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4 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 28, 2011–JANUARY 3, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

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Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Darwin BondGraham, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur, Stett Holbrook, Daedalus Howell, James Knight, Juliane Poirier, Sara Sanger, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

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End of Season

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

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This photo was submitted by Paul Lupus of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘I’ve never seen people more in need of a José Eber Brazilian blowout than those 99%-ers.’ F EATURE P1 8

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

Dredging the Bay in Carneros T H E PAP E R P 8

I Quite Liked ‘Friends with Benefits’ A RTS & IDEAS P 22

Templeton’s Top Torn Tix STAGE P 24 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Media p11 Green Zone p12 Dining p14

Wineries & Swirl p17 Feature p189 Culture Crush p21 Arts & Ideas p22 Stage p24

Film p25 Music p27 A&E p30 Astrology p34 Classified p35

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Deadheads with a keen eye may have noticed this Jerry Garcia stencil near Cleveland and College in Santa Rosa.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 28, 2011–JANUARY 3, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies An Open Letter to the Daily

Calling on all Press Democrat staff BY TERRY GARRETT

M

onday, Dec. 19, was big news day for the newspaper world, and particularly for employees of the Press Democrat, the North Bay Business Journal and the Argus-Courier. Their parent company, the New York Times, it seems, is breaking furniture for firewood by selling its regional publishing properties, including the PD, to Halifax Media Holdings, in Daytona Beach, Fla.

This is a great opportunity for employees at the PD, et al. Take a look at the list of properties and where they’re located. See a pattern? The only property outside of the Southeast U.S. is in Sonoma County. It stands out like a Wal-Mart insert in the Wall Street Journal. Buy it from the new owners before the ink is dry on their deal. Their best play is a strong regional one in the Southeast. If you don’t step up and buy it now, you can bet the PD will be owned by the Bay Area News Group within a year. Sonoma County deserves a locally owned daily newspaper again. Who better to own it than the folks who run it and read it day to day? Lord knows that given the sorry state of the news media and ad sales, passion and a strong desire for job security motivates better than anything else. Look, your parent sold you out to a company run by a guy who wants writers to sell ads, operates in a state packed with criminals on the lam and too many tanning beds per capita to still be called the Sunshine State, in a city known for Girls Gone Wild video shoots and hairy bikers. Could they care about you any less? Show ’em some entrepreneurial kick-ass. Buy the PD and keep it local. Halifax Media bought the Daytona Beach News-Journal two years ago for $20 million, $871 per thousand circulation (365 days total circulation). Let’s make them an offer. There are plenty of people who live here who would kick in. Let’s set up a page on Kickstarter and IndieGoGo and get the public engaged as owners too. Come on, you can do it! Terry Garrett is the operations manager for Go Local. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Partying Safe on New Year’s Eve

Thank you for your New Year’s Eve coverage, but why wasn’t there anything in the article about drinking and driving? I would hope our media would remember to remind those on New Year’s Eve to stay away from the wheel if they have been drinking. Remember that a little bit of Champagne can turn into a lot of sorrow if you try to drive home.

MICHELLE WATERBURY Novato

Starting Over, Equal Two thousand years ago, Christ chased the money-changers out of the temple. Four hundred years ago, Chief Seattle stated, “No one can own the Earth. She is our Mother. We must serve Her in gratitude for giving us life and sustaining us.” Robber barons started the banks and began practicing usury (which has been declared illegal in Europe), and made three times their loans back in interest. They still do. For hundreds of years, the practice of “debt forgiveness” in Europe was done, every 40 years (the average life expectancy then). Today in the United States, over 40 million people are in poverty, while the top 1 percent—bankers, stock brokers, financiers and corporate CEOs—have 43 percent of the money. I think it’s time to start over, equal. All debt erased. The United States was founded on the ideal of equality. Money is merely a measuring system, like inches. It has no inherent value. Our monetary system must facilitate an even exchange of materials and services so that we each receive value equal to what we give.

FOREST STAGGS Petaluma

Simple Enough

Heidi is the proprietor of a bar in Detroit. She realizes that virtually all of her customers are unemployed alcoholics and, as such, can no longer afford to patronize her bar. To solve this problem, she comes up with a new marketing plan that allows her customers to drink now, but pay later. Heidi keeps track of the drinks consumed on a ledger (thereby granting the customers loans). Word gets around about Heidi’s “drink now, pay later” marketing strategy and, as a result, increasing numbers of customers flood into Heidi’s bar. By providing her customers freedom from immediate payment demands, Heidi gets no resistance when, at regular intervals, she substantially increases her prices. Consequently, Heidi’s gross sales volume increases massively. A young and dynamic vice president at the local bank recognizes that these customer debts constitute valuable future assets and increases Heidi’s borrowing limit. He sees no reason for any undue concern because he has the debts of the unemployed alcoholics as collateral! At the bank’s corporate headquarters, expert traders figure a way to make huge commissions, and transform these customer loans into DRINKBONDS. These “securities” then are bundled and traded on international securities markets. Naive investors don’t really understand that the securities being sold as “AAA Secured Bonds” really are debts of unemployed alcoholics. Nevertheless, the bond prices continuously climb—and the securities soon become the hottestselling items for some of the nation’s leading brokerage houses. One day a risk manager at the original local bank decides that the time has come to demand payment on the debts incurred by the drinkers at Heidi’s bar. Heidi then demands payment from her alcoholic patrons. But, being unemployed alcoholics, they cannot pay back their drinking debts. Heidi is forced into bankruptcy. The bar closes, and Heidi’s employees lose their jobs. Overnight, DRINKBOND prices drop by 90 percent. The collapsed bond asset value destroys

THIS MODERN WORLD

the bank’s liquidity and prevents it from issuing new loans, thus freezing credit and economic activity in the community. The suppliers of Heidi’s bar had granted her generous payment extensions and had invested their firms’ pension funds in the BOND securities. Her wine supplier also claims bankruptcy, closing the doors on a family business that had endured for three generations, and her beer supplier is taken over by a competitor, who immediately closes the local plant and lays off 150 workers. Fortunately, the bank, the brokerage houses and their respective executives are bailed out by a multibillion dollar, nostrings-attached cash infusion from the government. The funds required for this bailout are obtained by new taxes levied on middle-class nondrinkers who have never been in Heidi’s bar. Now do you understand?

IRV SUTLEY Glen Ellen

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1

Spending vacation doing some prime whale watching along the Sonoma Coast

2

Guy at Big Lots buys shopping cart of stuff for family in line behind him

3

Bono raises money for charity by busking on the street in downtown Dublin

4

Rendez Vous Bistro feeds homeless on Christmas Eve in Courthouse Square

5 Helen Frankenthaler,

post-war abstract painter, dies at age 83

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 28, 201 1 –JA NUA RY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Rants

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 28, 2011–JANUARY 3, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Paper THE

SPOILS A Sausalito company plans to fill in the Carneros River Ranch, while some speculate there’s more to the project.

Fill ’Er Up

A massive South County project has environmental watchdogs guessing BY DARWIN BOND-GRAHAM

S

onoma County has seen plenty of forest-to-vineyard conversions in recent years, usually involving chainsaws and bulldozers. Yet in what may be a first of its kind, Sausalito-based Berg Holdings Co. is planning to create a 528-acre ranch suitable for growing wine

grapes and other crops by literally building land from scratch. Or is that the plan? The Carneros River Ranch lies at the mouth of the Petaluma River, in its historic floodplain, directly across from Port Sonoma. Companies controlled by Berg own both the ranch and the port. At the port, Berg plans to assemble an industrial complex capable of receiving and

processing 18.5 million cubic yards of wet dredge spoils from the San Pablo Bay, pumping the material under Highway 37 onto the ranch site. This fill material will be spread, dried and compacted as it’s received over the span of 20 years. When complete, the ranch will have risen from one foot above sea level to between seven and 11 feet. “This material is fine, salty clay without a lot of organic matter,”

explains J.T. Wick, a principle with Berg Holdings overseeing the project. “We mix worm castings with it to create fertile soil.” Beyond the river’s southern stretch was once a brackish marsh teeming with wildlife. But levees built by ranchers in the late 1800s cut off seasonal floods and destroyed much of the riparian habitat. Today, the low elevation of the Carneros Ranch and its separation from the flows of the river and bay make it suitable only for shallow-rooted crops, like wheat. Lifting the elevation is therefore being sold as an “agricultural enhancement,” and as such, the Sonoma Land Trust has given the project its blessing. Numerous environmental organizations, like the Sierra Club’s Redwood Chapter, are taking a different position. Last July, the Sierra Club asked the County Board of Zoning Adjustments (BZA) to require a full environmental impact report. The BZA denied that request, ruling instead that the existing mitigated negative declaration (MND) was sufficient. The Sierra Club and other organizations are appealing the BZA’s decision. A hearing is set for January. “Given the proposed expansion of the port of Sonoma into an industrial facility, which is unaddressed in the negative mitigated declaration, the county owes it to the public to do a full EIR on the project,” says David Keller of the Petaluma River Council. Keller’s group hasn’t formally joined the Sierra Club’s appeal, but says, in support, “the appeal should be sustained.” Berg Holdings’ lawyer Stephen Butler told Sonoma County officials back in October that the Sierra Club’s concerns were misinformed. “The project and the MND were attacked at the last minute without analyzing either the project file or the MND itself,” Butler wrote to supervisor David Rabbit. “As a result of the Club’s appeal, the opportunity to redirect dredge material has been lost for this season,” concluded Butler. Rue Furch, who served on the BZA from 1991 to 2009, has studied the project’s

Such S uch sspeculation peculation iiss ‘‘crazy,’ crazy,’ ssays ays Wick. Wick. Concerns have C oncerns like like these thesse h ave led many m any to to question if iimproving mproving fact thee point. aagriculture griculture is is in fa ct th Berg Holdings has Ber gH oldings h as a $20 million ccongressional ongressional earmark earmark a to to expand expand ccommercial ommercial ferry ferry operations opeerations Sonoma. Berg Holdings at Port Port S onoma. Ber gH oldings stands thee stan ds tto o be paid paid for for accepting accepting th dredge making thee pr project dr edge sspoils, poils, m akin ng th oject profitable without futuree pr ofitable with or wit thout futur farming. farmin g. Some Some have have speculated speculated thee project th project is is a first first step s ep toward st toward perhaps ssomething omething llarger, argerr, pe rhaps involving barge, and in volving rrail, ail, b argee, an d truck freight fr eight of aggregate aggregate materials materials or garbage. g arbage. Such S uch speculation speculation is is “crazy,” “crazy,” says says Wick. thiss pr project W ick. “All “All we we ccan an use use thi oject bring aapproval pproval for for is is to to brin ng in an offloader and thee b barges, and thee offlo ader an d th arrges, an d th dredge dr edge material material can can only only be used used enhancement. We’re ffor or soil soil en hancementt. W ee’re not not going bee b bringing goin g tto ob ringing aggregate aggregate in.” in.” The Land Trust The Sonoma Sonoma Lan dT rust ssued ued Berg Berg Holdings Holdings in 2005, 200 05, when when the the company began company beg an dumping dum mping dredge dredge material thee ranch material on th ranch h in much smaller than smaller quantities th han iiss now now proposed. Concerned that proposed. C oncerned d th at the the disposal—profitable disposal—profitable ffor or Berg— Berg— would harm would h arm aagriculture, gricultu ure, the the Land Land Trust Trust prevailed. prevailed. Settlement Settlem l ent terms terms created protocols and created ““strict strict pr otoccols an d performance performance standards standarrds on the the quantities, and handling titi loc llocations ation ti s an dh andlin dli g of materials, and stringent materials, an d stri ngent standards standards for for salinity, salinity, acidity acidity and and contaminants,” contaminants,” according accorrding tto oa 2008 S Sonoma Land Trust press onoma Lan dT rust pr ess release. release. Importantly, Importantly, affected aff ffected land land must also also be returned retturned to to agricultural operations. agricultural oper atio ons.

Prison P rison for for P rofit Profit The G The Geo eo G Group ro u p Inc. In c. iiss tthe he second sec on d largest l a rg e s t private p ri va t e prison prison world, ccompany o m pa n y iin n tthe he w orld, ooperating p e ra t i n g 1116 16 ffacilities ac i lit ie s aacross c ro s s the t h e globe. gl o be. One O ne of o f them th em is i s the the Adelanto Processing A d e l a n to ““ICE” ICE” P ro c e s s i n g Center, Ce nt er, which w h ic h holds ho lds immigration i m m i g ra t i o n U.S. ddetainees e t a i nee s ffor or U .S. IImmigration m m i g ra t i o n and a n d Customs Cust om s Enforcement. E n fo rc e m e n t . NPR A 22010 0 10 iinvestigation nvest ig ati o n bbyy N PR revealed rev ea l ed that t hat lobbyists l obb y ist s hired h i re d by b y the t h e Geo G eo Group G rou p contributed contributed large l a rge campaign c a mpaig n contributions contributions to t o 30 3 0 of of 36 36 co-sponsors c o- spo nso rs of of SB S B 1070, 107 0, the t he Arizona A ri z on a law l aw that that makes ma k es being b ei ng an an undocumented undocumented immigrant imm i gra n t a criminal criminal misdemeanor mis d eme a no r and an d makes m akes racial ra c i a l profiling p ro fi l i ng a virtual vi rt ual requirement re q u i re m e n t for for law-enforcement l a w - e nfo rc em ent officials. o f fi c i a l s . According NPR, Geo Group A cc ord in g ttoo N PR, G eo G ro u p president p re si de nt Wayne Wayn e Callabres Cal lab res said said ooff SSB B 11070, 07 0, ““Those T hos e ppeople eople ccoming o m in g aacross cro ss tthe he bborder ord er bbeing eing ccaught a u gh t aare re ggoing oi ng ttoo hhave ave ttoo bbee mee aatt ddetained, e t a i ned , aand nd tthat, h at, ttoo m lleast, ea st , suggests su gge st s there’s t h ere’s ggoing o ing ttoo bbee eenhanced nh a nc ed oopportunities ppor t un iti es ffor or what Geo w h a t we w e do.” do.” As As ssuch, uch, G eo Group G ro u p iiss iin n tthe he pprocess ro cess ooff ddoubling o u b li n g ccapacity apac ity aatt tthe he Adelanto Processing A delanto P roc essin g CCenter. ent e r. Wells W el l s FFargo a rg o iiss oone n e ooff tthe he ttop op iinstitutional n st i tut io n al hholders ol der s ooff sshares h a re s iin n Geo G e o Group G roup Inc., Inc ., with wi t h share s h a re $66 million, hholdings o ld in gs ooff oover ver $ 66 m illion, mutual aand n d tthey hey aare re tthe h e ttop op m utual ffund un d hholder o l der iin n tthe he ccompany, om pany, with million w i t h oover ve r 22.5 .5 m il lio n sshares. h a re s . TThe h e cconnection o n n ecti o n bbetween etwee n oone n e ooff tthe h e llargest a rge s t bbanks ank s iin n tthe he ccountry o un try aand nd oone ne ooff tthe he llargest a rg e s t pprivate ri va t e pprison ri son ccompanies om pani es hhas as bbecome ec o me tthe h e ttarget arget ooff tthe he Occupy movement. Occupy O ccupy m ovement. O ccupy Rosa, with SSanta anta R osa, w i t h tthe he CCommittee ommittee Rights, ffor or IImmigrant m m i g ra n t R ight s, tthe he Graton Day G ra t o n D a y LLabor ab o r CCenter e nter aand nd oothers, t h er s, hholds ol ds a rrally al l y aand n d ppress re s s Wells cconference o nfe re nc e aabout bout W e ll s FFargo a rg o aand n d ffor-profit o r-profit ddetention e tent i on ccenters enters oon n FFriday, ri d a y, JJan. an . 66,, iin n tthe he fformer ormer Albertson’s A l ber t so n’ s pparking ark ing llot ot oon n Road, Roseland. SSebastopol ebastopol R oad , iin nR oseland. TThe h e rrally a l l y bbegins e gins aatt nnoon oo n aand nd march Wells lleads ea d s ttoo a m arc h ttoo W el l s FFargo a rg o Bank B a n k iin n ddowntown o wnt ow n SSanta anta Rosa. R osa.— —Leilani Leilani CClark lark

The Bohemian Bohemia an started as The Paper Paper in 1978. 1978.

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Staring at Screens The continuing rise of e-books

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ure, 2011 saw a congressman inadvertently tweet his boner to the masses, Steve Jobs’ permanent departure from Apple, and Amazon’s overheated foray into the tablet market. The media and tech news of 2011 that will likely have the most enduring effect on our culture, however, is the rise of the e-book.

The Association of American Publishers and the Book Industry Study Group released a report earlier this year that indicated e-book sales in 2010 were 114 million. When sales data for 2011 rolls in, I expect it to have doubled. Thank the iPad and the Kindle. Though e-books existed in various form long before tablet devices, the sales for Apple’s iPad (about 25 million sold by June of 2011) and Amazon’s Kindle Fire (reportedly selling 1 million a week) suggest cultural ubiquity. Moreover, these guys are ruthless. Amazon recently raised the ire of indie booksellers and their patrons with its price-check

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shopping app, which enables consumers to scan a barcode and compare the prices of goods at brick and mortar stores with Amazon’s prices. This in itself wasn’t necessarily offensive; it was the 5 percent discount offered by Amazon for choosing to purchase from the online juggernaut instead of Main Street. Predictably, an “Occupy Amazon” movement ensued among booksellers, which might seem like rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic. E-books now account for about 20 percent of all book sales, which is remarkable when one considers that movable-type press was created 561 years ago and the iPad only two years ago. At that rate of disruption, e-books will entirely supplant printed books within the decade. Real life, of course, doesn’t work this way. But still, the numbers are staggering. Consider this: in 2011, a mere four years after the introduction of its first Kindles, Amazon reported that e-book sales have surpassed those of printed books. Even scifi legend Ray Bradbury, who’s been publicly skeptical about digital media (e-books “smell like burned fuel,” he famously opined to the New York Times) has finally permitted Fahrenheit 451 to be released as an e-book. Of course, the revolution has not been without its casualties—like, perhaps, fair trade. The European Commission recently opened formal antitrust proceedings to “investigate whether international publishers” including Harper Collins, Simon & Schuster and Penguin, have engaged in “anticompetitive practices affecting the sale of e-books in the European Economic Area, in breach of EU antitrust rules.” Moreover, they allege Apple may be helping them. Be assured, the outcome of this investigation is coming soon to an e-book near you.

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reen-leaning Americans vote, as I do, to protect the environment and human rights. But thanks to discriminatory voting-ID laws passed in states around the country, corporations are stealing citizens’ voting rights. This sends ice through my veins because I was in the South when black voters were kept from voting by systematic intimidation and worse. When my father’s military career forced our family to move to Biloxi, we arrived just before the civil rights explosion turned Mississippi into a battleground. And though I was too young to know it at the time, we got there just after an innocent black man had been shot and killed by a white lawmaker for the “crime” of registering to vote. Lawmakers now have a less bloody but just as effective strategy in place for eliminating potential voters, funded by corporate backers including—no surprise

here—the Koch brothers. The way it works is simple: the right-wing American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) drafts legislation and passes it along to lawmakers, who get states to pass it as a protection against “voter fraud.” Targeted by these laws are an estimated 5 million voters, including African-Americans, Latinos, students, the disabled, the elderly and women who, because of marriage or divorce, don’t happen to have their correct name on their photo ID. Those without a birth certificate or driver’s license, and those who can’t afford to acquire them, can’t vote. But law experts say voter fraud is a nonissue, because it is extremely rare. The Brennan Center for Justice at NYU’s School of Law claims voter fraud (a person voting twice) occurs as frequently as “Americans are struck and killed by lightning.” Yet the ALEC is helping conservative lawmakers get states to make discriminatory voting laws. Mississippi hasn’t succumbed— yet. But Mother Jones reported Oct. 3 that ALEC-drafted legislation has been proposed by lawmakers in 35 states and made into law in Alabama, Kansas, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin. And what kind of discrimination is being flaunted now in Texas, where under this new law citizens can vote using an ID for concealed firearms but not an ID issued from a college? Color of Change has launched a web campaign to stop corporatebacked voter suppression that is “part of a long history of voter suppression directed at black folks and other underrepresented groups.” Only now, says Color of Change, it’s not “violence, intimidation and literary tests” but laws that make voting “burdensome and difficult” for people whose lives are already hard enough. To help stop ALEC and its corporatebacked voter suppression, see www.colorofchange.org.

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14

POLLO ASADO Food trucks continued to gain cachet in 2011—or were we all just so broke we couldn’t afford much else?

Big Bites The year in food, 2011

I

f 2011 were a meal, we’d be taking the last bites of dessert. But before we push away from the table and start eyeing good things to eat in 2012, let’s take a moment to digest.

As far as food trends go, 2011 was the year of the food truck. Again. Maybe we were all so broke that a taco truck was the only dining out most of us could afford. The mobile, Twitter-powered restaurants have been growing in popularity for the past few

BY STETT HOLBROOK

years, but this year they went fully mainstream. Some restaurants even started to complain that they were siphoning away their customers. Has the trend peaked? Are food pushcarts next? The farm-to-table phenomenon grew, with more chefs touting just-picked, locally sourced produce. Taking the trend one step further, more chefs grew their own with kitchen gardens and restaurant farms. Foraged foods—mushrooms, obscure herbs, seaweed, berries and even pine needles—turned up in a growing

number of restaurants looking to one-up each other with rare or unusual ingredients. Craft beers with esoteric flavors (coriander, cherries, pumpkin) and kegdispensed wine flowed in greater quantities, too. Spain’s El Bulli, once regarded as the best restaurant in the world, closed its doors, but the avantgarde cookery pioneered by chef Ferran Adria lived on as chefs continued to manipulate food with dehydrators, vacuum sealers and ingredients formerly restricted to chemistry labs. Sous vide cooking,

one of the hallmarks of the socalled molecular gastronomy movement, went mainstream with semi-affordable equipment for home cooks. On the media front, networks continued to flog the celebritychef trend, and no one was the better for it. Top Chef produced new crops of “top chefs” who touted their newfound status. With so many “top chefs,” is anyone that impressed anymore? The worst offender was The Chew, a hodgepodge of A- and B-level chefs stinking up the already bereft daytime TV landscape by acting awkwardly and disingenuously. On a positive note, Marge Simpson became a food blogger on The Simpsons with her celebrityand trend-skewering blog, “Three Mouthkateers.” Go, Marge! This was also a big year in food politics. Congress cemented its status as hopelessly corrupt and out of touch when it voted to block a sorely needed overhaul of the nation’s school-lunch program, and handed a victory to makers of frozen pizza, french fries and tomato paste, in essence calling pizza a vegetable. The so-called super committee, the failed congressional body charged with reducing the federal deficit, almost sneaked through a reduction in the Farm Bill that would have slashed spending on agriculture conservation, support for local food and organic agriculture. Get ready for a big Farm Bill fight in 2012. Meanwhile, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a ban on shark-finning, the practice of lopping off fins from live sharks to make unremarkable Chinese soup. The ban goes into effect in 2013. This year was also the last full one to enjoy foie gras; the ban on fattened goose livers begins in July. Now if only we could only put an end to factoryfarmed beef, poultry and pork. In a development that will hopefully bear fruit in 2012, good food crusaders made a commoncause Occupy movement, seeking to expose the corporate control and dirty politics of Big Ag. Here’s to a delicious 2012.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

SONOMA COUNTY

garlic is God–all dishes are infused with the glorious stinking rose. Lunch and dinner daily. 8988 Brooks Rd, Windsor. 707.836.8300.

Arrigoni’s Delicatessen & Cafe

K&L Bistro French. $-$$$.

Deli. $. A perennial favorite with the downtown lunch crowd. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 701 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1297.

Bistro 29 Bistro. $$-$$$. Get an honestly prepared plate of excellence, reasonably priced, at this veritable palace of crepes. Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sat. 620 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2929. Bruno’s on Fourth American. $$-$$$. There’s real sophistication lurking in these upscale American comfort staples like flat-iron steak and fries, macaroni-ham casserole and stellar braised lamb shank. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner only, Sat; brunch, Sun. 1226 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8222.

Flavor California cuisine. $-$$. Fresh and organic white-tablecloth food at paper-napkin prices. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9695. French Garden French. $$$-$$$$. The French Garden serves classic French and California cuisine focusing on seasonal and sustainable foods, much of it grown on its own farm; also, a casual bar with small plates. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

This comfortable restaurant serves fine food with a friendly Sebastopol flair. Zagat-rated, consistently excellent and surprisingly innovative. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 119 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.6614.

Mac’s Delicatessen Diner. $. Large selection of Jewish-style sandwiches; excellent cole slaw. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 630 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3785.

Mike’s at the Crossroads Burgers. $. All kinds of burgers imaginable; fries Friday only, no shakes, da Jets. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 7665 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.665.9999.

Roberto’s Restaurant Italian. $$. Reliable home-style Italian cooking. Dinner, TuesSun. 4776 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0260.

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly, plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Sizzling Tandoor II Indian. $-$$. Coastal gem offers a great view of the Sonoma Coast. Come for happy hour and stay through dinner. 9960 Hwy 1, Jenner. 707.865.0625.

Stark’s Steakhouse

Hallie’s Diner American and more. $-$$. Classic diner food with a gourmet touch, plus Latin American items and homemade pizzas. Great for breakfast. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 125 Keller St, Petaluma. 707.773.1143.

Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour Mon-Fri, 3 to 6. Dinner daily; lunch, Mon-Fri. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Johnny Garlic’s

Tres Hombres Mexican.

California. $$. At Johnny’s,

$-$$. Excellent food in

Truc Linh Vietnamese. $. Your basic Vietnamse fare, prepared to perfection. Great for light meals. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat. 810 McClelland Dr, Windsor. 707.838.6746.

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

M A R I N COUNTY Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Open breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Sun; dinner, Fri-Sat. 1 Drake’s ) Beach Rd,

16

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 28, 201 1 –JA NUA RY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

15

Petaluma’s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick.Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

Happy New Year

Dining ( 15

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8–5pm Now Open for Lunch on Saturdays 11am–3pm

Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Holiday Small Bites Quiche Lorraine Squares Mini Croque Monsieurs Roasted Mushroom Gruyere Tartelette Petit Four Platter

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$. Perennial winner of SF Chron’s “100 Best,��� Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777.

Full Catering Menu Available

The Bay View Restaurant at The Inn at the Tides

December 31, 2011 MENU Caramelized Apple, Bermuda Onion & Spring Hill Cheese Tart

M&G’s Burgers & Beverages American. $. (Dine-in only. Valid with 2 beverage orders. Not valid on holidays. Cannot combine offers.) Exp. 12-31-11 31-11

arugula salad with basil oil étoile Rosé

Maine Lobster Thermidor golden chanterelle mushrooms, bourbon cream sauce 2009 Acacia Chardonnay Sangiacomo Vineyard

INTERMEZZO Passion Fruit Sorbet

The ultimate in American cuisine. Crispy fries, good burgers and friendly locals chowing down. Lunch and dinner daily. 2017 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.454.0655.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

thaipotrestaurant.com 707-575-9296 2478 W. Third St SSanta anta Rosa R

707-829-8889 In Downtown Sebastopol

Breast of Pheasant

Mountain Home Inn

ragoût of artichoke, brandy sauce 2008 Domaine Chandon Carneros Pinot Noir

American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Mustard-Crusted Rack of Lamb

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Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

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whisky ganache, chocolate glaze Veuve Cliquot Yellow Label Demi-Sec Midnight Toast ~ Dancing (DJ) Party Favors No-Host Bar: 7pm Dinner: 8pm ~ Music to 1am

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reservations: 707.875.2751 or email: reservations@innatthetides.com

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800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay 707.875.2751 www.InnattheTides.com

W NTO N JOE W

The First and Last Place to Meet 902 MAIN ST, NAPA 707.258.2337 | downtownjoes.com

BR E ERY W

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 32o Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900. Poggio Italian. $$-$$$.

photo: Marilee Koll

125 per person, plus tax and gratuity

DO

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | DECEMBE R 28, 20 1 1 – JANUARY 3, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

and dinner daily. Two San Rafael locations: 732 Fourth St. 415.451.4765. 901 Lincoln Ave. 415.256.8903.

Sorella Caffe Italian. $$. The embodiment of Fairfax casual, with delicious, high-quality food that lacks pretension. Open for dinner daily. 107 Bolinas Rd, Farifax. 415.258.4520.

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A P A COUNTY Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

Alexis Baking Co Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103.

Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Brannan’s Grill

Sol Food Puerto Rican. $.

$$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch

Flavorful, authentic and homestyle at this Puerto Rican eatery, which is as hole-inthe-wall as they come. Lunch

California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Brassica Mediterranean.

and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

C.C. Blue Japanese. $$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fujiya Japanese. $$-$$$. Good, solid sushi. The Fujiya Deluxe combo is a standout. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat. 921 Factory Stores Dr, Napa. 707.257.0639. Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, La Toque makes for memorable specialoccasion dining.. Dinner, WedSun. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Redd California cuisine. $$-$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA COUNTY

celebrated member of the “Pinot posse” by its other moniker, Siduri. 980 Airway Court, Ste. C, Santa Rosa. 707.578.3882.

Adobe Road Winery

Russian Hill Winery

Award-winning Cab, Pinot, Zin, Cab Franc, Syrah and Petite Sirah. Their tasting room is located in Petaluma at the Racers Group Porsche race headquarters. 1995 S. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. 707.939.7967.

Simple tasting room, strong Pinots and Syrah, fantastic view. 4525 Slusser Road, Windsor. Open Thursday–Monday, 10am–5pm. 707.575.9428.

Iron Horse Despite the rustic tasting room, Iron Horse produces sparkling wine and Pinots for the elite. A brilliant view for winetasting. 209786 Ross Station Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10am–3:30pm. 707.887.1507.

Kastania Vineyards Who knew that here on the border of Marin we’d find one of the most hospitable, no-nonsense, family-winery experiences in the county! 4415 Kastania Road, Petaluma. By appointment. 707.763.6348.

Loxton Cellars At Loxton, the shingle of Aussie Chris Loxton, who forewent a career in physics to save space-time in a bottle, Syrah and Shiraz are king. 11466 Dunbar Road, Glen Ellen. By appointment. 707.935.7221.

The Natural Process Alliance & Salinia Wine Co. A beige warehouse and a clean-cut, UC Davis–trained winemaker belie the wild-eyed truth: Unusual, fruity “natural wine” as fresh as next Friday, bottled in stainless steel Kleen Kanteens. Ask for Hardy. 3350 Coffey Lane, Santa Rosa. Friday–Saturday, 10:30am– 6pm, or by appointment. 707.527.7063.

Nicholson Ranch (WC)

St. Francis Winery Simple but cozy, inspired by the monk St. Francis and styled as a California mission. Beautiful views and food pairings. 100 Pythian Road, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.543.7713, ext. 242.

Sapphire Hill Sharing a property with such as Camilla Cellars and other boutique wineries on a compound they simply call “Front Street 5,” production is mainly reds, with the exception of an estate Chardonnay. 51 Front St., Healdsburg. Open Thursday– Monday, 11am–4:30pm. 707.431.1888. Woodenhead Damn good wine. Pinot, Zin–yum, yum, yum. 5700 River Road, Santa Rosa. Open Thursday– Monday, 10:30am–4:30pm. 707.887.2703.

NAPA COUNTY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Black Stallion Winery

Best known for its Chardonnays and a winery tour from the depths of the caves to the height of the property’s grandmother oak. 4200 Napa Road, Sonoma. Open daily, 11am–6pm; tours by appointment. 707.938.8822.

Owned by a pair of Midwest liquor-distribution barons who hired a capable winemaker and envision it to be a retaildestination winery. The wines are quite good. 4089 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.253.1400.

Novy Family Winery

Brown Estate Vineyards

Daily tastings by appointment in a no-nonsense warehouse, and is better known as a

(WC) A beautifully restored and converted stone and redwood barn is the winery

and tasting room facility at Brown Estate. And the construction of a 6,500square-foot subterranean wine cave was completed in 2005. Visitors are currently limited to wine club members by appointment only. 3233 Sage Canyon Road, Napa. 707.963.2435.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Del Dotto Vineyards (WC) Caves lined with Italian marble and ancient tiles, not to mention Venetian chandeliers and mosaic marble floors. They host candle-lit tastings, replete with cheese and chocolate, Friday–Sunday. Opera resonates until 4pm; rock rules after 4pm. 1055 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.963.2134.

Freemark Abbey In 1881, Josephine Tychson was the first woman to own and operate a winery in the valley. Enjoy the Cabs. 3022 St. Helena Hwy. N. (at Lodi Lane), St. Helena. Open daily, 10am5pm. 800.963.9698.

Grgich Hills Mike Grgich’s Chardonnays famously beat the competition at the 1976 “Judgment of Paris” and the allestate winery is solar-powered and practices organic and biodynamic. 1829 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 9:30am–4:30pm. 707.963.2784. Nichelini Winery Take a joyride in the Napa backcountry and discover this rustic little winery that’s been in the family for generations. 2950 Sage Canyon Road, St. Helena. Saturday and Sunday, 10am–5pm. No fee. 707.963.0717.

Schramsberg (WC) Sparkling wine at its best. The “tasting room” is a branch of the cave illuminated with standing candelabras. 1400 Schramsberg Road, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4558.

Out with the Old What’s Out: There are no vintages in California. What’s In: Rain, rain and more rain. What’s Old: The boundaries of the

Russian River Valley appellation. What’s New: The watershed reverses

course to follow its historic route back toward San Pablo Bay—according to federal regulators. Stop Saying: “I just can’t waste

good wine.” Do Please: Furnish tasting rooms with handy spittoons or cups, not just

one or two hard-to-reach dump buckets, so that tasters feel comfortable not getting wasted—on good wine. Tweeted Out: “Artisanal.” Tweeted In: “Made by elves!” (as tweeted by John Kelly, Westwood Wines). Had Their Day: Winery dogs. Flying High: Winery hawks (Hawley Winery, “Swirl” Nov. 11, 2011). Hip Last Wednesday: Mixologists. Useful This Friday: Competent, friendly “bartenders.” Lean: Unoaked Chardonnay. Mean: Neutral barrel-fermented Pinot Blanc. Out: “Our unique terroir . . .” In: “Our patch of dirt.” Moldy Oldy: Arguments against vineyards that lean on the epithet “the

alcohol industry.” Boo, alcohol! Try This: Demonize local dairy farmers as “the saturated fat industry.” Saying: “Our wines are handmade in the traditional way . . .” While Forgetting to Mention: “. . . and then separated from their solids

by technology developed by Nazi scientists, boiled off their alcohol and reconstituted in a laboratory. Tastes great!” Smoke and Mirrors: “The legacy of Vino Vigo Cellars began with my

Italian great-grandfather Vigo Vino, who made wine . . .” Cut to the Chase: “Listen, I made a shit-ton of money in investment banking, so I bought myself my own winery because I like drinking wine—a lot!—and it gives the wife something to do, all of which has got fuck-all to do with great-grandfather Vigo, who, stomping his grapes in his underwear in his shitty Brooklyn basement apartment, never dreamed of the perfumed goddamned piles of cash that I have. Come, enjoy my wine, made by my fantastically well-paid flying winemaker—I’m actually quite nice!” Cliché: “A passion for wine.” Vérité: The more you drink, the more passion you have. Earlier Days: High-priced new wine brands. New Times: You just haven’t earned it yet, baby. Old Hat: “Our wines epitomize terroir and evoke the senses . . .” Fresh Meat: Our wines eviscerate terror and invoke senselessness.

Goodnight.

—James Knight

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8ZLUO

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 28, 2011–JANUARY 3, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Knocking It Out Our special news experts assess the year of 2011

A

h, 2011. As news hounds, we remember all too well the Japanese earthquake, the killing of Osama bin Laden, the manufactured debt-ceiling “crisis,” the death of Steve Jobs and the incessant ubiquity of “Rolling in the Deep.” But what do the real experts remember about this tumultuous year? Specifically, what does Gavin Newsom’s hair remember? Luckily, we’ve contracted with these (not at all) totally real personalities to get exclusive (fake) reminiscences on the year. Peer into their souls and become one with their insight while you wait for the economy to turn back around. Then peer again, and wait anew. And peer, and wait, and peer, and wait, and then hope that you never have to hear about Casey Anthony ever again. Here’s to 2012!

The Year According to Gavin Newsom’s Hair You know what they say: hair today, gone tomorrow! Ha ha! Actually, that doesn’t apply to me at all. You see, I decorate the head of the suavest piece of man tango to hit Marin County since Sean Penn picked up and moved to L.A. after that nasty breakup. Luckily, old Spicoli’s return to the North Bay, when he stumped for Norman Solomon’s Congressional run in Petaluma, was short and sweet— his salt-and-pepper locks really

give me a stiff run for my money. Can you believe that a few folks thought that the boss moved up here from S.F. so that he could make a run for Lynn Woolsey’s spot after she announced her retirement? Hate to break it to you, but Sir Lieutenant Governor’s got his eyes on the bigger prize—and, yes, it does involve large amounts of very expensive hair products for moi—like mousse manufactured from serum made of the hearts of endangered black-crested macaques. But seriously, some real monkey business has gone down since Gav and Jen bought us that $2.2 million mansion in Kentfield (which just might have an ultra-special, glass-walled room containing 12 shelves filled with products to make me look even sleeker). Those SMARTtrainers got a run for their money when they got hit with a petition trying to stop that train in its tracks. Hey, I’m a SMART

supporter myself, as long as we can stay out of the wind. Then there was that Tea Party Express fiesta out in Napa. Everyone thought that pretty piece of perm Michele Bachmann might show up, but instead they got Pat Boone. He’s not only the president of the Hair Club for Men, he’s also a member. And then there was that HUD report all about Marin County and its lack of racial diversity and affordable housing. Um, can I plead the Fifth? I’d talk about those Occupy people that camped out on the lawn of Santa Rosa City Hall for a good few weeks, but seriously, I’ve never seen people more in need of a José Eber Brazilian blowout than those 99%-ers. OK, gotta go. Gav just picked up a new comb made of diamond-coated bristles. We’re heading out to meet up with new bestie Carlos Santana for a sweet hair party. Ooh-la-la! —Leilani Clark

The Year According to the UC Davis Pepper-Spray Cop At this time of year, I realize how truly fortunate we all are. What a momentous year it has been for the Pike family. Because the children PPPPPPPFPFFFFFFFFTTFTFTF TFTTTTT nearly grown, we

took what will probably be our last true family trip. Florida was everything we’d hoped it’d

be—Disney World, the Marlins PPPPPPPPFPFFFFFFFFFFFTFTF TFTFTFTTTTT lots of suntanning—

PPPPPPPPPFPFPFPFFFFFFFFFF FFFTTFTFTFTTTTT from the

hospital in order to work on her novel. She’s been having good luck with publishers and we expect a bestseller! I worked on my Mustang on the weekends and PPPPPPPFPFFFFFFFFFFFFTFTF TTFTFTFTTTTT most of the year.

Blessing to all of you, as we look forward to 2012.—Gabe Meline

The Year According to St. Peter No one ever said it was an easy job, deciding who gets to enter heaven and who gets bounced to the fiery depths. But at the end of this year, I’d say I deserve a raise. Think I’m exaggerating? You try breaking the news to bin Laden that there are no virgins in Hell, much less 72 of ’em. And man, who pissed in Muammar Gaddafi’s punch? I tried to warn him about the toasty temperature, but he insisted on wearing all those metals downstairs anyway. After dealing with those nincompoops, I sure was happy to see Liz Taylor come waltzing in. I’m such a sucker for those violet eyes that I had to go stick my head in a cloud just to keep from proposing. And then there was Steve Jobs, bringing me an iPad touch that not even God has gotten his hands on yet! Everything was going smooth with him up here until he started redesigning the harp, which just pushed the poor angels over the edge. And who can blame them? They’ve been testy ever

The Year According to Michele Bachmann So busy! After getting the thumbsup from God to rescue this great country from President Obama’s reign of Islamosocialist terror, I spent 2011 traveling this land, meeting all kinds of interesting people and learning so much. Of course, we know that 2011 was the year that the people rose up and said “enough” to a system that no longer serves them. I’m not talking about those godless 99%-ers. Get a job, people! I’m talking about all those good folks (and God) who support my candidacy. We are the .00001%ers. We are legion! On the road to my nomination, I’ve taken great inspiration from our founding fathers, great men like Thomas Jefferson, John Quincy Adams, Grover Cleveland and several other historical guys who worked tirelessly until slavery was no more in the United States. Back in August, I took off my hat to another great American, Elvis Presley. Without Elvis, all those colored people would have never gotten the idea for the blues, and rock and roll would have never been born, and then we’d never have the music of Air Supply. This year we also marked the withdrawal of American troops from Iraq. I visited Iraq once, and

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I hope it can rebuild to match the splendor of some our great American institutions, like the Mall of America in Minneapolis. There’s a commonality with the Mall of America, in that it’s on that proportion. There’s marble everywhere. The other thing I remarked about was there is water everywhere. See you in the White House!—Stett Holbrook

The Year According to Beyoncé’s Fetus It’s true: I’m the envy of every placentabound organism. I’ll have good looks, instant fame, amazing moves and the Rolls Royce of Playskool cars. But being Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s baby will have its share of problems. (No, I doubt there will be 99 of them, but, ha, thanks for going there; it’s not getting old.) For one thing, what in the name of Biggie’s fleshy left ear will they name me? Bey-Z? Jay-Y? Embryoncé? These are all names that no self-respecting zygote wants to hear vibrating off the walls of her amniotic sac. And my mom apparently doesn’t know what déjà vu is. I know, I know, that song was years ago, but sometimes when I listen to it, I curl my webbed fingers into miniscule balls of rage and air-punch her fallopian tube. But I can’t stay mad for long with

those 808s, and I usually just end up strapping on my cashew-sized stilettos and Single-Babiesing it up, if you know what I mean. And then, yes, I get jostled and shimmied and pirouetted around a lot. I get stuffed into body suits, artfully hidden by gold-sequined draping, and despite my mom’s obviously pregnant bikini photos, my very existence is still questioned by some. But none of that really worries me. You know what keeps me up at night, floating in a sea of uncertainty, doubt and electrolyte-rich fluid? My dad once appeared on a song in which zebras snorted coke. All things considered, though, I guess I have it pretty good. Now, excuse me while I sit back, relax and, literally, get me bodied. —Rachel Dovey

The Year According to a Humblebrag Oversharer Definition of a humblebrag, from the Urban Dictionary: A brag shrouded in a transparent form of humility [often delivered via social media]. Example: “Just stepped in gum. Who spits gum on the red carpet?” January: My last-season Prada makes the unemployment rate look good. February: Ouch. Just checked Billboard and Radiohead is totally outselling my latest album, My Shit Don’t Stink (In Fact, It Smells Like Hyacinth). March: Every day I wake up looking like a Tsunami survivor—then I brush my ) 20

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and some great surf ’n’ turf on the beach. And our sweet girls never fail to make us proud. Taylor is graduating in June with a 3.8 GPA and headed to USC, while Audrey is taking

since Clarence Clemons came on board and started serenading us constantly with “You’re a Friend of Mine.” Damn, that cat can blow a sax! (Whoops, I mean Darn.) Even though he created the squarest comic to ever fit inside a circle, I let old Bil Keane in—Heaven is just one big family circus anyway. And of course I welcomed Jack Kevorkian—how could I not, after all the good business he’s sent our way over the years? I sure am hoping for a quiet New Year’s Eve, but I’ve got to keep my eye on Jeff Conaway and Amy Winehouse. I may be old, going on 2007 years now, but I ain’t stupid—and I think that little Winehouse has a bit too much buzz up in her beehive, if you catch my drift.—Jessica Dur

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 28, 2011–JANUARY 3, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Year in Review ( 19

hair and go to work as a model. #HugzForJapan April: Kate’s pores look as big as mine from this close! Who knew? May: Yikes. Just checked Rotten Tomatoes and Bridesmaids is getting better reviews than my movie, Don’t You Wish Your Girlfriend, Wife, Mistress and Concubine Were Hot Like Me? June: Not surprised by the verdict: I know Blagojevich, his toupee and his toenail-clipping fetish all too well. #BiggestMistakeofmyLife July: Lol, if I had the patience for foreign films, I would understand what everyone means when they say I’m prettier than Hermione. August: So shallow: The phrase “debt ceiling” just makes me remember that I’m really fucking rich. September: Such a retard! If I’d known how much I would eventually get laid, I totally would’ve sprung for that HPV vaccine. October: New personal trainer is a beast: I smell like I’ve been pepper-sprayed and arrested after sleeping in a tent for a week. November: NOOO!! Just checked NYT and Steve Jobs way outranks my memoir, My Milkshake Makes Yours Look Like Curdled Smoothie. December: Don’t you hate it when you ask for a Clydesdale, and all your family can afford is a stupid pony!?! #99% For more insidious boasting, follow @humblebrag on Twitter. —Rachel Dovey

The Year According to Rejected Memoir Proposals Submitted to an Extremely Exhausted New York Literary Agent 1. Winning Weiner: The Untold

Story of an Unlikely TwitterFueled Friendship Between a Bitchin’ Hollywood Star Made of Tiger Blood and a Former U.S. Representative with a Penchant for Sexting, by Charlie Sheen. 2. The Five People You Won’t Meet in Heaven: Afterlife Conversations with Osama bin Laden, Muammar Gaddafi, Kim Jong-Il, Christopher Hitchens and That Guy from ‘Jackass,’ by John Edward. 3. Hackers: A Guide to Ethical Reporting (In Outer Space), by Rupert Murdoch. 4. A Woman’s Touch: Falling In and Out of Love and In and Out of Love Again and Again, by Herman Cain. (Comes with a coupon for one large cheese pizza, toppings not included.) 5. Bunga Bunga Breakdown: How I Brought Down an Italian Prime Minister with the Sheer Power of my Bellybutton, by Ruby the Heartstealer.—Leilani Clark

The Year According to Rebecca Black Wow, what a year! Now that it’s December, which comes after November, I’d like to go back and remember March. March is right after February, and right before April, and all that stuff comes before May. Then we we we we so excited for June, which comes before July, which comes before August. I would talk about October and September, but I can’t remember what order they’re in. But I know that everybody’s looking forward to January, which is both at the end of this year and the beginning of next year! Partyin’, partyin’, yeah!—Gabe Meline

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Choice of an Old Generation In 2009, a small group of former Phoenix Theater dwellers now in their 30s convinced several local bands from the early ’90s to reunite; they aptly dubbed their efforts Nostalgia Fest. This year, the trick apparently bore repeating. Fifteen, Siren, the Wunder Years, the Grady Sisters, Kalifornia Redemption, Mainstream Trend and Truant try to feel young again on Friday, Dec. 30, at the Phoenix Theater. 201 E. Washington St., Petaluma. 8pm. $10–$25. 707.762.3565.

SEBASTOPOL

N A PA

S T. H E L E N A

Moonshiners

Año Nuevo

Paris vs. Paris

There’s no telling what the reveling lads of Poor Man’s Whiskey may have up their collective sleeve for their New Year’s Eve show, and that’s a large part of the appeal. This is a bluegrass band who in the past has covered both “Bohemian Rhapsody” and Dark Side of the Moon; their unpredictable costumes always lend a theatrical air to the surprises. Party hard on Saturday, Dec. 31, at Hopmonk Tavern. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8:30pm. $30. 707.829.7300.

It would be a fiesta enough for the Los Angeles cumbia/hip-hop/ dance band Ozomatli to headline a show on New Year’s Eve. But throw in high-energy openers La Santa Cecilia, and you’ve entered maximum party mode. On top of that, add famously “fluffy” comedian Gabriel Iglesias? You’re starting to build the party of the year, right there. It all happens en la casa on Saturday, Dec. 31, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 9pm. $75–$85. 707.259.0123.

Every year, the Cameo Cinema in St. Helena asks its audience to vote on which film they’d like to see, for free, on New Year’s Day. This year the running was tight, but the choice was Casablanca. Winning by only six votes over Midnight in Paris, the timeless Humphrey Bogart / Ingrid Bergman classic screens free of charge, although tickets are required and available for pickup in advance at the theater. Relive the magic on Sunday, Jan. 1, at Cameo Cinema. 1340 Main St., St. Helena. Noon. Free. 707.963.9779.

—Gabe Meline

POWERHOUSE Frobeck headline a New Year’s Eve party at the Sebastopol Community Center. See our New Year’s Eve guide, p32.

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P E TA L U M A

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ArtsIdeas ONGOING Yes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s currently Oscar season, but the rest of 2011 contained gems as well, like AlmodĂłvarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Skin I Live In.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

The Year of Life

With the vibrancy of 2011, who says cinema is dead? BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

W

hen a doddering lunatic from Alameda predicted that the world was ending, he found an alarming number of appreciative listenersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;likely since there were enough people who felt that we were at the end of something. In the movie world, people were mourning the end of

35mm ďŹ lm, the end of 3-D as the savior of the theatrical experience, maybe the end of cinema itself. I interviewed a knighted thespian once. He told me the ďŹ rst question the queen asked him, after she ennobled him, was â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do people still go to the theater?â&#x20AC;? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll restate the obvious: seeing a ďŹ lm in a plaster paradise of a grand old theater is a boutique experience compared to the live-tweeted mass viewing in a

hundred spread-out householdsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; one eye on the TV, half an eye on the smartphone. In an age of relentless digital sampling and borrowing, the walls of individual movies become so thin that they start to leak. In 2011, in Hugo, Ben Kingsley suddenly stars in a Georges MĂŠliès ďŹ lm. In The Artist, Jean Dujardin edits himself into Douglas Fairbanksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mark of Zorro. And in a great cinephilic outrage much blogged, director Michel Hazanavicius helps himself to the music from

Vertigo. (For that matter, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows rips off some vintage Ennio Morricone.) If it really is curtains for cinema, it was surprising this past year to see Pedro AlmodĂłvar going grand and theatrical, handsomely refurbishing a Franju-esque revenge plot in The Skin I Live In. And kudos to Martin Scorseseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hugo, a kamikaze attempt to sneak some early cinema onto the kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; plates. Many other critics have included in their top 10 lists The Artist, which tells how sound ďŹ lm replaced obsolescent, corny silent cinema. Perhaps The Artist has some cachet, because nearly everyone feels obsolete now. The ďŹ lmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s battle between silence and sound might be a metaphor for the career of Jean Dujardin, a world-class French comic actor trying to crack an American market that cannot read subtitles. We may not be able to get many more prints of 35mm ďŹ lms, but they must be viable somehow. What is War Horse if not Steven Spielberg running out of a burning movie studio, carrying all the tropes he could loot? The best ďŹ lms of the year were haunted. Terrence Malickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tree of Life cherished youth and greenery; it mourned, and it was rounded with a nondenominational Valhalla. (The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shall We Gather at the Riverâ&#x20AC;? sequence was the deal-breaker for people who survived the dinosaur scenes.) When I saw The Tree of Life the second time, I was followed out by a woman, pleading to anyone who would listen, to explain to her why the ďŹ lm had â&#x20AC;&#x153;no closure.â&#x20AC;? I sort of snarled at her: â&#x20AC;&#x153;They went to heaven! How much closure do you want?â&#x20AC;? Lars von Trierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Melancholia

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really Brooklyn. So does Tintin having a dispute with a thieving falcon while trying to pilot a motorcycle down a treacherous hill. So, for that matter, does Hugo’s toylike Beaux-Arts French train station, and so does Scorsese’s use of a simple effect: the ballooning, lunatic face of Sacha Baron Cohen. Guess it’s time to stop claiming that the best use of 3-D was 57 years ago in the Three Stooges’ Spooks (1953), where Moe Howard advanced straight at the viewer, two fingers splayed and ready. Snippets of Hugo—such as Richard Griffiths frowning at a snappish lap dog—I’d happily trade for the entirety of Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris. Good for Allen for lifting the mortgages on so many struggling theaters, and most of them are struggling. But that tepid minor movie needs to be called out at year’s end for what it is: carrion for culture vultures. As for the worst movies, there’s no substitute for the traditional. Adam Sandler, you’re a genius: Just Go with It, a rewarming of a worm-eaten old French farce, made even Hawaii look ugly. (Somehow I forgot to see his monster hit Jack and Jill.) I Don’t How She Does It turned every theater seat into a 21st-century replica of the infamous Medieval “Judas chair.” Is it worse than the abject creepiness of The Green Hornet? Let’s go with Hornet as 2011’s nadir, because we fan boys are responsible. Barring Mayan apocalypse, foaming Republicans shutting down the theaters or even some kind of killer comet, 2012 promises us a Spider-Man, a Batman, a Superman, an Avengers assembly, a new 007 adventure and even a new Ghost Rider. The fan boys’ eyes may be bigger than their bellies, which is hard to imagine if you’ve seen those bellies. In the face of that planetary alignment of pop, only supposed machos can complain about chick flicks. Real machos, of course, complain about nothing.

Gallery

posited the world about to carom off a shadow planet, bringing the most final ending to a film since 1970’s Beneath the Planet of the Apes. Margin Call’s intense exploration of a skyscraper of purgatory ended with the sound of a shovel digging a grave, and Werner Herzog’s Into the Abyss compounded the eeriness of sitting in the presence of a murderer with the dead-mantalking interview sequences. Abbas Kiarostami’s Certified Copy, too, was a kind of hellish vision of love, whether real or counterfeited. (Roman legends of the world of the dead claim amnesia is an essential part of being in Hades.) And also recalled from the dead: a lean, bearded and sightless Mr. Rochester in Jane Eyre. This is Michael Fassbender’s best performance of 2011, despite how much he gives up in Shame. The dead inhabit the perimeter of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy’s tale of mortal treachery. One of the most exciting moments in this retelling of John le Carré’s novel of endless surveillance is when Gary Oldman as George Smiley indicates an empty chair that represents his Soviet counterpart in the spy game; “Karla” takes on a kind of spirit form as the cagey (but half-alive) Smiley recreates him for us. In the “guerrilla war is the new entertainment” department, we have Coriolanus, Ralph Fiennes’ bloody and highly exciting Balkan War adaptation of Shakespeare (opening here sometime in January). Philosopher and cultural critic Slavko Zizek, a fan of the movie, pronounces this story anti-fascist. A ghostly absence lies at the heart of the avant-garde in the documentary Pina (late January), a festschrift for the choreographer Pina Bausch. Bausch’s choreography honors sweat, toil, ordinary terrors and ordinary life, and director Wim Wenders’ use of 3-D for the dance performances demonstrates what’s magical about the format. So does Captain America chasing a Nazi through Brooklyn in the days when it was

Stage Kevin Berne

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 28, 2011–JANUARY 3, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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DRESSED UP ‘Seven Guitars’ takes David Templeton’s number one slot for 2011.

The Big Faves Top 10 torn tickets of 2011 BY DAVID TEMPLETON ,OJH

+ F SS Z

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Historic

RIVER THEATRE Dec 9tQNtt8PSME'BNPVT3FHHBF

Mighty Diamonds & Lumination Dec 17tQNt)PMJEBZ1BSUZ The Thugz and Dgiin Dec 31tQNtt/FX:FBST1BSUZ

The Tubes featuring Fee Waybill Send GPSNFSMZ5JNNZ

Tickets available at the door 16135 Main Street, Guerneville

707.869.8022

E

very New Year’s, regular as clockwork, I do it again.

I empty out my box of torn ticket stubs from the previous year of theater-going. I spread them out all over the floor. And using those bits and pieces of pasteboard scraps, I mentally revisit all of the plays I’ve seen over the previous 12 months. Then I choose my favorites. As always, my favorites are fairly subjective, highly personal choices, and do not necessarily constitute the best shows I’ve experienced. That’s an important distinction. There are plays that, though less than perfect, I look back on with great fondness and pleasure, while others, shows that might have been flawlessly executed, dropped out of my head the minute I filed my review. Simply put, my favorite plays are those which, months down the line, I find myself wishing I could see all over again. Here they are, my North Bay top 10 torn tickets of 2011. 1. ‘Seven Guitars’ (Marin Theatre Company ) Gracefully directed by Kent Gash, August

Wilson’s luxurious, lived-in drama begins with the funeral of a oncepromising musician, then skips back in time to show the events leading up to his death. The acting was so good, so alive, so fresh with detail and grit that it was easy to forget we were watching actors at all. Vibrantly and powerful written, this Seven Guitars sprung to live with the kind of force and elegance that theater should always strive for yet so rarely achieves. 2. ‘Bug’ (Narrow Way Stage Company) When a lonely waitress with devastating emotional scars meets a potentially delusional man (certain he’s the subject of a horrific government experiment), it makes for the weirdest, boldest love story of the year. Directed by Lennie Dean with verve and stunning compassion, and performed by a cast willing to bare their souls (and everything else), the show’s raw energy and sheer outrageousness made it absolutely unforgettable. 3. ‘The Caretaker’ (Imaginists and Ensemble theater collectives) Harold Pinter’s patented semiabsurdist drama, set in a cluttered

room crammed with debris, featured three supremely odd and damaged men, bouncing up against each other. Expertly directed, with a pair of towering performances, this magnificent show still lingers in the mind. 4. ‘Woody Guthrie’s American Song’ (Cinnabar Theater) Powered by great songs, all movingly rendered, this rich review of Guthrie’s musical skill was poetic, hypnotic and full of emotional power. 5. ‘How I Learned to Drive’ (SSU) Paula Vogel’s stunningly composed tale of a teenage girl’s complicated coming of age caused a sensation, and huge demand for tickets. With Danielle Cain’s sensitive direction and a fine, fearless cast, this one— both disturbing and uplifting—was worth the wait for seats. 6. ‘Crimes of the Heart’ (Cinnabar Theater) An appealing cast and some fine direction by Sheri Lee Miller coaxed huge laughs and a few tears from Beth Henley’s edgy-wacky Southern gothic comedy drama about a trio of sisters with some very big issues. 7. ‘Shirley Valentine’ (Cinnabar Theater) Mary Gannon Graham’s luminous, full-throttle performance in Willy Russell’s beloved onewoman show is now the stuff of local theater legend. This rollercoaster remounting, directed by John Shillington, showed why. 8. ‘Intimate Apparel’ (Sixth Street Playhouse) Fluidly staged by director Bronwen Shears, this tale of a shy seamstress taking a stab at love was lovingly crafted and performed with emotional fire and compassionate beauty. 9. ‘Cyrano’ (Sonoma County Repertory Theater) The Rep’s bittersweet swan song (shutting down immediately after) was an elegant, cleverly done three-actor reinvention of the classic romantic tragedy. Directed by Jennifer King, this was a lovely and memorable way to say goodbye to a treasured Sonoma County institution. 10. ‘Stalag 17’ (RIOT Theater) Tense and entertaining, this semiimmersive revival of the classic WWII POW drama, tightly directed by Denise Elia, put audiences in the action from the moment they ducked under the clothesline to enter the tastily claustrophobic set. Solid acting made this one a memorable descent into hell.

Bakers Bakers Dozen Do zen 2 012 2012 A r tist Reception: Artist Reception: Saturday, S aturday, JJanuary anuar y 21, 21, 4–6pm 4 – 6pm T he Gallery The Galle r y will w ill be b e closed close d for for vvacation ac at ion JJanuary anuar y 2 2–9, – 9, 2 2012 012 War m wishes Warm w ishe s for for peace, p eace, health healt h aand nd happiness happine s s in in the t he New N ew Year Year ffrom rom George, G e orge, Khysie K hysie & Ray R ay

FASSBENDEROVER Carey Mulligan plays the sister of a sex addict in ‘Shame.’

I Want Your Sex ‘Shame’ a full-frontal firestorm

11- 6 T 11-6 Thurs–Mon hurs – Mon ((closed closed Tues Tues & W Weds) eds) 6671 Front 6 671 F ront Street/Hwy Street/Hw y 116 116 Downtown D ow ntow n F Forestville orest ville 707-887-0799 7 07- 8 87- 079 9 quicksilvermineco.com q uick silver mineco.com

BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

A

rtist-turned-director Steve McQueen’s new film, Shame, is the story of a free man gorging himself. Brandon (Michael Fassbender) is ruled by his penis; through days and nights, the executive compulsively sexes the pain away. Commuting to work, he silently macks on married women on the subway. At his office, he desperately masturbates in the men’s room and downloads porn on the company computer. Meanwhile, Brandon is trying to keep his enormously troubled sister, Sissy (Carey Mulligan), at arm’s length—not an easy task, since she’s come uninvited to stay at Brandon’s one-bedroom apartment. As in a porn film, the worksite seems to be an office for the manufacturing of double-entendres. “You fucking nailed it today!” says David, emphasis on “nailed.” Brandon’s fellow worker Marianne (the delightful Nicole Beharie) sidles up and asks Brandon if he likes sugar—for his coffee, that is. There’s a retro air in the film’s American Psycho–style interior decoration, and in Brandon’s collection of LPs. As Sissy demands more attention, McQueen leaves the possibility of incest open, particularly in Sissy’s vague line to her brother: “We’re not bad people; we just come from a bad place.” Shame’s strength is the kamikaze acting by Fassbender. Every critic this side of the one at Highlights for Children has mentioned his frequent full-frontal nudity. Fassbender is brave for doing these scenes, but his other qualities are more interesting: his ruthlessness, his sense of panic and his total ravenousness. Unlike that other driven Manhattan compulsive Don Draper, Brandon makes us guess what he’s running from and what he’s running toward. Since Shame is an addict’s tale, it ends showing us Brandon bottoming out, soon after a date with Marianne. This last mad night of soulless compulsion is meant to be alienating, but unfortunately it looks like wild fun, no matter how ominously McQueen scores and shoots it. ‘Shame’ is playing at Summerfield Cinemas and the Rafael Film Center.

112/30/11 2 / 30 /11 – 11/5/12 / 5 /12

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(10:15, (1 0 :15, 112:30, 2 : 30, 22:45, : 4 5, 55:00) : 0 0 ) 77:15, :15, 99:30 : 30

Shame S hame NNC17 C17

(10:15, (10 :15, 112:45, 2 : 4 5, 33:00, : 0 0 , 55:15) :15 ) 77:30, : 30, 99:45 : 45

Descendants D escendants R (10:30, (10 : 30, 11:00, : 00 , 44:00) : 0 0 ) 66:45, : 4 5, 99:15 :15

My Week My Week with with Marilyn M arilyn R

(11: 00, 1:30, 1: 30, 3:45) 3 : 45 ) 7:15, 7:15, 9:35 9 : 35 (11:00,

J oin u Join us s ffor or p performances e r form an c e s o off S Swan wa n L Lake a ke ffrom rom tthe he B olshoi T heater in in M oscow on on Bolshoi Theater Moscow 1 /7 a 1pm a nd 1 /10 a : 3 0 pm . 1/7 att 1pm and 1/10 att 6 6:30pm. T icket s on on sale sale now! n ow ! Tickets us presentation off JJoffrey: JJoin oin u s ffor or a p resent at ion o o f f r ey : M ave r i c k s o me ri c an D an c e o n Mavericks off A American Dance on S aturday 1/28 1/28 at at 10:30am! 10 : 3 0 am ! F o l l ow i n g Saturday Following tthe he ffilm ilm tthere here w ill b eaL IVE s t re am o will be LIVE stream off a Q&A Q &A s session ession with with ballet ballet members member s a and nd ffilm ilm ccreators! re ator s !

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Film

Coming C oming January Januar y 20: 20:

GOLDEN GOLD DEN GLOBE GLOB BE

®

N O M I N E E

Film

Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

BEEST ACTOR BEST M MICHAEL F A AS SSBENDER FASSBENDER

NOW PLAYING

CRIT CRITICS TICS S’ CHOICE AWARD AWARD

Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G; 87 min.)

DRAMA

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 28, 2011–JANUARY 3, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

The Adventures of Tintin (PG; 107 min.) Directed by Steven Spielberg (produced by Peter Jackson) and presented in not always glorious CG. But RVB liked it. (GB)

MICHAEL MICH HAEL FASSBENDER FASSBENDER

Hawaiian shirts get digitized in this third installment of the Chipmunks franchise, when Alvin and co. find themselves on a desert island after too much partying on a cruise ship. Good subtitle. With Jason Lee and David Cross. (GB)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Arthur Christmas (PG; 97

NOMINEE BEST ACTOR

CAREY CA AREY MULLIGAN MULLIGAN

min.) Santa’s second son, Arthur, comes to the rescue when the Claus crew neglect to deliver a gift in this animated film from producers of Wallace & Gromit series. With the voices of Jim Broadbent, James McAvoy and Hugh Laurie. (GB)

The Descendants (R; 115 min.) Matt King (George Clooney) is forced to reconnect with his kids after his wife suffers a boating accident in Hawaii. With Jody Greer, Matthew Lillard and Beau Bridges. (GB) Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (R; 158 min.) David Fincher directs the English-language version of the hit 2009 Swedish film, based on the first in Stieg Larsson’s “Millennium series.” Co-stars Daniel Craig and Rooney Mara, as Lisbeth. (GB)

Happy Feet Two (PG; 117 min.)

EXCLUSIVE ENG ENGAGEMENT GAGEMENT

NOW PLA PLAYING AYING Y

SANTA ROS ROSA SA inemas Summerfield Ci Cinemas (707) 522-0 522-0330 0330

Elijah Wood, Pink, Robin Williams et al. provide the voices for Mumble and his family in the further adventures of . . . (GB)

Hugo (PG; 127 min.) Hugo, a young boy sent to live with his uncle who maintains the clocks at a railway station, searches for the missing part, the key to the heart, of the automaton his clockmaker father had found before his death. Directed by Martin Scorsese in an adaptation of Brian Selznick’s novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret. (GB)

J. Edgar (R; 137 min.) Clint Eastwood’s biopic takes on a halfcentury of histor. Leonardo DiCaprio plays J. Edgar Hoover, founder of the FBI. Protected from the world by his mother (Judi Dench) and his secretary (Naomi Watts), Hoover emerges for

lunches, dinners and the racetrack with longtime companion Clyde Tolson (Armie Hammer). (RvB)

Melancholia (R; 130 min.) Doomsday, precipitated by a planet on a collision course with Earth, gets the Lars von Trier treatment in the maverick director’s latest. Co-stars Kirsten Dunst, Kiefer Sutherland and Charlotte Gainsbourg. At Summerfield Cinemas. (GB) Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol (R; 132 min.) More capers and treachery in the fourth installment of the spy franchise Tom Cruise rebooted 15 years ago. Brad Bird (The Incredibles) directs, his first live-action. (GB)

The Muppets (PG; 120 min.) The first Muppet movie in 12 years co-stars Amy Adams and Jason Segal (who also wrote the script), who must rally the Muppet gang to save Muppet Theater from the evil oil magnate (Chris Cooper). (GB)

My Week with Marilyn (R; 106 min.) An assistant on the set of The Prince and the Showgirl in 1956 recounts his week spent with the bombshell while her husband Arthur Miller is out of town. Stars Michelle Williams as Marilyn. (GB)

New Year’s Eve (PG-13; 118 min.) Like his previous film, Valentine’s Day, Garry Marshall’s latest depicts through a series of vignette’s the various states of the union of a group of couples in New York on New Year’s Eve. With Halle Berry, Robert De Niro, Abigail Breslin, Hilary Swank et al. (GB) Puss in Boots (PG; 90 min.) Puss in Boots (based on the Shrek character) goes wrong where prequels usually do, by changing the nature of the characters we love in the name of fleshing them out. Naturally, though, there are some lovely sequences. Features the voices of Anotonio Banderas (as Puss), Salma Hayek, Zach Galifianakis and Billy Bob Thornton. (RvB)

Shame (NC-17; 101 min.) The world of a young New Yorker with a sex addiction starts unraveling when his troubled younger sister moves in. At the Rafael Center and Summerfield Cinemas. See review, p25.

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG-13; 128 min.) Guy Ritchie directs the sequel to his 2009 hit, with Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law reprising their roles. Holmes’ archenemy Moriarty’s here, played by the excellent Jared Harris. Also stars Rachel McAdams and Stephen Fry. (GB)

The Sitter (R; 82 min.) Comedy from David Gordon Green (Pineapple Express) stars Jonah Hill as a jobless underachiever roped into babysitting the scamps next door. Misadventure ensues. (GB) Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R; 127 min.) Big-screen version based on John le Carré’s 1974 novel stars Gary Oldman as George Smiley, British intelligence officer searching for a double agent in the organization’s top levels. With Colin Firth too! (GB) Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 1 (PG-13; 115 min.) The first part of the adaptation of Stephanie Meyer’s final book in her hugely popular Twilight series brings the gang back for Christmas. The second part is due November 2012. (GB)

A Very Harold and Kumar Christmas (R; 90 min.) Yet another low-comedy franchise swiping the title from the late-’80s Brady Bunch reunion film. (GB)

War Horse (PG-13; 146 min.) At the onset of World War I, a Devonshire boy’s horse is sold to the cavalry for the war effort, and shipped to the front in France. Based on British author Michael Morpurgo’s 1982 novel and directed by a busy Steven Spielberg. Opens Christmas Day. (GB)

We Bought a Zoo (PG; 123 min.) The memoir of Benjamin Mee, father and widower who finds his life radically changing after he buys a country estate—and, with it, a zoo— is brought to the screen by director and screenwriter Cameron Crowe (Jerry Maguire, Almost Famous). Stars Matt Damon and Scarlett Johansson. (GB)

Young Adult (R; 94 min.) The director and screenwriter of Juno team up again for Young Adult, starring Charlize Theron as a children’s book writer coming unraveled. (NB)

SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY

Redemption, Mainstream Trend and Truant pretend it’s the ’90s. Dec 30, 8pm. Phoenix Theater, 201 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Elvin Bishop

Poor Man’s Whiskey

Blues legend and his band, Pat Jordan Band and A Piece of My Heart featuring Julie Medeiros. Dec 31, 8:30pm. $50. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Celebrate with SF quintet, Champagne and balloon drop. Dec 31, 8:30pm. $30. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Brulée

“She’s a Beauty” hitmakers play historic theater with Mario Cippolina’s new band. Dec 31 at 8. $30. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.8022.

Music, balloons, party favors and Champagne toasts. Dec 31, 7:30pm. $15-$25. Main Street Station, 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Tommy Castro Local blues icon plays with David Jacobs-Strain. Dec 31, 8pm. $51-$56. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Cracker & Camper Van Beethoven David Lowery’s current and past projects both under one roof. Dec 29, 8pm. $26-$28. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

New Year’s Eve Bash with Fargo Brothers Including appetizers, Champagne and morning-after breakfast buffet. Dec 31, 8pm. $30. Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

New Year’s Eve Gala Featuring Petaluma’s own Elizabeth Walter and players from the San Francisco Symphony. Dec 31, 7pm. $25$30. Petaluma Historical Museum & Library, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

New Year’s Eve Party with the Carrtunes Featuring dancing, live music and Champagne. Dec 31, 9:30pm. Murphy’s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

No Tomorrow Dance party with DJs Sabin Cloud, Orestes, Club Trev, Paul Timberman, Symon & more, with Aztec Dancers and Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. Dec 31, 8pm. $15-$20. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Nostalgia Fest ’11 Fifteen, Siren, Wunder Years, Grady Sisters, Kalifornia

The Tubes

Vintage Ball Dress in days-gone-by finest for dinner ball with Uncle Wiggly. Dec 31, 8pm. $25-$30. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Welcome to the New World Music by Frobeck, David & Linda LaFlamme, Teresa Tudury, Moonbeams and more. Dances, drum circles and midnight ceremony by Francis Rico. Dec 31, 8pm. $40. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

MARIN COUNTY Hot Buttered Rum & New Monsoon New Year’s Eve homecoming show with two Marin-based bands. Sat, Dec 31, 9pm. $30. Palm Ballroom, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

New Year’s Eve Bash Celebration featuring comedy, music and dancing with Danny Click and the Americana Orchestra, Mort Sahl, Mark Pitta and Mike Pace. Sat, Dec 31, 7:30pm. $65. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Petty Theft & the 85’s New Year’s Eve celebration featuring Tom Petty tribute band. Sat, Dec 31, 8:30pm. $35-$40. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

NAPA COUNTY Terry Bradford Early and late events featuring in-house entertainment, glass of Champagne and party

Ozomatli LA funk/salsa pioneers ring in the new year with La Santa Cecelia and Gabriel Iglesias aka Fluffy and His Stand-Up Revolution Comedians. Sat, Dec 31, 9pm. $85. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Dec 29, Slip-Gooze Monkey. Dec 30, The Rusty String Express. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Dec 30, Hadley Hill CD release party. Dec 31, Vintage Ball with Uncle Wiggly. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Flamingo Lounge Dec 31, Electric Avenue. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Dec 30, Un Deux Trois. Dec 31, Honey B & the Pollinators. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden Dec 28, Rob Sudduth. Dec 29, Marti Blackard and Riverwerx. Dec 30, Greenhouse. Dec 31, Jayne Russell. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Tavern Dec 28, Big Fat Kiss-Off Comedy Show with Will Durst and friends. Dec 29, Juke Joint with the Ellusion Belly Dance Troupe. Dec 30, Opposing Media. Dec 31, Poor Man’s Whiskey. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Lagunitas Tap Room Dec 29, Smokehouse Gamblers. Dec 30, Jeffrey Halford. Dec 31, Erin and the Project. Jan 1, Blue Ribbon Healers. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Dec 28, Graham Lindsey, Tea Sisters, Ben Weiner, Orchid Killers. Dec 31, Elvin Bishop, Pat Jordan Band, A Piece of My Heart. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. ) 707.545.2343.

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27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 28, 201 1 –JA NUA RY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

favors. Sat, Dec 31, 7 and 10pm. $75-$100. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Music ( 27

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 28, 2011–JANUARY 3, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

Gaia’s Garden WED W ED – DEC DEC 28

International Vegetarian Buffet

Dec 29, Susan Sutton. Dec 30, Jess Petty and Tony D’Anna. Dec 31, Brulee. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

= F F ;ÝD L J @ :Ý8 I KÝ: F D D L E @ K P

Murphy’s Irish Pub

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PR E S E N T S SSTAND TAND UP UP COMEDY COMEDY

THE BIG THE BIG FFAT AT Y YEAR EAR EEND ND K KISS ISS O OFF FF COMEDY COMEDY SSHOW HOW XIX XIX

Wed Dec 28, nsJazz from NYC

Rob Sudduth & Trio 4HURS$EC nsJazz

Martha Blackard & Riverwerx

WILL W ILL DURST, DURST, JJOHNNY O H N NY S STEELE, TEELE, DEBI DEBI DURST DURST AND AND MICHAEL MICHAEL BOSSIER, BOSSIER, MARI MARI MAGALONI MAGALONI & ARTHUR ARTHUR GAUS GAUS

&RI$EC nsCeltic

Greenhouse

$$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 77:30PM/18+ : 30PM /18 +

THUR T HUR –DEC –DEC 29 29 W WEEKLY EEKLY E EVENT VENT JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT BURLESQUE/CABARET/VARIETY BUR LESQUE/ CABARET/ VARIET Y

THE T HE E ELLUSION LLUSION B BELLY ELLY DANCE DANCE TRO TROUPE UPE OPPOSING O PP O S I N G M MEDIA EDIA PRESENTS PR E S E N T S SSTAND TAND UP UP COMEDY COMEDY

XMAS XMAS O OPPOSING PPOSING M MEDIA EDIA R RIFF I F IF + ADAM ADAM A ARAGON, RAGON, S STEVE TEVE T THOMAS/JOE HOMAS/JOE K KROL ROL

Sat Dec 31, 9:30–12:30 Fun, Danceable Covers & Originals

Jayne Russell Band $

15 includes Champagne Toast Dinner until 9pm, $10 95 &INE"EERS7INESs$ 4 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Mon–Sat 11:30am–9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 7PM/18+ 7PM /18 +

SAT S AT – D DEC EC 3 31 1

HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R ESE NT S

707-544-2491

NYE C CELEBRATION ELEBRUATT! ION

www.gaiasgardenonline.com

FFOLK/BLUEGRASS/COUNTRY OLK / BLUEGRASS/ COUNTRY

+D DAVID AVID LLUNING UNING

$30/DOORS8:30PM/21+ $3 0 / DOORS8 : 30PM /21+ MON M ON – JAN JAN 2 W WEEKLY EEK KLY E EVENT VENT WBLK W BLK D DANCEHALL A N C E H ALL M MASSIVE ASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

MONDAY M ONDAY NIGHT NIGHT EDUTAINMENT EDUT TAINMENT

DJ D JBUS SILVERBACK ILGROUND VROEUNRDBSSOUND) ACK ((BURIAL R IAL G OUN D )

$ 3 RED $3 RED STRIPES S T R I PE S A ALL LL NIGHT N I G HT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11PM/DOORS 11PM / DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

The LOUNGE FRI DEC 30 SAT DEC 31

GREAT DANCE

NEW YEAR’S EVE

PARTY!

ELECTRIC AVENUE

THUR T HUR –JAN –JAN 5 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT JJUKE UKE JOINT J O I NT

GHETTO G HET TO FFUNK/BOOGIE UNK /BOOGIE B BREAKS/GYSPY REAKS/GYSPY D DOODLE OODLE

NEON DJ’S NEON DJ’S P PAUL AUL T TIMMERMAN, IMMERMAN, TRUTHLIVE, DOMO TRUTHLIVE, D OMO

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Peri’s Silver Dollar

Mystic Theatre

Pier 15

Dec 29, Cracker & Camper Van Beethoven. Dec 31, Tommy Castro Band and David JacobsStrain. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Presidio Yacht Club

Dec 29, Waters, Dogbag, Starskate, Lemme Adams and Down Comfort, YYU. Dec 30, Fifteen, Wunder Years, Grady Sisters, Siren, Kalifornia Redemption, Mainstream Trend, Truant. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Dec 31, Fargo Brothers. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Russian River Brewing Co

Dec 31, Jeff Walters. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121. Dec 31, Lonestar Retrobates. Fort Baker, Sausalito. 415.332.2319.

Rancho Nicasio

Sleeping Lad Dec 29, Blue Light River. Dec 30, Danny Click’s Texas Blues Night. Dec 30, Steve Wolf and Teja Bell. Dec 31, New Year’s Bash with Wendy DeWitt. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Station House Cafe Dec 31, Stephen Tamborski. Jan 1, Paul Knight and friends. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Dec 29, Brian Cline. Dec 30, Ralph Woodson. Dec 31, Fish Out of Water. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Dec 30, Butch Whacks & the Glass Packs. Dec 31, Zydeco Flames. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Silo’s

Sausalito Seahorse

Uptown Theatre

Dec 29, Anna Estrada. Dec 30, Montuno Swing. Dec 31, New Year’s Eve with Lynn Asher and James Moseley Band. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Dec 31, Ozomatli, La Santa Cecelia, Gabriel Iglesias. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Servino Ristorante

Dec 29, Smokin’ Joe & Steelhead. Dec 30, Nate Lopez Trio. Dec 31, Jack and Dan’s New Year’s party. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

Dec 29, Swing Fever. Dec 30, Lady’s D. Dec 31, Chris Brown. 9 Main St, Tiburon. 415.435.2676.

Dec 30, Used Blues Band. Dec 31, Terry Bradford. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria

Spancky’s Dec 30, Ed Early Band. Dec 31, Aftertayst. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Tradewinds Dec 30, Hellhounds. Dec 31, Levi Lloyd. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Transient Lounge Dec 30, Fallujah, Simoom, Aegaeon, Tinnitus and Toy Called God. 400 Todd Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.583.9080.

MARIN COUNTY George’s Nightclub Dec 30, John Santos Sextet. Dec 31, Petty Theft and 85’s. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Dec 31, Dore Coller. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

19 Broadway Club

SANTA S ANTA ROSA’S RO SA’S FAVORITE FAVO R ITE RESORT, R ESO RT, S SONOMA O NOMA C COUNTY’S O U NT Y ’ S B BEST E ST V VALUE A LU E

Dec 31, Hot Buttered Rum, New Monsoon. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. Dec 29, Vanessa Pritchard. Dec 30, Sage. Dec 31, Soul Pie. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Dec 31, Moonlighters. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

POOR P OORSMAN’S NOS WHISKY WHISKY O LD

Palm Ballroom

Dec 29, Bobby Jo Valentine. Dec 30, Joy Ride. Dec 31, Carrtunes. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Phoenix Theater

$3 $ 3H HAMMS…CAUSE AMMS…CAUSE WE WE GET GET HAMMY! H A M MY ! $8/DOORS $ 8 / DOORS 1 10PM/21+ 0PM /21+

FRI F RI – D DEC EC 30 30

Main Street Station

Americana Orchestra. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dec 29, Lockwood Barr. Dec 30, Swamp Thang and Fiver Brown. Dec 31, Chrome Johnson, Honeydust. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

142 Throckmorton Theatre Dec 31, Danny Click and

San Francisco’s City Guide

Woody Allen Tickets start at $87 to see film director play clarinet in New Orleans jazz group. Dec 28 at Regency Ballroom.

Trombone Shorty New Orleans funk and soul strutter with a huge dollop of showmanship. Dec 30-31 at the Fillmore.

The Velvet Teen Santa Rosa’s indie heroes close out 2011 with epic night of music from new EP, “No Star.” Dec 31 at Bottom of the Hill.

Sea of Dreams Santigold, Beats Antique, Amon Tobin’s incredible “Isam” show and more. Dec 31 at SF Concourse Exhibition Center.

Primus Les Claypool’s annual New Year’s Eve show goes tropical with a “Hawaiian Hukilau.” Dec 31 at the Great American Music Hall.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

UP UP UP So many great albumsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;like

tUnE-yArDs, aboveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so little space.

Ear Candy Five favorite albums of 2011

BY GABE MELINE

W

hen I ďŹ rst heard tUnE-yArDsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;w h o k i l l,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I was so ďŹ&#x201A;abbergasted that I could report my ďŹ ndings only in abstract poetry form. With a ukulele, a drum kit, a fantastic bassist and a total command of loop pedals, Merrill Garbus made a record thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daring, accessible and fully enjoyable. Garbusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; malleable voice is sweet and cooing one minute, a roar from another world the next; there are grinding, horn-heavy jams like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Biznessâ&#x20AC;? and slow, beautiful ruminations on love, like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Powa,â&#x20AC;? with a breathtaking upper-register ending.

The easy listeningiďŹ cation of everything was probably the deďŹ ning thread of 2011. Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

29

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

Thur, Dec 29 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45 Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Fri, Dec 30 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther hosts A NIGHTCLUB TWO-STEP PARTY

Sat, Dec 31 8:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:30am

8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9am; 9:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:15am Jazzercise California Ballroom NEW YEARS EVE DANCE call 707.529.2924 for reservation

Sun, Jan 1 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10

Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

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Mon, Jan 2 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Scottish Country Dancing 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise African and World Music Dance

Tues, Jan 3 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

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BUTCH WHACKS AND THE GLASS PACKS

Party Favors, Champagne Toast 8:30pm

THE ZYDECO FLAMES

Party Favors, Champagne Toast 9:00pm

MIRACLE MULE 6 Gumbo Honky Tonk 8:00pm / No Cover

Rancho Debut!

7 RUBBER SOULDIERS FEATURUNG DAVID GANS AND THE ROWEN BORTHERS 8:30pm

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Read about the Weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;House of Balloons,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Clams Casinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Instrumentals,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Odd Birdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Smith,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Krengâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Grimoire,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Amon Tobinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Isamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and 15 other top records from 2011 on the Bohemianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music blog at www.citysoundinertia.com.

Wed, Dec 28 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise

Jan

Rancho Debut! Americana, Alt Country,Blues, Newgrass 4:00pm / No Cover

8 THE OFFSHOOTS

Jan 13

LAURIE MORVAN BAND

Blues Guitarist/Singer 8:00pm / No Cover

STOMPY JONES Jan 14 The Coolest Swing 8:30pm

Rancho Debut!

Sat

Sun

Jan 15

HOUSTON JONES

High Octane Americana 4:00pm

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 28, 201 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;JA NUA RY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Gabe Meline

Music

chillwave mellowness permeated not just wispy rock hits, but snored its way into hip-hop as well. (Musically, Drakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Take Care is just a couple steps away from New Age.) I got tired of hearing rap music that wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t rap music in 2011, and Death Gripsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ExMilitaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; was the perfect antidote to blissed-out navel gazing in hip-hop. Led by the maniacal MC Ride, the album is one ferocious eruption of angry ideas after another, shouted recklessly over samples from the likes of Janeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Addiction and Link Wray. Menial details of oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life do not a deep statement make, but plenty of artists (and Facebook users) thought otherwise in 2011. EMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Past Life Martyred Saintsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is an album by Erika M. Anderson, who realizes life is not poetry unless you make of it something different and eloquent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wish that every time he touched me left a mark,â&#x20AC;? Anderson repeats on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marked,â&#x20AC;? sounding like an Exile in Guyville Liz Phair; â&#x20AC;&#x153;20 kisses with a butterďŹ&#x201A;y knifeâ&#x20AC;? reads like a castoff lyric from Tom Waits. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blood, jealousy, disappointment and revenge, especially in the fantastic semi-spoken â&#x20AC;&#x153;Californiaâ&#x20AC;?. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t jump out of my seat for a Gil-Scott Heron remix record by Jamie XX, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re New Here,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; but acquired a separate disc of the instrumentals. Each time, the sonorous bass on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m New Hereâ&#x20AC;? was like a drip of morphine; the insistent wiggle and menacing handclap of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Runningâ&#x20AC;? always put me in an imaginary heist movie. There is effervescence to Giversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;In Lightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; that I cannot deny. The ďŹ rst song is called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Up Up Up,â&#x20AC;? and if I were to pick a perfect single of the year, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saw You Firstâ&#x20AC;? would be a contenderâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just a sweet-sailing, high-kicking love song that hits all the right notes. There are megaepic â&#x20AC;&#x153;rock momentsâ&#x20AC;? all over the record, and the songs are a senior thesis in perfect arrangement.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 28, 2011–JANUARY 3, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

ot  o ot p ot pri  prings, pprrrin iing in ngs n ng ggss, s,  o ool o i in  iin n e, ool ine,  a ar m  el elc lcom ome arm elcome DON’T FORGET…WE SERVE FOOD TOO!

McNear’s Dining House

Comfortable, C omfor table, relaxing rela x ing getaway getaaw w ay at at “the “t he top top of of tthe he wine wine ccountry” ountr y”

Jan 3 At 6pm. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Members Show,” featuring sculpture, painting, photography and more. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

THUR 12/29 • 8:00PM DOORS • $26 ADV/$28 DOS • 21+ ROCK

AN EVENING WITH

CRACKER & CAMPER VAN BEETHOVEN NYE WITH

10% 1 0% O Off ff R ff Rates ates Mention M Me entio ion this this th is ad ad

Through Jan 1, “Holiday Invitational and Member’s Show.” 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.7648.

PLUS DAVID JACOB-STRAIN BALLOON DROP, PARTY FAVORS, & FREE DRINK TOKEN

BACKYARD BOOGIE TOUR 2012

J BOOG FRI 1/20 • 7:30PM DOORS • $24 ADV/$26 DOS • 21+ AMERICAN SURFROCK

DICK DALE JIMMY DALE ON DRUMS PLUS THE PYRONAUTS SUN 1/22 • 7:30PM DOORS • $23 ADV/$25 DOS • 21+ ACOUSTIC/FUNK/ROCK

AN EVENING WITH

KELLER WILLIAMS FRI 1/27 • 7:30PM DOORS • $26 • 21+ BLUES/FOLK/JAM

MELVIN SEALS & JGB SAT 1/28 • 7:30PM DOORS • $13 ADV/$15 DOS • 18+ SUBLIME TRIBUTE BAND

40 OZ TO FREEDOM PLUS BOBBY JO VALENTINE WED 2/1 • 7:00PM DOORS • $16 • 21+ FOLK/AMERICANA

THE WOOD BROTHERS PLUS SARAH AND

CHRISTIAN DUGAS No Children Under 10 Allowed For All Ages Shows

23 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma

707-765-2121 www.mcnears.com

SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma

TOMMY CASTRO BAND THUR 1/12 • 7:30PM DOORS • $21 ADV/$24 DOS • 21+ WORLD/REGGAE

Galleries OPENINGS

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner BBQ • Pasta • Steak

SAT 12/31 • 8:00PM DOORS • $51 ADV/$56 DOS • 21+ BLUES

Arts Events

1109 09 Wa W Wappo ap pp po Av A Avenue, vveenu ue, ue e, C Calistoga aali l i s to g a 7707-942-4200 077-942 4 2 - 4 2200 0 w www.brannancottageinn.com w w.bra nna ncootttaggeeinn n..ccom om

Buddha’s Palm Tattoo Gallery Through Jan 6, “Down the Rabbit Hole,” with works by Ricky Watts. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. Tues-Wed and FriSat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 707.829.7256.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jan 29, “The Flipside of Schulz’s Art: More Than Peanuts,” original drawings by Charles Schulz. $5-$8. Through Apr 2, “Hit the Road, Snoopy!” featuring the beagle’s most famous road trips. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Dec 31, “Make Yourself at Home,” exhibit of unusual home and garden accessories. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Wed-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Graton Gallery Through Jan 16, “A Picture Is Worth 500 Words (or Less),” watercolors by Sally Baker paired with poetry and prose. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Feb 2, “Group Show,” with new works by Andre Cisernos-Galido, Jerry Cohen and others. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Institute of Noetic Sciences Through Jan 12, “Errant Horizons,” an exhibition of paintings by Catherine J Richardson sponsored by Lucid Art Foundation. 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma. 415.669.7585.

and Atacama Desert,” with photographs by Lance Kuehne. Through Jan 8, “Weaver’s Dream,” featuring paintings and scarves by Karen Spratt. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Llewellyn

Russian River Resort

Current show features bronze figurative sculpture by Bruce Wolfe; also, paintings by William O’Keefe, William Cutler and Sandra Oseguera. 6525-A First St, Forestville. 707.887.2373.

Through Dec 31, solo showing of Mark Lifvendahl’s paintings. 16390 Fourth St, Guerneville. 707.869.0691.

Local Color Gallery Through Dec 31, “Celebration” with small paintings and holiday gifts by gallery artists. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 707.875.2744.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Jan 7, “Inside/Out Gallery Show” with various artists. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental.

Pelican Art Through Jan 7, “Small Works” with various artists. Open Tues-Thurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; SunMon by appointment only. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.773.3393.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Jan 8, Bronson Tufts honored at Members’ Annual Exhibition. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Mail Depot Through Jan 10 “The Year in Review,” featuring portraits by Murray Rockowitz. 40 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.762.8150.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Jan 1, “Esse Quam Videri,” with Harley. Ongoing, “Ramblin’ Modes,” an evolving window display by Monty Monty. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery Through Dec 29, sculptures by Stephen Fitz-Gerald. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jan 8, “Patagonia

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Dec 31, “Annual Members Show,” featuring works by current SCA members in various media. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jan 22, “Singgalot,” Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition on history of Filipino Immigrants in America. Through Feb 5, “Customized: The Art and History of the Bicycle,” with bicycle innovations, art bikes, regional history and more. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jan 1, “Sonido Pirata,” curated exhibit dealing with the phenomenon of pirated music. Free-$8. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.7862.

Tin Barn Vineyards Through Dec 31, “Thanks Any/Way: A Photographic Exploration of Gratitude.” 21692 Eighth St E, Ste 340, Sonoma. 707.938.5430.

Towers Gallery Through Dec 31, “Nouveau Holiday,” featuring various artists. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY Elsewhere Gallery Through Dec 31, “Wearable Art,” featuring fine art jewelry of five local artists. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jan 31, “Winter Group Show,” works by gallery artists Bryn Craig, Willam DeBilzan

1]c\bR]e\ b] 

Breathe Easy

NEW STYLES Work by Cayen Robertson (above) and others opens Jan. 3 at

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Artsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Members Show. See Openings, adjacent.

and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Marin Arts Council Gallery

Coy and Richard Lindenberg. 1139 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.461.0351.

Wed-Sun, 10:30 to 5:30. 707.944.0823.

Red Barn Gallery

Ongoing, Round Two of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art on F1RST.â&#x20AC;? Evolving exhibition of Gordon Huetherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine art. 1821 Monticello Rd, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Through Dec 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter Show 2011,â&#x20AC;? featuring the artwork of Alma Isabel de la Melena Cox, Ami Diallo and others. 906 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Through Jan 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grounded: A California Indian Life,â&#x20AC;? art by Miwok/Pomo artist Kathleen Rose Smith. 1 Bear Valley Rd, Pt Reyes Station. 415.464.5125.

Marin Community Foundation

Seager Gray Gallery

Through Jan 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Collective Actionsâ&#x20AC;? featuring artists from Artisans, Bolinas and Stinson Open Studios and Gallery Route One, among others. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA

Through Jan 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Paintings,â&#x20AC;? featuring the work of Leslie Allen. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 11 to 6, Friday-Saturday 11 to 7. Sunday 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY

Through Jan 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Agent of Changeâ&#x20AC;? featuring work of late Bay Area sculptor and activist Mary Tuthill Lindheim. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.899.8200.

Caâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Toga Galleria Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Arte

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts

Di Rosa

Through Dec 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Animalia Spirit,â&#x20AC;? with totems and shamanistic emblems juried by Diana Marto. Through Jan 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Members Show,â&#x20AC;? featuring sculpture, painting, photography and more. Reception, Jan 3, 6pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

142 Throckmorton Theatre Jan 1-31, photography of Mary Macey Butler. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Painters Place Through Jan 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Painters Place,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Christin

Ongoing murals, ceramics and wood sculptures by Carlo Marchiori. 1206 Cedar St, Calistoga. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.942.3900. Through Feb 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Looking at You Looking at Me,â&#x20AC;? featuring photography, video and other media selected from di Rosa collection by curator Robert Wuilfe. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. Wed-Fri, 9:30 to 3. Sat, by appointment only. 707.226.5991.

Downtown Napa Oct 19-April 2013, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Momentum: Art that Moves (Us),â&#x20AC;? second annual interactive public art exhibition ARTwalk. Free.. 707.257.2117. First Street and Town Center, Napa.

Gordon Gallery Ongoing original landscape paintings and limited-edition prints by Steven Gordon. 6484 Washington St, Yountville.

A]\][O1]c\bgWaVS`Sb]VSZ^ <]e[]ab^cPZWQ]cbR]]`O`SOaO\RSdS\baO`Sa[]YST`SS

Gordon Huether

Celebrate Smoke -Free Sonoma County eeea]\][OQ]c\bg]`U0`SObVS3Oag 1]c\bg]TA]\][O=`RW\O\QS<]#'#!

Graeser Winery Ongoing â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inside/Outside,â&#x20AC;? steel sculpture by Homer Johnson. 255 Petrified Forest Rd, Calistoga. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.942.4437.

Hess Collection Winery Ongoing outstanding private collection featuring work by Andy Goldsworthy, Francis Bacon, Frank Stella and other modern masters. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 707.255.1144.

Napa Valley Museum Through Jan 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Napa Valley: The People and the Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? featuring the photographs of Vi Bottaro. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Best of San Francisco Comedy Competition Anne and Jon Fox present a diversified program of comedy performances. Dec 31 at 9pm. $30. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Big Fat Year-End Kiss Off Comedy Show XIX Will Durst and his merry band of pranksters present year-end comedy extravaganza ) $18-$21. Tues at 8

32

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WELLNESS

CENTER Health Starts Here! Kick Your Sugar Addiction 12/27/11 & 1/5/12 - 6:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00pm Join Misty, our Nutrition Educator, as she shares valuable tips and supplement recommendations for kicking the sugar habit once and for all.

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Gluten Intolerance Group of Sonoma County 12/29/11 - 6:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00pm Join us as we discuss gluten intolerance and Celiac Disease, and the challenges we face while navigating a gluten-free world.

Focus & Productivity 1/3/12 - 7:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:00pm In this presentation, Dr.Hartman discusses what has helped him, and his staff, stay focused and productive all day. Every Tues., Weds., & Fri. - 3 - 6pm FREE One on One Nutrition Consultations with Misty, by appointment: misty.humphrey@wholefoods.com Wellness Center events are free unless otherwise noted.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | DECEMBER 28, 2011–JANUARY 3, 2012 | BOHEMIAN.COM

32 Arts Events Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers. Jan 1 at 7:30. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Opposing Media Adam Aragon, Joe Krol and Steven Thomas love to make fun of bad movies, without scripts. Special Christmas movie show. Dec 30 at 7. Free. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

( 31 Monroe Dance Hall, 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Steppin’ Out Dance Class with pianist John Allair. Dance with master of Flamenco, Ballet and Ballroom, among many others. Dec 29 at 7:30. $15. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Events

Stand-Up New Year New Year’s Eve Celebration featuring Rick Overton, Michael Pritchard and Mark Cordes, among others. Dec 31 at 8:30. $24.50-$34.50. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Bayer Farm Tending Every Fri, 3 to 6, all ages welcome to join LandPaths for garden care. Fri, 3-6pm. Bayer Farm, 1550 West Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.524.9318.

Dinner Dance Gala

Dance

Featuring “All Ways Elvis” band and Champagne toast at Midnight. Sat, Dec 31, 7:30pm. $35. Boys & Girls Club, 1101 Hahman Dr, Santa Rosa.

California Ballroom New Year’s Eve Dance

Food Not Bombs

Dust off your 18th-century dancing shoes. Dec 31 at 8.

Help prepare and serve free vegan meals every Sun

afternoon; served at 5. Sun. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.701.3620.

Mill Valley Art Walk First Tues monthly, 6 to 8, downtown area galleries and businesses showcase local artists. First Tue of every month, 6-8pm. Free. Downtown Mill Valley, Throckmorton Avenue, Mill Valley. 415.721.1856.

New Year’s Eve Bash for Single Professionals Dancing, mingling and business card swapping for singles to ring in the new year. Sat, Dec 31, 9pm. $20. Flamingo Resort Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Field Trips Sunset Hike & Dine Meet at parking area across from inn for monthly two-hour hike on moderate to steep trails with midhike wine and cheese served overlooking Pacific Ocean. Optional dinner and socializing at inn follows. Last Sat of every month. $15. Mountain Home Inn, 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley, RSVP. 415.331.0100.

Film Music, Mon Amour Tiburon Film Society presents German documentary on Japanese violinist Midori Goto, German composer Helmut Oehring and Israeli singer Yasmin Levy. Tue, Jan 3, 6pm. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

SONOMA COUNTY Bring in the New Year at the Charles M. Schulz Museum. At noon, watch the balloon drop and toast with root beer; at 3pm, ice cream is added for a root beer float toast. Reserve a spot at Safari West for Romp with the Beasts. For $100, guests can dine, dance, drink and encounter furry friends; for $500, two adults can do all the above and wake up to breakfast and Champagne in a safari tent. Live it up at the Arlene Francis Center in Santa Rosa with Sabin Cloud & Orestes (3rd FIST), Paul Timberman (Dirty Diamonds), $ymon, Club Trev, Coyolxauqui Aztec dancers and others. $20. The Moonlighters headline a big-band swing party at Russian River Brewing Company all for just the cost of great brew. Up at River Rock Casino, enjoy the sounds of highly acclaimed Hotel California as they play your favorite Eagles hits with prime-rib buffet. $19.99. At the Sebastopol Community Center, a $40 admission gets you Frobeck, the Love Choir, Mr. Music, David and Linda LaFlamme, the Phil Lawrence Band, Teresa Tudury, Moonbeams, a drum circle and a sacred ceremony at midnight.

New Year’s Free Movie

Nonstop laughs are a given as a local cast performs the songs of Tom Lehrer in “Tomfoolery” at the Cinnabar Theater. $25–$35.

Watch a film voted by the community, as part of a longstanding Cameo tradition. This year it’s ‘Casablanca.’ Sun, Jan 1. Free. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3946.

Petaluma’s own Elizabeth Walter and members of the San Francisco Symphony play three centuries of classical masterpieces. 7pm. Petaluma Historical Museum.$30.

Food & Drink TKO Will Durst hosts his annual year-end comedy blowout at 142 Throckmorton. See Comedy, p31..

New Year’s Eve

Black & White Party New Years Eve

) 34

Have a rockin’ New Year’s Eve with the Tubes at the River Theatre in Guerneville. $30. DJ Hope brings Las Vegas Style to Santa Rosa at the Chrome Lotus. Three rooms, 6,000-square-feet and two bars make for a fun New Year’s Eve celebration.

Enzyme Dynamite and DJ E20 also perform. $25.

up the Marin Center in San Rafael. $30.

Party big-city at the Doubletree Hotel in Rohnert Park when 10 DJs play everything from Top 40 to mashups. Hotel rooms include two to four tickets; dress shoes and dress shirt required. Tickets are $40; $140 VIP.

Eight years running, Mark Pitta hosts the 142 Throckmorton Theatre New Year’s Eve Annual Bash in Mill Valley, with Mike Pace, Mort Sahl, food and bubbly. $65.

Sebastopol’s Hopmonk Tavern features a night of high-octane hootenanny with Poor Man’s Whisky and their upbeat performances, zany stage antics and infectious songs. $30. Join the Cloverleaf Ranch as it hosts a New Year’s Eve gala at the Fountain Grove Inn. For $75 per person, Korbel Champagne will pour and a no-host bar will be available. Benefits Rotary Summer Camp for abused children and Elder Care Expo. The legendary Elvin Bishop and his band along with Sonoma County’s own Pat Jordan Band and Piece of My Heart featuring Julie Medeiros will headline the Last Day Saloon in Santa Rosa. Includes balloon drop, Champagne and snacks. (Special dinner menu available with reservations.) $50. At Aubergine in Sebastopol, join the Vintage Ball with Uncle Wiggly, Hand Me Down and Chango B; $20–$25. . . . Santa Rosa’s Boys & Girls Club holds its Dinner Dance Gala with music and Champagne toast starting 7:30pm. . . .Over in Cotati, Levi Lloyd and the 501’s take over the Tradewinds Bar. . . . The French Garden in Sebastopol swings with Honey B and the Pollinators ($25) and optional four-course dinner ($75). . . . The Mystic Theatre in Petaluma features Tommy Castro; $51–$56. . . . Out near the coast in Valley Ford, Rocker Oysterfeller’s hosts a réveillon dinner for $75. . . . At Guerneville’s Main Street Station, enjoy Brulee Jazz with a Twist for $15 or $25 per couple. . . Santa Rosa’s Sixth Street Playhouse features Sandy and Richard Riccardi in an All-Comedy Cabaret reminiscent of “SNL”; $20–$50. . . . And the Ledson Hotel in Sonoma has the Jess Petty Duo until midnight with no cover charge.

MARIN COUNTY Best of the San Francisco Comedy Competition cracks

The 85’s open a show with ’80s hits, then Petty Theft show up to rock the rest of the night. George’s Nightclub, San Rafael. $35–$40. Marin County-based band Hot Buttered Rum play the Palm Ballroom in San Rafael for a New Year’s Eve spectacular. In addition, festival favorite New Monsoon perform from their latest album. All ages. $30. Andonis Quartet plays Horizons in Sausalito. . . . The Barge in Sausalito features Rhythmtown Jive. . . . Osher Marin JCC in San Rafael hosts a Standup Comedy Showcase featuring Rick Overton for $30–$35. . . . 19 Broadway Nightclub in Fairfax holds a New Year’s Eve Extravaganza with Chrome Johnson and Honeydust for $23.

NAPA COUNTY Kick off 2012 at the Uptown Theatre in Napa with Ozomatli and guests La Santa Cecelia and comedian Gabriel Iglesias. $50–$85. Travel into the New Year with the Napa Valley Wine Train. Begins at 7pm with a multicourse meal on train, and continues until 1am with music and dancing. Benefits local breast cancer patients. $235; $50 for afterparty only. Westin Verasa Napa and La Toque host over-the-top Black and White Party, which includes five-course dinner at La Toque and Hollywood-themed ball at Westin Verasa Napa. $75; $195 with dinner. At Silo’s in Napa, enjoy the silky smooth vocals of Terry Bradford in two shows, 7pm ($75) and 10pm ($100). . . . Domaine Chandon in Yountville hosts a Carnival New Year’s Eve celebration for $75 . . . . Shake your groove thing at the Napa Valley Marriott & Spa Boogie Ball;$75 . . . . And Silverado Resort & Spa offers dancing, Champagne and a midnight balloon drop; $40.

33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 28, 201 1-JA NUA RY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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34 Arts Events party includes five-course dinner in La Toque and vintage Hollywood-themed ball at the Westin Verasa. Sat, Dec 31, 7:30pm. $195. Westin Verasa Hotel, 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.1800.

New Year’s Bash Featuring farm-to-table food and wine, chef Stephen Barber’s celebratory familystyle dinner menu and live music. Sat, Dec 31, 5 and 8pm. $65-$115. Long Meadow Ranch Winery, 738 Main St, St Helena. 415.394.6500.

New Year’s Eve Dinner Four-course prix fixe menu, live music by Frisky Frolics, and a midnight glass of sparking wine. Sat, Dec 31. $64.50. Left Bank Restaurant, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Sat, 9am-12pm. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

For Kids Bay Area Discovery Museum Ongoing, “Animal Secrets.” Hands-on art, science and theater camps, art studio, tot spot and lookout cove adventure area. Wed-Thurs at 10 and 11, music with Miss Kitty. $5-$6. Fri at 11, aquarium feeding. Ongoing. Admission: $8-$10. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd, Sausalito. 415.339.3900.

Carolyn Parr Nature Center Learn about Napa County habitats and birds of prey through tours, dioramas, games, hands-on activities and books. Ongoing. Free. Carolyn Parr Nature Center Museum, Westwood Hills Park, 3107 Browns Valley Rd, Napa. 707.255.6465.

Chops Teen Club Hang-out spot for Santa Rosa teens ages 12 to 20 offers art studio and class, open gym, tech lounge, cafe, recording studio and film club. Hours for high schoolers: Mon-Thurs, 3 to 9; Fri, 3 to 11; Sat and school

( 32 holidays, noon to 11. For middle school kids: Mon-Fri, 3 to 7; Sat and school holidays, noon to 7. Film club meets Tues at 4. Ongoing. Membership, $5$10 per year. Chops Teen Club, 509 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.284.2467.

Readings Northpoint Coffee House First Wednesday of every month, 7pm Sunset Poetry by the Sea open mic and readings. 1250 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.0777.

Sausalito Presbyterian Church

Lectures Lynn Woolsey & Bill Press

First Wed at 7:30, Sausalito Poetry Night with poets, open mic and chats. 112 Bulkley, Sausalito. 415.332.3790.

Political pundit Bill Press and Congresswoman Lynn Woolsey discuss gridlock in Washington, President Obama, the Republican presidential race and next year’s election. Thu, Dec 29, 7pm. $13-$15. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Book Passage

Exploring Meditation

First Wed at 7, open mic poetry evening. 1131 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Drop-in group meditation for beginners and advanced. Tue, 7pm. Free. Yountville Community Hall, 6516 Washington St, Yountville. 415.717.4943.

O’Hanlon Roundtable

Jan 2, Left Coast Writers present literary salon, ‘An Eveing with Lonely Planet’ featuring Alison Bing. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

West End Cafe

Theater

Continuing parade of experienced artists share thoughts on creative process. All artists welcome. First Tues each month, 4 to 6. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

All-Comedy Cabaret

Parenting Workshops

A Christmas Carol

Ongoing lectures help parents raise happy kids and stay sane. Registration required. First and third Wed monthly, parents’ group in Spanish. “A Star Is Born” keeps kids learning too: Tues at 9:30, twos together. $45; drop-in, $12. Wed at 9:30, infantgym; at 10:45, kindergym. $30; drop-in, $9. Thurs at 10:45, infantgym in Spanish; at noon, kindergym in Spanish. $15. $20-$50. Ongoing. California Parenting Institute, 3650 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.585.6108.

Dickens classic reenacted. Through Dec 30, 8pm. $18-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Sebastopol Senior Center

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Talks and events. Free unless otherwise noted. Mon at 2:30, help for caregivers. Tues at 1, beginning conversational Spanish class. $6; at 1:30; at 2, intermediate conversation Spanish class, $6. Wed at 5, qigong, $6. Thurs at 11:15, yoga, $6. Ongoing. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Swanky New Years show with Sandy and Richard Riccardi. Fri, Dec 30, 8pm and Sat, Dec 31, 7 and 10pm. $20$50. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Tomfoolery Cabaret-style musical revue featuring wicked, offbeat world of Tom Lehrer. Sat, Dec 31, 8:30pm. $60-$65. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of December 28

ARIES (March 21–April 19) In North America, a farmer who grows wheat gets only 5 percent of the money earned by selling a loaf of bread made from his crop. When my band recorded an album for MCA, our contract called for us to receive just 7 percent of the net profits. I encourage you to push for a much bigger share than that for the work you do in 2012. It will be an excellent time to raise the levels of respect you have for your own gifts, skills and products—and to ask for that increased respect, as well. TAURUS (April 20–May 20) For much of the 19th century, aluminum was regarded as a precious metal more valuable than gold. It was even used for the capstone of the Washington Monument, dedicated in 1884. The reason for this curiosity? Until the 1890s, it was difficult and expensive to extract aluminum from its ore. Then a new technology was developed that made the process very cheap. In 2012, Taurus, I’m predicting a metaphorically similar progression in your own life. A goodie or an asset will become more freely available to you because of your increased ability to separate it from the slag it’s mixed with. GEMINI (May 21–June 20) The coming year will be a good time for you to consider investigating the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster. Devotees of this religion call themselves Pastafarians. Their main dogma is the wisdom of rejecting all dogma. Having such a light-hearted approach to spiritual matters would be quite healthy for you to experiment with. For extra credit, you could draw inspiration from a church member named Niko Alm. He convinced authorities to allow him to wear a pasta strainer on his head for his driver’s license photo. Having a jaunty approach to official requirements and formal necessities will also serve you well. CANCER (June 21–July 22) Terrence Malick’s Tree of Life is an ambitious work that deviates from formulaic approaches to film-making. Some observers hated its experimental invocation of big ideas, while others approved. New York Times critic A. O. Scott compared the movie to Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, one of America’s great works of literature. Here’s what Scott wrote: “Mr. Malick might have been well advised to leave out the dinosaurs and the trip to the afterlife and given us a delicate chronicle of a young man’s struggle with his father and himself. And perhaps Melville should have suppressed his philosophizing impulses and written a lively tale of a whaling voyage.” Using this as a template, Cancerian, I urge you to treat 2012 as a time when you will be like Melville and Malick in your chosen field. Trust your daring, expansive vision. LEO (July 23–August 22) I love the way they celebrate the new year in Stonehaven, Scotland. A procession of revelers swings big flaming baskets around on the ends of long chains. I recommend that you carry out a comparable ritual as you barge into 2012, Leo. Symbolically speaking, it would set the perfect tone. The coming months should be a kind of extended fire festival for you—a time when you faithfully stoke the blaze in your belly, the radiance in your eyes and the brilliance in your heart. Are you ready to bring all the heat and light you can to the next phase of your master plan? I hope so. Burn, baby, burn.

of passage that will expedite an equally dramatic transformation. SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) Many of the questions we had as children never got resolved or answered to our satisfaction. They still remain marinating in the back of our minds. Meanwhile, fresh queries keep welling up within us as the years go by. After a while, we’ve got a huge collection of enigmas, riddles and conundrums. Some of us regard this as a tangled problem that weighs us down, while others see it as a sparkly delight that keeps making life more and more interesting. Where do you stand on the issue, Scorpio? If you’re in the latter group, you will be fully open to the experiences that will be flowing your way in 2012. And that means you will be blessed with a host of sumptuous and catalytic new questions. SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) The first half of 2012 will be an excellent time to for you to exorcize any prejudices you might be harboring toward anyone who lives or thinks differently from you. You’ll be able to see your own irrational biases with exceptional clarity, and are also likely to have exceptional success at scouring yourself free of them. This will give you access to new reserves of psychic energy you didn’t even realize you were shut off from. (P.S. I’m not saying you possess more intolerance or narrow-mindedness than any of the rest of us. It’s just that this is your time to deal brilliantly with your share of it.) CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) In Botticelli’s painting The Birth of Venus, the goddess of beauty and love is shown arriving on dry land for the first time after having been born in the ocean. Naked, she is trying to cover her private parts with her hand and thigh-length hair. Her attendant, a fully clothed nymph, is bringing a cloak to cover her up. Analyzing this scene, art critic Sister Wendy suggests it’s actually quite sad. It symbolizes the fact that since we humans can’t bear the confrontation with sublime beauty, we must always keep it partly hidden. Your assignment in the coming year, Capricorn, is to overcome this inhibition. I invite you to retrain yourself so that you can thrive in the presence of intense, amazing, and transformative beauty. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) The coming months will be an excellent time to take an inventory of your life to determine whether there are any ways in which you act like a slave. Do you find it hard to defeat an addiction that saps your energy and weakens your ability to live the life you want? Are there institutions that you help sustain even though they cause harm to you and others? Is it hard for you to change or end your relationships with people who are no damn good for you? Are you trapped in a role or behavior that is at odds with your high ideals? Discover what these oppressors are, Aquarius—and then summon all your intelligence and willpower to escape them.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Historian David McCullough wrote The Greater Journey, a book telling the stories of ambitious young American artists who relocated to Paris between 1830 and 1900. They had to move away because their home country had no museums or art schools at that time. You Virgos may want to consider seeking a similar enlargement of your possibilities in the coming months. As you seek out the resources that will help you follow your dreams, be prepared to look beyond what you already know and what’s immediately available.

PISCES (February 19–March 20) California engineer Ron Patrick put a jet engine in his silver VW Beetle. Now he’s got a 1,450-horsepower vehicle—but it’s not legal for him to drive on public highways. In the coming year, Pisces, I suspect you’ll be tempted to try something similar: create a dynamic tool with a modest appearance or a turbo-charged source of energy in a deceptively small package. But if you do, please make sure that you can actually use it to improve your ability to get around and make your life better.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Professional basketball player Ron Artest petitioned the court to let him change his name to “Metta World Peace.” “Metta” is a Buddhist term that signifies loving-kindness and benevolence. When the new moniker finally became official, Metta World Peace sealed a radical shift away from his old way of doing things, symbolized by the time he leaped into the stands in the middle of a game to punch a fan in the head. The coming months will be an excellent time for you Libras to initiate a rite

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Happy Health Spa open 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:30pm, 7 days

525 Ross St, Santa Rosa

707-591-8899

A Safe Place To Be Real

Connections

Finding inspiration and connecting with your community

The Journey Center: A Place for Transformation

Self Realization Fellowship Santa Rosa Meditation Group

Resources for your spiritual journey (contemplative prayer/meditation practices, workshops/retreats, spiritual direction, art gallery, reading room, bodywork). 1601 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa www.journeycenter.org 707.578.2121

Schedule: 24/7 VM 707.523.9555 795 Farmers Lane #22 www.srf-santarosa.org

Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center

Offers ongoing classes for all levels of practice and interest. NEW CLASS! How To Become A Friend DESIRE (Group) To The World You are invited to an introductory group about learn- A series of Commentaries & Meditations ing to open up to the Holy. Mon, Jan 9, 7pm Exploring Love & Compassion from a Buddhist Journey Center, Santa Rosa, 707.578.2121 Perspective: Tues & Wed evenings: Dec 13 www.journeycenter.org through Jan 28. 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8:45pm. Everyone is welcome. $10 donation requested per class. Holistic Nutrition for Depression, Prayers for World Peace: Sun: 10:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11:45am Anxiety & Memory This workshop will empower you and help you create Everyone is welcome. 304 Petaluma Blvd, N, Petaluma 707.776.7720 a brain health regimen! Sat, Jan. 14, 9am-4pm, Journey Center, Santa Rosa, 707.578.2121 www.meditateinnorcal.org. www.journeycenter.org.

Holistic tantric masseuse. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. Mon-Sat. Holiday discount. Call after 10:30am. 707.793.2232

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Women, men, couples. Enjoy the moment! Relaxing, private massage since 1991 by a Psychics gentleman with good virtues. PSYCHIC PALM AND In NW Santa Rosa, 707.799.4467 (C) or CARD READER 707.527.9497 (L) Jimmy. Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. Great Massage 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub convinces you. and pool available. Will do Appt. 707.542.9898 outcalls. 707.228.6883 Mitch, CMT. Mature. Professional. Relaxing intuitive touch. Private discrete studio. 707.849.7409

SPIRITUAL

Share your organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inspiration with over 123,000 Bohemian Readers monthly!

707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 28, 201 1-JA NUA RY 3, 201 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Family Services

EARN $75-$200 HOUR

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM

1901 CLEVELAND AVE SUITE B SANTA ROSA 707.576.0818 www.srtp.net

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxycontin and Vicodin using Methadone. s 3UBUTEX3UBOXONE AVAILABLE s 0ROVIDING 4REATMENT SINCE  s #ONFIDENTIALITY ASSURED s -EDI#AL ACCEPTED

Sonoma County Libraries CLOSED

Napa Meditation class:

From Fri, Dec 23, 2pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Mon Jan 2. Reopen Tues, Jan 3. Book drops closed. No materials be will be due. No fines will accrue. For more info www.sonomalibrary.com

Universal Love and Compassion. Mondays from 7:00 to 8:30pm at Jessel's Studio Gallery. We will explore Buddhism and the spiritual path, and what it means in our lives. The classes are $10 drop in; no commitment is needed, and they are open to both beginning and more experienced meditators. For information, call Mike Smith at 415.717.4943 or www.meditationinnorcal.org

PEACE IN MEDICINE IS NOW OPEN IN SANTA ROSA

Jessel Gallery is at 1019 Atlas Peak Road, Napa, 707.257.2350. www.jesselgallery.com

Adoptable Photography Exhibit Through Jan, Napa Humane Society launches traveling exhibit to show faces of adoptable animals. Alexis Baking Co, 1517 Third St, Napa, 707.255.8118.

1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Great Prices! Visit our online menu at www.PeaceinMedicine.org

Move In Specials

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BUY, SELL, TRADE

5 X 10â&#x20AC;Ś

707.546.4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

starting as low as $ 30 per month

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxycontin, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal!

10 X 10â&#x20AC;Ś

starting as low as $ 75 per month

We sell boxes, packaging and other moving supplies

Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

Donate Your Auto 800.380.5257

3205 Dutton Ave | 1435 Sebastopol Ave Santa Rosa | Locally Owned & Operated

We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not (restrictions apply). Live operators- 7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

707-546-0000 707-578-3299

A Bohemian approach to the web. The new Bohemian.com

Video Recording & Editing Professional HD video camera work, lights, audio recording, editing, custom labeled DVDs, uploading to YouTube. 707.578.3235 www.videosparkproductions.com

Sonoma County Museum Through Jan 22, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Singgalot.â&#x20AC;? Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition on history of Fillipino Immigrants in America. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500


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