Issuu on Google+

The transformation of Skaggs Island Naval Base

From War to Wildlife Sustainable Agenda p9 | Gleaning the Cube p14 | World’s a Mess p34

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

2

3

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

4

Bohemian

Free Live Entertainment

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

Coyote Den

Editor SM

endl endless green g ree een

Bar & Dance Hall

Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writer Leilani Clark, ext. 106

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

IC S HYDROPON UPPLIES 707-254-0200 NAPA, NAP A, CA CA

indoor indo or gardening gardening supplies suppllies bulbs,, organic bulbs organic soils soils,, coco, rrockwool, ockwool, coco,

Wednesday Nights 8:30 pm

Thursday Nights 8:30pm

Hispanic Karaoke

Karaoke

featuring DJ Rodrigo Mora

featuring DJ Kurt

Calendar Queen Kate Polacci, ext. 200

Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Leila-Anne Cavé, Suzanne Daly, Jessica Dur, Katrina Fried, Nicolas Grizzle, Daedalus Howell, James Knight, Kylie Mendonca, Juliane Poirier, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, David Sason, Michael Shapiro, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Intern Shelby Pope

specialty fertilizers fertilizers specialty

Design Director

ballasts reflectors ballasts,, reflectors

Production Manager

Kara Brown Harry Allison

25-3 ENTERPRISE C COURT OURT NAPA NAPA 94558 MON-FRI: 10-6, SAT&SUN: SA ATT&SUN: 11-4

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artists Gary Brandt, Tabi Dolan

Advertising Designers Mark Schaumann

Advertising Director Lisa Santos, ext. 205

Advertising Account Managers

Friday Night June 17th • 9pm

El Sello de Mexico

Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Susan M. Sulc, ext. 206

Circulation Manager Steve Olson, ext. 201

Sales Operations Manager Ashley Lazowski, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano

Saturday Night June 18th • 9pm

2 Tight Dance Variety

Coyote Valley Casino Coyotevalleycasino.com coyotevalleycasino.com • 707-485-0700 707-485-0700 5 miles North of Ukiah, Hwy 101, West Rd. Exit

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo by Leila-Anne Cavé. Design by Kara Brown.

5 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

nb PEACE & LOVE The Flaming Lips’ Wayne Coyne meets artist Mikayla Butchart, who painted his portrait for our cover, at the Harmony Festival.

Submit your photo for this feature to photos@bohemian.com.

‘We think of it as a once-missing puzzle piece for restoration of the North Bay.’

Save 75% on a

Home Energy Analysis

COV ER STORY P20

What’s Behind the Green Mask? T H E PAP E R P 9

Gleaning for the Classroom DI N I N G P 14

Second Act for ‘Prop 8 Love Stories’ A RTS & IDEAS P26

WŽƌŬǁŝƚŚĂĐĞƌƟĮĞĚ

Home Energy Rater to learn which energy-saving improvements are best for your home.

Contact the Sonoma County Energy Independence Program ĨŽƌƌĞďĂƚĞĚĞƚĂŝůƐ͘ Maximum rebates apply

Call us (707) 565-6470 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p9 Green Zone p13 Dining p14 Wineries p18

Swirl p19 Cover Story p20 Culture Crush p25 Arts & Ideas p26 Stage p28

Film p29 Music p31 A&E p35 Classified p41 Astrology p43

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies My Green Issue

Don’t think reusable bags and hybrid cars are going to save us BY KYLIE MENDONCA

n honor of the Bohemian’s green issue, I’m here to crap all over certain efforts and ideas about being “green.” What I take issue with today, in particular, is banning plastic bags and buying Priuses. Banning plastic grocery bags is fine; it’s fine in the way an organic cotton T-shirt with a “Hug the Earth” logo is fine, the way Priuses are fine. Sure, they’re better than kicking the earth in the ovaries, but they’re largely symbolic gestures.

I

It’s not that I’m a big green meanie, trying to rain on the Earth Day parade. But let’s get real for a minute. Earthlings have a serious problem: the world and its climate systems are changing fast. Symbolism is fine, but symbolism alone is dangerous: most people have only a limited attention span for environmental issues, and handing a person a plastic bag ordinance is like handing them a thimble to pitch water over the side of the Titanic. There are a few very simple actions that are both meaningful and green. Here are three: How about riding a bike instead of driving a car? That’s the easy one. According to the EPA, transportation is the second leading contributor to greenhouse gasses, behind energy production. Biking is simple, efficient, cheap, clean and good for your ass. Second, eat less meat. Compared to beans and nuts, meat requires a lot more water and results in more greenhouse gasses. And finally, just have fewer children—the greening effect is exponential. As unpopular as these ideas may be, they’re all more effective at reducing the negative impact a person has on the earth than buying a hybrid car or reusable shopping bag. They just take a little effort. The consumer-power mantra that we can vote with our dollars and change the world comes easy to Americans. It’s a nice sentiment that requires minimal extra effort for the consumer, and it’s true, to some extent. The problem with feel-good shopping, however, is that it’s still shopping and still winds up feeding landfills and clogging the air. The answer to this and the next climate crisis will never be to buy more crap. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Geysers, Grids, and Public Power

I read in amazement the front-page feature story published in the Bohemian (“Voltage and Violets,” May 25). The writer begins laying the foundation for the premise of his article by stating, and this bears repeating: “Unfortunately, Sonoma County residents currently get the biggest chunk of their electricity from enormous natural gas plants located far away, and another major source of PG&E-supplied energy is Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant.” What is amazing is that geothermal energy is not taken into consideration. In fairness to the writer, the geothermal resource of the Geysers is given a nod and mentioned later. Let’s consider for a moment what the contribution from this renewable resource, located mostly in Sonoma County, providing full-time jobs to about 400 people, means to us locally. I’ll make it simple. All of the electricity that we use here in Sonoma County comes from a renewable green-energy resource—all of it. Picture it this way: the grid is like the waterways in that it is ultimately all connected, but if you live right downstream from a big lake and you turn on the tap, you get the water from that lake, not one at the other end of the state. The population of Sonoma County is around 500,000, and when we turn on all our electrical taps we can’t even begin to use all the electricity that is flowing downstream from the Geysers. Darwin’s article states just the opposite of this, and does not give proper credit to this local green-energy resource that has been generating power and providing jobs locally, 24/7, for the last 50-plus years. It is irresponsible journalism at the least and tends to give the impression that someone hasn’t done much research on what is happening right here in our own community. And while we are on the subject of the

Geysers, another important point must be made. The Geysers, contrary to what was stated in the article, have no real room to expand. There are empty fields of wildflowers where Geyser Units 1-4 and 15 used to be, and an abandoned power plant (built by the state of California and never operated) stands on a hillside, all testament to the fact that even though it is renewable, there is only so much capacity in the steam fields at the Geysers, and that the number of power plants that are currently producing is pretty much at it’s limit. I’m all for green-energy resources being developed locally and creating jobs, but agencies created by people who don’t know what they’re doing will never be successful.

MARK BARRY Santa Rosa

Darwin Responds Thanks to Mark Barry for emphasizing the issue of geothermal energy and giving the Geysers their due. He is mistaken about a few key facts, however. First, it is not true that “all of the electricity that we use here in Sonoma County comes from a renewable greenenergy resource.” PG&E supplies electricity to most Sonoma County homes and businesses, and this electricity is sourced from a mixture of power plants located in and beyond California’s borders, the largest categories of which include natural gas plants (35 percent), nuclear stations (20 percent) and large hydroelectric dams (13 percent). None of these sources can be defined as “renewable” under California law. Power from these sources feed into a regional grid, where it is mixed with other greener power supplies, making distinctions about where a specific PG&E consumer’s energy is coming from irrelevant. According to PG&E’s most recent “Renewable Portfolio Standard Compliance” report filed with the California Public Utilities Commission, the company’s current power mix includes only 17 percent renewable sources, below its state mandated target of 20 percent.

Rants

The electrical grid doesn’t work like the waterways Mr. Barry uses as an analogy. In fact, because of state mandates that investor-owned utilities purchase certain increasing percentages of renewable energy, and because of other complex factors affecting power generation and transmission, the system actually does require that consumers at one end of the state be delivered electricity generated at the other end of the state. The Geysers are a perfect example. Energy generated at the Geysers is routinely shipped south on the grid and delivered to homes and businesses in Los Angeles and as far south as San Diego. I will take Mr. Barry’s statement about the Geyser’s finite potential at face value. I’m no expert on the geology of the region, and am inclined to agree when someone is pointing out that are limits to even good things.

DARWIN BOND-GRAHAM Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

THIS MODERN WORLD

7

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five 1 First Republican debate

An independent local cal cee 11890 890 COMMUNITY BANK since Voted Best Bank in Sonoma County

Personal and Business Checking king aand nd Savings products and services: ces:

held; public closer to finding out who’s going to lose in 2012

• •

2 City of Petaluma posts

• •

3 RIP Ig Vella, former

some documents online, omits most incriminating ones

supervisor and “father of artisan cheesemaking”

4 Greg Sarris offers State

Parks $5 million—in exchange for Rohnert Park casino

5 The Flaming Lips stop

by the Arlene Francis Center, hang out, watch local bands

Loans–Consumer and Business ess Online Banking with Bill Pay aand nd PPaperless aperless way! Statements–It’s the Greener w ay! Youth Savings programs ATM locations throughout SSonoma onoma County County for your convenience A Customer Service team dedicated edicated tto o answering your call before aand nd aafter fter business hours

We invite you to e-mail, call or visit visit us us at at any any of of our our branches to answer your questions how tions aabout bout h ow Exchange Bank can become your bank. our b ank.

www.exchangebank.com ank .com 707.524.3000 00 or toll free 800.995.4066 95. 4 0 6 6 Member M ember FDIC FDIC

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

Leilani Clark

Paper

In May, the city of Santa Rosa’s project development team received a $25,000 award for its Fuel from Aquatic Biomass (FAB) project. Created in conjunction with Sonoma State University, the innovative energyproduction program uses aquatic vegetation to treat wastewater while producing renewable energy. A video about the project, created by SSU intern Caden Hare only two days before the submission deadline, was selected as a finalist by public online voting. Soon after, Hare was flown to Los Angeles to walk the “green carpet” and receive the Green Civic Leader cash prize. “It was just such an amazing experience,” he says. “It felt like the Academy Awards.” The money will be used to expand the project, including studies on how to treat byproducts of steel manufacturing in wastewater. With inquires about FAB arriving from the Department of Energy, it’s clear that Hare and the project development team are on the right track toward better ways to clean up our water.

MIXED-USE MURK Some Agenda 21ers believe that sustainable development, such as this mixed-use housing in Santa Rosa,

is designed to force people out of their cars, take away private land and facilitate government surveillance.

Hidden Agenda The ‘Agenda 21er’ crusade against sustainable development BY LEILANI CLARK

T

he words “Post Sustainability Institute” might be eerily similar to the name of the Santa Rosa– based Post Carbon Institute, but its goals couldn’t be more different. While the Post Carbon Institute promotes bike-friendly streets, transit-oriented development and SMART

trains as solutions to a growing environmental crisis, members of the Post Sustainability Institute assert that there’s a dark side to sustainable development, one that will eventually result in the loss of liberty and the stripping away of private-property rights. It may sound a little ominous. And yet the nationwide group

of activists, loosely called Agenda 21ers, could soon be to sustainable growth what the Tea Party is now to the Obama administration. Agenda 21ers believe that an 18year-old United Nations initiative, called Agenda 21, is forcing sustainable development projects in the United States. They say the initiative is corporate-driven and has infiltrated local governments with a smart-growth ) 11 agenda that will result

Keep the Peace In the land of wine and roses, it’s all too easy to forget that the United States continues to wage deadly and costly wars. As a reminder, Rep. Lynn Woolsey hosts a call for an end to permanent U.S. warfare on June 18. A vocal opponent of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Woolsey has famously spoken on the floor of the House of Representatives on the subject nearly 400 times. As the promised time for a military drawdown in Afghanistan grows closer, Woolsey is joined by Norman Solomon, Code Pink and Iraq Veterans Against War for a day of grassroots activism. “It’s Time for Peace” takes place Saturday, June 18, at San Rafael City Plaza. Fourth and Court streets, San Rafael. 1–2:30pm. 415.507.9554.—Leilani Clark

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

9 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

THE

Green Mind

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

10

FREE FR REE GREEN GRE EEN PROGRAMS! PROGRAMS!! Available A vvailable th through hrough the U Utilities tilities D Department eppartment

tĂƚĞƌͲhƐĞĸĐŝĞŶĐLJ t ĂƚĞƌͲhƐĞĸĐĐŝĞŶĐLJpr program ogram Žī ŽīĞƌƐƚŚĞĨŽůůŽǁŝŶŐƌĞďĂƚĞƐƚŽƋƵĂůŝĮĞĚƌĞƐŝĚĞŶƚƐ͗ ĞƌƐ ƚƚŚĞ ĨŽůůŽǁŝŶŐƌĞďĂƚĞƐ ƚŽƋƵĂůŝĮĞĚƌĞƐŝĚĞŶƚƐ͗ 





'ƌĞĞŶ džĐŚĂŶŐĞͻ,ŝŐŐŚĸĐŝĞŶĐLJůŽƚŚĞƐtĂƐŚ ŚĞƌ ͻͻZĂŝŶǁĂƚĞƌ,ĂƌǀĞƐƟŶŐ ZĂŝŶǁĂƚĞƌ ,ĂƌǀĞƐƟŶ ŶŐͻ'ƌĂLJǁĂƚĞƌZĞƵƐĞ 'ƌĂLJǁĂƚĞƌ ZĞƵƐĞ ͻ 'ƌĞĞŶdžĐŚĂŶŐĞͻ,ŝŐŚĸĐŝĞŶĐLJůŽƚŚĞƐtĂƐŚĞƌ

Up to to $350

$25 R Rebate ebate

$0.25/gal $0.25/ gal storage storage

$75 or more more

&&ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶŽƌƚŽƐŝŐŶͲƵƉĨŽƌĂ&ZtĂƚĞƌͲhƐĞĸĐŝĞŶĐLJŚĞĐŬͲƵƉ ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶŽƌƚƚŽƐŝŐŶͲƵƉĨŽƌĂ&ZtĂƚĞƌ Ğ ͲhƐĞĸĐŝĞŶĐLJŚĞĐŬͲƵƉ Ɖ ŐŽƚŽƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘ŽƌŐͬthŽƌĐĂůůϱϰϯͲϯϵϴϱ ŐŽƚŽƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘Ž ŽƌŐ ͬthŽƌĐĂůůϱϰϯͲϯϵϴϱ ϱ

ƌĞĞŬ^ƚĞǁĂƌĚƐŚŝƉ ƌ ĞĞŬ^ƚĞǁĂƌƌĚƐŚŝƉ pr program ogram ĞŶĐ ĞŶĐŽƵƌĂŐĞƐLJŽƵƚŽŚĞůƉƉƌŽƚĞĐƚŽƵƌĐƌĞĞŬƐďLJ͗ ŽƵ ƵƌĂŐĞƐLJŽƵ ƚŽŚĞůƉƉƌŽƚĞĐƚƚ ŽƵƌ ĐƌĞĞŬƐ ďLJ͗ ͻŶũŽ ͻŶũŽLJŝŶŐĂŚŝŬĞĂůŽŶŐĂĐƌĞĞŬƚƌĂŝůͻ ͻͻŶ ŶũŽLJŝŶŐĂŚŝ LJŝŶŐ Ő ĂĂŚŝŬĞĂůŽŶŐĂĐƌĞĞŬ ƚƌĂŝů ͻ :Ž :ŽŝŶƚŚĞƌĞĞŬ^ƚĞǁĂƌĚƐŚŝƉWƌŽŐƌĂŵ ŽŝŶƚŚĞƌĞĞŬ^ƚĞǁĂƌĚƐŚŝƉWƌŽŐƌĂŵ ͻ ͻZ ZĞƉŽƌƟŶŐƐƉŝůůƐŽƌĚƵŵƉŝŶŐ Ğ ƟŶ ƐƉŝůůƐŽƌĚƵŵƉŝŶŐ ĞƉŽƌƟŶŐ Ɛ ͻŝƐƉŽƐŝŶŐŽĨĂůůǁĂƐƚĞƐƉƌŽƉĞƌůLJ ͻŝƐƉŽƐŝŶŐŽĨĂůůǁĂƐƚĞƐƉƌŽƉ ƉĞƌůLJ &ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶĐŽŶƚĂĐƚůŝƐƚĂŝƌůĞŝĨƵƐƐĂƚϱϰϯͲϯϴϰϱŽƌĂďůĞŝĨƵƐƐΛƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘ŽƌŐ &Žƌ Žƌ ŵŽƌĞ ŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶ ĐŽŶƚĂĐĐƚ ůŝƐƚĂŝƌ ůĞŝĨƵƐƐ ĂƚϱϰϯͲϯ ϯϴϰϱŽƌĂďůĞŝĨƵƐƐΛƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘Ž ŽƌŐ ZĞƉŽƌƚƐƉŝůůƐŽƌĚƵŵƉŝŶŐϱϰϯͲϯϴϬϬ;ŝƚLJͿŽƌϱϳϲͲϭϯϲϱ;ŽƵŶƚLJͿ ZĞƉŽƌƚƐƉ ƉŝůůƐŽƌĚƵŵƉŝŶŐϱϰϯͲϯϴϬϬ;ŝƚLJͿŽƌϱϳϲͲϭϯϲϱ;ŽƵŶƚLJͿ ƚ ƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘ŽƌŐͬƐƚŽƌŵǁĂƚĞƌĂŶĚĐƌĞĞŬƐZĞĐLJĐůĞ'ƵŝĚĞĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞΛƌĞĐLJĐůĞŶŽǁ͘ŽƌŐŽƌĐĂůůϱϲϱͲϯϯϳϱ ƐƌĐŝƚLJ ŝƚ ͘ŽƌŐͬƐƚŽƌŵǁĂƚĞƌĂŶĚĐƌ Ě ĞĞŬŬƐ ZĞĐLJĐůĞ Đů ' 'ƵŝĚĞ ŝĚ ĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞΛƌ ŝů ďů Λ ĞĐLJLJĐůĞŶŽ ů ǁ͘ŽƌŐŽƌĐĂůůůů ϱϲϱ ϱϲϱͲϯϯ ϯϯ ϯϳϱ







ddĂŬĞŝƚĨƌŽŵƚŚĞdW͊ ĂĂŬĞŝƚĨƌŽŵƚŚĞ ĞddW͊  ĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂůƉƌŽŐƌĂŵŽīĞƌƐĂůŽǁĐŽƐƚ͕ĐŽŶǀĞŶŝĞŶƚ͕ĂŶĚ ĞĚƵĐĂƟŽŶĂůƉƌŽŐƌĂŵ ŽīĞƌƐ Ă ůŽǁ ĐŽƐƚ͕ĐŽŶǀĞŶŝĞŶƚ͕ĂŶĚ







ĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚĂůůLJĨƌŝĞŶĚůLJĂůƚĞƌŶĂƟǀĞƚŽďŽƩůĞĚǁĂƚĞƌ͘ ĞŶǀŝƌŽŶŵĞŶƚĂůůLJĨƌŝĞŶĚůůLJĂůƚĞƌŶĂƟǀĞ ƚŽ ďŽƩůĞĚ ǁĂƚĞƌ͘

ZĞĂƐŽŶƐƚŽdĂŬĞŝƚĨƌŽŵƚŚĞdW͊ Z ĞĂƐŽŶƐƚŽddĂĂŬĞŝƚĨƌŽŵƚŚĞddW͊  ͻͻ^ĂŶƚĂZŽƐĂŚĂƐŚŝŐŚƋƵĂůŝƚLJƚĂƉǁĂƚĞƌͻdŽŚĞůƉƉƌŽƚĞĐƚ ^ĂŶƚĂ ZŽƐĂŚĂƐŚŝŐŚƋƵĂůŝƚLJƚĂƉǁ ǁĂƚĞƌ ͻ dŽ ŽŚĞůƉƉƌŽƚĞĐƚ   

 

 

ŽƵƌůŽĐĂůǁĂƚĞƌŝŶĨƌĂƐƚƌƵĐƚƵƌĞͻZĞĚƵĐĞǁĂƐƚĞͻZĞĚƵĐĞƌŝƐŬŽĨĞdžƉŽƐƵƌĞƚŽĐŚĞŵŝĐĂůƐŝŶ ŽƵƌ ůŽĐĂů ǁĂƚĞƌ ŝŶĨƌĂƐƚƌƵ ƵĐƚƵƌĞ ͻ ZĞĚƵĐĞ ǁĂƐƚĞ ͻ ZĞĚƵĐĞ ƌŝƐŬ ŽĨ ĞdžƉŽƐƵƌĞ ƚŽ ĐŚĞŵŝĐĂůƐ ŝŶ  ƉůĂƐƟĐƐͻΨĂǀĞŵŽŶĞLJͻŶĚŵŽƌĞ͊ ƉůĂƐƟĐƐͻΨĂ Ɖ Ψ ǀĞ ŵŽŶĞLJLJͻŶĚŵŽƌĞ͊











&&ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶŽƌƚŽďƵLJLJŽƵƌŽǁŶƌĞƵƐĂďůĞdWďŽƩůĞŐŽƚŽƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘ŽƌŐͬƚĂƉ Žƌ ŵŽƌĞ ŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶ Žƌ ƚŽďƵLJLJŽƵƌ Ž ŽǁŶ ƌĞƵƐĂďůĞ d WďŽƩ ƩůĞŐŽ ƚŽ ƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘ŽƌŐ ͬƚĂƉ

ůĞĂŶŶĞƌŐLJĚǀŽĐĂƚĞ ůĞĂŶŶĞƌ ŐLJĚǀŽĐĂƚĞƉƌ ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵŽīĞƌƐFREE ŽŐƌĂŵ Ž ŽīĞƌƐ FREE ĂĚǀŝĐĞ ĂĚǀŝĐĞƚŽ^ŽŶŽŵĂŽƵŶƚLJƌĞƐŝĚĞŶƚƐ ƚŽ ^ŽŶŽ ŽŵĂ ŽƵŶƚLJƌĞƐŝĚĞŶƚƐ ŝŶƚĞƌĞƐƚĞĚŝŶƐŽůĂƌƉŽǁĞƌƌ͕ĞŶĞƌ ͕ ŐLJƐĂǀŝŶŐƐ͕ĂŶĚ ĚǁĂƚĞƌ ĞĸĐŝĞŶĐLJ͘ ŝŶƚĞƌĞƐƚĞĚŝŶƐŽůĂƌƉŽǁĞƌ͕ĞŶĞƌŐLJƐĂǀŝŶŐƐ͕ĂŶĚǁĂƚĞƌĞĸĐŝĞŶĐLJ

^ŽůĂƌͻŶĞƌŐLJͻtĂƚĞƌ ^ŽůĂƌͻ ŶĞƌŐLJͻtĂƚĞƌƌ    

t tĂŶƚƚŽƌĞĚƵĐĞLJŽƵƌĞŶĞƌŐLJƵƐĂŐĞ͕ƐĂǀĞŵŽŶĞLJ͕ŐŽŐƌĞĞŶ͍FREE ĂŶƚƚŽƌĞĚƵĐĞLJŽƵƌĞŶĞƌŐLJƵƐƐĂŐĞ͕ƐĂǀĞŵŽŶĞLJ͕͕ŐŽŐƌĞĞŶ͍ FREE workshops͕ workshops͕ ĐŽǀĞƌŝŶŐĚŝīĞƌĞŶƚƚŽƉŝĐƐ͕ĂƌĞŽīĞƌĞĚƚŚĞϮŶĚtĞĚŶĞƐĚĂLJŽĨĞĂĐŚŵŽŶƚŚ͊ ĐŽǀĞƌƌŝŶŐĚŝīĞƌĞŶƚƚŽƉŝĐƐ͕ĂƌĞŽ ŽīĞƌĞĚƚŚĞϮŶĚtĞĚŶĞƐĚĂĂLJŽĨĞĂĐŚŵŽŶƚŚ͊

&ŽƌŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶĂŶĚƚŽZ^sWĨŽƌǁŽƌŬƐŚŽƉƐŐŽƚŽ͗ƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘ŽƌŐͬͻϱϰϯͲϯϴϴϲͻΛƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘ŽƌŐ &Žƌ ŵŽƌĞ ŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽ ŽŶ ĂŶĚ ƚŽ Z^sW ĨŽƌ ǁŽƌŬƐŚ ŚŽƉƐŐ Ɛ ŐŽ ƚŽ͗ ƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘ŽƌŐ ͬ ͻ ϱϰϯ ϱϰϯͲϯϴϴϲ ϯϴϴϲ ͻ ΛƐƌĐŝƚLJ͘Žƌ ͘ Ő

Save S ave money, mo oney, reduce reduce waste, waste, & help p protect rotect our lo local cal a resources! resources! ŝƚLJŽĨ^ĂŶƚĂZŽƐĂhƟůŝƟĞƐĞƉĂƌƚŵĞŶƚͻϲϵ^ƚŽŶLJŝƌĐůĞ͕^ĂŶƚĂZŽƐĂ͕ϵϱϰϬϭͻϳϬϳͲϱϰϯͲϰϮϬϬ



Agenda 21 ( 9

11 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

in the loss of property through eminent domain and increasing land restrictions. Depending on which wing of the group is pointing fingers, Agenda 21 might also be forcing people to ride bikes, stealing family-owned land and boxing the population into congested areas to facilitate government spying. On Aug. 6, the Post Sustainability Institute sponsors a conference in Santa Rosa, “Behind the Green Mask,” featuring talks on smart meters, the “new urbanism” and “recognizing communitarianism.” One of the founders of the Post Sustainability Institute is Rosa Koire. Koire and partner Kay Tokerud are familiar names in local politics; in 2007, Tokerud was asked to step down as president of the Santa Rosa Junior College Neighborhood Association when other members labeled her a “disagreeable character.” Speaking of the pair, Neighborhood Alliance chair Judy Kennedy says, “They really rile people.” And of Tokerud’s presidency, Santa Rosa City Council member Gary Wysocky says, “She didn’t run it like a neighbor. She had other ideas.” One of those ideas was a 2007 lawsuit filed by Tokerud against the city to block the formation of a redevelopment district along the Highway 101 corridor. Judgment was awarded to the city, but the Juilliard Park area, where Tokerud owns property, was taken out of the plan, and the Gateways Redevelopment project was put on hold for three years. “I looked behind it,” says Koire, pointing to the International Council on Local Environmental Initiatives as the “implementation” arm of the United Nations, “and I found Agenda 21.” (Supervisor Valerie Brown is a board member of ICLEI, but tells the Bohemian she’s never heard of a connection between Agenda 21 and property rights.) Koire, who works as a commercial real estate appraiser specializing in eminent domain valuations for the California Department of Transportation,

describes herself a “feminist, pro-choice, pro–gay marriage, anti-war liberal.” Her contentious views on eminent domain, “not-smart” trains and bike boulevards in Sonoma County have created a deep divide with otherwise similarly-minded Democrats, who she says “started crawling out of the woodwork and attacking me.” This month, Koire spoke about Agenda 21 to an East Bay Tea Party group. “Property rights are not a right-wing issue,” says Koire of the appearance. “I don’t know if they think I’m going to hell or what, but they were very nice to me.” In fact, Tea Party groups across the nation have aligned under the anti–Agenda 21 umbrella. In Maine, a Tea Party group issued a “red alert” notice about a development proposal to ease traffic around a major highway. A recent video made by Dean Philpot, a libertarian Texan operating seven blogs including “Peak Oil Freaks,” claims that the goal of Transition Towns and the PostCarbon Institute is “takin’ yer land away from ya.” Michael Ruppert, Sebastopolbased journalist profiled in the 2009 documentary Collapse, says the Agenda 21 fear is an example of the scapegoating that occurs when societies face economic collapse. “This is a cookie-cutter tactic practiced by corporations, banks and the powers that be to sow and create political discontent,” says Ruppert, “and to separate and divide and distract via needless controversy.” “It’s unfortunate that antigovernment groups like the Post Sustainability Institute see nefarious plots behind the efforts of those working towards environmental sustainability,” says Asher Miller, executive director of the Post Carbon Institute. “After all, we likely share many beliefs—including the value of strong local communities. But I am curious to know what they envision a ‘post-sustainable’ world looks like. Here’s betting they wouldn’t actually want to find themselves or their kids there.”

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

12

Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream.

Come pla play y ...g get et health healthy y . . . or just relax!

BECOME A Sonoma County Regional Son

PARKS P AR A MEMBER! Annu Membership Includes: Annual Da Day-use ay y-use par parking pass, Free Map to all 46 Parks, Program Pr ogram Discounts D Merchandise Discounts, Invitations In nvi v to Member events, P Parks ar Member window decal

Suzanne Wandrei EcoGreen Certified 2006 Sebastopol Realtor of the Year

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 101 Morris Street - Suite. 100 Sebastopol, CA 95472 cell: 707.292.9414 Please call cell first office direct: 707.824.4260

www.suzannewandrei.com

“Of all the places I’ve ridden around the world, Sonoma County is still my favorite place to ride and enjoy the outdoors. There’s no better place to do that than our beautiful parklands.” ~Levi Leipheimer, Professional Cyclists, Park Member Get your your Membership Membe mbe at: On-line at sonomacountyparks.org, staffed stafffed park park entry entry stations, CVS/Pharmacy stores in Sonoma County, County, REI Santa Rosa, Ro osa, and many m man ny other locations locatio ons

sonomacountyparks.org sonoma coun n yp rks.org ntypar g 70 707/565-2041 07/565-2041

Small Change

Why minting pennies makes no cents BY JULIANE POIRIER

I

have no idea what songwriters Arthur Johnston and Johnny Burke were smoking when they wrote “Pennies from Heaven” in 1936, but Bing Crosby’s version claims that long ago “no one appreciated a sky that was always blue,” and so from time to time nature would vanish and people would have to scoop up pennies that rained down from above in order to purchase back amenities like “sunshine and flowers.”

Nature is vanishing for other reasons now and can’t be purchased back. Even heavenly pennies can’t pay away the heavy metal tailings that result from mining required to make pennies from Earth. Johnson and Burke’s 75-year-old lyrical myth may be the penny’s last homage now that it costs far more, both economically and environmentally, than it’s worth.

The zinc mining lobby, not surprisingly, is one of the groups arguing to keep the penny. “If it takes a lobby group to continue doing something, then I’m usually suspicious of the merits,” says Michael Visser, assistant professor of economics at Sonoma State University. The penny, according to Visser, is produced at a loss and has limited utility. “Research suggests,” Visser explains, “that eliminating the penny would not result in higher prices.” (The arguments for and against elimination of the penny are fairly represented, Visser claims, on the Wikipedia entry for “Penny debate in the United States.”) Moving ahead while others argue, bicycle shop Mike’s Bikes recently decided to ban pennies at all of its nine Bay Area locations in a program it’s calling “Letting Go of Lincoln.” Cash transactions are rounded down to the nearest nickel in the customer’s favor, and reasons on the company website include the actual cost to produce one penny ($1.79), the subsequent cumulative waste to taxpayers last year ($32 million), the hours per year the average American spends handling pennies (12) and the Red Dog Mine’s EPA pollution ranking (No. 1) for the toxic waste created in mining the zinc which makes up 97 percent of each “copper” penny made. Visser claims that when legislation is proposed to eliminate the penny, representatives from Illinois (and, of course, zinc lobbyists) routinely block it. “Continuing to mint pennies,” says Visser factitiously, “seems to be a subsidization of Illinois tourism. If they want pennies to continue to be in circulation, ask them to foot the bill.” Lincoln is honored in many ways, but in the 21st Century, the penny is no longer one of them. I suspect he’d feel shamed knowing his face adorned a pointless coin. More at www.mikesbikes.com.

First Local Bank With Mobile Banking And It’s FREE! Along with FREE checking, FREE bill pay, FREE 28,000 ATMs nationally, FREE competency with a smile

707/546-6000 ☎ www.comfirstcu.org Guerneville • Healdsburg • Sebastopol • West & Central Santa Rosa

Saving the World from High-Cost Banking for 50 Years!

osmosis D A Y S P A S A N C T U A R Y

Osmosis is Committed to Healing the Environment Visit us in an alternative fuel, hybrid or electric vehicle, by scooter, vespa, bikes, or on foot anytime during the month of June

Solar Hot Water Collectors

and RECEIVE 25% off any of our Ecofriendly products in our Spa Boutique OSMOSIS.COM Š707-823-8231 A SUSTAINABLY MANAGED GREEN SPA founding Member V ITAL P EOPLE . V ITAL P LANET .

Constructed Greywater Wetlands

13 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Green Zone

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

14

Dining LETTUCE CELEBRATE! Since its inception, the Marin Organic gleaning program has donated more than 150,000 pounds of

vegetables, eggs and dairy products to Marin County schools.

The Glean Team Marin Organic’s gleaning program rescues surplus organic farm food and delivers it to local schools BY KATRINA FRIED

I

t all started seven years ago with 200 slightly imperfect zucchinis.

Helge Hellberg had just taken up his position as the executive director of the nonprofit Marin Organic, and in an effort to better know the community he represented, he set out to tour the farms of Marin. As he stood in one of the fields of Peter

Martinelli’s Fresh Run Farms in Bolinas, Hellberg noticed a slew of gorgeous “photo-contest-sized” zucchinis clipped off the vine. He asked Martinelli why this was. The farmer explained that they’d grown too fast and were already too large to meet the market’s strict aesthetic requirements, so they were clipped to conserve the soil’s valuable nutrients. “Peter said that an eight-inch

zucchini about the thickness of two thumbs is called a ‘super fancy,’” recalls Hellberg. “Everything beyond that is called a ‘fancy’— and in today’s marketplace, no one will buy a fancy.” As a result, beautiful healthy organic fruits and vegetables are regularly plowed back into the soil simply because they are too large, too small, a bit crooked or slightly discolored.

In fact, a whopping 20 percent of all produce grown for human consumption in the United States never leaves the field. “I just thought that was crazy,” says Hellberg. “All that energy and care, the water and nutrients that go into cultivating those crops, and they’re plowed under?” So with Martinelli’s permission, Marin Organic carted off those orphaned zucchinis and donated them to a local community center—and the seed for the Organic School Lunch and Gleaning Program was planted. In the program’s first year, the goal was to glean enough organic produce to supply three local public schools. To date, under the oversight of Marin Organic’s Scott Davidson, the nonprofit has collected over 150,000 pounds of local vegetables, eggs and dairy products and donated it to over half the schools in Marin, and is now gleaning enough to feed 10,000 of the county’s 30,000 students a week. “If 30 percent of surplus produce was collected,” says Hellberg, “we could feed Marin’s entire student population.” The numbers are persuasive, and last year, the Marin Organic team spread their gospel countrywide by founding the first National Gleaning Day; 15 other states joined their cause on Sept. 20, 2010, to glean for local schools. Gleaning, the act of collecting the leftovers from harvested crops, is an age-old practice dating back to Biblical times. In the Book of Leviticus, God instructs Moses to leave the corners of the fields untouched after the land is reaped: “thou shalt leave them unto the poor, and to the stranger.” Today, the tradition remains alive through a growing number of nonprofits around the country partnering with farmers, retailers and private garden owners to collect and donate unused food to those in need. Chester Densmore, who drives the Marin Organic delivery truck, says he’s privileged to have his job—“I feel like the school-lunch Robin Hood.” The personal gratification is a great motivation, but Marin

To learn more about Marin Organic’s School Lunch and Gleaning Program, or to volunteer to glean, visit www.marinorganic.org.

Take a FREE tour of a Sonoma County vineyard!

Self-guided tours through the area’s most beautiful spots Currently available at: s Balletto Vineyards

s Matanzas Creek Winery

s Paradise Ridge Winery

s Francis Ford Coppola Winery

s Mauritson Family Winery

s Schug Carneros Estate Winery

s Landmark Vineyards

s Michel-Schlumberger Winery

s Stryker Sonoma Winery

Every day during tasting room hours!

Visit SonomaVineyardAdventures.com

Feel at Home with Your Dentist!

! Full Service Dentistry ! 21 Years in Practice ! Private insurance

accepted. Member Delta Dental ! Warm environment with knowledgable staff ! All ages welcome!

Rose Lucchese DDS 568 PETALUMA AVE SEBASTOPOL

707-829-0692

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 7PM

JAMES OLSON

The Whole Brain Path To Peace MONTGOMERY VILLAGE STORE SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 1PM

MEG WAITE CLAYTON

The Four Ms. Bradwells PETALUMA STORE SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 7PM

FREE/Zd,KEdZK>

Women’s Health Specialists

DIANA ALSTAD AND JOEL KRAMER

The Passionate Mind Revisited MAIN STAGE WEST 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol

confidential compassionate nonjudgmental More Than Just Health Care...

707.537.1171 DŽƌŶŝŶŐŌĞƌWŝůů͕WƌĞŐŶĂŶĐLJdĞƐƟŶŐ͕ ďŽƌƟŽŶ^ĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ͕,ĞĂůƚŚĚǀŝĐĞ>ŝŶĞ noma Hwy (Hwy 12 )S 5 So osa 441 www.cawhs.org uite D, Santa R

www.copperfieldsbooks.com

15 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Organic also champions the importance of financial viability. In addition to supplying organic products gratis, the organization facilitates direct sales between participating farmers and schools to supplement what’s donated, which puts money in the growers’ pockets and gives the schools more bang for their buck. “Everybody benefits,” explains Adrienne Baumann, who replaced Hellberg at the helm as Marin Organic’s executive director this past April. One of the first to recognize the value in such a program was the Novato Unified School District’s food and nutritional services director Miguel Villarreal. “It was the perfect opportunity to help educate our community about the value of buying and eating local organic food,” says Villarreal, who’s held his position since 2002. At the height of the agricultural season in August and September, 20–25 percent of food in Novato’s 13 school cafeterias is gleaned or purchased from farms within a 20-mile radius. “We glean on Monday, the food is delivered and Tuesday, and it’s on the kids’ plates on Wednesday,” says Villarreal, who encourages parents, students and teachers to volunteer for Marin Organic’s weekly “Glean Team.” Individual classes also glean together on designated “Farm Days”—the kids get their hands in the dirt, harvest food for donation and meet the growers. Recently, the USDA paid a visit to Novato to learn more about Villarreal’s success at bringing local organic food into the school system. “The model we’ve created here works,” says Villarreal, whose future plans include creating an organic school farm, so that students need only “walk a hundred yards—or even a hundred feet—to help grow and hand-pick the food that they eat for lunch the next day.” Adds Villarreal, “Now that’s local.”

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y

and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

El Coqui Puerto Rican. $-$$. Authentic and delicious Puerto Rican home cooking. Plan on lunching early–the place fills up fast. 400 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8868.

Vineyards Inn Spanish.

Hamburger Ranch & Pasta Farm American. $. Old-fashioned, informal mom’n’-pop roadhouse. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 31195 N Redwood Hwy, Cloverdale. 707.894.5616.

Hopmonk Tavern Pub fare. $$. More than serviceable bar food with a menu that hops the globe. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Johnny Garlic’s California. $$. At Johnny’s, garlic is God–all dishes are infused with the glorious stinking rose. Lunch and dinner daily. 8988 Brooks Rd, Windsor. 707.836.8300.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Phyllis’ Giant Burgers American. $. Come with a hearty appetite for an oldfashioned patty. Three locations: 4910 Sonoma Hwy, Ste B, Santa Rosa. 707.538.4000. 924 Diablo Ave, Novato. 415.989.8294. 2202 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.456.0866.

The Red Grape Pizza. $-$$. Delectable New Havenstyle thin-crust pizzas with fresh ingredients and a dazzling array of toppings. Lunch and dinner daily. 529 First St W, Sonoma. 707.996.4103.

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly, plentiful staff at outstanding

$$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

Washoe House Roadhouse. $$. Since 1859, serving straightforward roadhouse grub and Italian fare. Canned green beans, buffalo burgers, amazingly satisfying pies. The bar alone is worth a trip. Lunch and dinner daily. Stony Point and Roblar roads, Cotati. 707.795.4544.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch and dinner,

Mon-Sat. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sat. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Hatam Persian. $. Fresh and lushly seasoned regional fare. Lunch and dinner, TuesSun. 821 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.8888.

Koffee Klatch Diner. $. Amid 1950s Hollywood memorabilia, suck on a delicious chocolate shake and enjoy the tacky charm. 57 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.454.4784.

M&G’s Burgers & Beverages American. $. The ultimate in American cuisine. Crispy fries, good burgers and friendly locals chowing down. 2017 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.454.0655.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677. Portelli Rossi Italian. $$. Tasty and affordable fare in a cozy setting. Lunch, Tues-Sat; dinner, Tues-Sun. 868 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.892.6100.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Station House Cafe American-California. $$. Innovative menu, fresh local seafood and range-fed meats. Outdoor dining; full bar. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes. 415.663.1515.

Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch,

Mon-Fri; dinner, Mon-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620.

N A PA CO U N TY Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly French, but not aggressively so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.244.6328.

Go Fish Seafood/sushi. $$$$$. An über-trio of chefs all in one fantastic fresh fish house: Cindy Pawlcyn, Victor Scargle and Ken Tominaga. Need we say more? Open for lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700. Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Miguel’s Mexican-

Open Sesame The Kitchen Door, the new eatery in Napa’s Oxbow Market helmed by chef Todd Humphries and restaurateur Richard Miyashiro, is primed, prepped and ready to open on June 14. A friends-and-family preview dinner last week gave a sneak peek at the restaurant’s menu and design. Soaring ceilings, an enormous glass skylight and white subwaytiled walls give the sunlit dining room its airy loftlike feel, while shelves filled with general store goods, a low-hanging rack of old copper pots and mismatched rustic wooden chairs and tables bring the room back down to earth. Diners place their orders at a counter, grab a number and find a seat inside or on the patio while their meal is prepared by Humphries and his team in the open kitchen. The menu of locally driven, multiethnic comfort food features a selection of salads, soups, pastas and snacks, including chicharrónes from Ryan Farr’s 4505 Meats and a Fatted Calf charcuterie plate from literally just around the corner. The wood-burning oven turns out perfect puffy and crunchy flatbreads and pizzas, and entrée highlights include a burger made with Kobe beef from nearby Snake River Farms and grilled king salmon served atop a mound of sweet corn relish—at $18.95, this is the most expensive item on the menu. The Straus Family soft serve ice cream for dessert is a must-try. The Kitchen Door will be open for lunch and dinner seven days a week starting June 14. For more information, visit www.kitchendoornapa.com.—Katrina Fried

daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Californian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna

Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner

$-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.226.2633.

puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.259.0633.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Award Winning Dog Training ~ Dog Boarding Doggie Day Care 707.542.2066 2404 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa

www.olivetkennel.com

the buch

revivedrinks.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Tommy’s Wok Chinese. $-$$. Tasty and filling Chinese fare without the greasy weigh-down. Nice vegetarian selections, too. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun.3001 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.5818.

17

SMALL BITES

Wineries

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment.

SONOMA CO U N TY Boisset Taste of Terroir

Best Chinese Restaurant

Compare local Pinot with Burgundy from Burgundy in French wine magnate’s snazzy tasting salon. 320 Center St., Healdsburg. Daily 10:30am–5:30pm; till 9pm Thursday–Saturday. Fees vary, $12–$100. 707.473.9707.

D’Argenzio Winery

Best Chinese in Marin

Homestyle Chinese Cooking

Novato • 415-892-8838 Vintage Oak Shopping Center

Petaluma • 707-762-6888 Theater Square, C Street & 2nd W W W. J E N N I E L O W. C O M

Much like the family-run, backstreet bodegas of the old country that the decor invokes. Sangiovese, Moscato di Fresco, and Randy Rhoads Cab. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Daily 11am–5pm. $10 tasting fee. 707.280.4658.

Eric Ross Winery Just friendly folks pouring Pinot, Zin and Marsanne-Roussane; don’t ask about the rooster. Ask about the rooster. 14300 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday-Monday 11am– 5pm.707.939.8525. Foppiano Vineyards Over 100 years old, Foppiano produces wines that can be described as simple but delicious. 12707 Old Redwood Hwy., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.433.7272.

Gundlach Bundschu Winery (WC) A fun, casual winery with enjoyable wines. Shakespeare and Mozart performed on the grounds in the summer. 2000 Denmark St., Sonoma. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.938.5277.

Korbel Champagne Cellars A large, ivy-covered winery with a huge tasting room, fun staff, excellent deli and hourly tours, a perfect stop on the way to the Russian River. 13250 River Road, near Rio Nido. Open daily, 10am– 5pm daily. 707.824.7316.

Ledson Winery & Vineyards What warlock, many high-way travelers wondered, within those stone walls broods? Happily, Ledson’s wine-wizard is a Zinfandel zealot, making 10 from the zaftig grape. 7335 Sonoma Hwy.,

Kenwood. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.537.3810.

Moondance Cellars Dogs, Cabs and cars are the focus; when a supercharged 1965 Corvette is parked in front, the vintner is in the house. Also, Port and Sherry from Sonoma Valley Portworks. 14301 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Daily 11am–6pm. $5 tasting fee. 707.938.7550.

Sausal Winery Simple, rural, without corporate crosspromotions and pretense. Good Zinfandel and nice cats. 7370 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.433.5136.

Stryker Sonoma Vineyards Off-thebeaten-path winery features beautiful views and spectacular wine, the best of which are the reds. 5110 Hwy. 128, Geyserville. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.433.1944.

Wilson Winery Friends should never let friends drink shitty wine. Do you have a truck? After all, friends don’t let friends drink alone. 1960 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 5pm. 707.433.4355.

N A PA CO U N TY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Thursday– Sunday, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.942.5854.

Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dust– Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tastings $15–$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Bennett Lane Winery The old trope “beer-drinking NASCAR fans vs. Chardonnaysipping highbrows” runs out of

gas at a winery that sponsors an annual NASCAR race and has its own car, emblazoned with grapes. A Roman emperor who appreciated hearty vino as much as a good chariot race inspired Maximus White and Red “feasting wines.” 3340 Hwy. 128, Calistoga. 707.942.6684.

Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345. Flora Springs Winery & Vineyards Napa Valley’s latest geotectonic eruption on Highway 29 is a stylish place to explore famous Chardonnay, Meritage blend and wineryexclusive Italian varietals. Hip but not too cool, the 30year-old family winery surely has a sense of humor as well as sense of place. 677 S. St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. Tasting fees, $15–$25. 707.967.8032.

Hess Collection Winery An intellectual outpost of art and wine housed in the century-old Christian Brother’s winery. Cab is the signature varietal. 4411 Redwood Road, Napa. Open daily, 10am–4pm. 707.255.1144.

Mumm Cuvée Napa Californian-style fizz factory, all barn and no chateau, offers a robust account of how the bubbles get in the bottle. Sparkling winetastings offered on the patio, or take it to the next level in plush love seats on the Oak Terrace. Sparkling red is novel; DVX Brut among the best in the valley. Photography gallery includes Ansel Adams prints and other exhibits. 8445 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–5pm daily. Tasting $6–$20; Oak Terrace $30. 707.967.7700.

Summers Estate Wines Excellent Merlot and that rarest of beasts, Charbono. Small tasting room and friendly staff. 1171 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Open daily, 10am– 4:30pm. 707.942.5508.

8ZLUO

19 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Willamette, Dammit

I

n the lore of California wine, international fame ensued when a few Napa Valley bottles bested their French counterparts in a blind tasting. Oregon’s breakaway moment came a few years later, when a Willamette Valley Pinot Noir scored . . . well, a close second to a top Burgundy. Très Oregonian. While we usually train the tip of our tongue on Pinot Noir of the North Bay, this week we find ourselves in the Burgundy of the north, only an hour and change out of the Sonoma County Airport via a Horizon Air’s Bombardier.

Copious rain and gray skies are hallmark hazards of Oregon winegrowing, but last year it was flocks of migratory robins from Canada, says winemaker Stewart Boedecker. Boedecker Cellars is a young urban winery in Portland’s Northwest industrial district, where the main aroma is of beer—courtesy of the Pyramid Brewery across the tracks. With notes of nutmeg and classic, demure fruit, the 2009 Barrel Select Willamette Valley Pinot Noir ($16) has an unexpectedly lush palate of black fruit over a cranberry-tart core. A random stroll through sleepy McMinnville finds us at Eyrie Vineyards, home to the famed also-ran of 1979. In this antique warehouse, a Frenchman pours the 2007 Pinot Noir Reserve ($60). Delicate, suggesting sautéed shiitake, crumbled bacon and Mandarin orange peel, with flavors like a tea of dried cranberry and cherry, this Pinot sees only 10 percent new oak, the balance including neutral barrels at least 12 years old, an age when many have long since been sawed in half and planted with tomatoes. Coincidentally, a portrait of Eyrie cofounder Diana Lett graces some labels of the equally venerable Adelsheim Vineyard. Its 2008 Allette Pinot Noir ($45), Pommard clone, has just a ghost of the cherry-cola aroma that’s familiar to Russian River Valley enthusiasts. The scene around a sign announcing the Yamhill viticultural area is unlike anything in California’s wine country. Fields of hay, orchards of hazelnuts—or filberts, if you will—and the occasional bright red rhododendron. Not a grapevine in sight. (End-to-end vineyard vistas are not the norm here, where total vineyard acreage is only one-third of that in Sonoma County alone.) The WillaKenzie Estate is high on a hill, above lush lowland grass reserved for a lazing herd of longhorn cattle (see above). From the terrace of the industrial-styled winery, we spy two red-tailed hawks swooping in circles above the slopes, while a crew works the vines below. The 2009 Estate Cuvée Pinot Noir ($28) features a bouquet of dried cherries, graphite; the fruit is light, but the silky texture is the key. Have we found that Oregon Pinot is a less fruit-forward beverage than that produced in the North Coast in this too-brief survey? Yes, but not in the same way that our generic Californiaappellated Pinot is simply weaker. Like many things up here—from the drizzling rain to strangely polite drivers—it just takes some getting used to.—James Knight

Visit the

Cokas Diko Outlet

with savings up to 20-80% off retail prices! Monday-Saturday 10-4, Sunday 11-4

WAREHOUSE OUTLET All Sales Final. No adjustments on prior purchases. No store credit or gift cards accepted.

3499 Industrial Drive, Santa Rosa

Cokasdiko.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

20

Back to the Land For almost 20 years, former naval base Skaggs Island has been a dilapidated home to native wildlife and habitat— now it’s finally being converted back into a nature preserve BY JULIANE POIRIER PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEILA-ANNE CAVE´

y first view of Skaggs Island is blurred by rain, and by the confused feeling that comes when a word applied to a land feature doesn’t seem to match up.

“All this is Skaggs Island,” my guide says, gesturing with a sweep of his arm. From the bridge over the Napa Slough, where I stand with U.S. Fish and Wildlife manager Don Brubaker, all I see through the rain are brackish fields and a pattern of channels reaching toward the eastern horizon. It requires some imagination to think of this as the site of an active military base, but that’s exactly what Skaggs Island was for over 50 years. Since 1993, when the base was decommissioned, wildlife and habitat have been living among the ruins—the cracked concrete, dilapidated duplexes and bombedout buildings of the military-industrial complex. Now, thanks to conservation efforts, Skaggs Island is slowly being converted back into restored wetlands. Unlike the Marin Islands, farther out to sea and distinctly observable as dry land surrounded by water, Skaggs Island appears to the regular observer as a marsh. It’s only an island as long as the pumps are working and more than 30 miles of channels are diverting water away from a site that, if left to nature, would return to the tidal swamp it was when Spanish explorers first arrived. The Spaniards, seeing the existing pseudo-islands formed by natural tidal channels, dyked and dredged waterways to drain the land for horses and hay farming. One patch of the resulting acreage remained in farming until World War II, when the Navy took over most of it for a communications base, Naval Security Group Activity Skaggs Island. There, the Navy intercepted and decoded Soviet radio communications, transmitted special-intelligence information and carried out the American military duties of the Cold War. Today, a half-century later, evidence of the once thriving military community here has all but disappeared. Brubaker and I leave the rainy bridge and drive a few hundred feet to the entrance to Skaggs Island, its 3,300 acres now owned by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and a key piece—about 25 percent—of the 13,000-acre San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Skaggs Island includes natural habitat for the California clapper rail and the salt marsh harvest mouse, both federally endangered species. Brubaker unlocks the main gate that keeps unauthorized visitors out until a plan for appropriate public access is devised. But intruders get in, Brubaker explains, pointing to road reflectors shot to fragments and to pump housing recently vandalized. The pumping apparatus is the only infrastructure the Navy left behind, to keep water off of the one remaining hay farm on Skaggs Island.

) 22

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

M

21

Back to the Land ( 21

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: An owl inside the

old Navy barracks, now demolished; a snake slithers along the deserted two-mile road between the highway and the former base; and ďŹ sh thrive in a base pond. NEXT PAGE: Deer explore Skaggs Island while in the background stands a water tower, now destroyed; the slough gives Skaags its island status until a complete wetlands conversion. FOR MORE: A massive historical archive of Skaggs Island photos and stories from the Cold War era up to the present day can be found at www.navyhistory.com.

23 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

“You can see where the farmed area starts,” says Brubaker, pointing into the rainy distance as he drives us down the main road, where weeds push through cracks in the asphalt. Native jackrabbits and quail, along with non-native ring-necked pheasants, saunter rather than sprint in front of our slow-moving truck, as if to flaunt knowledge that they now own the place. But nature doesn’t own the farm that comes into focus past the wild radish crowding the roadside, and neither does the public. When the U.S. government took over the land for its Naval base in 1942, paying $52 an acre, it left 1,100 acres in hay under private ownership. The deal then struck made it the Navy’s job to pump water off the adjacent farm. The agreement is still binding at a present pumping cost of $50,000

a year, but the responsibility now falls to the Wildlife Service. The Wildlife Service offered farm owner Jim Haire $6,000 an acre for the property— $6.6 million. But Haire has thus far refused, claiming the land is worth triple that amount. Wildlife advocates, ruing that more than 80 percent of the original tidal marshes in the San Francisco Bay have been lost to development, hope those acres might someday become part of the refuge. “We’ve been excited about the addition of Skaggs Island,” said Brubaker. “It’s an important stopover along the Pacific flyway for migratory birds. We think of it as a once-missing puzzle piece for restoration of the North Bay.” Brubaker says the refuge is the result of years of work among the Navy, the Wildlife Service

and a number of partners in the wildlife-advocacy community, including Congresswoman Lynn Woolsey, who introduced legislation that removed bureaucratic impediments so the property could be transferred. The Navy performed environmental cleanup of the site, and last year demolished more than a hundred structures, including eyesores that had fallen to ruin and been vandalized for the past 17 years. Transference became official March 31, 2011. Yet in its heyday, Skaggs Island had been a well-tended community, as anyone can observe simply by studying the photos posted on the internet by military personnel, including one black-

and-white image of a proud officer holding a trophy in the Skaggs Island bowling alley, back when 270 residents could shop at a base commissary, attend services in a chapel and go boating from a dock along a protective seawall. As we drive past these former sites, I see—barely visible among thriving wildlife, lush greenery and water channels—a few weedy roads leading nowhere, a couple of pump sheds and the old seawall, still holding back the tide that may one day fully reclaim the eerily beautiful Skaggs Island.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

#####

.”THE CINEMATIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE YEAR.” MICK LASALLE

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

“EVOKES THE WONDERMENT OF LIFE’S EXPERIENCE.” ROGER EBERT

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT SUMMERFIELD CINEMAS

STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 17

Santa Rosa (707) 522-0330

Crush WHERE YOU LIVE

The week’s events: a selective guide

N A PA

SA N R A FA E L

FORE!

COME ON

DOLPHIN ROCK

CARLINESE

Being a festival regular in Northern California is a lot like being a golf fan. Just like the Masters opens the season as the first major golf tournament, the Harmony Festival, held last weekend, kicks off a string of long-running annual festivals: the Kate Wolf Memorial Festival (June 24–26), Reggae on the River (July 16–17), the Gaia Festival (Aug. 5–7) and Earthdance (Sept. 23–25). This weekend, it’s the Sierra Nevada World Music Festival (June 17–19), with Toots & the Maytals, Ozomatli, Steel Pulse, Rebelution, Anthony B and others. Friday–Sunday, June 17–19, at Mendocino County Fairgrounds. 14400 Hwy. 128, Boonville. $60–$70 per day. www.snwmf.com.

Some country stars turn into reality show contestants, some turn into bluegrass icons and still others go on television to sell toothpaste. Mary Chapin Carpenter has done none of these things. Instead, the singer who’s still defined by the early crossover smash album Come On Come On turned to print media, writing a column for the Washington Times. Since the tepid reaction to her 2001 album Time*Sex*Love, Carpenter has had nothing left to lose, carrying a stark honesty about love, music and politics. She plays on Sunday, June 19, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 7:30pm. $40–$50. 707.259.0123.

Readers of our Green Zone column will recall the recent story of Schuyler Schwartz, who founded the Imagination Film Festival after watching a moving documentary about dolphin fishermen, ‘The Cove.’ The film screens this week in San Rafael, where filmmakers Ric O’Barry and Louis Psihoyos will be on hand to discuss the plight of the dolphin population in Japan and the Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir, who was similarly moved into action by the film, will perform a set of music. It’s all happening Tuesday, June 21, at the Smith Rafael Film Center. 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael. 7pm. $40. 415.454.1222.

“Never argue during a circus.” That’s sound advice for any relationship, but for George Carlin, it held an extra significance: all of life often was a circus anyway. This and other relationship axioms, like “Compliment and flatter Sally all day long,” are found in the new book by Carlin’s wife Sally Wade, The George Carlin Letters: The Permanent Courtship of Sally Wade. For the last 10 years of his life, Carlin sent his wife love notes: some goofy, some profane, all very romantic in their own way. Wade reads and discusses the book on Tuesday, June 21, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. 7pm. Free. 415.927.0960.

LES FLEURS Not to Reason Why celebrate their new record, ‘The Book of Hours,’ June 18 at the Phoenix Theater. See Clubs, p33.

CORTE MADERA

—Gabe Meline

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

CULTURE

25

ArtsIdeas Š Rosemarie Lion Photography

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

SECOND DANCE Jessica Wysocky and Ellie Gossage are Angela and Nick in this years’ production.

Love Revival

Walking Elephant’s ‘Prop 8 Love Stories’ to run in New York BY DAVID TEMPLETON

E

verybody who saw it last June kept saying, ‘You can’t stop now! The show must go on!’�

“

Director Brian Glenn Bryson, describing initial reactions to the play Prop 8 Love Stories, took the audience’s advice. Unveiled last summer under the banner of Bryson’s Walking Elephant Theatre Co., the play continues

this year literally coast to coast, from Sebastopol to New York City. “People said Prop 8 Love Stories should, you know, travel the world,� says Bryson, “that we should take it to Africa, to Ohio, to Alabama, to Alaska—because this play has the power to make a change.� Walking Elephant is a unique company, made up of young actors, writers, musicians and artists between the ages of 10 and 17. Using the same documentary

theater techniques made popular with plays like The Laramie Project and the stageworks of Anna Deveare Smith, the members of Walking Elephant choose a subject of monumental signiďŹ cance that few people want to talk about—an “elephant in the room.â€? They interview people who have experience with the subject and, with Bryson as co-director, fashion the interviews into performance pieces. Prop 8 Love Stories is

constructed from eight interviews with eight couples, ďŹ ve of them same-gender, three of them mixedgender. The actors conducted the interviews themselves, traveling with Bryson to meet the couples. The subjects include Molly McKay, an Oakland-based attorney and civil rights lawyer, and her partner, Davina Kotulski, a clinical psychotherapist and the author of Why You Should Give a Damn About Gay Marriage; Robert and Maben Rainwater, married contractors from Sebastopol who’ve adopted three kids; Rabbi Jerry Danzig and wife, Joy, of Santa Rosa; Sally Miller Gearhart, the ďŹ rst openly lesbian educator to earn tenure at a major university; and Phyllis Lyon, the ďŹ rst woman to legally marry another woman (the late Del Martin), which ushered in a wave of same-sex marriages that continued until the passage of California’s Proposition 8 in November 2008 ended the right of gay and lesbian couples to marry. “The idea for this play came to life at the same moment that Obama won the election,â€? explains Bryson. “For a few moments, there was this great sense of joy and hope, and just a few minutes later we all found out that Prop. 8 had passed too. It was so unreal. It was such a punch in the gut.â€? Raised in Arizona, where the schoolyard playground was an intensely homophobic place, Bryson found himself in the wake of Prop. 8 trying to imagine what it must be like for gay kids to grow up in such an environment. “The worst thing you could call another kid was gay,â€? he remembers. “Thinking about it, I realized that if I’d been a gay kid growing up, I probably would have been tempted to kill myself, knowing how alone I would have felt. But if a play like Prop 8 Love Stories had come to my school—a

pay the bills in New York. At the same time, these two shows at home will be a great warm-up for the cast, just before we all climb onto the plane.” In addition to drawing those who want to support the off-Broadway shows, Bryson hopes that people will bring friends and family who are still on the fence about the whole same-sex-marriage issue.

27

Ipmjtujd!'! Qsfwfoujwf!! Efoujtusz gps!zpvs!gbnjmz" Warm, gentle and caring, Dr. Mallory, trained in both Germany and the U.S., listens and responds to your every need. CHILDREN & ADULTS COSMETICS/FIK?F;FEK@8›D<I:LIP&D<K8C=I<<   

Es/!Nbsjf!Nbmmpsz-!E/E/T 76 Doctors Park Drive, Santa Rosa 707.542.7800 | drmallory.com

‘This play really does change people’s hearts. It changes their minds. And I believe it can change the world.’

).DcZ=djgBVhhV\Z EVbeZgZY;ZZi$GZ[aZmdad\n8ZciZg

'*DcZ=djg;ddiBVhhV\Z ^cXajYZh]ZVY!Vgb!h]djaYZgh!WVX` 8Vaa,%,",,-",--lll#_Zhh^Z_^c\hbVhhV\Z#Xdb &+&@ZcijX`nHigZZi!EZiVajbV

Ayurvedic “One of the greatest experiences of my life was when a woman pulled up next to me in a parking lot and said, ‘I just want to thank you. I was a ‘Yes on 8’ person, and my 11-year-old daughter and I saw your play together, and on the way home we started talking about it and we both started crying. I had to pull the car over, and I basically told her that I’d been wrong. That play of yours helped me change my mind.’ “How amazing is that!” Bryson says. “This play really does change people’s hearts. It changes their minds. And I believe it can change the world.” ‘Prop 8 Love Stories’ plays Sunday, June 12, at Main Stage West (104 N. Main St., Sebastopol; 2pm; $20–$25; www.mainstagewest.com) and on Saturday, June 18, at SSU’s Evert B. Person Theater (1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park; 3pm; $20–$25; 707.664.2353).

Indian Head Massage • improves mobility in neck

and shoulders • relief from tension headaches,

eyestrain, and sinusitis

Margery Smith 707.544.9642

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

play that told real stories of real people who’d found love and happiness and acceptance—well, that would probably have saved my life.” Prop 8 Love Stories premiered at Cinnabar Theater in Petaluma, sparked a sensation and eventually ran in theaters all over the Bay Area, from the Curtain Call Theater in Guerneville to the Magic in San Francisco. The last performances of the show were staged in the fall, but the notion of keeping it alive never left Bryson. Earlier this year, when a friend suggested the original cast try and take the show to New York, Bryson made some calls. Shortly afterward, the announcement went out: Prop 8 Love Stories would have a two-week run off-Broadway in New York this July. “The stars really lined up on this one,” Bryson says. “First this incredible script came into being, and then this incredibly talented, extremely committed cast. These kids, they really feel that they are walking down the street with Martin Luther King on this one. As the director and producer, I’m basically in the position of being the gatekeeper. Am I going to open the gate, let this continue, or am I going to move on to the next thing? I decided this was a oncein-a-lifetime opportunity, and so we’re keeping the gate open, to see how far we can take this. “Of course, like most things,” he adds, “first you decide to do it—and then you have to pay for it.” The New York run, to take place at the New York Theatre Workshop, will cost upwards of $25,000, only half of which has been raised so far. With opening night just over six weeks away, the company of 16 actors is hard at work raising the remaining funds, securing a marketing team and preparing to take the show across the United States. “Since there are a lot of people kicking themselves because they missed the opportunity to see the show the last time we did it,” says Bryson, “we decided to stage a couple of performances right here in Sonoma County. If we can pack the theaters, we might end up with enough to

PA I D A D V E R T I S I N G S E C T I O N

ART

G

A

L

L

E

R

Stage Alessandra Mello

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

Y

BOUNCE Wesley Taylor and Mary Birdsong lace up their skates.

Tuneless ‘Tales’ Bay Area classic is set to music— with mixed results BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

wish I could just be a romantic . . . and skip past the ‘hopeless’ part!” With those words, wistfully spoken by the character of Michael “Mouse” Tolliver (Wesley Taylor), playwright Jeff Whitty (Avenue Q) sets the bittersweet tone of Tales of the City, the glitzy new musical adaptation of Armistead Maupin’s iconic novels, recently opened at San Francisco’s American Conservatory Theater.

Call Today to Advertise! 707.527.1200 sales@bohemian.com

Originally published as a newspaper serial in the 1970s, Tales of the City has become a beloved touchstone for residents of the Bay Area, describing all that is most

appealing—and indefinably mysterious—about San Francisco. Yet in adapting those tales to the stage in what is clearly intended as a Broadway-bound show, Whitty, with songwriters Jake Shears and John Garden, have de-emphasized the mysteries of Maupin’s original. By focusing their attentions on the romantic yearnings of the story’s many eccentric characters, the creators have decided to appeal to the hearts of audience members, many of whom will take their seats already in love with the story. For those wholly unfamiliar with Tolliver, Mrs. Madrigal, Marianne Singleton and the other residents of 28 Barbary Lane, the total immersion experience of Tales might be a little less welcoming. The major problem with this musical is the music, most of it somewhat tuneless and, except for the outrageously filthy whorehouse anthem “Ride ’Em Hard and Put ’Em Down Wet,” hardly memorable. Clearly still a work in progress, Tales does offer plenty of highenergy flashback fun, crammed as it is with disco-balled spectacle, omnivorous sexual adventure and the expected smattering of rollerskating men dressed as nuns. The cast is largely solid, with an impressive turn by Broadway actress Judy Kaye as Anna Madrigal, the pot-growing landlady and secret-keeping force of nature who watches over her residents like a mildly dangerous mother hen. As Singleton, the wide-eyed, innocent newcomer to sexy San Francisco, Betsy Wolfe nicely conveys her gradual self-discovery. Whitty’s strongest suit is his way with multiple characters, allowing story lines to crisscross without becoming indistinguishable. In most cases, those individual tales are love stories—love lost, love found or love found to be unnecessary if you find the right family and your own comfortable corner of the wide, weird world. ‘Tales of the City’ runs Tuesday– Sunday through July 24 at American Conservatory Theater. Tuesday– Sunday at 8pm; July 17 at 7pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays and on July 13, 16 and 23. 415 Geary St., San Francisco. 415.749.2228. www.act-sf.org.

Film

29 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

BY THE SWORD Mikijiro Hira and Koji Yakusho, before the 45-minute battle.

Samurai Sanctum ‘13 Assassins’ reveals war’s horrors BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

akashi Miike’s hit film 13 Assassins mulls over something novel in a samurai film: how terrible it is to be transfixed by a sword, and how much a man has to mentally prepare himself for the possibility.

It’s the middle of the 1800s. Samurai are accustomed to their rank as mere decoration, requiring no duties, and none is ready for what sword-fighting entails. Miike shows us what that means by opening the film with an elder noble (Uchino Masaaki) committing an act of seppuku in political protest. It takes some nerve-steadying for the old man to commit the disgusting yet unavoidable task. The self-murder is the last straw in a national crisis. The shogun’s brother, Lord Naritsugu (Goro Inagaki), is a Caligula who rapes and mutilates anyone he pleases. Recruited to do something is Shinzaemon, played by Koji Yakusho, maybe the most stirring Japanese actor since Mifune. (Yakusho resembles Patrick Stewart, with an aura of authority that matches a personal mildness.) It falls to Shinzaemon to organize an ambush that can strike and wipe out this highly placed madman. Essential to the assassination will be outwitting the psycho’s all-too-sane general (Masachika Ichimura). The time-honored mixed bag is assembled. Most flamboyant is Yusuke Iseya as a mosquito-bitten hunter who is lethal with a rock in a sling. There’s also a suave gambler (Shinzaemon’s easy-going nephew) and the usual mercenary ronin. 13 Assassins is capped with a battle lasting some 45 minutes. Takeshi dreams up a long, muddy siege with huge man-traps that corral the troops, and firebombs that burn them alive. The ultimate lesson here is that war is less glorious than it sounds. That’s nothing new. But it’s Koji’s gravity we take with us, and the shock of the battle, more a brutal slamdance than a Kurosawa ballet.

Going Away For the 4th? G e t a FREE* Get FREE* Nig N i g hts h t s Stay Stay Book B ook yyour our p pet et a stay stay ffor or a m minimum inimum o off 3 d days, ays, iincluding ncluding 4th off JJuly, night off tthe he 4 th o uly, aand nd tthe he n i g ht o tthe he 4 4th th iiss ffree! re e !

7707.542.3766 07.542.3766

wwww.fourpawspetranch.com w w. f o u r p a w s p e t r a n c h . c o m 33410 4 1 0 Guerneville G u e r n e v i l l e RRoad o a d SSanta a n t a RRosa, o s a , CCAA 995401 5401

‘13 Assassins’ opens Friday, June 17, at Summerfield Cinemas. 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

ΎΎZĞƐƚƌŝĐƟŽŶƐĂƉƉůLJ͘ĂŶŶŽƚďĞĐŽŵďŝŶĞĚǁŝƚŚĂŶLJŽƚŚĞƌŽīĞƌ͘ ZĞƐƚƌŝĐƟŽŶƐĂƉƉůLJ͘ĂŶŶŽƚďĞĐŽŵďŝŶĞĚǁŝƚŚĂŶLJŽƚŚĞƌŽīĞƌ͘ ZĞƐĞƌǀĂƟŽŶƐƌĞƋƵŝƌĞĚ͘KŶĞĐŽƵƉŽŶƉĞƌĨĂŵŝůLJƉůĞĂƐĞ͘džƉŝƌĞƐϳͬϰͬϮϬϭϭ͘ ZĞ Ɛ Ğ ƌ ǀ Ă Ɵ Ž Ŷ Ɛ  ƌ Ğ Ƌ Ƶ ŝ ƌ Ğ Ě ͘  K Ŷ Ğ  Đ Ž Ƶ Ɖ Ž Ŷ  Ɖ Ğ ƌ  Ĩ Ă ŵ ŝ ů LJ  Ɖ ů Ğ Ă Ɛ Ğ ͘   dž Ɖ ŝ ƌ Ğ Ɛ  ϳ ͬ ϰ ͬ Ϯ Ϭ ϭ ϭ ͘

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

30

Outdoor Dining 7 Days A Week Reservations Advised

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

DIN N E R & A SHOW

SINGER/SONGWRITER SERIES June 16 Hosted by Lauralee Brown Thur

7:00pm / No Cover

Fri

June 17 Fri

June 24

Green Lantern (PG-13; 114 min.) Ryan Reynolds (Definitely Maybe) is Hal Jordan, the

FIREWHEEL

BBQs on the Lawn

Gates Open at 3:00pm • Music at 4:00pm Father’s Day with

June 19 PABLO CRUISE

BIG SANDY & HIS FLY-RITE BOYS

RED MEAT ## # 4TH OF JULY WEEKEND with special guests

THE PETER ROWAN July 3 BLUEGRASS BAND

## #

Sun

Mon

PETER ROWAN & FRIENDS 2ND ANNUAL BLUEGRASS BIRTHDAY BASH WITH VERY SPECIAL GUESTS T HE ROWAN BROTHERS

July 4

The Art of Getting By (PG-13; 84 min.)

Roots Rock 8:00pm 8:30pm

June 26

NEW MOVIES Romcom about what happens when a high school senior who’s never done a minute of homework meets the like-minded girl of his dreams. (NB)

JOHNNY VEGASAND THE HIGH ROLLERS June 25 High Energy Rock & Soul Review

Sun

Film capsules by Nicholas Berandt and Richard von Busack.

77 EL DEORA Rancho Alternative Country/Americana Debut! 8:30pm / No Cover

Sat

Sun

Film

THE ZYDECO FLAMES 415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

first human to join the intergalactic league of protectors known as the Green Lantern Corps. But, naturally, with intergalactic powers come intergalactic bad guys. With Blake Lively, Peter Sarsgaard and Tim Robbins. (NB)

Mr. Popper’s Penguins (PG; 95 min.) The classic 1938 children’s books comes to the screen in an adaptation starring Jim Carrey as divorced businessman Tom Popper, who finds his house (and life) overrun with a bevy of inherited penguins. (NB)

ALSO PLAYING Bride Flight (NR; 130 min.) Three women emigrating from Holland to marry awaiting fiancés in New Zealand become friends on the flight and meet a handsome chap who falls for one of the new friends. At the Rafael Film Center. (NB)

Bridesmaids (R; 125 min.) Hangover for the girls. Hilarious Kristen Wiig co-stars with Maya Rudolph in raunchy-ish chic flick about a Vegas bridal party that goes too far. Directed by Paul Feig of Freaks and Geeks fame and produced by Judd Apatow. (NB) The Cove (NR; 92 min.) A special showing of the award-winning documentary benefits Earth Island Institute’s Save Japan Dolphins fund. Includes discussion with filmmakers Ric O’Barry and Louie Psihoyos, and a live performance from Bob Weir. June 21 at 7pm. (NB)

The First Grader (PG; 120 min.) Justin Chadwick (The Other Boleyn Girl) directs the story of an 80-year-old Kenyan man determined to learn to read after the government institutes the nation’s first public school system—and the parents and school officials who don’t want resources wasted on him. Based on a true story. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB) Forks Over Knives (PG; 90 min.) An acclaimed documentary that examines the claim—and evidence—that our meat-based diet is responsible for most of our ailments. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB)

The Hangover Part II (R; 102 min.) Maybe the saddest words in the movie, as the ensemble stir from an evening of blackout debauchery in Bangkok: “I think it happened again.” The script takes far too much time

to explain why Phil (Bradley Cooper), Stu (Ed Helms) and Alan (Zach Galifianakis) got back together in the first place, and it’s hard to get into the spirit of things until Ken Jeong’s profane Mr. Chow turns up. Runner-up for humor after Jeong is a spider monkey, who does a lot of things that the SPCA wouldn’t like. (RvB)

Incendies (R; 130 min.) At the reading of their mother’s will, twins learn their father still lives and they have a brother they never knew existed. At Summerfield Cinemas. (NB) Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Summer (PG; 91 min.) Third-grader Judy’s boring summer turns adventurous when kooky Aunt Opal comes for a visit. Based on the popular children’s books by Sebastopol author Megan McDonald. (NB)

Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG; 95 min.) Jack Black is back voicing Po, panda warrior, who must protect the Valley of Peace—and the art of kung fu itself—from a new danger. Also features the voices of Dustin Hoffman, Angelina Jolie, Seth Rogen and Jackie Chan. (NB) Midnight in Paris (PG-13; 100 min.) Woody Allen’s newest stars Owen Wilson as Gil, a disenchanted screenwriter who wants to be a novelist. On a trip to Paris with family, he starts receiving midnight visitations from F. Scott Fitzgerald (Tom Hiddleston) and Zelda (Alison Pill). As the forays continue, Gil meets the artistic and literary lights of the 1920s, magically reincarnated, but the not very pungent point is stretched into a culture-vulture’s version of Play It Again, Sam. Midnight in Paris is a harmless, gentle nothing, but it’s also a moldy vision of the city during its era of artistic adventurousness. (RvB) Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (PG-13; 137 min.) Number four in the franchise follows Johnny Depp’s Jack Sparrow on a quest for the Fountain of Youth. New perils on this journey include mermaids, zombies and the dread pirate Blackbeard. Also in 3-D. (NB)

Super 8 (PG-13; 112 min.) Something creepy may have escaped a train wreck witnessed by teens making a Super 8 movie in this film written and directed by the very busy J. J. Abrams. Produced by Steven Spielberg. (NB)

13 Assasins (NR; 126 min.) From cult director Takashi Miike comes the remake of a ’60s martial arts classic. See review, p29.

The Tree of Life (PG-13; 138 min.) Sean Penn and Brad Pitt co-star in Terrence Malick’s ambitious new film that follows the eldest son of a Texas family as he wrestles questions of life and existence. At the Rafael. (NB) X-Men: First Class (PG-13; 140 min.) A trip down memory lane shows us the early work of noble mutants Professor X and Magneto as they fight to stop a nuclear holocaust. (NB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES

SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Atlantic Brass Quintet Group perform works by JS Bach, Thom Ritter George and more. Jun 17 at 7:30. Free. Green Music Center 1029, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2468.

Friday Night Live Live music and dancing every Fri at 7. Jun 17, Jenny Kerr (rock). Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale. 707.894.4410.

Friday Night Music Bring a picnic or indulge in food trucks, Fri at 5. Jun 17, Carlos Herrera (Latin jazz). $5. Michel-Schlumberger Winery. 4155 Wine Creek Rd, Healdsburg. 800.447.3060.

Huge Large Raw, gigantic ‘60s garage sound from two mighty musicians. Jun 18, 3 to 6. Last Record Store, 1899-A Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1963.

Landmark Series Sat, 1 to 4. Jun 18, Carlos Herrera. Landmark Vineyards, 101 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.0053.

Sizzling Jazz Dance the night away to Sono Trio Plus in fundraiser for local PTA, 4H and venue. Jun 18, 6 to 10:30; Dance lessons at 6:15. $2-$8. Bodega Grange Hall, 1370 Bodega Ave, Bodega Bay. 707.876.3093.

Summer Nights on the Green Every Thurs at 6. Jun 16, Bell Brothers (country). Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

Tech N9ne Kansas City rap king returns. Jun 20 at 8. $32. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

nightclub & restaurant

Rock N Women

OPEN AT 4 PM WED. - sAT.

Benefit for Center for Domestic Peace with music by Kathi McDonald, Diana Mangano, Linda Imperial and Mari Mack. Jun 18 at 9. $20-$25. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. www.rocknwomen.org.

& ANY DAY A SHOW IS SCHEDULED AVAILABLE FOR PRIVATE PARTIES, BANQUETS, FUNDRAISERS AND OUTSIDE PROMOTERS 707.545.5876

Tiburon Music Festival

The Blushin' Roulettes

A North Bay Hootenanny Production

+ Heather Van Cleve

Linda Ferro Band

6/22

All-day Beatles tribute on Paul McCartney’s birthday with performances by Napa School of Music, Cryers, Sun Kings and others. Jun 18, noon to 10. $20-$40. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Jazz Attack

BBQ on the Lawn

Big Head Todd & the Monsters

Rick Braun, Peter White, Gerald Albright and Fourplay in smooth jazz blowout. Jun 18 at 5. $50-$85. Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.869.1595.

With sunshine comes grilled meat, cool bear and good-time music. Every Sun at 4. Jun 19, Father’s Day with Pablo Cruise. $32-$35. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Radio favorites steeped in blues. Jeffrey Halford & the Healers open. Jun 17 at 8. $29-$39. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. ) 707.259.0123.

7:30 PM | $5/8| FOLK ALL AGES

A North Bay Hootenanny Production

John Courage + Chris Gabrill 6/23

Beatles Radio Fest

9:00 PM | $5 | DANCE ROCKIN BLUES

6/17

NAPA COUNTY

Free summer concerts every Tues, 6 to 8. Jun 21, Frobeck (funk). Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg. 707.431.3301.

7:30 PM | $5/8| FOLK ALL AGES

6/15

Classical music festival in beautiful setting, with each concert beginning at 7:30. Jun 19, Contemporary Opera Marin perform “The Life of Mozart” and “Anna’s Windows.” Jun 21, Tiburon Chamber Players perform works by Mozart. Jun 24, pianist Paul Smith. $5-$20. St Hilary Catholic Church, 761 Hilary Dr, Tiburon. 415.457.5226.

Tuesdays in the Plaza

MARIN COUNTY

the last day saloon

Socially and politically progressive hip-hop. Jun 17 at 10. $20. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

9:30 PM | $5 | ROOTS ROCK

The Marshall House Project + Hillside Fire + Mercuryville + Brett Fenex 7/1

9:30 PM | $10 | ROCK COVERS

ADD/C (AC/DC Tribute Band)

+ Cowboys From Hell

32

(Pantera Tribute Band)

Wed, Jun 15 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 10am–12:15pm Scottish Dance Youth and Family 7–11pm Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club Thur, Jun 16 7:15–11pm 7:15–8:45pm 8:45–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise Circle ‘n Squares Square Dance Club New Dancer Class Plus Dancing

9 PM | $20 | 80'S DANCE HITS

Tainted Love 7/9

9:30 PM | $10/13 | ROCK

Cream of Clapton

Fri, Jun 17 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 10am–11pm FAULTLINE FROLIC WEEKEND with North Country Dance Society

(salute to Eric Clapton)

Sat, Jun 18 8–9am; 9:15–10:15am Jazzercise 10:15am–11:30pmFAULTLINE FROLIC WEEKEND with North Country Dance Society

Faster Pussycat

Sun, Jun 19 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 10am–4pm FAULTLINE FROLIC WEEKEND with North Country Dance Society 5–9:30pm DJ Steve Luther Country Western Lessons & Dancing $10 Mon, Jun 20 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm Scottish Country Dancing

ON THE MAP Thomas Mapfumo plays the Mystic Theatre June 17. See Clubs, p33.

7/2

+ A Piece of My Heart 7/21

8:00 PM | $10 | ROCK

+ bAD bOY eDDIE + rOAD cREW

HAPPY HOUR 4 - 7 PM $1.50 pbr, $2 domestic beer, $3 import/draft beer, well drinks, wine, & appetizers all shows are 21+ unless noted

Tues, Jun 21 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:40pm Jazzercise 7:30–9pm African & World Music Dance

for reservations: 707.545.5876

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922

120 5th st. @ davis st. santa rosa, ca

1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

707.545.2343 lastdaysaloon.com

31 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

KRS-One

32

Music ( 31

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Cafe Cabaret

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Taylor Bartolucci, Barry Martin and Andrew Moore pay tribute to fathers in “Dear Dad.” Jun 19 at 4. $25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Mary Chapin Carpenter Twenty-five years after release of her first album, Americana singer-songwriter still as passionate as ever. Jun 19 at 7:30. $40-$50. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0333.

X Legends hail from earliest days of punk. Devil’s Brigade open. Jun 16 at 8. $35. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0333.

Clubs SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters Jun 17, John Trubee (guitar). Jun 18, Bee Rays (acoustic). 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe Jun 18, Farallons. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Theater Jun 16, the Glowing Stars, Crashfaster. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Jun 16, Freedom, Diane Patterson. Jun 17, Bear Bones. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Flamingo Lounge Jun 18-19, Crossfire (funk oldies). 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Gaia’s Garden Every Wed, Jim Adams (jazz guitar). Jun 16, Roger Bolt. Jun 17, Mark McDonald. Jun 18, Doug Jayne. Jun 20, Greg Hester. Every Tues, blues with Sonny Lowe and friends. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Highland Dell Jun 17, Carlos Reyes. 21050 River Blvd, Monte Rio. 707.865.2300.

Hopmonk Tavern Jun 16, Juke Joint with A Skillz, Gramatik and Malarkey. Jun 17, David Jacobs-Strain Trio (Americana). Jun 18, Albino, Aphrolicious. Mon, Monday

Bring Crackers Bon Iver’s new album sounds great—until the end With the self-titled Bon Iver, Justin Vernon and company have made a delicate, clever, lush and sonically rich album to complement 2008’s breakout debut, For Emma, Forever Ago. Nine of the album’s 10 songs are nearly jaw-dropping and beautiful. And then it gets covered by a big can of Cheez Whiz. For Emma was famously recorded in a remote cabin in Wisconsin during a winter hibernation. The process for this album was similar; recorded by Vernon himself with guests on pedal steel guitar and baritone sax, the album has a folksy feel. The songs are nostalgic, slightly sad and decisive, and the sonic space created with keyboard sounds and layers of vocal harmonies makes a New Americana type of sound. It’s very pleasing until the last song, which I honestly thought was a joke. After a brief instrumental blips ’n’ bleeps song (“Lisbon, OH”), “Beth/Rest” opens with John Tesh-y New Age piano and a Phil Collins–style drum loop. Then comes a Prince-esque delayed guitar solo and the cheesiest, most generic sax solo this side of KJZY. Pedal steel, flute and acoustic piano do nothing to salvage the mess. Still, nine great songs minus one really, really terrible song still equate to an overall very good album. Bon Iver is officially released June 21.—Nicolas Grizzle

Night Edutainment with Junior X. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jasper O’Farrell’s Jun 15, BrainStorm with Sugarpill. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jun 15, Blue Merle. Jun 16, Todalo Shakers with Suzy Thompson. Jun 17, JimBo Trout. Jun 18, Beso Negro. Jun 19, Roy Book Binder. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Day Saloon

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jun 16, Pete Olson. Jun 17, Brothers Comatose. Jun 18, Perfect Crime. Jun 19, Greenhouse. Jun 21, Jesse Brewster. 464 First St, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre Jun 17, Thomas Mapfumo & the Blacks Unlimited. Jun 21, Marc Broussard, Matt Hires, Chic Gamine. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Phoenix Theater Jun 17, Devil in the Machine, FLI High, Daydream, Generation, Sanctuary Lost, Heap of Stone. Jun 18, Not to Reason Why, the New Trust, Goodriddler, Shuteye Unison, Odd Bird, You Are Plural. Jun 20, Tech N9ne (see Concerts). 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Jun 18, California Cowboys. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Russian River Brewing Co Jun 16, Jolie Holland (free noon show). Jun 18, Adient Zoo. Jun 19, Tracorum. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Scallywags. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

142 Throckmorton Theatre Jun 17, Matt Jaffe. Jun 18, Peppino D’Agostino, Carlos Reyes. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Jun 15, Whiskey Pills Fiasco. Jun 16, Rahman’s songwriters in the round. Jun 17, Swamp Thang. Jun 18, Dani Paige Band. Jun 21, Holden Young Trio. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Smiley’s

Southern Pacific Smokehouse Jun 15, Philip Claypool & the Smokehouse Band. Jun 16, Jay Alexander’s dinner and show. Jun 17, Bonnie Hayes Band, Acoustic Son. Jun 18, Jamie Clark Band. Jun 21, Cole Tate (acoustic). 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.899.9600.

Presidio Yacht Club Jun 18, Cathy Cotten. Fort Baker, Sausalito. 415.332.2319.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s

Rancho Nicasio Jun 17, 77 El Deora (Americana). Jun 19, Pablo Cruise. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sleeping Lady Jun 16, Amber Morris’ classic rock workshop. Jun 17, Danny Click’s Texas blues night. Jun 18 at 2, uke jam; at 9:30, Big Dog Trouble. Jun 19 at 2, trad Irish; at 6:30, Judy Hall. Mon at 8, open mic with Simon Costa. Jun 21, Liz Stires student showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Jun 16, Simon & Herman. Jun 17, Henry Hawk. Jun 18, Hall One. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Silo’s Wed at 7, jam session. Jun 17, Petty Theft. Jun 18, Terry Bradford. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria Jun 15, T Olah Night School Jazz. Jun 16, Davies Dukes (blues). Jun 18, Nate Lopez Trio. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

Tradewinds Thurs, DJ Dave. Jun 18 at 3, Dick Conte Jazz Quartet; at 9:30, Linda Ferro Band. Jun 19, Richie Blue. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Jun 17, Blind Side Blues Band, flanelhed. Jun 18, the Rock’n Women show (see Concerts). 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

19 Broadway Club Jun 15 at 6, Buddy Owen; at 9, Rayner Brock. Jun 16, Funkanauts. Jun 17, KRSOne (see Concerts). Jun 18, Soul Pie. Jun 19 at 3, Lone Star Retrobates; at 9, local music. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Old Western Saloon Jun 17, Fleeting Trance. Jun 18,

McNear’s Dining House Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner BBQ • Pasta • Steak FRI 6/17 • 7:30PM DOORS • $19 ADV/$23 DOS • 21+ WORLD/AFRO-BEAT/FOLK/REGGAE

AN EVENING WITH

THOMAS MAPFUMO

& BLACKS UNLIMITED TUE 6/21 • 6:30PM DOORS • $21 ADV/$23 DOS • 21+ SINGER/SONGWRITER

MARK BROUSSARD PLUS MATT HIRES &

CHIC GAMINE WED 6/29 • 7:00PM DOORS • $21 ADV/$23 DOS • 21+ FUNK

IVAN NEVILLE’S DUMPSTAPHUNK FRI 7/1 • 7:30PM DOORS • $21 ADV/$23 DOS • 21+ REGGAE

THE MELODIANS LIAM O’MAONLAI

San Francisco’s City Guide

OF HOTHOUSE FLOWERS THUR 7/28 • 8:00PM DOORS • $15 ADV/$17 DOS • 21+ SONGWRITER

Bobby Bland If you only buy one blues album, you’ll be in good hands with “Two Steps from the Blues.” Jun 18 at Yoshi’s SF.

Matt & Kim The most gleeful batch of jubilation to hit the stage since Up with People. Jun 18 at the Fox Theater.

MARIN COUNTY George’s Nightclub

DON’T FORGET…WE SERVE FOOD TOO!

THU 7/21 • 7:00PM DOORS • $16 • 21+ FOLK/FOLK ROCK

Stout Brothers Jun 15, Cassidy Crowley. Jun 18, Faith Ako Band (Hawaiian). 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

33

Jun 16, the Mushrooms (rock). Jun 17, Fell in a Well (rock). Jun 18, Mad Maggies. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Mountain Goats John Darnielle and fellow erudite tunesmiths patiently perform amid shouts for “No Children.” Jun 20 at the Fillmore.

Odd Future Tyler, Hodgy, Syd and the rest of this year’s darlings lay waste to all common sense. Jun 21 at the Regency Ballroom.

Jaga Jazzist Norwegian electro-jazz 10-piece makes rare appearance in the States. Jun 22 at Great American Music Hall.

LANGHORNE SLIM WED 8/3 • 7:00PM DOORS • $22 ADV/$25 DOS • 21+ ROOTS/REGGAE

THE MIGHTY DIAMONDS THUR 8/4 • 7:00PM DOORS • $17 ADV/$21 DOS • 21+ BLUES

MATT SCHOFIELD THUR 8/11 • 8:00PM DOORS • $17 ADV/$21 DOS • 21+ COUNTRY/PSYCHEDELIC/ROCK

THE SADIES AND JESSE SYKES No Children Under 10 Allowed For All Ages Shows

23 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma More San Francisco events by subscribing to the email letter at www.sfstation.com.

707-765-2121 www.mcnears.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Jun 15, Blushin’ Roulettes, Heather Van Cleve (folk). Jun 17, Linda Ferro Band. Mon, karaoke. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

34 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

JJUNE UNE 18TH 8T H

Music

@ Grace Pavilion - Sonoma County Fairgrounds ds

7

doors open pm

bout starts

8 pm

Wine Countryversus Homewreckers rs Boardwalk Bombshells ls of the Santa Cruz Derby Girls ls

ADVANCE $10ATINDOOR

$15$20-$25 RESERVED

$5 SENIORS, KIDS 12 & U UNDER N ER ND

FOR F OR TICKET TIICKET IN INFORMATION FORM O ATIO T ON VISIT WEBSITE VIS SIT THE THE W EBSITE @ WWW WW W.SON SONOMACOUNTYROLLERDERBY NOMACOUNTYROL O LERDERBY.C COM OM

OR WW WWW.BROWNPAPERTICKETS.COM W.B .BROWNPAPERTICKETS..COM

3

Rialto Cinemas

TM

at Sixth Street Playhouse

RIALTO CINEMASTM FILM FESTIVAL

CRITIC’S PICK! “Captivating & Entertaining... Sometimes You Don’t Have To Go Very Far Into The Past To Be Amazed At How Drastically Things Have Changed. A Fascinating Recent History & A Fascinating Personal Story As Well!” – New York Times

MAKING THE BOYS Tue June 21 Only! 1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00

THE MET SUMMER ENCORES Anthony Minghella’s Stunning Performance!

MADAMA BUTTERFLY Wed June 15 at 1:30 & 6:30pm

DON PASQUALE

Wed June 22 at 1:30 & 6:30pm

ÕÞÊ/ˆVŽiÌÃÊ>ÌÊÀˆ>ÌœVˆ˜i“>ðVœ“ÊÊUÊʘvœÊÇäÇÊxÓx‡{n{ä

New Client Specials $10 off cuts

(reg. $45)

by appointment:

707-544-5250 or 707-331-9945

$20

off cut & color

(reg. $100 & up)

Two Women Doing Hair 309 D Street, Santa Rosa SINCE 1995

YEAR ONE Exene Cervenka hadn’t sung a note until she was 20.

Queen Exene

Exene Cervenka on staying artistically true BY LEILANI CLARK

T

he world of punk rock would undoubtedly be a far less spirited and dynamic place if X hadn’t come along in the late 1970s. Founded after John Doe and Exene Cervenka met at a Venice, Calif., poetry reading, the band’s raw, wallowing songs about the pains of love and societal disintegration have forever altered the landscape. Along with DJ Bonebrake’s stellar drumming and Billy Zoom’s rockabilly-tinged guitar, what makes X stand out especially has always been the vocal interplay between Cervenka and bassist Doe.

“I hadn’t sung in any way shape or form my entire life until I was 20. John Doe and I would

sit around and sing old songs. Hank Williams. George Jones,” says Cervenka on the phone from a farmers market in Anaheim, shopping for cilantro and onions to make Mexican food for a friend’s wedding. “Singing was incredibly difficult for me. I had to make up my own voice, and I’m glad I did because my least favorite thing in an artist is imitation. I would not want to sound or do or be or act anything like anyone else. I just don’t believe in it.” It’s a philosophy that has worked wonders for Cervenka. Nearly 35 years after X began, they continue to put on explosive live performances for a multigenerational fan base. Though X haven’t recorded a new album since 1993, they don’t phone it in for their galvanizing live shows, something Cervenka attributes to respect for their audience. Cervenka says that she holds out hope that the band will work on new material at some point, but in the meantime, she’s got more than enough to keep her busy. Her latest solo album The Excitement of Maybe came out on Bloodshot Records in March to good reviews. A multiple sclerosis flare-up forced Cervenka to cancel a short Southwest tour last month, but she’s been organizing hootenannies near her home in Orange and continues to do spoken word out and about in Southern California, along with touring with X and their altcountry counterpart the Knitters. “I always make the best of it and I don’t give up with anything,” says Cervenka. “I represent myself as best I can. Not as a role model, but as an example to people of what you can do. I do a lot of things I’m not supposed to do. I get up onstage and sing. You don’t have to force it and be ambitious and be angry if things don’t go your way. You’re just an artist. You don’t have to have any pressure other than that. That’s plenty right there.” X play with Devil’s Brigade (featuring Matt Freeman from Rancid) on Thursday, June 16, at the Uptown Theatre. 1350 Third St., Napa. 7pm. $35. 707.259.0123.

Arts Events Jun 17 From 5:30 to 7:30. Falkirk Cultural Center, “RE: Value,” a Plexus Art Group exhibition. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438. From 6 to 7:30pm. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, “Bibliophoira II: Art of the Book,” a national juried exhibition, and “From the Endpapers,” work by Katherine Klein. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Jun 18 Member preview from 11am to 1pm. Sonoma County Museum, “Gertrud Parker: Artist and Collector,” and “Pat Lenz: Nobody’s Poodle.” 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500. From 1 to 6pm. ARTHouse Gallery, “Valley of the Moon: A Visual Feast,” work by various artists. Also on Jun 19 from 1-6pm. 13758 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.3513. From 4 to 7pm. Petaluma Arts Center, “Fire/Ice,” a juried exploration of opposites. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

City Hall Council Chambers Jun 20-Aug 19, “Terra Incognita,” paintings by Suzanne Edminster. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Jul 2, “Figments for a Warrior,” work by Catherine J Richardson. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 139 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600.

Local Color Gallery Through Jun 27, “Wavescapes,” paintings by Pamela Wallace and graphite drawings by Linda Gamble. Daily, 10 to 5. Closed Wednesdays. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2744.

Pelican Art Through Jul 2, “Masters of Today,” artwork by Carole Gray-Weihman and Nobee Kanayama. Open Tues-Thurs and Sat, 11 to 6; Fri, 11 to 8; Sun-Mon by appointment only. 143 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.773.3393.

Petaluma Arts Center Jun 17-Jul 24, “Fire/Ice,” a juried exhibition of art dealing in opposites. Reception, Jun 18, 4 to 7. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Art of the Book,” a national juried exhibition, and “From the Endpapers,” work by Katherine Klein. Reception, Jun 16, 6 to 7:30. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 6780 Depot St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Aug 6, “Scorched Earth,” sculpture and ceramics by Connie Robeson, and “Bibliophoria,” handmade books by Lin Max. Open daily, 11 to 6. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Jun 26, “Zone of Focus,” a juried exhibition of photography by high school students. Jun 19-Sep 11, “Gertrud Parker: Artist and Collector,” and “Pat Lenz: Nobody’s Poodle.” Member preview reception, Jun 18, 11 to 1. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Aug 28, “Six Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm: Original Etchings by David Hockney.” Free-$8. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Towers Gallery Through Jul 31, new cooperative gallery’s first exhibition features two- and three-dimensional fine art, wearable art and antiques. 240 North Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum

Through Jul 4, “Winter Landscapes,” paintings by Jerrold Ballaine. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 6671 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.0799.

Through Jul 31, work by Wolfgang Bloch, Lawrence La Bianca, Stephen Galloway and Michael Porter; also, “The Last Wooden Schooner Built in Bolinas: The Elizabeth Muir.” Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Donna Seager Gallery

“Valley of the Moon: A Visual Feast,” work by various artists. Reception, Jun 18-19, 1 to 6. 13758 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.3513.

Through Jul 10, “Late Spring Show” with work by various artists. Tues-Thurs and Sun, 10:30 to 6. Fri-Sat, 10:30 to 8. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

Ending Jun 18, “Kay Bradner: On Water.” Tues-Wed and FriSat, 11 to 6; Thurs, 11 to 8:30. 851 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.4229.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Jun 17 at 6:30, “Wine &

Jun 16-Jul 24, “Bibliophoira II:

From 6 to 8pm. di Rosa, “Zombie-Proof House,” range of media explores zombies in pop culture. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

NAPA COUNTY ARThouse Gallery

Quicksilver Mine Company

FUNCTIONAL ART

Falkirk Cultural Center Jun 17-Aug 20, “RE: Value,” a

) 36

fine & fashion jewelry handmade gifts Michael Michaud

OPENINGS

Cartooning” (see Events). Jun 18 at 11:30am and 1, Joe Wos (see Events). Through Jun 19, “The Browns and the Van Pelts: Siblings in ‘Peanuts.’” Through Jul 11, “’Peanuts’ Philosophies.” Through Oct 2, “A Change of Scene: Schulz Sketches from Abroad.” $5-$8. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Supporting local artists since 1999 146 N. Main Street, Sebastopol • 707.829.3036 10:30–6pm, Sun til 5pm • artisanafunctionalart.com

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Galleries

35

36

Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Plexus Art Group exhibition. Reception, Jun 17, 5:30 to 7:30. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Miller, oils by Timothy David Dixon and others. Daily, 10 to 5. 1019 Atlas Peak Rd, Napa. 707.257.2350.

Gallery Route One

LMumm Napa Cuvee

Through Jun 26, “Finding My Way: Maps, Grids, Signs,” work by Will Thoms; also, “The Left Coast: California on the Edge,” work by Alex Fradkin and Tim Graveson. Through Jul 3, “Seventh Street Studios,” a group art exhibit. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

Through Nov 13, “Signs of Life,” photographs by Robert Buelteman. Daily, 10 to 5. 8445 Silverado Trail, Rutherford. 707.967.7740.

Marin Community Foundation Extended through Aug 30, “Black Power, Flower Power,” black-and-white photographs of Black Panthers and HaightAshbury by Pirkle Jones and Ruth-Marion Baruch. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato.

Marin MOCA Through Jul 10, “Artfully Reclaimed V,” fine art made from recycled and repurposed materials; also, “Spectrum: Color as Expression and Form.” Wed-Sun, 11 to 4, Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Jun 28, work of Kathleen Piscioneri and Deanna Pedroli. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

NAPA COUNTY

ffeaturing e a t u r i n g linda l i n d a ferro f e r r o at at

Giants Gi ants nnight ight

( 35

Napa Valley Museum Through Jul 16, “Wanderlust: Journeys with Napa Valley Photographers,” featuring photos by seven artists; also, “A Year in Flowers,” work by Joanne Youngberg and Nina Antze. Jun 16 at 7, meet photographers of “Wanderlust” exhibit. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Preservation Napa Valley Through Jun 30, “Memory Bank: A Discovery of Old Hands, Old Faces and the Way It Was,” photographic and film documentation of local old timers. 1400 First St, Napa.

St Supery Winery Through Jun 30, “Mountains,” paintings by Wayne Thiebaud. 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.4507.

Comedy Dinosaurs of Improv Jedi masters of improvised comedy. Jun 16 at 8. $15-$18. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Frank Olivier Comedy Thrill Show

Through Jun 30, “Figurative Sense,” paintings by Bobbie Burgers. Open daily, 10 to 6. 1328 Main St, St Helena. 415.531.6755.

Olivier’s unique, off-beat brand of humor shares the stage with puppeteer Bob Hartman. Jun 18 at 8. $16$21. Dance Palace, Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Di Rosa Jun 18-Sep 17, “Zombie-Proof House,” range of media explores zombies in pop culture. Reception, Jun 18, 6 to 8. Public program, Jul 6 at 7. Tours available Sat at 10, 11 and noon (reservation required) and Tues-Fri at 10, 11, 12 and 1 (reservation recommended). Gallery hours: Wed-Fri, 9:30 to 3. Sat, by appointment only. 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Jessel Gallery Ongoing, watercolors by Jessel

Sixth Street Improv Troupe play improv games in gut-busting performance under current theme, “Vacation Getaway.” Jun 18 at 8. $14. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Risk Dance Company Actor’s Basement presents “Dance: A Window to My Soul.” Jun 17-18 at 8. $5-$10. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Sea World Fantasy Windsor Dance Academy presents ocean-inspired program of ballet, hip-hop, jazz and acrobatics. Jun 20-21 at 7. $18. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.2226.

Spring Recital Performance Annual dance performance by Bohemian’s “Best Of” winners Sebastopol Ballet Company. Jun 18 at 3. $10-$20. Analy High School, 6950 Analy Ave, Sebastopol. 707.576.3906.

Events Art in the Park Art demos, exhibition and sale with food, wine and beer. Jun 18, noon to 4. Parking fee. Armstrong Woods State Reserve, Armstrong Woods Road, Guerneville. 707.869.9177.

A Day at the Races Afternoon of wine, food and fun to celebrate 300 years of Royal Ascot. Jun 18, 11:30 to 3. $75-$125. Trefethen Family Vineyards, 1160 Oak Knoll Ave, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Gardening Workshops Jun 12 at 11am, “Ornamental Grasses.” Jun 15 at 11am, “Kids Veggie Gardening.” Free. Cottage Gardens, 3995 Emerald Dr, Petaluma. 707.778.8025.

Gay Wine Weekend Celebration of Gay Pride Month with VIP reception, gay comedy, Twilight T-Dance, Big Gay Brunch and more. Jun 17-19. $35-$295. Various locations, around Sonoma County. www.outinthevineyard.com.

Hot Air Balloon Classic Watch gigantic hot-air balloons come up with the sun, and fill the sky with color. Food, crafts, and tethered balloon rides for kids available. Jun 18-19, 5 to 11am. $5-$8. Keiser Park, 700 Windsor River Rd, Windsor. 707.837.1884.

Healdsburg Farmers Market Market and music every Sat, 9 to noon. May-Nov, market every Tues, 4 to 7. Healdsburg Farmers Market, North and Vine streets, Healdsburg. 707.431.1956.

Santa Rosa Farmers Markets Sat, 9 to 12. Oakmont Drive and White Oak, Santa Rosa. 707.538.7023. Wed and Sat, 8:30 to 12. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Wednesday Night Market Farmers market and street fair features live music and entertainment every Wed, 5 to 8, through Aug 31. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa. www.srdowntownmarket.com.

Windsor Farmers Market

DRESSED UP Sculptor Gertrud Parker exhibits her own work alongside pieces from her vast collection at the Sonoma County Museum. See Openings, p35.

Marin Art Festival Lawn party for the arts at Lagoon Park features work of over 250 artists, auctions, entertainment, art projects for children and more. Jun 18-19, 10 to 6. Free-$10. Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.7000.

Open House Sip lavender limeade, sample culinary delights, meet goats and tour the property. Jun 18, 10 to 4. Free. Harms Vineyards & Lavender Fields, 3185 Dry Creek Rd, Napa. www.larmsvineyardsand lavenderfields.com.

Solstice Celebration Peace dance, drumming and song. Jun 19 at 7. $15. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.829.8212.

Wine & Cartooning Unique pairing of Lagunitas beer and Balletto wines with cartoon lessons for adults. Jun 17 at 6:30. $15-$20. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane,

Santa Rosa, Reservations. 707.284.1263.

Sun, 10 to 1, through Dec. Thurs evenings, 5 to 8, through Aug. Summer Thurs night market features produce, al fresco dining and live entertainment (see Concerts). Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor. 707.838.1320.

Joe Wos Join cartoonist Jun 18 at 11:30am for live storytelling and cartoon performance; at 1, bring your pet for cute and funny portraits. Free-$5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Writers Forum “The Bone Weaver” and “Exit Laughing” author Victoria Zackheim talks about turning personal history into fiction. Jun 16, 7 to 9. $15. Petaluma Community Center, 320 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. www.thewritespot.us.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101”

Field Trips Art & Vista Hikes Join guides on moderately strenuous walk to top of Milliken Peak. Jun 18 at 10am. $15. Di Rosa, 5200 Carneros Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991, ext 25.

Shollenberger Park Two family-friendly nature walks in Spanish and English. Jun 18 at 10am. Free. Shollenberger Park, Meet at first kiosk, Petaluma. 707.338.2237.

Wildcare Adventures Family hikes in both English and Spanish. Carpool at 9:15am, hikes begin on location at 10am. Jun 18, “Deer Park Insect Safari.” Free. Canal )

38

37 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

38

Arts Events Alliance, 91 Larkspur St, San Rafael. 415.453.1000.

Film Ballet & Opera Live presentations of highbrown entertainment beamed from all over the world in HD. Jun 26, “Swan Lake.” $12-$20. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

Carbon Nation Positive eco-documentary by Peter Beck explores climate change solutions. Jun 16 at 7. Donations appreciated. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. www.transitionsonomavalley.org.

The Cove Special benefit screening of documentary plus discussion with filmmakers, mammal expert Ric O’Barry and live performance by Bob Weir. Jun 21 at 7. $40. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Film Night in the Park Jun 17 at 8, “How to Train Your Dragon.” Free. Old Mill Park, Throckmorton and Cascade, Mill Valley. www.filmnight.org.

Met Opera Summer encore series features classic operas beamed from all over the world Sat mornings at 10am. Jun 19, “Madama Butterfly.” $10-$15. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Monday Night Movies Every Mon at 7, enjoy a classic film. Jun 20, “Some Like It Hot.” Free. Mill Valley Library, 375 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.389.4292, ext 116.

Rialto Film Festival Independent gems shine on the big screen. Jun 21 at 1, 3, 5 and 7, “Making the Boys.” $8$10. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. www.rialtocinemas.com.

Toast Nostalgia trip through everything edible in 1960s Britain. Jun 18 at 7. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Vintage Film Series Enjoy a classic film one Mon monthly at 7. Jun 20 at 7 and

( 37 Jun 22 at 1, “Some Like It Hot.” $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.540.6119.

Lectures Camping Basics Head for the hills this summer, but be prepared. Jun 16 at 7. Free. REI Santa Rosa, Southside Shopping Center, 2715 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.9025.

Empowerments Ven Lama Tsang Tsing offers series of empowerments. Jun 18 at 3, Vow of Refuge. $25. Kagya Takten Puntsokling, 5594 Volkerts Rd, Sebastopol. www.ktpling.com.

Metaquizzical Cafe Musical science and philosophy salon explores theme “Newsflash: 96% of the Universe is Missing” with Marilyn Schlitz. Jun 19 at 1. $10. Petaluma Historical Museum & Library, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.869.9403.

Science Buzz Cafe Every Thurs at 6:30, gather to discuss weekly topics. Jun 16, “Biography Work: The Story in Your I’s” with Marianna DeCroes. $3 donation. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.292.5281.

poetry with Mike Tuggle; at 3:30, “The Sweetness of Tears” with Nafisa Haji. 16355 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.2242.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jun 15 at 7, “The Whole-Brain Path to Peace” with James Olson. 2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Senior Center Jun 18 at 2, “The Remembrance Album of Harriet Pruden” with Rick Pate. 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Book Passage Jun 15 at 7, “Ten Thousand Saints” with Eleanor Henderson. Jun 16 at 7:30, “Zero” with Kathryn Otoshi (for kids). Jun 17 at 7, “Billy Twitters and His Blue Whale Problem” with Mac Barnett (for kids). Jun 18 at 5, “Anya’s War” with Andrea Alban (for teens). Jun 19 at 7, “Robert Redford: The Biography” with Michael Feeney Callan. Jun 20 at 7, “Buddha Standard Time: Awakening to the Infinite Possibilities of Now” with Lama Surya Das, and “Exile” with Cary Groner. Jun 21 at 7, “The George Carlin Letters: The Permanent Courtship of Sally Wade” with Sally Wade. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Theater Lend Me a Tenor

Readings Main Stage West Jun 19 at 7, “The Passionate Mind Revisited” with Diana Alstad and Joel Kramer. 104 North Main St, Sebastopol.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jun 18 at 1, “The Four Ms Bradwells” and “The Peach Keeper” with Meg Waite Clayton. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Readers’ Books

When the actor playing Othello calls in sick, two others take his place, each unaware of the other. Ending Jun 18; Fri-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.2214.

The Mystery of Irma Vep Gothic, melodramatic spoof where music takes on a role of its own. Through Jun 26; Thurs-Sat at 8, Sun at 2. $15$32. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Jun 16 at 7, “Thoughts Without Cigarettes: A Memoir” with Oscar Hijuelos. Jun 18 at 2:30, “Emotional Currency: A Woman’s Guide to Building a Healthy Relationship with Money” with Kate Levinson. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.939.1779.

Shirley Valentine

River Reader

One-woman show by writer and performer Oceana Taicher

Jun 18 at 11am, open mic

Disillusioned housewife finds adventure, hope and love. Extended through Jun 18; FriSat at 8, Sun at 2. $15-$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Shut-Up, Woman

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Hairspray Beloved John Waters musical about a teenage dancer who rallies against racial segregation in 1962. Ending Jun 19; Sat-Sun at 2. $30-$40. Sidney B Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre, Mt. Tam, Mill Valley. 415.383.1100.

The Laramie Project

Brains! Di Rosa’s latest gets smart on the zombie trend Zombies may have jumped the shark a few years back, when Pride and Prejudice and Zombies began appearing in every chain bookstore across the country. But if part of art’s challenge and responsibility is to mirror a culture back on itself while revealing new and surprising depths, then “Zombie-Proof House,” a major group exhibition debuting at di Rosa this month, aims to do just that—with the undead. Last February, di Rosa curator Robert Wuilfe told the Bohemian that while the title is somewhat of a joke, the message is a serious one. “Zombies keep popping up in political, economic and philosophical theory. There are certain zombie ideas that have been proven not to work, like trickle-down economics, and they’re these dead ideas but they won’t go away,” Wuilfe said. Described as a meditation on anxiety and hope in a troubled time, the group exhibition includes sculpture, video, photography, interactive installations and an artistdesigned web project. Post-apocalyptic iconography abounds in pop culture these days, but the goal of the exhibit is to go beyond the surface by creating an environment wherein the viewer can reflect on recent, real crises like climate change and anti-immigrant rhetoric while locating the potential for finding a better way forward. With “Zombie Proof House,” maybe those flesh-eating creepers aren’t so played out after all. “Zombie-Proof House” runs June 18– Sept. 17 at the di Rosa Gatehouse Gallery. 5200 Sonoma Hwy., Napa. Wednesday– Friday, 9:30am–3pm. Free. 707.226.5991. —Leilani Clark

Dramatic play based on interviews with citizens of Laramie, Wy following ‘98 murder of Matthew Shepard. Jun 16-18 at 8. $15-$20. Larkspur American Legion Hall, 500 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.827.1373.

Picasso at the Lapin Agile Steve Martin’s comedy about a fictional meeting between Pablo Picasso and Albert Einstein at a Paris bar in 1904. Ending Jun 19; Thurs-Sat at 8, Sun at 3. $15-$20. Novato Theater Company, 484 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.883.4498.

SF Mime Troupe Socially and politically relevant theater of highest professional quality and hilarity. Jun 18 at 4. Donations appreciated. Lagunitas School, Lagunitas School Road, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888, #253.

3 from Geography & Plays Three short performance pieces by Gertrude Stein. Ending Jun 18, most shows Fri-Sat at 8; Jun 15 at 5. $10-$12. Imaginists Theatre Collective, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

Tiny Alice Edward Albee’s theatrically innovative play examines man’s relationship with God. Through Jun 26; Tues and Thurs-Sat at 8, Wed and Sun at 7:30. $32$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it by email to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Please DO NOT SEND e-mail attachments. The BOHEMIAN is not responsible for photos. Events costing more than $35 may be withheld. Deadline is 2 weeks prior to desired publication date.

39 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

reveals her life in 28 minutes. Jun 20 at 8. Free. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.769.9234.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

40

41

Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN)

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

g Career Development

Earn $75-$200 Hour

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/ locations. (AAN CAN) Status: Ad Status: NEW AD

g gg Family Services Adoptions

Pregnant? Considering Adoption? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

g

Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, film, fashion. One Health Services week class. Stable job in VIAGRA 100MG weak economy. Details at www.AwardMadeUpSchool.co and CIALIS 20MG!! m 310/364-0665. (AAN CAN) 40 Pills +4 FREE only $99.00. #1 Male Enhancement,

MEN SEEKING MEN

Adult Services MEN SEEKING MEN 1-877-409-8884 Gay hot phone chat, 24/7! Talk to or meet sexy guys in your area anytime you need it. Fulfill your wildest fantasy. Private & confidential. Guys always available. 1-877-409-8884 Free to try. 18+

Do you really want to be with a Woman whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been with 1000s of Men? Join AshleyMadison.com and meet real Women in your city who are trapped in Sexless Marriages. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 100% Secure, Anonymous & Guaranteed! (AAN CAN)

Discreet Shipping. Only $2.70/pill. Buy The Blue Till Now! 1-888-797-9022

1-877-409-8884 Gay hot phone chat, 24/7! Talk to or meet sexy guys in your area anytime you need it. Fulfill your wildest fantasy. Private & confidential. Guys always available. 1-877-409-8884 Free to try. 18+ (AAN CAN)

Home Services

Miscellaneous Services

g Classes & Instruction

High School Diploma!

Call 707-795-7166 www.ranchobodegaschool. com

Real Estate Services

g

Fast, affordable and accredited. Free brochure. Shared Housing Heritage Fence Builders Call Now!. 1-888-532-6546 ALL AREAS ext. 97 www.continentalacadQuality built to withstand ROOMMATES.COM time. Free estimates. All type emy.com. (AAN CAN) of fencing and gates. Licensed Browse hundreds of online Ballet/Tap Classes Contractor #904463. listings with photos and New Studio in 707-321-7210 maps. Find your roommate Santa Rosa with a click of the mouse! Remodeling/Repair TV and Movie dancer from Visit: http://www.RoomNew York/Hollywood. mates.com. (AAN CAN) www.jettdanceproductions. com 707-217-6435 or 707-843-5932 Decks/Fencing

4/@E3AB@3AB=@/B7=<A 1=<AB@C1B7=< Â&#x2019;1O`^S\b`g>OW\bW\U Â&#x2019;0O[P]]4Z]]`W\U Â&#x2019;>Zc[PW\U3ZSQb`WQOZ Â&#x2019;;Oa]\`gBWZS1]\Q`SbS Â&#x2019;ASWa[WQ@Sb`]TWbbW\U Â&#x2019;@]]T@S^OW`a Â&#x2019;A]ZO`1]ObW\U Â&#x2019;>`Saac`SEOaVW\U Â&#x2019;5cbbS`1ZSO\W\U Â&#x2019;B`SSB`W[[W\U

%% &"&'

1O:WQS\aS%#$&'

Jobs

Auditions

g 8W[9S\\SRg

Youth Failing School or School Failing Our Youth ? Try Rancho Bodega School Small Group/One on One Instruction - Enriched Middle/High School Curriculum - Special Studies/Independent Study - Emphasizing Music & Art Serving Grades 7-12 NOW ENROLLING !!

Adult Massage

Every 60 seconds another woman joins

Place your classified ad here

AshleyMadison.com looking to have a Discreet Affair. With over 7 million members, we Guarantee youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have an Affair or your money back! Try it FREE today. As seen on: Free To Try! Hot Talk CNN, FOXNews & TIME. 1-866-601-7781 Naughty Local (AAN CAN) Girls! Try For Free! 1-877-433A Rare Irish Rose 0927 Try For Free! 100â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Of Local Women! 1-866-517-6011 Mature, Independent in Live Sexy Talk 1-877-602-7970 Marin. Call for photos. 18+ (AAN CAN) Please, no calls after midnight. No blocked calls, Miscellaneous No texts. Kara, 415/233-2769.

g

Call

With over 2.3 million Women

707.527.1200

AshleyMadison.com is the #1 Discreet Dating service for Married Women looking to have a Discreet Affair. Sign-up for FREE at AshleyMadison.com. Featured on: Howard Stern, Sports Illustrated & MAXIM. (AAN CAN) Class: Dating

x206 today!

MEET SOMEONE NOW! CALL NOW!

Santa Rosa

707-206-6494 70 707-206-6 6494 94 707-206-6494 TRY IT

FREE!*

18+ *Charges may apply to certain features.

voice.lavalife.com COLLECT CALL BILLING! 1-866-607-5282 1-900 PRICING OPTIONS! 1-900-622-1100 DIAL #CLICK (#25425) 79¢/MIN. SPRINT, BOOST, AT&T 99¢/MIN. VERIZON

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

g Employment

g

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

42

g

Russian River Massage

Chiropractic

The Relaxation Station

4HAIs$EEP4ISSUE Swedish #OUPLES-ASSAGE by appointment, walk-ins welcome

g

707.528.2540 3401 Cleveland Ave #2 Santa Rosa

You need a massage! I am an easygoing provider of pleasure since 1991. Good virtues. NW Santa Rosa, Jimmy, (C) 707-799-4467 or (L) 707-527-9497.

Relaxing massage and bodywork by male massage therapist with 11 yrs experience. 707-542-6856

A sanctuary of pleasure and relaxation. Enjoy the best of healing and sensual massage by a lovely lady with a caring touch. Quality and class Accept Visa/MC. Tania. C.M.T. 707-477-1766. Santa Rosa.

Bearhands4u

Great Massage

Massage for men, Sebastopol. Mature, strong, professional. 707/291-3804. Days, evenings, weekends $60/hr. Outcalls available.

By Joe, CMT. Relaxing hot tub and pool available. Will do outcalls. 707-228-6883.

RELAX!

PAIN/STRESS RELIEF Professional male massage therapist; strong, deep healing bodywork. 1 hr / $50, 1 1/2 hr $65. 707-536-1516 www.CompleteBodyBalance.

RELAX - TAKE IN REBOUND Specializes in resolving your body needs - Strong, Thorough, Intuitive. Shower Available. Colin, CMT (707) 823-2990

Transformational Therapy

g Massage & Relaxation

A Safe Place To Be Real Holistic tantric masseuse. Unhurried, private, heartfelt. Mon-Sat. First time client discount. Call after 10:30am. 707-793-2232.

With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Visa/MC accepted. Gretchen 707/478-3952.

NOW OPEN Therapeutic Massage Center Body Massage $55/hr

707.578.3088

For Men, Women, and Couples. Lara 707-481-2644

MAGIC HANDS Swedish and Deep Tissue Massage with light stretching for men/women. Flexible M-F schedule; Incalls only 60min/$60 | 90min/$75 Please call Leo 707-623-6096

• Swedish & Deep Tissue Massage • Hot Stone Massage • Jacuzzi & Hot Shower

699 Petaluma Blvd. N

707.765.1879 Open 7 days 9am-10pm

Foot Massage $19.99/45 min 2460 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa

Unity Church of Santa Rosa Sunday School & Service 10:30am. Non-traditional. Inter-denominational. A spiritually-minded community. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy 707-542-7729

LILY’S LIL LY’S Y CHINESE MASSAGE GRAND OPENING SPECIAL OFFER $ 45/hr Body Massage gZ\jaVggViZ*%$]g

Buy 2 hrs @ $45/hr jhZl^i]^c(%YVnhd[ejgX]VhZ $

100/ 1/hr (4 hands)

$

75/hr (out call)

g 707.720.7657

4927 Sonoma Hwy 12 Ste Ste.. D D,, Santa Rosa

Psychics

Psychic Palm and Card Reader Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707-542-9898

Full Body Sensual Massage

Swedish, Esalen, Deep Tissue, Sports Massage, Chinese Guerneville Acupressure, and other healM4M Massage ing modalities. Star Rose Mitch, CMT. Mature. Bartell, CMT. 707-623-3259 Professional. Relaxing intuitive touch. Private Man of Your Dreams discrete studio. 707-849-7409 Men, women, couples. TLC, massage, Tantra, nurturing mutual touch. William 707-548-2187

Open 7 days 9-10pm

Sensual Healing Touch

SPIRITUAL CONNECTIONS Finding inspiration and connecting with your community

Women, Men, & Couples

Step off the World, into....

Healing & Bodywork

Golden Flower Massage Spa

Full body massage, body electric experience. In /Out. Body shaving/trimming available. Bob 707-865-2093.

Ayurvedic

Indian Head Massage

Mahakaruna Buddhist Meditation Center Summertime Meditation Classes just $5 per Class. Think like a Buddha. Tues, Weds & Thurs evenings 7:30-8:45pm. June 15th - Sept 1st. Noontime Meditation - Weds, an oasis in your busy day. Prayers for World Peace Sun - 10:30-11:45am Everyone welcome. 304 Petaluma Blvd, N, Petaluma 707-776-7720. www.meditateincal.org.

Compassion Buddhist Meditation Center Fundraising Picnic Saturday, July 2nd, 10:30-3:30 Warm Springs Dam - Lake Sonoma (park entrance is located at furthest most Western end of Dry Creek Rd. in Healdsburg)

10:30-11am - coffee & pastries 11-12pm - Meditation hike 12-1:30pm Pot-luck lunch Cost: $15 pp or $25 per family - Everyone Welcome! No one turned away due to lack of funds Sign up: www.meditateinsantarosa.org Compassion Kadampa Buddhist Center 436 Larkfield Center, Santa Rosa Purchase your ticket at event, please RSVP

707.477.2264

• relief from tension headaches, eyestrain, and sinusitis • improves mobility in neck and shoulders • balances energy

Margery Smith 707.544.9642

Share your organization’s inspiration with over 123,000 Bohemian Readers monthly!

Phone: 707.527.1200 email: sales@bohemian.com

43 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | BOHEMIAN.COM

BEST OF WINNERS...

GO TO WWW.BOHEMIAN.COM AND DOWNLOAD YOUR AWARDS!

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM

1901 CLEVELAND AVE SUITE B SANTA ROSA 707.576.0818 www.srtp.net

Medical Marijuana Certifications

A & A Kitchens

Full exam. Low cost. No charge if you do not qualify. Santa Rosa. Authentication 24/7. 707-591-4088.

Need commercial kitchen space? Our spot will accomodate all your culinary needs. Stop lookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and start cookinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;! Call us in St Helena, CA at 707.968.9474,

Hairstylist Teri Kinney Has Moved to Blazing Hair Design! 1519 4th street. Call me for 50% off all services for new clients! 707.544.1422

Creative Light Productions Professional photographer & videographer. Weddings, parties, special events. Call award winning David Ludwig Local: (707) 527-6004 Toll Free: (800) 942-8433 www.creativelightproductions.com

Bankruptcy & Debt Relief Attorney Evan Livingstone (707) 206-6570. 740 4th St #215, Santa Rosa

Green Earth Catering Organic and Earth friendly foods and supplies Scott Goree Entertainment coordinator and business manager. 707.795.7358 home, 707.479.5481 cell, redgore23@aol.com

RICK SPRINGFIELD FRIDAY, JUNE 24

THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND SATURDAY, JUNE 25

BLUE OYSTER CULT & FOGHAT

RICK SPRINGFIELD

Santa Rosa Plumbing

SUNDAY, JUNE 26

FIESTA LATINA & ÂĄCANTA CON EL ALMA!

;S\bW]\ bVWa 1]c^]\

"% DS`WTWQObW]\  2` 6O\gO 0O`bV

eee5@33< #Q][ :]QOZ >`]TSaaW]\OZ  3abOPZWaVSR

AO\bO @]aOÂł%%#$&" 

September 2011!! 200 hour non-residential program. 1 wknd/mo for 10 months. Bodyworks-Integrative Yoga Studio. 490 2nd St., Petaluma. 707-769-9933 or www.bodyworksyoga.com

Are You Seeking More Meaningful Relationships? Spiritually oriented psychotherapy for couples and individuals reveals unconditional loving as our true nature. After 15 years in Berkeley, Gateway Institute is now in Healdsburg. Heather Parrish, Ph.D. MFC36455. 707-473-9553.

Rocks and Clouds Zendo Rohatsu Sesshin -- Seven Day Meditation Retreat Fri Dec 2nd - Fri Dec 9th. Email us with any questions: dterra@sonic.net. Find us on the web: www.rocksandclouds.org or call 707-824-5647

Advertise on the Back Page Call 707.527.1200 today and be seen more than in any other section of the Bohemian!

INFORMATION

HYPNOTIST SHOWS, PIG RACING, SOLAR TRAIN, LIVESTOCK SHOWS, WINE AND FARM TO TABLE TASTINGS, INTERACTIVE

GAMING, EXHIBITS, MAKE & GO WORKSHOPS, AND MORE! 707-283-FAIR (3247) Get the latest news from the fair! TEXT THE WORD

â&#x20AC;&#x153;FAIRâ&#x20AC;? to 66746

CONCERTS & CARNIVAL RIDES FREE WITH LOW ADMISSION

WWW.SONOMA-MARINFAIR.ORG ;ObQV /\g :]QOZ >`WQS

Sign up Now-Integrative Yoga Teacher Training

EVERY DAY AT THE FAIR!

Confidential Program. (707) 576 1919

;SRWQOZ ;O`WXcO\O 3dOZcObW]\a

Sunday 6/26 - 12-3:30pm. Join Bauman College Berkeley for a hands-on cooking class. Learn how to incorporate healthful therapeutic ingredients into fun and delicious recipes for kids. Master recipes and artful preparation that will draw them in at mealtime. Cost: $75 RSVP: baumancollege.org or 800.987.7530

THURSDAY, JUNE 23

707-546-4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

53B :35/:

Euro Business Solutions Can Help You Discover & Succeed! Call Freddie Baggerman for a FREE Consultation: 707.483.5135

TOWER OF POWER

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; BUY, SELL, TRADE

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxycontin, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal!

Cooking for Kids: How to Keep it Interesting

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22

Quality beads, sterling silver clasps, etc. Custom necklaces, earrings and bracelets for you or that someone special. Jewlery repair available also, no soldering. 707.696.9812, tiffany_beadsandpieces@yahoo.com Now doing jewelry parties

tankless water heaters, high efficiency toilets recirculation, general plumbing needs. Call 707.528.8228

Does Your Business Need Some New Vitality?

COMING SOON! SONOMA-MARIN FAIR!

T.H. Bead Design & Repair

Water Conservation Experts. Friendly, Honest Service. Licensed, Bonded and Insured. License #871026

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxycontin and Vicodin using Methadone. s 3UBUTEX3UBOXONE AVAILABLE s 0ROVIDING 4REATMENT SINCE  s #ONFIDENTIALITY ASSURED s -EDI#AL ACCEPTED

BODY-MIND MEDICINE Integrative Approaches for dynamic well-being. Carlisle Holland DO 707.824.8764. holonomicsinstitute.com

Donate Your Auto 800.380.5257 We do all DMV. Free pick up- running or not (restrictions apply). Live operators- 7 days! Help the Polly Klaas Foundation provide safety information and assist families in bringing kids home safely.

MacAdvantage Macintosh Computer Repair FREE Diagnosis, Friendly In-House Staff Answer Calls, Hardware/Software, DATA Recovery, Internet, Email, Wireless Network Setup & Security, Apple Authorized Business Agent, Tam Nguyen-Chief Tech, M-F 10-6. 707.664.0400, info@themacadvantage.com

Q UALITY G RAPHIC D ESIGN BUSINESS CARDS â&#x20AC;˘ BROCHURES POSTERS â&#x20AC;˘ T-SHIRTS â&#x20AC;˘ CD COVERS FLYERS â&#x20AC;˘ PHOTOGRAPHIC RESTORATION

general marketing materials

Mark Schaumann 707.795.0924

schaumann1@earthlink.net


1124_BO