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Years of Enriching, Educating, Entertaining

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Bohemian 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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5

MAUREEN JOHNSON & STEPHANIE PERKINS

nb THE HAIRS OF HIS CHIN

Summertime’s over and the Burma Shave signs go back in the garage. Thanks for the fun memories, Wendell Joost!

This photo was taken near downtown Guerneville. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘This year, we pull these people out of the wings and give them their long-overdue curtain call.’ F EATUR E P21 The 14th Annual Boho Awards

Saturday, October 8, 7pm

Thursday, October 13, 3:30pm

GANGAJI

JAMES DASHNER

PETALUMA

Hidden Treasure: Uncovering the Truth in Your Life Story

The Death Cure

Tuesday, October 4, 4pm

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Tuesday, October 11, 3:30pm

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PETALUMA To register, call 707-762-0563 Tuesday, October 18, Grades K-3, 6pm Wednesday, October 19, Grades 4-6, 6pm Thursday, November 3, Grades 7-12, 6pm SEBASTOPOL To register, call 707-823-2618 Tuesday, October 25, Grades K-3, 6pm Wednesday, October 26, Grades 4-6, 6pm

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6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Back the Night Before BY SKIP ROBINSON

I

yearn for the huge silver airliners to pull backwards

Out of the buildings they’ve slammed into, for the knives to retreat from the flesh as if they had never thought of entering, that the blades return to their box-cutting, with no move to the left or the right. I plead with the explosions to return back into their bombs, their hand grenades, their mortar shells, back into the airplanes filled with fuel for the long journey home. I plead that the great expanses of rubble and broken stone rise back up into the buildings they had been before the attack, the roads back into being, leading again to the homes of loved ones. I beseech the blood, the pieces of flesh, the eyes, the guts, the skin, the organs of love-making to float up from deep in the rubble and soil and weave themselves back into the living bodies of family and community. I cry that we gain the determination to climb back before the deathly events, back the night before, the night of Sept. 10th, while the angry and oppressed talk outside, people are talking and listening with each other inside over dinner how to live fairly with each other, how to live fairly with the planet, how to bring those outside in - the next day the same people climbing onto the same airliners, flying successfully to their destinations, the balance of things swinging back toward a fair center, minds flooding with visions of a new century and millennium. I reach my hands up toward the sky and plead that cooling rain fall down, that a bright moon may rise into the black sky, that all the stars are luminous against the backdrop of utter darkness and that the families are all safe and home again, that the only fires are in the fireplaces and in the stars.

We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

A Day at the Races

Who Would Jesus Kill?

Terry Fautley’s Open Mic piece (“Up in the Air,” Sept. 21) is a perfect segue into what the Reno Air Races are all about. My father took me to the Reno Air Races for the first time when I was 12 in 1972. I have been attending as often as possible ever since.

The execution of Troy Davis, despite the serious doubts about his guilt, leaves me saddened. More blood spilled. What it is it about the United States that leaves us committing legalized murder along with countries like China, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan? The discrepancy between our rhetoric and our reality is stark. For example, many in this country say that we are and should be a Christian nation but often don’t live in accordance with Jesus’ teachings. Would Christ support the death penalty? Wars? Torture? No.

As you might imagine, over such a span of time you build relationships with fellow race fans. You see, the air races are not just another form of racing; you see the same people every year and make new friends. Over the years, I’ve met and maintained relationships with people from all over the United States. After the accident this year, when my wife and I made our way back to our tent, we sat down and consoled one another while waiting for our friends. Somber as it was. . . when I saw Terry and his wife walk into camp, I walked right up to him and gave him a hug. No words were needed. The camaraderie at this event is extra-ordinary. Air race fans are a family. Terry brought up very valid points, and I have a few to add. In any “sport” there is risk, even for the spectator. In baseball, you might get hit by a foul ball; in hockey, you might get hit by a flying puck; in soccer, the stands have collapsed. In motor sports the danger is more evident. All sorts of things have happened to participants and spectators alike. Cars hit the fence in NASCAR, and pieces go flying into the stands and people get hurt. Do they go to see another race? Of course they do, because they love the sport; it’s part of who they are, part of their life. The Air Races in Reno stared in 1964. This is the only time any spectators have been hurt or killed. Tragic as it is, we know there are risks, even for us. Don’t take it away.

SAN SEIBERT Hayward

I’m not a biblical scholar, but I wonder if there’s confusion between the Old and New Testaments. The Old Testament God demands an eye for an eye and bids his people smite their enemies and slaughter them. Jesus is the antithesis of that: turn the other cheek, love thy neighbor as thyself. Would it perhaps be more accurate to say that those who call themselves Christian and yet support Old Testament values are not Christians at all? Then our policies make more sense. My heart goes out to both the Davis and McPhail families. I don’t believe either has gotten justice.

MOSS HENRY Santa Rosa

Missing Ingram’s Back in the 70’s, I drove by Jack Ingram’s Chili Bowl on Old Redwood Highway every day on my way to bust tires at K-Mart Automotive. Sometimes, when I was flush with cash, I might splurge on some food at “Ingram’s Eats.” I could always tell where Jack had pinched off the mold from the bread he toasted for me, by the round depressions torn into the surface of the toast. I always appreciated Jack’s point of view on things, too. You had to, or you wouldn’t get served any food. I could never digest the food he served, though. It was like he was just daring

Rants

you to eat his food. In fact, he actually sold T-shirts that said “I survived the chili at Ingram’s.” Jack was good with words. “Survive”—that was pretty much spot-on. Now that Ford’s Cafe in Sonoma is closed, and Jack is gone too, breakfast just isn’t the same any more. A true original, Jack Ingram was a Sonoma County all-star. It didn’t matter that he couldn’t cook worth a damn.

REV. STEPHEN FERRY Napa As someone who grew up a half-mile from Ingram’s, I can say with certainty that the T-shirts didn’t boast of surviving the chili—they read “I survived the El Dorado Special,” the joint’s famously huge chili plate. My dad had one of those shirts, and it was one of his most prized possessions; the El Dorado Special was a beast of a dish, nearly impossible to eat. The last time I ate there was in 1996, on my birthday. I miss it too.—The Ed. Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28–OCTOBE R 4, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1 Anonymous leaks

personal info of abusive police at Wall Street protests

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3 Guy who invented

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 28- O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8

Gabe Meline

If anyone has ideas for how to fix the economy, it’s Ralph Nader. The author, consumer advocate and attorney speaks on that very topic when he appears at Sonoma State University this week. The title of his latest book, Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us!, may have people scratching their heads, but the four-time presidential candidate says that it’s “not non-fiction”; Nader describes it as a practical utopia, “a fictional vision that could become a new reality.” Hey, at least he’s not doing the same old same old! A passionate advocate for the power of citizenry to propel the United States away from its current dystopic prospects, the Washington, D.C. resident is nothing if not solutions-oriented. Ralph Nader speaks on Tuesday, Oct. 4, at the Sonoma State University Cooperage. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 7:30pm. $5-$10, free for students. 707.664.2382.

Chicken Little PELOTON POWER Cyclists line up on Stony Point Road before last year’s GranFondo.

Off the Back

Victim of hit-and-run returns to ride the GranFondo, but will road rage against cyclists ever end? BY JAMES KNIGHT

A

s late as four in the afternoon on Oct. 9, 2010, the King Ridge GranFondo was coming to a successful close. Cyclists on the return loop, having climbed one thousand feet up Coleman Valley Road, were enjoying an exhilarating descent down Graton Road.

Then, at approximately 4:15, cyclist Anoush Zebarjadian was struck by the right-side mirror of a vehicle. The blow hurtled the then 57-year old San Franciscan more than 30 yards to the side of the road. Just as fast, the vehicle disappeared around a bend, leaving Zebarjadian with critical head injuries. Thanks to the actions of a doctor on the scene, Zebarjadian survived, while a lengthy and expensive recovery

disrupted his life for the better part of a year. The good news is that Zebarjadian is returning to the race, says Greg Fisher, editor of Bike Monkey magazine and a coordinator for the GranFondo. “The guy took quite a lot,” says Fisher. “The fact that he comes back, a year later, ready to put himself back into the world—it’s an inspiration.” ) 10 The bad news is

Once upon a time in Santa Rosa, raising chickens was a necessary part of daily life. But now, zoning ordinances make it illegal for anyone not in a rural part of town (with less than 20,000 square feet of land) to set up their own mini backyard egg-production stations. Oakmont Senior Living LLC, of all entities, aims to change that with a recent zoning code amendment request that asks for the City of Santa Rosa’s land use and animal keeping regulations to allow six hens per zoned planned development lot under 10,000 square feet. Not to worry about bleary-eyed, crow-filled dawns— roosters would be prohibited. The proposal won’t be considered by the Planning Commission and City Council until 2012, but public comments are welcomed and encouraged until Oct. 20, 2011. Contact Senior Planner Erin Morris at 707.543.3273 or email emorris@ srcity.org.—Leilani Clark The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Off the Back ( 9 that there is no more news. The perpetrator has not been identiďŹ ed, let alone brought to justice. In fact, the crime under investigation is only a hit-andrun, intent not being sufficiently established to warrant a charge of assault. But numerous reports suggest little doubt: the vehicle, described as an early â&#x20AC;&#x2122;90s, maroon Ford Explorer, had intimidated cyclists for miles along the route that day before swerving sharply toward Zebarjadian. So why is this case so cold? The answers are complex, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not for lack of diligent effort by the cycling community and law enforcement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It happened when everyone was going on a pretty good downhill,â&#x20AC;? explains Fisher. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As a cyclist, your eyes are trained on the road. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to shift your awareness.â&#x20AC;? Given the fast pace of events, nobody could get a license plate number or identify the driver. Sandra Lupien, outreach director for the Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition (SCBC), says that two representatives from the sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s department and the California Highway Patrol she works with are cyclists themselves, and affirms those departmentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; active cooperation. To date, donors have contributed more than $6,700 for information leading to an arrest. The CHP reviewed photographs and hours of video footage, says Sgt. Robert Mota. People called in tips, and the CHP checked them out. After receiving a report of a vehicle parked on a remote ranch, officers drove a four-wheel drive through two riverbeds and hiked in for half a hour. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a match. After all that, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get much at all,â&#x20AC;? says Sgt. Mota. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re kind of at a wall with this one.â&#x20AC;? Fortunately, such extreme incidents are rare, but the SCBC offers an online form where cyclists can report aggressive motorists. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a particularly egregious incident,â&#x20AC;? says Lupien, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the police might send a letter, saying that someone who drove this car registered in your name did this, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not OK.â&#x20AC;? Lupien affirms that, given a license plate number,

they will follow up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes one warning is all it takes, but as it is with speeding or DUIs, it might take a few warnings to sink in: you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t harass folks on bikes.â&#x20AC;? Reading through the reports, one might get the impression that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absolutely harrowing out there, although theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re distilled from a seven-year time frame. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was hit in the back with a can of soda,â&#x20AC;? complains an early entry. More recently, a stocky Caucasian male drove a truck through Alexander Valley, â&#x20AC;&#x153;screaming, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;all people on bikes should die.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? White males driving trucks hold no monopoly. A middle-aged blonde female driving a Ford Excursion chased cyclists down Fountaingrove Parkway, honking and ďŹ&#x201A;ipping them off, stopping to â&#x20AC;&#x153;yell at us and tell us to get off the road.â&#x20AC;? Sgt. Mota says that the law is perfectly clear on that point, citing Section 21202(a) of the California Vehicle Code: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any person operating a bicycle upon a roadway at a speed less than the normal speed of traffic moving in the same direction at that time shall ride as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway.â&#x20AC;? The roadway, Sgt. Mota emphasizes, means the mosttraveled part of the roadâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;between the center line and the white line. Meanwhile, this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GranFondo has grown to include 7,500 riders. For their part, the CHP plans to enhance its presenceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;at a cost of $45,000, paid for by the GranFondo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The goal is for people to see us out there, and to be able to respond in a timely mannerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not that I think there will be a reason,â&#x20AC;? says Sgt. Mota. With Zebarjadian back on the road, and the GranFondo going stronger than ever, there may be only one person who has not yet demonstrated their inner strength in the past year. As Lupien says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel sad for the person who knows, but is not coming forward.â&#x20AC;? Levi Leipheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s King Ridge GranFondo begins on Saturday, Oct.1, leaving from Finley Park in Santa Rosa at 8am. Anyone with information regarding last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hit-and-run incident can contact the CHP at 707.588.1400.

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ipping caffeine at Dr. Insomnia’s in Novato, I wonder how many (otherwise garden-useful) coffee grounds it takes to fill a curbside debris box. This is no idle calculation on my part. Garbage from all commercial enterprise is being subjected to serious scrutiny in Marin County, where any business generating roughly a dumpster’s worth of waste each week will be subject to a mandatory recycling ordinance, scheduled to become law in July 2012.

Glancing at the storefronts up and down Grant Avenue, I’m unable to guess which, if any, might not recycle at all, don’t recycle enough, or haven’t yet identified the bottom-line benefits of shrinking a carbon footprint.

Marin residents were recycling, reducing and reusing for years, some even for decades, before Californians received a regulatory push in 1989; during that year, the state looked at fast-filling landfills and said, “Uh-oh, we’d better divert some of that waste stream.” The formal expression of that utterance was the California Integrated Waste Management Act. But business didn’t get the push; they escaped being subjected to waste diversion requirements established for California, even though the volume of waste produced by business amounts to almost 70 percent of all that goes into the landfills. Twenty-two years after passage of the Integrated Waste Management Act, Marin is pushing the world of commerce toward a late arrival at their civic and planetary duty. Other jurisdictions around California will do the same in a statewide effort to divert up to three million tons of commercially generated waste materials from our landfills. Under AB32, the state’s Global Warming Solutions Act, cities have been obliged to mandate commercial recycling programs. The consequent reduction in production of methane is expected to annually offset “5 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalents,” according to the California Department of Resources, Recycling and Recovery. California now produces about 1.5 percent of the planet’s greenhouse gases, and over six percent of the nation’s total. Marin’s latecomers to commercial recycling are being offered free consultation and education about the business advantages of a strategic waste reduction program, with hands-on help including waste audits and assessments, and consulting for Green Business and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. Businesses can get assistance by calling Todd Start and Rich Garbarino at 415.456.2601 or Kim Scheibly at 415.458.5514. For more, see www.marinsanitary.com.

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WELLNESS

CENTER Health Starts Here! Weston A Price Foundation Presentation 10/4/11 - 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7pm Anne Fischer Silva shares the principles of this nutrition pioneer.

Whole Foods Monthly Weight Loss Support Group 10/8/11 - 11am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12pm Join this supportive group every ďŹ rst Saturday of the month. Share goals, recipes & menu ideas.

Anti-Aging & Diet with Dr. Stella 10/10/11 - 6:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:30pm Discussing nutritional ways to support your youth and vitality.

How to Communicate better with your Liver - the great detoxifyer 10/11/11 - 6:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:30pm Explains ways to minimize harm to your liver and assist the hardest working organ in your body! Wellness Center events are free unless otherwise noted.

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Store open daily 8am-9pm (707) 542-7411 calendar: wholefoods.com/coddingtown

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28- OCTOBE R 4, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Enter for a chance to

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14

WINE NOTES

October

NAPA & SONOMA VALLEY

ST. CLEMENT 2000 MAIN STREET, ST. HELENA | 866.708.9463 | BERINGER.COM

2867 ST. HELENA HWY NORTH, ST. HELENA | 707.265.5000 | ST. CLEMENT.COM

Cooking Channel’s Live Filming of the ‘Beringer Great Steak Challenge’

St. Clement’s Annual Winemaker Dinner

Saturday, October 15 Exciting opportunity! ~ Join the Deen Brothers, Beringer Winemaker Laurie Hook, and Cooking Channel for the closed set filming of the Beringer Great Steak Challenge, our nationwide steak recipe and wine pairing contest. There are a select number of studio audience tickets remaining. Come cheer on your favorite contestant as they battle for the $25,000 grand prize. Price $40 for a viewing of one session, $75 for a double session ticket package — Call us to reserve your tickets. Viewing Sessions of Live Filming: Session One: 10:45am — 12:15pm Session Two: 12:45pm — 2:15pm

Private Reserve Cabernet Release Celebration Saturday, October 1, 11 am — 3 pm

Saturday, October 1, 6 pm Intimate evening ~ Join us for the annual Winemaker’s Dinner at St. Clement Vineyards. This intimate evening will be hosted by awardwinning winemaker Danielle Cyrot and feature highly-rated St. Clement wines, including library magnums of Oroppas paired to perfection with a delicious “farm-to-table” family-style dinner on the Winemakers Lounge Patio. Price $130 per person — Reservations Required

Sensory Celebration Music Series Saturday, October 1st from 1 – 3 pm Bone Dog – Rock Music

A must for Cabernet lovers! ~ Be among the few to taste the 2008 Private Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon at our Reserve Tasting Bar in the historic Rhine House Mansion. This Iconic Napa Valley Cabernet was recently recognized by Robert Parker as “one of the top Cabernet Sauvignons made in Napa Valley that has remained at a realistic price.” Wine Advocate, June, 2011 Price: $25 per person — No Advance Reservations Required

STAGS’ LEAP WINERY

8555 SONOMA HIGHWAY, KENWOOD | 800.543.7572 | CHATEAUSTJEAN.COM

An Experience Rooted in Tradition ~ Come explore California’s earlier wine estates with a historical 90-minute tour and tasting. Taste wines and learn the origins of the stone Manor House, built in 1890, and famed Stags’ Leap District. Price: $45 per person. Tour and Tastings by Appointment Only

10th Annual Cinq Cépages Release Party Saturday, October 1, 11 am — 3 pm Exclusive offering ~ All wine lovers are invited to a formal sit-down vertical tasting led by Margo Van Staaveren, Winemaker, and Philippe Thibault, Chateau Manager, of our classic Cinq Cépages Bordeaux Blend. This is a unique chance to sample world-class wines while assessing their aging potential in a professional environment. Be sure to call early to secure your seat. Price $75 per member & $100 non-member — Reservations Required

Promenade Tour & Tasting Sunday, October 2, 11 am & 1 pm Popular experience ~ With gracious style, exquisite architecture, and inviting gardens, Chateau St. Jean has become an icon in the Sonoma Valley. Join an educated host on a guided tour of the stunning estate— learn about our rich history, unique fruit characteristics and growing cycle, while sipping on some of Sonoma’s finest wines. Price $15 per person, Duration 30 min — Reservations Recommended

6150 SILVERADO TRAIL, NAPA | 800.395.2441 | STAGSLEAP.COM

Historical Tour & Tasting

Everyday, 10am - 2:30pm

ETUDE 1250 CUTTINGS WHARF ROAD, NAPA | 707.257.5300 | ETUDEWINES.COM

Harvest Sensory Experience — See, Smell, Taste & Feel Everyday, 10 am — 4:30 pm Delight Your Palette ~ Experience harvest in Napa Valley and explore the nuances of terroir reflected in Etude’s renowned Pinot Noirs and world class Cabernet Sauvignons. In celebration, Etude is showcasing the sights, smells, and tastes of Harvest. Visit us to enjoy a Reserve or Premium tasting – Reservations Recommended

S PECIAL O FFER - 2 for1 T ASTING Bring this ad to any of the following properties and receive two tastings for the price of one.

Stags’ Leap not included. Offer valid until 12/31/11.Terms and Conditions Apply — Call for details. 3100

CALEDONIA CUISINE Classic Bay Area farm-to-table cooking is the order of the day at Plate Shop 2.0.

Better by the Bay The ‘new’ Plate Shop in Sausalito is more accessible, but not dumbed down BY STETT HOLBROOK

T

he story goes like this: Talented chef Kim Alter opened Plate Shop in February on Sausalito’s Caledonia Street with promises to bring big-city dining to the little city on the water. Alter brought her experience from top kitchens (Aqua, Michael Mina, Manresa, Ubuntu) and a fondness for nose-to-tail

dining, but in spite of the buzz, the restaurant didn’t pack diners in as hoped. Add to that an apparent rift between the front of the house and the kitchen. In May, Alter split, taking a few of her crew with her. After a rocky intermediary period, chef Peter Erickson and general manager Kent Liggett came aboard from San Francisco’s 1550 Hyde to pick up the pieces. The argument made was that sleepy Sausalito wasn’t ready for

Alter’s palate-challenging food (smoke uni risotto, cleaved duck head, crispy pig’s ear, miner’s lettuce) and big city vibe. Plate Shop 2.0 seems to read Sausalito better. Like Alter, Erickson draws from local farms and purveyors. The menu offers few surprises, and given Alter’s experience, that’s probably by design. It’s classic Mediterranean-inflected, Bay Area farm-to-table cooking. For me, the starters are the best part of the menu. The rosemary frites

Plate Shop, 39 Caledonia St., Sausalito. 415.887.9047.

15 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28–OCTOBE R 4, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

with creamy aioli ($5) are as good as any you’d find—and the fries stay crisp and hot in the narrow necked crock they’re served in. Ordering calamari is always a gamble, given how often the little cephalopods turn out rubbery, but Plate Shop’s grilled version is a winner. With the accompanying cranberry beans and salsa verde, the dish could pass as a light entrée. While the menu has been retooled to appeal to more catholic tastes, that doesn’t mean it has been dumbed down. The best thing I tasted was the rabbit liver crostini ($9). Mention of liver might scare some diners away, but the bunny organs are sublimely rich and creamy without a whiff of the metallic tang and funk that often characterizes liver. Entrées are more straight-upthe-middle: grilled pork chops ($23), herb-rubbed chicken ($22) and ricotta ravioli ($16). Grilled Columbia River salmon paired with green beans and sunchokes and a ribbon of herb aioli on top was good, if a little boring. I liked the hearty flavor of the Côtes-duRhône braised beef ($24), but the meat itself was less than tender. Desserts ($6-$8) are standardissue (sorbet, polenta-olive oil cake, pot de crème, bread pudding, lemon-almond tart), and there’s a short but appealing list of cheese. While the kitchen may have loosened its tie and relaxed a bit, Plate Shop still emits an urbanrustic cool with its caged light bulb pendant lamps, wood floors, glass façade and gleaming bar. Speaking of the bar, mixologist Chris Burgeson shakes and stirs an appealing lineup of classic and classically inspired cocktails. The Spring Street Manhattan ($12, made with Eagle Rare single barrel bourbon, Carpano Antica Vermouth, Peychaud’s bitters and brandied cherries) is a boozy but balanced concoction of premium ingredients. All told, under Erickson and Liggett, Plate Shop seems to have found the right balance of flash and familiarity.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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250+ WinesÂ&#x2021;TASTE Wines Â&#x2021;TASTE & BUY BUY ALL 3 DAYS DAYS Â&#x2021;Chef Â&#x2021; Chef DemosÂ&#x2021;Grape Demoos Â&#x2021; Grape Stomp Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;Fun Fun & Food Food Â&#x2021;Ag-Tivities Â&#x2021; Ag-Tivities for for Kids Â&#x2021;Art Â&#x2021;Art Show & Sale Â&#x2021; Live Live Jazz Jazz

37UI"OOVBM "OOVBM

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Arrigoniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Delicatessen & Cafe

Sonoma County Fairgrounds, Santa Rosa

& October S t ''SJEBZt4BUVSEBZt4VOEBZ September 30 Octobe er 1-2 1 2 SJEBZt4BUVSEBZt4VOEBZ September 30 Grand G Tasting Taasting 5:30 - 8:00pm "MM)BSWFTU'BJS"XBSE8JOOJOH8JOFT'PPET "MM)BSW FTU'BJS "XBSE X 8JOOJOH 8JOFT'PPET Taste T aste 250+ Gold d Medal Winning Wines All 3 dayss 8JOF5BTUJOH1BJSJOH4FNJOBSTt$IPDPMBUF1PSU1BJSJOHT 8JOF5BTUJOH1BJSJOH4FNJOBSTt$IPDPMBUF1PSU1 1BJSJOHT Purchase Award-Winning Award-Winning Wines at Our Harvest Harvest Fair Fair Marketplace Maarketplace

Cafe La Haye CaliforniaFrench. $$-$$$. The very best Sonoma ingredients are married with nouvelle French cooking styles at this comfortable bistro. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.5994.

Central Market California cuisine. $$$. Fish is the thing at this airy spot that features local and sustainable foods. Lots of pork dishes, tooâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re insanely good. Dinner daily. 42 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.9900.

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Deli. $. A perennial favorite with the downtown lunch crowd. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 701 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1297.

TM

BLUES & BBQ SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15TH HOURS: H OURS: M MONDAY ONDAY & TTHURSDAY-SATURDAY HURSDAY-SATURDAY 1 11:30AM-9PM 1:30AM-9PM / SUNDAY SUNDAY BRUNCH BRUNCH 10:30AM-4PM 10:30AM-4PM 235 HEALDSBURG 2 35 H EALDSBURG AVENUE AVENUE (BEHIND (BEHIND THE THE LA L A CREMA CREMA TASTING TASTING ROOM) ROOM) 707.431.1113 70 7.431.1113 | AFFRONTIHEALDSBURG.COM AFFRONTIHEALDSBURG.COM

A taste of real Thailand in convivial atmosphere. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 8492 Gravenstein Hwy, Ste M (in the Apple Valley Plaza), Cotati. 707.793.9300.

McNearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alehouse. $.

Eclectic. $$. Homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and entrĂŠes. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.9563.

Wolf House Californian. $$$-$$$$. Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner, Tues-Sun; brunch, SatSun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401.

MARIN CO U N T Y Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub

Citrus & Spice Thai/

Pub fare. $. Casual, homey place serving no-nonsense pub grub like shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pie. Lunch and dinner daily. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

American. $$-$$$. Friendly, warm service in a spot whose menu is thick with local, organic ingredients. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 14415 Coast Hwy 1, Valley Ford (at the Valley Ford Hotel). 707.876.1983.

and more. $-$$. Classic diner food with a gourmet touch, plus Latin American items and homemade pizzas. Great for breakfast. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 125 Keller St, Petaluma. 707.773.1143.

Water Street Bistro

Sports bar: barbecue, big appetizers, burgers. Lunch and dinner daily. 21 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Rocker Oysterfellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Hallieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diner American

JJIVE IVE SSAMBA AMBAA

Lynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thai Thai. $$.

American. $. Classic, fresh diner food in a comfortable diner setting. Ought to be in a movie. Breakfast and lunch daily. 404 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.573.5955. Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

NO COVER CHARGE!

La Gare French. $$$. Dine in an elegant atmosphere of Old World charm. Dinner, Wed-Sun 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355.

Dierkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parkside Cafe

The Girl & the Fig

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30TH 9-11PM IN THE COURTYARD

glop or goop here. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 816 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.0881.

concoctions with a New Orleans flair. Menu is divided into pizzas, small plates, charcuterie and desserts. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 6761 Sebastopol Ave (in the Gravenstein station), Sebastopol. 707.823.1943.

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly,

Easy Street Cafe American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Frantoio Italian. $$-$$$.

Royal China. Chinese. $$. Smart dĂŠcor, professional service, very solid wonton soup. Lunch, Mon-Fri and Sun; dinner daily. 3080 Marlowe Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2911.

Hatam Persian. $. Fresh

Kirin Chinese. $$. Specializing in Mandarin, Szechuan and Peking styles. Kirinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pot stickers are the best in Sonoma County. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner, Sun. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1957.

Tuscan flavors. Can be crowded, but you get to see what the neighbors ordered. Dinner, Tues-Sun. 109-A Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.433.5282.

La Fondita Mexican. $.

Starlight Wine Bar

Hearty, filling, very tasty. No

American bistro. $$. Tasty

Scopa Italian. $$. For true

Perennial winner of SF Chronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;100 Best,â&#x20AC;? Frantoio also produces all of its own olive oil. Dinner daily. 152 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.289.5777. and lushly seasoned regional fare. Lunch and dinner, TuesSun. 821 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8888.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalitoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Insalataâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mediterranean. $$$. Simple, high-impact dishes of exotic flavors. Lunch

and dinner daily. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700.

SMALL BITES

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$.

Popping Up

Pine Cone Diner Eclectic. $$. Funky diner meets upscale bistro. Ambitious dishes, like cherry-wood-smoked pork loin with lavender gastrique, and steak au poivre with peppercorn brandy sauce are served in homey atmosphere. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Closed Mon. 60 Fourth St, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1536. Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

N A PA CO U N TY Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103.

Boonfly Cafe California cuisine. $-$$. Extraordinary food in an extraordinary setting. Perfect pasta and mussels. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 4080 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.299.4900.

Bouchon French. $$$. A Keller brother creation with a distinctly Parisian bistro ambiance, offering French classics. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 6540 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8037. Coleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chop House American steakhouse. $$-$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dry-aged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.244.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

The business license posted says La Mixteca, but otherwise, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never know what to call this Roseland pop-up that for the last several months has been setting up shop after the sun goes down on Sebastopol Road in Santa Rosa. But names are irrelevant: the place is great. Tucked beneath a tent and a string of lights in an unused lot near an auto shop, the family in charge cooks up homestyle Mexican dishesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;tacos, sopes, enchiladasâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all in the cramped confines of an outdoor kitchen. After ordering, visitors open a sliding glass door to a shed-like room painted a vibrant green; three long, communal tables are filled with families, farmworkers and neighborhood residents, all eating together. On offer is tomatillo sauce, red salsa, onions and cilantro, laid out in bowls upon the tables; drinks are in a self-service fridge. And though the atmosphere is no-frills and casual (after one pays, a seven-year-old daughter makes change), the food is excellent. The posole is a special treat (above), with soaked maize, chiles and a chunk of carne served in a flavorful soup; cabbage is optional, and the large bowl comes in well under $10. The chile relleno is stuffed liberally with cheese thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s notably spicier than most, and served with beans and rice. On a recent night, the place even had fried chicken available. Amid the chatter of the dining room, the several cars parked diagonally in the driveway and the throng of people gathered to wait for pickup, La Mixteca is looking to be one of Roselandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best pop-ups worth checking outâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;while it lasts. 1905 Sebastopol Road, Santa Rosa.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Gabe Meline

Go Fish Seafood/sushi. $$$$$. An Ăźber-trio of chefs all in one fantastic fresh fish house: Cindy Pawlcyn, Victor Scargle and Ken Tominaga. Need we say more? Open for lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily.

933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28â&#x20AC;&#x201C;OCTOBE R 4, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

17

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 28 – O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Harvest Fair Double Gold Winner!

Gluten Free

Raspberry Darjeeling Muffin Come in early!

Wineries

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

100 TEAS! Serving organic cuisine daily—vegan options

6988 McKinley St, Sebastopol

(next to Whole Foods) 707.829.1181

sonomachocolatiers.com

SONOMA CO U N TY

stop: Côte-Rôtie on the way to Beaune. 8400 Graton Road, Sebastopol. Thursday-Monday 10am-4:30pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.829.8500.

percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Alexander Valley Vineyards At family-run

Topel Winery Hailing from

On the Edge A key stop

Hopland, Topel offers estategrown Meritage and other wines in this well-appointed tasting room with casement windows open to the street, across from Oakville Grocery. Cedar, chicory, chocolate and brown spice–makes one hungry for a portobello-mushroomon-focaccia sandwich. 125 Matheson St., Hopland. Open daily, 11am–7pm. Tasting fees, $5–$12. 707.433.4116.

for devotees of the cult to Charbono. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 707.942.7410.

Alexander Valley Vineyards, the Wetzels serve as curators of local history, having restored Cyrus’ original adobe and schoolhouse. 8644 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Tasting room open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.433.7209.

Gary Farrell The namesake is gone but the quality remains. Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 10701 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.473.2900.

Lambert Bridge Winery On gloomy

SANTA ROSA SEAFOOD MARKET

Best Chinese Restaurant

Local & Exotic

Largest selection of oysters Over 15 varieties Local King Salmon available NOW! Also at Windsor & Santa Rosa Farmers Markets

Wed–Sat, 11-6:30pm Sun until 5:30

707.280.2285

946 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa corner of SR Ave & Petaluma Hill Rd

santarosaseafood.com

now available on draft at Oliver’s Marke Market et hand crafted in small batches with organic/fair trade ingredients ingrredients

Best Chinese in Marin

Homestyle Chinese Cooking

Novato • 415-892-8838 Vintage Oak Shopping Center

Petaluma • 707-762-6888 Theater Square, C Street & 2nd W W W. J E N N I E L O W. C O M

afternoons, a string of lights and a curl of smoke from the stone chimney make this Dry Creek landmark all the more inviting. Chandelierilluminated redwood cellar is a warm setting to sample meticulously crafted Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Zin and claret. 4085 West Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.431.9600.

Lynmar Winery Produces world-class Pinot and Chard in elegant rural setting. Look for fun food pairings. 3909 Frei Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.829.3374. Marimar Estate A great stop for locals on a Sunday drive. And the Pinot is fantastic. 11400 Graton Road, Sebastopol Open daily, 11am–4pm. 707.823.4365. Martin Ray Focus is on

deliciously refreshing kombucha soda

mountain Cab. And continuing the old tradition, folks can pick up a gallon of hearty Round Barn Red for $13. 2191 Laguna Road, Santa Rosa. Summer hours, daily, 11am–5pm. 707.823.2404.

Red Car Wine Co. Lay

sustainably created, brewed, fermented, bottled in Sonoma County

revivedrinks.com

facebook.com/revive facebook.com/revivedrinks edrinks

some track to the “Gateway to Graton” and take your palate on a ride with Boxcar Syrah and Trolley Pinot from Sonoma Coast vineyards. Next

Woodenhead Damn good wine. Pinot, Zin–yum, yum, yum. 5700 River Road, Santa Rosa. Open Thursday– Monday, 10:30am–4:30pm. 707.887.2703.

N A PA CO U N TY Brown Estate Vineyards (WC) A beautifully restored and converted stone and redwood barn is the winery and tasting room facility at Brown Estate. And the construction of a 6,500square-foot subterranean wine cave was completed in 2005. Visitors are currently limited to wine club members by appointment only. 3233 Sage Canyon Road, Napa. 707.963.2435.

Clos Pegase Winery (WC) Practically an art museum. A 2,800-square-foot “cave theater” plays frequent host to parties and more. Tasting flight of four wines, red and white, $10. 1060 Dunaweal Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 800.366.8583.

Corison Winery Winemaker Cathy Corison proudly describes herself as a “Cabernet chauvinist.” 987 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.0826.

Cuvaison Estate Wines (WC) Producing some 65

Peju Province Vineyards Talented staff, terrific food pairings and fantastic Cab. 8466 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–6pm. 707.963.3600.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Schramsberg (WC) Sparkling wine at its best. The “tasting room” is a branch of the cave illuminated with standing candelabras. 1400 Schramsberg Road, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4558.

Smith-Madrone Riesling is Smith-Madrone’s main fame claim. Its Riesling has steadily gained fame while Napa Valley Riesling in general has become a rare antique. 4022 Spring Mountain Road, St. Helena. By appointment. 707.963.2283. Somerston Wine Co. Ambitious ranch and winery inclues utility-vehicle “buggy” rides by appointment. The cheese shop and grocery opens in April. All that and wine, too. 6488 Washington St., Yountville. Tasting room open noon-8pm Monday–Thursday; to 9pm, Friday–Saturday; to 10pm, summer. Tastings $15– $40. Ranch tours by appointment, $50. 707.944.8200.

Stag’s Leap Wine Cellars (WC) Their three estate-grown Cabs are among the most highly regarded in the world. 5766 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2020.

Spann Vineyards

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apa has long eclipsed Sonoma in terms of name recognition, to the point where Silicon Valley weekenders can sometimes be overheard describing their whereabouts while standing in Healdsburg Plaza, “I’m in Napa.” But the old town of Sonoma is bested by none in terms of history. The site of the too short-lived California Republic, and home to historic buildings left behind by progress during long, sleepy decades, today Sonoma is thronged with summertime tourists and sightseers year-round. Autumn is a fine time to make a day of it; parking is rarely a hassle, and one needn’t feel underdressed amid the dear, ambling tourists. For longtime residents like me, the town’s history is doubled with personal nostalgia of childhood visits to the historic adobes, free cheese at the Sonoma Cheese Factory, and a first bottle of fizzy wine cooler enjoyed on the Plaza after employing an effective Jedi mind trick—or so I imagined, at, ahem, age 17—on an unsuspecting corner store clerk. Alas, the corner store is gone, but happily for wine tasters of a legitimate age, Sonoma is catching up with its neighbors in tasting rooms. An organization called the Sonoma Wine Walk lists no less than 16 within a few blocks of the plaza. Spann Vineyards is the newest tasting room, sharing space with a photography gallery where limited edition black and white prints are available for upward of $32,000, while color wine country prints by Bob Nixon fetch in the more moderate $700s. Peter and Betsy Spann come to the business with a keen appreciation of territory— not to be confused with terroir, but they’ve got that, too: Peter got his start recommending French wines to New Orleans restaurant patrons, then worked as an importer and distributor before planting a vineyard in Glen Ellen. Ninety percent of Spann wines are distributed out of state, leaving a little aside to pour just off the Plaza. Naturally, the Spanns favor Bordeaux styles. Having quit their day jobs in the past several years, they handle winemaking themselves. The list features some appealing Chardonnay, Malbec, and Mourvedre, while the standout selection hails from the home vineyard. The 2006 Mayacamas Range Cabernet Sauvignon ($35), with nutmeg and tobacco leaf aromas, has focused chocolate liqueur and cassis flavors, and the lean profile of product from this side of the mountains. The take-home bargain is the 2008 Classic Four ($20), with floral, cherry aromas and immediately appealing black cherry flavor. With this quality at these prices, one can definitely phone in to one’s associates: we’re not in Napa anymore. Spann Vineyards, 111 East Napa Street, Sonoma. Open daily, 12 to 6pm. Tasting fee. 707.933.8343.—James Knight

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The 2011 Boho Awards: Standing Ovation

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pplause is a funny thing. No one can be positive how the practice started, but somewhere in our evolution, standing up in unison and beating our palms together to create a sound became the go-to method for saying “good job.” Is it an instinctive action in humans, or was it an intentional creation? We’ll never know. Applause is also usually directed at the star of the show, when, let’s face it, the star oftentimes does very little in relation to the stage manager, the promoter, the sound engineer, the guy who sweeps up afterward. Where is the applause for these people? Like teachers and plumbers, they finish their job and are left with gales of silence, forced to be content with a job well done. The Boho Awards serves as their applause. For 14 years now, these awards have honored those who’ve made significant contributions to the arts in the North Bay. Most of the honorees are behind-the-scenes individuals or organizations responsible for bringing the inspiration and and passion of the arts into a public arena, whose sole satisfaction is standing in the wings and knowing they helped create someone else’s shining moment. This year, we pull these people out of the wings and give them their curtain call. People like Robin Pressman, who as program director of the North Bay’s most robust public radio station brings news, music and arts over the airwaves on KRCB-FM; people like Donna Seager, whose keen eye has brought untold artists, and in particular book artists, into the public eye; people like Paul and Leilani Slack who constructively create opportunities for young musicians and emerging artists in the adult-oriented city of Napa; people like Gary and Linda McLaughlin of Russian River Chamber Music, who have incredibly been presenting free classical performances for 20 years; and finally, the many people behind the Sonoma County Book Festival, which puts focus annually and squarely on the literary arts. All of this applause, of course, is long overdue. Without further ado, it’s time to stand up and cheer. —Gabe Meline

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Awards Alma Shaw

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A HUB FOR CULTURE Pressman has been nurturing the arts at KRCB since day one.

Making Radio Waves Robin Pressman broadcasts Sonoma County’s hidden artists BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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lot of radio stations,” observes Robin Pressman, “when they are choosing the music they play, work from the idea that when a listener hears something they are familiar with—a piece of music they know really well—they get a special kind of good feeling. . . At KRCB, with programs like Our Roots Are Showing, we do some of that, definitely—but we’re also devoted to exploring great new music, artists you’re being introduced to for the first time. I love that people discover new favorites through the music we play. I can’t say that we’re star-makers, but we are definitely giving voice to people who don’t necessarily get a voice in today’s media.” As program director of KRCBFM, Pressman has been diligently giving voice to the voiceless for more than 16 years, making her a clearly obvious recipient for this year’s Boho Awards. At 90.9 FM, KRCB radio— arguably Sonoma County’s most

influential and innovative public radio station—has developed a large and varied slate of on-air programs, many designed by Pressman specifically to serve and support the artists of Sonoma County. (Full disclosure: I host one of them.) These include the aforementioned Our Roots Are Showing (Saturdays, 1-5pm), the hugely popular roots-andfolk show Pressman co-hosts with Steve DeLap; Sonoma Spotlight, Roland Jacopetti’s pleasantly unfussy daily fiveminute interview show (9am, Monday through Friday); Curtain Call (Fridays at noon), host Charles Sepos’ articulate weekly conversation with classical musicians, poets, theater artists, authors and others; Arts ID, an occasional magazine-style show with artists as its primary focus. The list goes on and on. “I’ve always seen my job as trying to provide a hub for the community, particularly a hub for cultural life,” says Pressman.

“From the beginning, I wanted KRCB to be a station that that would champion the arts, that would nurture and represent the arts—in every possible way.” Raised in Kentucky, Pressman moved to New York in fourth grade, and eventually went to film school in southern Illinois, where she fell in love with documentary films. After a number of years working bicoastally in Hollywood and New York (“By then I’d gotten sidetracked into a career in commercials,” she explains), Pressman and husband Peter Cooper relocated to Sonoma County. That was in 1993—a year before KRCB-FM officially went on the air. “When we got here, New York had become a very difficult place to live, so we were just thrilled to get away,” she says. “And I was excited at the people I was meeting in Sonoma County, the artists I was meeting, going to ARTrails, exploring the back country roads, finding hidden artist studios, going to theater, going to concerts, exploring everything. So it was a pretty exciting time.” In 1994, when KRCB radio started up and the call went out for volunteers, Pressman was among the very first to heed the call. “I remember getting the letter in the mail,” she laughs, “and immediately jumping in the car and driving to the station and saying, ‘Okay. How can I help?’” Eight months later, she was named KRCB’s program director. Sonoma County has grown a lot since then, and its art scene has grown right along with KRCB. On being elected as a recipient of the Boho Award this year, Pressman says, “I really don’t think this is an award for me, personally. I really see this as an award for KRCB, and everyone who works here, including all of the many volunteers. Our intention has always been to celebrate the arts, to celebrate artists, and to encourage participation in the arts. “That,” she adds, “is one of the most important things we do, to honor and point out creativity— because there is so much creativity here in Sonoma County.”

Alma Shaw

CHAMBER CHAMPION McLaughlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free concert series is in its 20th year.

Music for Everyone

Russian River Chamber Music offers free classical concerts for all BY GABE MELINE

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or the past 20 years, Russian River Chamber Music (RRCM) has brought world-renown classical musicians to Sonoma County. The chamber concerts have ranged from vocal performances and horn quartets to well-known string quartets often featured in the New York Times. This alone would make a substantial case for notice, but whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most laudableâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the reason we honor them on their 20th anniversary with a Boho Awardâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is that Russian River Chamber Music concerts are absolutely free. As an art form in ever-present danger of dying, classical music, and chamber music in particular, is perpetually in need of a broader audience. How better to broaden that audience than by presenting free performances? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we do make converts,â&#x20AC;? says RRCM co-founder Gary McLaughlin, whose brief stint as a social worker in downtown Los Angeles in the 1950s might

well have colored his populist viewpoint. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are people living on the streets, and there are people who are living in poverty,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and the only way theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be exposed to classical music is if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free.â&#x20AC;? McLaughlin has seen that exact scenario play out time and again. Many of those who show up to one concert keep coming back. Some of them have eventually joined on as volunteers. At least one now serves on the board of directors. All of them are living proof that Russian River Chamber Music is successfully keeping classical music alive and well. McLaughlin grew up near the Watts Towers in Los Angeles and was ďŹ rst exposed to classical music in the ďŹ fth grade, when he began playing violin in school. After college, he moved to Michigan, where he taught at the University of Michigan and toured in the resident string quartet there. In Oregon, while working for the Oregon Coast

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Music Festival, he met his future wife, Linda; the two relocated to Healdsburg and wasted no time putting on their ďŹ rst concert. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had standing ovations, got a good crowd,â&#x20AC;? McLaughlin recalls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And we said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I guess weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gonna have to go ahead with this.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The town had never had anything like this, and they responded so well.â&#x20AC;? A board of directors was chosen, and one of them, Tom Barnett, suggested that all the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concerts be free. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy it right away,â&#x20AC;? admits McLaughlin now. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty counterintuitive. But he made a case for it, and I thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Well, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pretty out-of-the-box idea, but it just might work. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s try it.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; And it seemed to be successful.â&#x20AC;? So successful that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lasted 20 years, and spanned venues ranging from churches, bakeries, cafes, galleries, wineries and theaters. The RRCM still uses Healdsburg Community Churchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the site of the very ďŹ rst concert, 20 years ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a nice big space,â&#x20AC;? McLaughlin says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no pews in there, a little stage, backstage rooms, plenty of parking, fairly close to downtown, and the acoustics are great.â&#x20AC;? Linda and Gary McLaughlin are no longer married, but the two still work side by side. Recently, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve expanded their emphasis on education, working with schools to provide instruments and teaching. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a natural pursuit for McLaughlin, who in addition to playing in the Glendeven String Quartet is part of the adjunct music faculty at the Santa Rosa Junior College. Two seasons ago, RRCM experimented with charging for concerts. When receipts roughly equaled the donations from the free concerts, and for the sake of larger audiences, the concerts became free once again. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just ďŹ ne with McLaughlin, even while pointedly mentioning that donations are always needed. Still, he knows that despite the obstacles, RRCM is doing the right thing for chamber music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always thought,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;that the broadest audience possible is best for any art form.â&#x20AC;?

Awards Leilani Clark

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DISCOVERING GOLD Donna Seager is a North Bay pioneer in book art.

Doorways of Art

Donna Seager exhibits the North Bay’s visual richness BY LEILANI CLARK

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tepping through the doors of Donna Seager Gallery in downtown San Rafael, an afternoon visitor is greeted with a welcoming smile from gallery assistant Suzanne McSweeney. Beyond the entry and into the current exhibition space, Berkeley-based artist Emily Payne’s wire-ball sculptures hover sweetly, tucked amongst light-drenched paintings and installations by other emerging Bay Area artists. In the middle is an entire room dedicated to book arts, and nearby, two high school students lounge casually on the floor, sketching in notebooks. Seager, owner and director of the gallery since 2005, greets the girls warmly. “Galleries have this reputation for being stuffy and intimidating,” Seager says, when asked about the inclusive environment. “But we definitely don’t have that reputation. I don’t want it to be intimidating. I want people to find a doorway into the art world.” It’s for this non-hierarchal approach, her dedication to the

North Bay arts scene, as well as her passionate support for book arts, that we are glad to make Donna Seager a 2011 Boho Award recipient. Raised in New Orleans, Seager bought her first print with money saved from babysitting after attending an exhibit by Françoise Gilot, Pablo Picasso’s former lover and a talented artist in her own right. “It was a little piece called ‘Air,’ says Seager, today wearing a black shift and a hand-crafted silver necklace. “I’d just read Life with Picasso. I was 17. That print cost me $300 unframed. That to me, at the time, was a lot of money. They let me pay a little bit at a time and I still have it.” Bit by the art bug, she spent a year saving money and working as cook on a charter sailboat, going on to double-major in Art History and English at the University of Texas. A love for art and books flourished, providing seeds that would grow into an annual “Art of the Book” show, an exhibition of handmade and altered books that takes over the

gallery each spring. “What started out as a fascination has really ended up distinguishing me as a dealer and opened a lot of doors for me,” says Seager of the book show. “It was just all so fortuitous.” After some years spent directing a gallery in Boston, Seager moved to San Francisco in 1989. “I’d always had a love of Bay Area art, since first seeing some figurative Diebenkorns at the New Orleans Museum of Art,” says Seager. “I loved it and I still love it.” She eventually landed at the Robert Green Fine Arts in Mill Vallley, spending 10 years cultivating relationships with artists and collectors. After a stint at CFA Gallery in Marin, she decided to break out on her own, leasing the current space on Fourth Street. “You start developing your own aesthetic. You want to make your own choices,” she says. Being on her own allowed Seager to focus on the Art of the Book exhibitions; it was a medium she delved into after being introduced to Charles Hobson, an instructor in the Printmaking Department at the San Francisco Art Institute and a major book arts collector. “As it happens, in the Bay Area, there is some of the richest history of people making books as a medium for art,” says Seager. “It was like discovering this rich vein of gold in the ground. . . Not only did I enjoy the work I was encountering, I enjoyed the community.” Seager is soon switching things up a bit when she takes on McSweeney as a business partner; they’ll close the San Rafael location and reopen in Mill Valley on Nov. 1 as Seager-Gray Gallery. While change is afoot, her dedication to emerging artists and artist’s books remains as strong as ever. “Marin and the North Bay is a huge community of artists,” says Seager. “A place like this, with its beautiful light and natural beauty, attracts people who have artistic sensibilities. They need galleries to show their work, give it context, and to bring it out to a larger world.”

Gabe Meline

AWAY, PASTEL LANDSCAPES! The Slacks showcase Napa’s rich DIY underground.

Taking Up the Slack Paul and Leilani Slack provide opportunities for Napa’s underground BY GABE MELINE

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loom Creative Hair Design shares a block in downtown Napa with the Napa Valley Opera House and Ubuntu Restaurant & Yoga Studio, but one step inside and a visitor knows that Bloom is no ordinary wine country destination. A current exhibit of tattoo and tattoo-inspired art hangs on the walls; at night, underground bands might play among the styling stations. Across the street, at Bloom salon, even rawer, more political art adorns the space. Through a back hallway is Slack Collective Studios, where 13 different artists rent studio space for just $150 a month, and where canvases, silkscreen equipment, custom shoes, zines and sculptures pack every square foot. Stapled high on a loft is a T-shirt that says it all: “Shut Up and Make Something.” It feels a million miles away from the Napa of wine country weekends

and tourist magazines, and that’s just the way Paul and Leilani Slack like it. With their downtown endeavors, along with underground events held outside of town at their Slack Ranch, the Slacks are changing the status quo in Napa in the best possible way—not by complaining, or fighting, but by shutting up and making something. A lot of things, in fact. Throw their upcoming InDIYpendent Culture Fair into the mix, and the jury has reached a consensus: it’s time to give these people a Boho Award. “When I moved to Napa, it wasn’t a very solid artistic community, where people are really into what each other are doing, and making something bigger out of the individual perspective into something collective,” says Paul. “That’s a goal of mine, where people can come together.” Come together they have, and often under the umbrella of some

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Slack-related project or in a Slackrelated venue. Both Paul and Leilani cite the formation of the group Wandering Rose several years ago as an inspiration to keep opening doors for the younger generation; as Paul says, “it was really exciting for me to see some young people, for the first time in the whole 17 years I’ve lived here, to see those young people stepping up and taking initiative to get things happening.” Leilani herself knows what little opportunities for teenagers exist in a city geared specifically for those over 21, having spent her formative teen years in Napa. “If you wanted to do anything, you had to go out of town,” she says. “I’m surprised more people didn’t get into drugs and become alcoholics, because that’s all there was to do for kids in Napa back then.” Paul, a bassist in the band Planets, moved to Napa from Sacramento to live on land that’s been in the family since the 1860s. (“It’s three acres that are left out of literally hundreds of acres of property,” he says of the homestead, “99 percent of it is all vineyards now.”) That same night, upon arrival, he held a show at the ranch, walking through downtown Napa beforehand and inviting strangers to see live music. Last year, the Slacks decided to take the reins of the InDIYpendent Culture Fair, a day-long event in a warehouse with live painting, bike repair workshops, craft workshops, belly dancers, fire spinners, baby goats and a taco truck. This year, the InDIYpendent Culture Fair on Oct. 1 will be held on the 950 block of Pearl Street, near the Slack Collective Studios, with the street closed to traffic. So far, interest has been massive. “I was thinking I would have to go to these businesses on the block and explain the whole theory of DIY, and the punk ethic, but they were already in—just like that,” Paul says. “It’s amazing. I think that everybody has some sort of that ethic in them.” With their continued support of emerging artists and their open-door policy to nearly anyone wanting to use their performance spaces, Paul and Leilani Slack are improving their city not simply by making the best of Napa, but as Paul pointedly says, “building the best of it.” Here’s hoping their construction is ongoing.

Awards Leilani Clark

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 28 – O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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PAGE TURNERS Melissa Kelley, second from left, and volunteers at the festival.

A Love of Reading Sonoma County Book Festival a haven for authors, readers alike

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BY LEILANI CLARK

O

n a recent Saturday afternoon with fall in the air, the Sonoma County Book Festival set up in downtown Santa Rosa. Transformed into an open-air market and piled with books and authors, Fourth Street became a utopia for bibliophiles, where engaged discussions about words and ideas are the norm— rather than geeky anomalies in screen-entranced world. If the buzz around this annual festival is any indication, a community of book lovers is still very much alive and well in Sonoma County. “It’s joyful, a really uplifting experience,” says Executive Director Melissa Kelley, still buzzing two days after the 2011 book fest had drawn to a close. “It helps create community. People who love books can come together and say, ‘This is a special place for me and people like me.’” For 12 years, the book festival, under the umbrella of the Literary Arts Guild—a nonprofit organization that recently

adopted the Sonoma County Bookmobile—has provided a place where authors and readers from all over the Bay Area can immerse themselves in the literary arts. For this dedication, we are pleased to award the Sonoma County Book Festival a 2011 Boho Award. The origins for the festival lie in a vision for a literary festival first proposed by Dana Gioia, former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, and Jack Stuppin, a Sonoma County landscape painter, explains Kelley. Years later, the festival has become a highly anticipated event in the North Bay literary community—a feat of wonder for an almost entirely volunteer-run event. Kelley has led the Sonoma County Book Festival for two years. She is the only paid staff. A crew of dedicated volunteers is responsible for the book fest’s functioning, one this year that included expanded teen programming, storytelling at Corrick’s, a vibrant children’s area

and writer Maxine Hong Kingston at La Rosa Tequileria and Grille. Armando Garcia-Davila is one of those many volunteers. Every year (“He’s been doing it as long as I know,” says Kelley), the dedicated logistics committee member heads down to Courthouse Square on the eve of the festival to tape off sections and start prepping for the next day. He returns at 5am to give directions to rental crews. . . all on his own time. “We have people involved throughout the entire year that are actually putting the festival together,” says Kelley. Volunteers spearhead the various committees: publicity, poetry, author committees, children’s committees, logistics and a general steering committee. A coordinator works to make sure the 70 to 80 volunteers that show up on the day of the festival know exactly where to go and what to do. But really, why all the hard work for no pay in an era when the demise of the book is predicted on a daily basis, thanks to the Kindle and e-readers? Kelley says it’s all about giving readers a chance to interact with their favorite literary folk, and giving authors the chance to get out from under their computer keyboards and into the world. “People who are just beginning to enter the world of writing have the opportunity to rent a booth and have people stop by and talk to them about being an author,” explains Kelley. “It gives them validation they might not have otherwise.” Furthermore, on a whole, seasoned authors, self-publishing companies, booksellers and publishing houses have a limited opportunity to reach audiences in person, says Kelley. “They really enjoy the opportunity to be face to face with readers,” she adds. Heavily dependent on donations for support, the Sonoma County Book Festival continues to thrive. If the large amount of families in attendance is any indication, new audiences amongst rising generations will proudly wear the badge of “book lover”—and the Sonoma County Book Festival will be there to provide a space for them.

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

N A PA

GUERNEVILLE

R O H N E R T PA R K

FORESTVILLE

Country Royalty

Light Into Ashes

Imagine

Gourds Galore

Every October, the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival invites a host of talent to Golden Gate Park—and luckily for us, some local venues intercept the spillover. Napa’s Uptown Theatre welcomes country music royalty Emmylou Harris (Sept. 28; 8pm; $75-$85) and Merle Haggard (Sept. 30; 8pm; $80-$90), both playing the grand weekend festival just afterward. Over 40 and 50 years into their careers respectively, Harris and Haggard boast resumes nearly unrivaled in the country music biz; see why they’re in the Hall of Fame on Sept. 28 and 30 at the Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St., Napa. 7pm. $75$90. 707.259.0123.

Deadheads unite! Over 30 years after Jerry Garcia graced the River Theater’s stage with the Jerry Garcia Band, the reopened venue welcomes Grateful Dead tribute band Dark Star Orchestra. Now almost 2,000 concerts into their career, Dark Star Orchestra bring their eclectic, all-American style to the venerable Guerneville theater. The band has appeared on stage with former Grateful Dead members including Bob Weir, Bob Kreutzmann and Donna Jean Godchaux. Come go through the transitive nightfall of diamonds on Thursday, Sept. 29, at the River Theater. 16135 Main St., Guerneville. 9pm. $28. 707.869.8022.

Imagine all the people—carrying on the John Lennon legacy. Love is the Answer: The Concert for John Lennon celebrates and salutes the man who popularized the notions of peace and love through his music. The Plastic Fauxno Band presents a two-and-a-half-hour concert that stands to answer the question, what might Lennon have played if he were still alive today? The concert will span Lennon’s entire solo career, from “Imagine” and “Power to the People” to “Starting Over.” The legacy continues on Saturday, Oct. 1, at Spreckels Performing Arts Center. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 8pm. $26-$28. 707.588.3400.

Rarely is gourd art at the center of attention. But once a year, Food for Thought, a Sonoma County food bank serving people living with AIDS and HIV, introduces these squash-turned-art creations to the limelight for one glorious day. The Calabash Festival includes close to 100 examples of original, avant-garde gourd art, available during a silent auction. Admission to the event includes wine along with seasonal hors d’oeuvres and gourd musicians creating the appropriate festive atmosphere. Get out of your gourd on Sunday, Oct. 2, at Food for Thought’s organic gardens. 6550 Railroad Ave., Forestville. 1pm-5pm. $45-$50. 707.887.1647.

—Lacie Schwarz

27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28- OCTOBE R 4, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

BEST NEW ARTIST Esperanza Spalding plays Oct. 2 at the Uptown Theatre. See Concerts, p31.

Stage Eric Chazankin

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EN GARDE! Rahman Dalrymple

wields his mighty blade as Harry Kite.

Sword Play Tired of the Drive?

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Sixth Street’s ‘Kite’s Book’ takes rousing risks BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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his will be a first for us,” says Craig Miller, Artistic Director of Santa Rosa’s Sixth Street Playhouse. “I don’t believe there’s been anyone drawn and quartered on our stage before!”

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Drawing and quartering, for those unfamiliar with such arcane forms of medieval punishment, describes the process of chaining a prisoner’s arms and legs to four different horses, each sent off in a different direction, effectively dividing the victim into four separate pieces. It was, in its day, quite obviously a death sentence. In the opening moments of Kite’s Book: Tales of an 18th Century Hitman, a young convict stands before his accusers,

moments away from his own drawing and quartering, relating how his adventurous life has landed him in such an undesirable position. Then a lot of sword fighting happens. Says Miller, “I would say that, for those who remember the days of the Actors Theater, Kite’s Book is more of an Actors Theater type of show than much of what we’ve been presenting over the last few years. It’s grittier. It a little darker, and the humor is . . . well, that’s pretty dark too. Kite’s Book is probably best described as a contemporary play that just happens to be set in London of the 1700s, when people’s notion of justice was a bit . . . intense.” Written by Robert Caisley and directed by Miller (with rousing fight choreography by Marty Pistone), Kite’s Book is described by the director as a swashbuckling, action-packed adventure about government corruption, human imperfection and the ways class distinctions inform our notions of punishment and justice. “Poverty leads to crime,” Miller says. “And crime leads to punishment. And fair punishment is determined by how far you are above the poverty level. It was true hundreds of years ago—and it’s still true today.” Caisley’s play—inspired in part by the sensational televised murder trials of the 1990s—follows killer-for-hire Harry Kite (Rahman Dalrymple), who has his own sense of justice, determining whom he is willing to dispatch and who he isn’t. “Harry Kite,” says Dairyimple of the colorful character he plays, “definitely has a strange and bizarre moral compass. To me, he’s like an 18th century version of the TV character Dexter. Like him, Kite has a blind spot. He hasn’t delved into all the corners of why he is the way he is. “But in the course of the play,” he chuckles, “Kite is forced to look hard into some of those corners.” ‘Kite’s Book: Tales of an 18th Century Hitman’ runs Thursday-Sunday through October 23 at Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth Street, Santa Rosa. Thursday-Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees, Sundays. $15-$32. 707.523.4185.

Film

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Can Cancer Be Funny? ‘50/50’ fights death with laughter BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

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0/50, whose alternate title could be So/So, has a pair of first-rate actors in the lead, Anna Kendrick and Joseph Gordon-Levitt. Their work is regularly disrupted by Seth Rogen. In regularly scheduled bullish comedy moments, Rogen’s Kyle turns up to rattle the cage of the seriously ill Adam (Gordon-Levitt). Rather than just the sketchily drawn victim of a dread form of cancer, Adam may be a kind of a princeling. He’s a bit remote, and it’s interesting to see one of the best young actors around underplaying it while finding some humorous notes (a cool slow-mo saunter through the hospital, heavily stoned on marijuana macaroons). Adam is vaguely a radio journalist, with a Charlie Parker poster, but doesn’t seem to listen to jazz. He has a menorah, but doesn’t seem Jewish in the customary movie sense: he’s neither sarcastically verbal nor menschy. He’s defined mainly by the contrast between the two girls in the picture. One is Adam’s live-in Rachael (Bryce Dallas Howard, doing what she can with yet another punitive part). The other is Katie, the inexperienced grief counselor (Kendrick, unusually cast in a role of toothy embarrassment). Rogen is the shot caller and a lecherous wreck. Rogen’s ultimate contribution to cinema is taking the fun out of that game where you pretend that the hero and his buddy are lovers; with Rogen, bromance has to go ever further to get the outraged laughs, ever closer to the unambiguous, direct sexual come-on. On the bright side, this may be the least spiritual film about facing death we’ve seen. And the mood is right: donating a fog-bound despair is Vancouver, clearly not the Seattle it’s pretending to be. (No one worries about the hospital bills, for instance.) Anjelica Huston is tigerish as Adam’s mom, and Philip Baker Hall gives a surprisingly big endorsement of those magic cookies. As elder actors, they spice up the film in all the right ways.

For tickets call 707.546.3600 (noon-6pm Tue-Sat) Online wellsfargocenterarts.org

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SOMBER BROS Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Seth Rogen in this unusual comedy.

Film

Live Jazz every Thursday & Friday H A P P Y HOUR HAPPY HOU R Mon–Thurs Mon –Thurs 5–7pm 5 –7pm

Film capsules by Nicholas Berandt, Leilani Clark, Lacie Schwarz and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES

on a James Sallis novel. (NB)

50/50 (R; 99 min.) Kyle (Seth Rogen) uses

African American maids in the South at the dawn of the Civil Rights movement is based on Kathryn Stockett’s bestselling debut novel. (NB)

any and every means necessary—sex, drugs and profanity—in this heavy-hearted comedy to help his best friend Adam (Joseph GordonLevitt) cope with a recent cancer diagnosis. (LS)

U PS C A L E L UPSCALE LOUNGE OU N G E & LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

Dream House (PG-13; 92 min.) Yet another haunted house film that aims to scare the viewer into questioning what’s really hiding underneath the bed. Daniel Craig proves yet again that he’s the alpha male in this suspensethriller that places an unknowing family in to a house with a murderous past. (LS) Margaret (R; 149 min.) 17-year-old Lisa Cohen (Anna Paquin), who believes she has inadvertently played a role in a traffic accident that left a woman dead, realizes the world of youthful ideals in which she was raised is in stark opposition to the realities and complexities of the real world. (LS)

What’s Your Number? (R; 106 min.) With a face that begs the question “Where have I seen this girl before?,” Anna Faris stars as a hopelessly single woman who believes one of her many ex-boyfriends may have been “the one” that got away. (NB)

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Abduction (PG-13; 106 min.) Taylor Lautner stars in this thriller about young man who discovers his baby photo on a missing persons website. Adventures ensue when he discovers that his true identity is a thing of danger. With Sigourney Weaver and Alfred Molina. Directed by John Singleton (Boyz n the Hood). (LC)

Contagion (R; 105 min.) Acclaimed director Steven Soderbergh and an all-star cast add their two cents to the disaster genre in thriller about a fast-spreading virus and the society in ruins it leaves behind. Costars Matt Damon, Jude Law, Kate Winslet, Gwyneth Paltrow and Laurence Fishburne. (NB)

The Debt (R; 114 min.) English remake of 2007 Israeli suspense film about Mossad agents who learn mission 30 years earlier to bring a Nazi war criminal to justice may not have been successful after all. Stars Helen Mirren. (NB)

Dolphin Tale (PG; 113 min.) A young boy (Nathan Gamble) becomes friends with a dolphin that has become seriously injured by a crab trap. Morgan Freeman plays the doctor who creates a prosthetic tail for the creature. Based on a true story, the film also stars Harry Connick Jr. and Ashley Judd. (LC)

Drive (R; 100 min.) Ryan Gosling plays a Hollywood stuntman moonlighting as a getaway driver for hire in action thriller based

The Help (PG-13; 137 min.) Drama about

I Don’t Know How She Does It (PG-13; 89 min.) And I don’t care. Reputedly, the source novel by Allison Pearson is witty. The film tries to recapture the strong narrative voice of the book with loads of voiceover, freeze frames and interviews with minor characters. It’s an alleged comic love triangle: executive mom juggling foibles, fighting off a crush on her boss (Pierce Brosnan) and clinging to her husband (Greg Kinnear). The dialogue contains chunks of 1965 era feminism, which are overwhelmed by the breed-now propaganda (“Trying to be a man is a waste of a woman”). (RvB) Killer Elite (PG-13; 105 min.) (R; 105 min.) Based on the 1991 novel The Feather Men by Ranulph Fiennes, this action-packed film tells the story of a member of Britain’s Elite Special Air Service who is called out of retirement after a series of assassinations. Starring Jason Statham (The Expendables), Clive Owen (Children of Men) and Robert De Niro. (LC)

Moneyball (R; 105 min.) (PG-13; 133 min.) Oakland A’s General Manager Billy Beane (Brad Pitt) builds a winning baseball team through a statistical system called sabermetrics. Co-stars Jonah Hill and Robin Wright. (LC)

Our Idiot Brother (R; 95 min.) Upbeat, New Agey, hippie-nouveau Ned (Paul Rudd) comes home to live with the family after some trouble with the law in new comedy costarring Elizabeth Banks, Steve Coogan, Zooey Deschanel and Emily Mortimer. (NB) Rise of the Planet of the Apes (PG-13; 105 min.) At Genesis, a Bay Area genetic tech lab of about 2012 or so, scientist Will Rodman (Palo Alto’s own James Franco) is working on a cure for Alzheimer’s. When a superintelligent baby lab chimp named Caesar (Andy Serkis) is ordered to be destroyed, Will brings him to his Peninsula home, and a San Francisco Zoo veterinarian (Freida Pinto) helps him raise the critter. This isn’t a demolition job but a handsomely done renovation. (RvB)

Shark Night (R; 91 min.) Late-summer blood and boobs for teens in thriller about young friends’ fun weekend ruined by sharks in a lake (note to self: check Wikipedia). In 3D, of course. (NB)

Straw Dogs (R; 109 min.) Unnecessary remake of Sam Peckinpah’s controversial 1972 classic stars James Marsden (X-Men) and Kate Bosworth (21, Superman Returns). (NB)

Warrior (PG-13; 140 min.) Troubled father, troubled son, booze, boxing in latest fight movie to hit the screen. Stars Nick Nolte. (NB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Bob Schneider Austin-based songsmith with a penchant for sweet melodies. Pat Jordan opens. Oct 2 at 7. $20-$20. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.7300.

Concert for John Lennon Plastic Fauxno Band perform songs from throughout Lennonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. Oct 1 at 8. $26$35. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park, 707.588.3400.

Concerts A-Zed Works by Walton, Wolf-Ferrari, Webern, Weill and two Wilsons in this monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alphabetthemed concert. Oct 2 at 7. Petaluma Museum, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma, 707.778.4398.

Dark Star Orchestra Live recreators of historic Grateful Dead shows. Sep 29 at 9. $25-$28. River Theatre, 16135 Main St, Guerneville, 707.869.3194.

David Bazan Pedro the Lion frontman has taken some fascinating, challenging turns in the last decade. Sep 28 at 8. $20. House concert, address provided with ticket, Santa Rosa. www.undertowtickets.com.

Friday Night Music Bring a picnic or indulge in food trucks for night of live music weekly, Fri at 5. Sep 30, Andrea Claburn. $5. MichelSchlumberger Winery, 4155 Wine Creek Rd, Healdsburg, 800.447.3060.

Guerneville Music on the Plaza Live summer music series. Sep 29, Passions. Downtown Guerneville Plaza, 16201 First Street, Guerneville.

Jazz in the Lobby Every Fri-Sat. Sep 30, Susan Sutton Duo. Oct 1, Ken Cook Trio. Free. Hotel Healdsburg, 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg, 707.431.2800.

Jazz It Up Summer wine and jazz concert series, Sat at 4. Oct 8, Mad and Eddie Duran Trio. Seasons of the Vineyard, 113 Plaza St,

Healdsburg, 707.431.2222.

Roots: Americana Open-air Americana fest featuring performances by Easy Leaves, Beso Negro and Misner & Smith. Oct 1, 4 to 7. Free. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa.

Saxon NWOBHM legendary warriors clad in denim and leather. With Canadian power metal act Borealis, and Skitzo, celebrating 30 years as a band. Oct 1 at 8. $25-$30. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.2343.

MARIN COUNTY Concerts Under the Oak Monthly concerts Fri evenings at 6:30. Sep 30, Shuffle Kings. Free. The Mall at Northgate, San Rafael, 415.479.5955.

31

Free Concert Series American Canyonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own jazz, rock and blues concert series. Oct 2, Coastal Zone Band. Free. Main Street Park, Highway 29, American Canyon.

Grand Night for Singers First Sat of the month at 7, vocalists from around Northern California and beyond take turns onstage. Piano accompaniment by host Richard Evans. $15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa, 707.255.5445.

Jose Feliciano Dazzling blind guitarist wellknown for version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Light My Fire.â&#x20AC;? Oct 1 at 8. $48-$58. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville, 707.944.1300.

Merle Haggard An American outlaw original with a family band and crew. Sep 30 at 7. $80-$90. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa, 707.259.0123.

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Friday Concert Series Get your groove on in the plaza monthly at 6. Sep 30, Juke Joint Band. Free. Pacheco Plaza, 366 Ignacio Blvd, Novato.

Totally Tchaikovsky Marin Symphony performs works by the Romantic composer. Oct 2 at 3; Oct 4 at 7:30. $29-$70. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, 415.499.6800.

Two Sets of Keys Eric Zivian and Katherine Heater perform works for piano and harpsichord composed by Dutilleux, Couperin and Debussy. Sep 29 at 8. $20-$25. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Bacon Brothers Movie star Kevin Bacon straps on a guitar and sings harmonies with his sibling. Sep 28 at 8. $25-$45. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.226.7372.

Emmylou Harris One of the most endearing voices in country music. Sep 29 at 7. $75-$85. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa, 707.259.0123.

Esperanza Spalding Recent Grammy winner and the biggest name in current

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Roma Roasters Sep 30, Solid Air. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe Last Thurs monthly, live improv with Slip-Goose Monkey (see Comedy). Sep 30, Machiavelvets. 189 H St, Petaluma, 707.778.6060.

Aubergine Wed at 7, open mic. Sep 29, Dead Winter Carpenters, Pine Needles. Sep 30, BrownChicken BrownCow, Dgiin. Oct 1, Nick Gravenites, Seabass. First Sun, Fresh (LGBT night). Tues at 7, ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; limelight open mic with Tawnie. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.2722.

DIN N E R & A SHOW Fri

Riding High on the Charts!

Sept 30 TERRY HANCK BAND Soulful Sax and Singing 8:30pm

Sat

Oct

Christyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the Square

Sun

Oct

HUSTLER 2 Rock and Roll

4:00pm / No Cover

Sat at 2, bluegrass jam. Mon at 6,

SAGE

Fri

Oct

7

Sun

9 KURT HUGET

Oct

Island Vibe 8:00pm / No Cover 4:00pm / No Cover

JOSE NETO

Rancho Debut! Rancho Debut!

ase CD Rerlety! Pa

International Guitar Hero in a Fundraising Event 7:30pm Fri

Oct 14 Oct 16

DAN HICKS & BAYSIDE JAZZ

Dance to Danâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Favorite Standards 8:30pm

JOE NEW

Original Americana 4:00pm / No Cover

77 EL DEORA

Alternative Country 7:00pm / No Cover

415.662.2219

Coffee Catz

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Locally Roasted Fair Trade Organic Coffee

Boogie Woogie and Swing 8:30pm

Sun

Every Wed, Gallery Wednesdays (live painting and DJs). 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa, 707.528.8565.

Yo el Rey Roasting

1 MITCH WOODS AND HIS ROCKET 88S

Centre du Vin Sep 30, Jess Petty. 480 First St East, Sonoma.

Outdoor Dining 7 Days A Week Reservations Advised

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

1217 Washington St, Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com 707.942.1180

CHILDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PPLAY CHILDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S L AY aann eexhibit xhibit of of dimensional dimensional paintings p aint ings bbyy W William illiam John John Callnan Callnan III III

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Music

jazz also happens to be on the White House playlist. Oct 2. $65. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa, 707.259.0123.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 28- O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Music ( 31

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CRITIC’S CHOICE ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

Flamingo Lounge Sep 30, Sugar Rush. Oct 1, Bone Drivers. Sun, salsa with lessons. Tues, swing night with lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.8530.

Best Music Venue / Best Place for Singles to Meet

French Garden Restaurant Sep 30, Blue & Lonesome. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol, 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden Sep 30, Greenhouse. Oct 1, Haute Flash Quartet. Every Tues, Jim Adams (jazz guitar). 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.544.2491.

Hopmonk Tavern Sep 28, Boho Awards and NorBay Awards party. Sep 29, Juke Joint pajama party. Sep 30, Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey. Oct 1, Music for Animals. Oct 2, Bob Schneider (see Concerts). Mon, Monday Night Edutainment. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.7300.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Sep 21, Brainstorm with Bleep Bloop. Sun, Open Mic. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Sep 28, Emma Lee Project. Sep 30, Acacia Collective. Oct 1, Dynamo Jones. Oct 2, Jason Bodlovich. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma, 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon Every Wed at 7, North Bay Hootenanny’s Pick-MeUp Revue. Sep 30, Young Dubliners, Mr December. Oct 1, Saxon (see Concerts). Mon, karaoke. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.2343.

Main Street Station Sep 29, Susan Sutton. Oct 1, Susan Sutton. Sun, Kit Mariah’s open mic. 16280 Main St, Guerneville, 707.869.0501.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Sep 29, Keeley Valentino. Sep 30, David Thom. Oct 1, Tony Gibson & Dawn Angelosaunte. Oct 2 at 3:30, Celtic jam; at 6:30, Magnolia Row. 464 First St, Sonoma, 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Sep 30, Reckless Kelly, Drifting Compass. Oct 1, Mark Hummel’s Blues Harmonica Blowout, Rod Piazza, Lazy Lester, Little Charlie Baty. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.765.2121.

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Work the Crowd 2011 Hardly Strictly lineup worth the packed park Of all the ways to describe the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival, Yogi Berra may have said it best: “Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.” Berra was describing a St. Louis restaurant when he uttered these words—not the festival. But it’s an entirely appropriate phrase to invoke each year when asked the inevitable: “You goin’ to Hardly Strictly?” The problem is this: walking from stage to stage is not an option at the festival anymore. Not only are attendees shoulder-to-veryclose-shoulder, but it’s impossible to visually see performers unless one arrives early, picks just one stage, lays down a blanket and stays put for the entire day. This year’s lineup, however, is enticing enough to fight the crowds. Staying at the Rooster Stage on Friday, Sept. 30, yields a unique lineup featuring Woods, Kurt Vile & The Violators, the Felice Brothers, M. Ward and Bright Eyes. The Towers of Gold Stage on Saturday, Oct. 1, has a what-the-hell lineup of Ricky Skaggs, Hugh Laurie, Broken Social Scene and Buckethead. Other notables this year include Thurston Moore (above), Robert Plant & The Band of Joy, Dr. John & The Lower 911, and Irma Thomas. Usual returnees flesh out this year’s lineup, including John Prine, Emmylou Harris, Steve Earle & The Dukes, Del McCoury, Robert Earl Keen and Gillian Welch—all excellent. The free festival runs Friday–Sunday, Sept. 30–Oct. 2, at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. For full schedule, see www.hardlystrictly.com.—Gabe Meline

Wed, Sept 28 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Country Dance Youth & Family 7–10pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Sept 29 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–8:45pm Circle ‘n Squares Square Dance Club 8:45–10pm New Dancer Class, Plus Dancing Fri, Sept 30 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7–11pm DJ Steve Luther hosts WEST COAST SWING PARTY Sat, Oct 1 8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise 10:30am–1:30pm Scottish Dance 7–11pm SINGLES & PAIRS HOEDOWN Sun, Oct 2 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10:30–11:30am ZUMBA GOLD WITH TONING 5–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Oct 3 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise Scottish Country Dancing

Tues, Oct 4 7:30–9pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:40pm Jazzercise African and World Music Dance

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28–OCTOBE R 4, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

open mic. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.6600.

Music ( 33

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Papa’s Taverna

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEPTE MBER 28 – O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Fri at 7, live music. Sat at 7 and Sun at 4, Kefi (Greek). Sun at 1:30, Greek dance lessons; at 3:30, live music and bellydance show. 5688 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma, 707.769.8545.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Oct 1, Pulsators. Oct 2, Dgiin. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido, 707.869.0821.

River Theatre Sep 29, Dark Star Orchestra (see Concerts). 16135 Main St, Guerneville, 707.869.3194.

The Rocks

Oct 1, Kate Price, Mare Wakefield. Address provided with tickets, Sebastopol, www. northbaylive.net.

Cecilia C ecilia A Armenta rmenta H Hallinan allinan September S eptember 3 30–November 0 – November 1 13, 3, 2 2011 011

A r tist Reception: Artist Reception: Saturday, S aturday, O October c to b e r 1 4–6pm 4 – 6pm H om a ge to Homage to Diego. D iego. Oilil iin O n ca canvas, nva s , 5 52” 2” X 5 52”, 2 ”, 2 2011 011

11-6 1 1- 6 Thurs–Mon Thurs – Mon (closed (closed Tues Tues & Weds) Weds)

707- 8 87- 079 9 q 707-887-0799 quicksilvermineco.com uick silvermin m eco.com 6 671 Front Front Street/Hwy Street/Hw y 116, 116 Downtown Downtown Forestville F o re s t v i l l e 6671

Sep 29, Ken Cook Trio. Sep 30, Salon con Clase. 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Sep 28, Nicholas Glover & Wray. Sep 29, Dogbone. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael, 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Rancho Nicasio Sep 30, Terry Hanck. Oct 1, Mitch Woods & Rocket 88s. Oct 2, Hustler. Town Square, Nicasio, 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Sep 29, Audrey Shimkas. Sep 30, Danny Click, Fiver Brown &

Good Sinners. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Sep 28, Dylan Flynn, Sam Doores, Alynda Lee. Sep 29, Steve Wolf & Teja Bell. Thurs at 9, Texas Blues. Sep 30, Big Dog Trouble. 23 Broadway, Fairfax, 415.485.1182.

Smiley’s Sep 30, Culann’s Hounds. Oct 1, Rusty Evans & Ring of Fire. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas, 415.868.1311.

Southern Pacific Smokehouse Wed, Philip Claypool and friends. Sep 29, Muddy Roses. Sep 30, String Rays. Oct 1, Cream of Clapton. 224 Vintage Way, Novato, 415.899.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Lincoln Theater Oct 1, Jose Feliciano. 100 California Dr, Yountville, 707.226.8742.

Silo’s Wed at 7, jam session. Sep 30, Dean-o-Holics. Oct 1, Terry Bradford. 530 Main St, Napa, 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Sep 28, Emmylou Harris (see Concerts). Sep 30, Merle Haggard (see Concerts). Oct 2, Esperanza Spalding (see Concerts). 1350 Third St, Napa, 707.259.0123.

Tradewinds Sep 28, Justin Froes. Thurs, DJ Dave. Sep 30, Levi Lloyd. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati, 707.795.7878.

MARIN COUNTY

SIGNS S IGNS

Osteria Divino

Sep 28, Royal Deuces. Sep 29, Emma Lee Project. Sep 30, Rusty Evans & Ring of Fire. Oct 1, Dani Paige Band. Oct 4, Stages of Sleep. 29 Broadway, Fairfax, 415.459.9910.

Studio E

SPRECKELSONLINE.COM

Sep 30, Stefanie Keys & Lost Cats. Oct 1, Sage. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station, 415.663.1661.

Russian River Brewing Co

Sep 30, Gravenstein Mandolin Ensemble. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol, 707.829.4797.

BOX OFFICE 707 588-3400

Old Western Saloon

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Spreckels Performing Arts Center

Sep 28, Gail Muldrow & Rockin Blues Band. Sep 29, Tom Finch Group. Sep 30, Richie Spice. Oct 1, breast cancer fundraiser: Rack n’ Roll Music Breastival. Oct 2 at 2, Cathey Cotten, Elliott’s Evil Plan; at 6, Goodtime Band. 19 Broadway, Fairfax, 415.459.1091.

Sep 29, Starskate, Derailed Freight Train & Engineers, Jesus Donkey. Fri-Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma, 707.782.0592.

Oct 1, Quarter Mile Combo, Petunia & Vipers. Oct 2, BrownChicken BrownCow. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545. BEER.

October 21 – 30

19 Broadway Club

142 Throckmorton Theatre Sep 29, Left Coast Chamber Ensemble. Sep 30, Lache Cercel & Roma Swing Ensemble, Trio Zazi. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Finnegan’s Marin Sep 29, Dennis Haneda. 877 Grant Ave, Novato, 415.899.1516.

George’s Nightclub Wed, standup comedy (see Comedy). Sep 30, It’s a Beautiful Day. Oct 1, Barry ‘The Fish’ Melton Band, David Nelson Band. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.226.0262.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Sep 28, Savannah Blue. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax, 415.485.1005.

San Francisco’s City Guide

Asha Bhosle Bollywood legend whose voice has been featured in over 1,000 films. Sep 30 at Paramount Theater.

Mekons Billed as ‘Quiet Night In,’ band plays acoustically in lovely wood-carved hall. Sep 30 at Swedish American Hall.

Broken Social Scene Canadian heroes play last American show before hiatus; special guest Isaac Brock to appear. Oct 1 at the Fillmore.

Amon Tobin Insane multi-media 3D tour for Brazilian-born electronic artist with new album, “Isam.” Oct 1-2 at the Warfield.

Wayne Shorter Towering jazz saxophonist and composer from classic Blue Note era still shines with an all-star band. Oct 2 at Herbst Theater.

More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

RISE UP, OLD JOE HILL

McCutcheon’s show sticks up for unions.

A Love of Labor

John McCutcheon debuts Joe Hill bio show in Sebastopol BY BRUCE ROBINSON

I

t’s not a dream.

The life and times of longago union organizer Joe Hill breathe anew at Sebastopol’s Main Stage West this weekend in the form of a new biographical play, Joe Hill’s Last Will. The one-man show is a collaboration between three songwriters: Hill himself, of course; long-time musical activist Si Kahn, who has written the script; and contemporary folk singer John McCutcheon, who embodies Hill on stage. “The script is a combination of [Hill’s] writing and some imagining of how things might have gone,” McCutcheon explains by phone from Washington, D.C. “The conceit of the play is that he is speaking to a reporter through the bars of his cell, a reporter who

Joe Hill’s Last Will runs Friday and Saturday, Oct. 7–8, Main Stage West, 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol. 8pm. $40. 707.823.0177. www.mainstagewest.com.

the last day saloon

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nightclub & restaurant

OPEN AT 4 PM WED. - sAT. & ANY DAY A SHOW IS SCHEDULED AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATE PARTIES, BANQUETS, FUNDRAISERS AND OUTSIDE PROMOTERS 707.545.5876

9/30

8:30 PM | $15 | CELTIC ROCK

Young Dubliners + Mr. December 10/1 8:30 PM | $25/30

| ROCK

Saxon + bOREALIS + Skitzo

10/2

12:30 PM | $10 | ROCK

The Fog City Stompers + jam sessions by T.R.A.D. J.A.S.S.

10/7

9:30 PM | $TBA | ROCK

Love FOol 10/8

8:30 PM | $20/25 | ROCK

Pat Travers Band

+ LoNero + Darkside Shine + Johnny Tsunami 10/14 8:30 PM | $10 | CLASSIC ROCK

Metal Shop + AZ/DZ (tribute to AC/DC) 10/15 8:30 PM | $11 | BLUES $1 OF COVER GOES TO "NIGHT OF SWEET RELIEF" BENEFITTING ILL, DISABLED, AND ELDERLY MUSICIANS IN NEED

Daniel Castro Band 10/21

8:00 PM | $10/13 | ROCK

Royal Bliss + Star City Meltdown + Our Vinyl Vows + Midway

10/28

8:30 PM | $10/15 |ZYDECO

Lil' Brian & The Zydeco Travelers + Andre Thierry Zydeco 11/2 8:00 PM | $15/18 | BLUES

The Blues Broads

all shows are 21+ unless noted for reservations: 707.545.5876

707.545.2343 120 5th st. @ davis st. santa rosa, ca

lastdaysaloon.com

DON’T FORGET…WE SERVE FOOD TOO!

McNear’s Dining House Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner BBQ • Pasta • Steak FRI 9/30 • 8:00PM DOORS • $16 • 21+ COUNTRY

RECKLESS KELLY PLUS DRIFTING COMPASS SAT 10/1 • 7:30PM DOORS • $23 ADV/$25 DOS • 21+ BLUES

MARK HUMMEL’S BLUES HARMONICA BLOWOUT ROD PIAZZA, LAZY LESTER & LITTLE CHARLIE BATY FRI 10/7 • 8:00PM DOORS • $19 ADV/$23 DOS • 21+ ROCK-N-ROLL

DAWES/ BLITZEN TRAPPER PLUS SMOKE FAIRIES FRI 10/14 • 8:00PM DOORS • $21 • 21+ NEIL DIAMOND TRIBUTE BAND

SUPER DIAMOND PLUS THE CHEESEBALLS SAT 10/15 • 7:00PM DOORS • $26 • 21+ ROOTS ROCK

DAVE ALVIN AND THE GUILTY ONES FRI 10/21 • 7:30PM DOORS • $16 ADV/$21 DOS • 21+ TOM PETTY TRIBUTE

PETTY THEFT

PLUS ZOO STATION U2 TRIBUTE SAT 10/22 • 8:45PM DOORS • $18 • 21+ DANCE/PARTY HITS

WONDERBREAD 5 FRI 10/28 • 7:00PM DOORS • $21 • 21+ AMERICAN BLUEGRASS

STEEP CANYON RANGERS PLUS ELEPHANT REVIVAL No Children Under 10 Allowed For All Ages Shows

23 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma

707-765-2121 www.mcnears.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28–OCTOBE R 4, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

has come from a Salt Lake City paper to get his last words. And Joe is essentially playing with the guy: ‘Yeah, I’ll give you my last words, but for the next hour, you’ve got to hear the story of my life.’” Hill, also known as Joseph Hillström, was a Swedish immigrant and itinerant worker who became a popular organizer for the International Workers of the World, using music to spread his pro-labor message. He was executed by a Utah firing squad in 1915, just 36 years old, after being convicted of the murder of a Salt Lake City grocer and former policeman—a charge Hill steadfastly denied. As a songwriter, Hill “basically took songs that were popular songs of the day, hymns or Tin Pan Alley or vaudeville songs, and wrote new words to them,” McCutcheon explains. Some remain familiar melodies, though he has devised new arrangements for most of them. But preparing the music has been the easy part. “I’ve never tried to portray someone other than me in front of a group of people,” McCutcheon acknowledges, although he’s relishing the challenge of this new endeavor. “It allows me to occupy the skin of an American labor icon—which is a humbling thing, being a union worker my whole life—to be able to animate that character who’s been dead for nearly 100 years and lives in the form of his songs. And be able to use his own words to explain himself.” Although they are billed as previews and not a premiere, these will be the first actual performances of a script that has been under construction for several years. Audience reaction and comments will be invited after each show, “to give some feedback and let us know how it’s working.” And yes, the audience will get to hear what Joe’s last words actually were. But no, they won’t be given away here.

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | SE PTEMB ER 28 – O CTO BE R 4, 20 1 1 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Arts Events Galleries OPENINGS Sep 30 From 6 to 8pm. Arts Guild of Sonoma, various works by members of the Guild. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma, 707.996.3115. From 6 to 8pm. Marin Arts Council Gallery, “Asia Observed,” works addressing the cultural complexity of Asia. 906 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.666.2442.

Oct 1 From 6 to 9pm. di Rosa, “Auction X” preview and artists party. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa, 707.226.5991.

SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma

5250 Aero Dr, Santa Rosa, 707.579.3004.

Charles M Schulz Museum Ending Oct 2, “A Change of Scene: Schulz Sketches from Abroad.” Through Dec 11, “Pop’d from the Panel,” parallel worlds of fine art and commercial art. Through Nov 28, “The Games Children Play.” $5-$8. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa, 707.579.4452.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Oct 20, “The Roseland Series,” plein air paintings capturing Roseland’s vibrancy by Jamie Mitsu & Alicia Lopez de Oceguera. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa, 707.543.3010.

Gallery One Ending Oct 3, “California Landscapes,” “Lyrics in Color” and “Light on the Land.” 209 Western Ave, Petaluma, 707.778.8277.

Sep 30-Oct 24, various works by members of the Guild. Reception, Sep 30, 6 to 8. WedThurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma, 707.996.3115.

Glaser Center

Branscomb Gallery

Ending Oct 2, “Mixed Elements,” oil paintings and other media by Linda Ratzlaff, John Gruenwald and others. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton, 707.829.8912.

Ongoing, oils by Ralph Beyer, collages by Edmund Dechant, sculptures by Sharyn Desideri and watercolors and etchings by James D Mayhew. Daily, 11 to 4. 1588 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay, 707.875.3388.

Buddha’s Palm Tattoo Gallery Through November, “Our Backyard Bohemia: the People and Places of Sonoma County.” Tues-Wed and Fri-Sat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 313 North Main St, Sebastopol, 707.829.7256.

Calabi Gallery Through Nov, “Beyond Borders,” works by artists of the Central and South American diaspora. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.781.7070.

California Indian Museum & Cultural Center Ongoing, “Ishi: A Story of Dignity, Hope and Courage.”

Ending Oct 2, “Faces of Spain,” photography by Maite Klein. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.568.5381.

Graton Gallery

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Oct 8, works by Penny Michel and Mike Tinney. TuesFri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg, 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Oct 16, “Red Dot 2011: Think Twice,” mixed media by Allegra Burke, sculpture by Charlese Doiron Reinhart and photography by Jerry Takigawa. Daily, 11 to 6. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg, 707.431.1970.

J Howell Fine Art Ongoing, work by contemporary California artists. Sun-Mon, 11 to 4; ThursSat, 11 to 6. 101-A Plaza St, Healdsburg, 707.431.2684.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Oct 29, “Abstractions,” an abstract multimedia group show. Graton Rd and Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

Petaluma Arts Center Sep 30-Nov 6, “Bridges of Light / Puentes de Luz,” visual art and altars for Dia de los Muertos celebration. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma, 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Museum Through Nov 28, “Pirates,” a kid-friendly exhibit featuring everyone’s favorite seafaring marauders. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma, 707.778.4398.

Quercia Gallery Through Oct 10, “Reflection,” paintings and sculpture by Ron Quercia and Bobbi Jeanne Quercia. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 5. 25193 Hwy 116, Ste C, Duncans Mills, 707.865.0243.

Quicksilver Mine Company Ending Sep 29, “Calabash,” preview exhibition of gourd art. Sep 30-Nov 13, “Signs,” recent oil paintings by Cecelia Armenta Hallinan. Reception, Oct 1, 4 to 6. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 6671 Front St, Forestville, 707.887.0799.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Nov 6, “Two Photographic Views,” photography by Amber Reumann Engfer and Craig Melville; “Soft Focus,” photography by Rhen August Benson and Mayr McLean. Wed-Thurs and Sun, 11 to 7; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. Tues-Thurs and Sun, 10:30 to 6. Fri-Sat, 10:30 to 8. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Oct 22, “Roots,” juried mixed-media; also, ceramics by Michiko Sodo Kinoshita. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol, 707.829.4797.

Sonoma County Museum Through Feb 5, “Customized: The Art and History of the Bicycle,” with bicycle

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts

37 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 28â&#x20AC;&#x201C;OCTOBE R 4, 201 1 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Ending Sep 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alphabet Soup,â&#x20AC;? group show juried by Kathleen Burch. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Ending Sep 29, prints by Zachary Gilmour. Oct 3-30, Marge Rector retrospective. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo, 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY Artists of the Valley Ongoing, mixed-media work of 57 artists in two Napa locations. An artist is always on-site. Daily, 10 to 6. 710 First St and 1398 First St, Napa, 707.265.9050.

Bloom Salon & Art Gallery GOOD GOURD! Gourd art by Monty Monty, above,

and many others is at Calabash Oct 2. See Events, p38.

innovations, art bikes, regional history and more. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Jan 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sonido Pirata,â&#x20AC;? curated exhibit dealing with the phenomenon of pirated music. Free-$8. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma, 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Nov 4, fine art photography by Nik Catalina. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa, 707.543.3282.

Towers Gallery Through Oct 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cruisin,â&#x20AC;? works by various artists. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale, 707.894.4331.

University Art Gallery Through Oct 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Future Is Now: New Bay Area MFA Graduates,â&#x20AC;? work by 11 men and women. Mon-Fri, 8 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5. SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.4240.

Wells Fargo Center Through Oct 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARTrails Preview,â&#x20AC;? exhibiting works by studios participating in the ARTrails program. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Through Nov, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reflections in Yesterday,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Anne Herrero. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Donna Seager Gallery Through Oct 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Full Circle,â&#x20AC;? wire, drawing and gouache by Emily Payne; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grey Matter,â&#x20AC;? book collage by Lin Max, and drawings on monoprint by Sylvia Gonzalez. Tues-Wed and Fri-Sat, 11 to 6; Thurs, 11 to 8:30. Tues-Wed and Fri-Sat, 11 to 6; Thurs, 11 to 8:30. 851 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.4229.

Through Oct 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inkslingers,â&#x20AC;? work by tattoo artists. MonSat, 9 to 7. 1146 Main St, Napa, 707.251.8468.

Caâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Toga Galleria Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Arte Ongoing, murals, ceramics and wood sculptures by Carlo Marchiori. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 1206 Cedar St, Calistoga, 707.942.3900.

Christopher Hill Gallery Ongoing, contemporary modern painting of 20th and 21st centuries. Sun-Mon and Wed-Thurs, 10 to 5:30; Fri-Sat, 10 to 7:30. 1235 Main St, St Helena, 707.963.0272.

Di Rosa

Through Oct 30, mixed media by Geraldine LiaBraaten, Debra Stuckgold and Eric Engstrom. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station, 415.663.1347.

Oct 1 from 6 to 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auction Xâ&#x20AC;? preview and artists party. $5-$10. Tours available Sat at 10, 11 and noon (reservation required) and Tues-Fri at 10, 11, 12 and 1 (reservation recommended). Gallery hours: Wed-Fri, 9:30 to 3. Sat, by appointment only. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa, 707.226.5991.

Marin Arts Council Gallery

Hess Collection Winery

Through Nov 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Asia Observed,â&#x20AC;? works addressing the cultural complexity of Asia. Reception, Sep 30, 6 to 8. 906 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.666.2442.

Ongoing, outstanding private collection featuring work by Andy Goldsworthy, Francis Bacon, Frank Stella and other modern masters. Daily, 10 to 5:15. 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa, 707.255.1144.

Gallery Route One

Marin MOCA Through Nov 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Legends of the Bay Area: Manuel Neri,â&#x20AC;? mixedmedia drawings and sculpture. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4, Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato, 415.506.0137.

I Wolk Gallery Ongoing, contemporary sculpture, painting and mixed media. 1354 Main St, St Helena, 707.963.8800 or 707.963.9922.

) 38

Š2011 BLUE MOON BREWING COMPANY, GOLDEN, CO "%,')!.7()4%"%,')!. 349,%7(%!4!,%s"$!-,"0 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Giantsâ&#x20AC;? is a registered trademark of the San Francisco Giants. All rights reserved.

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Arts Events Mumm Napa Cuvee Through Nov 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Signs of Life,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Robert Buelteman. Daily, 10 to 5. 8445 Silverado Trail, Rutherford, 707.967.7740.

Napa Valley Museum Through Oct 30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Discrepancy: Living Between War & Peace,â&#x20AC;? works from various artists addressing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville, 707.944.0500.

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Through Nov 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Water and Wood: Paintings and Sculptures Inspired by Nature,â&#x20AC;? paintings and sculpture by Carine Mascarelli and Crystal Lockwood. Daily, 10 to 5. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville, 707.968.2203.

Comedy SF Comedy Competition Semifinals Ten standups compete for the coveted prize. Oct 1. $39.75. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

Holy City Zoo Improv Workshop Every Mon at 7, weekly comedy improv workshop. $15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Holy City Zoo Reunion Well-known local comedy improv troupe returns. Oct 1 at 8. $18-$25. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Events Calabash Annual gourd art and auction fundraiser always packs â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em in. Oct 2, 1 to 5. $40-$50. Food for Thought, 6550 Railroad Ave, Forestville, 707.887.1647.

( 37 Fall Luncheon Fashion Show Lioness Club presents fundraising fashion show with a raffle and classic Villa lunch. Oct 1, 11:30 to 2:30. $30 donation. The Villa, 3901 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa, 707.545.1150.

Food Not Bombs Help prepare and serve free vegan meals every Sun afternoon; served at 5. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa, 415.408.8094.

Harvest Fair Celebrate the bounty in our backyard with food, wine and lots of exhibits from local farms. Sep 30-Oct 2. $3-$8. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.545.4200.

Yoga Aid Local yogis gather to raise money, awareness and karma for the Africa Yoga Project. Oct 2 at 10. Free. DeTurk Round Barn, Decker and Prince streets, Santa Rosa, 707.528.1071.

Autumn Plant Sale Get ready for your fall garden with tastings, tours, and plenty of plants and starts for sale. Oct 1-2, 10 to 1. Free. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato, 415.457.8811.

Open Studios Over 40 artists in three buildings, first Sun of the month, 11 to 4. Free. Marin MOCA, Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato, 415.899.8200.

Enchanted Village Faire Crystal caves, sleeping giants and more interactive magic to capture the imaginations of children of all ages. Oct 1, 11 to 4. $2. Stone Bridge School, 1870 Salvador Ave, Napa, 707.252.5522.

InDIYpendent Culture Faire Learn to DIY with workshops in screenprinting, bicycle repair, wheatpasting and more. Celebrate DIY with performances and installations. Oct 1-2, 11 to 10. Free. 950 Pearl St Block, 950 Pearl St, Napa.

Napa Vallery ARTS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;11 Celebrate the arts with multiple events around the county. Oct 1-31. Various

locations, Napa Valley, Napa, 707.257.2117.

Food & Drink End of Summer Canning Learn to keep late-summer bounty through the rest of the year in this hands-on class. Oct 1, 11 to 3. $70. Viva, 7160 Keating Ave, Sebastopol, 707.824.9913.

Harvest Lunch Three-course lunch from the Girl and the Fig during the harvest. Sep 30-Oct 1, 11 to 2. $65. Michel-Schlumberger Winery, 4155 Wine Creek Rd, Healdsburg, www. michelschlumberger.com/ events.

Lunchtime in the Sculpture Garden Weekly activities and crepes every Thurs through Sep 29. $5-$7. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500.

Occidental Farmers Market Bohemian market with live music every Fri through Oct 29, 4 to dusk. Downtown Occidental, Bohemian Highway, Occidental, www. occidentalfarmersmarket.com.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Sat, 9 to 12. Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Wed and Sat, 8:30 to 12. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.522.8629.

Sebastopol Farmers Market Through Nov; Sun, 10 to 1:30. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol, 707.522.9305.

Sonoma Farmers Market Fri, 9 to noon. Depot Park, First St W, Sonoma. Also, Through Sep; Tues, 5:30 to dusk. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma, 707.538.7023.

Fairfax Farmers Market Wed, 4 to 8. Through Sep. Bolinas Park, 124 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax, 415.472.6100.

Point Reyes Farmers Market Every Sat, 9 to 1, through Nov 5. Tobyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feed Barn, 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station, www. marinorganic.org.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Grange Documentary Film Festival Series of shorts from local documentarian Rich Panter. Oct 1, “Micro-Credit.” All shows at 7; free popcorn. $5. Bodega Grange Hall, 1370 Bodega Ave, Bodega Bay, 707.875.3616.

Vintage Film Series

Bicycle Love!

New exhibit at Sonoma County Museum explores rich cycling history With the third annual King Ridge GranFondo ride this week, the timing is perfect to honor local cycling with a full museum exhibit. Customized: the Art and History of the Bicycle, at the Sonoma County Museum, covers more than 100 years of the art and history of the bicycle and its evolution in Northern California. The exhibit explores political issues, the green movement, mountain biking, bicycle racing and showcases dozens of unique bicycle inventions. An 1860s velocipede, classic “balloon tire” children’s bikes of the 1940s and 1950s and an early customized mountain bike are on display, and a documentary with local professional cycling superstars screens. Annual events such as the GranFondo and the Tour of California have made Sonoma County a new mecca for cycling enthusiasts. This year, the museum will participate in the Radio Shack GranFondo downtown celebration on Sept. 30. In addition, the Sonoma County Museum is offering several rides with the Sonoma County Bike Coalition. One such ride on Oct. 22 includes a tour of bicycle shops and a chance to meet the region’s top custom bike builders. Customized runs through Feb. 5, 2012, at the Sonoma County Museum. 427 Seventh St., Santa Rosa. Tuesday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. $2-$5. 707.579.1500.—Anna Freeman Gluten-Free Beer Taste gluten-free beer and other beverages. Sep 29 at 5. Free. Pica Pica Maize Kitchen, Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa, 707.226.6529.

Stave Wine Lounge, 1149 First St, Napa, 707.259.5411.

Film

Winemaker Nights

Ballet & Opera

Thurs, 6 to 9, taste new releases and meet the makers.

Live presentations of highbrow entertainment beamed from

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Through December, classic films on the big screen. Sep 28 at 1, “On the Waterfront.” Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma, 707.996.9756.

Warriors of the Sun Documentary about indigenous traditions threatened by globalization, focusing on the Totonac tribe of Huehuetla Pueblo. Filmmaker Retired Albert Wahrhaftig will present the film and Q&A after. Sep 30 at 7. Free-$6. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2606.

White Fang Disney’s film version of the Jack London classic is shown to raise funds for his namesake park. Oct 2 at 7. $10-$25. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen, 707.938.5216.

ROBERT BREYER PAINTINGS & PRINTS

Sept 25–Nov 12 Reception: Oct 8, 5–7pm Robert Bryer Talks About His Art Fri, Nov 4, 6:30–8pm

Global Tango A documentary tale of the effects of the Argentinean economic crisis capturing performances and testimonial from tango artists. Oct 4 at 6. Free. Bay Model Visitor Center, 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito, 415.332.3871.

SEBASTOPOL GALLERY

150 N. Main St. Sebastopol, Ca 95472 707-829-7200 www.sebastopol-gallery.com

Italian Film Festival Selected modern films from the land of Antonioni, Fellini and Leone. Oct 1, “Eighteen Years Later.” Showtimes at 5:30 and 7:45. $14-$78. Showcase Theatre, Marin Center, San Rafael, 415.499.6800.

Lectures Mohammed ibn Musa & the First Algebra Textbook Instructor Dean Gooch presents the history and impact of the early Islamic mathematician. Oct 3 at 12:15. Free. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4372.

) 40

Emmanuel Catarino Montoya 1989 Exhibiting a diverse selection of unusual antique, modern & contemporary artworks.

Calabi Gallery 707.781.7070 | 144 Petaluma Blvd N calabigallery.com

Call Today to Advertise! 707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

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Gabe Meline

all over the world in HD. Sep 28 and Oct 2, “Faust.” $12-$20. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.522.0719.

Arts Events  





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Oaks Class

Readersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Books

Learn about the many species of oak with botanical expert Steve Barnhart. Oct 1, 9 to 3. $10. Pepperwood Preserve, 3450 Franz Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.542.2080.

Oct 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exotic Life:Laughing Rivers, Dancing Drums and Tangled Hearts,â&#x20AC;? with Lisa Alpine. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma, 707.939.1779.

The Sitting Room

Salute to Irving Berlin

Science Buzz Cafe

Oct 2 at 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wisdom Has a Voice: Every Daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Memories of Mother,â&#x20AC;? with Kate Farrell and others.. 2025 Curtis Dr, Cotati, 707.778.3972.

Musical review featuring songs, comedy and dance. Oct 2 at 2. $22-$28. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park, 707.588.3400.

Poetry SoCoCo

She Loves Me

Every Thurs at 6:30, gather with scientists and amateur science fans to discuss weekly topics. Oct 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chocolate Science,â&#x20AC;? with Kirsten Tripplett, PhD. $3 donation. French Garden Restaurant, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol, 707.292.5281. Expert panel discusses metrics and measurements in medical treatment. Sep 29, 7 to 9:30. $15 suggested. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Transit & Trails Presentation on hiking and camping the Bay Area without a car. Sep 28, 7 to 8:30. Free. REI Corte Madera, 213 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera, 415.927.1938.

Ask a Historian Research Advisory Council tackle tough questions posed by moderator, first Sun monthly at 2:30. Free. Napa County Historical Society, Goodman Library, 1219 First St, Napa, www.napahistory.org.

Readings Barking Dog Roasters First Sat monthly at 5:30, UniverSoul poetry and music open mic. Hosted by Juanita J Martin. First Sat, 5:30 to 7. 707.435.1807. 18133 Sonoma Hwy, Sonoma.

Petaluma Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Sep 29 at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goliath,â&#x20AC;? with Scott Westerfield. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma, 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books

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Kiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Book Sep 30-Oct 23. A tale of intrigue, villainy, murder, corruption, and revenge set in eighteenth-century London in the 1750s. Thurs-Sun at 8, SatSun at 2. $15-$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

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Sep 30 at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lost in Time: A Blue Bloods Novel,â&#x20AC;? with Melissa de la Cruz. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol, 707.823.2618.

North Bay Poetry Slam Monthly poetry performance competition. First Sun monthly at 7. Hopmonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.7300.

Join Ed Coletti and friends for evening of poetry on the first Sat of every month, 7 to 9. Free, 707.527.6434. SoCo Coffee, 1015 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

Book Passage Sep 28 at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created,â&#x20AC;? with Charles Mann. Sep 29 at 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Columbus: The Four Voyages,â&#x20AC;? with Laurence Bergreen; at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Original I Ching,â&#x20AC;? with Margaret Pearson. Sep 30 at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;John Huston: Courage and Art,â&#x20AC;? with Jeffrey Meyers and David & Janet Peoples. Oct 2 at 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Conjugated Visits,â&#x20AC;? with Dian Kirsten Martin; also, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Translatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sister,â&#x20AC;? with Mary Winegarden; at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gay in America,â&#x20AC;? with Scott Pasfield. Oct 4 at 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;13 Gifts,â&#x20AC;? with Wendy Mass; at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knocking on Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Door,â&#x20AC;? with Lisa Randall. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera, 415.927.0960.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Sep 29 at 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Family of Secrets: the Bush Dynasty, Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Invisible Government, and the Hidden History of the Last Fifty Years,â&#x20AC;? with Russ Baker. 11445 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station, 415.663.1349.

Theater Annie Jr H-Town Youth Theatre presents a new production of the always-popular â&#x20AC;&#x153;Annie.â&#x20AC;? Ending Oct 2; Fri-Sat at 7, Sat-Sun at 2. $10. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg, 707.433.3145.

Broadway Under the Stars World-class Broadway performers stage revue of song and dance to raise money for State Park. Oct 1 at 7:30pm. $25-$100. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen, 877.424.1414..

Lighthearted romantic comedy based on Miklos Laszloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parfumerie.â&#x20AC;? Ending Oct 1; Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $25$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.763.8920.

Weya American Dream players present a humorous musical production as part of Pomo Honoring Month. Oct 1-2 and 89. Sat at 1, Sun at 1 and 3. Free. Ragle Ranch Park, 500 Ragle Rd, Sebastopol.

Emperorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New Clothes Family-friendly production of the Hans Christian Andersen tale. Oct 2 at 3. $10-$15. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville, 707.226.8742.

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Sondheimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immensely successful, Tony awardwinning musical farce. Ending Oct 2. Friday and Saturday at 8, Sunday at 2. $20-$30. Dreamweavers Theatre, 1637 W Imola Ave, Napa, 707.255.5483.

The Ultimate Christmas Show Irreverent, festive, seasonallychallenged comedy. Ending Oct 2. Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15-$20. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa, 707.259.7500.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Classifieds Astrology BOHEMIAN

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ARIES (March 21–April 19) I’ve got a challenging assignment for you. In accordance with your current astrological omens, I am inviting you to cultivate a special kind of receptivity—a rigorously innocent openness to experience that will allow you to be penetrated by life’s beauty with sublime intensity. To understand the exact nature of this receptivity, study Abraham Maslow’s definition of real listening: to listen “without presupposing, classifying, improving, controverting, evaluating, approving or disapproving, without dueling what is being said, without rehearsing the rebuttal in advance, without freeassociating to portions of what is being said so that succeeding portions are not heard at all.” TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Government officials in Southern Sudan are proposing to build cities in fantastic shapes. They say that the regional capital of Juba would be recreated to resemble a rhinoceros, as seen from the air. The town of Yambio is destined to look like a pineapple, and the city of Wau will be a giraffe. I’m confused by all this, since I know that most of the people in South Sudan live on less than a dollar a day. Is that really how they want their country’s wealth spent? Please consider the possibility, Taurus, that there are also some misplaced priorities in your own sphere right now. Hopefully, they’re nothing on the scale of what’s happening in South Sudan, but still: allocate your resources with high discernment, please.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) You have cosmic clearance to fall deeply, madly and frequently in love, Gemini. In fact, it’s OK with the gods of fate and the angels of karma if you swell up with a flood of infatuation and longing big enough to engorge an entire city block. The only stipulation those gods and angels insist on is that you do not make any rash decisions or huge life changes while in the throes of this stupendous vortex. Don’t quit your job, for instance, or sell all your belongings, or dump your temporarily out-of-favor friends and loved ones. For the foreseeable future, simply enjoy being enthralled by the lush sexy glory of the liquid blue fire. CANCER (June 21–July 22) Among the surprises spilled by WikiLeaks some months back was the revelation that U.S. diplomats think Canadians feel “condemned to always play ‘Robin’ to the U.S. ‘Batman.’” If that’s true, it shouldn’t be. While Canada may not be able to rival the war-mongering, plutocrat-coddling, environment-despoiling talents of my home country, America, it is a more reliable source of reason, compassion and civility. Are you suffering from a similar disjunction, Cancerian? Do you imagine yourself “Robin” in relationship to some overweening “Batman”? This would be an excellent time to free yourself of that dynamic. LEO (July 23–August 22) “Enigmatology” is an infrequently used word that means the study of puzzles and how to solve them. I’m invoking it now to highlight the fact that you need to call on some unusual and idiosyncratic and possibly even farfetched resources as you intensify your efforts to solve the puzzles that are spread out before you. The help you’ve called on in the past just won’t be enough for this new round of gamesmanship. The theories and beliefs and strategies that have brought you this far can’t take you to the next stage.

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VIRGO (August 23–September 22) This would not be a good time for you to read the book called The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Enhancing Self-Esteem. In fact, it will never be the right time to read it. While it’s true that at this juncture in your life story you can make exceptional progress in boosting your confidence and feeling positive about yourself, you’re not an idiot and you don’t need idiot-level assistance. If there was a book called The Impish Guide to Accessing and Expressing Your Idiosyncratic Genius, I’d definitely recommend it. Likewise a book titled The Wild-Eyed Guide to Activating Your HalfDormant Potential or The Brilliant Life-Lover’s Guide to Becoming a Brilliant Life-Lover.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) “When I was born,” said comedian Gracie Allen, “I was so surprised I didn’t talk for a year and a half.” I suspect you will soon be experiencing a metaphorical rebirth that has some of the power of the event she was referring to. And so I won’t be shocked if you find it challenging to formulate an articulate response, at least in the short term. In fact, it may take you a while to even register, let alone express, the full impact of the upgrade you will be blessed with. SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) “During a game of Apocalypse against the Witchhunters,” reports Andrew_88 in an online forum, “I authorized my Chaos Lord to throw his vortex grenade at the oncoming Cannoness and her bodyguard. Safe to say he fluffed it and the vortex grenade scattered back on top of him. Then he proceeded to take out my allies, the Havocs, Land Raider and Baneblade, before disappearing, having done no damage to my opponent.” I suggest you regard this as a helpful lesson to guide your own actions in the coming days, Scorpio. Do not, under any circumstances, unleash your Chaos Lord or let him throw his vortex grenade at anyone. He could damage your own interests more than those of your adversaries.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it’s high time for you to receive a flood of presents, compliments, rewards, and blessings. You got a problem with that? I hope not. I hope you are at peace with the fact that you deserve more than your usual share of recognition, appreciation, flirtations, and shortcuts. Please, Sagittarius? Please don’t let your chronic struggles or your cynical views of the state of the world blind you to the sudden, massive influx of luck. Pretty please open your tough heart and skeptical mind to the bounty that the universe is aching to send your way.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) I like how astrologer Hunter Reynolds encapsulates the Capricornian imperative. If you “can manage your ego’s erratic moods and uneven motivations well enough to offer a service with consistent quality,” he says. “The world confers social recognition and its accompanying material advantages on you.” The members of other signs may appear warmer and fuzzier than you, but only because you express your care for people through a “strictness of focus,” “disciplined work” and by being a “dependable helpmate.” This describes you at your best, of course; it’s not easy to meet such high standards. But here’s the good news: The omens suggest you now have an excellent opportunity to function at your very best. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) “Not being omniscient is a really big drag for me,” says poet Charles Harper Webb. I sympathize with him. My life would be so much easier and my power would be so much more graceful if only I knew everything there is to know. That’s why I’m going to be a little jealous of you in the coming weeks, Aquarius. You may not be supremely authoritative about every single subject, but you will have access to far more intuitive wisdom than usual, and you’ll be making extra good use of the analytical understandings you have. Bonus: You will also be absorbing new lessons at an elevated rate. PISCES (February 19–March 20) John Tyler was President of the United States from 1841 to 1845. Believe it or not, two of his grandsons are still alive today. They’re Lyon Gardiner Tyler and Harrison Ruffin Tyler, born late in the life of their father, who was born late in John Tyler’s life. I invite you to find some equally amazing connection you have to the past, Pisces. How is your destiny linked to the long ago and faraway? I suspect you might find that distant history will be more vital and important than usual in the coming weeks.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

g Chiropractic

A Safe Place To Be Real Holistic tantric masseuse. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. Mon-Sat. Summer discount. Call after 10:30am. 707.793.2232

Pampering Foot Treatment $25 Women love Jessie Jing`s Pampered Feet Center. 1 hr. only $25. 707.526.1788. jessiejingsmassage.com

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Bearhands4u Massage for men, Sebastopol. Mature, strong, professional. 707.291.3804. Days, evenings, weekends $60/hr. Outcalls available.

RELAX! Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 11 yrs experience. 707.542.6856

Man of Your Dreams Men, women, couples. TLC, massage, Tantra, nurturing mutual touch. William 707.548.2187

PAIN/STRESS RELIEF

Massage $55 hr • Deep Tissue/Swedish • Sports • Shiatzu • Back Walking • Foot Reflexology • Chair $10/10 min massage • Couples Room

Foot and Body Massage 10 East Washington St, Petaluma. Open 10am–9pm Closed Sundays. 707.762.3699

Full Body Sensual Massage With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Visa/MC accepted. Gretchen 707.478.3952

699 Petaluma Blvd. N

525 Ross St, Santa Rosa

Open 7 days 9am-10pm

open 10-10, 7 days

Women, Men, & Couples You need a massage! I am an easygoing provider of pleasure since 1991. Good virtues. NW Santa Rosa, Jimmy, (C) 707.799.4467 or (L) 707.527.9497

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By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883 Psychics

Professional Restorative Massage Sports, Swedish, Acupressure, Thai, Deep Tissue, Rohnert Park $40/hr + $10 outcall. Sebastian 707.758.0060 www.wix.com/rpcotati/ massage

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MASSAGE FOR MEN Open 7 days, 9am–10pm Walkin Ok. 8492 Gravenstein Want your entire body squeezed, kneaded, masHwy., Ste. G. 707.665.9689 saged & stretched by skillful male CMT? Call/text Guerneville 707.824.8700, or visit M4M Massage www.SantaRosaMassagefor Mitch, CMT. Mature.ProfesMen.com for pix & scheduling. sional. Relaxing intuitive touch. Private discrete studio. 707.849.7409

• Swedish & Deep Tissue Massage • Hot Stone Massage • Jacuzzi & Hot Shower

Happy Health Spa 707-591-8899

Professional male massage Step off the World, therapist; strong, deep healing bodywork. 1 hr / $50, into.... 1 1/2 hr $70. A sanctuary of pleasure and 707.536.1516 relaxation. Enjoy the best of www.CompleteBodyBalance.com healing and sensual massage by a lovely lady with a caring touch. Quality and class Massage & Relaxation Accept Visa/MC. Tania. C.M.T. Swedish Massage By 707.477.1766. Santa Rosa.

CMT in Cotati

Golden Flower Massage Spa

PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

707.765.1879

LILY’S CHINESE MASSAGE GRAND OPENING SPECIAL OFFER $ 45/hr Body Massage

SPIRITUAL

Connections

Finding inspiration and connecting with your community Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center Offers ongoing classes for all levels of practice and interest. General program and introductory class: Tues & Weds evenings 7:30–8:45pm. Noontime Meditation: Weds An oasis in your busy day 12:15–1:15pm Prayers for World Peace: Sun 10:30–11:45am Everyone welcome. 304 Petaluma Blvd, N, Petaluma 707.776.7720. www.meditateinnorcal.org.

(regular rate $50/hr)

Buy 2 hrs @ $45/hr use within 30 days of purchase

Learn to Meditate – “Turning the Mind Into an Ally” 5 week course teaches the fundamentals and the reasons why we meditate. Begins Sept 21, 7–9PM. $25 for all 5 classes Wednesday nights. Santa Rosa Shambhala Center, 709 Davis, Entry via the parking lot side, Room 206. www.santarosa.shambhala.org to register

Unity Church of Santa Rosa Sunday School & Service 10:30am - Non-traditional. Inter-denominational. A spirituallyminded community. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy 707-542-7729 www.UnityofSantaRosa.org

$

Heart-Centered Metaphysics 4 Wk Class

$

Weds, Oct 5–26, 6:30–8:30pm. Love Offering. Learn basics about: Life as Consciousness, Evolving Spiritual Awareness, Divine Guidance, Silence, Meditation, Prayer, Oneness, the Spiritual & Physical Universe, Divine Paradoxes, Spirit, Soul, and Body.

90/hr (4 hands) 75/hr (out call)

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707.720.7657

4927 Sonoma Hwy 12 Ste. D, Santa Rosa

Share your organization’s inspiration with over 123,000 Bohemian Readers monthly!

707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

Workshops Rosicrucian Mystical Weekend

Movement & Magic — FREE Workshops

Rosicrucian Open Meeting Friday Sept 30, 7 pm Admission Free Kabbalah and the Tree of Life workshop. Saturday Oct 1, 9 am - 5 pm. $40 advance $50 at door (includes Lunch) Rosicrucian Convocation Saturday Oct 17 pm (Evening event for Rosicrucian Members only) Contact Bob Harris for registration information sailorbucky@gmail.com or call 707.312.9041

Thursday Sept. 22nd. 6–7:30 pm Sat. Sept 24th. 10:15–12:00 am Tuesday the 27th 6–7:30 pm Feel the benefit of Feminine Fitness! Learn about the Prosperity Hormone! Connect with like minded women! Absolutely FREE Laurie 707.318.9865

Lectio/Video Divina:

Rocks and Clouds Zendo

Contemplating Scripture in Word and Image with Victoria S. MacDonald, MA Learn this technique while discussing what these prayer practices offer us in spiritual growth. Thurs, Oct 13 7–9pm, Journey Center, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org.

Zazenkai One Day Meditation Retreat, Sunday, Nov. 20. 6:00am–4:00pm. Email us with any questionsdaterra@sonic.net. Find us at www.rocksandclouds.org or call 707.824.5647

Dance of Tendencies: Exploring Communication in Withdrawn, Compliant and Assertive Enneagram Types Join Claire Barnum (NC-IEA) for an intermediate Enneagram workshop. Sat, Oct 15, 9–4:30p, Journey Center, 707.578.2121, www.journeycenter.org.

The Body Mirror System of Healing Oct 12–16 in San Rafael,CA taught by Marin Brofman, PhD. Over 4 intensive days, learn to understand yourself as a being of energy and how symptoms in your body reflect tensions in your consciousness. Info: www.worldrainbowhouse.com or www.healer.ch. Contact jocelynefcohen@gmail.com or 808.352.7444.

Sign Up Now-Integrative Yoga Teacher Training Starting training will start Feb. 2012!! A 200 hour non-residential training, 1 weekend/month for 10 months. You will learn how the elements of yoga: asanas, pranayama, body awareness, guided imagery meditation and deep relaxation come together as a vehicle for health and healing. BodyWorks-Integrative Yoga and Stress Management Studio. 490 2nd Str., Petaluma 707.769.9933 www.bodyworksyoga.com

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Alternative Health&Well-Being

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SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM

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Pomo Project/WEYA (healing energy)

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A play with music- FREE ADMISSION. Ragle Park, Seb. Sats. Oct. 1 & 8 @ 1:00 Suns, Oct. 2 & 9 @ 1:00 and 3:00 info: 707.538.7543, 478.1994

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We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxycontin and Vicodin using Methadone. s 3UBUTEX3UBOXONE AVAILABLE s 0ROVIDING 4REATMENT SINCE  s #ONFIDENTIALITY ASSURED s -EDI#AL ACCEPTED

Donate Your Auto 800.380.5257 We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not (restrictions apply). Live operatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

Medical Marijuana Certifications Full exam. Low cost. No charge if you do not qualify. Santa Rosa. Authentication 24/7. 707.591.4088.

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Josh Guttig, email - jgutt7@yahoo.com or call 707.364.1540

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Spiritually oriented psychotherapy for couples and individuals. After 15 years in Berkeley, Gateway Institute is now in Healdsburg. Free introduction on first Thursday of the month. CALL TO RESERVE A SEAT. Foss Creek Court Community Room 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 pm Healdsburg. Heather Parrish, Ph.D. MFC36455. 707.473.9553.

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I STOLE IT AND Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;M GLAD I DID. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right, Our annual Jive writing contest is going unabashedly criminal. This year, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re asking you for a 400 words-or-less piece of fiction themed around this shameless declaration. Stolen cars, stolen hearts, stolen files, stolen kisses, stolen ideasâ&#x20AC;Ś we want to read what your wily imagination puts forth. Just make sure that your story at some point includes the phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;I stole it and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m glad I did.â&#x20AC;?

Our favorite little thieving Jive entries will be published in our Fall Lit issue, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have a party and reading with the winners that very night, Oct. 19, at Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books in Sebastopol at 6pm. Send us your entries to: javajive@bohemian.com. Deadline is Wednesday, Oct. 12, at 5pm.


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