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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Why We Occupy

A collective hope for true democracy BY ALISON MALISA

A

s Americans take to the streets, the steps of courthouses and financial institutions across the country, we stand united in our concern for the future of our nation. Our determination and growing numbers are testimony to a collective hope for change. On the streets, the homeless, the jobless and the first of the fearless join forces to represent 99 percent of Americans. We are diverse, but we share the same basic needs—needs that are not being met. And so we are volunteering our time at fire departments, food banks and free health clinics. We are starting nonprofits to provide the services that are lacking in our communities. We are educating ourselves in schools with decreasing quality and rising costs. We are unemployed or underemployed with an escalating cost of living. We are overworked in our public service, without financial resources to implement effective programs for children, the environment, public health and criminal rehabilitation. We are families working at least two full-time jobs, without vacation, afraid of losing our homes. We are paying for health insurance, but unable to afford office visits and medication. We are busy everyday trying to hold our lives together. We do not have time or energy to be camping out on curbsides protesting the obscene inequality between corporate income and our own, and protesting tax evasion by the wealthy. We are too exhausted to take to the streets demanding basic services and ethical regulation of all business and government actions. But here we are, and let it be known: our political presence is growing in spite of our other obligations. We want our elected politicians to represent us, not their corporate sponsors. The president could begin by verbally committing to the separation of corporation and state, using executive authority to disallow corporations from contributing unlimited and anonymous funds to political campaigns. He can close tax loopholes, end our war on terrorism and ensure affordable healthcare and education for all Americans. If he does this, he will balance the budget, reconnect to the American people and just may get reelected in 2012.

Direct Contact

Thanks for your article on Shirley MacLaine (“Totally Shirley,” Sept. 21). I have read all her books and would love to have her email address if you happen to have it, or a way to directly contact her. Shirley got me going on my spiritual journey, which Shirley herself has been on since writing Out on a Limb. Going within one’s self (like Mandela and Ghandi) is the only way to work out what is going on in our violent, unhappy world.

MARGOT HAYS Australia

A Clean Break The United States has been pledging since Gerald Ford was president to become energy-independent. The best way to do that is to create jobs. Investment in solar energy creates seven times more jobs than in old dirty energy like coal and oil. Clean energy like solar and wind power employ more than a hundred thousand Americans throughout the country, and it is an area of business that is growing. Be forward thinking and go solar.

JODY WEISENFELD Petaluma

Simple Math It’s based on percentage. A Jewish friend of mine told me a Bible story about a poor widow who gave more than all the fat cats to help a greater cause. She was one of the 99 percent.

GERRY BENWAY Alison Malisa is an uninsured mother, part-time teacher and unemployed global health and community food professional living in Sebastopol. Open Mic is a weekly feature. We welcome your contribution. Send your topical essay of 350 words to openmic@bohemian.com.

Santa Rosa

Oliver’s Market has threatened to leave Cotati if it doesn’t get its way. In 1997, many Cotati citizens, myself included, joined forces with Oliver’s to successfully defeat the “evil” Lucky grocery store. It was seen as a threat to Cotati’s small-town character and, more specifically, to Oliver’s profitability. That was why, behind a facade of “Keep Cotati Small” and “Size Matters,” Oliver’s bankrolled the consultants, political ads, flyers and all other Measure F expenses.

Fast-forward 14 years, and now Oliver’s is the 800-pound gorilla. Using the profits from its continued monopoly in Cotati, it purchased the former Lucky property. The proposed modifications to Old Redwood Highway that it now labels a “deal breaker” have their origin in the Walkable Cotati meetings from 2000—meetings that I sat in with Tom Scott. These modifications were widely acclaimed but now pose a threat to Oliver’s profits. Cotati had Oliver’s back in 1997, and now it threatens to turn its back on Cotati. It may be sandals now instead of Gucci loafers, but the tactics are unchanged. Steve Maass and Tom Scott should be ashamed of their ploy. I am.

GERRY BENWAY Santa Rosa

Look in the Sky I appreciate your coverage of leastreported stories (“News to Me: Project Censored picks old media’s most ignored news stories,” Oct. 12). I understand your writer’s aversion to the evidence pointing to the 9-11 attacks being an inside job, and the report on geoengineering/cloud seeding. I felt the same way. But the evidence is there for both. The geo-engineering is going on regularly over Sonoma County. Look at www.californiaskywatch.com. I’d like to see some reporting on this. Thank you.

BRIDGET BREESE Sebastopol

Walkable Locale It’s ironic how history repeats itself.

Rants

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26 –NOVE MBER 1 , 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

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By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five

Can’t Stop Much as the lamestream-media tripesheets of this country would so delight in just blowing off the occupation movement, blithely dismissing us on their fifth or sixth page as the “disgruntled few,” they don’t stand the chances of a gingerbread angel in a rat hole of getting by with such a willfully omissive stunt like that now. This phenomenon, like an incoming meteor, is just too immense to ignore: the ugly cat is out of the bag about the so-called Federal Reserve Bank, and all the attempts at suppression by the tethered media cannot stop what is coming.

ROBERT HAUSER Vineburg

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Obama announces withdrawl of U.S. troops from Iraq by end of the year

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Guy Fieri subject of damning cover story in Minneapolis City Pages

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Pete Rugolo, famed bigband arranger raised in Santa Rosa, dies at age 95

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5 Paranormal Activity 3 breaks weekend record; story is set in Santa Rosa

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Leilani Clark

RN RENEGE Nurses are fighting for what they call ‘takeaways’—existing benefits that Sutter is trying to eliminate.

Hospital Heartbeat While posting record revenues, why is Sutter Health negotiating to lower benefits and cut staff ? BY LEILANI CLARK

I

t happens over and over again, says Nancy Anderson. A phone rings off the hook, or the doorbell to the locked ward buzzes, and Anderson, a registered nurse in the neonatal intensive care unit at Sutter Medical Center in Santa Rosa, is forced to exit her consultation and care of parents and newborns to

answer the call. In addition, she and the other RNs stock supplies, clean equipment, put name stickers on charts and wipe down counters, responsibilities once handled by a full-time clinical service assistant staff. “Most days we don’t have a clinical service assistant,” says Anderson, an RN for over 30 years. “It really can take away

from time with our patients. That’s what bugs us the most. We’re answering doorbells instead of hands-on time with the mother, talking with the family, comforting the family.” Anderson is a member of the California Nurses Association, an arm of the 150,000-strong labor union National Nurses United, and lowered staffing ratios is just one of the issues in contract negotiations with Sutter. ) 10 On Sept. 22, 23,000

Last week, the Sonoma County Water Agency presented the results of a six-month feasibility study for a proposed community choice aggregation (CCA). Sonoma Clean Power promises the development of a local public-power agency that puts control in the hands of the community rather than PG&E. “This is the most powerful tool under local control for reducing greenhouse gas emissions,” says Ann Hancock, executive director of the Climate Protection Campaign, citing the results of the $150,000 feasibility study. “Plus, it gives us more jobs and an economic boost as well.” While job boosts and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions are nothing but positive, power rates would most likely increase by a few dollars a month, but customers can opt out of Sonoma Clean Power, if they chose, at no cost. “This is part of the whole program that this community has committed itself to doing,” she says. After the presentation, the board of supervisors voted unanimously to continue the study of a CCA for Sonoma County, asking that the water agency return in six months with the results of further examination. The decision was reached after a series of questions about the types of jobs that would be created and whether the results and statistics were truly reliable, says Hancock. “They know this is a big deal, and they asked terrific questions,” she says. “What’s going is what we’re calling due diligence. It’s an important step. We’ve been studying it for six years. It’s something that deserves and is getting good investigation before deciding how to proceed.”—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Sutter ( 9 RNs at 34 Northern and Central California hospitals, including Sutter Health-affiliated hospitals and Kaiser-Permanente, held a one-day strike. According to CNA, Sutter is asking for cuts to healthcare benefits and medical leave, as well as an elimination of charge nurses, extra nurses who help stabilize patients, do paperwork and provide backup during emergencies. “We’re bargaining to keep protections we already have,” says Laura Hittenfield, an RN at Sutter Santa Rosa and member of the bargaining team, which last met with Sutter management on Oct. 13. These are what Hittenfield calls “takeaways.” Lisa Amador, executive director of development at Sutter Santa Rosa, says it’s too early in contract negotiations to predict what might happen. “We just got to the table in July after requesting meetings from the California Nurses Association since March,” Amador says. She says the strike is part of a “greater agenda” adopted by the union. “We’re hopeful that we can reach an agreement soon, because we highly value our nurses and what they do with our patients,” Amador adds. “We have every intention of getting them a good contract.” Before that happens, both sides will need to decide what the contract is actually about. Recent full-page ads in Bay Area newspapers, including the Press Democrat, declared that full-time nurses at Sutter-affiliated hospitals earn an average of $135,000 a year. “Union demands are out of touch with today’s economic realities,” the ad stated in bold, black print. Many RNs have decried the claim, stating they don’t make nearly this amount. (“Maybe a nurse in the city, but not here in Santa Rosa,” says Anderson.) When asked if nurses at Sutter Santa Rosa make an average of $135,000 a year, Amador could not confirm, saying that pay

“depends on the kind of nurse they are.” Amador points out that benefited nurses—out of 385 RNs at Sutter Santa Rosa, 94 are benefited—receive fully funded pensions, and “those are benefits,” she says, “that a nurse might not necessarily think of as part of their compensation.” But the key issues for RNs are not necessarily those of pay. “Our goal in bargaining is to maintain a level of benefits and working conditions that nurses in the facility have established over generations,” says Benjamin Elliot, labor representative with CNA/National Nurses United. “What we’re facing is massive takeaways at a time when Sutter is making record profits, which is unacceptable.” According to an article in the Sacramento Business Journal last March, Sutter Health posted its best net income in years in 2010, rising nearly 30 percent over 2009 to $878 million. That same year, it claimed $9.1 billion in total revenues, compared to $8.5 billion in 2009. According to records filed by the nonprofit company with the Internal Revenue Service, 20 Sutter Health bosses were paid more than $1 million in 2010; that year, company CEO Pat Fry was paid $4 million. As Sutter Health claims that it needs to cut benefits and pensions in order to keep up with today’s economic realities, it has also joined a group of 33 companies that have pledged a collective $10 million to the Sacramento Kings to keep the NBA team in Sacramento. Nancy Anderson argues that prioritization of revenue over patient care has led to increasingly poor conditions for staff and patients alike. When nurses are tired, ill-rested or forced to come back early from medical leave, problems inevitably arise. “When you peel it all back, it affects patient care,” she says. “It’s about the nurses being able to be at the bedside, and a lot of the things that they are taking away affect the RN’s ability to be at the bedside.”

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ll of my heroes have helped other people, not just themselves,” says Richard Busse, Santa Rosa psychologist. Busse is inadvertently becoming a hero himself; one day he took action to curb global warming, and a few years later found himself changing the course of history a bit. He’s certainly changed the course of his own life.

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Please recycle this newspaper The Bohemian is printed at Northern California’s leading LEED-certified printing facility, using soy-based ink and the most advanced environmental practices in the industry. We continue to work, as a socially-conscious local company, to reduce energyconsumption, use recycled materials and promote recycling. Thank you for reading the Bohemian.

It began when he saw the documentary An Inconvenient Truth in 2006. As the credits rolled, Busse says he listened to the Melissa Etheridge song and read the message to “do something” about global warming. “One part of the sign-off credits,” Busse explained, “is an African saying that when you pray, move your feet.” That got Busse thinking. “About five months later,” he said, “I got an idea.”

Busse starting calling school principals in Sonoma County. He offered to purchase out of his own pocket copies of An Inconvenient Truth for use in classrooms. “I didn’t need people to agree [about global warming],” explained Busse. “I just wanted to get the conversation started.” Favorable response from principals was about 30 percent, but through a helpful contact, Busse was able to place 182 copies on the shelves of school libraries countywide. And Busse didn’t stop there. After canvassing Sonoma County, he reached out to Lake and Marin counties. Before he knew it, he’d covered California, all 52 counties. Then he branched out into Washington, Oregon and Arizona. Even on vacation in the South Pacific, Busse made a serendipitous contact and supplied every school (and one college) in the Republic of Palau with copies of An Inconvenient Truth. Back home, it was tougher going. “After the BP oil spill disaster, I reached out to the Gulf states,” explains Busse. He predicted a high response rate among those suffering through such environmental devastation. But he was wrong. Response was only half of what it had been in the Western states. “One Alabama teacher told me she’s fighting an uphill battle against ignorance,” said Busse, “not only on this topic, but others.” Undeterred, Busse covered all 50 states, succeeding at 4,000 schools and reaching about 2 million students. Canadian schools are next, as Busse continues for what he calls the shelf life of the documentary, one day to be replaced by an updated film. Busse loves this project. Occasional hate mail aside, the overwhelming feedback is positive. “I get thank you letters from Molokai, Texas and Alaska,” says Busse. “It feeds me, the thankfulness.” It’s so rewarding, in fact, that he’s taken two years off private practice to pursue it full-time. “Psychology is rewarding work,” says Busse, “but helping Mother Nature is even closer to my heart.”

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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NO JINGLE REQUIRED The Smokehouse’s baby back ribs cleave from the bone with the faintest flick of the wrist.

Hot on the Grill

Southern Pacific Smokehouse a strip-mall treasure BY STETT HOLBROOK

G

enerally speaking, shopping malls do not inspire greatness. Or even goodness, for that matter. So as I drove into Novato’s Vintage Oaks Shopping Center and passed Target, IHOP, Party City and Gymboree in search of the Southern Pacific Smokehouse, my expectations were low.

But set inside a big, black freestanding 9,000-square-foot building that was formerly home to a Shane Co. jeweler, Southern Pacific Smokehouse lies at the edge of the mall, as if it wants to stand apart. And it does. Fresh-faced chef Ryan Barnett turns an appealing menu of American food, the best of which spends hours in the depths of the hulking smoker that looks like it came from the boiler room of an old Navy destroyer. It’s a big, bulky contraption with stainless steel

panels and a firebox that can hold an armload of wood. Hickory is the fuel of choice, and prevailing westerly winds waft the scent over the mall. Best of all is the pulled pork. The shredded meat scores on both flavor (smoky, yes, but not overpowering) and texture. Pulled pork can easily dry out in lesser hands, but the pork that emerges from the kitchen here is downright juicy. It’s great on its own ($17) or piled between toasted buns for a sandwich ($13). The vinegar tart

slaw helps to set off the meat. The baby back ribs ($17–$25), crusty with savory herbs and spices, cleave from the bone with the faintest flick of the wrist and reveal the same moist, flavorful, porky goodness. Minding a pork butt for eight hours in the smoker requires patience and a careful eye, lest it dry out. Chicken is less forgiving. The shorter cooking time and lower fat content means the difference between juicy and chalky is just a few minutes. Southern Pacific Smokehouse steers well clear of the line to produce excellent wood-ovenroasted chicken ($18). Leg and breast are moist and flavorful. Reaching deeper into its Southern pride, Southern Pacific Smokehouse offers a good shrimp and grits ($21), fat shellfish cloaked in a thick but not heavy-handed shallot cream sauce. The kitchen also does a solid burger ($14). For starters, don’t miss the chicken wings ($7); the harissarubbed wings were the plumpest I’ve ever set my teeth into. The bar deserves special recognition, especially for the selection of American whiskey and rye—and professional bartenders. The restaurant contracts with Kentucky’s Evan Williams distillery to make a special batch of bourbon just for them. It’s great in the Imperial ($11) of the bar’s signature Manhattans, and you’ve got to love a bar that pickles its own vegetables and quail eggs. The restaurant itself is a handsome place, a mixture of comfortable booths and tables facing the open kitchen. On the other side of the restaurant is a separate live music venue and events space, and there’s also a spacious outdoor patio. Southern Pacific Smokehouse has plans to open other locations, perhaps moving into other malls. But for now, before the restaurant becomes a chain, enjoy the decidedly un-mall-like experience of this Novato newcomer. Southern Pacific Smokehouse, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.899.9600.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26 –NOVE MBER 1 , 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Alma Shaw

Dining

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Dining

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBER 26 – NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Chloe’s French Cafe French. $. Hearty French fare, decadent desserts and excellent selection of French and California wines. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Fri. 3883 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3095.

Cucina Paradiso Northern Italian. $-$$. Delicious innovative fare. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 114 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.782.1130.

East West Restaurant

Gaia’s Garden International Vegetarian Buffet = F F ;ÝD L J @ :Ý8 I KÝ: F D D L E @ K P Sat Oct 29, 8–10 Queen of the Boogie Woogie

Wendy DeWitt Mon Oct 31, 8–10 50’s Cool Jazz

Neil Buckley Octet

SANTA ROSA SEAFOOD MARKET Local & Exotic

Largest selection of oysters Over 15 varieties Local King Salmon available NOW! Also at Windsor & Santa Rosa Farmers Markets

Wed–Sat, 11-6:30pm Sun until 5:30

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946 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa corner of SR Ave & Petaluma Hill Rd

santarosaseafood.com

Thur Nov 3, 12–1:30sPiano

Julie C Benefits Growing a Village

Thur Nov 3, 7–9sWorld Music

Hand Me Down Fri Nov 4, 7–9sModern Folk

Spark and Whisper Sat Nov 5, 8–10sFolk/Rock

Ruminators &INE"EERS7INESs$ 4 minimum Delicious food at a reasonable price

Mon–Sat 11:30am–9pm 1899 Mendocino Ave Santa Rosa

707-544-2491 www.gaiasgardenonline.com

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California cuisine. $$. Comfortable and casual, Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 557 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.6142.

Gohan Japanese. $$-$$$. Superb Japanese favorites with modern twists like green-tea cheesecake and wakame snow-crab caviar salad in a martini glass. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 1367 McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.789.9296.

Graffiti Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Jazzed-up waterfront destination really is all that jazz. Big menu focuses on creative seafood dishes, also steak and lamb. Variety of indoor and outdoor seating; wide selection of appetizers– half vegetarian–can make the meal. Lunch and dinner daily. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Sky Lounge Steakhouse & Raw Bar American/ sushi. $$$. An overpriced coffee shop with a tiny sushi bar. Breakfast and lunch daily; dinner, Wed-Sun. 2200 Airport Blvd (in Sonoma County Airport), Santa Rosa. 707.542.9400.

Sonoma-Meritage Martini California-French. $$$. The menu, which changes daily, is well-rounded with plenty of options, thanks in no

small part to the fresh seafood bar. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner, Wed-Mon; brunch, SatSun. 165 W Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.5556.

Syrah California-French. $$$. Sophisticated cuisine in restaurant or indoor courtyard. Seasonally changing menu and inventive desserts. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4002.

Tai Yuet Lau Chinese. $$. Atmosphere is nothing to write home about, but the food will bring you back. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 941 Golf Course Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.545.2911. Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$. The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Vineyards Inn Spanish. $$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting

Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Open breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Paradise Bay Californian. $$. For tasty standards and vegetarian items. Also get a delicious curry here. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226. Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525. Small Shed Flatbreads Pizza. $$. Slow Food-informed Marin Organics devotee with a cozy, relaxed family atmosphere and no BS approach to great food served simply for a fair price. 17 Madrona Ave, Mill Valley. Open for lunch and dinner daily. 415.383.4200.

Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500. Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103.

Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Busterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destinationâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;for a reason. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot!â&#x20AC;? Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

C.C. Blue Japanese. $$-$$$. Eat Godzilla maki and hamachi carpaccio in aquarium-chic environs. Hearty portions. Dinner TuesSun; late-night dining, ThursSat. 1148 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.9100.

Coleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a â&#x20AC;&#x153;nostalgiaâ&#x20AC;? cocktail. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.244.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Go Fish Seafood/sushi. $$$$$. An Ăźber-trio of chefs all in one fantastic fresh fish house: Cindy Pawlcyn, Victor Scargle and Ken Tominaga. Need we

SMALL BITES

1st Annual

Brewmaster Dinner Series

Small Bites I liked Pizzavino 707, but the layout of the late Sebastopol restaurant always bugged me. The dining room was too big, hangar-like, even. The industrial-looking open kitchen seemed overexposed and out of place. I usually ate in the bar or out on the patio, because the disconnected space felt like two restaurants. New owners Patrick Wynhoff, Jamilah Nixon and Steven Peyer must have felt the same way. But rather than fight the floor plan, they embraced it, deciding to formalize the concept with two restaurants in one, Forchetta/Bastoni. It not only fits the 6,000-square-foot building, it fits Nixon and Peyer, too. The husband-and-wife duo met at Rubyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, an older incarnation of the building, but they have different culinary passions. She likes Southeast Asian street food. He likes rustic northern Italian. Why not do both? The restaurant (the name means â&#x20AC;&#x153;forks and sticksâ&#x20AC;? in Italian) will make food out of two separate kitchens. Forchetta will serve Italian food, and Bastoni will serve Southeast Asian cuisine. The bar and patio will be dedicated to Bastoni, while the lofty dining room will be Forchettaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. To soften the big room, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re adding cozier booths, lower lighting and a beautiful series of window collages made from salvaged materials that will hang above the kitchen, framing it and giving it more definition. On a visit to the restaurant last week, the place was in mid-construction disarray, but I could see it coming together. I think it will work. Forchetta/Bastoni opens in early November.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Stett Holbrook

say more? Open for lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare.

at The Tides Wharf Restaurant welcomes

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LAGUNITAS

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    -ENDOCINO!VE 3ANTA2OSA  -ENDOCINO! !VE 3ANT A2 OSA

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Hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ouevre Reception Featuring: Lagunitas PILS Czech Style Pilsner MENU Prawns Spring Roll mango chutney, micro arugula Lagunitas A Little Sumpinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sumpinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ale

Casereccie Pasta red pepper, speck, cherry tomato, arugula, chili Lagunitas IPA

Filet Mignon au Poivre & Undercover Sauce mashed potatoes, roasted baby vegetables

Lagunitas Undercover Investigation Shut Down Ale Butterscotch Mousse with almond toffee crunch Lagunitas Olde GnarlyWine

reservations: 707.875.3652 or email: reservations@innatthetides.com

The Tides Wharf 835 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay www.InnattheTides.com

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;NOVE MBER 1 , 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

Wineries

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

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SONOMA CO U N TY Audelssa Audelssaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wines are indeed as dramatic, dry and rugged as the location suggests. 13750 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Tasting room open Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm; Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thursday and vineyard estate visits, by appointment. 707.933.8514. Cellar No. 8 Historic Italian Swiss Colony at Asti revived as a rechristened timecapsule. Original woodwork, motifs, mementos and the marble wino carving are not to be missed; tasting-room only Sonoma County Zin and Petite Sirah have gobs of oldfashioned flavor. 26150 Asti Post Office Road, Cloverdale. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. Tasting fee, $5. 866.557.4970. David Coffaro Vineyards Coffaro

BOO!

Selection so good itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scary Low prices, knowledgeable, friendly staff

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specializes in unique red blends and Zinfandels. Coffaro keeps an online diary of his daily winemaking activities (www.coffaro.com/diary. html). 7485 Dry Creek Road, Geyserville. Appointment only. 707.433.9715.

Eric Ross Winery Just friendly folks pouring Pinot, Zin and Marsanne-Roussane; donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask about the rooster. Ask about the rooster. 14300 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday-Monday 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5pm.707.939.8525. Gloria Ferrer Winery (WC) Part of the international Freixenet wine empire, owner Jose Ferrerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family has been in this business since the 13th century. Explore the Champagne caves on a guided tour. 23555 Carneros Hwy., Sonoma. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5pm. Cave tours at 11am, 1pm and 3pm. 707.996.7256.

Hop Kiln Winery Both

707.762.2042 www.wilibees.com 309 Lakeville St, Petaluma Corner of D & Lakeville Sts

pleasant and rural, Hop Kiln has an extremely popular crisp white wine (Thousand Flowers) which sells out every year. The grounds are gorgeous, right on the Russian River.

6050 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 707.433.6491.

Locals Tasting Room Locals is a high-concept tasting room offering over 60 wines from nine wineries in varietal flights. Corner of Geyserville Avenue and Highway 128, Geyserville. Open daily, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6pm. 707.857.4900.

River Road Vineyards Russian River Pinot for $18 at no-nonsense, solid producer. 5220 Ross Road, Sebastopol. By appointment only, Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Friday. 707.887.8130.

Sausal Winery Simple, rural, without corporate crosspromotions and pretense. Good Zinfandel and nice cats. 7370 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm. 707.433.5136.

Stryker Sonoma Vineyards Off-thebeaten-path winery features beautiful views and spectacular wine, the best of which are the reds. 5110 Hwy. 128, Geyserville. Open daily, 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 707.433.1944.

Twomey Cellars Framed by the spacious environs, through a massive glass wall, a panoramic $10 million view of the Russian River Valley awaits tasters. 3000 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. 800.505.4850.

N A PA CO U N TY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sunday, 11:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dustâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm.

Tastings $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Constant (WC) Boutique winery specializing in the kind of Cabernet that makes the Wine Spectator drool. 2121 Diamond Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.942.0707. Fantesca Estate & Winery (WC) Set on land that was the dowry gift when Charles Krug married in 1860, this estate winery specializing in Cab features a wine-aging cave built right into the side of Spring Mountain. 2920 Spring Mountain Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.968.9229.

Hall Winery (WC) Craig and Kathryn Hall specialize in â&#x20AC;&#x153;beefyâ&#x20AC;? wines favored by Robert Parker. Intensely modern art and all things Austrian. New tasting room will be by Frank Gehry. 401 St. Helena Hwy. S., St. Helena. Open daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm. 866.667.HALL. Phifer Pavitt Wines Lots of cowgirl sass but just one wine: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Date Nightâ&#x20AC;? Cabernet Sauvignon. Hale bale seating. 4660 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4787. Schramsberg (WC) Sparkling wine at its best. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;tasting roomâ&#x20AC;? is a branch of the cave illuminated with standing candelabras. 1400 Schramsberg Road, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4558.

Taste at Oxbow Discover refreshing white varietals AlbariĂąo and Vermentino in stylish setting across from Oxbow Market, then move on to Pinot Noir from Carneros pioneer Mahoney Vineyards; Waterstone Wines, too. 708 First St., Napa. Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;7pm; Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday, 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.265.9600.

8ZLUO

19

T

he Romanian wine invasion was a quiet affair, occurring around lunchtime one recent day at Napa’s La Toque restaurant. Proximate to press-time in advance of Halloween, as it was, I had to wonder if the occasion was timed to tie in with the one and only Romanian wine that anyone in the North Bay has likely ever seen, Dracula’s Blood Merlot, Vampire’s Blood Cabernet Sauvignon, or some such combination of bloodsuckers and wine that has been a popular Halloween party gift in recent years.

When we think of Romania, our thoughts trend morbid. There’s Count Dracula, to be sure; the nation also contributed the only bloodstains to the Velvet Revolution of 1989. But Romania is among the top wine producers of the world, and its recent bid to duplicate export successes like Argentina and New Zealand was hopeful yet tentative. How to gain a foothold? Trading on Transylvania was an obvious first start, but at La Toque, there were no vampire-related wines of any kind. Instead, three young representatives from Romania offered their best wines in the French-international vein: Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon. These weren’t bad, but perhaps the native varietals are of more interest. The wines of Romania have been praised since Plato, and it’s reputedly the birthplace of Dionysus himself. Fetească Neagră is a juicy, robust red that might serve as a signature varietal. The Romanians professed hesitancy on account of its exotic name; but they pronounce it like “fantastic” minus the n and the c. Corporate branding strategists get paid top dollar for that kind of assonance. Senator Wine’s 2009 Monșer Fetească Neagră has smoky, wild grape aromas over black cherry and vanilla. With only 12 percent alcohol and a gentle gesture of tannins, it’s an agreeable table wine with a twist. With a simple sketch of a bowler for a logo (reminiscent of the hat from a well-known movie set in another former Eastern Bloc country; being Americans, that’s close enough for us), this is the kind of try-me wine that might best appeal to our market. Indeed, some of these wineries are in negotiations with Trader Joe’s, and Senator looks best poised for success. Romanian wineries make much of their shared latitude and varietals with France. In the U.S. market, however, one more Merlot from a faraway me-too region might be one too many. But with well-made native varietals with exotic cachet and a manageably pronounceable name (sounds like “fantastic!”) they just might have a chance. If you see a Romanian wine in the light of day, don’t be scared.—James Knight

TThe he third third annual annual LLeadership eader ship in in Sustainability Sus t ainabilit y AAwards wards D Dinner inner recognizes r e c o g n i ze s aand nd ccelebrates elebrate s ccommunity ommuni t y lleaders e ader s w ho hhave ave ddisplayed isplayed remarkable remarkable achievements achievement s in in who creating socially, socially, eeconomically conomic ally aand nd eenvironmentally nvironment ally ssustainable us t ainable ccommunities. ommuni t ie s . creating 5 : 30 pm, SSat, at , N ov 55,, 22011 011 Mary M ar y Agatha A gatha FFurth ur th Center, Center, Windsor W ind sor 5:30pm, Nov Event Highlights: Highhlight s : Event sInspirational keynote key note address address by by Jakada Jakada Imani, Imani, Executive E xe c u t i v e sInspirational D irec tor, Ella Ella Baker Baker Center Center for for Human Human Rights R ig h t s Director, s3ILENT!UC TIONHIGHLIGHTINGLOC ALPRODUC T SANDSER V ICES s3ILENT!UCTIONHIGHLIGHTINGLOCALPRODUCTSANDSERVICES s$INNERFEATURINGLOC ALLYGROW N ORGANICANDFAIRTRADEFOOD s$INNERFEATURINGLOCALLYGROWN ORGANICANDFAIRTRADEFOOD 75 pper er pperson, erson, $5500 0 0 for for a table t able of of 8 Ticket s : $75 Tickets: PPresented resented by by the the Leadership Leader ship Institute Institute for for Ecology Ecolog y and and the the Economy Ec o no my

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grisly gallows A burglary, a murder, a lost skeleton and Napa’s last public hanging BY TOBI SHIELDS

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ine-soaked tourists in downtown Napa today might cringe if they knew which rooftop housed the corpse of 19th-century serial killer William Roe while his body rotted away in the sunlight. After evading capture for a murder he had committed five years earlier, Roe earned the distinction of being the last man hanged in Napa County. Roe may have breathed his last breath on Jan. 15, 1897, but his story continues to haunt the county. It is a story of robbery, deceit, betrayal . . . and a skeleton lost to the sands of time. On Feb. 9, 1891, career criminal William Roe headed across the San Francisco Bay aboard a steamer with his new friend, a recent German immigrant named Carl Schmidt. With Schmidt, Roe planned to rob the Napa County residence of retired sea captain John Greenwood. Unbeknownst to the dimwitted Schmidt, Roe plotted to kill him after the robbery. At five o’clock the men reached the Greenwood Ranch. They accosted 60-year-old John Greenwood outside, drawing their pistols on the unsuspecting rancher as Roe hollered, “Throw up your hands!” They kept their guns pointed at Greenwood as they followed him across the yard toward the house. In the kitchen, Roe ordered Schmidt to bind the older man’s hands and feet with bale rope while he filled a cup with water. Roe produced a bottle from his pocket. Obtained in San Francisco’s Chinatown, the bottle contained a sleepinducing opiate. Roe was quite familiar with its effects, as he nightly relied upon the mixture. He poured a few drops from the bottle into the cup and shoved it toward his captive. Greenwood explained to Roe that he suffered from heart trouble. His protests were ignored. At gunpoint, Roe forced the older man to swallow the liquid. Shortly thereafter, Lucina Greenwood returned home. She left her horse harnessed to her buggy and walked up the side of the porch. Just as she reached the door leading into the kitchen, Roe flung it open. Startled, Lucina quickly stepped back and fell backwards over the porch railing. Lucina fought her assailant as he quickly pulled her to her feet and dragged her up the porch steps. Schmidt bound the injured woman’s hands and feet with a window cord as Roe forced her to swallow the opiate-laced water. Roe became enraged as John Greenwood, unaffected by the opiate, demanded his wife be released. In order to incapacitate the man, Roe gave him a dose of chloroform. Schmidt stood watch over

) 21

NonproďŹ t Guide2011 Nourishing Our Community Through Education, Health Care and the Arts

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ur mission with our annual NonproďŹ t Guide is to spotlight the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s active nonproďŹ t culture. The North Bay boasts a broad spectrum of diversity, rich resources, a wide array of services and a vast network of volunteers. This year, given the state of the economy, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to shed light on the ways we are strengthening our own foundations and community infrastructure, primarily in the sectors of health and education. With that, we feature in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guide fresh and inspiring perspectives on the programs and initiatives that are enhancing peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives. And we cannot resist

including the arts, as they are so interwoven into the fabric of our communities, uplifting our spirits and sense of well-being. We are fortunate in the North Bay to have access to innovative programs and to the fruits of their labor. We have every opportunity to engage ourselves and one other, and to get involved as a positive force for social change. We also have the power to independently enrich our lives and the lives of others through knowledge, compassion and a healthier state of being. Reach out, embrace a new nonproďŹ t project, experience a new perspective, volunteer and give!

ROSEMARY OLSON, PUBLISHER, NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN /2D3@B7A7<5AC>>:3;3<B

2011 NO NP R OF I T GU I DE

2

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ARTrails Gallery at Corrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Landpaths

Canine Companions for Independence

Quarryhill Botanical Garden

Community Foundation of Sonoma County

Redwood Empire Food Bank

Community Media Center of the North Bay

Santa Rosa Community Market

Computer Recycling Center

Summit State Bank

Friends of ArtQuest

Sutter Care at Home/Hospice Thrift Shops

Hope of Sonoma County

United Way of the Wine Country

The Imaginists Theatre Collective

Veriditas

KWMR

YMCA Sonoma County

Community Tax Preparation Service

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Education Through the Arts at Wells Fargo Center for the Arts KRISTI BUFFO, PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER, WELLS FARGO CENTER FOR THE ARTS

At Wells Fargo Center for the Arts in Santa Rosa, children discover a passion for what is artistic within all of us. Wide-eyed nine-year olds impatiently await the curtain rising on their ďŹ rst live theater-productionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;excited squeals and sheer joy as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the momentâ&#x20AC;? approaches. As the African Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir, Moscow Circus, Celtic Legends or Spanish Harlem Orchestra take the stage, children come face to face with the diverse people, customs and cultures of the world. Horizons are broadened and futures inspired. In the classroom, a student learns to play a ďŹ&#x201A;ute that he made out of bamboo using the methods of ancient Mexico. In this one project, he receives lessons in music, history and culture. These are dynamic lessons that lasts a lifetime and empower him to excel.

2011 NONP R O F I T GU I DE

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Throughout the North Bay, as children learn to play music, a world of possibility opens. The 400-piece musical instrument lending library at Wells Fargo Center for the Arts shapes hundreds of young lives each year. Students who cannot afford an instrument are given one, and receive the experience of learning to play music. From school performances to artist-led classroom workshops to the Music For Schools instrument library, the Education Through the Arts program at Wells Fargo Center for the Arts serves more than 30,000 students a year from ďŹ ve counties, Sonoma, Marin, Napa, Lake and Mendocino. The costs are minimal and children from low-income families participate for free or at reduced rates. The center is a nonproďŹ t organization, owned and operated by the Luther Burbank Memorial Foundation. Its education programs are nationally recognized and made possible only through donations. They ďŹ ll a gap left by school budget cuts and work to keep the arts alive in our schools and in our community. To give to the Education Through the Arts programs at Wells Fargo Center for the Arts or ďŹ nd out more about how you can help, contact Diana Hodgins, development manager, at 707.527.7006, ext. 116, or dhodgins@ wellsfargocenterarts.org.

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SEE OUR WEBSITE FOR NEW LOCAL LABYRINTH EVENTS

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Supporting ArtQuest through education, community building, student support programs, volunteerism and advancement.

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Offers The Labyrinth Experienceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gathering, Training & Inspiring People on the Path

www.veriditas.org

2011 NO NP R OF I T GU I DE

4

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DEBORAH PHELAN, MEDIA STRATEGIST, EXPERIENCE CORPS MARIN



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Grand Opening Boutique Store ~ November 12

When Larry Wolff, a semi-retired engineer, signed up with Experience Corps Marin, he wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just looking for something to ďŹ ll up his day. He has plenty of hobbiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;hiking, motorcycling, readingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even an aviation enthusiast with a pilotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license â&#x20AC;&#x153;thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not presently current, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thinking about it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wanted something that was meaningful to me and had something to do with kids,â&#x20AC;? says Wolff, a Mill Valley resident. Wolff heard about Experience Corps, a national program which pairs adults 55 and over with elementary school children, on the radio. The program launched in Marin County in 2007 to work with elementary schools in San Rafael neighborhoods, which serve children from predominantly lowincome Spanish-speaking households. Experience Corps is based on a big idea: society meets its greatest challenges by making full use of

experience. The award-winning national program now operates in 20 cites nationwide, with over 2000 Experience Corps members working to tutor and mentor elementary school students, help teachers in the classroom and lead after-school enrichment activities. The focus is on enhancing the literacy skills in K-3 classrooms. Experience Corps Marin currently has 70 volunteers working on ďŹ ve elementary campuses. Sponsored by Northern California Presbyterian Homes and Services, the program was nominated last year for the Eisner Award, and one of its volunteers, Terra Linda resident Rosmarie Ellingson, 80, won a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heroes for Childrenâ&#x20AC;? award from the Marin Advocates for Children program. Now entering his third year as an Experience Corps tutor, Wolff is thrilled that he made the commitment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;First I started with two kids and then it was four and sometimes I talk to the whole class,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once you gain a kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trust, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no limit to what you can accomplish as a positive inďŹ&#x201A;uence in their lives.â&#x20AC;? Experience Corps holds a free hour-long Open House each month for potential volunteers to ďŹ nd out more about the program. For information about the next open house, contact Susan Kraemer at 415.464.1767 or drop her an email at skraemer@ncphs.org.

New Location: 3209 Cleveland, Next to Trader Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Hospice Thrift Stores

The Whole Story

THE IMAGINISTS THEATRE COLLECTIVE

SUTTER CARE AT HOME

Voted Best Secondhand Store* Visit all our locations: Rohnert Park: 6350 Commerce Blvd, Next to Safeway Santa Rosa: 510 Lewis Road Sebastopol: 748 Gravenstein Hwy North *2009 Bohemian Readers Poll

for FREE pick-up or to donate call: 707.523.1775 to volunteer call: 707.535.5790

Find Your Catch of the Day!

Just last month, the Imaginists Theatre Collective joined forces with Landpaths/ Bayer Farm community to create a sitespeciďŹ c play, Everybody Eats/Todos Comemos, which, to the delight of overďŹ&#x201A;owing audiences, was performed between the corn shocks and the

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tomato patches in English and Spanish. Amaranth sang, crows harangued, and scarecrows told stories of the ancestors, while troupes of hormigitas marched and chanted. Said one audience member as they journeyed through the garden: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exciting to be a part of it all!â&#x20AC;? How did audience and artists get to be so separate, anyway? Theater, born in ritual, was integral to the life of society. What has happened to tear them apart? Through what awful machinery has it become so hard for theater artists to respond intimately to their own communities? Instead, theater is shipped in from New York, Chicago or L.A. Artistic directors plan seasons based on money and salability. Witness how many productions of Rent are performed across the land--but Rent was made for New York City audiences

5 is a reďŹ&#x201A;ection of the artists who make it: diverse in age and background, multilingual, multicultural. We want to tell the stories that resound with meaning here, entertain and excite here. We want to challenge our community about the nature of art and performance. Theater can be recycled, site-speciďŹ c, multilingual, low-tech and high-tech, collaborative; it can be on bicycles, it can be made with community, it includes the classics and new work. Here artists can fail, risk, dig in and develop discipline and craft. What stories are we telling? How do we tell them? These are the questions we ask ourselves every day at the Imaginists. And the amazing thing is that the theater is better for it. For more information go to www.theimaginists.org.

Breathe Easy!

MARIN COUNTY SMOKING REGULATIONS AND BANS

SONOMA COUNTY SMOKING REGULATIONS AND BANS

On Sept. 13 and Oct. 4, the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors amended chapter 32 of the existing Sonoma County code to include new regulations helping to protect nonsmokers from secondhand smoke. Where canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you smoke? Smoking is prohibited in multiunit residences; all areas owned by the county and dining areas in locations under county jurisdiction; during public events on public or private property in county jurisdiction; services areas in the county; areas within a minimum of 25 feet of doors, windows, air ducts and ventilation systems; and county regional parks and campgrounds (effective date to be determined) Contact Smoke Free Sonoma County at 707.565.6680 or visit the ofďŹ cial website at www.sonoma-county. org/health/topics/smokefreeinfo. asp or, for meeting information, www. sonoma-county.org/health/meetings/ tobaccofreecoalition.asp

78,000 people are hungry. We feed your neighbors in every neighborhood in Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;children, families, seniors, individuals, the disabled and homeless. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;as a community supporterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;make this possible.

Since 2009, Marin has been steadily increasing regulations in regards to smoking and smoking in public places to help create a smoke-free Marin. Where is the ban? Outdoor dining areas at restaurants and bars; within 20 feet of building openings or entrances (public and private); outdoor service waiting lines, such as ATMs and bus stops (no smoking within 20 feet); outdoor work areas and construction sites (no smoking within 20 feet); outdoor public gathering places, such as fairs, farmers markets, sports events and major performances. In addition, Marin is increasing the number of smoke-free hotel and motel rooms to reďŹ&#x201A;ect the fact that over 80 percent of the public does not smoke (80 percent of the rooms are smoke-free). For more information, contact Smoke Free Marin County at 415.473.3020 or smokefreemarin@ yahoo.com, or visit the ofďŹ cial website at www.smokefreemarin.com/ smokefreemarin@yahoo.com NAPA COUNTY SMOKING CONTROL AND CESSATION PROGRAMS

In the past three years, Napa has passed ordinances restricting smoking in public parks as well as aiding multiunit residences in becoming smoke free. Smoking is prohibited in public parks in Napa county, as well as most outdoor eating areas in restaurants and some multi-unit residences. Contact the Napa Tobacco Education and Quit Smoking Program / CANV at 707.253-6103 or visit the ofďŹ cial website at www.canv.org/tobacco-educationand-quit/.

/2D3@B7A7<5AC>>:3;3<B

Make a Food or Financial Donation. Volunteer.

www.refb.org info@refb.org 707-523-7900

2011 NONP R OF I T GU I DE

about New York City issues. What are the issues here? Are we only a â&#x20AC;&#x153;provincial backwaterâ&#x20AC;?? No. But it involves risk taking, hard work, discipline and passion to make relevant theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;risks like performing in two languages, working with emerging artists and collaborating with community organizations to create plays based on whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening here. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a partial list of the incredible organizations that we have partnered with over the years: Santa Rosa Bicycle Coalition, Graton Day Labor Center, Healdsburg Day Labor Center, LandPaths/Bayer Farm, Redwood Food Bank, KRCB, Community Action Partnership, Sonoma County Committee for Immigrant Rights, PACT, SOFA and ArtStart. We are working so that our audience

2011 NO NP R OF I T GU I DE

6

INVEST

Teen Parent Connections

BY PAULINE RICHARDSON,

HEALTH PROGRAM MANAGER, PUBLIC HEALTH HOME VISITING PROGRAMS, COUNTY OF SONOMA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES, PUBLIC HEALTH DIVISION

IN WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POSSIBLE

707.579.4073 WWW.SONOMACF.ORG

WATCH ARCHIVES OF 275 LOCAL

SNAPSHOTS an award winning magazine show created by Communtiy Media Center staff and interns that highlights the people, places, organizations, history, and culture of the North Bay. Catch

VIDEOS online at:

COMMUNITYMEDIA.ORG

Teen Parent Connections is a homebased program that serves teenagers throughout Sonoma County. Clients are visited in their home or locations of the clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice. The implementing agency, Maternal Child and Adolescent Health Program, is located in the Public Health Division of Sonoma County Department of Health Services. Clients eligible for the program include pregnant and/or parenting young women under age 18, as well as a small number of expectant and parenting young men less than 18 years of age. The Adolescent Family Life program (AFL) was established in 1985 by the Maternal and Child Health Branch of the California Department of Health Services to address the increasing recognition of the importance of teen health and well-being. The Sonoma County program was established in 1987. The goals of the program included: (1) promoting the health and well-being of pregnant and parenting adolescents and their infants by maximizing the use of existing services, and (2) saving public funds by reducing long term welfare dependency resulting from school failure and preventing problems associated with preterm births and low birth weight. Those eligible include females younger than 19 years of age who are pregnant and/or have one or more children. Their male partners can also be eligible if they are younger than 21 and are involved in their childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. Teen Parent Connections purposefully targets a higher risk /2D3@B7A7<5AC>>:3;3<B

population, including teenagers with chronic health conditions, unstable home environments, substance abuse problems, and/or involvement with juvenile justice or gangs. Teen Parent Connections in Sonoma County is focused on the care services aspect of the AFL program, dealing with the alleviation of the negative consequences of pregnancy for the teen parent and offspring. = The program works very closely with the California School Age Family Education (CalSAFE) programs i.e. class room settings which include child care, having a staff member located at each of the 5 sites located throughout the county. Last year the combined efforts of TPC and CalSAFE resulted in 63 teen parents graduating. This was celebrated at an Annual Graduation Brunch where the featured speaker was Dr. Toni Simmons, chief medical ofďŹ cer, Anesthesia Analgesia Medical Group Inc. Each year this Brunch presents keynote speakers who were former teen parents thus illustrating the ultimate self sufďŹ ciency goal. As in all the research of home visiting evidence based programs it is the client/ worker relationship that is the key to success. TPC clients often identify their worker as the change agent in their life, having someone who believed in them, helped them set goals and inspired them to see a future. We are very proud of our TPC clients and staff and grateful to be part of a community that supports our youth through partnerships. For more information, go to www. sonoma-county.org/health/services/ homevisiting.asp.

CanDo Helps the Napa Valley Thrive

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The CanDo spirit is alive and well in the Napa Valley. Napa Valley CanDo, a grassroots community-service organization, helps funnel volunteers to assist nonproďŹ ts and creates exciting projects of its own. Founded following the 2008 election, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re an issueoriented group, not a partisan one. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re strong, creative and growing quickly from 15 at our ďŹ rst gathering to over 900 today. We have no dues, no required service hours and meet in small groups as needed. Our volunteers know that together we CanDo great things. Members receive a weekly email, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The CanDo Connection,â&#x20AC;? which highlights done-in-a-day projects, most requiring approximately three hours of service. Volunteers might sort at the food bank, mulch trees along a creek, read to children or assist in a fun run. We also spotlight engaging community events: a vigil for Napa Emergency Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Services or Day of the Dead activities. The blast, our website, www.NVCanDo. org and Facebook all â&#x20AC;&#x153;ease the path from intent to actionâ&#x20AC;? when those with the CanDo spirit are ready to move. In addition, CanDoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekly column in the Napa Register, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neighbor2Neighbor,â&#x20AC;? showcases the good work of a different nonproďŹ t or service group each week. When we spot a need thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not being ďŹ lled by a local group, CanDo creates original projects. Currently, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s through three issue groups: Energy and Environment, Governance and CanDo Kids, dedicated to engaging children and young people in service. Two current projects help keep valley residents and the environment healthy and safe. Booster Shot! promotes the valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forward-thinking drug take-back program through Clinic Ole, which provides

primary medical and dental services to the valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s underserved. When residents drop unwanted medications in Clinic Oleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lockboxes, they are kept out of our landďŹ ll, water supply and out of the hands of those who should not have them. CanDo volunteers transport meds weekly to Household Hazardous Waste for incineration. CanDoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Better Bag Project, seeks to reduce use of throwaway plastic, focusing on single-use plastic bagsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;about 68 million per year in the Napa Valley alone. Largely made from petroleum with chemical additives, many of which have been shown to be harmful to humans, they litter our rivers, clog drains and recycling equipment and choke animals. Because they photo-degrade, given enough sunlight they eventually disintegrate into tiny, chemical-laden pieces ending up in our oceans and ďŹ sh. At CanDoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s behest, the city of Napa declared October â&#x20AC;&#x153;Better Bag Month.â&#x20AC;? Other valley communities followed suit. Through education, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned that we can coax small changes in behaviors, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re tabling outside of grocery stores, distributing hundreds of free reusable bags, presenting to service and faith-based groups and rallying the media. After free screenings of the ďŹ lm Bag It, an engaging award-winning documentary on the problems of plastic, Napa school children have been encouraged to created art illustrating their new awareness. Wednesday, Oct. 26, CanDo holds a beneďŹ t showing of Bag It at the Napa Valley Opera House, 6:30pm, to raise funds for rights to more copies of the student version. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for students. For further information, visit www.nvcando.org or contact us at NVCanDo@gmail.com or 707.252.7743.

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Salvador: Inspiring Learning Through the Arts PAM PERKINS, PRINCIPAL, SALVADOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

What do we really want our kids to learn at school? Reading? Math? Science? Yes, of course, but more important is to teach our kids to be critical thinkers and problem solvers. At Salvador Elementary School, we value inquiry, creativity and the 21st-century skills of communication and collaboration. To meet these goals we are delivering academics through a unique framework called Artful Learning. As one of four magnet schools in the Napa Valley UniďŹ ed School District, Salvador is redesigning the school program by integrating the arts and the artistic process into the daily classroom experience. This unique methodology employs an interdisciplinary approach anchored by a central concept while posing a signiďŹ cant question that allows educators to teach a broad spectrum of rigorous academic content. Studying through the arts generates deeper comprehension for students and high levels of student engagement. Artful Learning, supported by the Leonard Bernstein Center (www. leonardbernstein.com/artful_learning. htm) is working with Salvador staff to implement this school reform model based on Bernsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s belief that that the process of experiencing the arts provides a fundamental way to instill a lifelong love of learning in children. The modelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;experience, inquire, create, reďŹ&#x201A;ectâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;starts with a masterwork experience. Students learn about a painting, photograph, song or other art piece. This immediate engagement leaves students curious to learn more. The signiďŹ cant question guides the inquiry, and students use a variety of research techniques to delve into the content. As students inquire, new understandings develop and connections are made. After the learning, students design and complete /2D3@B7A7<5AC>>:3;3<B

an original creation, a tangible, artistic manifestation that demonstrates their understanding of the new knowledge. This ďŹ nal product is then ready for presentation. Finally, students reďŹ&#x201A;ect on their learning. This process is documented through narratives, maps and metaphors that enable students to make connections to their lives and the world around them. Salvador teachers just completed the ďŹ rst of three phases of training. Teachers mapped their standards in order to develop interdisciplinary units and create inquiry centers for learning. Teachers were introduced to more than a dozen arts-based strategies that will be infused across the curriculum for increased student understanding and cognitive development. Although the training was intense and took the teachers out of the classroom, every teacher left feeling renewed as teachers and anxious to employ this new model of instruction. The success of this program will hinge on the development of artist partnerships to support students in their original creations. Working with the teachers and offering master classes for students to perfect their artistic skills will be a crucial role that artists will play in this model of implementation. Music, metal, watercolor, clay, etc., are all mediums that can be used to reďŹ&#x201A;ect student learning and expand their artistic repertoire. Developing these partnerships within our community will help us sustain a program designed to develop students into creative, innovative, solution-driven individuals that we need for the future success of our economy. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re interested in getting involved in this exciting project, please contact Pam Perkins, principal of Salvador at pperkins@nvusd.k12. ca.us, or visit our website at http:// salvadorschool.com/.

napa hanging

( 20

Roe drunkenly bragged to the saloon keeper of his Napa crimes. Upon searching Roe, Los Angeles County sheriff John Burr found a small bottle of poison and a sharpened butcher knife. At his trial, Roe told the packed courtroom that he wished to be hanged so that he would no longer have to live with the knowledge of his crimes. Since committing his first murder at the age of 14, he explained, he knew that something was wrong with him. He believed that an autopsy would reveal abnormalities that would account for his criminal behavior.

‘The last reported accounting of the skeleton was in the 1960s. As of this writing, its whereabouts are unknown.’ After two weeks of trial proceedings, the jury found Roe guilty of murder in the first degree. As the law designated, a conviction of first-degree murder was punishable by either death or life imprisonment. Newspaper reporters had theorized that Roe would be hanged at San Quentin. Due to the overwhelming outcry for vengeance by the Napa community, Judge Murphy granted Sheriff McKenzie the responsibility of executing Roe. Hanging day came on Friday, Jan. 15, 1897, at the Napa County Courthouse. With his wrists bound to his thighs, Roe was marched to the scaffold under the guard of Sheriff McKenzie and several deputies. Roe’s hands trembled as he discarded his cigar. Sheriff

McKenzie tightened the noose around Roe’s neck, covered Roe’s head with a black hood and signaled to the three deputies behind the scaffold. Roe dropped through the trapdoor at lightning speed. His neck snapped, causing a clean break between the third and fourth vertebrae. The execution staff descended the scaffold and took their places around the body for the final pronouncement of death. The hanging rope was cut into small pieces and distributed among the 400 spectators as souvenirs, while the noose was bestowed upon Sheriff McKenzie. It would be the last public hanging in California. The following morning, Dr. Edwin Z. Hennessey accompanied the crate containing Roe’s coffin to the College of Physicians and Surgeons in San Francisco for dissection. After a determination of mental deficiency, the dissected corpse was returned to Napa. On Jan. 8, 1898, almost a year after the hanging, the Napa Daily Journal reported that for the past six months the bones of William Roe had been bleaching atop the roof of the Williams block on Main Street. Dr. Hennessey later cleaned and articulated the skeleton for his own anatomical collection. The skeleton was eventually given to the Napa Valley Unified School District to be used as an instructional aide in biology classes. The last reported accounting of the skeleton was in the 1960s. As of this writing, its whereabouts are unknown. Within a year after the execution, jailer Wall Kennedy adamantly professed his belief that Roe haunted the jail. To this day, employees of the Napa County Courthouse report strange paranormal occurrences. When a radio goes on the fritz at one of the businesses housed in the Williams-Kyser building—now home to Cole’s Chop House, Ubuntu Yoga Studio and Restaurant, and Vineyard Dog Boutique and Bakery—Roe receives the blame. As Roe himself told a reporter shortly before his execution, “The spirit lives after death; [it] enters some other form of life on this earth.”

21 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26 –NOVE MBER 1 , 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Greenwood as Roe carried Lucina into a nearby bedroom, where he proceeded to assault her. Greenwood could hear Roe talking in a rough manner to his wife and voiced his objections. Schmidt dragged Greenwood into the front hall, where Roe jammed a makeshift gag from a small piece of broken broom handle and a piece of fabric he had torn from one of Lucina’s white skirts into his mouth. Roe then returned to the front bedroom and strangled Lucina with a window cord. After ransacking the house, the men departed in Lucina’s buggy. Greenwood worked the gag from his mouth and vomited poisonlaced bile, which likely saved his life. He then slid himself down the hall and into the bedroom. With his hands bound, John used his teeth to grab hold of Lucina’s clothes to pull her toward him. Before he could administer any aid to Lucina, he slipped into unconsciousness. When Roe and Schmidt reached the city of Napa, they stopped at a saloon on Brown Street. Roe had initially planned to rob the Bank of Napa, located less than 600 feet from the courthouse, but after a conversation with the bartender confirming that John Greenwood was a wealthy man, Roe decided to return to the Greenwood ranch for a second search. Upon entering the residence, Roe grabbed John Greenwood and fired two shots at close range into the left side of his head. The first shot passed downward into John’s mouth, dislodging a tooth that he spit out onto the hall floor, while the second angled upwards and embedded itself in his skull. While John feigned death, Roe rebound his feet and retied the gag. He then entered the bedroom and fired a single shot into Lucina’s skull. Roe never found the stash he was looking for. He pocketed $4, none of which he shared with Schmidt, and some jewelry he could pawn in San Francisco. After extinguishing the house lights, the thieves made their final getaway via Lucina’s horse and buggy. In Cordelia, they found a grove of

trees where they slept undetected. The following morning, John Greenwood summoned every ounce of strength that remained as he unbound his feet and crawled from his home in search of help. He made his way down the dirt road until he reached the front gate of his property, where he was found by his neighbor, Hugh Kelly. Napa County sheriff George McKenzie immediately launched an intense manhunt for the two killers. Contributions for a reward for the capture of both men came from John Greenwood ($1,200), Napa citizen Levi George ($250) and Sheriff McKenzie ($250), and California governor Henry Harrison Markham signed a bill offering a reward of $2,500. The entire community was willing to lynch the men who had killed Lucina Greenwood. After 11 months of false arrests, the first break in the case finally came. On Jan. 1, 1892, a detective in Denver overheard a man drunkenly brag to a saloon keeper of his participation in a murder. He identified himself as Carl Schmidt and revealed that he had helped another man rob and murder the Greenwoods in Napa. Schmidt was arrested and booked in the Denver County Jail to await extradition to Napa. At his trial, Schmidt admitted his participation in the robbery of the Greenwood residence but maintained his innocence in relation to the poisoning and shooting of John and Lucina Greenwood. William Roe was solely to blame for the death of Lucina and the injuries inflicted upon John, he explained. In order to escape the gallows with an insanity defense, Schmidt carried on conversations with invisible demons and threatened the judge. On May 28, 1892, he was found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to imprisonment for life. His ploy had worked. Sheriff McKenzie personally delivered him to San Quentin where he served his sentence out on Crank’s Alley, the prison ward devoted to the mentally insane. Four years later, history repeated itself. While tanked up on black label whiskey in a San Fernando Valley saloon, William

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WHERE YOU LIVE

Childhood Horror

Getting Schooled

Personally, the Hansel and Gretel story was the most damaging of my childhood. The idea that ruthless tyrant stepmoms of the world could be so evil as to banish their children to the woods was enough to keep my little brain spinning until sunup. The crazy old witch with an appetite for plump children? Just the topping on the whole scary cake. If crazy women torturing children is your schtick, be assured that the tale has stood the test of time. Golden Gate Opera presents ‘Hansel and Gretel’ on Friday, Oct. 28, and Sunday, Oct. 30, at the Marin Center. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. Friday at 7pm; Sunday at 2pm. $15–$45. 415.499.6400.

If you’re one of those people who couldn’t pick Jeff Beck out of a lineup, his biography might make you wonder, “Where the hell have I been?” Not only has this guitar god been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice, he’s also ranked No. 14 on “Rolling Stone’s 100 Greatest Guitarists” list. How many people can claim that Pink Floyd wanted them to join their band, but were just too intimidated to ask? Beck plays Monday, Oct. 31, at the Wells Fargo Center (50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa; 8pm; $30–$89; 707.546.3600) and Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 1–2, at the Uptown Theatre (1350 Third St., Napa; 8pm; $129–$300; 707.259.0123).

S A N TA R O S A

N A PA

The Hills Are Alive

Still Truckin’

These days, if a movie musical doesn’t incorporate oversized plants exclaiming “Feed me, Seymour!” or a bluesy duo clad in trendy shades and supersweet suits, most people don’t bother. But the 1960s were a much different time, and even the American Film Institute agrees that The Sound of Music was a little more relevant. It’s also a gas to sing along to. Test your vocal skills with a crowd of other Julie Andrews fans at the Sing-a-Long ‘Sound of Music’ on Saturday, Oct. 20, at the Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $15–$25. 707.523.4185.

The Grateful Dead franchise seems to turn up in everything, from sneakers and lunchboxes to playing cards and stuffed animals. Sometimes, having grown up in an era mostly devoid of Deadheadery, the younger generation forgets that the Dead were musicians first and iconsturned-novelties second. Many former Grateful Dead members still continue to produce music today, proving their talent far beyond the stretch of their namesake. Former Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kruetzmann brings his new band, 7 Walkers, to wine country on Thursday, Oct. 27, at the Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. $25–$30. 8pm. 707.226.7372.

SEBASTOPOL

Blood and Candles If one were to mash the old-soul country twang of Johnny Cash together with the prose and lessons of Aesop’s fables, the end result might bear a striking resemblance to the folk sounds of Tom Russell. Working as a taxi driver, Russell got his big break when he looked in his rearview mirror one day to find none other than Robert Hunter of the Grateful Dead sitting in the back seat. Hunter invited Russell to play as the opening act for a New York concert, and the rest is history. Russell brings his folk storytelling on Thursday, Oct. 27, to Studio E. Address provided with ticket purchase, Sebastopol. 7:30pm. $25. www.northbaylive.com.

—Lacie Schwarz

LADY BE GOOD Nneena Freelon toasts ‘Ella Sings Gershwin’ Oct. 30 at the Wells Fargo Center. See Concerts, p28.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26- NOVE MBER 1 , 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

23

ArtsIdeas Gabe Meline

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UNDER THE SEA Ross Lockhart has collected a fantastic book of Lovecraft-inspired stories about the mighty Cthulhu.

Cthulhu Calling Ross Lockhartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s monstrous anthology

A

ll hail Cthulhu! For one day, when the stars are right, Cthulhuâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the enormous, octopus-headed godmonster who sleeps at the bottom of the PaciďŹ c Oceanâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;will awaken, rise up and eat all of humanity. So wrote the great H. P. Lovecraft, whose celebrated 1930s tales of alien creatures and insane cults continue to inspire science ďŹ ction and horror writers into the present.

They include Petaluma writereditor Ross Lockhart. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I came to Lovecraft indirectly, more from the side than straight on,â&#x20AC;? says Lockhart, whose new volume, The Book of Cthulhu, has just been published by Night Shade Books. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I was about 11 or 12 years old,â&#x20AC;? he recalls, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was really into Dungeons and Dragons, and the D&D people published an encyclopedia titled Gods and Demigods.â&#x20AC;? In the ďŹ rst edition of that muchrevered tome, there was a section devoted to the Lovecraft mythos, with descriptions of

BY DAVID TEMPLETON creepy-crawly alien gods with names like Cthulhu, Hastur and Nyarlathotep, illustrated by Errol Otis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was totally blown away,â&#x20AC;? Lockhart says. A friend recommended T. E. D. Klineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lovecraft-inspired short story â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Man with a Horn,â&#x20AC;? one of the tales Lockhart has included in The Book of Cthulhu. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an amazingly chilling story,â&#x20AC;? Lockhart says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a horror story that does everything right. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smart and literary, and it causes the hair on the back of the neck to stand up. Reading that story started the Lovecraft ball rolling

for me. Eventually, I checked out some actual Lovecraftâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and I was hooked.â&#x20AC;? What is now called the Cthulhu mythos all began in 1926 when Lovecraft, known for somewhat sensational shock-ďŹ lled ďŹ ction, wrote a story titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Call of Cthulhu.â&#x20AC;? Published two years later in the magazine Weird Tales, the story caused a stir among readers and immediately inspired other writers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Call of Cthulhuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is so wellwritten; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just layer after layer after layer,â&#x20AC;? Lockhart says. Lovecraft went on to create a whole cosmology of weird alien gods, writing stories that developed from the basic bumpin-the-night scary stories to more sophisticated tales. During his life, Lovecraft encouraged other authors to take his ideas and run with them. In time, those writers became known as the Lovecraft Circle.â&#x20AC;? Cthulhuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tentacled grasp continues to capture writers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Book of Cthulhu represents the best of the last 35 years of Cthulhu mythos short ďŹ ction,â&#x20AC;? says Lockhart, who read hundreds of stories in the process of choosing the 27 that make up the book. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was looking for stories that really stood on their own, that werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just pastiches. Because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty easy to throw in a monster and use words like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cthulhuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;eldritchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;squamous,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and just kind of imitate Lovecraft. But I was looking for stories that stood on their own, that brought something new to the mythos. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These 27 stories,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;comment on the mythos in an intelligent, sometimes comedic way. And they all give you that delicious shiver that a good horror story should give.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Book of Cthuluâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is available at your local independent bookseller.

Hyde the Bugs!

Two chilling fall plays at Spreckels BY DAVID TEMPLETON

G

oing crazy is not supposed to be this much fun.

‘Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical’ runs Friday–Saturday, Oct. 28–29, at 8pm, and Sunday, Oct. 30, at 2pm; $24–$26. ‘Bug’ runs Thursday–Sunday through Nov. 6; Thursday–Saturday at 8pm, Sundays at 2pm. Both shows at Spreckels Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

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At the Spreckels Center, two distinct shows about darkness and insanity have just opened: one, a musical adaptation of a literary classic; the other, a squirminducing cult-sensation. Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical, directed by musical-theater veteran Gene Abravaya, tells the story of a good-hearted doctor whose pioneering science projects split his soul into two. Based on the book by Robert Louis Stevenson, the Spreckels production features a cast of North Bay regulars and includes the welcome Sonoma County return of power-throated Kelly Brandeberg, back for a visit after a long sojourn in New York City. Dr. Jekyll (John Shillington) is desperate to understand how the human mind breaks down into madness. Believing the answer can be found in the natural duality between good and evil, he concocts a serum that will

divide the mind into its good and bad halves. When the board of the local hospital laughs off his request for support of his research, he becomes his own guinea pig, alarming his friend Gabriel (John Rathjen) and his fiancée, Emma (Heather Lane). Transformed into an amoral libertine, exulting in his sense of newfound freedom, the doctor—as Mr. Hyde—launches a murderous reign of terror against the hospital directors. Caught up in the storm is Lucy (Brandeberg), an abused young saloon singer who falls for the kind Jekyll, while unknowingly becoming the object of Hyde’s desire. The large cast is strong and in fine voice, more than compensating for some weak tunes and a good deal of silly melodramatics. Jekyll & Hyde is good pop-opera fun, a welcome surprise this Halloween season. Meanwhile, in Spreckels’ small Condiotti Theater, Narrow Way Stage Company presents Tracy Letts’ outrageous comedy-drama

LIGHTING • KITCHEN TOOLS • ARCHITECTURAL • GLASS

Al Christenson

WAKING UP John Browning and Jessica Short in Narrow Way’s must-see ‘Bugs.’

25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26 –NOVE MBER 1 , 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Stage

Bug, directed with verve and passion by Lennie Dean. The first work by Letts, who won the Pulitzer for August: Osage County, the brilliantly demented Bug requires a rare commitment from its actors (intense performances, blood-spurting violence and lots of full frontal nudity), and this cast brings that commitment, and plenty more. Agnes (Jessica Short) is a lonely waitress with deep emotional scars and a crippling self-hatred she’s trying to overcome. When she meets Peter (John Browning), a shell-shocked Gulf War vet with gradually emerging paranoiac tendencies, Agnes is gradually pulled into his convincingly detailed delusions. Or are there really infinitesimal carnivorous aphids in Agnes’ hotel room? Perhaps Peter really is a refugee from a sinister government experiment to imbed robotic transmitter bugs under his skin, as he insists. It’s possible that Agnes’ best-friend R. C. (LC Smith) and bullying ex-husband Jerry (Matthew T. Witthaus) truly are part of a CIA conspiracy to recapture Peter, as Agnes eventually comes to believe. And if the mysterious Dr. Sweet (Samson Hood) really is looking out for Peter’s welfare, why is he acting so . . . weird? Part love story and part freak show, Letts’ magnificently plotted script is a mesmerizing look at two damaged souls whose union both saves and undoes them. The splendid sound design by Doug Faxon and the perfectly seedy set by Tony Ginesi are practically characters themselves. Definitely not for the squeamish, Bug is a must-see for its fullthrottle performances. Though it takes its audience to very dark places, the aching honesty of its deeply human story is strangely powerful, deeply moving and entirely unforgettable.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26 – NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Film

BREWING Director Jeff Nichols’ latest rains down on the madness of our times.

Storm Warning Michael Shannon plays stressed-out dad in ‘Take Shelter’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

t’s hard to imagine a more timely film than the harrowing Take Shelter. Watching it, one thinks of Herman Cain’s offhand comment that a failed person in America only has himself to blame. This message was hardly worth even a little of Cain’s substantial quantity of wind, since every working person has internalized it already.

Take Shelter stars Michael Shannon in a phenomenally tough piece of acting, fulfilling the promise he showed in his breakthrough part in Revolutionary Road. Shannon plays Curtis, a drill-rig operator whose rage is particularly slow-cooked. His wife, Samantha—played by Jessica Chastain, capping a remarkable year as an actress—holds down a swap-meet booth on the weekends; her off-hours are spent bugging the insurance company to authorize a cochlear implant. It’s an uneventful life. Or it would be, if it weren’t for a vision of a coming storm that bolts Curtis out of his sleep. This portent causes Curtis to dig up his backyard, and mortgage his house and future. He excavates a crater large enough to fit a subterranean shelter. When not watching the skies, his nightmares are growing. He dreams first of his dog, then Samantha, and then of gravity itself, all coming unglued. Our holy books are full of this kind of story—of a prophet being given signs. But the movie gives us an alternative explanation, provided in a small but incisive role by the too-seldom-seen Kathy Baker. Take Shelter’s very title is resonant in a nation as high-strung as a harpsichord, quivering with bunker mentality. Just as Nicholas Ray’s Bigger Than Life showed how many fathers were strangling on their neckties in Ike’s day and Todd Haynes’ Safe perfectly outlined the gargantuan affluence and bad chemicals of the Reagan years, Take Shelter seems keyed to the madness of our times. ‘Take Shelter’ opens Friday, Oct. 28, at Summerfield Cinemas.

In Time (PG-13; 115 min.) Justin Timberlake and Amanda Seyfried co-star in sci-fi thriller about a future where old-age can be overcome by those wealthy enough to afford (literally) more time. Directed by Andrew Niccol (Gattaca, Lord of War). (NB) Puss in Boots (PG; 90 min.) Antonio Banderas voices the spinoff character from the Shrek series in the latest from Dreamworks Animation. Also features Salma Hayek, Zach Galifianakis and Billy Bob Thornton. In 3-D. (NB) The Rum Diary (R; 120 min.) A New York journalist sinks into the mire of alcohol and tangled love in San Juan in this adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson’s novel of the late 1950s. Stars Johnny Depp. (NB)

The Santa Rosa Jewish Community Center screens documentary about a suitcase delivered to Tokyo’s Holocaust Center and the story surrounding it. Tuesday, Nov. 1, at the JCC. (NB)

Johnny English Reborn (PG-13; 101 min.) British comedian Rowan Atkinson revives his hapless spy for a sequel to the 2003 Bond parody. Gillian Anderson’s in it! (NB) The Mighty Macs (G; 100 min.) The true story of the Immaculata College women’s basketball team, who in 1972 achieved an unlikely championship through the work of visionary coach and future Basketball Hall of Famer Cathy Rush (Carla Gugino). Co-stars Ellen Burstyn and David Boreanaz (TV’s Angel). Moneyball (R; 105 min.) (PG-13; 133 min.) Oakland A’s General Manager Billy Beane (Brad Pitt) builds a winning baseball team through a statistical system called sabermetrics. Co-stars Jonah Hill and Robin Wright. (LC)

ALSO PLAYING

Paranormal Activity 3 (R; 84 min.) A

The Big Year (PG; 100 min.) Steve Martin,

year after the second, Paramount releases the third installment of director and video-game programmer Oren Peli’s horror franchise. (NB)

Owen Wilson and Jack Black co-star as birders in a competition to find the most species in this new comedy from David Frankel (Marley & Me, The Devil Wears Prada). Based on Mark Obmasick’s book The Big Year: A Tale of Man, Nature and Fowl Obsession. (NB)

Dolphin Tale (PG; 113 min.) A young boy (Nathan Gamble) becomes friends with a dolphin that has become seriously injured by a crab trap. Morgan Freeman plays the doctor who creates a prosthetic tail for the creature. Based on a true story, the film also stars Harry Connick Jr. and Ashley Judd. (LC)

50/50 (R; 99 min.) Kyle (Seth Rogen) uses any and every means necessary—sex, drugs and profanity—in this heavy-hearted comedy to help his best friend Adam (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) cope with a recent cancer diagnosis. (LS) Footloose (PG-13; 117 min.) Remake of the 1984 film that launched Kevin Bacon stars newcomer Kenny Wormald. Also with Andie MacDowell and Dennis Quaid. (NB) The Ides of March (R; 101 min.) Ryan Gosling continues his rise to ultimate moviestar status in this drama about an idealistic young campaign consultant who discovers that all is not what it seems on the campaign trail. George Clooney plays the presidential candidate at the center of a struggle for power. The power-house cast includes Paul Giamatti, Marisa Tomei, Jeffrey Wright and Philip Seymour Hoffman. (LC)

Inside Hana’s Suitcase (NR; 90 min.)

FUNCTIONAL ART

Real Steel (PG-13: 127 min.) Hugh Jackman plays a struggling ex-boxer in this actiondrama set in a future where robot boxing has become a popular sport. His discovery of a discarded robot with champion potential offers a second chance at success and a renewed relationship with the young son he never knew he had inspires a reinvigorated sense of courage. Co-stars Evangeline Lilly (Lost) and Dakota Goyo. (LC)

Take Shelter (R; 120 min.) A family man’s life unravels when he obsesses over building a backyard shelter after dreaming of an apocalyptic storm. See review, previous page (NB)

Fine & Fashion Jewelry Handmade Gifts

146 N. Main Street, Sebastopol • 707.829.3036 10:30–6pm, Sun til 5pm • artisanafunctionalart.com

The Thing (R; 102 min.) Billed as a prequel taking place three days prior to the events in John Carpenter’s 1982 remake, this Thing stars Mary Elizabeth Winstead (Death Proof) and a mostly Norwegian cast. Directed by Matthijs van Heijningen Jr. (NB)

The Three Musketeers (PG-13; 110 min.) Resident Evil director Paul W. S. Anderson is the latest to update the classic Dumas tale. Stars Milla Jovovich, Orlando Bloom, Christoph Waltz and Mads Mikkelsen. (NB)

The Way (PG-13; 115 min.) A California doctor (Martin Sheen) takes a journey that will change his life after he flies to France to collect the remains of his son (Emilio Estevez), killed while trekking the Pyrenees, and decides to finish his son’s pilgrimage. Written and written by Estevez. (NB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com NapaMovieTimes.com

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necklace by Kristina Kada

NEW MOVIES

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Film capsules by Nicholas Berandt, Richard von Busack, Leilani Clark and Lacie Schwarz.

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A Tale of Murder and Redemption

Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY ALO Modern California rockers brandish musical chops. Oct 30 at 8. $26-$28. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

BOX OFFICE 707 588-3400

SPRECKELSONLINE.COM

Weekend of dancing, auction, kids’ activities and more. Oct 28-30. $10-$40. Wischemann Hall, 460 Eddie Lane, Sebastopol. www.wischemannhall.com.

Coffee Catz Thurs, Science Buzz Cafe (see Lectures). Sat at 2, bluegrass jam. Mon at 6, open mic. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

First Edition Sun, Carl & Paul Green. 1820 E Washington Ave, Petaluma. 707.775.3200.

Steep Canyon Rangers

Flamingo Lounge

Former Yardbird and current guitar god slays a Halloween crowd. Oct 31 at 8. $30-$89. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Though they’ve headlined festivals like MerleFest and Bonnaroo alongside Steve Martin, the Rangers continue to perform alone as a quintet. Elephant Revival opens. Oct 28 at 8. $21. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Wed and Thurs, karaoke. Oct 28, Reed Fromer. Fri and Sat, live music. Oct 29, Halloween costume party with Electric Avenue. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Cirque du Sebastopol

Wine Down Eat Up

Jeff Beck

Spreckels Performing Arts Center

Sebastopol Celebration of Dance

with Tawnie. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Annual party stretching bounds of reality with Love and Light, Stephan Jacobs, Dr. Dylon, iNi, Jug Dealers, Easy Leaves and more. Oct 29 at 8:30. $20-$30. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Food trucks, music and wine from five Santa Rosa vintners every Thurs. Oct 27, Alam Lieb Trio. Santa Rosa Vintner Square, 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa.

Nneena Freelon

ALO

Ella Fitzgerald’s recordings of the great American songwriters started with a 5-LP set dedicated to George and Ira Gershwin; Freelon pays tribute to the collection in a special trio concert. Oct 30 at 3. $32-$75. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Modern California rockers play extended set. Oct 29 at 9. $20-$30. Palm Ballroom, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. www.murphyproductions.com.

Mash Potangos Trio This trio performs its own arrangements of traditional, nuevo and contemporary tango for a unique instrumental combination. Oct 29 at 11. Arista Winery, 7015 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.473.0606.

Mystique Masquerade This one-of-a-kind Halloween party features two full bars, fire performers, inflatable decor and live music including Fans of Jimmy Century, Baby Seal Club, Ellusion Dance Company, DJ Zack Darling & Damien, DJ Malarkey, Josheldo and Mal Eye. Oct 29 at 9. $20. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.861.9190.

Tom Russell Premier singer-songwriter accompanied by Thad Beckman. Oct 27 at 7:30. $25. Studio E, Address provided with tickets, Sebastopol. www.northbaylive.com.

MARIN COUNTY

NAPA COUNTY Jeff Beck Former Yardbird and current guitar god shreds the fretboard. Nov 1-2 at 8. $129$300. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

7 Walkers Former Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann’s new project. Oct. 27 at 8. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House. 1030 Main St., Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Oct 29, Tom and Maggie Ballard. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Wed at 7, open mic. Oct 27, Old Jawbone, Mr December. Oct 28, Sol Horizon, DJ Malarkey. Oct 29, Mystique Masquerade (see Concerts). Oct 30, Irish Seisun with Riggy Rackin. Tues at 7, ladies’ limelight open mic

Gaia’s Garden Oct 26, Michelle Holland. Oct 27, Roger Bolt. Oct 28, Greenhouse. Oct 29, Wendy DeWitt. Oct 31, Neil Buckley Octet. Every Tues, Jim Adams (jazz guitar). 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Tavern Oct 26, 7 Walkers (see Concerts). Oct 27, Juke Joint annual Halloween mustache bash. Oct 28, “Ghoulies” as mocked by an MST3K-style cast. Oct 29, Cirque du Sebastopol (see Concerts). Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. Tues, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Oct 28, Susan Sutton Duo. Oct 29, Fred Randolph Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Inn at the Tides Sat at 7, Maple Profant. Bay View Restaurant. 800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 800.541.7788.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Last Sat monthly, Good HipHop. Sun, Open Mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Last Day Saloon Every Wed at 7, North Bay Hootenanny’s Pick-Me-Up Revue. Oct 27, Coaltion of Independent Artists presents Sonoma County Pro Jam. Free. Oct 28, Lil’ Brian and the Zydeco Travelers. Oct 29, Adema. Mon, karaoke. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Oct 27, Susan Sutton. Oct 28, Si Perkoff. Oct 29, Rhonda Benin. Sun, Kit Mariah’s open mic. Oct 31, Willie Perez. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Carrtunes. Every other Mon, knitting night. 464 First St, Sonoma. 707.935.0660. Thurs at 7:30, Rubber Chicken open mic. 1810 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.829.3403.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Wed at 6:30, Don Giovannis (Italian). Mon at 6, Steve Swan (Sinatra croonings). 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Northwood Restaurant

Happy KOWS Halloween Ball to benefit Occidental radio KOWS Radio is a nonprofit, allvolunteer station founded in 2007 whose programming blends music with discussion and public affairs shows broadcasting around the clock. KOWS provides West County with a forum for free speech while serving as the community’s small, three-watt emergency broadcast station. KOWS, of course, is in need of funding. To that end, supporters are invited to dance the night away to live music by the Jug Dealers, the Coast Pilots, Beso Negro and others at the KOWS Radio Masquerade Ball. The family-friendly event includes fire dancing in the plaza, strolling performers, tarot readers, magicians, arts and plenty of tasty food and drink. (Come dressed in your most creative Halloween flair to enter the costume contest.) KOWS can be heard in Occidental, west Sonoma County and a good portion of Santa Rosa. Proceeds help keep the station’s unique local programming, as well as provide a new broadcasting tower to reach a wider audience. Join the fun at the KOWS-aPalooza Halloween Ball on Saturday, Oct. 29, at the Occidental YMCA, Graton Road at Bohemian Highway. Occidental. 6pm–1am. $10–$25. 707.874.1073.—Anna Freeman

Mc T’s Bullpen Wed, open mic with Angelina. Thurs, karaoke with Country Dan. Fri, DJ Alexander. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Monroe Dance Hall Thurs and Sun, Circles ‘n

Squares Dance Club. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Wed at 7:30, trivia night. Oct 27, Jaydub and Dino. Oct 28, Sean Carscadden duo. Oct 29, Midnight Sun. Oct 30,

Thurs at 7, the Thugz (cosmic rock). 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Olde Sonoma Public House Oct 27, Maldonado Brothers. 18615 Sonoma Hwy, Ste 110, Sonoma. 707.938.7587.

Papa’s Taverna Fri at 7, live music. Sat at 7 and Sun at 4, Kefi (Greek). Sun at 1:30, Greek dance lessons; at 3:30, live music and bellydance show. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.769.8545.

Phoenix Theater Wed at 6, jazz jam. Second and fourth Thurs, writers workshops. Oct 28, Hillside Fire, Space Between, Mud, the Blood and the Beer, Marshall House Project, Tim O’Neal Band. Oct 29, Halloween Bash (21 and over) with H.O.T.S., Highway Poets. Sun at 5, rock and blues jam. Mon at 7, young people’s AA. Tues at 7, acoustic Americana jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe Wed at 6, local music. Thurs at 7:30, open mic. Fri-Sun, live music. Tues at 6:30, SSU night open mic and poetry reading. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

The Rocks Oct 27, Bam/Vox, Motivenation. Fri-Sat, Top 40 DJs. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Tradewinds Thurs, DJ Dave. Oct 28, Floydian Slip. Oct 29, Levi Lloyd. Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

The Zoo Every Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 527 Barham Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.0980.

MARIN COUNTY Club 101 Wed at 8:20, salsa

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My Friend Joe

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Music ( 29

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dancing with lessons. 815 W Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.460.0101.

Cucina Thurs at 6:30, Bonnie Hayes. 510 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.2942.

DeSilva’s Fri, DJ Ken & Alton. 1535 S Novato Blvd, Novato. 415.892.5051.

Sleeping Lady Thurs at 9, Texas Blues. Sat at 2, uke jam. Sun at 2, Irish music. Mon at 8, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Reservations Advised

DIN N E R & A SHOW

Oct 30 Sat

Nov 5

T HE RANCHO ALLSTARS

Featuring Mike Duke 8:30pm

JOHNNY VEGAS

AND THE HIGH ROLLERS Rockin’ Halloween Costume Ball 8:30pm

T HE FUNNY FARMERS

With Special Friends 4:00pm / No Cover

T HE SUN KINGS

A Salute to The Beatles! 8:30pm

Annivverr sary Week Celeb rat ion

Wed

Nov 16

AN E VENING WITH

WILLIE K

Special Winter Luau 8:00pm Thur

Nov 17 Fri

Nov 18

ANNIVERSARY SHOW

Celebrating 70 Years of Rancho 8:00pm

L IPBONE REDDING AND THE L IPBONE ORCHESTRA RON T HOMPSON AND THE

Sat

Smiley’s

Oct 28, Doc Kraft Dance Band. 350 Smith Ranch Rd, San Rafael. 415.491.5990.

Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Moylan’s Brewery

Southern Pacific Smokehouse Wed, Philip Claypool and friends. Oct. 27, Marin Comedy Showcase. Oct 28, JD and

Terry’s Rocking Halloween Bash. Oct 29, Michael Lamacchia’s Organic Jive Collection. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415-899-9600.

William Tell House Oct 29, Halloween Party. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403.

NAPA COUNTY Calistoga Inn Wed, open mic. Thurs, reggae DJ night. Fri, old-school DJ night. Sat DJ night. 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Rainbow Room Fri-Sat at 10, DJ dancing. Sun, Salsa Sundays. 806 Fourth St, Napa. 707.252.4471.

Silo’s Oct 26, Trevor Lyon. Oct 27, Sing-a-Long. Oct 28, Terry Bradford. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria Oct 26, Collaboration. Wed, Gentlemen of Jazz. Oct 27, Smokin Joe & Steelhead Delta Blues. Oct 28, Jack Pollard & Dan Daniels. Oct 29, Gentlemen of Jazz. Sun, James and Ted. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

Sun, Mon, Wed-Fri, DJ dance. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Sun

Sausalito Seahorse

Sat at 11, Frederick Nighthawk. Sun at 11, Carolyn Dahl. 387 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3261.

Nickel Rose

Oct 29

Oct 28, Contino. Oct 29, Johnny Vegas. Oct 30, Funny Farmers. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Mama’s Royal Cafe

Thurs at 8:30, jam session. 15 Rowland Way, Novato. 415.898.HOPS.

Sat

Rancho Nicasio

Oct 28, Monophonics. Oct 29, The 85’s 3rd Annual “Thriller” Halloween Costume Ball. Oct 31, Pride and Joy Halloween Costume Party. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

McInnis Park Club Restaurant

Oct 28

Oct 26, Continentals. Oct 27, Gabriel Diamond Trio. Oct 28, Chrome Johnson.Every Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Wed, Tengo Tango. Oct 27, Lisa Silva Brazilian Dance & Music. Sun at 4, Salsa-lito. Oct 30, Freddy Clarke and Wobbly World Big Halloween Party Costume Contest. Oct 31, Local Talent On Stage. Tues, Noel Jewkes and friends (jazz jam). 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

George’s Nightclub

Fri

Peri’s Silver Dollar

8:30pm

R ESISTORS

THE JAMES MOSELEY BAND Nov 19 Hot Soul Music 8:30pm

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

19 Broadway Club Oct 26 at 6, James Froman Jazz Ensemble; at 9, Gail Muldrow. Oct 27 at 6, Diamond Jazz; at 9, Ooh. Oct 28, Hip Hop Halloween Party. Oct 30, Honey Dust. Mon at 9, open mic. Tues at 9, Uzilevsky Korty Duo with special guests. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar Fri at 9, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun at 3, Mal Sharpe’s Dixieland. Tues at 8:30, open mic with Damir. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Old Western Saloon Oct 28, Lucky 7 Honky Tonk Band. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Osteria Divino Oct 26, Donna D’Acuti. Oct 27, Suzanna Smith. Oct 29, Ken Cook Trio. Oct 30, Grupo Buonjiorno. Oct 31, Liza Silva & Voz do Brazil. 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Palm Ballroom Oct 29, ALO Halloween Dance Party (see Concerts). 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Hans-Joachim Roedelius German ambient electronic pioneer and founding member of Cluster plays solo. Oct 26 at Cafe du Nord.

The Game Why isn’t his SF show sold out yet? Oh, right—he has a Dodgers tattoo on his face. Oct 27 at the Regency Ballroom.

Pomplamoose Charming, twee duo best known for YouTube covers of “Single Ladies” and more. Oct 29 at YBCA Forum.

The Fastbacks Seattle’s enduring pop-punk ensemble soldiers on with opening act the Muffs. Oct 29 at the Bottom of the Hill.

Zola Jesus A little Bjork, a little Laurie Anderson:—Nika Roza Danilova is an icy experimentalist of fascinating order. Nov 1 at the Independent.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

Also:

David Lindley January 15th 7:30 pm

Sebastopol and in association with the Mr. Music Foundation: First Friday (The songs of Motown) Dec. 2nd 7:00 pm

New Year’s Eve “Dance and Peace” Celebration

Community December 31st

Cultural Center

Tickets and Information: www.seb.org or 707-823-1511

raventheater.org

Saturday, Nov. 12, 8PM

raventheater.org

Vote online now!

raventheater.org

Nov. 19 8PM/NOV. 20 2PM raventheater.org

433-6335

Mostl y Mozart!

433-6335

But no other song on Bad As Me, released Tuesday, cowers

December 17th 8:00 pm

433-6335

T

he good news about Bad As Me, the 17th studio album by Tom Waits, is that most of it sounds little like the title track leaked for streaming over a month ago. “Bad As Me,” the song, breaks absolutely no new ground in the Waits canon, and, given that he’s an artist beloved as a pioneer, this felt disturbing at first. “Bad As Me” bellows, it grinds, it huffs along in that chugging junkyard-blues jalopy of an arrangement—it is, in other words, a sound and a style which stamp over a dozen Tom Waits songs released in the last decade.

The Klezmatics

433-6335

BY GABE MELINE

Grammy Award winning

raventheater.org

Tom Waits’ new album

November 6th 7:30 pm

433-6335

Breaking ‘Bad’

“Hills to Holler” (Bluegrass to Soul)

raventheater.org

recorded just outside of Sebastopol.

31

Laurie Lewis, Linda Tillery & Barbara Higbie

433-6335

Jesse Dylan

BRAWLER Waits’ latest record was

Upcoming Events

at Sebastopol Community Cultural Center with Cumulus Presents

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Music

so low in this trench. No other song journeys far from the known, either. Retreads abound on the album; longtime fans will recognize threads pulled from Waits’ last 30 years, sewn into a collection of shorter-thanusual tracks. In a sense, the record could have been called A Tom Waits Reader, priming newcomers by concentrating and conveniently distilling his madman elements. But if the biggest crime of a Tom Waits record is sounding too much like Tom Waits, then send it to the jailhouse, cuffed and booked. Sure, it can sit alongside Dylan’s latest or Springsteen’s latest, which sound like paint-by-numbers versions of their respective artists. The difference is you’ll actually want to listen to the Waits record over and over again. Is a paintby-numbers kiss from your girlfriend, whom you believe to be the most beautiful girl in the world, anything to grouse about? In fact, Waits tackles that very question. “Kiss Me” begs of a partner to make their love feel new, with all the unexpected thrills—to “kiss me like a stranger.” (The song solidly evokes “Blue Valentine,” from 1978.) But the main theme of the record is that of leaving: to “Chicago,” where things will be better; to “Get Lost,” evoking a lost Brando speech; to Vegas on “New Year’s Eve,” with $200 and a stack of LPs. Home is such an unobtainable here that the narrator of “Pay Me” is paid by his family for never returning. Waits’ own concept of home means recruiting his best players. Much has been made of Keith Richards’ presence on this record, but he brings more name than style; no one will pick him out of the mix above the marvelous playing of Marc Ribot, David Hidalgo, Augie Myers and Waits’ own son Casey. He’s certainly no match for Waits himself, who leads this group through bogs of cacophony, nostalgia and malaise—and back again. If he truly is the “last leaf on the tree,” as he sings on “Last Leaf,” then here’s hoping Tom Waits holds on until springtime.

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ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

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Arts Events Galleries OPENINGS Oct 27

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Ayurvedic

Indian Head Massage

From 6pm. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, “Shoes,” a multimedia show juried by Genevieve Barnhart and Julia Geist. Also, “The Color of Magic,” work by Art Heaven painters celebrating 10 years of working together. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Oct 28

• improves mobility in neck

and shoulders • relief from tension headaches,

eyestrain, and sinusitis

Margery Smith 707.544.9642

From 6 to 8pm. Arts Guild of Sonoma, “Annual Collaborative Show” with various artists. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115. From 5 to 7pm. City Hall Council Chambers, oil paintings by Mark Jacobson. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Oct 29

HALLOWEEN DANCE WITH

GATOR BEAT Friday, Oct 28 Wed, Oct 26 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Oct 27 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm Circles N’ Squares Square Dance Club Fri, Oct 28 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7–11pm DJ Steve Luther hosts a HALLOWEEN DANCE with GATOR BEAT Sat, Oct 29 8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise 10:30am–1:30pm Scottish Dance 8–11pm North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance hosts a HALLOWEEN DANCE with SWING FARM Sun, Oct 30 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:30am ZUMBA GOLD WITH TONING 5:30–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Oct 31 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing Tues, Nov 1 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:40pm Jazzercise 7:30–9pm African and World Music Dance

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

Low Cost Vaccination Clinics every Sunday, 9:30-11:30am

WESTERN FARM CENTER 707.545.0721 21 West 7th St., Santa Rosa

From 6 to 8pm. di Rosa, “Looking at You Looking at Me,” photography, video and other media by Robert Wuilfe. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

SONOMA COUNTY Art Honors Life Through Oct, “Funeria’s Fifth Biennial International Ashes to Art Exhibition,” a collection of 100 funerary vessels by various artists. 2860 Bowen St #1, Graton. 707.829.1966.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

Free Hair Care Kit

with any color service

Free Manicure with Spa Pedicure

›Permanent Make Up Service

Full Service Salon 320 West 3rd Street JXekXIfjX›707.577.8824

Oct 27-Nov 21, “Annual Collaborative Show” with various artists. Reception, Oct 28, 6 to 8. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

Buddha’s Palm Tattoo Gallery Through November, “Our Backyard Bohemia: the People and Places of Sonoma County.” Tues-Wed and Fri-Sat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4.

313 North Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7256.

Calabi Gallery Through Nov, “Beyond Borders,” works by artists of the Central and South American diaspora. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Jan 29, “The Flipside of Schulz’s Art: More Than Peanuts,” original drawings by Charles Schulz. Through Dec 11, “Pop’d from the Panel,” parallel worlds of fine art and commercial art. Through Nov 28, “The Games Children Play.” $5-$8. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Oct 25-Dec 23, oil paintings by Mark Jacobson. Reception, Oct 28, 5 to 7. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Dec 31, “Make Yourself at Home,” exhibit of unusual home and garden accessories. Wed-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Nov 7, “Texture with Paper,” “Glimpses of Nature” and “Heavy Mettle.” 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Nov 30, “On and On: Sequel of Memories,” installation work by Kathleen Yorba. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600.

Local Color Gallery Through Nov 21, “Two Points of View,” paintings by Olga Storms and Cathy Coe. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2744.

New Leaf Gallery Ongoing, sculpture, fountains and kinetic sculpture by over 50 artists including Zachary Coffin’s “Rockspinner 6.” Daily, 10 to 5. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. 707.933.1300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Ending Oct 29, “Abstractions,” an abstract multimedia group show. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Nov 6, “Bridges of Light / Puentes de Luz,” visual art and altars for the Dia de los Muertos celebration. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Nov 28, “Pirates,” a kid-friendly exhibit featuring everyone’s favorite seafaring marauders. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Nov 13, “Signs,” recent oil paintings by Cecilia Armenta Hallinan. Through Dec 24, “Rambin Modes,” an evolving window display by Monty Monty. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799.

RiskPress Gallery Through Oct 27, “Resilience,” work by Jann Aanestad; also, assemblage art by Libby Martin. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Nov 6, “Two Photographic Views,” photography by Amber Reumann Engfer and Craig Melville; “Soft Focus,” photography by Rhen August Benson and Mayr McLean. Wed-Thurs and Sun, 11 to 7; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. Tues-Thurs and Sun, 10:30 to 6. Fri-Sat, 10:30 to 8. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

Rohnert Park Community Center Through Nov 18, fine arts by local artists of the Santa Rosa Art Guild. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 9; Fri, 8 to 5. 5401 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.584.7357.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Oct 27-Dec 3, “Shoes,” a two-dimensional and threedimensional multimedia show juried by Genevieve Barnhart and Julia Geist. Also, “The Color

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Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

GO WEST The Lark Theater screens ‘The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert’ in a raucous costume party and sing-along on Oct. 29. See Film, p34.

Come see us! of Magic,” work by Art Heaven painters celebrating 10 years of working together. Reception for both shows, Oct 27 at 6. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Feb 5, “Customized: The Art and History of the Bicycle,” with bicycle innovations, art bikes, regional history and more. Through Nov 4, Day of the Dead altars. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jan 1, “Sonido Pirata,” curated exhibit dealing with the phenomenon of pirated music. Free-$8. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Nov 4, fine art photography by Nik Catalina. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3282.

Towers Gallery Through Oct 31, “Cruisin,” works by various artists. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

Wells Fargo Center Through Oct 28, “ARTrails Preview,” exhibiting works by studios participating in the ARTrails program. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY Elsewhere Gallery Through Nov 2, oil paintings by Jean-Marc Brugeilles. Daily, 11 to 6. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.526.2855.

Gallery Route One Through Oct 30, mixed media by Geraldine LiaBraaten, Debra Stuckgold and Eric Engstrom. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

Marin Arts Council Gallery Through Nov 12, “Asia Observed,” works addressing the cultural complexity of Asia. 906 Fourth St, San Rafael.

Yesterday,” paintings by Anne Herrero. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Red Barn Gallery Through Jan 6, “Grounded: A California Indian Life,” art by Miwok/Pomo artist Kathleen Rose Smith. 1 Bear Valley Rd, Pt Reyes Station. 415.464.5125.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Oct 30, Marge Rector retrospective. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY Di Rosa

Through Nov 1, “Legends of the Bay Area: Manuel Neri,” mixedmedia drawings and sculpture. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4, Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

Oct 29-Feb 18, “Looking at You Looking at Me” featuring the photography, video and other media of Robert Wuilfe. Reception Oct 29, 6 to 8. Gallery hours: Wed-Fri, 9:30 to 3. Sat, by appointment only. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Marin Society of Artists

Mumm Napa Cuvee

Marin MOCA

Through Nov 12, “84th Annual Members’ Show,” juried exhibit featuring works by MSA members. Mon-Thurs, 11-4; Sat-Sun, 12-4. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Oct 27, “What’s the Big Idea,” juried group show. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

142 Throckmorton Theatre Through Nov, “Reflections in

Through Nov 13, “Signs of Life,” photographs by Robert Buelteman. Daily, 10 to 5. 8445 Silverado Trail, Rutherford. 707.967.7740.

Napa Valley Museum Through Oct 30, “Discrepancy: Living Between War & Peace,” works from various artists addressing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Through Nov 14, “Dia de Los Muertos,” works by local artists and high school students. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. ) 707.944.0500.

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Haunted Opera House Masquerade Party

Through Nov 9, “Water and Wood: Paintings and Sculptures Inspired by Nature,” paintings and sculpture by Carine Mascarelli and Crystal Lockwood. Daily, 10 to 5. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 707.968.2203.

This masquerade party celebrates the culmination of Napa Valley ARTS ‘11, the month-long celebration of the arts and culture in the Napa Valley. Oct 28 at 8. $25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

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KOWS-A-PALOOZA Halloween Ball

Through Nov 6, “Contemporary Still Life Paintings,” works by Michael Beck and Michael Tompkins. 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.4507.

Events Cameo Monster Ball and Auction A night of food, drinks and costumes at quaint little theater to benefit the 2012 Cameo Community Arts programs. Oct 28 at 7. $50. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3946.

Danny Click & the Americana Orchestra Hear Danny Click pay homage to blues-inflected rock and roll. Oct. 28 at 8. $18-$25. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Food Not Bombs Help prepare and serve free vegan meals every Sun afternoon; served at 5. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 415.408.8094.

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Red Cross make-up artists apply realistic wounds like vampire teeth marks and gashes with glass protrusion and missing eyeballs to benefit local emergency services. Oct 29 and Oct 30 at 2. $10$25. Santa Rosa Plaza, B Street, Santa Rosa. 707.577.7632.

Halloween Costume Contest Celebration includes food, beer and costume contest. Oct 31 at 8. Free. Moylan’s Brewery, 15 Rowland Way, Novato. 415.898.HOPS. Head to Marin Brewing Company for great beer, good food and a fun costume contest. Oct 31 at 8. Free. Marin Brewing Company, 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677.

Benefit for KOWS Community Radio 107.3FM features performances from Jug Dealers, Beso Negro and more. Oct 29 at 6. $10$15. Occidental YMCA, 3920 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.1073.

Metales M5 Brassy, sassy, and classic, Metales M5 is Mexico’s leading brass quintet. Oct 28 at 8. $22-$27. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Mermaidfest Benefit to support marine life, featuring mermaids performing in a pool and BBQ seafood. Oct 30 at 11. $5 donation. Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.484.8767.

Food & Drink Cheese Loves Beer Two educational and entertaining talks by UC Davis cheese and beer experts, Moshe Rosenberg and Charlie Bamforth. With plenty of cheese and beer. Oct 29 at 2. $40. Rohnert Park 4H Center, 6445 Commerce Blvd., Rohnert Park. www.ucanr.org/ cheeselovesbeer.

Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Edible Insects & Other Rare Delicacies Multi-course meal featuring insects from California and Mexico as key ingredients, accompanied by high-class mescal and served in the historic and truly beautiful Mess Hall. Oct 27 at 6:30. $50. Headlands Center for the Arts, Bldg 944, Fort Barry, Sausalito. 415.331.2787.

Napa Vallery ARTS ’11

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets

Month-long festival of visual art, music, theater, dance, comedy and more through Oct at various venues. For full schedule, see www.nvarts.org. Various locations, Napa Valley, Napa. 707.257.2117.

Tutta Zucca

Sexy Cats & Hunky Pimps Society of Single Professionals costume party and dance. Oct 28 at 8. $10. Embassy Suites Hotel, 101 McInnis Pkwy, San Rafael. 415.507.9962.

Sunday Cruise-In Last Sun monthly at noon, fire up your hot rod and bring the kids for day of live music, food, prizes and more. Free. Fourth and Sea Restaurant, 101 Fourth St, Petaluma. www.sundaycruisein.com.

Word Up! “Festival of Finding Out” brings community together in celebration of learning. Bands, speakers, and learning workshops on everything from birdhouses to DJing. Guests include Author Anne Lamott. Oct 30 at 11. Free. Petaluma Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.290.6723.

Sat, 9 to 12. Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Wed and Sat, 8:30 to 12. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629. Learn to turn the humble squash into the star of the table. Oct 27, 11:30 to 2:30. $90. Viva, 7160 Keating Ave, Sebastopol, 866.360.6662.

Film The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert Two drag queens journey into the Australian desert on a lavender bus. Oct 29 at 8:30. $22. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Aida Part of the Opera in HD Series, this film shows the “opera of epic proportions” staged in a rustic quarry in Austria. Oct 29 at 7. $20. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Italian Film Festival Selected modern films from the land of Antonioni, Fellini and Leone. Oct 29, “The 1000 Euros Generation.” Showtimes at 5:30 and 7:45. $14-$78. Showcase Theatre, Marin Center, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Jewish Film Festival

Major Mollusks ‘Oyster Culture’ captures farming, shucking history Before I moved to Sonoma County, I’d never eaten an oyster. One fateful day, a foodie friend egged me on to slurp down one of the quivering bivalves at a bistro in Occidental, and it was like consuming a cold dollop of ocean— a surprisingly pleasant sensation. Gwendolyn Meyer, the photographer behind the gorgeous photographs of Oyster Culture (Cameron & Co.; $19.95), co-written with Doreen Schmid, has a reverence for all the steps, from farming to shucking, that bring the oceanic treats to the table. “It’s hard work to farm oysters, and that intrigued me,” says Meyers, “the way the agriculture works and the farming in the water. And visually, it’s very beautiful.” The book includes recipes and full-color photos. Meyers was once a chef (“My first big job was at Ventana Inn, and we used to have to open dozens and dozens of oysters”), and she tested all of the recipes in the book, from places like Marshall Store, Osterina Stellina, Nick’s Cove and Drake’s Bay. “I love oysters,” says Meyer. “They are one food that seems to travel from fine dining to your average barbecue on a Sunday afternoon. It’s the same product. Once you open the shell, you’re eating this fantastic, delicious, tasty treat.”—Leilani Clark

Best of the Fest Popular films from the Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival are screened in this series. Oct 28, “Goodnight Nobody.” $10. Sebastopol Center

for the Arts, 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Fantomas Restored century-old French serial by Louis Feuillade shown over consecutive Sundays.

Sixteenth annual fest runs through December. Nov 1 at 1, 4 and 7:15, “Inside Hana’s Suitcase.” Nov 2 at 7:15, “100 Voices: A Journey Home.” $15. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

The Met: Live in HD High-definition opera broadcasts from the Metropolitan Theatre in NYC. Oct 29 and Nov 2, “Don Giovanni.” $16-$23. Jackson Theater, Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa.

Vintage Film Series Through December, classic films on the big screen. Oct 24 at 7 and Oct 26 at 1, “Wizard of Oz.” Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

For Kids Hanna Boys Center Kiddie Halloween Carnival Children 8 years and under in costume and their families are invited to this pre-Halloween party including petting zoo, face painting and carnivalstyle games. Oct 29 at 11. Free, donations accepted. Hanna Boys Center, 17000 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.2504.

Harvest Festival at Connolly Ranch Bring the whole family out for a day of farm activities: Explore the gardens, take a nature walk, spin wool, learn about bees, or just pull up a straw bale and have a picnic at the barn. Oct 29 at 11. Free. Connolly Ranch, 3141 Browns Valley Rd, Napa. 707.224.1894.

Third Annual Trick or Treat For this community event, volunteers decorate their car trunk and ) provide treats for

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35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 26 –NOVE MBER 1 , 201 1 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Gwendolyn Meyer

Oct 30 and Nov 6 at 4. $5$6. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTOBER 26 – NOV E M BE R 1 , 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Arts Events

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community children dressed in their Halloween costumes. Oct 30 at 6:30. Free. Two Rock Presbyterian Church, 7063 Bodega Ave., Petaluma. 415.762.4942.

Lectures Larry Broderick Join “raptor magnet” Larry Broderick and learn how to identify birds of prey by observing their markings and behavior, and get pointers on great birding destinations in Sonoma County and beyond. Nov 1 at 7. Free. REI Santa Rosa, Southside Shopping Center, 2715 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.9025.

Insecta-Palooza

ROBERT BREYER PAINTINGS & PRINTS

The third annual InsectaPalooza features guest speakers, an exhibit by the Hallberg Butterfly Sanctuary and a popular silkworm exhibit. Oct 29 at 9. $5-$10. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.327.9746. American Fine Art Gallery Since 1988

SALUTE TO AMERICAN HAND CRAFT Oct 6–16, 2011

Sept 25–Nov 12

Promote and Advance Original Artwork Made in America

Robert Bryer Talks About His Art Fri, Nov 4, 6:30–8pm

Science Buzz Cafe Every Thurs at 6:30, gather with scientists and amateur science fans to discuss weekly topics. Oct 27, “Animal Tracking and Bird Language,” with Jim Sullivan. $3 donation. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.292.5281.

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¡Puro Alma Apachicano! Emmanuel Catarino Montoya Calibi Exhibiting a diverse selection of unusual antique, modern & contemporary artworks.

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SRJC presents talk about Jeju Island in South Korea and the “Save Jeju Island” campaign to stop the construction of a Naval Base in Gangjeong village. Oct 26 at 7. Free. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4266.

Readings Book Passage Oct 26 at 7, Paul La Farge, “Luminous Airplanes”; also, Charles Frazier, “Nightwoods.” Oct 27 at 7, Matthew Fox, “Christian Mystics: 365 Readings and Meditations.” Oct 28 at 7, Steve Inskeep, “Insteant City: Life and Death in Karachi.” Oct 29 at 1, William Adler and Jon Fromer, “The Man Who Never Died: The Life Times and the Legacy of Joe Hill”; at 4, Alan Hollinghurst, “The Stranger’s Child”; at 7, Julie

( 35 Klam, “Love at First Bark: How Saving a Dog Can Sometimes Help You Save Yourself.” Oct 30 at noon, Susan Orlean, “Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend”; at 4, Lucia Greenhouse, “fathermothergod: My Journey Out of Christian Science”; at 7, David Guterson, “Ed King.” Nov 1 at 7, Sandra Spanier, “The Letters of Ernest Hemingway.” 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Copperfield’s Books Oct 27 at 7, Tamora Pierce, “Mastiff: The Legend of Beka Cooper” (138 Main St, Sebastopol). Oct 28 at 6, YWCA’s “Changing Hurt to Hope: Writers Speak Out Against Domestic Violence” (2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa). Oct 28 at 7, Laini Taylor, “Daughter of Smoke and Bone” (140 Kentucky St, Petaluma). 707.823.8991.

Osher Marin JCC Oct 27 at 7, “The Lady of the Rivers” with Philippa Gregory. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Frankenstein Puppets, poetry and stagecraft combine to create a unique vision of Shelley’s gothic tale. Through Oct 30; Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $20. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Gothic Double Bill “We <3 You, Nosferatu,” vampire satire returns for a witty and welcome second run, then screening of Murnau’s “Nosferatu,” set to a live score by Dave Mac Nab. Oct 28-31 at 8; special matinee Oct 30 at 2. $15-$20. Main Stage West, 104 North Main St, Sebastopol.

Jekyll & Hyde: The Musical Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of good and evil, love, lust, murder and redemption transformed into a Broadway musical. Ending Oct 30. Fri-Sat at 8; Sun at 2. $24-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Sing-Along Sound of Music

Theater American Gothic Dramatizations of classic stories of the macabre written by American writers. Oct 28 at 7:30. $25. Falkirk Cultural Center, 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.251.1027.

Bellwether Bellwether was a nice, safe place to live. People knew each other. They looked out for each other. Bad things didn’t happen there. That was until six-yearold Amy Draft went missing. Tues and Thurs-Sat at 8; Wed at 7:30; Sun at 7; Matinee Oct 29 at 2. $20-$55. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Bug A cocktail waitress and a Gulf War vet hide out in a seedy motel room and descend into paranoia and conspiracy. Through Nov 6; Thurs-Sat at 8, Sun at 5. $24-$26. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Crimes of the Heart A troubled family escapes their past to seize the future. Through Nov 6; Fri-Sat at 8. Special matinee performances Oct 30 and Nov 6 at 2. $15-

Sing along with Julie Andrews and the Von Trapp family singers. Oct 29 at 7; Oct 30 at 2. $15-$25. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, S anta Rosa. 707.523.4185 .

A Special Relationship This Vaudeville comedy uses cricket and baseball to examine the cultural divide between America and England. Oct 27 at 8. $18-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Ten Little Indians Agatha Christie’s script involves 10 people tricked onto an island; a mysterious voice informs them that they have each committed a serious crime and will each be brought to justice. One by one, they are murdered. Through Nov 6. Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15-$23. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.6335.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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ARIES (March 21–April 19) “Life is not just a diurnal property of large, interesting vertebrates,” poet Gary Snyder reminds us in his book The Practice of the Wild. “It is also nocturnal, anaerobic, microscopic, digestive, fermentative: cooking away in the warm dark.” I call this to your attention, Aries, because according to my astrological reckoning, you’d be wise to honor all the life that is cooking away in the warm dark. It’s the sun-at-midnight time of your long-term cycle; the phase when your luminescent soul throbs with more vitality than your shiny ego. Celebrate the unseen powers that sustain the world. Pay reverence to what’s underneath, elusive and uncanny. Halloween costume tips: draw inspiration from the shadow, the dream, the moon, the depths. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Speaking on behalf of the cosmic powers-that-be, I hereby give you permission to make your love bigger and braver. Raise it to the next level, Taurus! Help it find a higher expression. Wherever your love has felt pinched or claustrophobic, treat it to a liberation. If it has been hemmed in by a lack of imagination, saturate it with breezy fantasies and flamboyant dreams. Cut it free from petty emotions that have wounded it and from sour memories that have weighed it down. What else could you do to give love the poetic license it needs to thrive? Halloween costume suggestion: the consummate lover.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) You’ve heard the old platitude, “If life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” The owner of a pizzeria in Mildura, Australia, updated that sentiment in 2010 when the area was invaded by swarms of locusts. “They’re crunchy and tasty,” he said of the bugs, which is why he used them as a topping for his main dish. It so happens that his inventive approach would make good sense for you right now, Gemini. So if life gives you a mini-plague of locusts, make pizza garnished with the delectable creatures. Halloween costume suggestion: pizza delivery person carrying this novel delicacy. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

Some doors are almost always locked. On those infrequent occasions when they are ajar, they remain so for only a brief period before being closed and bolted again. In the coming weeks, Cancerian, I urge you to be alert for the rare opening of such a door. Through luck or skill or a blend of both, you may finally be able to gain entrance through—or perhaps exit from—a door or portal that has been shut tight for as long as you remember. Halloween costume suggestion: the seeker who has found the magic key.

LEO (July 23–August 22) Microbiologist Raul Cano managed to obtain a 45-million-year-old strain of yeast from an ancient chunk of amber. It was still alive! Collaborating with a master brewer, he used it to make a brand of beer. One critic praised Fossil Fuel pale ale for its sweetness and clove aroma, while another said it has a “complex and well-developed taste profile.” I regard their successful project as a good metaphor for the task you have ahead of you in the coming weeks, Leo: extracting the vital essence from an old source, and putting it to work in the creation of a valuable addition to your life. Halloween costume suggestions: a friendly ghost, a polite and helpful mummy, a cloned version of Buddha, the person you were as a child. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

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“When I read a book on Einstein’s physics of which I understood nothing, it doesn’t matter,” testified Pablo Picasso, “because it will make me understand something else.” You might want to adopt that approach for your own use in the coming weeks, Virgo. It’s almost irrelevant what subjects you study and investigate and rack your brains trying to understand; the exercise will help you stretch your ability to master ideas that have been beyond your reach—and maybe even stimulate the eruption of insights that have been sealed away in your subconscious mind. Halloween costume suggestion: an eager student, a white-coated lab researcher, Curious George.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22)

“Sit, walk or run, but don’t wobble,” says the Zen proverb. Now I’m passing it on to you as advice worthy of your consideration. Maintaining clarity of purpose will be crucial in the coming weeks. Achieving crispness of delivery will be thoroughly enjoyable. Cultivating unity

among all your different inner voices will be a high art you should aspire to master. Whatever you do, Libra, do it with relaxed single-mindedness. Make a sign that says “No wobbling,” and tape it to your mirror. Halloween costume suggestion: be the superhero known as No Wobbling.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) You could preside over your very own Joy Luck Club in the coming days. According to my reading of the astrological omens, the levels of gratification possible could exceed your normal quota by a substantial margin. You may want to Google the Chinese character that means “double happiness” and use it as your ruling symbol. And it might be time to explore and experiment with the concepts of “super bliss,” “sublime delight” and “brilliant ecstasy.” Halloween costume suggestions: a saintly hedonist from paradise, a superhero whose superpower is the ability to experience extreme amounts of pleasure, the luckiest person who ever lived.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) For over a hundred years, an English woman named Lena Thouless celebrated her birthday on Nov. 23. When she was 106, her daughter found her birth certificate and realized that mom had actually been born on November 22. I’m guessing that a comparable correction is due in your own life, Sagittarius. Something you’ve believed about yourself for a long time is about to be revealed as slightly off. Halloween costume suggestion: a version of yourself from a parallel reality or another dimension. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “Everyone is a genius at least once a year,” said scientist Georg Lichtenberg. According to my reading of the astrological omens, Capricorn, the coming weeks will be your time to confirm the truth of that aphorism. Your idiosyncratic brilliance is rising to a fever pitch and may start spilling over into crackling virtuosity any minute now. Be discriminating about where you use that stuff; don’t waste it on trivia or on triumphs that are beneath you. Halloween costume suggestions: Einstein, Marie Curie, Leonardo da Vinci, Emily Dickinson. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) You’re ready to shed juvenile theories, amateurish approaches or paltry ambitions. I’m not implying you’re full of those things; I’m just saying that if you have any of them, you’ve now got the power to outgrow them. Your definition of success needs updating, and I think you’re up to the task. Why am I so sure? Well, because the Big Time is calling you—or at least a Bigger Time. Try this: Have brainstorming sessions with an ally or allies who know your true potential and can assist you in formulating aggressive plans to activate it more fully. Halloween costume suggestions: a head honcho, big wheel, fat cat, top dog. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

I know a woman who claims on her Facebook page that she speaks four languages: English, Elvish, Mermish and Parseltongue. (For those of you who don’t read Tolkien or Harry Potter, Elvish is the language of the elves, Mermish of the mermaids and mermen, and Parseltongue of the serpents.) My Facebook friend probably also knows pig Latin, baby talk and glossolalia, although she doesn’t mention them. I’d love for you to expand your mastery of foreign tongues, Pisces, even if it’s just one of the above—and the coming weeks and months will be an excellent time to begin. You will have a greater capacity for learning new ways to talk than you have since childhood. Halloween costume suggestion: a bilingual bisexual ambidextrous expert in reciting tongue twisters.

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