : (11:00) (11: 00 ) 7:00 7: 00 WWednesday ednesda y 2/15 2 /15 Only: Onl y : (3:00) ( 3 : 00 ) 7:00 7: 00

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28

SHORTSHD PRESENTS

THE OSCAR® NOMINATED SHORT FILMS 2O12 84TH ANNUAL ACADEMY AWARD® NOMINEES

TWO SEPARATE PROGRAMS:

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM NOMINEES PENTECOST Ireland RAJU Germany/India THE SHORE Northern Ireland TIME FREAK USA TUBA ATLANTIC Norway

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SUNDAY/DIMANCHE Canada A MORNING STROLL UK WILD LIFE Canada THE FANTASTIC FLYING BOOKS OF MR. MORRIS LESSMORE USA PIXAR’S LA LUNA USA

PLUS ADDITIONAL ANIMATED SHORTS!

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SUMMERFIELD CINEMAS Santa Rosa (707) 522-0330

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Film

Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG; 94 min.) The sequel to 2008’s Journey to the Center of the Earth stars Dwayne Johnson, Luis Guzman and Michael Caine (?). (GB)

Norwegian Wood (NR; 133 min.) Adaptation of the novel by Haruki Murakami follows a young man in the late ’60s and his attachment to two women. In Japanese with English subtitles. At the Rafael Film Center. (GB)

Safe House (R; 117 min.) When a CIA safe house is attacked by Cape Town rebels, the paper-pushing agent must step up to transport the secured criminal to an even safer house. With Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds. (GB)

The Vow (PG-13; 104 min.) A young husband (Channing Tatum) tries to rekindle the affection of his wife (Rachel McAdams) after she wakes from a coma with no memory of her life with him. (GB)

ALSO PLAYING Albert Nobbs (R; 117 min.) Glenn Close stars in the adaptation of George Moore’s 1927 story about a woman living life disguised as a man. (GB)

The Artist (PG-13; 100 min.) French romance and homage to silent film, The Artist stars Jean Dujardin (OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies) as a silent-film star in love with an aspiring actress during the rise of the talkies. In black-and-white with French subtitles. (GB) Being Flynn (R; 102 min.) Robert De Niro stars as an estranged father and self-proclaimed great wirter who reaches out to his son after his eccentricities leave him penniless. Costars Julianne Moore and Paul Dano. At the Rafael Feb. 14 at 7pm with director Paul Weitz. (GB)

Big Miracle (PG; 123 min.) Drew Barrymore and John Krasinski co-star in the adaptation of Tom Rose’s book Freeing the Whales, about a 1988 international effort to rescue gray whales trapped under ice near Alaska. (GB)

Chronicle (PG-13; 83 min.) Three teens develop superhuman abilities after stumbling on a mysterious substance in a crater. (GB)

Contraband (R; 110 min.) Familiar story about a retired criminal dragged back into the game stars Mark Wahlberg as an expert smuggler who agrees to do one last job to settle his brother-in-laws debts. Co-stars Kate Beckinsale. (GB) The Descendents (R; 94 min.) Matt King (George Clooney) is forced to reconnect with his kids after his wife suffers a boating accident in Hawaii. With Jody Greer, Matthew Lillard and Beau Bridges. (GB)

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (PG-13; 129 min.) A 10-year-old boy journeys across New York City in search of a lock box belonging to his father, who died in the 9-11 attacks. Based on the novel by Jonathan Safran Foer and starring Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock. (GB)

Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (R; 158 min.) David Fincher directs the English-language version of the hit 2009 Swedish film, based on the first in Stieg Larsson’s “Millennium series.” Co-stars Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara, as Lisbeth. (GB)

The Grey (R; 117 min.) Liam Neeson plays Ottway, an Arctic legend busted down to wolf shooter on an Alaska oil-drilling rig. The flight home doesn’t make it through a storm, and he and his cohorts are picked off by a pack of wolves—large, computer-animated, almost human in their malice. One believes Neeson’s ability to growl down anything from a moose to a Mountie, but The Grey is overamped with CGI-aided ordeals. It has crepe hair on its chest, as the editor Max Perkins said of Hemingway, and it’s ultimately an adventure sliced too thick for anyone but Sarah Palin. (RvB)

Haywire (R; 93 min.) A freelance operative is doublecrossed after a mission rescuing a hostaged Chinese journalist in the latest from Steven Soderbergh. (GB)

Hugo (PG; 127 min.) Hugo, a young boy sent to live with his uncle who maintains the clocks at a railway station, searches for the missing part, the key to the heart, of the automaton his clockmaker father had found before his death. Directed by Martin Scorsese in an adaptation of Brian Selznick’s novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret. (GB)

The Iron Lady (PG-13; 115 min.)

Meryl Streep plays Margaret Thatcher in biopic co-starring Jim Broadbent, Nick Dunning and Richard Grant. From the director of Mamma Mia! (GB)

Man on a Ledge (PG-13; 102 min.) An ex-cop—the man on the ledge—makes a bold and dangerous move in an attempt to prove he was framed for stealing from a ruined businessman. (GB) My Week with Marilyn (R; 106 min.) An assistant on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl in 1956 recounts his week spent with the bombshell while her husband Arthur Miller is out of town. Stars Michelle Williams as Marilyn. (GB)

One for the Money (PG-13; 91 min.) Stars Katherine Heigl in the adaptation of Janet Evanovich’s 1994 novel about a young out-of-work woman who turns to bounty hunting to pay the bills. (GB)

Oscar Nominated Short Films This year’s live-action and animated shorts with an Oscar nod screen at the Rafael Center and Summerfield Cinemas. See review, p27.

Pina (PG; 106 min.) Wim Wenders’ glorious cinematic festschrift for German choreographer Pina Bausch, who passed away in 2009. The dancers deliver their memories of Bausch straight to the camera, and we can see why they fell in love, despite what Bausch demanded from them. However rarefied it seems in descriptions, Bausch’s art was all about hard work and ordinary pain. (RvB)

Red Tails (PG-13; 125 min.) Producer George Lucas brings the story of the Tuskegee Airmen to the big screen. With Cuba Gooding Jr. and Terrence Howard. (GB)

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R; 127 min.) Big-screen version based on John le Carré’s 1974 novel stars Gary Oldman as George Smiley, British intelligence officer searching for a double agent in the organization’s top levels. With Colin Firth too! (GB) The Woman in Black (R; 95 min.) Daniel Radcliffe plays a widowed lawyer processing a will in an eerie village where the sight of a spectre foretells the death of another child. From recently reborn Hammer Film Productions! (GB)

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Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Alexander String Quartet Sponsored by Sonoma Classical Music Society, quartet performs works by Haydn, Beethoven and Schubert. Feb 12, 3pm. $10-$25. Vintage House, 264 First St E, Sonoma.

Boris Adrianov & Alex Kobrin

featuring Highway Poets’ CD release, Easy Leaves, Sally Haggard and others. Feb 11, 6:30pm. $10. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.7300.

James Hunnicutt Alt-countryish star brings the m’f’ing ruckus with Bobby Joe Ebola and the Children MacNuggits, Soda Gardocki and Graham Lindsey. Feb 12, 8pm. $5. Doc Holliday’s Saloon, 138 Calistoga Road, Santa Rosa, 707.537.0308.

Sponsored by Redwood Arts Council, two masters perform Beethoven, Britten, Schumann, Sollima and Shostakovich. Feb 11, 8pm. $10-$25. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental, 707.874.9392.

Marianne Aya Omac with Joan Baez

Concert for Dominic

Santa Rosa Symphony’s Valentine’s weekend program features Darby Hinshaw. Feb 11, 2 and 8pm, Feb 12, 3pm and Feb 13, 8pm. $15-$65. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

Show celebrates life and music of Dominic Agius, featuring Girls In Suede, Mystery Invention, Dan Coxon, Pet Sounds and others. Feb 11, 8pm. Free with RSVP. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma, 707.762.3565.

McKenna Faith Seventeen-year-old singersongwriter performs after Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real. Feb 10, 8:30pm. $10$12. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.2343.

Folk, gypsy and flamenco musician performs with recent collaborator Baez and her son Gabriel Harris. Feb 9, 8pm. $25. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.765.2121.

Mozart Horn Concerto

Kevin Seconds Frontman for 7 Seconds showcases singer-songwriter chops. Feb 9, 8pm. $5. Christy’s on the Square, 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa, 707.528.8565.

Highway Poets

Sonora Santanera & Los Mismos

Special North Bay Hooenanny

Revival of the ‘50s Mexican

ta2izzy@yahoo.com contact: Izzy 530.340.0517

2777 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa www.flamingoresort.com 707.545.8530

Valentine’s Cabaret

Tickets: $20 per day or $35 for weekend

Jazz-infused celebration features Bonnie Brooks, John Simon and others. Feb 12, 4pm. $25-$45. Occidental Center for the Arts, Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental, 707.874.9392.

MARIN COUNTY English Beat Birmingham ska revivalists play decades-old classics. Feb 11, 8:30pm. $25-$29. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Idle Warship Hip hop great Talib Kweli and oft-featured singer Res craft animalistic, euphemism-filled hits that make Spinal Tap’s “Trouser Armadillos” seem like cuddly plush toys. Feb 10, 10pm. $25-$35. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax, 415.459.1091.

Tao: The Art of the Drum Taiko drummers showcase centuries-old Japanese tradition presented with modern flair. Feb 10, 8pm. $20$40. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, 415.499.6800.

NAPA COUNTY Los Lonely Boys

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MATCH MADE IN BROOKLYN Talib Kweli and Res, performing as Idle Warship, play Feb. 10 at 19 Broadway. See Concerts, above.

1162 62 Kentucky Kentuck y St St Petaluma Pet aluuma 707-762-1210 707-762-1210

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Showtime 9pm, 2 full sets Tickets at generaladmissionentertainment.com $15 adv / $20 at the door Tickets available at the door 16135 Main Street, Guerneville

707.869.8022

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 8–14, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

band Tropical Santanera. Feb 11, 8:30pm. $30-$40. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.2343.

Music ( 29

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

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French Music Jam

$5/DOORS $ 5/ D O OR S 1 10PM/21+ 0PM /21+

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Wed Feb 8, 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm Folk Music from Central France Thurs Feb 9, 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm Bottleneck Blues & Slide Guitar

Tony Gagarin Fri Feb 10, PMsComedy Night $ 5 cover, 2 drink minimum

Mike Olson, Juan Carlos 3AT&EB PMsFolk & Funk

NORTH N O R TH B BAY AY H HOOTENANNY O OT E N AN N Y P PRESENTS R ESE NT S

The Ruminators

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WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT BILL B ILL DECARLI DECARLI PRESENTS PR E S E N T S A ANYTHING NY THING GOES GO E S

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT

Teresa Tudury Mon Feb 13, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 Dine with the Authors

Literary Salon 4UE&EB sUnplugged Love

Accordian Babes &INE"EERS7INESs$ 4 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

707-544-2491 www.gaiasgardenonline.com

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Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Feb 11, Home Brew. 189 H St, Petaluma, 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Feb 9, In Atria. Feb 10, Makuru and Eyezon with A People Like Us Band. Feb 11, Blend and Love Stinks. Tues and Wed, open mic. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental, 707.874.9037.

Feb 9, Kevin Seconds, Box Office Poison, Restless Sons. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa, 707.528.8565.

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Jazz and classic rock group features musicians who have played with Sting, Leonard Cohen, Ella Fitzgerald and others. Feb 10, 7pm. $40$60. Juddâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hill Winery, 2332 Silverado Trail, Napa, 707.255.2332.

Christyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the Square

BURLESQUE/CABARET/VARIETY BUR LESQUE/ CABARET/ VARIET Y

$$44 JJAMESON'S A M E SO N ' S & O ORGANIC R G AN I C G GUAYAKI UAYAKI CO COCKTAILS CKTAILS

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Sketchy Black Dog

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new self-produced LP. Feb 10, 8pm. $45-$55. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa, 707.259.0123.

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dining House

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S A BEAUTIFUL DAY PLUS THE PULSATORS

4(5s0-$//23s!$6$/3s REGGAE

ALBOROISE & THE SHENGEN CLAN PLUS DJ JACQUES (WBLK)

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Doc Hollidayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Saloon Feb 10, Johnny Tsunami. Feb 12, Bobby Joe Ebola, James Hunnicutt and more. Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 138 Calistoga Road, Santa Rosa, 707.537.0308.

Flamingo Lounge Feb 10-11, Crossfire. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.8530.

Gaiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Feb 8, French jam. Feb 9, Tony Gagarin. Feb 11, Ruminators. Feb 12, Teresa Tudury. Feb 14, Accordion Babes. Tues, Jim Adams. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Sonoma Feb 10, Jeff Campbell. Feb 11, Roem Baur. 691 Broadway, Sonoma, 707.935.9100.

Young Homie Chris Rene plays Petaluma If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t jumped on the X Factor bandwagon, then you probably missed the buzz surrounding the TV singing competitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s breakout star Chris Rene, a native Santa Cruz trash collector with a captivating story of drug and alcohol addiction, now nine months into recovery. As last seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third-place winner, Rene charmed fans and judges with his original song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Homie,â&#x20AC;? a soulful melody laid over modest, homespun beats thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grabbed nearly 2 million YouTube views. The song epitomizes an effort to conquer personal vices and strive for a meaningful, long life. Recently signed to Sony, Reneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music ties into the ever-expanding movement to spread positive messages through hip-hop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This concert is a positive event for area youth, communicating a message of love and hopeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and to provide an outlet for the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;almost famousâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Chris Rene to speak directly to a young audience about his recovery, maintaining a drug-free life, and loving life,â&#x20AC;? says Gabriel McDowell, event producer and drummer for the Activ808 Band. Finding a life path through music rings true as 30 percent of ticket sales go to the Phoenix Theater teen center. Other performers include the Activ808 crew, Mac Jar and Monikape, Ghambit and Sincere plus special guests when Chris Rene performs on Friday, Feb. 10, at the Phoenix Theater. 201 E. Washington St., Petaluma. 8pm. $20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 707.762.3565. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jacquelynne OcaĂąa

Hopmonk Tavern Feb 9, Juke Joint with J Pod the Beat Chief. Feb 10, California Honeydrops. Feb 13, Lloyd Brown. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, open mic

night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Fri and Sat, Jazz in the Lobby.

Feb 10, Rob Fisher & Matt Clark. Feb 11, Michael Coleman with Hamar Atwal and Kim Cass. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg, 707.431.2800.

Finneganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marin

Wed, Brainstorm. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.2062.

Feb 11, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s Night with Liquid Television. 877 Grant Ave, Novato, 415.225.7495.

Last Day Saloon

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

Feb 10, Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real plus McKenna Faith. Feb 11, Sonora Santanera and Los Mismos. Wed, 7pm, North Bay Hootenannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pick-Me-Up Revue. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.2343.

Feb 10, Pop Fiction. Feb 11, About Face with Bass Culture. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.226.0262.

Main Street Station Feb 9, Susan Sutton. Feb 10, Bruce Halbohm. Feb 11, Susan Sutton. Feb 12, Tony Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Anna. Feb 15, Willie Perez. 16280 Main St, Guerneville, 707.869.0501.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub Feb 10, Tonewoods. Feb 11, Larry Carlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mostly Simply Bluegrass Night. Feb 12, Sean Carscadden and Marty Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly. 464 First St E, Sonoma, 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

19 Broadway Club Feb 8, C & C Rock and Soul Revue. Feb 10, Talib Kweli and Res Idle Warship. Feb 11, Melodians. Feb 12, Buddy Owen. Feb 14, Jeb Brady Band. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Tues, 9pm, Uzilevsky Korty Duo with special guests. 19 Broadway, Fairfax, 415.459.1091.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Feb 8, Elaine Romanelli. Feb 10, Honeydust. Feb 11, Cup Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Joe. Feb 12, Sexy Sunday. Feb 14, Henry Moser Group. Feb 15, Halstead. 29 Broadway, Fairfax, 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Feb 9, Marianne Aya Omac feat Joan Baez. Feb 11, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s A Beautiful Day, Pulsators. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.765.2121.

Feb 10, Stefanie Keys. Feb 11, Annie Sampson. Feb 12, Mike Lipskin and Dinah Lee. Feb 14, Baguette Quartette. Town Square, Nicasio, 415.662.2219.

Phoenix Theater

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Feb 10, Chris Rene, Activ808, DJ Myke 1, Ghambit â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sincere, Mac Jar â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Monikape and Infamous Band. Feb 11, Concert for Dominic with Olâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Dom Musical Revue, Girls In Suede, Mystery Invention, Dan Coxon and Pet Sounds. 201 Washington St, Petaluma, 707.762.3565.

Feb 10, Blind Willies. Feb 11,

Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Tradewinds Feb 10, Purple Haze. Feb 11, Bobby Young Project. Feb 12, Motogruv. Feb 15, Feral Moon. Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati, 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Feb 9, Kai Eckhardt Zeitgeist. Feb 11, English Beat. Feb 12, Maria Muldaur and her Jazz Quintet. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Dance Palace Feb 12, Sofija Nedic. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station, 415.663.1075.

Dead Hat Cat. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas, 415.868.1311.

31

TAP ROOM

NAPA COUNTY Calistoga Inn Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, old-school DJ night. Sat, DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga, 707.942.4101.

& Beer Sanctuary

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Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Juddâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hill Winery

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Feb 10, Sketchy Black Dog. 2332 Silverado Trail, Napa, 707.255.2332.

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Fri, Sat, 10pm, DJ dancing. Sun, salsa Sundays. 806 Fourth St, Napa, 707.252.4471.

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Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feb 11, Aleza Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Agostino. Feb 14, Maria Muldaur. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa, 707.251.5833.

Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3!

Feb 10, Los Lonely Boys. 1350 Third St, Napa, 707.259.0123.

1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

White Barn Feb 10, Le Jazz Hot. 2727 Sulphur Springs Ave, St Helena, 707.251.8715.

Lana Del Rey The internetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new favorite argument continues to justify her existence in free in-store. Feb 9 at Amoeba SF.

Don Carlos From the Jamaica to Black Uhuru and beyond, reggae sensation survives. Feb 9 at the Independent.

Estelle â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Boyâ&#x20AC;? hitmaker polishes off a dance-oriented brand of R&B. Feb 10 at the New Parish.

Social Distortion

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Come see us!

Uptown Theatre

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

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Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

VALENTINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DAY WEEKEND AT

RANCHO NICASIO

â&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľ 10 STEFANIE KEYS

Fri

Feb Sat

Feb 11 Sun

Feb 12 Tue

Feb 14

Americana/Rock/Janis Joplin Tribute 8:30pm Our Sweetheart and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blues Broadâ&#x20AC;?

ANNIE SAMPSON

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Blues 8:30pm

T HE BAGUETTE QUARTETTE

â&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľ

THE STRING RAYS Feb 17 Original Americana, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;n Soul

Bill Cosby

Sat

Pioneering standup and television comedian needs little introduction, dives right into the jokes. Feb 11 at the Paramount Theater.

Sun

Feb 18

8:00pm / No Cover Rancho Debut!

DANNY CLICK & THE HELL YEAH! The Bohemianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Marin Band 2011 8:30pm

JOHN LEE SANDERS Feb 19 Phenomenal Musician/Singer Mon

Feb 20 Sat

Feb 25

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Wed, Feb 8 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Feb 9 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7am; 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Dance Club Fri, Feb 10 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

MIKE LIPSKIN & DINAH LEE

Special Valentine Songs 4:00pm / No Cover Bring your Sweetheart for a Romantic Evening with Fabulous Food & Drinks and featuring A Special Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Menu 7:00pm

Fri

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Reservations Advised

DIN N E R & A SHOW â&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľ

Mike Ness & Co. celebrating over 30 years of fury and frustration from Fullerton. Feb 11-12 at the Fox Theater.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

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4:00pm / No Cover The California Bluegrass Assoc. Presents

THE FOGHORN STRING BAND

Old Time Mardi Gras Night 7:00pm

PETTY THEFT

The Ultimate Tom Petty Tribute 8:30pm

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am: 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise VALENTINE PARTY Nightclub Two-Step lesson & Ballroom, Latin & Swing Dance hosted by California Ballroom

Sat, Feb 11 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9am; 9:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:15am Jazzercise 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:30pm Scottish Challenge Dance with Gary Thomas Sun, Feb 12 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:30am 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3:30pm 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm

8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise Zumba Gold with Toning Vintage Dance DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10

Mon, Feb 13 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Feb 14 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm African and World Music Dance

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;14, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Upcoming Events

Music

Ryan Jay

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 8 –14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

32

Eric Bibb

Friday, February 17, 8:00 pm

Soulful and Gospel infused Folk-Blues…

Tim O’Brien

Sunday, Feb. 26th, 7:30 pm Folk, Bluegrass, Irish, Scottish – A veritable smorgasbord

Also Coming Soon

Girlyman – March 16 Dervish – March 24

Tickets/Info: www.seb.org s   1511

Check out our

Gorgeous Spring Colors

117 West Napa St, Ste B, Sonoma 707.933.8422 | Mon-Sat 11-7 | Sun 12-6

www.sonomaconsignment.com

Award Winning Dog Training ~ Dog Boarding Doggie Day Care 707.542.2066 2404 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa

www.olivetkennel.com

FORGET ME NOT Dominic Agius, performing in 2008 at the Phoenix Theater.

Little Brother

Dominic Agius’ life honored in film, concert and album BY LEILANI CLARK

F

or friends and family, the true scope of 23year-old Dominic Agius’ prodigious musical talent didn’t come to light until after his death last year on Valentine’s Day. “I had no idea the volumes of his music,” says Jim Agius, who’s spent the last year discovering just how productive his little brother was. “He devoted himself so fully to his music.” The results of Jim’s discoveries are collected, in part, in his loving documentary Dominic Agius: Life Inside the Kaleidoscope, which premieres on Friday, Feb. 11. The following night at the Phoenix Theater, where Jim is a booker, “Concert for Dominic” presents Dominic’s songs performed by friends and former band mates from all eras of his musical career, including his time in bands like Mute Vernacular, Girls in Suede, Pet Sounds and Mystery Invention. Robert McLean, a close friend

of Dominic’s who recorded Mystery Invention in 2010, has mixed that album for release. In addition, he’s recorded and mixed an album of cover songs culled from the young musician’s vast catalogue. Copies of both will be handed out to attendees of this weekend’s show. “We wanted to have a concert where we’d play for him and record new versions of his songs,” says McLean. I pitched the idea to Jim, and with him backing the whole project, the ambition increased.” It wasn’t difficult to find material; McLean recalls his astonishment at the trove of songs—142 tracks, to be exact—on Dominic’s SoundCloud account. He was prolific in a way that surpassed many of his peers, McLean says, a creative output tempered by modesty— and one that didn’t seem to be interrupted by the rollercoaster of recovery and addiction. “That’s why it kind of slapped people in the face when he died,”

says McLean. “He didn’t shove his music in people’s faces. He let people discover them when they did. He played and recorded to get better at it, and it shows in the album. In the performances, you can hear, literally, the passion and love coming through.” Jim, who’s been making short films since 2003, says Life Inside the Kaleidoscope has been a cathartic way of dealing with his brother’s death: “I never looked at this as providing myself with therapy, but I’ve definitely experienced emotions and thought about things in ways that I would never have experienced.” The idea for the film came after Jim heard from people in Southern California, where Dominic spent the last few months of his life in a soberliving environment. Struck by a desire to connect those in Sonoma County that had long loved his brother with this newer set of friends, Jim set out for Newport Beach, along with McClean and two other friends. As they interviewed more people, the film gained power and scope. “His devotion to music and his really valiant attempt at fighting the addiction—those two things define him,” says Jim. “But you walk away not looking at him as a drug addict. “I view the weekend as a onetwo punch,” explains Jim. “The documentary is going to be very sad, and there’s no way around it. There are some laughs and praises, but the bottom line is that it’s a sad story. That leads you right into the next night. And that night’s going to be very much a celebration. The point of it is for people to know what Dominic did while he was here.” ‘Life Inside the Kaleidoscope’ premieres Friday, Feb. 10, at the Roxy Theater (85 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa; 11:30pm; free; 707.522.0330). The Concert for Dominic takes place on Saturday, Feb. 11, at the Phoenix Theater (201 E. Washington St., Petaluma; 8pm; free; 707.762.3565).

Galleries OPENINGS Feb 9

At 6pm. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blue,â&#x20AC;? a juried exhibition of work in a variety of media; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quintet,â&#x20AC;? ceramics by Denis Hazlewood. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Feb 10

At 5pm. Gallery Bergelli, survey of paintings by John McNamara. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454. At 7pm; also, Feb 11 at 5pm. Towers Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seasons,â&#x20AC;? including works by Nancy Burres, Jim Van Deren and many others. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

Feb 11 From noon to 6pm. ArtHouse Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artrageous,â&#x20AC;? new work by Ken Berman and Cat Kaufman. 13758 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.3513. At 5pm. Rohnert Park Community Center, oil paintings by Dee Fay and pastel landscapes by Tim Brody. 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.584.7357.

Feb 12

At 4pm. San Geronimo Valley Community Center, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Executive Order 9066,â&#x20AC;? teenage watercolors of Kasumi Gus Nakagawa, whose Japanese-American family was sent to an internment camp in Poston, Ariz. Also, group show by students of Marty Meadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College of Marin class. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

SONOMA COUNTY ARThouse Gallery Through Feb, new work by Ken Berman and Cat Kaufman. Reception, Feb 11, noon-6 . 13758 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.3513.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Feb 29, February member show featuring Patricia Akay, Roberta Alexander and more. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Apr 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hit the Road, Snoopy!â&#x20AC;? featuring the beagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most famous road trips. Feb 12, all Little RedHaired Girls get in free. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Mar 1, Obie G Bowmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pen, brush and ink works on display. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Mar 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eye of the Beholder,â&#x20AC;? an exhibition of abstract art by Becoming Independent. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery Through Mar 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invitational Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? featuring fine art by 31 master painters. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Llewellyn Through Mar 17, bronze figurative nudes by Bruce Wolfe, paintings by William Cutler and William Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keeffe, paintings and lithograph prints by Sandra Oseguera and bronze â&#x20AC;&#x153;Un-ediblesâ&#x20AC;? by Valerie Brunmeier and Matt Hart. 707.887.2373. 6525-A First St, Forestville.

Miyares Gallery Through Feb 29, paintings by Claire B Cotts including layered, figurative and abstract works. Sonoma Academy, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 4. 707.545.1770.

Oldest Operating Dispensary in Sonoma County!

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Mar 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Along the Russian River and Water Quilt,â&#x20AC;? textiles exhibit featuring work by Pointless Sisters Art Quilt Group. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Mar 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clay and Glass Exhibit,â&#x20AC;? featuring sculpture and functional works in clay and glass by members of Association of Clay and Glass Artists of California. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Mar 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women Who Fought for Civil Rightsâ&#x20AC;? features 25 women of different races and cultures from the Civil Rights movement. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

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Quicksilver Mine Company Through Feb 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bakers Dozen 2012,â&#x20AC;? featuring the work of 13 artists. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Riskpress Gallery Through Feb 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Creative Illusions,â&#x20AC;? featuring the work of Kath Root, Chris Stover and Andrea Way. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol, no phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Mar 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Lifeâ&#x20AC;? paintings by Kathleen Deyo and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Color in Motionâ&#x20AC;? photopaintings by Jerrie Jerne. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Rohnert Park Community Center Through Mar 28, featuring oil paintings by Dee Fay and pastel landscapes by Tim Brody. Reception, Feb 11 at 5pm. Free. 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.584.7357.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Feb 11, 10am-4pm, Photography workshop with Dianne Monroe. $85. Feb 9Mar 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blue,â&#x20AC;? a ) juried exhibition

34

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PROS AND CONS Formal wear is not required at the Peaceroots Valentine Dance Celebration with Billie Shields on Feb. 11 in Sebastopol. See Events, p35.

Arts Events of work in a variety of media. Reception, Feb 9 at 6pm. Feb 9-Mar 17, “Quintet,” features ceramics by Denis Hazlewood. Reception, Feb 9 at 6pm. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

Hart’s ’ Desire Wines

J. Keverson ve so ve so Winery

Sapphire S Sa pp p ph hii Hill Winery

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The Family Vintners of

Old Roma Station Historic Wine District Invite you to hop on board the Old Roma Transcontinental Express To Celebrate Presidents’ Day, Sunday February 19th from 11am to 4pm Hop on board the Old Roma Transcontinental Express and enjoy delicious regional cuisine from the heartland to our coastlines while you sample from over 40 limited production wines from the boutique vintners of Old Roma Station. Tickets are $20* per person. Order tickets online at www.OldRomaStation.com or call 707-433-2364 for reservations. *$5 from each ticket will be donated to the Healdsburg Museum and Historical Society

At the intersection of Hudson and First Streets, Healdsburg, where the river meets the tracks.

Through Mar 18, “Undiscovered,” features five dynamic artists from Sonoma County. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939. SVMA.

Towers Gallery Through Apr 1, “Seasons,” including works by Nancy Burres, Jim Van Deren and many others. Reception, Feb 10, 7pm, and Feb 11, 5pm. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Through Mar 2, “Lightscape/ Darkscape,” featuring artworks by Kala Art Institute students. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bolinas Museum

It just clicks. The new Bohemian.com

Through Mar 11, woven photographs of constructed landscapes, by Julie V Garner. Through Mar 11, “Women in Print,” etchings from Paulson Bott Press. Gallery talk with Renee Bott, Print publisher, Feb 18 at 2pm. Through Mar 17, “Attic Treasures,” featuring artifacts from the history collection. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun,

( 33 noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Mar 9, “H2O: Fragility and Strength,” featuring works by California Society of Printmakers, juried by Don Soker. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Feb 10-Mar 7, survey of paintings by John McNamara. Reception, Feb 10 at 5:30pm. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Feb 19, “Duration,” annual juried show featuring works by “Best of Show” Ellen Litwiller and others. Through Mar 4, “Photography: A Fine Art,” featuring the work of Tim Fleming, Alan Plisskin and Sister Adele Rowland. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. WedMon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin History Museum Through Sep 1, “The Golden Gate Bridge, an Icon That Changed the World,” historical exhibit. Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. Tues-Fri, plus second and third Sat monthly, 11 to 4. 415.454.8538.

Marin MOCA Through Feb 26, “Fresh,” featuring new work by resident artists. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4,. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Mar 3, “How Do You

See It: Through the Artist’s Eyes,” a juried member show featuring still life, landscapes, figuratives and abstracts. Through Mar 3, Marin Watercolor Society showing, featuring Noel Ryan and others. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Feb 28, “Red,” juried by artist and self-proclaimed alchemist Toni Littlejohn. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Feb 28, “Executive Order 9066,” featuring the teenage watercolors of Kasumi Gus Nakagawa, whose Japanese-American family was sent to an internment camp in Poston, Ariz. Reception, Feb 12 at 4pm. Through Feb 29, Group show by students of Marty Meade’s College of Marin class. Reception, Feb 12 at 4. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY Di Rosa Through Feb 11, “Looking at You Looking at Me,” featuring photography, video and other media selected from di Rosa collection by curator Robert Wuilfe. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sat, 9:30am to 3pm. 707.226.5991.

Hess Collection Winery Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by

Through Mar 12, “Mustard and More” juried exhibit sponsored by Napa Valley Photographic Society. 6516 Washington St, Yountville.

Events Ace of Hearts Pink & Red Ball Dinner, dancing, auctions and games to support children and families living with autism spectrum disorders. Feb 11, 5:15pm. $60-$110. Friedman Event Center, 4676 Mayette Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.360.3021.

Cartoonist-inResidence Second Sat monthly at 1, meet, watch and talk to professional cartoonists. Feb 11, Raina Telgemeier and Dave Roman. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa, 707.579.4452.

An Evening at the Cabaret Appetizers, wine and music from the Napa Valley College Music stars of the future. Feb 10, 7pm $35. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa, 707.256.7500.

Love Life ’n’ Skate Benefit

Science Fair Preparation Workshop Fifth and sixth grade students invited to select and create a winning science project. Feb

Film Film, Food & Love Series of foodie films benefits local celebrity chefs. Through Feb 23. Feb 9, “Ratatoullie,” with Kelly McCown. $30. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena, 707.963.3946.

Monday Night at the Movies Political satire series featuring “The Great Dictator” and “Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.” Mon, Feb 13. Mill Valley Library, 375 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.389.4292.

National Theatre Live

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Talent Show

Murder Mystery Dinner Show (Pre-Sale Only – 6:30 PM)

LOS CAPORALES MARIACHI 1 pm & 3:30 pm

GATOR BEAT - Zydeco & New Orleans R & B

Chocolate Extravaganza

2 pm & 4:30 pm - Free with Fair Admission!

Taste local chocolates and enjoy the sounds of live jazz. Feb 10, 3pm. $10. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol, 707.829.2440.

Murder Mystery Dinner Show (Pre-Sale Only – 6:30 PM)

MONDAY

KIDS’ DAY 12 & UNDER FREE!

‘ General Admission - $7 ‘ Juniors 6–12 & Seniors - $5 ‘ Children 5 & under are FREE! FOR INFO CALL 707.894.3992 or visit www.cloverdalecitrusfair.org

Chocolate, Wine & Art Savor fine chocolates and wine and purchase locally-made gifts for your sweetie. Feb 12, 3pm. Artists of the Valley, 1398 First St, Napa, 707.265.9050.

TAKE HIGHWAY 101 TO CITRUS FAIR DRIVE EXIT IN SONOMA COUNTY

www.raventheater.org

Homemade Chocolate Learn how to make a simple chocolate ganache, then roll up a pound of chocolate truffles to take home. Feb 9, 7pm. $35. Fresh Starts Cooking School, 1399 North Hamilton Pkwy, Novato, 415.382.3363.

Valentine’s Pick Up Party

Live series of performances broadcast from the National Theatre, London. Thurs, Feb 9, “Traveling Light.” $30. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.924.5111.

Wine tasting, food, free chair massages and festive entertainment. Feb 11, noon3pm $25. Judd’s Hill Winery, 2332 Silverado Trail, Napa, 707.255.2332.

Time for Change

Valentine’s Weekend

Film presents an optimistic alternative to 2012 apocalypse. A list of the subjects included, translated from the press release to the best of our ability: conscious agents of evolution (people), a postindustrial society based on ecological principals (people on a farm), a regenerative planetary culture where collaboration replaces competition (people on a farm getting high), a place where exploration of psyche and spirit becomes the new cutting edge

THURSDAY

One-hour dance lessons followed by a special threecourse menu created by chef Aaron Wright. Second Mon of every month. $40. Lark Creek Inn, 234 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur.

Drop in for wine tasting paired with aphrodisiac treats. Feb 11-12, 11am-4:30pm. $15. Bella Vineyards, 9711 W Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg.

Wild Steelhead Festival Celebrate the return of wild Steelhead to the Russian River at three-day Festival. Feb 1012. $40 for salmon dinner at Villa Chanticleer. Plaza Park, Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg, 707.484.6438. )

36

433-6335

Event features the X-Factor’s Chris Rene, Radioactive + 808 Band, Mac Jar and Monikape, Ghambit and Sincere and Infamouz Band with all proceeds going to Phoenix Theater Teen Center. Feb 10, 7:30pm. $20-$25. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma, 707.762.3565.

Hike the Cobblestone and Rough Go trails to Lake Ilsanjo. Meet at parking lot across from Cobblestone trail on Channel Drive. Feb 10, 10am Free. Annadel State Park, Channel Drive, Santa Rosa.

PRESIDENTS’ WEEKEND

FEBRUARY 17–20

www.raventheater.org

Beauty professionals offer tips to enhance your own natural beauty and disguise skin and hair changes that may occur with chemotherapy or radiation. Mon, Feb 13, 10pm. Free. American Cancer Society, 1451 Guerneville Rd, Ste 220, Santa Rosa.

Annadel Hike

CLOVERDALE CITRUS FAIR

433-6335

Look Good, Feel Better

Field Trips

35

“MARDI GRAS”

433-6335

Featuring dinner and music by Billie Shields, Jethro Jeremiah Reggae Band and others, sponsored by Peaceroots Alliance. Feb 11, 6:30pm. $25. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol, 707.823.1511.

120th ANNUAL

www.raventheater.org

Yountville Community Hall

Valentine Dance Celebration

(see previous translation), celebrities (people on a farm getting high with Sting). Feb 12, 7pm $7-$10. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8280 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati, 707.478.7274.

433-6335

11, 9pm Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville, 707.944.0500.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 8–14, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Andy Goldsworthy, Francis Bacon, Frank Stella and other modern masters. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 707.255.1144.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 Known by Deadheads worldwide, Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart is working on a new album due out April 2012. $5 discount to first 25 to buy tickets online with the coupon code “Hart.” www.raventheater.org

®

PERFORMING ARTSTHEATER

115 North St., Healdsburg

Lectures Anthony Bourdain with Eric Ripert Join author of “No Reservations” and regular on “Top Chef” for evening of discussion about the place of food in our lives. Feb 10, 8pm. $30-$65. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

First Class Jails, Second Class Schools Dr. Marc Lamont Hill, host of “Our World” with Black Enterprise, speaks on financial focus given to our jail system. Feb 8, 7:30pm. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2880.

Birds and More in Peru See videos of Peruvian wildlife at the Redwood Region Ornithological Society meeting. Feb 9, 7pm. Free. Laguna Wastewater Treatment Plant (Administration Building), 4300 Llano Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.823.8527.

( 35 Zsolt Debreczy, whose modest dream is to document all of the world’s temperate conifers in their natural habitats. Feb 12, 5:30pm $10-$15. Quarryhill Botanical Gardens, Highway 12, Glen Ellen.

Dr Leonard Mlodinow Bestselling author of “The Grand Design” talks about new book, “The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives.” Feb 9, 7pm. Free. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 1.800.564.SRJC.

Legacies as Lessons: Learning from the Past Holocaust and Genocide Lecture series featuring daughter of Holocaust survivors Claudia Stevens. Various times. Tues through May 8. Free. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2880.

SSU Jazz Forums Feb 8 at 1pm, the Holly Martins. Green Music Center, Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2880.

Conifers Around the World

Town Hall on Occupy Movement

Lecture by Hungarian botanist

Third in ongoing series of

Town Hall meetings on the Occupy movement featuring internationally acclaimed political comedian Swami Beyondananda. Feb 9, 6:30pm United Methodist Church, 500 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Readings Bean Affair Feb 12, 2pm, 14 poets read love poems, accompanied by chocolate. Free. 1270 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.395.0177.

Book Passage Feb 9, 7pm, “Monstress,” with Lysley Tenorio. Feb 11, 7pm, “The Scientific American Book of Love, Sex, and the Brain,” with Judith Horstman. Feb 12, 2pm, “Ascension,” with Giovanni Singleton. Feb 12, 4pm, “Ancient Greece, Modern Psyche” with Virginia Beane Rutter and Thomas Singer. Feb 13, 7pm, “The Lost Saints of Tennessee,” with Amy Franklin-Willis. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

River Reader Feb 8, 7pm, poetry reading with Judy Halebsky and Joan Baranow Editor. Feb 13, 7pm, “Damascus,” with Joshua Mohr. 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

Theater Burying Our Father Isaac and Ishmael meet to bury their father Abraham in the cave that has become one of the most revered and violently contested holy sites in history. Feb 10-11, 8pm. $15$20. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.763.8920.

Chicago Popular musical set in Prohibition-era Chicago. Through Feb 19. $15-$30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg, 707.433.3145.

Civil Disobedience: The Musical

POPULAR MECHANICS Work by Ken Berman,

above, and Cat Kaufman opens at the ArtHouse Gallery in Glen Ellen. See Openings, p33.

Walking Elephant Theatre Company presents original documentary theater and film project portrayed by actors ages 8 to 18. Feb 10-11, 8pm. $10-$15. Curtain Call Theatre at the Russian River, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio, 707.849.4873.

Fault Lines Debut play of Santa Rosa native Rebecca Louise Miller inspired by Polly Klaas kidnapping. Fri, Feb 10, 8pm, Sat, Feb 11, 8pm and Sun, Feb 12, 5pm. $15-$20. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

CRITIC’S CHOICE Suzanne Daly

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 8 –14, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

36 Arts Events

Murder at Breslingdale Estates Interactive, dress-up event written by Analy senior Lauren Feldman. Sun, Feb 12, 5pm. $35-$40. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.2722.

Proof Winner of the 2001 Pulitzer Prize, “Proof” follows a troubled young woman as she discovers a revolutionary mathematical breakthrough. Feb 10-26, 2 and 8pm. $10-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

She Stoops to Conquer Ross Valley Players present comedy of manners by Oliver Goldsmith. Through Feb 19, 2, 7:30 and 8pm. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555.

Sing-Along Oklahoma Special performance allows audience members to sing along with Rodgers and Hammerstein classic. Feb 12, 5pm $9-$16. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2880.

Sylvia Classic story about man, wife and dog by Pegasus Theater Company. Through Feb 12, 2 and 8pm. $15-$30. Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido, 707.869.0821.

Young Playwrights Festival Features eight 10-minute plays written, directed and acted by Marin County teens. Feb 13, 7pm Free. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Suds Galore!

Celebrating Beer Week in the North Bay This year’s San Francisco Beer Week (Feb. 10–19) offers hundreds of events at beer-minded locations throughout the Bay Area. Here are five events in North Bay particularly worth checking out; more are listed on the SF Beer Week website. Bear Republic Winter Beer Dinner The Bottle Room’s chef Tony Alcazar joins Bear Republic’s Brew Team for a special fivecourse pairing dinner in Healdsburg. Feb. 11, 6–9pm. $65. Ratebeer: Taste the Top Awards Beer Dinner Santa Rosa–based website Ratebeer. com hosts an evening of aperitifs, five courses and hard-to-find brews with chef Billy Reid (above). An “unprecedented tasting” of beers from breweries recognized in the Ratebeer Best 2012 awards. Hopmonk Sonoma, Feb. 12. 6pm. $100. Craft Beer Dinner with Napa Smith Brewery Napa Smith’s flavorful brews are highlighted in this three-course pairing event in Napa’s Oxbow Public Market. Kitchen Door Restaurant, Feb. 13, 6:30– 8:30pm. $65. Ales for Autism presents the Black & White Beer Ball This unique fundraising ball in Windsor offers up black and white beers only, from Northern California and beyond. Cocktail attire encouraged. Mary Agatha Furth Center, Feb. 17, 6–10pm. $35. Barrel Aged Cellar Release Sip cellared, barrel-aged and specialty brews in one of the area’s most comprehensive beer spots. This ongoing event offers plenty of opportunities for “grocery shopping.” Whole Foods Coddingtown Tap Room, Feb. 11–19, noon–9pm daily.—Ken Weaver

37 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 8-14, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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38

Astrology

FREE WILL

We’re looking for you. The Bohemian newspaper is looking for a candidate to join our close-knit team of dedicated, self-motivated sales people in our downtown Santa Rosa office. The right person for the job is professional, friendly, outgoing, comfortable with both written and verbal communication, has a positive attitude and excellent customer service skills. You will be responsible for soliciting new business. Reliable transportation required. Must be fluent in digital media. A minimum of two years sales experience is necessary. This high-energy, full-time position pays commission. The Bohemian newspaper offers full benefits. Please email Rosemary Olson at rolson@bohemian.com or fax resume to 707.527.1288. No phone calls please.

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of February 8

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “Marriage must be a relation either of sympathy or conquest,” said author George Eliot. I believe the same is true even about intimate bonds that have not been legally consecrated. Each tends to either be a collaboration of equals who are striving for common goals or else a power struggle in which one party seeks to dominate the other. Which of those two models has characterized your romantic history, Aries? Now is an excellent time to begin working to ensure that the partnership model will predominate for the rest of your long life. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

“Love loves to love love,” wrote James Joyce in his 1922 novel Ulysses. “Nurse loves the new chemist. Constable 14A loves Mary Kelly. Jumbo, the elephant, loves Alice, the elephant. Old Mr Verschole with the ear trumpet loves old Mrs Verschoyle with the turnedin eye. The man in the brown macintosh loves a lady who is dead. His Majesty the King loves Her Majesty the Queen.” What Joyce said 90 years ago is still true: the world is a churning, burning uproar of yearning. The droning moan of “I want you, I need you” never dies down. Give yourself to that cosmic current without apology this valentine season, Taurus. Celebrate your voracious ache for love. Honor your urge to merge with reverence and awe for its raw splendor.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) I’ve ghostwritten a personal ad for you to give to your valentine or potential valentine: “I’m looking for a free yet disciplined spirit I can roll down hills with on sunny days and solve thorny puzzles with when the skies are cloudy. Can you see the absurd in the serious and the serious in the absurd? Are you a curious chameleon always working to sharpen your communication skills? Might you be attracted to a sweet-talking wise-ass who’s evolving into a holy goofball? Emotional baggage is expected, of course, but please make sure yours is organized and well-packed. Let’s create the most unpredictably intriguing versions of beauty and truth that anyone ever imagined.” CANCER (June 21–July 22)

On average, an adult on planet Earth has sex 103 times a year. But I’m guessing that in the immediate future, Cancerians everywhere may be motivated to exceed that rate by a large margin. The astrological omens suggest that your tribe’s levels of sensual desire may reach astronomical heights. Do you know anyone you’re attracted to who might be willing help you out as you follow your bliss? If not, be your own valentine. One way or another, it’s prime time to celebrate your relationship with eros.

LEO (July 23–August 22) I’d love for you to be able to always give the best gifts you have to give without worrying about whether they will be received in the spirit with which you offer them. But that’s just not realistic. I would also be ecstatic if you never had to tone down your big, beautiful self out of fear that others would be jealous or intimidated. And yet that’s not a rational possibility, either. Having said that, though, I do want to note that now and then both of those pleasurable scenarios can prevail for extended lengths of time. And I believe you’re now in one of those grace periods. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) In accordance with the astrological omens, here’s what I wish and predict for you in the near future: you will be a connoisseur of temptations. By that I mean you will have a knack for attracting and playing with allurements and enticements. More importantly, you’ll have a sixth sense about the distinction between good bait and bad bait—between provocative temptations that will serve your most fervent dreams and debilitating traps that will dissipate your integrity. And when you get a lock on the invigorating, ennobling kind, you will know just how to work with it so that it drives you wild with smart longing. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Eliphas Levi was a 19th-century author and hermetic magician whose work has had a major influence on Western mystery schools. The great secret of magic, he said, is fourfold: “to KNOW what has to be done, to WILL what is required, to DARE what must be attempted, and to KEEP SILENT with discernment.” Your assignment, Libra, is to apply this approach to your love life. How can you create a relationship with love that will be a gift to the

world and also make you smarter, kinder and wilder? KNOW what magic you have to do. WILL yourself to do it. DARE to be ingenious and inspired. And don’t tell anyone what you’re doing until you achieve your goal.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

After analyzing the astro data for this Valentine’s season, I realized that you could really benefit from being less sober, solemn and serious about your intimate relationships. That’s why I decided to collect some one-liners for you to use as you loosen up your approach to togetherness. Please consider delivering them to anyone you’d like to be closer to. 1. “Let’s go maniacally obsess about our lives in a soothing environment.” 2. “We’ll be best friends forever because you already know too much about me.” 3. “It would be great if you would schedule your social events around my mood swings.” 4. “I’m sorry, I drunk-dialed you before realizing you were already in bed with me.” 5. “I wanna do boring things with you.” (All the one-liners come from Someecards.com.)

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) “The world is an oyster, but you don’t crack it open on a mattress,” said a character in Arthur Miller play. He was referring to the idea that if you’re obsessed with sex and romance, your level of worldly accomplishment may be rather low. It jibes with what a friend in my youth told me when he noticed how much of my energy was engaged in pursuing desirable females: “They don’t build statues in parks for guys who chase women.” I realize you may not be wildly receptive to ruminating on these matters during the Valentine’s season, Sagittarius. However, the omens suggest I advise you to do just that. It’s a good time to fine-tune the balance between your life-long career goals and your quest for love.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Ancient Egyptians thought that drinking bear grease could stimulate ardor, while the Greeks believed that eating sparrow brains would do the trick. When potatoes first appeared in Spain in 1534, imported from the New World, they were used in love potions and worth more than $1,000 a pound. The Asian rhinoceros was hunted nearly to extinction because its horn was thought to have aphrodisiac properties. Just in time for Valentine’s season, I’d like to suggest that you call on a very different kind of romantic stimulant that costs nothing and doesn’t endanger any species: being a good listener. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Maybe there is a soul mate for you in this world. Maybe there isn’t. But you can count on this: if that person is out there, you will never bond with him or her by clinging to a set of specific expectations about how it should happen. He or she will not possess all the qualities you wish for and will not always treat you exactly as you want to be. I’m sure you already know this deep down, Aquarius, but hearing it from an objective observer like me might help liberate you further from the oppressive fantasy of romantic perfection. That way you can better recognize and celebrate the real thing. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“We are all a little weird and life’s a little weird, and when we find someone whose weirdness is compatible with ours, we join up with them and fall in mutual weirdness and call it love.” So proclaimed Dr. Seuss. I think this is an excellent meditation for you during this season of love. You need more permission to share your idiosyncrasies and eccentricities, and you need more freedom to ally yourself with people whose idiosyncrasies and eccentricities you’re compatible with—and on behalf of the cosmos, I’m hereby giving you that permission.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

39

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This year, avoid commercialism and give your Valentine a meaningful gift in the true spirit of cherishing love. Please join visiting Buddhist monk Kelsang Mikyopa for heartfelt teachings, meditations, and his unique gentle humor. Sat., Feb. 11, 11:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:00. Compassion Buddhist Center, 436 Larkfield Center, S.R., $20 incl. lunch, www.meditateinsantrosa.org Everyone welcome!

Centering Prayer Groups Practice an ancient Christian meditative prayer form leading to a deeper intimacy with the Divine. Beginners & all spiritual paths welcome. Mondays, 12:00â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:45pm & Thursdays, 5:30 6:40pm, Journey Center, Santa Rosa, 707.578.2121,www.journeycenter.org.

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