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LAW SCHOOL

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Informational Seminar Wednesday, February 15 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. Keynote Speaker:

Richard C. Koman, Esq. Solo Practitioner Empire Class of 2008 Since 1973, Empire College School of Law has prepared more than 800 graduates for careers as attorneys. Alumni now comprise approximately 25% of the Sonoma County Bar and include members of the judiciary in Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino, Lassen and Merced Counties.

Call today to reserve your seat!

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1

years

71 Brookwood Ave., Santa Rosa 707.576.0861 Mon-Sat 10am-6pm, Sun 11am-4pm • www.wbu.com 1961-2012

3035 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa

Birdseed . Feeders . Birdbaths . Optics . Nature Gifts . Books

Enjoy Local Wines & Tasty Desserts! Send a Morse Code Radiogram! Support Community Radio for West Marin: 90.5 Pt Reyes & 89.9 Bolinas

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Laurie Lewis & Tom Rozum Eric & Suzy Thompson Misner & Smith Steve & Karen Tamborski

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For F or tickets call 707.546.3600 7 .546.3600 (Mon-Sat noon 707 noon-6pm) n-6pm) Online we wellsfargocenterarts.org ellsfargocenterarts.org Highway 10 01 to River Road, Santa Rosa 101

Wells W ells Fargo Fargo Center for the Art Arts ts gratefully gratefully acknowledges generous support from frrom

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x153;II FOL FOLLOWED F LOWED Nico Niico on the Bodega Highway, Hiighhwaay, through throough SSebastopol, e ebastopol, and onto a two-lane road road th that hat snaked up and hills.â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;? an nd ddown own gentle hills. Teller: T eller: e A Novel Novel author, Frederick Weisel bbyy local autho r, F red derick W eeisel Paperback: P aperback: $16.95 ee-book: -book: $6.99

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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers Leilani Clark, ext. 106 Rachel Dovey, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Rachel Dovey, ext. 200

Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur, Robert Edmonds, Robert Feuer, Nicolas Grizzle, Stett Holbrook, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Juliane Poirier, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Interns Jennifer Cuddy, Michael Shufro

Design Director Kara Brown

Production Operations Coordinator Mercy Perez

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Dolan

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

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Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Susan M. Sulc, ext. 206

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

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Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano

You are invited to the 13th Annual

PAWS FOR LOVE

Saturday, February 11, 2012 6:00 to 10:00pm Finley Community Center W. College at Stony Point, Santa Rosa â&#x2122;Ľ heartfelt art created by rescue animals

â&#x2122;Ľ live and silent auctions â&#x2122;Ľ wines by Kenwood, Mutt Lynch, & Pedroncelli â&#x2122;Ľ gourmet hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres

All proceeds benefit animals in need

Admission: $30 donation adv/$40 door VISA/MC accepted For information and tickets: www.pawsforlove.info or 707.799.6151 or 707.544.3974

25 % Off 25% Off 1st 1st Meeting M eeting Room Room Rental Rental Free WiFi Free WiFi and and Parking Pa r k ing Call tour consultation. C all ffor or ssite ite to ur aand nd c o n s u l t at i o n .

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover design by Kara Brown.

5

Start the year off right. With a good laugh. Headlining the Feb 1 show will be improv group

INSIDE OUT (unauthorized 6th Street Theater members) Troupe members: Paul Armstrong, Saskia Baur, Hilary Moore, Jeff Savage & Cheryl Ulrich

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nb SHADOW OF A DROUGHT

Santa Rosa Creek near Prince Memorial Greenway prepares (hopefully!) for some more rainfall this year.

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This photo was taken by Ellyn Siegel of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

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6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies The Police Log Why transparency is important BY GABE MELINE

O

n Saturday night, I drove with my two-year-old to the store to buy cookies. Once there, I saw four police cars parked in the parking lot. The store, on the outskirts of Roseland, was open; no lights blinked on the cars, and four or five officers stood around, casually chatting. Whatever had brought them there had clearly passed. As I got my daughter out of the car, I noticed a twenty-something kid, Latino, with sports gear and a cap, walking on the sidewalk. All of the officers stopped talking and looked at him. He said something to them, and they charged up to him on the sidewalk. One mentioned he could smell alcohol on the kid’s breath. Within 10 seconds, he was in handcuffs and up against the wall. This seemed strange. I’m not a police-accountability activist. In my life, I’ve never questioned police officers to their faces. But when I left the store, and one smiled at my daughter and me, I had to ask. Did the kid say something that caused them to put him in handcuffs? One of the officers turned and growled at me: “This is none of your business.” I stayed calm. “I do have a right to observe police activity.” “But you don’t have a right to interrupt,” he snarled in rising tones. “You need to leave.” “I’m only wondering why you’ve detained him.” “If you know what’s good for you, you’ll take her”—pointing at my daughter—“and get out of here. Do you understand?” I didn’t understand. The kid was taken care of. There were four officers. Couldn’t one have explained that the kid was a suspect in a robbery or had flashed a knife, or some other explanation? The message was clear: You need to stop asking questions. This week’s cover story is by Robert Edmonds, whom I willfully acknowledge has been very outspoken in his work with police accountability. But I believe he’s exercised fairness in reporting on police funding from Measure O, and the inability of the department to produce consistent and accurate gang-related statistics that would measure the effectiveness of Santa Rosa taxpayers’ voterapproved investment. Afetr Saturday night, I also believe we need to keep asking questions of our police department, even when they don’t want to give an explanation. Or, as you’ll discover in our cover story, can’t. Gabe Meline is the editor of this paper. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Last Week’s Cover Story Was Written by Nicolas Grizzle

Yes, you may have noticied it too: last week’s excellent cover story on the fallout and future of SOPA and PIPA was printed—most embarrassingly—without a byline. The bots of production saw fit, at the last moments before press, to chew up the wonderful name of Nicolas Grizzle and spit it out into the netherworld of nothingness, leaving its owner unable to take proud credit for a job well done. Alas. To remedy this most unfortunate oversight, we extended to Nicolas Grizzle the invitation to supply us with a photo of his choosing—any photo at all—with the promise that we would run it in this week’s paper. He has given us a picture of himself in formal garb next to a vintage Victorian chair, upon which sits a small dog.

Quixotic Moment?

Thank you so much for the excellent article on Move to Amend (“Taking the Power Back,” Jan. 18). I have two corrections/comments to offer regarding professor David McCuan’s response: 1. One does not have to go through Congress in order to amend the constitution. Two-thirds of the states can propose an amendment, instead of two-thirds of each branch of Congress. 2. He calls this a “quixotic moment” in the body politic and predicted a “cold day in hell before there’s a constitutional amendment.” The Arab Spring happened on a colder day than a constitutional amendment. It is the way of academics to say that things that have not happened will not happen, and it is the task of activist citizens to make them happen anyway.

ABRAHAM ENTIN North Bay Move to Amend

In Names We Trust I empathize with Ms. Burton’s thoughts on keeping the family name after marriage (“The Feminist Wife,” Jan. 18). I did when I married 16 years ago. My reasons included wanting to feel connection with family heritage; keeping a sense of personal identity; and, most important, giving a gift of continuity to my parents after the untimely death of my older brother and only sibling when I was 10. Being a single child for most of my life has heightened my awareness of the ephemeral nature of our names. I wasn’t ready for my father’s name to disappear just yet. I wanted to extend it into the future just a little longer.

THE ED. Vowing to Double-Check All Proofs

My urgency was further compounded by the fact that my partner and I chose not to reproduce. But if we had decided to

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parent, my husband had already made clear his belief that the mother gets ďŹ rst dibs on bestowing her family name, if thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what she wants. Though keeping oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family name is sometimes inconvenientâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;duplicate mailings to the same address; being addressed as your husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;missusâ&#x20AC;?; having to clarify youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a couple at timesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;these I consider minor annoyances. After so many years, most family and friends have gotten my name right. That my husband has always introduced me as â&#x20AC;&#x153;this is my wife, Janet Baroccoâ&#x20AC;? has helped a lot.

JANET BAROCCO Santa Rosa

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Rants

Dr. D r. Downing Downi ow n i ng ng has ha s been be e n practicing Bay Area pr ac t ici ng iin n tthe he B ay A r ea for for o over ver 40 4 0 years. yea r s. He He is is Free F ree IInitial nitia l internationally i nter nat iona l ly known k now n for for C Consultation onsu ltation his h i s innovative i n novat ive work work in in Holistic Optometry, Hol i st ic O ptomet r y, the t he de ve lopment o he D ow n i n g development off tthe Downing Technique off LLight Therapy Tec h n ique o i g ht T her apy aand nd tthe he Lu mat ron Light L ig ht Stimulator. St i mu lator. Lumatron

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

Paper THE

TRANSFER Buses like the one above service the 101 corridor, but for many in West Marin, public transportation is nonexistent.

Waiting for the Bus In the state’s wealthiest county, an aging community struggles to get around—and get by BY RACHEL DOVEY Note: This is the first part in a series on senior care in Marin County.

S

he hasn’t been out to lunch in 30 years, but in 2009, Theresa Byrne finally paid off her West Marin home. The 4-foot, 9-inch 62-year-old lives on a fixed income of $1,081

a month in a county where the median income is nearly seven times that. On a recent afternoon, as a rainstorm engulfed the coastal village of Dillon Beach, Byrne’s peach-colored cottage was bright with oil paintings and filtered light. It’s hard to believe this “jewel box,” as she calls it, was a single-walled, cement-floored fishing shack when she bought

it 22 years ago. Over the years, she’s saved enough money for remodeling to accommodate her osteoporosis: ramps, a step-down bathtub, low counters. Her secret, she says, is meticulous accounting. She flips through a drawer full of files, opens a color-coded notebook and runs a finger down its neatly stacked figures. It’s all there: over-the-counter medications,

vitamins, water bills, groceries, even the occasional cup of coffee. “The IRS has called before and said, ‘We can’t believe you live on that in Marin County,’ and I go, ‘Come on out here, I’m dying to show you,’” she says, snapping the book shut. Yet even as she stretches her social security to meet her needs, Byrne faces a challenge that no amount of asceticism can fix. Since she left an abusive marriage and settled on the coast, she’s suffered grand mal seizures and been unable to drive. With no fixed-route buses and a 30-minute commute to the nearest hospital, she becomes increasingly isolated as each year ticks by. Byrne may seem like an anomaly in a county famed for its million-dollar houseboats and fine dining, but she’s not. Though Marin’s median household income was $89,268 in 2010, this number varies widely by census tract within the county. A 2012 Human Development Report found that West Marin, along with Novato and parts of San Rafael, has a median income of $21,000 to $36,000, roughly one-fourth the county standard. It also skews older than Marin as a whole: though 21 percent of the county is over 62, that demographic makes up 25 percent of Tomales, 33 percent of Point Reyes and 38 percent of Byrne’s small town. In other words, Byrne’s not the only one who can’t get around. One route travels from Marin’s densely populated 101 corridor to Point Reyes, but nothing extends to the ranches and fishing towns above it. Only one shuttle brings residents into Petaluma, the closest city, on Wednesday mornings to buy groceries. Terri Sylvain is a care manager for West Marin Senior Services, working with elders from the region’s northernmost villages. “A lot of them no longer have driver’s licenses, and even if they do, they can’t drive at night on those winding, poorly lit streets,” she says. “A cab ride from Dillon Beach to Petaluma is $80 to $85.” Routine checkups and tests may be skipped because of this

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The IRS has called before and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe you live on that in Marin County.â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to check up on each other,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People will call each other and check in. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll watch to see if someone hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t picked up their mail or if their light hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been turned on.â&#x20AC;? The lack of transit isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a simple case of government negligence. Paul Branson, a community mobility manager with Marin County District Transit, says the organization is trying to accommodate the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aging population with shuttles, volunteer-driver programs and funding from Measure B taxes, mostly in the cities and towns along 101. But building infrastructure in rural West Marin, where the population density is lower than the rest of the county, is a challenge, he says, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The money has to go where the people are and where they want to travel.â&#x20AC;? West Marin supervisor Steve Kinsey acknowledges that residents in the north, particularly, need transit. However, he agrees that with limited funds and low density, the area may be a candidate for shuttle and volunteer driver

service, but is unlikely to see ďŹ xed-route transit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the responsibilities and consequences of living in a rural area,â&#x20AC;? he says. Branson and Kinsey also indicated that for many West Marin residents, the nearest services are across county lines in Petaluma. Sharing responsibilities with a separate jurisdiction would add another wrinkle of complexity, they said. Villagers are often told the answer to their problems is moving into a denser area or a less expensive county, Byrne says. But residents and community advocates alike stress that the very factors they would move to get away fromâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;expensive utilities, high property taxes, isolationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;keep them in their rural homes. Sylvain says many of her clients retired to the peaceful coast 40 years ago, when the rural property values and utilities were affordable on a retirement income. Their homes accrued valueâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and then began losing it around 2008. Meanwhile, social security stagnated with no cost-of-living adjustment in 2010, while medical co-pays and utilities rose; Byrne has a small tub in her sink where she saves water for re-use. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our bills have tripled, and our houses arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worth a third of what they were,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave.â&#x20AC;? And even with her extreme frugality, Byrne says she wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to leave her small home surrounded by an aging community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why should we not live where we want to live?â&#x20AC;? she asks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lived here 22 years on only social security and disability, and through great personal neglect Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve paid every bill myself, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve paid all my taxes myself and I rely on nobody but myself. I would be ďŹ ne if there were just public transportation.â&#x20AC;? This article was produced as a project for the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, a program of USCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Enter the Oracle In an era when YouTube videos seem to trump all, the idea of thousands of people reading the same book, brains sparked with all kinds of new inspiration, is uplifting. This is exactly what the One Book One Marin reading program accomplishes, with an annual program sponsored by Marin County Free Library, Book Passage, City Public Libraries of Marin and Dominican University. Past participating authors have included Dave Eggers, Isabel Allende, Michael Chabon and Amy Tan. In 2012, the chosen book is Michael David Lukasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bestselling novel The Oracle of Stamboul. Set during the 19th-century Turkish Ottoman empire, Lukasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; story is laden with American spies, sultans, historical upheaval and Eastern mysticismâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in short, a whole slew of conversation sparkers. Lukas appears at the kick off celebration on Thursday, Feb. 2, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 7pm. Free. 415.927.0960.

Watercolored History On Feb. 19, 1942, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into declaration one of American historyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most shameful moments. With the swoosh of a pen, the president authorized the internment of over 110,000 Japanese-Americans in camps near the California border. Thousands of families were swept up, many losing everything. Kasumi â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gusâ&#x20AC;? Nakagawa, a teenager at the time, was sent with his family to the War Department Internment Center in Poston, Ariz. For the next three years, he painted watercolors, capturing images of life in the campâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;an uncommon chronicle, since all cameras and recording devices had been conďŹ scated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Executive Order 9066: The Watercolors of Kasumu â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Nakagawaâ&#x20AC;? runs Feb. 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;28 at the San Geronimo Valley Community Center. A reception is held Sunday, Feb. 12, 4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Leilani Clark The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Charlotte C harlotte Hideko Hideko Huggins Huggins Certified Family Certified Family Law Law Specialist Specialist 9950 50 Northgate Northgate D Drive, rive, SSuite uite 307 307 San Sa nR Rafael, afael, C CA A | 4415.457.4497 15.457.4497

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inconvenience, and, tragically, the same may go for emergencies. This threat has formed strong ties between neighbors, says Doris Pareas, a 65-year-old Dillon Beach resident and publictransportation advocate.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

10

Green Zone

Woman W oman Owned d & Operated! Be s t Costume Best C os t u me Shop Shop Best B e s t Erotica Er o tica Shop Shop Marin M arin

Free Hair Cut with Highlighting Services

F or Y For Your ou r Valentine Va lentine Sex y llover’s Sexy over ’s gifts, gi f t s , llingerie ingerie & ggift i f t ccards ar d s J oin oour Join ur eemail mail llist ist events@pleasuresoftheheart.com e vents @ pleasuresof thehear t.com

415.482.9899 4 15.4 8 2. 9 8 9 9 11310 310 F Fourth our th S St. t. @ C C,, S San an R Rafael afael

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olunteers for Label GMO, a grassroots organization, are working to make California the first state to require labeling of genetically engineered foods. Gearing up to collect 504,760 signatures between Feb. 18 and April 22, these volunteers hope to place required GMO labeling on the November ballot. Ann Thomas of Corte Madera is Label GMO’s signature drive coordinator for Marin, Sonoma, Napa, Lake, Mendocino and Humboldt counties. “The North Coast has been the most enthusiastic of any region around the state,” explained Thomas. “Volunteers are itching to get their hands on the petitions.” The goal is to require GMO labels on “raw or processed food offered for sale to consumers if food or any of its ingredients contain or are made from plants or animals with genetic material that has been changed in specified ways.”

Politically, this is big stuff, since California stands to strike an enormous economic blow to pushers of Frankenfoods, including Monsanto and Kellogg’s. Europeans have GMO labeling in place, but the United States needs the Golden State to rally the nation. Melinda Suelflow, from the Organic Consumers Association— part of a national coalition supporting this initiative—tells the Bohemian, “We think California will set the precedent.” A labeling law is more than surface change. It can oust GMOs for reasons best articulated in 1994 by Norman Braksick, an employee of a Monsanto subsidiary (who likely lost his job over this quote published in the Kansas City Star): “If you put a label on genetically engineered food, you might as well put a skull and crossbones on it.” Seeing a trusted food suddenly marked “GMO” can kill brand loyalty. Multiply that by millions, and GMOs take a market dive. Such is the power of labeling. Under the proposed law, however, foods containing “small amounts” of GMO won’t require labeling; restaurant food is exempt; and if your favorite whiskey is fermented from GMO barley, oh well. From wine to rum, alcohol makers are off the hook for accountability in this legislation. Meat will continue to be a problem, so one’s choices are limited to becoming vegetarian or keeping an eye on the raising of animals. Meat from an animal fed or injected with GMO foods or medicine does not require GMO labeling. The dark side of the food industry will be spending millions to defeat this measure. In case Monsanto is already out there circulating some bamboozling counter-petition, make sure the petition you sign is offered by someone wearing this slogan: “I’m a volunteer because I want to know when I’m eating genetically engineered food.” To volunteer, contact Ann Thomas at athomas1@pacbell.net. For more information, see www.labelgmos.org.

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WELLNESS Health Starts Here! Personal Safety - Dr. Craig Hartman 2/1/12 - 7:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:00pm Dr. Hartman discusses awareness, stretching, lifting, and core bracing techniques to protect the health of your spine.

Ayurveda: 13 Fires of Digestion 2/7/12 - 6:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:30pm Ayurveda teaches methods to avoid toxic build ups and chronic diseases. Mamta Landerman C.A.S.

Gluten Free Lecture & Store Tour 2/11/12 - 10:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:00am Store tour and samples.

Doggie Day Care 2nd Day FREE! (a $25 value)

Engine 2 - 28 Day Challenge begins 2/15/12 - 6:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00pm Join us for a free Engine 2 diet challenge! In weekly meetings you will learn the tools of lifelong health and wellness through diet. Each Wednesday 2/15-3/14. Reservations required: misty.humphrey@wholefoods.com

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Wellness Center events are free unless otherwise noted.

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FEB. 10, 11 & 12 FRIDAY 6 - 9 PM FRIDAY Wild Salmon Dinner at the Villa Chanticleer Chanticleer with Jim Nor Norton, ton, PBS Nature filmmaker of "Salmon: Running the Gauntlet"

SATURDAY SA ATURD T AY 10 - 4 Downtown Downtown Plaza under tents Wine Tasting Tasting Fishing & Cooking Demos Fishing Gear Trout Pond Pond Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Trout Painting Fish Painting

(707) (70 07) 484-6438 SUNDAY SUNDAY 10 - 3 En Enjoy njoy all the family family fun activities at the fun visitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s v visitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; s center at Lake Sonoma View Viiew the returning steelhead stteelhead jumping the fish ladder ladder

Respect, Restore Restore, e, Celebrate Wild Steelh Steelhead head with the help of our sponsor sponsors: rs: s Re Redwood edwood Empire Chapter Trout Trout Unlimited d

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Theater Party and Fundraiser for the Leadership Institute for Ecology and the Economy

Please join us for a fun night of theater with friends.

Proof

Directed by David Lear Winner of the 2001 Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award for Best Play

Woman-Owned Woman-Owned Family-Friendly Family-Friendly

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 1-7, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

CENTER

Dining Stett Holbrook

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

12

TIPPING THE PLATE The aguachile at La Condesa combines slices of opa in a chile-infused citrus sauce.

The Countess ’ Aria La Condesa hits all the right notes in St. Helena BY STETT HOLBROOK

T

hese are good days for upmarket Mexican food.

While taco trucks and divey burrito shacks are the still the soul of North Bay Mexican food, there’s a growing sophistication among restaurants in the mid-tier. Mateo’s Cocina

Latina in Healdsburg, El Molino Central in Sonoma, and C Casa and Cielito Lindo in Napa stand out for their use of local ingredients and for diving deeper into regional Mexican food. St. Helena’s five-month-old La Condesa does both, and offers even more—the cool factor. La

Condesa (“the countess,” in English) is the West Coast version of a popular Austin, Texas, eatery of the same name. It has the heavily branded feel of a multiunit operation but stops well short of feeling like a chain. The restaurant is in the old Keller Brothers Meats building on

Main Street. The place is a mishmash of styles, with robin-egg-blue walls, midcentury modern chairs and a spider nest of hanging light bulbs garlanding from the ceiling. The kitchen is visible through a portal at the back of the restaurant, while up front, large windows frame the street outside. Most striking of all is the bar, a knotty, exposed wood structure that casts a warm amber glow over the dining room. The head of an angry black bull hangs above the temple of tequila and mescal, while a wellcurated loop of indie rock (Band of Horses, the Breeders, Silversun Pickups) fills the room. Chef Rene Ortiz has created a menu that’s accessible and creative. The menu name-drops local farms and purveyors while keeping rooted in traditional Mexican fare. What sets the food apart is its innovative style and sybaritic glee. Chef Ortiz carefully pushes many dishes over the top, mainly with the addition of pork. The selection of ceviche is a good introduction—only it’s not really ceviche. Rather than limecured seafood, what you get is more like ornately sauced sashimi or crudo. The “aguachile” ($15) combines slices of opah in a bright orange, chile-infused citrus sauce that had me tipping the plate back to get it all. “Chifa” ($15) is yellowtail kingfish with fiery Thai chiles, apples, Japanese turnip and avocado in a yuzu-lime dressing. One of my favorite starters was the zanahoria ($12), a carrot salad made with epazote-accented grilled carrot slices, roasted beets, grilled romaine lettuce drizzled with a carrot-habanero-chile dressing and served alongside wonderfully sweet and gooey burrata. While you won’t find burritos on the menu, La Condesa does make good tacos. The slow-roasted pork in the cochinita pibil tacos (two for $10) has a great citrus and achiote flavor. While a bit dry, the tangy and smoky chicken tacos ($8) were good, too. For something more exotic, there’s the huitlacoche huarache ($15). Huitlacoche, “corn smut,” is a fungus that swells kernels of corn

La Condesa, 1320 Main St., St. Helena. 707.967.8111.

13

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our Oaxacan tradition: mole & mezcal pairing â&#x20AC;Śfull of passion

LIVE JAZZ AT 15 RESTAURANTS IN HEALDSBURG AND GEYSERVILLE

The Main Course...

Mole Tasting Happy Hour Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thur, 3â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm 5 Chicken Skewers + Chips 5 Margaritas, $ 3 Draft Beer $ 3 Sangria

6 TO 9PM Each restaurant will feature signature dishes and live music. A portion of their proceeds go to the Healdsburg Jazz Festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Music Education Programs.

$ $

... and for Dessert 7:30 TO 10:30PM

AFTER PARTY AND DESSERT BAR AT COSTEAUX BAKERY AND CAFĂ&#x2030;

Swinging sounds from the SSU Faculty Jazz Ensemble. Tickets are only $10, including dessert bar!

For a full list of restaurants and musicians, and to buy your tickets: 707.433.2411 www.Agave-Mex.com 1063 Vine Street, Healdsburg

HEALDSBURGJAZZFESTIVAL.ORG I N F O : 70 7- 4 3 3 - 4 6 3 3 t  5 * $ , & 5 4  "5  % 0 0 3  4 6 # + & $ 5  5 0  "7" * - " # * - * 5 :  t

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to create a black, mushroomlike delicacy that goes very well with a sprinkling of farmers cheese, wild mushrooms and corn. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s served on a huarache, a thick oval of masa named after the sandal. While I understand the mushroom theme, the added truffle oil was too strong. How about a few shavings of real truffles instead? The torta is Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gift to the sandwich world, and La Condesa takes the Mexi-sando to places itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never been before. With the use of griddle-pressed ciabatta instead of a telera roll, tortas here are more like paninis. The panza de puerco ($10) is loaded with piloncillo (unreďŹ ned sugar) glazed pork belly, brown-butterapple purĂŠe, Pt. Reyes blue cheese, arugula, tequila-poached pear and tomatillo. I went for the cubanita ($12), a beauty of a sandwich made with smoked ham, pork belly, Swiss cheese, picked jalapenos and habanero mustard. For something more substantial, I liked the bife lento ($32), pasillachile-braised short ribs cooked in a thick, smoky-sweet mole-like sauce. I want to like chile rellenos, but the rice stuffing always has me wanting more protein. La Condesa solves this by ďŹ ling its poblano chiles ($20) with protein-rich quinoa. Why didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t anyone ever think of that before? Through it all, the guayabera-clad servers were prompt and professional. Even when the place was busy, which was often, food came out of the kitchen with surprising speed. Pastry chef Laura Sawicki skips standards like rice pudding and churros, and offers gems like a goat-cheese cheesecake ($10) made with Redwood Hill cheese and the excellent â&#x20AC;&#x153;cafĂŠ con leche,â&#x20AC;? a Blue Bottle coffee and caramel pot de crème ($8). I loved the salty sweet cocoa nib shortbread served with it, too. La Condesa is part of a new breed of Mexican restaurants that walk the line between accessible and esoteric, populist and rareďŹ ed. It succeeds deliciously while still offering a good time.

now available on draft at Ol Oliver’s iver’s Marke Market et hand crafted in small batches with organic/fair trade ingr ingredients redients

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com.

Recipe from Chef de Cuisine Octavio and his mother, his mentor

COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

deliciously refreshing kombucha

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

sustainably created, brewed, fermented, bottled in Sonoma County

Seasonal Specialty

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Chanterelle Mushrooms Seared with Vegetarian Mole, black beans $

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Mole Tasting Happy Hour $

Mon–Thur, 3–6pm 5 Chicken Skewers with Mole $ 5 Margaritas, $ 3 Draft Beer $ 3 Homemade Sangria

SANTA ROSA SEAFOOD MARKET Valentine Delights live or cooked Jumbo

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Gourmet pub fare. $-$$. Popular brewpub and bistro, award-winning handcrafted beers, outdoor dining in summer and pork chops to die for. Lunch and dinner daily. 50 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.765.9694.

Kirin Chinese. $$. Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirin’s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

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IIndian ndian Cuisine Cui s ine

Sophisticated cuisine in restaurant or indoor courtyard. Seasonally changing menu and inventive desserts. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4002.

From the folks of Taverna Santi, with artisan wood-fired pizzas and elaborate antipasti served in a rustic-chic old brick former smokehouse. Lunch and dinner Wed-Mon. 21021 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0111.

707.280.2285

corner of SR Ave & Petaluma Hill Rd Reserve seafood online

Borolo’s Original Pizza

Diavola Italian/Pizza. $$.

Retail Store: Wed–Sun, 11– 6:30

946 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa

McNear’s Alehouse. $.

Dempsey’s Alehouse

FRESH CAUGHT & GUARANTEED

$-$$. Southern-style and slow-cooked from a chef who’s worked with Wolfgang Puck and Alice Waters. Zing! 6811 Laguna Park Way, Sebastopol. 707.575.3277.

Eritrean. $. Authentic and filling, and a welcome culinary addition. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 913 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.6455. Pizza $. Classic, California and European pizza combos beyond the ordinary. Borolo’s uses organic mozzarella, locally sourced produce and milled flour. Salads are made to order, with homemade dressings, and the pizza is baked in a stone oven. Takeout and delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Mission Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.539.3937.

707.433.2411 www.Agave-Mex.com 1063 Vine Street, Healdsburg

Fresh Lobster & Local Crabs

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Abyssinia Ethiopian/

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La Hacienda Mexican. $$. A family-style Mexican eatery with a Michoacan touch. Lunch and dinner daily. 134 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.9365. Larry Vito’s BBQ Smokehouse Barbecue.

Sports bar: barbecue, big appetizers, burgers. Lunch and dinner daily. 21 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

yrah California-French. $$$.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Wolf House Californian. $$$-$$$$. Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sun; brunch, SatSun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401. Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180. Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Chez Pierre FrenchItalian-American. $$. A former

Denny’s turned Parisian bistro, with surprisingly competent cozy French favorites like escargot and chicken Cordon Bleu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 7330 Redwood Blvd, Novato. 415.898.4233.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Hatam Persian. $. Fresh and lushly seasoned regional fare. Lunch and dinner, TuesSun. 821 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8888.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033. Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525. Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey ) atmosphere.

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Dining ( 14

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Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

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Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

N A PA CO U N T Y

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Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6540 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037. Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

409 Mendocino Ave, Downtown Sa anta Rosa Rosa Santa 707.579.5999 70 7.579.5999 ccross ros s sstreet t re et 5th 5t h 1280 1280 Healdsburg Healdsburg Ave, Ave, Healdsburg H e ald sb u r g

707.433.2961 7 07.433.2961

Brassica Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive

SMALL BITES

DIY Olives Instead of slyly sneaking samples of kalamatas from the olive bar at Whole Foods, why not make your own at home? As part of the Sonoma Valley Olive Festival, Glen Ellen’s B.R. Cohn Winery offers an olive-curing workshop this week with olive guru Don Landis. Landis, long a fixture at the annual festival, speaks about the history of olives in California, diving headlong into the Greek style of curing olives with salt instead of lye. Weather permitting, a stroll around the 125-year-old olive orchard follows. Landis is a popular fellow, and reservations for this week’s workshop are already sold-out. But never fear: a second workshop has been added in March, so act fast. The Home Olive Curing Seminar with Don Landis gets underway on Sunday, March 11, at B.R. Cohn Winery, 15000 Hwy. 12, Glen Ellen. 11am–1pm. $20 includes wine and olive oil tasting; reservations required at 800.330.4064, ext. 124.—Stett Holbrook

by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

C.C. Blue Japanese. $$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual

setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y

relationship with the West Block Pinot. 6192 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Thursday– Monday 11am–4pm. 707.433.2305.

Adobe Road Winery

Selby Winery Regularly

Award-winning Cab, Pinot, Zin, Cab Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah. Their tasting room is located in Sonoma on the Plaza. 481 First St. W., Sonoma. 707.939.9099.

D’Argenzio Winery Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

Eric Ross Winery Just friendly folks pouring Pinot, Zin and Marsanne-Roussane; don’t ask about the rooster. Ask about the rooster. 14300 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday-Monday 11am–5pm. 707.939.8525. Littorai Wines The future of integrated, sustainable wine farms may be glimpsed through a window darkly, while Sonoma Coast Pinot and Chard are brilliant in the glass. Tour and tasting by appointment. In west Sebastopol. 707.823.9586.

Matrix Winery Taking over the former warren of Rabbit Ridge, Mazzocco Winery’s new spinoff promises (threatens?) “Wines to die for.” Pinot, Zin and Syrah are tragically good; bar stool seating and a relaxed vibe are pluses. 3291 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Tasting fee $5. 707.433.1911.

Ravenswood Winery The winery motto is “No wimpy wines,” and they make strong, much-praised Zinfandels. A great place to learn that wine is supposed to be fun. 18701 Gehricke Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.933.2332.

Rochioli Vineyards & Winery White House scrapbook details dozens of luncheon menus featuring waiting-list-only Rochioli wine. Tony Blair had a special

served at White House state dinners, Selby Chard has been through several administrations. 215 Center St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–5:30pm. 707.431.1288.

Topel Winery Hailing from Hopland, Topel offers estategrown Meritage and other wines in this well-appointed tasting room with casement windows open to the street, across from Oakville Grocery. Cedar, chicory, chocolate and brown spice–makes one hungry for a portobellomushroom-on-focaccia sandwich. 125 Matheson St., Hopland. Open daily, 11am– 7pm. Tasting fees, $5–$12. 707.433.4116.

Vinoteca Vinify Wine Services is like a Russian doll of wineries within wineries making brands for still more clients. It’s in a generic industrial-park location, but with unique, single-vineyard wines from Frostwatch, Baker Lane, Bjornstad, Super Sonoman and others. 3358 Coffey Lane, Ste. C, Santa Rosa. Friday– Sunday 11am–5pm. $10 fee. 707.542.3292.

N A PA CO U N TY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Black Stallion Winery Owned by a pair of Midwest liquor-distribution barons who hired a capable winemaker and envision it to be a retaildestination winery. The wines are quite good. 4089 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.253.1400.

Chateau Montelena The winery triumphed at the 1976 “Judgment of Paris” tasting where French judges, quelle horreur, found that they had awarded top honors to a California contender. 1429 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 9:30am–4pm. 707.942.5105. Frank Family Vineyards A media mogul imagineered a Napa Valley winery that’s surprisingly no-frills, friendly and free of charge, from the flute of bubbly welcome to the last sip of award-winning Cab. Emphasis is on the historic Larkmead winery, the wine and, natch, the guest at this popular tasting room set in the winery’s remodeled craftsman farmhouse. Frank Family Vineyards, 1091 Larkmead Lane, Calistoga. Tasting daily, 10am–4pm, $10; reserve, $25. 707.942.0753.

Olabisi & Trahan Wineries In the fancy heart of downtown Napa, a low-budget “cellar” where wines are shelved, with clever economy, in stacks of wood pallets; vibes are laid-back and real. Carneros Chardonnay and fruity but firm and focused Cab and Merlot from Suisin Valley, Napa’s much less popular stepsister to the east. 974 Franklin St., Napa. Open daily, noon–5:30pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.257.7477.

Summers Estate Wines Excellent Merlot and that rarest of beasts, Charbono. Small tasting room and friendly staff. 1171 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.5508.

Uncorked at Oxbow Across from the Public Market, this remodeled house in Napa’s historic “Little Italy” is a casual and unaffected joint. Ahnfeldt and Carducci wines include estate Merlot, Syrah, Cab, vinted by Paul Hobbs. Don’t ask about the horse. 605 First St., Napa. Open daily, noon–8pm; winter hours vary. Tasting fee, $10–$20. 707.927.5864.

Sonoma Valley Portworks

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n the middle of the night, friends of Sonoma Valley Portworks might get a call. No, they’re not unloading contraband down by the docks under cover of a fog that lurks over the slough like a jealous lover. Although it’s a smalltime crime to call a wine “port” when it wasn’t made in Portugal, it’s all on the level here in Petaluma—grandfathered in. For 20 years, Bill Reading has been creating flavorful dessert wines in a style all his own.

Where was I? Having another sip. Ah, yes . . . The folks at SVP make California port in an industrial sector of Petaluma that includes Cowgirl Creamery and Aqus Cafe, and which retains its ramshackle charm while drawing customers from the Theater District nearby. “We like to say it’s a well-kept secret,” says retail sales director Caryn Reading. “But don’t keep it a secret.” Damn, this port is good! If you have two glasses, don’t fret—it’s served in such tiny glasses . . . As I was saying: About those midnight calls, to produce some of their port, SVP practices the ancient method of foot treading. When it gets down to 9 percent sugar, the pressing must be done; feet rallied to action no matter what inopportune the hour. Curious tasters may simply sidle down Second Street on any long weekend. The warehouse is decorated with old vines and lights, the bar is a simple across-two-barrels affair. Tchotchkes are at a minimum, but everybody gets a button. One says, “Lick my glass!” This is the home of DECO Port ($18), the first California dessert wine packaged in a tall, thin bottle. This tawny-style, sweet wine made from California Zinfandel and Australian Shiraz and Grenache has just a hint of chocolate. The Aris Petite Sirah Port ($30) is a sweet, substantial ruby wine; while the Aris Petite Verdot Port ($30) is substantially different, with a dry, tannic finish and herbal high notes. The Maduro ($40) has nutty, Frangelico aromas and is said to pair well with aged cheese and desserts: “We have what I call high-calorie conversations,” Reading says of visitors whose imaginations are spurred by their wines. The Spirit of the Harvest Grappa ($35) is made from the juicy remnants of gentle foot-treading and imparts a clean, fruity, ghostof-the-grape aroma after being distilled next door at Stillwater Spirits. This spirit may be sniffed and purchased on the premises, but not tasted—some things are still verboten by the Fed, down by the docks. Sonoma Valley Portworks, 613 Second St., Petaluma. Thursday–Monday, noon to 5pm, and by appointment. No tasting fee; donations to Committee on the Shelterless accepted. 707.769.5203.—James Knight

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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The Big O Santa Rosa taxpayers have funded an extra $21 million to gang prevention since Measure O was approved. So why aren’t any accurate gang-related crime statistics being produced? BY ROBERT EDMONDS

M

easure O, the 20-year quarter-cent sales tax increase that was approved by voters in 2004, has had its share of critics. At a time when city centers, swimming pools and senior services have been threatened with closure due to budget constraints, Measure O’s surplus is available only to fire, police and gang prevention, barring a near unanimous 6-out-of-7 vote from the Santa Rosa City Council. Other departments at city hall have suffered salary cuts and layoffs, while Measure O largely protects public safety from shared sacrifice. But five years after full implementation, one of the more distressing aspects of Measure O is in evaluating its success. Written into the text of Measure O is a citizen oversight committee, which monitors expenditures and appropriations of tax revenues and “additional duties as the [City] Council may designate.” Those duties do not yet include hard statistical measurements for the success of the Mayor’s Gang Prevention Task Force, but they may soon. In phone calls, emails and in-person meetings for this article, numerous members of the police department and the task force repeatedly said that its gang-related crime statistics should not be trusted to be accurate in comparing year-toyear gang crime in Santa Rosa. Measure O allocates 40 percent of raised taxes to fire services, 40 percent to increased police enforcement and 20 percent

to programs of the Santa Rosa Mayor’s Gang Prevention Task Force. But inaccurate data collection and reporting methods make objective evaluation of gang intervention, prevention and enforcement success nearly impossible, leaving some to wonder whether voters’ 20-year $100 million investment is being spent on results—and more importantly, if vulnerable kids are being served effectively. City officials indicate that the most important measures of success are the way the community “feels” and the reports of success

by service providers and those served by the task force’s programs. With Measure O funds, Santa Rosa is spending between $1.5 and $2 million a year strictly on the prevention and intervention of “gang-related” crimes. That does not include the $3.5 million spent annually by the Santa Rosa Police Department for “gangrelated” enforcement in their over $40 million annual budget. Nor do these numbers account for the additional millions of “gangrelated” dollars which continue to be spent by Santa Rosa City

Schools, Sonoma County, and state and federal governments, as well as nonprofit and community organizations. How do we determine if we are getting our money’s worth? Nobody can seem to explain it in concrete terms usually associated with huge expenditures of public money. Ellen Bailey, the Gang Prevention Services manager for the city of Santa Rosa, who retired at the end of December, says that the “self-reported satisfaction of the kids being served is one of the most important measures of success for the task force.”

However, during a five-year review at a Dec. 13 city council meeting, a different set of data from the California Attorney General’s Office was provided by the SRPD and the task force, indicating that juvenile violent

at this time, even though the attached reports are formatted to do so. Annual comparisons should only be considered accurate from year 2011 onward.” How are we supposed to make sense of these discrepancies? How do we move forward to the next five-year plan without reliable statistics?

‘I do not have the statistical information regarding gangrelated juvenile arrests at this time.’—Sgt. Ray Navarro crime in Santa Rosa was down by 32 percent during that period. Councilmember Gary Wysocky asked Sgt. Ray Navarro of the SRPD why the statistics that he presented to the council were only for juvenile offenses, “which would not necessarily be indicative of gang-related crimes.” Navarro replied that he really didn’t have an answer to that. “I do not have the statistical information regarding gangrelated juvenile arrests at this time,” he said. Both nationwide and on a city level, overall violent crime is reportedly down. The most recent nationwide FBI data indicates that violent crime totals are 13.2 percent below 2006 levels. For the city of Santa Rosa, the SRPD’s 2010 annual report indicates that “violent crime is down 14 percent over the past five years.” But city and police officials, in quantifying gang-related crime trends, routinely reference various combinations of these statistics—national violent crime data, local violent crime data and juvenile crime data from the state of California—none of which represent gang-related crime in Santa Rosa. Crime analyst Conan Mullen of the SRPD provided 16 pages of statistical reports for this article, and stated, “I do not recommend comparing year-toyear gang crime in Santa Rosa

T

he text of Measure O promised increases in police and fire services, but more significantly, voters opted for the measure as a way to achieve city officials’ demand for measurable reduction in escalating gang violence. Statistical increases in violent gang crime pre-2004, presumably, created such a demand. The political backers of the measure, city officials and police and fire unions enlisted political consultant firm TBWB Strategies to promote the measure. According to TBWB’s website, “Polling did not show that voters supported public safety enough to pass a ballot measure in November 2002.” Santa Rosa residents’ highest priority, according to polls,

mean, especially in terms of measuring success? The task force’s strategic plan attempts to explain, but presents only two actual statistics for “customer satisfaction” from these very complicated, theoretical logic models. This “logic model” is so convoluted and vague that the task force pays CCPA to decipher it on an ongoing basis. These statistics show: “Average Satisfaction of Youth = 84%; Average Satisfaction of Parents of Youth = 89%” The five-year strategic action plan of the task force, written in 2006, set goals for reducing gang activity in Santa Rosa and indicated that at the end of 2011 the effectiveness of these goals was to be evaluated. According to the plan, the SRPD would provide statistical analysis of crime trends. Now, at the end of the first five-year strategic action plan, the draft plan for the next five years is in the works and scheduled to be approved imminently. At the Dec. 13 city council meeting, members of the task force policy team updated the Santa Rosa City Council about the progress made during the first five-year plan. The policy team includes members from a wide range of public agencies and public-interest groups, including Social Advocates for Youth and Santa Rosa City Schools. This update included worthwhile praise and commendation for good work, and plenty of talk about how people on the task force feel positively about the work they are doing. Santa Rosa mayor Ernesto Olivares, a retired SRPD lieutenant and former manager of the task force, summed up the presentation to the city council: “It’s tough work, it’s necessary work, and I think we’re beginning to show some positive results in a positive direction. . . . This could have been a much longer presentation with all the data that they’ve gathered over time, but in the interest of time, I

‘We lost the ability to capture the data. We are trying to reinstitute it and fine-tune it, so you will see some striking numbers.” —Police Chief Tom Schwedhelm was traffic, but TBWB ultimately convinced “uninformed citizens” that “they absolutely needed to address public-safety-funding issues first” by passing Measure O. The task force now employs a consulting agency called Community Crime Prevention Associates (CCPA), which evaluates the task force by using something called the “SR CHOICE Performance Logic Model Evaluation System [which] is based on the principles and practices of Continuous Quality Improvement.” What does that

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n a recent in-person interview in his office, Santa Rosa Police Chief Tom Schwedhelm explained how the police department compensates for confusing and alarming data. “When we were going through the budget cut process, we lost the ability to capture the data. We are trying to reinstitute it and fine-tune it, so you will see some striking numbers. “Holy smokes!” he said, “Has violence increased that much? If you were just to look at the numbers, you might feel that way.” Consequently, the task force is now gauging success in ways that are more difficult to quantify. According to Schwedhelm, “We talk to the officers in the streets, we talk to the community partners [and ask,] ‘How are you feeling?’ because everyone is impacted by the crime. And they are feeling that we are trending in a positive direction.” Happy kids and positive feelings in the community are great, but what happened to the vote for accountability promised by these officials who sold us Measure O? According to the “Strategic Work Plan 2008–2012” published by the task force, the SRPD was charged with “establishing a baseline for measuring success” and to “develop a standard statistical reporting format for the Mayor’s Gang-Prevention Task Force and community decision makers to quickly and easily understand and interpret gang-related criminal data and trends.” According to official crimeanalysis data obtained from the Santa Rosa Police Department in October 2011, some gang-related crimes in Santa Rosa are up by as much as 1,400 percent since 2006, with the total number of gang-related crimes up by 253 percent and an alarming 371 percent increase for gang crimes in public schools.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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thought it was good to just give a brief overview of what is going on and allow you to ask questions.” In addition to his questions for Sgt. Navarro about juvenile crime rates versus gang-related crime rates, Councilman Wysocky questioned Sonoma County deputy chief probation officer Sheralynn Freitas on why the fiveyear report included no figures for recidivism rates among the population served by the task force. She responded that “as far as the Mayor’s Gang Prevention Task Force—people responding, prevention—they aren’t entering into any sort of database, so there is some limitation.” Wysocky continued by asking Lynn Garric from the Sonoma County Office of Education why there was no trending data included in the report from the California Healthy Kids Survey and the custom “gang module,” which the city of Santa Rosa paid to develop and to have included in the survey. Garric replied that they currently only have three years of data, and that they have had trouble with scoring the tests and are just starting to examine the data now. Official SRPD documents now carry this warning: “The accuracy of this report’s annual gang crime data has been impacted by numerous changes to SRPD’s gang crime identification and reporting methodology between years 2006 and 2010. Any conclusions based on this data should be made with CAUTION.” In his office interview, Chief Schwedhelm and Gang Prevention Services manager Ellen Bailey were asked how they are dealing with changes in data collection methodology by the SRPD. Bailey responded, saying, “Actually, we use data provided by Peter Ellis, who is with Community Crime Prevention Associates, the evaluator for all our programs. He looks at the state data or gets the

information from the state. All of the information from the police department goes through this process with the FBI. “Right?” Bailey asked, turning to the police chief. Schwedhelm confirmed that the task force uses the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports data. Bailey continued, “And that is the data we use to look at trends.” Chief Schwedhelm, Bailey and Bailey’s boss at Recreation, Parks and Community Services Marc Richardson all agreed in the interview that the task force is currently using data from the FBI’s annual Uniform Crime Reports. They agreed, too, that the statistics do not directly address gang-related activities, and that the statistics are not applicable to gang crime at a local level, since they only examine statewide and national trending of violent and property crime. None of the three were able to explain how FBI data describes effectiveness at the local level, since all agreed that Uniform Crime Reports data do not include any measurement of “gang related” offenses. A request to crime analyst Mullen for policies that indicate the methodology the SRPD has used in the past, and

FRONT AND CENTER A new marketing campaign for the Mayor’s Gang

Prevention Task Force features lots of feel-good images with community leaders.

which reviews the financial expenditures of the Measure O funding stream, the codified 40-40-20 split and the ways in which funds disperse to agencies. The design of the committee strictly prevents Measure O funds from supplanting existing general fund resources devoted to public safety, but according to its members, the committee deals only with tracking money already spent and have no oversight of the effectiveness of the programs for which the money is spent. Councilmember Gary Wysocky’s oversight appointee is Santa Rosa attorney Erin Carlstrom, a 2012 candidate for the Santa Rosa City Council. Carlstrom says she is very interested in understanding how the task force gauges its own effectiveness, since her own involvement with the oversight committee allows for no such evaluation. Councilmember Marsha Vas Dupre’s appointee is studentrights advocate Michaele Morales says that “the committee is fiscal only, no say about programs or anything, just over seeing that the funding is 40 percent police, 40 percent fire and 20 percent supposed gang prevention.” Morales also adds that “the supposed gang prevention part is given to friends, not any new innovative programs. The people picked to serve are not really community-member stakeholders.” When asked what she knew

‘There are no such official policies for reporting methodology.’—SRPD Crime Analyst Conan Mullen which indicate the changes to methodology resulting in such substantial surges in recent gang crime statistics, was answered with, “There are no such official policies for reporting methodology.” Chief Schwedhelm promised in an interview to provide the current reporting methodology SRPD uses. Three months after his interview for this article, and after repeated reminders, there is no such methodology to report.

S

anta Rosa City Council members each appoint a representative to the Measure O oversight committee,

of the task force’s measurement of their effectiveness, she said, “They do a year’s glossy, shining self-serving report saying that 80 percent or more of families and youth served are happy with services received. The report is very convoluted and vague.” A look inside the SRPD’s recently updated 2010 policy manual includes no updates or methodology for officers to use in including crimes in “gangrelated” statistics. The Mayor’s Gang Prevention Task Force undoubtedly has good intentions, and many young people benefit by the programs it supports. But the $21 million spent so far for the task force and the SRPD is a huge sum of taxpayer money to receive in exchange for unreliable measurements of effectiveness, especially at a time when every other city department is sacrificing budgets, salary and personnel to make ends meet. Absent any reliable statistics, or methodology for reporting such statistics, what measures of accountability are in place? The Santa Rosa Mayor’s Gang Prevention Task Force policy team and operational team hold a special joint meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 8, in the Cypress Room at the Finley Community Center. 2060 W. College Ave., Santa Rosa. 7:15–9am. The meeting is open to the public. Robert Edmonds has actively worked on and written about police accountability issues in Sonoma County for over ten years.

21

The week’s events: a selective guide

BY THE SEA ‘Albatross’ screens at the Mostly British Film Festival running Feb. 6–9 at the Rafael Film Center.

HEALDSBURG

FA I R FA X

N A PA

N A PA

Out to Dinner

Purple Haze

Satisfy My Soul

Queen’s Landing

Friday most definitely makes my list of top five favorite movies ever. Best quote? “Puff, puff, give. Puff, puff, give!”—those words of wisdom spoken so eloquently by Ice Cube’s sidekick, Smokey. Cube’s not the only one to take on the green stuff as his muse. Snoop Dogg’s latest album, High School, boasts a suite of songs about the wacky tobacky, and North California–based reggae artist Winstrong finds irie inspiration on his latest album with DJ Jacques, A Tribute to Legends (The Ganja Refix). Interpolating classic reggae and R&B hits with new ganja-culture lyrics (“I like the way you roll it, no diggity, we about to smoke it up”), he fits right into the ever-growing weed lexicon. Winstrong plays on Friday, Feb. 3, at 19 Broadway. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 10pm. 415.459.1091.

When Paul Thorn played the EarleFest stage last year, he told the crowd that he’d written his debut album in an attempt to win back a lost love. But it didn’t work; if anything, it just gave the lady more fuel to “treat me like dirt,” Thorn sardonically told a charmed crowd. Known for his fiery, barnstorming performances and wry humor, Thorn takes the stage in Napa with another soulful, church-raised crooner, Ruthie Foster. Get all the fire-and-brimstone of a good church sermon without all that God stuff when Soul Salvation, featuring Ruthie Foster and Paul Thorn, hits the stage on Wednesday, Feb. 8, at the Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. 8pm. $25. 707.226.7372.

In my high school years, Queensrÿche’s creepy lullaby “Silent Lucidity” earned major airplay on the local hard-rock station. The song displayed a softer side of the progressive metal band, best known for heavy riffs, long flowing hair and even longer guitar solos. Lead singer Geoff Tate may have less hair now, but he has become quite the wine man, putting out limited edition white and red wines (called “Insania”) with Three Rivers Winery out of Walla Walla, Wash. One could presume that his show in Napa this week is basically a good excuse to go winetasting in the area; see Tate explore lucid dreaming through song on Thursday, Feb. 2, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 8pm. $25. 707.259.0123

Nothing goes better with a tasty supper than a captivating bit of live jazz. For the second year in a row, Jazz on the Menu comes to Healdsburg, offering a night on the town with fine food in the service of a good cause. A portion of the proceeds from each meal benefit Healdsburg Jazz Festival’s education programs. Fifteen participating restaurants host live jazz on Feb. 2 this year, including Spoonbar, Diavola Pizzeria and Charcuterie. An after-party with dessert bar and the SSU Faculty Jazz Ensemble swings on Thursday, Feb. 2, at Costeaux French Bakery. 417 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. $10. For a complete list of participating restaurants, ticket info. and performers, see www.healdsburgjazzfestival.org.

—Leilani Clark

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 1-7, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

CULTURE

ArtsIdeas Dennis Kwan

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22

REMEMBERING A FRIEND Rebecca Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play, ďŹ rst performed in New York, hits a much stronger chord back home.

Twenty Years On â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fault Linesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; delicately revisits the Polly Klaas tragedy BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

here is no way around the fact,â&#x20AC;? says playwright Rebecca Louise Miller, â&#x20AC;&#x153;that for kids of my generation in Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;kids who were 12, 13, 14 years old when Polly was kidnappedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; that that event was a huge milestone in our lives. We had enough of an understanding of the world that we could really grasp what was happening, and we were also

â&#x20AC;&#x153;

young enough that this was probably the ďŹ rst time we were confronted with the truly terrible things that exist in the world.â&#x20AC;? Miller, an actress and writer working in New York City, grew up in Sonoma County, where she was a student in the very ďŹ rst ArtQuest drama program at Santa Rosa High School. She went on to perform often on local stagesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; many still remember her in Tom Stoppardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arcadia, performed by Actors Theater in 1999â&#x20AC;&#x201D;before

moving to New York and marrying playwright David L. Epstein. She continues to act in plays and movies, most recently appearing in the television ďŹ lm Prayers for Bobby with Sigourney Weaver. Several years ago, encouraged by her husband to take a stab at writing, Miller began toying with the idea of building a play around her memories of the 1993 Polly Klaas tragedy. As a childhood friend of Klaasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, Miller wrestled with conďŹ&#x201A;icted feelings about turning her memories into words in an actual script. But eventually

she did write the play. Titled Fault Lines, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a ďŹ ctional story about three estranged friends gathering together 20 years after the kidnapping of a mutual friend. In part, it examines the impact of the media on such tragedies and asks questions about exactly whom such public events belong to. When one character is told that her friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story is not hers to tell, she replies, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the only thing I have thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth talking about.â&#x20AC;? Fault Lines debuted in New York City in 2008, earning glowing reviews, and last year was published in the anthology Plays and Playwrights, 2011 (New York Theatre Experience; $19). Now Fault Lines comes home to Sonoma County, where it will be staged at Main Stage West theater in Sebastopol, directed by Beth Craven. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little terrifying, to be honest,â&#x20AC;? says Miller, speaking on the phone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exciting, on some levels, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a little scary. It took me a really long time to write this play, in part because I had to grapple with the idea of the Polly I remembered, my friend, as compared to Polly Klaas the iconâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; an icon of something really terrible. The last thing I wanted to do was exploit Pollyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memory, but I felt I really needed to tell this story my way. And I had to ďŹ ght these weird feelings of guilt and unease as I was writing the play, because here I was bringing it all up again.â&#x20AC;? Miller plans to attend a performance partway through the run, looking forward to seeing the show as an audience member. Technically, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never seen the play, since in the New York run, she played the role of Rachel, a woman who responded to the kidnapping by becoming a driven, high-proďŹ le child-safety activist. Though deeply moving throughout, the play as written by Miller has plenty of authentic humor, and in its New York run, audiences were taken on a bit of a

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Though based on painful memories, Miller feels that the play is an important step in coming to terms with the way we all process unspeakable events. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the reason I got into the performing arts to begin with,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe that people having an experience together in a room in real time creates a capacity for change. It creates the opportunity for conversations, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s essential in helping us process those feelings. This play wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t written to heal myselfâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;or to heal anyone. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think a play can do that. But it can get us talking. And maybe some healing can come from that.â&#x20AC;?

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roller-coaster ride. Miller suspects the experience will be different in Sonoma County. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most of the people seeing it in New York didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what it was about when they walked in,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t immediately obvious what it is these three women have in common. This time, I doubt there will be anyone who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about and already has strong feelings about it. So the surprise element will be missing, and I expect people wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel as comfortable laughing when the bits of humor pop up. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be interesting, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for sure.â&#x20AC;?

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Stage

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DECONSTRUCTING SGT. PEPPER TUESDAY, FEB 7, 7:30 PM A multimedia journey: Using rare & unreleased recordings, Beatles expert Scott Freiman walks PERFORMING the audience through the construction of songs ARTS THEATER from take one to the final version. $15. 115 North St., Healdsburg ®

www.raventheater.org

WORD-FOR-WORD Diana Kingsbury, 16, portrays Occupy Santa Rosa activist Carl Patrick in a unique new play.

Refusing to Obey Protesters’ struggles and disruptive dogs BY DAVID TEMPLETON

FUNCTIONAL ART

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Just say... I Love You,

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I

f you grow up in a country that doesn’t allow you to question, then you’re going to grow into an adult that never questions anything.” So says seventy-something activist Conrad Knudsen near the beginning of Walking Elephant Theater’s new slice of politicaldocumentary performance art, Civil Disobedience: The Musical. As directed by Brian Glenn Bryson, Civil Disobedience features a cast of 12 journalists/performers (ages eight to 18) presenting theatrical recreations of interviews they’ve conducted with a string of real-life protesters, all folks who’ve put their ideals and bodies on the line for their beliefs. Social causes represented in the show range from civil rights and free speech (Mario Savio’s famous UC Berkeley oratory

is recreated by eight-year-old Symian Trott) to animal-rights issues and the Occupy movement. Knudsen, who walked with Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma in 1965, is portrayed onstage through video interviews and the wordfor-word performance of young actor Jordan Torres (Knudsen’s grandson). Deeply heartfelt and often highly inventive, though occasionally a bit clunky and uneven, the show defies conventional criticism but is best summed up in a comment Knudsen makes at the end of the show: “Hope,” he says, “is contagious.” Ultimately, so is the hopeful spirit and stirring openheartedness of Civil Disobedience. Meanwhile in Rio Nido, Pegasus Theater has launched a show about a very different kind of open-heartedness, that of a canine game-changer who wreaks havoc on the marriage of a middle-aged couple. In A. R. Gurney’s enduring 1995 comedy Sylvia, an energetic stray (played brilliantly by Rachel Custer, who captures doghood with charming accuracy) is brought home by unhappy New York businessman Greg (Mark Gregory, a little too muggy and surface-level until his effectively tender final scenes). To say the dog is not welcomed by Greg’s schoolteacher wife, Kate (an excellent Jacquelyn Wells, all churning contradictions), is an understatement. Smartly and crisply directed by Beulah Vega, Sylvia is often hilarious. The dog’s foul-mouthed face-off with a cat is one of many little comic gems. By its unexpectedly loving, satisfying ending, Sylvia proves itself to be more than a play about a dog; it’s a play about people learning how to love all over again. ‘Civil Disobedience: The Musical’ runs Feb. 3–5 at the Glaser Center (547 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa; Friday–Saturday at 8pm; Sunday at 3pm; $10–$15) and Feb. 10–11 at the Russian River Hall (20347 Hwy. 116, Monte Rio; 8pm; $10–$15). ‘Sylvia’ runs Friday–Sunday through Feb. 12 at the Rio Nido Lodge. 4444 Wood Road, Rio Nido. Friday– Saturday at 8pm; Sunday at 2pm. $15–$20. 707.583.2343.

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Join uuss ffor Join or sspecial pecial pperformances er formances of of Mediterranea Medi t er r a nea ffrom rom tthe he Teatro Teat ro alla alla Scala Scala inin Milan, Milan, Italy It aly on on Sunday S unda y 22/5 / 5 aatt 11pm pm and and Tuesday Tuesday 2/7 2 /7 at at 66:30pm. : 30pm. Tickets T ic k e t s aare re on on sale sale now now at at oour ur box box office of fice or or wwww.movietickets.com! w w.movieticket s.com ! JJoin oin us us for for a Double Double Feature Feat ure on on Sunday Sunday 22/12 /12 of of RRemembering emembering PPlayland layland aatt tthe he BBeach each at at 1pm 1pm & SSutro’s: ut ro’s : The The PPalace alace aatt Lands L ands EEnd nd at at 2:30pm. 2: 30pm. Q&A Q&A wwith ith Film Film maker maker Tom Tom Wyrsch W yrsch after af ter both both films! f ilm s !

FIGURE, FORM Pina Bausch comes to life in the new Wim Wenders documentary.

Dance for Me ‘Pina’ an elegant trip through the dance avant-garde BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

t’s one of the best films of 2011, but when one describes Wim Wenders’ Pina, it sounds like fodder for Saturday Night Live’s “Sprockets.” The documentary is a cinematic festschrift for the German choreographer Pina Bausch, who passed away in 2009; it’s also an introduction, visible in superb 3-D, to her works.

Bausch’s choreography sometimes exhibits the German angst that looks deranged to American eyes. “This is veal!” screams a lone dancer in the courtyard of a factory; she then stuffs this raw meat into the toes of her ballet slippers. Meaning? Potentially, a note about the agony dancers endure to get en pointe. Yet few dances outside of children’s ballets engage with a person in a hippopotamus costume. “I had a love affair with the hippo,” recalls one of the members of Pina’s dance company. Other dancers deliver their memories of Bausch straight to the camera, recalling vague yet penetrating advice: “You have to go crazier,” “She saw everything I was afraid of.” From the evidence of Pina, we can see why they fell in love, despite what Bausch demanded from them. She led them through obstacle courses, a minefield of scattered chairs and sleeping drunks in the Café Müller piece. Bausch’s famed Rites of Spring is carried out on a peat-covered stage. The old vaudeville joke is that you never let the audience see you sweat, though it’s actually this sweat on the dancers which brings out the primeval mud in the Stravinsky. We’re all supposed to be very worried about elitism in high art. Yet however rarefied it could be, Bausch’s art was all about hard work and ordinary pain. There’s even a kind of homeliness in the site-specific pieces, done in and around the city of Wuppertal’s famous aerial tram. One performance is marvelously staged on the edge of traffic, with T.J.Maxx and McDonald’s signs looming overhead.

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Film

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Yo el Rey Roasting/ Art House

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Film

The Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s W rldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wo Most

Beloved Belo ve ed MUSICAL L

Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES Big Miracle (PG; 123 min.) Drew Barrymore and John Krasinski co-star in the adaptation of Tom Roseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book Freeing the Whales, about a 1988 international effort to rescue gray whales trapped under ice near Alaska. (GB)

Chronicle (PG-13; 83 min.) Three teens develop superhuman abilities after stumbling on a mysterious substance in a crater. (GB)

Book & Lyrics by TOM JONES Music by HARVEY SCHMIDT Directed by MATTHEW TEAGUE MILLER Music Direction by LUCAS SHERMAN

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Haywire (R; 93 min.) A freelance operative is doublecrossed after a mission rescuing a hostaged Chinese journalist in the latest from Steven Soderbergh. (GB)

The Woman in Black (R; 95 min.) Daniel Radcliffe plays a widowed lawyer processing a will in an eerie village where the sight of a spectre foretells the death of another child. From recently reborn Hammer Film Productions! (GB)

Hugo (PG; 127 min.) Hugo, a young boy sent

The Artist (PG-13; 100 min.) French romance and homage to silent film, The Artist stars Jean Dujardin (OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies) as a

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Pina (PG; 106 min.) Wim Wendersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 3-D documentary of German choreographer Pina Bausch screens at the Rafael Film Center. See review, p25.

stars in the adaptation of George Mooreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1927 story about a woman living life disguised as a man. (GB)

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Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (R; 158 min.) David Fincher directs the Englishlanguage version of the hit 2009 Swedish film, based on the first in Stieg Larssonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Millennium series.â&#x20AC;? Co-stars Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara, as Lisbeth. (GB)

Man on a Ledge (PG-13; 102 min.) An ex-copâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the man on the ledgeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;makes a bold and dangerous move in an attempt to prove he was framed for stealing from a ruined businessman. (GB)

ALSO PLAYING

February 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 19

journeys across New York City in search of a lock box belonging to his father, who died in the 9-11 attacks. Based on the novel by Jonathan Safran Foer and starring Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock. (GB)

silent-film star in love with an aspiring actress during the rise of the talkies. In black-andwhite with French subtitles. (GB)

Contraband (R; 110 min.) Familiar story about a retired criminal dragged back into the game stars Mark Wahlberg as an expert smuggler who agrees to do one last job to settle his brother-in-laws debts. Co-stars Kate Beckinsale. (GB) A Dangerous Method (R; 94 min.) David Cronenberg directs the adaptation of John Kerrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2122;93 book about Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender), his mentor, Freud (Viggo Mortensen), and patient Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley), who became one of the first female psychoanalysts. (GB)

Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone (NR; 107 min.) Perpetual â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80sâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s next-big-thing are subject of doc narrated by Laurence Fishburne. Onscreen interviewees include Ice-T, Flea, Branford Marsalis, and George Clinton. Filmmaker Chris Metlzer appears for discussion after film. At the Rafael, Feb. 5, 7pm. (GB)

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (PG-13; 129 min.) A 10-year-old boy

oil-rig workers face starvation and a pack of wolves after their plane crashes in the Alaskan wilderness. Stars as Liam Neeson. Produced by Ridley and Tony Scott. (GB)

to live with his uncle who maintains the clocks at a railway station, searches for the missing part, the key to the heart, of the automaton his clockmaker father had found before his death. Directed by Martin Scorsese in an adaptation of Brian Selznickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret. (GB)

The Iron Lady (PG-13; 115 min.) Meryl Streep plays Margaret Thatcher in biopic costarring Jim Broadbent, Nick Dunning and Richard Grant. From the director of Mamma Mia! (GB) One for the Money (PG-13; 91 min.) Stars Katherine Heigl in the adaptation of Janet Evanovichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1994 novel about a young out-ofwork woman who turns to bounty hunting to pay the bills. (GB)

Red Tails (PG-13; 125 min.) Producer George Lucas brings the story of the Tuskegee Airmen to the big screen. With Cuba Gooding Jr. and Terrence Howard. (GB) Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R; 127 min.) Big-screen version based on John le CarrĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1974 novel stars Gary Oldman as George Smiley, British intelligence officer searching for a double agent in the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top levels. With Colin Firth too! (GB) Underworld: Awakening (R; 88 min.) Kate Beckinsale returns for another paycheck in the fourth installment in the apparently unceasing war between vampires and werewolves. (GB) We Bought a Zoo (PG; 123 min.) The memoir of Benjamin Mee, father and widower who finds his life radically changing after he buys a country estateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, with it, a zooâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is brought to the screen by director and screenwriter Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire, Almost Famous). Stars Matt Damon and Scarlett Johansson. (GB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY American Philharmonic Guest conductor Evan Craves and pianist Elena Ulyanova in a program that includes Mahler, Berlioz and Rachmaninoff. Feb 5, 3:30pm. Free. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Beso Negro With the Steve Pile band and the Water Tower Bucket Boys. Feb 4, 8pm. $10. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Groundation Feel irie with reggae powerhouse. DJ Jacques opens. Feb 3, 9:30. $21-$26. Mystic Theatre, 21 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Jayhawks Americana favorites with blissful harmonies. Feb 6, 7:30. $33-$36. Mystic Theatre, 21 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Punk Covers Night Tribute bands include Shit for Brains (Bad Brains), SemiEvolved Kennedys (Dead Kennedys), Death Church (Rudimentary Peni) and Largactyl (Amebix). Feb 4, 8pm. $6. Transient Lounge, 400 E Todd Rd, Santa Rosa. No phone.

ta2izzy@yahoo.com contact: Izzy 530.340.0517

2777 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa www.flamingoresort.com 707.545.8530 Tickets: $20 per day or $35 for weekend

Carolyn Wonderland Blues phenomenon sings and plays her soul out. Feb 3, 8:30pm. $15-$18. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

SONOMA COUNTY Acre Coffee Feb 5, Elaine Lucia. 21 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.772.5117.

Aubergine

MARIN COUNTY Steve Lucky & Rhumba Bums Jump and jive with retro sounds. Feb 4, 8pm. $9-$19. Danca Palace. 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Winstrong Reggae artist whose recent collaboration with DJ Jacques pays green-crystalline tribute to the legends. Feb 3, 10pm. 19 Broadway, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

NAPA COUNTY Paul Thorn & Ruthie Foster Two of the great Americana songwriters wrestle with religious upbringing in ‘Soul Salvation,’ a unique night of gospel and folk songs. Feb 8, 8pm. $25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Geoff Tate Frontman for Queensryche goes unplugged. Feb 2, 8pm. $25. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Feb 2, T’Soul. Feb 3, Spends Quality. Feb 4, Luv Handles. Feb 5, Murder at Breslingdale Estates (dinner theater). 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Barley & Hops Tavern Fri, Jen Tucker. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Chrome Lotus Feb 3, Ladies Night. 501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. www.chromelotussr.com.

Coffee Catz Mon, open mic. Thurs, Science Buzz Cafe (see Lectures). Sat, 2pm, Bluegrass jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Doc Holliday’s Saloon Wed, Sonoma County Blues Society live music. 138 Calistoga Road, Santa Rosa. 707.537.0308.

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Flamingo Lounge Feb 4, Decadance with guest DJ Little John. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Gaia’s Garden Feb 1, Shade. Feb 2, Hand Me Down. Feb 3, Activist Lounge. Feb 8, ) French jam. Tues,

28

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27 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

Clubs & Venues

Music ( 27

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

Jim Adams. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

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$$5/DOORS 5/ DOORS 7PM/ALL 7PM /ALL AGES AGES MON M ON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FEB FEB 6 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE PRESENTS PRESENTS REGGAE/DANCEHALL/HIP R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL / HIP HOP HOP

MONDAY M ONDAY N NIGHT IGHT EEDUTAINMENT DUT TAINMENT

Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Upcoming Events

TUES TUES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FEB FEB 7

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT

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Blame Sally

Saturday, February 4, 8:00 pm Vivacious, infectious, rhythmic energy that produces a smile to the faceâ&#x20AC;Ś

$$44 JJAMESON'S A M E SO N ' S & O ORGANIC R G AN I C G GUAYAKI UAYAKI CO COCKTAILS CKTAILS

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$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Fri and Sat, Jazz in the Lobby. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wed, Brainstorm. Sun, open mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Last Day Saloon Feb 1, Girls & Boys, Izzy Cox, Ben Dubin, Hannah Jern-Miller. Feb 3, Carolyn Wonderland, Mofo Party Band. Feb 4, Rock and Roll Detention featuring Coast Pilots, Third Rail Band and Court â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Disaster. Feb 5, Golden Gate Rhythm Machine. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343. Feb 1, Willie Perez. Feb 2, Maple Profant. Feb 2, Willie Perez. Feb 4, Yancie Taylor. Sun, Kit Mariahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501. Feb 2, Tony Gibson. Feb 4, Andrew Freeman. Feb 5, Acoustic Celtic Jam. Every other Monday, knitting night. Wed, 7:30pm, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Feb 1, Wood Brothers with Sarah and Christian Dugas. Feb 3, Groundation with DJ Jacques. Feb 4, ALO with Nicki Bluhm and Gramblers. Feb 6, Jayhawks with Abigail Washburn and Kai Welch. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Stop the Show Announcing our Built to Spill cover song contest! Unlike their creative progeny My Morning Jacket and Band of Horses, Built to Spill have consistently shined under the radar, never quite reaching outsized arena-rock status and sticking to small theatres. Now, the Bohemian gives fans a chance to win two tickets to see Built to Spill at the Uptown Theatre in Napa on Feb. 25. Yes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to get stoked on our official Built to Spill Cover Song Contest. The rules are easy: First, record a Built to Spill cover song. Then, send the mp3 to us at letters@bohemian.com. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll listen to the entries, pick some finalists, and if your song is selected by our panel of expert judges, you win! Entries must be received by Feb. 15. The winner will be announced in the Feb. 22 issue of the Bohemian, and the winning song will be posted online. Never fearâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one need not have a band to submit an entry. In fact, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d probably be charmed if you sent us a recording of yourself singing underwater, serenading a sea walrus with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kicked It in the Sun.â&#x20AC;? Entries will be judged not on how accurately the song is represented but by how much it tickles our fancy, so be creative, get recording, and best of luck! Send all entries to letters@bohemian.com.

Nonniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ristorante Italiano

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

NORTH N O R TH B BAY AY H HOOTENANNY O OT E N AN N Y P PRESENTS R ESE NT S

Hotel Healdsburg

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

$ 3 RED $3 RED S STRIPES T R I PE S A ALL LL NIGHT N I G HT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11PM/DOORS 11PM / DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGESâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10PM AGESâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10PM THUR T HUR â&#x20AC;&#x201C;FEB â&#x20AC;&#x201C;FEB 9 W WEEKLY EEKLY E EVENT VENT

Feb 1, the Feud. Feb 2, Juke Joint anniversary. Feb 3, Gator Beat and Pulsators. Feb 4, Steve Pile Band, Beso Negro and Water Tower Bucket Boys. Feb 6, Monday Night Edutainment with special guest DJ Kobie. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Main Street Station

DJJ KOBIE D KOBIE ((ASHANTI ASHANTI HIFI) H I FI )

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT BILL B ILL DECARLI DECARLI PRESENTS PR E S E N T S A ANYTHING NY THING GOES GO E S

Hopmonk Tavern

Eric Bibb

Friday, February 17, 8:00 pm

Soulful and Gospel infused Folk-Bluesâ&#x20AC;Ś

Also Coming Soon Tim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Feb. 26

Tickets/Info: www.seb.org s   1511

Mon, 6pm, Steve Swanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sinatra croonings. Wed, 6:30pm, Don Giovannis. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Northwood Restaurant Thurs, 7pm, Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Olive & Vine Cafe Every other Sunday, Songwriter

Sessions. 14301 Arnold St, Glen Ellen. 707.996.9150.

Papaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Taverna Fri, 7pm, live music. Sat, 7pm and Sun, 4pm, Kefi. Sun, 1:30 and 3:30pm, Greek dance lessons, live music and bellydance show. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

Phoenix Theater Mon, 7pm, young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, Rock and blues jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe Feb 4, Dr Pander & the Lobes with the Machiavelvets. First

Nickel Rose Mon, Wed-Sun, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Simon Costa. Thurs, 9pm, Texas Blues. Sat, 2pm, juke jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

The Rocks

19 Broadway Club

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Feb 1, Skylark. Feb 2, Tom Finch Group. Feb 3, Winstrong. Feb 4, Monophonics. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Tues, 9pm, Uzilevsky Korty Duo with special guests. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar

Calistoga Inn

Feb 1, All of a Sudden. Feb 2, Acacia. Feb 3, Hustler. Feb 4, Rusty Evans and the Ring of Fire. Feb 5, Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bluesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Jam. Feb 7, Pasion Habanera. Feb 8, Elaine Romanelli. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, oldschool DJ night. Sat, DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Feb 2, Casa Rasta with Lady Passion and Luv Fyah. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann and guests. Sun, Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, no phone.

Spanckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thurs, DJ Dray Lopez. Feb 3, Mustache Harbour. Feb 4, Counterbalance. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Toad in the Hole Pub

Rancho Nicasio Feb 3, Amy Wigton. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rainbow Room Fri, Sat, 10pm, DJ dancing. Sun, salsa Sundays. 806 Fourth St, Napa. 707.252.4471.

Sausalito Cruising Club

Tradewinds

Sausalito Seahorse

Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Mon, local talent onstage. Tues, jazz jam. Sun, salsa class. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Transient Lounge

Mon, 8pm, open mic with

Mon, Blue Monday Jam Session with the Taters. 300 Napa St, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady

Feb 4, Joni Morris. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Silverado Resort

â&#x20AC;&#x153;MARDI GRASâ&#x20AC;?

CLOVERDALE CITRUS FAIR PRESIDENTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WEEKEND

FEBRUARY 17â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20

COME RAIN OR SHINE! CONTINUOUS FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT Including Â&#x2018; CITRUS EXHIBITS Â&#x2018;

NAPA COUNTY

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Mon, open mic. First Sunday of every month, Robert Herrera, Brianna Lee, Josh Barrett. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

120th ANNUAL

ARTS & CRAFTS Â&#x2018; FARM ANIMALS Â&#x2018; CARNIVAL CHEFSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; DEMOS Â&#x2018; VILLAGE BLACKSMITH WINE TASTING â&#x20AC;&#x201D;SATURDAY & SUNDAY

DAILY! â&#x20AC;&#x201C; PAY ONE PRICE FOR UNLIMITED CARNIVAL RIDES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; PRE-SALE DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY

Pre-Fair Kick-Off Concert & Dance ANDRE THIERRY & ZYDECO MAGIC 7 PM - $15 BINGO - SENIORSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; DAY, 62 & OVER $1

PARADE AT 11 AM

Talent Show

Murder Mystery Dinner Show (Pre-Sale Only â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6:30 PM)

LOS CAPORALES MARIACHI 1 pm & 3:30 pm

GATOR BEAT - Zydeco & New Orleans R & B 2 pm & 4:30 pm - Free with Fair Admission! Murder Mystery Dinner Show (Pre-Sale Only â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6:30 PM)

MONDAY

KIDSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; DAY 12 & UNDER FREE!

Fri, Sat, Hall 1. 1600 Atlas Peak Rd, Napa. 707.257.0200.

Â&#x2018; General Admission - $7 Â&#x2018; Juniors 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12 & Seniors - $5 Â&#x2018; Children 5 & under are FREE! FOR INFO CALL 707.894.3992 or visit www.cloverdalecitrusfair.org

Uptown Theatre

TAKE HIGHWAY 101 TO CITRUS FAIR DRIVE EXIT IN SONOMA COUNTY

Feb 2, Geoff Tate. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Feb 4, Shit for Brains, Semi-Evolved Kennedys, Death Church, Largactyl. 400 E Todd Rd, Santa Rosa. No phone.

MARIN COUNTY Club 101 Wed, 8:20pm, salsa dancing with lessons. 815 W Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.460.0101.

Dance Palace

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Shabazz Palaces Butterfly from Digable Planets, whose â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Upâ&#x20AC;? was a hip-hop highlight of 2011. Feb 2 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SF.

VHS or Beta

Feb 4, Steve Lucky and the Rhumba Bums. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Brooklyn outfit outgrows fringes of electroclash with new album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Diamond and Death.â&#x20AC;? Feb 2 at Rickshaw Stop.

DeSilvaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Legendary R&B group behind â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Shameâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mighty Loveâ&#x20AC;? play jazz club. Feb 3-5 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oakland.

Fri, DJ Ken and Alton. 1535 S Novato Blvd, Novato. 415.892.5051.

Finneganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marin Feb 2, Roem Baur. Feb 4, Jon Popeno Blues Band. Mon, open mic with KC Turner. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.225.7495.

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Feb 2, Peter Horvath performing Herbie Hancock. Feb 3, John Nemeth. Feb 4, Wonderbread 5. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

The Spinners Elanor Friedberger Never one to settle for normalcy, the Fiery Furnaces founder always surprises. Feb 4 at the Independent.

Twin Sister Long Island buzz band peddles in dreamy disco and fantasy-laden imagery with lead singer Andrea Estella. Feb 4 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

THE WILD CATAHOULAS Saturday, Feb 4

Wed, Feb 1 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45 Jazzercise 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Feb 2 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45 Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Dance Club Fri, Feb 3 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm DJ Steve Luther West Coast Swing Party $10 Sat, Feb 4 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9am; 9:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:15am Jazzercise 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;1:30pm Scottish Dance 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm DJ Steve Luther presents THE WILD CATAHOULAS Sun, Feb 5 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:30am Zumba Gold with Toning 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Feb 6 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45 Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Feb 7 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:40pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm African and World Music Dance Brazilian Drumming Dance Night with live drumming $13

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

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Sunday of every month, Music and Mimosas. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30 ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

Best Music Venue / Best Place for Singles to Meet THUR )FEB 2 )8PM )NO COVER

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Feb 4

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LADY LAY When Bob Dylan calls, you hop in the van and start driving.

Shining On The wild ride of Carolyn Wonderland BY ROBERT FEUER

C

arolyn Wonderland, who describes her music as having “one foot in the blues and the other in rock ’n’ roll,” appears Feb. 3 at Santa Rosa’s Last Day Saloon. The van she’s driving from her current base in Austin includes keyboardist Cole El-Saleh and drummer Rob Hooper, and a variety of instruments she incorporates into her act—her guitar (nicknamed Patty), trumpet, mandolin and lap steel. She also may whistle. During a phone interview from Austin, Wonderland recounts her adventurous life that’s led to her most recent album, Peace Meal. Her mother, a singer-songwriter who gigged at pizzerias and coffeehouses with a “cosmic country music” band, taught her guitar at age eight. Concurrently,

Wonderland began writing songs and formed an a cappella group that performed at school recesses. By 15, she began sneaking into bars to sing. Two years later, she got expelled from every high school in the district, labeled a “troublemaker,” for challenging the dress code and skipping lunch to take part in a Tiananmen Square protest. (Ironically, though that ended her school career, she’s now invited to lecture at universities.) For Wonderland, life has been a trip through the keyhole. The redheaded guitarist and singer spent the early ’90s fronting a band called the Imperial Monkeys, but left her hometown of Houston for Austin in 1999. “I needed a change of scenery,” she says, “and Doug Sahm convinced me Austin was the promised land.” Arriving with a suitcase full of Houston music awards but little money, Wonderland spent two years living in her van. Invited to play at Austin’s famed blues venue Antone’s soon after arriving there, she became immersed in the local scene. Word got around about Carolyn Wonderland. She toured with Johnny Winter, whom she describes as “a divine human being for his humanity and what he does for his friends.” One day, Wonderland’s producer Ray Benson told her that Bob Dylan was in Austin and wanted to meet her. Wonderland, out of town at the time, drove two-and-a-half hours of Texas road in record time, she says. Dylan asked for her latest CD and later called to comment on it, track by track. (She describes him as “a good guy and a serious musicologist.”) Since then, she’s appeared on Austin City Limits and played at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, joining an all-star cast for a Janis Joplin tribute. And, of course, she’s toured extensively in the van. Wonderland’s musical influences are “the folks I get to play with, everything that goes on around me,” she says. “I try to be hopeful, and tell a story that’s universal.” Carolyn Wonderland plays Friday, Feb. 3, at the Last Day Saloon. 120 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 8:30pm. $15–$18. 707.545.2343.

Galleries

to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Llewellyn

OPENINGS Feb 5 From 2 to 4pm. Marin Society of Artists, “How Do You See It: Through the Artist’s Eyes” a juried member show featuring still life, landscapes, figuratives and abstracts. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

Feb 7 At 8pm. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Red,” juried by artist and self-proclaimed alchemist Toni Littlejohn. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

SONOMA COUNTY Aubergine Feb 7, 7:30pm, Sonoma County artist Tony Speirs incorporates everything from pop art to Middle Eastern patterns into his colorful pieces. Free. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Apr 2, “Hit the Road, Snoopy!” featuring the beagle’s most famous road trips. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Finley Community Center Feb 6-Mar 30, “National Arts Program Exhibition and Competition” encourages artistic growth and offers $4,000 in scholarships and awards. Through Feb 2, “Honoring the Pomo Youth Dancers” with photographs by Christine Cobaugh. 2060 W College Avenue, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1. 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Mar 17, “Eye of the Beholder,” an exhibition of abstract art by Becoming Independent. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon

Through Mar 17, bronze figurative nudes by Bruce Wolfe, paintings by William Cutler and William O’Keeffe, paintings and lithograph prints by Sandra Oseguera and bronze “Un-edibles” by Valerie Brunmeier and Matt Hart. 707.887.2373. 6525-A First St, Forestville.

Local Color Gallery Through Feb 12, “Watercolor Festival,” Sally Cataldo, Mara Farnworth and Ned Luzmoor. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

Miyares Gallery Through Feb 29, paintings by Claire B Cotts including layered, figurative and abstract works. Sonoma Academy, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 4. 707.545.1770.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Mar 2, “Along the Russian River and Water Quilt,” textiles exhibit featuring work by Pointless Sisters Art Quilt Group. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Arts Center Feb 7, 8pm, Donna DeLaBriandais demonstrates still life painting in acrylic. Through Mar 4, “Clay and Glass Exhibit,” featuring sculpture and functional works in clay and glass. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Museum Feb 3-Mar 11, “Women who Fought for Civil Rights,” features 25 women of different races and cultures involved in civil rights movement. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Feb 26, “Bakers Dozen 2012,” featuring the work of 13 artists. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Mar 4, “Living Life” paintings by Kathleen Deyo

Jeremy Thornton

and “Color in Motion” photopaintings by Jerrie Jerne. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Rohnert Park Community Center Feb 1-Mar 28, featuring oil paintings by Dee Fay and pastel landscapes by Tim Brody. Reception, Feb 11 at 5pm. Free. 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.584.7357.

Sonoma County Museum Through Feb 5, “Customized: The Art and History of the Bicycle,” with bicycle innovations, art bikes, regional history and more. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Mar 18, “Undiscovered,” features five dynamic artists from Sonoma County. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Feb 23, paintings by Kathy Cia White. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Towers Gallery Through Apr 1, “Seasons,” including works by Nancy Burres, Jim Van Deren and many others. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum Through Mar 11, woven photographs of constructed landscapes, by Julie V Garner. Through Mar 11, “Women in Print,” etchings from Paulson Bott Press. Through Mar 17, “Attic Treasures,” featuring artifacts from the history collection. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Mar 9, “H2O: Fragility and Strength,” featuring works by California Society of Printmakers, juried by Don Soker. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

‘RED’ Artist and alchemist Toni Littlejohn curates a show at O’Hanlon Center for

the Arts opening Feb. 7. See Openings, adjacent.

Gallery Route One Through Feb 19, “Duration,” annual juried show featuring works by “Best of Show” Ellen Litwiller and others.. Through Mar 4, “Photography: A Fine Art,” featuring the work of Tim Fleming, Alan Plisskin and Sister Adele Rowland. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA Through Feb 26, “Fresh,” featuring new work by resident artists. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Feb 5-Mar 3, “How Do You See It: Through the Artist’s Eyes” a juried member show featuring still life, landscapes, figuratives and abstracts. Reception, Feb 5, 2-4pm. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Feb 7-28, “Red,” juried by artist and self-proclaimed alchemist Toni Littlejohn. Reception, Feb 7 at 6. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

NAPA COUNTY Di Rosa Through Feb 11, “Looking at You Looking at Me,” featuring photography, video and other media selected from di Rosa

collection by curator Robert Wuilfe. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sat, 9:30am to 3pm. 707.226.5991.

Yountville Community Hall Through Mar 12, “Mustard and More” juried exhibit sponsored by Napa Valley Photographic Society. Meet the Artists weekend, featuring reception, silent auction and sale, Feb 24-26. 6516 Washington St, Yountville.

Comedy Cafe Theatre Comedy Series Featuring Darren Carter and David Lew. Feb 2, 6:30pm. $13-$15. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.226.7372.

Dance

workshops for those interested in growing their own food, from planning and designing garden to canning and freezing harvest. Sat, Feb 4. $40 each workshop. Canvas Ranch, Petaluma. 707. 766.7171.

Jazz on the Menu Various restaurants in the Healdsburg and Geyserville area feature a signature dish and live music to support Healdsburg Jazz Festival. Afterparty and desert bar held at Costeaux Bakery. For list of venues, visit healdsburgjazzfestival.org. Feb 2, 6-10:30pm. 707.433.4633.

Meet the Founders of I AM Foundation Steve Viglione and Dr Marilyn Powers discuss affirmative publishing company. Feb 3, 7pm. Center for Spiritual Living, 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.4543.

Meet Your Valentine Spreckels Performing Arts Center Feb 4, 2 and 7:30pm, Studio Gray Dance Performance. All styles of dance, ages 3 and up. $10-$15. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Events Backyard Farm Workshops “Playing in the Dirt,” a series of

Society of Single Professionals sponsors dance party. Feb 4, 8pm. $10. Embassy Suites Hotel, 101 McInnis Pkwy, San Rafael.

Winery Winter Bridal Faire Showcasing musicians, cakes, florists, caterers and more. Feb 4, 1-4pm. $10. Paradise Ridge Winery, 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa, 707.528.9463. )

32

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Arts Events

31

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | FEBRUARY 1–7, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32

Arts Events ( 31

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Field Trips Dirt Roll III Led by Mark Weir, mountain bike pioneers join pros and cycling enthusiasts in no-drop ride. Followed by barbecue. Feb 5, 10am. $50. Camp Tamarancho, 1000 Iron Springs Rd, Fairfax.

Trail Maintenance Volunteers needed to help with maintenance and seed preparation. Feb 4, 10am-1pm. Pepperwood Preserve, 3450 Franz Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.591.9310.

Film Film, Food & Love Series of foodie films benefits local celebrity chefs. Feb 2-23. $30. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena, 707.963.3946.

First Friday Film Series Watch Schulz’ favorite films. First Fri of every month. Feb 3, 7pm, ‘Gigi.’ $5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa, 707.579.4452.

Live Theater Broadcasts Classic ballet and opera broadcast live from around the globe. Feb 5, 1pm, and Feb 7, 6:30pm, ‘Medeterranea.’ Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.528.4222.

Lunafest An evening of food, film, fun and philanthropy. Feb 2, 5:30pm. $25-$50. Marinitas, 218 Sir Francis Drake, San Anselmo, 415.454.8900.

Monday Night at the Movies Political satire series featuring “The Great Dictator” and “Dr. Strangelove, Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.” Mon, Feb 6. Mill Valley Library, 375 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.389.4292.

Mostly British Film Festival Four new films from dear old Blighty. Feb 6-9, 7pm. Rafael

Chopping Block

Marc Lamont Hill speaks truth to power In 2009, after expressing support for exiled political activist and former Black Liberation Army member Assata Shakur, Dr. Marc Lamont Hill was summarily fired from his regular gig as a Fox News Channel commentator. Allegedly, News Corporation CEO Rupert Murdoch decided to axe the liberal talking head after being asked by shareholders why he employed someone with a history of “defending cop killers and racists.” An associate professor at Columbia University Teacher’s College, author of numerous books and committed activist for the rights of the poor and working people, Hill is now the host of his own television show, Our World with Black Enterprise, and has been described as one of the “leading hip-hop generation intellectuals.” And not to worry, he can still occasionally be spotted duking it out with crazy conservatives on The O’Reilly Factor—he’s just not on the regular payroll. In this week’s lecture at SSU, Hill speaks about the continuing growth of prisons even as the education system progressively falls into further disrepair. See Dr. Marc Lamont Hill on Wednesday, Feb. 8, at the Sonoma State University Cooperage. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 7:30pm. $10; free for SSU students. 707.664.2753.—Leilani Clark

Film Center, 1118 Fourth Street, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Super Bowl Sunday Watch the game in HD on the

big screen. Feb 5, 3pm. $10-$20. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.924.5111.

) 34

33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 1-7, 201 2 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Marvin’s Garden Herbal Cooperative

Oldest Operating Dispensary in Sonoma County!

NO R E MEMBE! FE

Providing safe and compassionate access to medicine since 1996

707.869.1291 / 707.869.9687

14016 Armstrong Woods Road, Suite B Guerneville, CA 95446 Hours: 7 Days a Week, 12–7pm

Brazilian Waxing $45 up to

TouchStone Therapies Your Brazilian Wax Specialist!

707.331.0631

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 1-7, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

34 Arts Events

Food & Drink Crab Feed Award-winning wines, crab and sunset on the terrace. Feb 4, 5pm. $65-$90. Sbragia Family Vineyards, 9990 Dry Creek Rd, Geyserville.

Silver Oak Release Day Be the first to taste the 2007 Silver Oak Cabernet Sauvignon. Feb 4, 9am-4pm. $30-$40. Silver Oak Cellars, 24625 Chianti Rd, Geyserville, 800.273.8809.

Stand Up for a Cause Comedy and craft beer help fund local Boys and Girls Club. Fri, Feb 3. $10. Bear Republic Brewing Co, 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg, 707.433.2337.

Syrah Saturday Explore the many styles of Syrah with gourmet food pairings. Feb 4, 11am. $25-$30. Amista Vineyards, 3310 Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg, 707.431.9200.

Wine & Chocolate Fantasy Cabernets, ports, chocolates and live music. Feb 4, 1-4pm. $50$65. Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg, 707.431.1533.

Lectures Achieving Results in 2012 Seminar teaches successful business strategies by following an effective goal-setting process. Feb 2, noon. $45-$50. Share Exchange, 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.393.1431.

Harvesting Life Wisdom: Empowering Seniors

( 32 How to Fundraise Without Freaking Out Designed to get nonprofit board members and staff involved in creative fundraising. Feb 2, 7-8:30pm. Free. SoCo Coffee, 1015 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.433.1660.

Kenny Johnson Inspirational speaker and author of “The Last Hustle” recounts 20 years of incarceration and transformation. Feb 2, 6:30pm. Center for Spiritual Living, 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.4543.

SSU Jazz Forums Wesla Whitfield and Mike Greensill are first in series of Jazz vet lectures. Feb 1, 1pm. Green Music Center Room 1029, Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2880.

Readings Book Passage Feb 1, 7pm, “A Lethal Inheritance: A Mother Uncovers the Science Behind Three Generations of Mental Illness,” with Victoria Costello. Feb 3, 7pm, “Craft Beer Bar Mitzvah: How It Took 13 Years, Extreme Jewish Brewing and Circus Sideshow Freaks to Make Shmaltz Brewing Co an International Success” with Jeremy Cowan. Feb 4, 1pm, “Full-Filled,” with Renee Stephens. Feb 4, 4pm, “Spillway Magazine,” featuring over 25 Bay Area poets. Feb 4, 7pm, “Underside of Joy,” with Sere Prince Halverson. Feb 6, 7pm, “Contents May Have Shifted,” with Pam Houston. Feb 7, 7pm, “Defending Jacob” with William Landay. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Three-session workshop allows older adults to connect with others and gain empowering tools. Wed, Feb 1, 10:30am. JFCS Sonoma County, 1360 N Dutton Ave, Ste C, Santa Rosa, 707.571.8131.

Napa Copperfield’s Books

How Girls Bully

Gaia’s Garden

Lecture addressing how to empower your daughter if she is being bullied and prevent her from bullying. Feb 2, 6:30pm. $35. Jewish Family and Children’s Services, 600 Fifth Ave, San Rafael.

Feb 5, 2pm, Open Mic featuring guest speaker Leonore Wilson. 3900-A Bel Aire Plaza, Highway 29 and Trancas Street, Napa. 707.252.8002. Feb 3, 8-10pm, 100 Thousand Poets for Change featuring Vilma Ginzberg, Jodi Hottel and others. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

River Reader Feb 8, 7pm, Poetry reading

with Judy Halebsky and Joan Baranow Edito.r 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

Theater Chicago Popular musical set in Prohibition-era Chicago. Through Feb 19. $15-$30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg, 707.433.3145.

Civil Disobedience: The Musical Walking Elephant Theatre Company presents original documentary theater and film project portrayed by actors ages 8 to 18. Feb 3-4, 8pm and Sun, Feb 5, 3pm. $10-$15. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.568.5381.

The Drowsy Chaperone The ultimate love letter to musical theater. Through Feb 5, 2 and 8pm. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

Murder at Breslingdale Estates Interactive, dress-up event written by Analy senior Lauren Feldman. Sun, Feb 5, 5pm. $35-$40. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.2722.

She Stoops to Conquer Ross Valley Players present comedy of manners by Oliver Goldsmith. Through Feb 19, 2, 7:30 and 8pm. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555.

Sylvia Classic story about man, wife and dog by Pegasus Theater Company. Through Feb 12, 2 and 8pm. $15-$30. Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido, 707.869.0821.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

For the week of February 1

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Sad but true: a lot of people seem to be perpetually in a state of wanting what they don’t have and not wanting what they actually do have. I’m begging you not to be like that in the coming weeks, Aries. Please? I’ll tell you why: More than I’ve seen in a long time, you will have everything going for you if you want precisely what you do have— and are not full of longing for what’s unavailable. Do you think you can you manage that brilliant trick? If so, you will be amazed by the sublimity of the peace that will settle over you. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Of all the signs of the zodiac, Tauruses are the least likely to be arrogant. Sadly, in a related development, they’re also among the most likely to have low self-esteem. But your tribe now has an excellent opportunity to address the latter problem. Current cosmic rhythms are inviting you rather loudly and dramatically to boost your confidence, even at the risk of you careening into the forbidden realm of arrogance. That’s why I recommend Taurus musician Trent Reznor as your role model. He has no problem summoning feelings of self-worth. As evidence, here’s what he confessed when asked about whether he frequents music social networks: “I don’t care what my friends are listening to. Because I’m cooler than they are.”

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “If Mark Twain had had Twitter,” says humorist Andy Borowitz, “he would have been amazing at it. But he probably wouldn’t have gotten around to writing Huckleberry Finn.” I think you’re facing a comparable choice, Gemini. You can either get a lot of little things done that will serve your short-term aims, or else you can at least partially withdraw from the day-to-day give-and-take so as to devote yourself with more focus to a long-range goal. I’m not here to tell you which way to go; I just want to make sure you know the nature of the decision before you. CANCER (June 21–July 22) You now have a special talent for helping your allies tap into their dormant potentials and latent energy. If you choose to use it, you will also have a knack for snapping lost sheep and fallen angels out of their wasteful trances. There’s a third kind of magic you have in abundance right now, Cancerian, and that’s the ability to coax concealed truths out of their hiding places. Personally, I’m hopeful that you will make lavish use of these gifts. I should mention, however, that some people may resist you. The transformations you could conceivably set in motion with your superpowers might seem alarming to them. So I suggest that you hang out as much as possible with change-lovers who like the strong medicine you have to offer.

LEO (July 23–August 22) “Publishing a volume of poetry is like dropping a rose petal down the Grand Canyon and waiting for the echo,” said author Don Marquis, speaking from experience. Something you’re considering, Leo, may seem to fit that description, too. It’s a project or action or gift that you’d feel good about offering, but you also wonder whether it will generate the same buzz as that rose petal floating down into the Grand Canyon. Here’s what I think: To the degree that you shed your attachment to making an impact, you will make the exact impact that matters most. Give yourself without any expectations. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

Comedian Louis CK told a story about his young daughter. She had a fever, and he gave her some Tylenol that was bubblegum flavored. “Ewwww!” she complained. Louis was exasperated. “You can’t say ‘ewwww,’” he told her. What he meant was that as a white kid in America, she’s among the most privileged characters in the world— certainly far luckier than all the poor children who have no medicine at all, let alone medicine that tastes like candy. I’m going to present a similar argument to you, Virgo. In the large scheme of things, your suffering right now is small. Try to keep your attention on your blessings rather than your discomfort.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) I stumbled upon an engineering textbook for undergraduates. There was a section on how to do technical writing, as opposed to the literary kind. It quoted a poem by Edgar Allan Poe: “Helen, thy beauty is to me / Like those Nicean barks of yore / That gently, o’er a perfumed sea, / The weary way-worn wanderer bore / To his

own native shore.” Then the book gave advice to the student: “To express these ideas in technical writing, we would simply say, ‘He thinks Helen is beautiful.’“ Don’t take shortcuts like that, Libra. For the sake of your emotional health and spiritual integrity, you can’t see or treat the world anything like what a technical writer would.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Are you ready to start playing in earnest with that riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma? Are you looking forward to the rough-and-tumble fun that will ensue after you leap into the middle of that sucker and start trying to decipher its impossibly interesting meaning? I hope you are primed and eager, Scorpio. I hope you can’t wait to try to answer the question that seems to have no answer. Be brave and adventurous, my friend—and be intent on having a blast.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Lessons could come to you from unforeseen sources and unanticipated directions during the next few weeks, Sagittarius. They will also come in expected forms from all the familiar influences, so the sum total of your learning could be pretty spectacular. To take maximum advantage of the opportunity, just assume that everyone and everything might have useful teachings for you—even people you usually ignore and situations that have bored you in the past. Act like an eager student who’s hungry for knowledge and curious to fill in the gaps in your education.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “The consuming desire of most human beings is deliberately to plant their whole life in the hands of some other person,” said British writer Quentin Crisp. If you harbor even a small tendency in that direction, Capricorn, I hope that in the coming days you will make a concentrated effort to talk yourself out of it. In my astrological opinion, this is a critical moment in the long-term evolution of your healthy self-sufficiency. For both your own sake and the sake of the people you love, you must find a way to shrink your urge to make them responsible for your well-being. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) If you go to California’s Yosemite National Park this month, you might get the chance to witness a reddish gold waterfall. Here’s how: At sunset, gaze up at the sheer east face of the rock formation known as El Capitan. There you will see what seems to be a vertical river of fire, also known as Horsetail Fall. I nominate this marvel to be your inspirational symbol for the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will have the power to blend fire and water in novel ways. I encourage you to look at the photo here—bit.ly/fluidicfire—and imprint the image on your mind’s eye. It will help unleash the subconscious forces you’ll need to pull off your own natural wonder. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

After singer Amy Winehouse died, actor Russell Brand asked the public and media to scale back their derisive opinions about her struggle with intoxicants. Addiction isn’t a romantic affectation or glamorous self-indulgence that people are too lazy to overcome, he said. It’s a disease. Would you mock a schizophrenic for his “stupid” propensity for hearing voices? Would you ridicule a victim of multiple sclerosis for not being vigorous? I’m of the opinion that all of us have at least one addiction, although it may not be as disabling as Winehouse’s weakness for liquor and narcotics. What’s yours, Pisces? Porn? Sugar? Internet? Bad relationships? The coming weeks would be a very good time to seek help in healing it.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center The Journey Center: A Place Offers ongoing classes for all levels of practice for Transformation and interest. Eveyone is welcome. $10 donation requested per class. Prayers for World Peace: Sun, 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:45am Noontime Meditations: Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday, 12:00 General Programs: Tues & Weds - 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:30 304 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma, 707.776.7720 www.meditateinnorcal.org.

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Visiting Teacher: Kelsang Mikyopa, a Buddhist monk, whose heartfelt teachings & meditations offer true love & gentle humor. Compassion Buddhist Center, 436 Larkfield Center, Santa Rosa. $20, incl. lunch & tea tasting. No one turned away for lack of funds.

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