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Members Calendar 路 Summer 2013

Members Highlights

Members-Only Events The Civil War and American Art Free Members lectures: Supporting,* Sustaining, Family/ Dual with Stephanie Herdrich, lecturer. Saturday, June 1, 11:00, or Sunday, June 2, 1:00. Advance registration is not required, but you must present your Membership card for admission. Sustaining viewing and reception, Tuesday, June 4, 6:00–9:00. A Special Evening with the Director President’s Circle, Patron Circle, Patron. Reception and presentation by Director Thomas P. Campbell, Wednesday, June 5, 6:00–8:00. Spring Garden Party at The Cloisters President’s Circle, Patron Circle, Patron, Sponsor, Donor. Monday, June 10, 5:30–8:30. Reception and live music. New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 Supporting.* Thursday, June 13, 6:00– 9:00. Reception and private viewing of the galleries. The Roof Garden Commission: Imran Qureshi (weather permitting) and PUNK: Chaos to Couture Supporting* viewing and reception, Thursday, June 20, 6:00–9:00. Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective Free Members lectures: Supporting,* Sustaining, Family/Dual with Marla Prather, Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art. Saturday, June 22, 11:00, or Sunday, June 23, 1:00. Advance registration is not required, but you must present your Membership card for admission.

Summer Soirées for Members Summer Fête Supporting,* Sustaining, Family/Dual. Wednesday, June 26, 7:00–11:00. Black-tie dinner and dancing in The New American Wing. Tickets, $400. For more information, call 212-570-3887. Young Members Party For Young Members of the Museum, ages 21–35. Thursday, July 11, 7:30–11:00. Tickets starting at $100 for Members, $170 for non-Members (fee includes a one-year Met Net Membership).

Registration Dates for Fall Programs Plan ahead. Register online at metmuseum.org/memberclasses for the fall programs below. Call 212-650-2819 for more information. Fees vary. Children’s Art Classes Family/Dual, Sustaining, Contributing, Donor, Sponsor, Patron, Patron Circle, and President’s Circle. Two types: Classes for children (ages 3–6) with adults, and drop-off art classes (ages 5–14). Programs for Adults Sustaining, Contributing, Donor, Sponsor, Patron, Patron Circle, and President’s Circle Members: Monday at the Met, Saturday Seminar, Wednesday Workshop: Behind the Scenes, and Thursday Seminar.

Private Celebrations All Members may rent one of our four elegant rooms for private parties throughout the year. Please call 212-650-2819 or visit metmuseum.org/celebrations for more information. *Supporting includes President’s Circle, Patron Circle, Patron, Sponsor, Donor, Contributing, Met Family Circle, Apollo Circle Patron, and Apollo Circle Members.

Dining at the Met Members Dining Room overlooking Central Park is exclusively for Members. Call 212-5703975 to make a reservation or book a table online by signing in to the MyMet section of the website at www.metmuseum.org/mymet. Petrie Court Café Through June 30, Sunday, Tuesday–Thursday: 11:30–4:30; Friday– Saturday: 11:30–9:00 (last seating at 8:30). Starting July 1, Sunday–Thursday: 11:00–4:30. For reservations or parties of five or more, call 212-570-3964. American Wing Café Through June 30, Sunday, Tuesday–Thursday: 9:30–4:30; Friday– Saturday: 9:30–8:30. Starting July 1, Sunday–Thursday: 10:00–4:30. The Cafeteria Through June 30, Tuesday–Thursday: 11:30–4:30; Friday: 11:30–7:00; Sunday: 11:00–4:30. Starting July 1, Monday–Thursday: 11:30–4:30. Great Hall Balcony Bar Friday–Saturday: 4:00–8:30 (last call at 8:00). Roof Garden Café and Martini Bar Open May 14–November 3, 2013, weather permitting. Through June 30, Sunday, Tuesday–Thursday: 10:00–4:30. Friday–Saturday: 10:00–8:30; Martini Bar, 5:30–8:30 (last call at 8:15). Starting July 1, Sunday–Thursday: 10:00–4:30. 2 | www.metmuseum.org

From the Director

Contents Members Highlights • 2 Exhibitions and The Collection • 4

Dear Members and Friends,

Gallery Update • 11

This season is marked by the opening of our New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800. The renovation makes it possible to explore the history of European painting in ways that will appeal to everyone, from the curious student to the devoted specialist. With so many outstanding paintings highlighted in this fresh installation, the new galleries will be a place to visit old favorites and enjoy new discoveries. Celebrating fashion and its impact on art and culture is a summer tradition at the Met, and this year’s Costume Institute show, PUNK: Chaos to Couture, provides a thrilling look at the ways in which designers since the 1970s have embraced punk’s aesthetic to redefine beauty and fashion. American masterworks are also a highlight this summer. The major loan exhibition The Civil War and American Art considers how some of the country’s finest artists responded to the war and its aftermath. This once-in-a-lifetime exhibition proposes significant new readings of some of this country’s most iconic paintings and photographs. A related landmark exhibition, spring’s Photography and the American Civil War continues its run with more than 200 poignant photographs, many of them from the Met’s collection. Our collection of ancient Near Eastern art provides a stunning backdrop to The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia: Charting a New Empire. An exhibition of famous surviving icons on loan from the British Museum, it shows the impressive range of cultural innovations initiated by ancient Persian rule. The innovative works of Los Angeles artist Ken Price helped redefine contemporary sculpture, and this summer he is the focus of a major museum exhibition. Finally, no summer is complete without a visit to the Museum’s Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden, and this year’s site-specific work by Pakistani artist Imran Qureshi (b. 1972) combines traditional Indian and contemporary themes to engage the natural environment and transport the viewer. These are just some of the highlights. Do visit soon.

Guided Tours • 12

Travel with the Met • 12 June Programs • 13 July Programs • 16 August Programs • 18 The Cloisters Museum and Gardens • 20 Programs for Families, Teens, Teachers, and Visitors with Disabilities • 21 Ways to Give • 22 Plan Your Visit • 23

Met to Open 7 Days a Week Starting July 1 As of July 1, 2013, the Museum will be open to the public 7 days a week and the Museum’s opening time each morning will change to 10:00 a.m. (from 9:30 a.m.). This new schedule will go into effect at both the Museum’s main building on Fifth Avenue at 82nd Street and at The Cloisters museum and gardens in Fort Tryon Park.

Both locations will be closed on Thanksgiving Day and December 25, and the main building will also be closed on the first Monday in May. Evening Hours Visit the Museum on Friday and Saturday until 9:00 p.m. when the galleries are less crowded.

Sponsored by The Audio Guide is a recorded guide to selected special exhibitions and the permanent collection. It is free for visitors who are blind, partially sighted, or hard of hearing; neck loops and large-print scripts are available. All-in-One Player $7.00 General public $6.00 Members $5.00 Children under 12

Guides are “$5 after 5” on Friday and Saturday evenings. Rent four Audio Guides, and the fifth one is free with a Frequent User Card! On the cover: Karl Lagerfeld for House of Chanel, Vogue, March 2011, Photograph by David Sims

Thomas P. Campbell Director General Information: 212-535-7710 | 3

Exhibitions and The Collection

PUNK: Chaos to Couture Through August 14, 2013 Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Exhibition Hall, 2nd floor

techniques, and embellishments associated with the anti-establishment style. Presented as an immersive multimedia, multisensory experience, the clothes are animated with period music videos and soundscaping audio techniques. Made possible by Moda Operandi. Additional support provided by Condé Nast.

Paul Cook, late This year’s Costume Insti1970s. Phototute exhibition, PUNK: graph © Dennis Chaos to Couture, examines Morris – all punk’s impact on high fash- rights reserved ion from the movement’s Comme des birth in the 1970s through Garçons (Japanese, founded its continuing influence 1969), spring/ today. Featuring approxisummer 2006. mately 100 designs for men Photograph by and women, the show juxCatwalking taposes original punk garments with recent, directional fashion to illustrate how haute couture and ready-to-wear have borrowed punk’s visual symbols, with paillettes being replaced with safety pins, feathers with razor blades, and bugle beads with studs. Focusing on the relationship between the punk concept of “do-it-yourself” and the couture concept of “made-to-measure,” the show is organized around the materials, 4 | www.metmuseum.org

Exhibitions and The Collection

The Civil War and American Art May 27–September 2, 2013 Robert Lehman Wing, court level and 1st floor

This major loan exhibition considers how American artists responded to the Civil War and its aftermath. The works of art on display trace the trajectory of the conflict and express the intense emotions that it provoked: unease as war became inevitable, optimism that a single battle might end the struggle, growing realization that fighting would be prolonged, enthusiasm and worries alike surrounding emancipation, and concerns about how to reunify the nation

after a period of grievous division. The exhibition proposes significant new readings of many familiar masterworks—some 60 paintings and 18 photographs created between 1852 and 1877—including outstanding landscapes by Frederic E. Church and Sanford R. Gifford, paintings of life on the battlefront and the home front by Winslow Homer and Eastman Johnson, and photographs by Timothy H. O’Sullivan and George N. Barnard. Made possible by an anonymous foundation. Additional support provided by the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund and the Enterprise Holdings Endowment. Supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Prisoners from the Front (detail), 1866, by Winslow Homer, oil on canvas. Gift of Mrs. Frank B Porter (1922.22.207)

Our Banner in the Sky, 1861, by Frederic Edwin Church, oil on paper. Collection of Fred Keeler

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 5

Exhibitions and The Collection

Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective June 18–September 22, 2013 Lila Acheson Wallace Wing, 1st floor

This long overdue retrospective, the first major museum exhibition of Ken Price’s work in New York, traces the development of his ceramic sculptures with approximately 65 examples from 1959 to the present. The selection ranges from the luminously glazed ovoid forms of Price’s early work to the suggestive, molten-

Exhibitions and The Collection like slumps he made starting in the 1990s. In addition to the sculpture, there is a small group of Price’s landscape drawings. Organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Made possible through major grants from the LLWW Foundation and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. L. Red, 1963, by Ken Price, ceramic painted with lacquer and acrylic. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Evelyn and Walter Haas, J. Fund Purchase. © Ken Price. Photograph © Fredrik Nilsen

Big Load, 1998, by Ken Price, fired and painted clay. Stéphane Janssen. © Ken Price. Photograph © Fredrik Nilsen

Search for the Unicorn: An Exhibition in Honor of The Cloisters’ 75th Anniversary The Cloisters

The Cyrus Cylinder is one of the most famous surviving icons from the ancient world. Excavated at Babylon in 1879, the Cylinder was inscribed in Babylonian cuneiform on the orders of the Persian king Cyrus the Great after he captured Babylon in 539 B.C. It records how Cyrus restored shrines and allowed deported peoples to return home. Although not mentioned, it is thought to be at this time that the Jews returned to Jerusalem to build the Second Temple, as recorded in the Bible. The exhibition includes the Cyrus

Gallery 199, Special Exhibition Gallery, 1st floor

More than 200 of the finest and most poignant photographs of the American Civil War have been brought together for

Cylinder and 16 other objects from the British Museum that illustrate innovations initiated by Persian rule in the ancient Near East (550–331 B.C.) and chart a new path for this empire, the largest the world had known. Made possible by the NoRuz at the Met Fund. Organized by the British Museum in partnership with the Iran Heritage Foundation and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

The Cyrus Cylinder, excavated at Babylon, Iraq, in 1879, Achaemenid, 539–538 B.C., baked clay. British Museum 90920 © Trustees of the British Museum

this landmark exhibition. Through examples drawn from the Metropolitan’s celebrated holdings of this material, complemented by important loans from public and private collections, Photography and the American Civil War examines the evolving role of the camera during the nation’s bloodiest war. The “War between the States” was the great test of the young Republic’s commitment to its founding precepts; it was also a watershed in photographic history. The camera recorded from beginning to end the heartbreaking narrative of the epic fouryear war (1861–1865) in which 750,000 lives were lost. Made possible by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.

Cloister from Saint-Michel-de-Cuxa, Catalonia, ca. 1130–40, from the Benedictine monastery of SaintMichel-de-Cuxa (Sant Miquel de Cuixà), near Perpignan, France, marble. The Cloisters Collection, 1925 (25.120.398–.954)

Aquamanile in the Form of a Unicorn, ca. 1425–50, German, Nuremberg, copper alloy. Gift of Irwin Untermyer, 1964 (64.101.1493) seum.org

Ancient Near Eastern Art, 2nd floor

Through September 2, 2013

Given by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., in time for the opening of The Cloisters in 1938, the Unicorn Tapestries are its best-known masterpieces; yet, 75 years later, their history and meaning remain elusive. They have been seen both as complicated metaphors for Christ and as emblems of matrimony, and they are beloved as quaint indications of medieval notions about the natural world. This exhibition, gathering some 40 works of art from the collections of the Metropolitan, sister institutions, and private collections, invites audiences to see the Unicorn Tapestries anew.

6 | www.metmu-

June 20–August 4, 2013

Photography and the American Civil War

Through August 18, 2013

Made possible by the Michel David-Weill Fund and the Quinque Foundation.

The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia: Charting a New Empire

Captain Charles A. and Sergeant John M. Hawkins, Company E, 38th Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry, 1861–62 by Unknown Artist, ¼ plate ambrotype. Private Collection General Information: 212-535-7710 | 7

Exhibitions and The Collection

Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective June 18–September 22, 2013 Lila Acheson Wallace Wing, 1st floor

This long overdue retrospective, the first major museum exhibition of Ken Price’s work in New York, traces the development of his ceramic sculptures with approximately 65 examples from 1959 to the present. The selection ranges from the luminously glazed ovoid forms of Price’s early work to the suggestive, molten-

Exhibitions and The Collection like slumps he made starting in the 1990s. In addition to the sculpture, there is a small group of Price’s landscape drawings. Organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Made possible through major grants from the LLWW Foundation and The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. L. Red, 1963, by Ken Price, ceramic painted with lacquer and acrylic. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Evelyn and Walter Haas, J. Fund Purchase. © Ken Price. Photograph © Fredrik Nilsen

Big Load, 1998, by Ken Price, fired and painted clay. Stéphane Janssen. © Ken Price. Photograph © Fredrik Nilsen

Search for the Unicorn: An Exhibition in Honor of The Cloisters’ 75th Anniversary The Cloisters

The Cyrus Cylinder is one of the most famous surviving icons from the ancient world. Excavated at Babylon in 1879, the Cylinder was inscribed in Babylonian cuneiform on the orders of the Persian king Cyrus the Great after he captured Babylon in 539 B.C. It records how Cyrus restored shrines and allowed deported peoples to return home. Although not mentioned, it is thought to be at this time that the Jews returned to Jerusalem to build the Second Temple, as recorded in the Bible. The exhibition includes the Cyrus

Gallery 199, Special Exhibition Gallery, 1st floor

More than 200 of the finest and most poignant photographs of the American Civil War have been brought together for

Cylinder and 16 other objects from the British Museum that illustrate innovations initiated by Persian rule in the ancient Near East (550–331 B.C.) and chart a new path for this empire, the largest the world had known. Made possible by the NoRuz at the Met Fund. Organized by the British Museum in partnership with the Iran Heritage Foundation and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution. Supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

The Cyrus Cylinder, excavated at Babylon, Iraq, in 1879, Achaemenid, 539–538 B.C., baked clay. British Museum 90920 © Trustees of the British Museum

this landmark exhibition. Through examples drawn from the Metropolitan’s celebrated holdings of this material, complemented by important loans from public and private collections, Photography and the American Civil War examines the evolving role of the camera during the nation’s bloodiest war. The “War between the States” was the great test of the young Republic’s commitment to its founding precepts; it was also a watershed in photographic history. The camera recorded from beginning to end the heartbreaking narrative of the epic fouryear war (1861–1865) in which 750,000 lives were lost. Made possible by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.

Cloister from Saint-Michel-de-Cuxa, Catalonia, ca. 1130–40, from the Benedictine monastery of SaintMichel-de-Cuxa (Sant Miquel de Cuixà), near Perpignan, France, marble. The Cloisters Collection, 1925 (25.120.398–.954)

Aquamanile in the Form of a Unicorn, ca. 1425–50, German, Nuremberg, copper alloy. Gift of Irwin Untermyer, 1964 (64.101.1493) seum.org

Ancient Near Eastern Art, 2nd floor

Through September 2, 2013

Given by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., in time for the opening of The Cloisters in 1938, the Unicorn Tapestries are its best-known masterpieces; yet, 75 years later, their history and meaning remain elusive. They have been seen both as complicated metaphors for Christ and as emblems of matrimony, and they are beloved as quaint indications of medieval notions about the natural world. This exhibition, gathering some 40 works of art from the collections of the Metropolitan, sister institutions, and private collections, invites audiences to see the Unicorn Tapestries anew.

6 | www.metmu-

June 20–August 4, 2013

Photography and the American Civil War

Through August 18, 2013

Made possible by the Michel David-Weill Fund and the Quinque Foundation.

The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia: Charting a New Empire

Captain Charles A. and Sergeant John M. Hawkins, Company E, 38th Regiment Georgia Volunteer Infantry, 1861–62 by Unknown Artist, ¼ plate ambrotype. Private Collection General Information: 212-535-7710 | 7

Exhibitions and The Collection

Exhibitions and The Collection

The Roof Garden Commission: Imran Qureshi

Coming Soon

Through November 3, 2013

Julia Margaret Cameron

The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden

Imran Qureshi (b. 1972, Hyderabad, Pakistan) is renowned for his skillful reinterpretations of traditional miniature painting that first flourished in the Mughal courts of the Indian Subcontinent at the end of the 16th century. He is equally adept at creating large-scale environments in which foliate motifs sourced from miniature landscapes surround the viewer and transform the site. Qureshi won the Sharjah Biennial Prize in 2011, and his site-specific work They Shimmer Still was a highlight of last year’s 18th Biennale of Sydney. Made possible by Bloomberg. Additional support provided by Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon B. Polsky. Threatened (detail), 2010, by Imran Qureshi, gouache and gilt on Wasli paper. Collection of Amna and Ali Naqvi. © Imran Qureshi. Photo: courtesy the artist and Corvi-Mora, London

Birds in the Art of Japan Through July 28, 2013 The Sackler Wing Galleries for the Arts of Japan, 2nd floor

Japanese artists from earliest times have depicted birds—real and fanciful—often with literary, religious, or auspicious connotations. Birds in the Art of Japan Cranes (detail), Edo period (1615–1868), by Nagasawa Rosetsu, pair of hanging scrolls; ink and color on paper. Fishbein-Bender Collection, Gift of T. Richard Fishbein and Estelle P. Bender, 2011 (2011.572.2a, b) 8 | www.metmuseum.org

August 19, 2013–January 5, 2014 captures a spectacular array of real and imaginary East Asian bird species in seasonal settings. Presented are approximately 150 works in various media and styles from medieval times to the present. The exhibition draws mostly on the Met’s own impressive holdings of pre-modern Japanese art, but also includes major loans from New York City private collections. Made possible by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Foundation.

At War with the Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston Through July 28, 2013 The Howard Gilman Gallery, 2nd floor

William Eggleston (American, b. 1939) emerged in the early 1960s as a pioneer of modern color photography. Now, 50 years later, he is its most prolific and influential exemplar. Through a profound appreciation of the American vernacular (especially near his home in the Mississippi Delta) and confidence in the dye transfer printmaking process to reveal the region’s characteristic qualities of light and saturated chromatics, Eggleston almost single-handedly validated color photography as a legitimate artistic medium. Made possible in part by Renée Belfer. Untitled (Memphis), 1971, printed 1999, by William Eggleston, dye-transfer print. Purchase, Louis V. Bell, Harris Brisbane Dick, Fletcher, and Rogers Funds and Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Fund, through Joyce and Robert Menschel, and Charlotte A. and William E. Ford Gift, 2012. © Eggleston Artistic Trust

Plain or Fancy? Restraint and Exuberance in the Decorative Arts Through August 18, 2013 Wrightsman Exhibition Gallery, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts, 1st floor

Modernism was not the first movement to cast a shadow on ornament and adornment, though it was the most effective one. This

exhibition contrasts austere works of art with ornate ones, encouraging viewers to examine their own responses and to consider them in the light of different stylistic imperatives of the past. Drawn from the Museum’s collection of European decorative arts, the exhibition follows the theme from the Renaissance to the early 20th century.

Living in Style: Five Centuries of Interior Design from the Collection of Drawings and Prints June 18–September 8, 2013 Drawings and Prints, 2nd floor

From an early moment on, sculpting our living environment became an art form in its own right, often involving highly paid artists working in a wide array of disciplines. Made singlehandedly or by an interpreter in various stages of the actual manufacturing process, many features of their designs have been captured on paper. Collected over a period of more than 100 years, this selection of drawings, prints, and objects highlights the ingenuity, beauty, and wit often found in designs for the interior. Wall Elevation for a Salon, ca. 1780, by Jean Démosthène Dugourc, pen and ink and watercolor. Gift of William Rieder, 2009 (2009.465.11)

Everyday Epiphanies: Photography and Daily Life Since 1969 June 25, 2013–January 26, 2014 Joyce and Robert Menschel Hall for Modern Photography, 2nd floor

This exhibition examines the ways in which artists have used the camera to explore subjects close to home—the quotidian, intimate, and overlooked aspects of everyday existence. The works on view range from the countercultural questioning of conventions in art and life by Conceptual artists to recent works by young artists who combine process and product in novel ways.

Flora and Fauna in Korean Art June 15, 2013–June 1, 2014 Arts of Korea Gallery, 2nd floor

With works from the Met’s collection, this small installation takes a closer look at portrayals of plants and animals in Korean paintings, ceramics, lacquer, and textile. Noteworthy themes and motifs range from auspicious symbols like dragons, cranes, deer, and pine trees to emblems associated with the Confucian gentlemanscholar, such as plum blossoms and bamboo, as well as such quintessential flowers of the East as the peony and lotus. Deer Amidst Pine Trees (Part of Ten Symbols of Longevity)(detail), 19th century, two hanging scrolls; ink and color on silk. Purchase, Friends of Asian Art Gifts, 2013 (2013.29a, b)

Small Is Beautiful: Chinese Snuff Bottles July 19, 2013–February 17, 2014 Charlotte C. Weber Galleries for the Arts of Ancient China, 2nd floor

Snuff bottles caught the imagination of the upper class at the Qing imperial court and hold a unique place in the history of Chinese art. The broad range of materials, techniques, and artistic styles found in these miniature masterpieces represent almost every art form developed during the five millennia of Chinese civilization. All the works on view are from the Museum’s collection, and many have not been shown in decades.

Snuff Bottle, Qianlong period (1736–95), Qing dynasty, painted enamel on copper. Bequest of Edmund C. Converse, 1921 (21.175.314a, b)

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 9

Exhibitions and The Collection

Exhibitions and The Collection

The Roof Garden Commission: Imran Qureshi

Coming Soon

Through November 3, 2013

Julia Margaret Cameron

The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden

Imran Qureshi (b. 1972, Hyderabad, Pakistan) is renowned for his skillful reinterpretations of traditional miniature painting that first flourished in the Mughal courts of the Indian Subcontinent at the end of the 16th century. He is equally adept at creating large-scale environments in which foliate motifs sourced from miniature landscapes surround the viewer and transform the site. Qureshi won the Sharjah Biennial Prize in 2011, and his site-specific work They Shimmer Still was a highlight of last year’s 18th Biennale of Sydney. Made possible by Bloomberg. Additional support provided by Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon B. Polsky. Threatened (detail), 2010, by Imran Qureshi, gouache and gilt on Wasli paper. Collection of Amna and Ali Naqvi. © Imran Qureshi. Photo: courtesy the artist and Corvi-Mora, London

Birds in the Art of Japan Through July 28, 2013 The Sackler Wing Galleries for the Arts of Japan, 2nd floor

Japanese artists from earliest times have depicted birds—real and fanciful—often with literary, religious, or auspicious connotations. Birds in the Art of Japan Cranes (detail), Edo period (1615–1868), by Nagasawa Rosetsu, pair of hanging scrolls; ink and color on paper. Fishbein-Bender Collection, Gift of T. Richard Fishbein and Estelle P. Bender, 2011 (2011.572.2a, b) 8 | www.metmuseum.org

August 19, 2013–January 5, 2014 captures a spectacular array of real and imaginary East Asian bird species in seasonal settings. Presented are approximately 150 works in various media and styles from medieval times to the present. The exhibition draws mostly on the Met’s own impressive holdings of pre-modern Japanese art, but also includes major loans from New York City private collections. Made possible by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Foundation.

At War with the Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston Through July 28, 2013 The Howard Gilman Gallery, 2nd floor

William Eggleston (American, b. 1939) emerged in the early 1960s as a pioneer of modern color photography. Now, 50 years later, he is its most prolific and influential exemplar. Through a profound appreciation of the American vernacular (especially near his home in the Mississippi Delta) and confidence in the dye transfer printmaking process to reveal the region’s characteristic qualities of light and saturated chromatics, Eggleston almost single-handedly validated color photography as a legitimate artistic medium. Made possible in part by Renée Belfer. Untitled (Memphis), 1971, printed 1999, by William Eggleston, dye-transfer print. Purchase, Louis V. Bell, Harris Brisbane Dick, Fletcher, and Rogers Funds and Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Fund, through Joyce and Robert Menschel, and Charlotte A. and William E. Ford Gift, 2012. © Eggleston Artistic Trust

Plain or Fancy? Restraint and Exuberance in the Decorative Arts Through August 18, 2013 Wrightsman Exhibition Gallery, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts, 1st floor

Modernism was not the first movement to cast a shadow on ornament and adornment, though it was the most effective one. This

exhibition contrasts austere works of art with ornate ones, encouraging viewers to examine their own responses and to consider them in the light of different stylistic imperatives of the past. Drawn from the Museum’s collection of European decorative arts, the exhibition follows the theme from the Renaissance to the early 20th century.

Living in Style: Five Centuries of Interior Design from the Collection of Drawings and Prints June 18–September 8, 2013 Drawings and Prints, 2nd floor

From an early moment on, sculpting our living environment became an art form in its own right, often involving highly paid artists working in a wide array of disciplines. Made singlehandedly or by an interpreter in various stages of the actual manufacturing process, many features of their designs have been captured on paper. Collected over a period of more than 100 years, this selection of drawings, prints, and objects highlights the ingenuity, beauty, and wit often found in designs for the interior. Wall Elevation for a Salon, ca. 1780, by Jean Démosthène Dugourc, pen and ink and watercolor. Gift of William Rieder, 2009 (2009.465.11)

Everyday Epiphanies: Photography and Daily Life Since 1969 June 25, 2013–January 26, 2014 Joyce and Robert Menschel Hall for Modern Photography, 2nd floor

This exhibition examines the ways in which artists have used the camera to explore subjects close to home—the quotidian, intimate, and overlooked aspects of everyday existence. The works on view range from the countercultural questioning of conventions in art and life by Conceptual artists to recent works by young artists who combine process and product in novel ways.

Flora and Fauna in Korean Art June 15, 2013–June 1, 2014 Arts of Korea Gallery, 2nd floor

With works from the Met’s collection, this small installation takes a closer look at portrayals of plants and animals in Korean paintings, ceramics, lacquer, and textile. Noteworthy themes and motifs range from auspicious symbols like dragons, cranes, deer, and pine trees to emblems associated with the Confucian gentlemanscholar, such as plum blossoms and bamboo, as well as such quintessential flowers of the East as the peony and lotus. Deer Amidst Pine Trees (Part of Ten Symbols of Longevity)(detail), 19th century, two hanging scrolls; ink and color on silk. Purchase, Friends of Asian Art Gifts, 2013 (2013.29a, b)

Small Is Beautiful: Chinese Snuff Bottles July 19, 2013–February 17, 2014 Charlotte C. Weber Galleries for the Arts of Ancient China, 2nd floor

Snuff bottles caught the imagination of the upper class at the Qing imperial court and hold a unique place in the history of Chinese art. The broad range of materials, techniques, and artistic styles found in these miniature masterpieces represent almost every art form developed during the five millennia of Chinese civilization. All the works on view are from the Museum’s collection, and many have not been shown in decades.

Snuff Bottle, Qianlong period (1736–95), Qing dynasty, painted enamel on copper. Bequest of Edmund C. Converse, 1921 (21.175.314a, b)

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 9

Exhibitions and The Collection

Brush Writing in the Arts of Japan

Klee – Path to Abstraction

August 17, 2013–January 12, 2014

Through August 4, 2013

Arts of Japan Galleries, 2nd floor

Modern and Contemporary Art, mezzanine

This installation focuses on pre-modern Japanese works that were inspired by classical Chinese or Japanese literature. Included are ink landscapes and calligraphy created in the context of medieval Zen monasteries, as well as works that draw inspiration from ancient Heian court culture. Other highlights include screen paintings, deluxe lacquerware and textiles, and a selection of contemporary prints and calligraphy.

Unlike Mondrian and Kandinsky, Klee did not embrace abstraction in pursuit of some deep spiritual goal, but to keep drab reality somewhat at bay. During his visit to Tunisia in April 1914, he took that decisive step. Inspired by the strong light of North Africa, he gradually detached color from literal description and reduced the forms of the landscape into abstract translucent color planes. As a magician, he created a prodigious variety of forms and shapes. Southern Gardens, 1919, by Paul Klee, watercolor and ink on paper. The Berggruen Klee Collection, 1984 (1984.208.2)

Poem on the Theme of Snow, 14th century, by Musô Soseki, hanging scroll; ink on paper. Gift of Sylvan Barnet and William Burto, in honor of Maxwell K. Hearn, 2011 (2011.534)

Eighteenth-Century Pastels from the Permanent Collection

Land Marks

August 6–December 1, 2013

Through August 18, 2013

European Paintings, 2nd floor

Lila Acheson Wallace Wing, 1st floor

In the last 10 years the Museum has added to a very small group of highly finished 18th-century English pastels a number of important examples of the French, Italian, and German schools. The materials are luminous and the pastel portraits are lifelike and expressive.

This installation is devoted to how artists have used the land itself as a canvas. The works are notable for the range of perspective: from the epic sweep achieved by pioneers of the Earthworks genre to meditations on myth and identity from the 1970s and 1980s to more traditional photographs that track the traces of man’s exploitation of the natural world.

Study of a Boy in a Blue Jacket, 1717, by Benedetto Luti, Pastel and chalk on blue laid paper, laid down on paste paper. Gwynne Andrews Fund, 2007 (2007.360)

Also on View Cambodian Rattan: The Sculptures of Sopheap Pich Through July 7, 2013 Velázquez’s Portrait of Duke Francesco I d’Este: A Masterpiece from the Galleria Estense, Modena Through July 14, 2013 African Art, New York, and the AvantGarde Through September 2, 2013 10 | www.metmuseum.org

Untitled, 1983, by Ana Mendieta, gelatin silver print. Purchase, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Gift, through Joyce and Robert Menschel, 1994 (1994.227.1)

Gallery Update

New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 The Museum’s galleries for its worldrenowned collection of European Old Master paintings—which number more than 1,700 works from the 13th through the early 19th century—reopened on May 23 after an extensive renovation and reinstallation. This is the first major renovation of the galleries since 1951 and the first major reinstallation of the collection since 1972. Gallery space has increased by almost one third, and the configuration of the galleries makes it possible to give the collection greater coherence and a more natural progression than ever before. The Met’s collection of early Netherlandish, Italian, and French paintings is wide ranging and

includes landmark pictures, while its collection of Dutch school paintings must be counted among the finest in the world. As for individual artists, the representation of Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer, Poussin, Velazquez, Goya, and David is the strongest in the western hemisphere, and there are individual masterpieces known to every student of art history, such as Bruegel’s Harvesters and David’s Death of Socrates. Visitors can now follow the history of painting in the lowlands from Jan van Eyck

Sixteenth-century Venetian painting, with works by Titian, Veronese, and Tintoretto, can be found in gallery 607, above.

through Bruegel and the development of landscape in the 17th century through to Frans Hals, Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Rubens and Van Dyck. There are now galleries for portraiture, landscape, genre painting, and still life. The history of Italian painting too, from Giotto and Duccio to Tiepolo, is told in galleries organized by chronology and region—Florence, Siena, Venice, Rome—with galleries dedicated to themes such as domestic art and portraiture. A key aspect of the reinstallation is the presentation of sculpture where the exchange between the two mediums is illuminating and pertinent. Visitors will also find a significant number of pictures from private collections, lent for the occasion. For the curators in the Department of European Paintings, the reinstallation has been “a labor of love,” and thanks to donated funds as well as gifts and bequests, the collection continues to grow. Above: Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (1743–1794) and His Wife (Marie-Anne-Pierrette Paulze, 1758–1836) (detail), 1788, by Jacques-Louis David, oil on canvas. Purchase, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wrightsman Gift, in honor of Everett Fahy, 1977 (1977.10) Left: The Harvesters, 1565, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, oil on wood. Rogers Fund, 1919 (19.164) General Information: 212-535-7710 | 11

Travel with the Met

Lyon to Arles aboard MS AmaDagio October 2–11, 2013 View the glorious landscapes and historic cities of Provence on a cruise along the Saône and Rhône rivers. Board the riverboat AmaDagio in Lyon for tours of its famed museum collections. View masterpieces of 15th-century sculpture in Dijon, the grand interiors and gardens of the Château de Cormatin, and the paintings in Avignon’s Petit Palais. Visit ancient Roman monuments in Aix and Nîmes, and walk in Van Gogh’s footsteps in Arles. Hôtel-Dieu de Beaune Additional highlights include a reception at the home of a former Louvre curator, a wine tasting in Châteauneufdu-Pape, and a culinary demonstration by a Paul Bocuse-trained chef. Optional Lyon prelude. Land/cruise rates: from $4,995.

Vienna: A New Year’s Celebration December 27, 2013–January 3, 2014 Winter is a magical time to experience Vienna. During a one-week stay at the landmark Hotel Sacher, view paintings at the Kunsthistorisches Museum, see one of the world’s finest collections of drawings at the Albertina Museum, and tour the Vienna Secession Museum. At the Spanish Riding School, see a performance by the famed Lipizzaner Stallions. During a waltz lesson at a historic dance school, practice your steps before toasting the New Year at the lavish Imperial Ball. Enjoy a recital by a leading pianist in the intimate setting of her home, and attend a New Year’s Day performance of Johann Strauss’s Die Fledermaus at the renowned Vienna State Opera House. Land rate: $10,995. For more information on both trips, call 212-650-2110, visit www.metmuseum.org/travel, or e-mail travelwiththemet@ metmuseum.org. Vienna, Austria

Guided Tours

June Programs The Museum presents programs related to exhibitions and the collections as listed on the following pages. All programs are subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, check www.metmuseum.org or the information desks upon arrival. Films require no tickets unless otherwise noted. Gallery Talks and Tours (indicated by “G” in the listings) are presented by Museum curators, conservators, educators, outside scholars, and advanced students of art history. They start in Gallery 534, Vélez Blanco Patio, unless noted as EE (“exhibition entrance”) or another location. Lectures (free with Museum admission) by curators, scholars, conservators, and artists are presented on Sunday afternoons and occasional weekdays September–June. Subscription lectures by leading authorities on art, music, and historical topics are presented weekdays and evenings October–May. Met Museum Presents is the 2012–13 season of performances, talks, and special gallery tours. New this year are two special ticket offers: 30 & Under Rush $15 tickets for audience members 30 years and younger when purchased the day of the event (subject to availability). Call 212-570-3949 or visit the . box office. Events are designated with a Bring the Kids! Selected concerts have $1 tickets available for children (ages 7–16) when accompanied by an adult with a fullprice ticket. Call 212-570-3949 or visit the box office. Events are designated with a . Access Symbols

Assistive listening devices available American Sign Language

12 | www.metmuseum.org

C Concert F Film G Gallery Program L Lecture M Members Event SC Short Course SW Studio Workshop I Summer Graduate Intern Talk Location:

BJSLH Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall CFH Carson Family Hall EE Exhibition Entrance GRR Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium MSH Medieval Sculpture Hall

Special Summer Gallery Talks

Museum Graduate Interns lead gallery talks on topics of their choice between June 21 and August 10, indicated with an “I” in the program listings. Check the information desks or online calendar for titles, topics, and speakers. Talks start in Gallery 534, Vélez Blanco Patio. Saturday, June 1 M 11:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, The Civil War and American Art, with Stephanie Herdrich, lecturer. No reservations required; present Membership card for admission. GRR G 11:00 The Science of Ceramics and Glass in the Islamic World. Federico Carò G 7:00 In with the New: Iran and Early Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull Sunday, June 2 G 11:00 The Science of Painting. Julie Arslanoglu M 1:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, The Civil War and American Art, with Stephanie Herdrich, lecturer. No reservations required; present Membership card for admission. GRR G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Folding Stories. European Paintings galleries, 2nd floor

Membership Categories

Met Net (MN) Individual (IN) Family/Dual (FA/DU) Sustaining (SU) National Memberships

Associate (AS) Friend (FR) Supporting Memberships (SUP)

Free Guided Tours of the Museum’s collections in English and other languages are offered by Museum-trained guides throughout the summer. Inquire at the main information desk in the Great Hall for tour availabilities. In addition to Museum Highlights tours, the Met’s guides offer overviews of the following collections: American Art; Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas; Ancient Near Eastern Art; Asian Art; European and American Sculpture, Decorative Arts and Period Rooms; Egyptian Art; European Art; Islamic Art; Greek and Roman Art; Medieval Art; Modern Art; Musical Instruments; and The Robert Lehman Collection. Note: The full schedule of Guided Tours, showing time and location, will return in the Fall Members Calendar.

Program:

Contributing (CO) Donor (DO) Apollo Circle (AC) Met Family Circle (MFC) Sponsor (SO) Patron (PA) Patron Circle (PC) President’s Circle (PR)

Sunday at the Met—World Science Festival: Art and the Mind L

Explore the neuroscience of perception and response with art historian David Freedberg, artist Matthew Ritchie, Met curator Luke Syson, and neuroscientist Edward Vessel. GRR

Tuesday, June 4 G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—Birds in the Art of Japan. John Carpenter. EE M 6:00–9:00 SU Members reception and viewing, The Civil War and American Art Wednesday, June 5 G 10:00 Exhibition Tour—Cambodian Rattan. John Guy. EE General Information: 212-535-7710 | 13

Travel with the Met

Lyon to Arles aboard MS AmaDagio October 2–11, 2013 View the glorious landscapes and historic cities of Provence on a cruise along the Saône and Rhône rivers. Board the riverboat AmaDagio in Lyon for tours of its famed museum collections. View masterpieces of 15th-century sculpture in Dijon, the grand interiors and gardens of the Château de Cormatin, and the paintings in Avignon’s Petit Palais. Visit ancient Roman monuments in Aix and Nîmes, and walk in Van Gogh’s footsteps in Arles. Hôtel-Dieu de Beaune Additional highlights include a reception at the home of a former Louvre curator, a wine tasting in Châteauneufdu-Pape, and a culinary demonstration by a Paul Bocuse-trained chef. Optional Lyon prelude. Land/cruise rates: from $4,995.

Vienna: A New Year’s Celebration December 27, 2013–January 3, 2014 Winter is a magical time to experience Vienna. During a one-week stay at the landmark Hotel Sacher, view paintings at the Kunsthistorisches Museum, see one of the world’s finest collections of drawings at the Albertina Museum, and tour the Vienna Secession Museum. At the Spanish Riding School, see a performance by the famed Lipizzaner Stallions. During a waltz lesson at a historic dance school, practice your steps before toasting the New Year at the lavish Imperial Ball. Enjoy a recital by a leading pianist in the intimate setting of her home, and attend a New Year’s Day performance of Johann Strauss’s Die Fledermaus at the renowned Vienna State Opera House. Land rate: $10,995. For more information on both trips, call 212-650-2110, visit www.metmuseum.org/travel, or e-mail travelwiththemet@ metmuseum.org. Vienna, Austria

Guided Tours

June Programs The Museum presents programs related to exhibitions and the collections as listed on the following pages. All programs are subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, check www.metmuseum.org or the information desks upon arrival. Films require no tickets unless otherwise noted. Gallery Talks and Tours (indicated by “G” in the listings) are presented by Museum curators, conservators, educators, outside scholars, and advanced students of art history. They start in Gallery 534, Vélez Blanco Patio, unless noted as EE (“exhibition entrance”) or another location. Lectures (free with Museum admission) by curators, scholars, conservators, and artists are presented on Sunday afternoons and occasional weekdays September–June. Subscription lectures by leading authorities on art, music, and historical topics are presented weekdays and evenings October–May. Met Museum Presents is the 2012–13 season of performances, talks, and special gallery tours. New this year are two special ticket offers: 30 & Under Rush $15 tickets for audience members 30 years and younger when purchased the day of the event (subject to availability). Call 212-570-3949 or visit the . box office. Events are designated with a Bring the Kids! Selected concerts have $1 tickets available for children (ages 7–16) when accompanied by an adult with a fullprice ticket. Call 212-570-3949 or visit the box office. Events are designated with a . Access Symbols

Assistive listening devices available American Sign Language

12 | www.metmuseum.org

C Concert F Film G Gallery Program L Lecture M Members Event SC Short Course SW Studio Workshop I Summer Graduate Intern Talk Location:

BJSLH Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall CFH Carson Family Hall EE Exhibition Entrance GRR Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium MSH Medieval Sculpture Hall

Special Summer Gallery Talks

Museum Graduate Interns lead gallery talks on topics of their choice between June 21 and August 10, indicated with an “I” in the program listings. Check the information desks or online calendar for titles, topics, and speakers. Talks start in Gallery 534, Vélez Blanco Patio. Saturday, June 1 M 11:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, The Civil War and American Art, with Stephanie Herdrich, lecturer. No reservations required; present Membership card for admission. GRR G 11:00 The Science of Ceramics and Glass in the Islamic World. Federico Carò G 7:00 In with the New: Iran and Early Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull Sunday, June 2 G 11:00 The Science of Painting. Julie Arslanoglu M 1:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, The Civil War and American Art, with Stephanie Herdrich, lecturer. No reservations required; present Membership card for admission. GRR G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Folding Stories. European Paintings galleries, 2nd floor

Membership Categories

Met Net (MN) Individual (IN) Family/Dual (FA/DU) Sustaining (SU) National Memberships

Associate (AS) Friend (FR) Supporting Memberships (SUP)

Free Guided Tours of the Museum’s collections in English and other languages are offered by Museum-trained guides throughout the summer. Inquire at the main information desk in the Great Hall for tour availabilities. In addition to Museum Highlights tours, the Met’s guides offer overviews of the following collections: American Art; Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas; Ancient Near Eastern Art; Asian Art; European and American Sculpture, Decorative Arts and Period Rooms; Egyptian Art; European Art; Islamic Art; Greek and Roman Art; Medieval Art; Modern Art; Musical Instruments; and The Robert Lehman Collection. Note: The full schedule of Guided Tours, showing time and location, will return in the Fall Members Calendar.

Program:

Contributing (CO) Donor (DO) Apollo Circle (AC) Met Family Circle (MFC) Sponsor (SO) Patron (PA) Patron Circle (PC) President’s Circle (PR)

Sunday at the Met—World Science Festival: Art and the Mind L

Explore the neuroscience of perception and response with art historian David Freedberg, artist Matthew Ritchie, Met curator Luke Syson, and neuroscientist Edward Vessel. GRR

Tuesday, June 4 G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—Birds in the Art of Japan. John Carpenter. EE M 6:00–9:00 SU Members reception and viewing, The Civil War and American Art Wednesday, June 5 G 10:00 Exhibition Tour—Cambodian Rattan. John Guy. EE General Information: 212-535-7710 | 13

June Programs 2:30 YoungArts at the Met: Manhattan School of Music Jazz Arts featuring Gabe Schnider, guitar, and Kate Davis, bass and vocals. Tour of the galleries immediately follows concert. The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments M 6:00–8:00 PR, PC, PA Members. A Special Evening with the Director. Reception and presentation by Director Thomas P. Campbell C

Thursday, June 6 G 11:00 Early Netherlandish Painting: The Legacy of Jan van Eyck. Sandra Hindriks SC 2:00–4:00 Short Course—Northern European Paintings: Van Eyck to Vermeer. Discover the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 in this three-session course (sessions two and three are on June 13 and 20) led by Elizabeth Perkins and other Met experts. $150, Museum admission included. To register, visit www .metmuseum.org/events/programs/ workshops-and-courses.

June Programs Saturday, June 8 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—At War with the Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston. Marian Cohen. EE SW 1:00–6:00 Studio Workshop—Linking the Past: Wirework Inspired by Ancient Jewelry. Link yourself to ancient innovations in this one-day workshop exploring the power of loops and chains in metal. Tam Tran, artist. $65, plus $10 for materials, Museum admission included. To register, visit www .metmuseum.org/events/programs/ workshops-and-courses. G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Japanese Ink and Colors. The Sackler Wing Galleries for the Arts of Japan, 2nd floor G 7:00 Turning Points in 20th-Century Art. Julie Reiss C 7:00 So Percussion and Man Forever. An evening of drumming by the celebrated ensemble So Percussion and composer/percussionist John Colpitts’s experimental drum project Man Forever. $25. GRR Sunday, June 9 G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Japanese Ink and Colors. The Sackler Wing Galleries for the Arts of Japan, 2nd floor Monday, June 10 M 5:30–8:30 PR, PC, PA, SO, DO Members. Spring Garden Party at The Cloisters. Reception and live music Tuesday, June 11 G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—African Art, New York, and the Avant-Garde. Yaëlle Biro. EE

Young Woman with a Water Pitcher, ca. 1662, by Johannes Vermeer, oil on canvas. Marquand Collection, Gift of Henry G. Marquand, 1889 (89.15.21)

Friday, June 7 G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator— Kashan Carpet. Janina Poskrobko G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Navigating Patterns. Maya Valladares and Jessica Houston. Koç Family Galleries G 6:30 Marie Antoinette and the French Revolution. Molly Kysar C 7:00 Edward Arron, artistic director. Biber: Passacaglia in G Minor for Solo Violin. Bach: Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, arranged for String Trio by Dmitry Sitkovetsky. $35. $1 tickets available for children ages 7–16 with a full-price-paying adult. GRR 14 | www.metmuseum.org

Wednesday, June 12 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Velázquez’s Portrait of Francesco I d’Este. Inés Powell. EE Thursday, June 13 G 11:00 Drawings and Prints from the Collection. Constance McPhee and Samantha Rippner M 6:00–9:00 SUP Members. New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800. Reception and private viewing of the galleries Friday, June 14 G 11:00 Drums of War. Jayson Dobney G 2:00 Gallery Talk and Demonstration— Roentgen Furniture. Gallery 553 G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—Photography and the American Civil War. Jeff L. Rosenheim. EE

G

7:00 The Observant Eye—Revolution in Resolution: Lilliputs on the Face of a Giant and a Portrait by Chuck Close. See box below. CFH

The Observant Eye

These gallery programs, indicated with a “G” in the program listings, are for college and graduate students, along with other young adults. To register, e-mail observanteye@metmuseum.org. Saturday, June 15 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich. Gallery 963 G 7:00 Impressionism, Everyday Life, and the Industrial Revolution. With voice Emmanuel von Schack interpretation Sunday, June 16 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Velázquez’s Portrait of Francesco I d’Este. Inés Powell. EE G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Folding Stories. European Paintings galleries, 2nd floor Sunday at the Met—Origins of Punk L

3:00 Explore the punk evolution in New York and London in conversation with Jon Savage and Roberta Bayley, moderated by Glenn O’Brien. GRR

Tuesday, June 18 G 11:00 From Washington to Lincoln in The American Wing. Lois Stainman Wednesday, June 19 G 10:30 Gallery Conversation—The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich and military historian Michael McAfee. Gallery 963 Thursday, June 20 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Plain or Fancy? Luke Syson. EE L 5:30 The Cyrus Cylinder from Ancient Babylon and the Beginning of the Persian Empire. John Curtis, British Museum. Free; use ground-level entrance at Fifth Ave. and 83rd St. GRR M 6:00–9:00 SUP Members. Reception and viewing of The Roof Garden Commission: Imran Qureshi (weather permitting) and PUNK: Chaos to Couture Friday, June 21 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator—Drawing of an Angel from Iran. Valerie Faivre

6:00 How, When, and Why African Art Came to New York: A Conversation. Jack Flam, President, The Dedalus Foundation, and Yaëlle Biro, Assistant Curator, MMA. BJSLH G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Capturing Reflections. Michelle Hagewood and Deborah Lutz. Emma and Georgina Bloomberg Arms and Armor Court G 6:30 Artists on Artworks—Susanna Coffey. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. C 9:30 iPad Mixing Piece. Audience participation using DJ Spooky’s iPad app. Download the free app and bring your device. $30. Petrie Court Café L

Saturday, June 22 M 11:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective, with Marla Prather, Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art. No reservations required; present Membership card for admission. GRR I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 2:15 Arts of the Americas. Debra Cole No voice interpretation I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, June 23 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk M 1:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective, with Marla Prather, Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art. No reservations required; present Membership card for admission. GRR Sunday at the Met—The American Civil War L

3:00 Lectures by MMA curators Jeff L. Rosenheim and H. Barbara Weinberg. Performance by President Lincoln’s Own Band. GRR

Tuesday, June 25 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia. Michael Seymour. EE Wednesday, June 26 G 11:00 Flora and Fauna in Korean Art. Soyoung Lee I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk M 7:00–11:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members. Summer Fête. Black-tie dinner and dancing in The New American Wing. Tickets $400

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 15

June Programs 2:30 YoungArts at the Met: Manhattan School of Music Jazz Arts featuring Gabe Schnider, guitar, and Kate Davis, bass and vocals. Tour of the galleries immediately follows concert. The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments M 6:00–8:00 PR, PC, PA Members. A Special Evening with the Director. Reception and presentation by Director Thomas P. Campbell C

Thursday, June 6 G 11:00 Early Netherlandish Painting: The Legacy of Jan van Eyck. Sandra Hindriks SC 2:00–4:00 Short Course—Northern European Paintings: Van Eyck to Vermeer. Discover the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 in this three-session course (sessions two and three are on June 13 and 20) led by Elizabeth Perkins and other Met experts. $150, Museum admission included. To register, visit www .metmuseum.org/events/programs/ workshops-and-courses.

June Programs Saturday, June 8 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—At War with the Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston. Marian Cohen. EE SW 1:00–6:00 Studio Workshop—Linking the Past: Wirework Inspired by Ancient Jewelry. Link yourself to ancient innovations in this one-day workshop exploring the power of loops and chains in metal. Tam Tran, artist. $65, plus $10 for materials, Museum admission included. To register, visit www .metmuseum.org/events/programs/ workshops-and-courses. G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Japanese Ink and Colors. The Sackler Wing Galleries for the Arts of Japan, 2nd floor G 7:00 Turning Points in 20th-Century Art. Julie Reiss C 7:00 So Percussion and Man Forever. An evening of drumming by the celebrated ensemble So Percussion and composer/percussionist John Colpitts’s experimental drum project Man Forever. $25. GRR Sunday, June 9 G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Japanese Ink and Colors. The Sackler Wing Galleries for the Arts of Japan, 2nd floor Monday, June 10 M 5:30–8:30 PR, PC, PA, SO, DO Members. Spring Garden Party at The Cloisters. Reception and live music Tuesday, June 11 G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—African Art, New York, and the Avant-Garde. Yaëlle Biro. EE

Young Woman with a Water Pitcher, ca. 1662, by Johannes Vermeer, oil on canvas. Marquand Collection, Gift of Henry G. Marquand, 1889 (89.15.21)

Friday, June 7 G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator— Kashan Carpet. Janina Poskrobko G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Navigating Patterns. Maya Valladares and Jessica Houston. Koç Family Galleries G 6:30 Marie Antoinette and the French Revolution. Molly Kysar C 7:00 Edward Arron, artistic director. Biber: Passacaglia in G Minor for Solo Violin. Bach: Goldberg Variations, BWV 988, arranged for String Trio by Dmitry Sitkovetsky. $35. $1 tickets available for children ages 7–16 with a full-price-paying adult. GRR 14 | www.metmuseum.org

Wednesday, June 12 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Velázquez’s Portrait of Francesco I d’Este. Inés Powell. EE Thursday, June 13 G 11:00 Drawings and Prints from the Collection. Constance McPhee and Samantha Rippner M 6:00–9:00 SUP Members. New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800. Reception and private viewing of the galleries Friday, June 14 G 11:00 Drums of War. Jayson Dobney G 2:00 Gallery Talk and Demonstration— Roentgen Furniture. Gallery 553 G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—Photography and the American Civil War. Jeff L. Rosenheim. EE

G

7:00 The Observant Eye—Revolution in Resolution: Lilliputs on the Face of a Giant and a Portrait by Chuck Close. See box below. CFH

The Observant Eye

These gallery programs, indicated with a “G” in the program listings, are for college and graduate students, along with other young adults. To register, e-mail observanteye@metmuseum.org. Saturday, June 15 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich. Gallery 963 G 7:00 Impressionism, Everyday Life, and the Industrial Revolution. With voice Emmanuel von Schack interpretation Sunday, June 16 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Velázquez’s Portrait of Francesco I d’Este. Inés Powell. EE G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Folding Stories. European Paintings galleries, 2nd floor Sunday at the Met—Origins of Punk L

3:00 Explore the punk evolution in New York and London in conversation with Jon Savage and Roberta Bayley, moderated by Glenn O’Brien. GRR

Tuesday, June 18 G 11:00 From Washington to Lincoln in The American Wing. Lois Stainman Wednesday, June 19 G 10:30 Gallery Conversation—The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich and military historian Michael McAfee. Gallery 963 Thursday, June 20 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Plain or Fancy? Luke Syson. EE L 5:30 The Cyrus Cylinder from Ancient Babylon and the Beginning of the Persian Empire. John Curtis, British Museum. Free; use ground-level entrance at Fifth Ave. and 83rd St. GRR M 6:00–9:00 SUP Members. Reception and viewing of The Roof Garden Commission: Imran Qureshi (weather permitting) and PUNK: Chaos to Couture Friday, June 21 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator—Drawing of an Angel from Iran. Valerie Faivre

6:00 How, When, and Why African Art Came to New York: A Conversation. Jack Flam, President, The Dedalus Foundation, and Yaëlle Biro, Assistant Curator, MMA. BJSLH G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Capturing Reflections. Michelle Hagewood and Deborah Lutz. Emma and Georgina Bloomberg Arms and Armor Court G 6:30 Artists on Artworks—Susanna Coffey. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. C 9:30 iPad Mixing Piece. Audience participation using DJ Spooky’s iPad app. Download the free app and bring your device. $30. Petrie Court Café L

Saturday, June 22 M 11:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective, with Marla Prather, Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art. No reservations required; present Membership card for admission. GRR I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 2:15 Arts of the Americas. Debra Cole No voice interpretation I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, June 23 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk M 1:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective, with Marla Prather, Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art. No reservations required; present Membership card for admission. GRR Sunday at the Met—The American Civil War L

3:00 Lectures by MMA curators Jeff L. Rosenheim and H. Barbara Weinberg. Performance by President Lincoln’s Own Band. GRR

Tuesday, June 25 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia. Michael Seymour. EE Wednesday, June 26 G 11:00 Flora and Fauna in Korean Art. Soyoung Lee I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk M 7:00–11:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members. Summer Fête. Black-tie dinner and dancing in The New American Wing. Tickets $400

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 15

June / July Programs Thursday, June 27 G 10:15 Exhibition Tour—Ken Price Sculpture. Marla Prather. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Friday, June 28 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk F 6:00 Pasargadae. Introduced by David Stronach, Professor of Near Eastern Studies Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley. BJSLH G 6:30 Revolutionizing the Figure: Alberto Giacometti. Jacqueline Terrassa G 7:00 The Observant Eye—No Revolt: Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II. See box on page 15. CFH Saturday, June 29 G 11:00 Illusion in European Paintings. Page Knox I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, June 30 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk Tuesday, July 2 G 11:00 In with the New: Iran and Early Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull Wednesday, July 3 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Living in Style. Femke Speelberg. EE I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Friday, July 5 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator —Panel with Marquetry Decoration from Egypt. Daniel Hausdorf G 6:30 Quiet Revolutions in Early and Medieval Chinese Art. Dora Ching Saturday, July 6 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, July 7 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Painterly Portraits. European Paintings galleries, 2nd floor Tuesday, July 9 G 11:00 Drawings and Prints from the The Girl I Left Behind Me, ca. 1872, by Eastman Johnson, oil on canvas. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C., Museum purchase made possible in part by Mrs. Alexander Hamilton Rice in memory of her husband and by Ralph Cross Johnson 16 | www.metmuseum.org

July Programs Collection. Constance McPhee and Freyda Spira Wednesday, July 10 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia. Ira Spar. EE I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Thursday, July 11 G 11:00 Metalwork from the Islamic World. Jean-François de Lapérouse and Sarah McGregor L 2:00 The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia. Discover the significance of the Cylinder and its legacy with Irving Finkel, British Museum; Robert Faulkner, Boston College; and moderator Mohamad Tavakoli-Targhi, University of Toronto. GRR I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk M 7:30–11:00 Young Members Party. For Young Members of the Museum, ages 21–35. Tickets starting at $100 for Members, $170 for non-Members (fee includes a one-year Met Net Membership)

G

I I

1:00 How Did They Do That? Mesopotamian Writing. Ancient Near Eastern Art galleries, 2nd floor 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk

Sunday, July 14 G 11:00 Modernism and a Changing Society. Catherine Fukushima G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Mesopotamian Writing. Ancient Near Eastern Art galleries, 2nd floor Tuesday, July 16 G 11:00 From Washington to Lincoln in The American Wing. Lois Stainman Wednesday, July 17 G 10:30 Literature and The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich. Gallery 963 I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Thursday, July 18 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Photography and the American Civil War. Jeff L. Rosenheim. EE

Friday, July 12 G 11:00 The Newly Installed Galleries for Italian Paintings. Andrea Bayer G 2:00 Gallery Talk and Demonstration— Roentgen Furniture. Gallery 553 G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Exploring Gesture in Painting. Jessica Houston and Deborah Lutz. Gallery 601 G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—At War with the Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston. Jeff L. Rosenheim. EE G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Armed for Battle? Dressed to Kill? Design and Decoration in Arms and Armor. See box on page 15. CFH

G

6:30 Artists on Artworks—Allison Smith. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio.

Saturday, July 20 SW 10:30–3:30 Studio Workshop—Image Remix: Stenciling and Screen Printing on Fabric. Learn how to print on fabric in this two-session course (session two is on July 27). Maya Valladares, artist. $150, plus $15 for materials, Museum admission included. Register at www .metmuseum.org/events/programs/ workshops-and-courses. G 10:30–12:00 Exhibition Tour— Photography and the American Civil War and The Civil War and American Art. Visit both exhibitions to compare how the war was portrayed in different mediums. Jeff L. Rosenheim and Page Knox. Vélez Blanco Patio I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, July 21 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Painterly Portraits. European Paintings galleries, 2nd floor Tuesday, July 23 G 11:00 Revolutionizing the Figure: Alberto Giacometti. Jacqueline Terrassa Wednesday, July 24 G 10:15 Exhibition Tour—Ken Price Sculpture. Marla Prather. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Thursday, July 25 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Plain or Fancy? Ellenor Alcorn. EE I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk

Saturday, July 13 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich. Gallery 963 Private James House with Fighting Knife, Sixteenth Georgia Cavalry Battalion, Army of Tennessee, 1861– 62(?), by Unknown, ambrotype, sixth-plate; ruby glass. David Wynn Vaughan Collection. Image: Jack Melton

I

3:30 Summer graduate intern talk

Friday, July 19 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator —Islamic Glass. Lisa Pilosi G 5:00–8:00 Artist Demonstrations— Painting from the Past. Drop in; all ages welcome. European Paintings galleries, 2nd floor

Friday, July 26 G 11:00 Punk Music and Contemporary Art. Ian Alteveer and Vivien Goldman G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Light and Dark Shadows. Pamela Lawton. Gallery 621 G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—Birds in the Art of Japan. John Carpenter. EE G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Revolutionary Vision. See box on page 15. CFH G 7:30–8:30 Friday Evening Gallery Event—Birds in the Art of Japan. Encounter a spectacular array of real and fanciful birds featured in works of art during interactive experiences. EE

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 17

June / July Programs Thursday, June 27 G 10:15 Exhibition Tour—Ken Price Sculpture. Marla Prather. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Friday, June 28 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk F 6:00 Pasargadae. Introduced by David Stronach, Professor of Near Eastern Studies Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley. BJSLH G 6:30 Revolutionizing the Figure: Alberto Giacometti. Jacqueline Terrassa G 7:00 The Observant Eye—No Revolt: Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II. See box on page 15. CFH Saturday, June 29 G 11:00 Illusion in European Paintings. Page Knox I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, June 30 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk Tuesday, July 2 G 11:00 In with the New: Iran and Early Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull Wednesday, July 3 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Living in Style. Femke Speelberg. EE I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Friday, July 5 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator —Panel with Marquetry Decoration from Egypt. Daniel Hausdorf G 6:30 Quiet Revolutions in Early and Medieval Chinese Art. Dora Ching Saturday, July 6 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, July 7 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Painterly Portraits. European Paintings galleries, 2nd floor Tuesday, July 9 G 11:00 Drawings and Prints from the The Girl I Left Behind Me, ca. 1872, by Eastman Johnson, oil on canvas. Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C., Museum purchase made possible in part by Mrs. Alexander Hamilton Rice in memory of her husband and by Ralph Cross Johnson 16 | www.metmuseum.org

July Programs Collection. Constance McPhee and Freyda Spira Wednesday, July 10 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia. Ira Spar. EE I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Thursday, July 11 G 11:00 Metalwork from the Islamic World. Jean-François de Lapérouse and Sarah McGregor L 2:00 The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia. Discover the significance of the Cylinder and its legacy with Irving Finkel, British Museum; Robert Faulkner, Boston College; and moderator Mohamad Tavakoli-Targhi, University of Toronto. GRR I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk M 7:30–11:00 Young Members Party. For Young Members of the Museum, ages 21–35. Tickets starting at $100 for Members, $170 for non-Members (fee includes a one-year Met Net Membership)

G

I I

1:00 How Did They Do That? Mesopotamian Writing. Ancient Near Eastern Art galleries, 2nd floor 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk

Sunday, July 14 G 11:00 Modernism and a Changing Society. Catherine Fukushima G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Mesopotamian Writing. Ancient Near Eastern Art galleries, 2nd floor Tuesday, July 16 G 11:00 From Washington to Lincoln in The American Wing. Lois Stainman Wednesday, July 17 G 10:30 Literature and The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich. Gallery 963 I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Thursday, July 18 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Photography and the American Civil War. Jeff L. Rosenheim. EE

Friday, July 12 G 11:00 The Newly Installed Galleries for Italian Paintings. Andrea Bayer G 2:00 Gallery Talk and Demonstration— Roentgen Furniture. Gallery 553 G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Exploring Gesture in Painting. Jessica Houston and Deborah Lutz. Gallery 601 G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—At War with the Obvious: Photographs by William Eggleston. Jeff L. Rosenheim. EE G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Armed for Battle? Dressed to Kill? Design and Decoration in Arms and Armor. See box on page 15. CFH

G

6:30 Artists on Artworks—Allison Smith. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio.

Saturday, July 20 SW 10:30–3:30 Studio Workshop—Image Remix: Stenciling and Screen Printing on Fabric. Learn how to print on fabric in this two-session course (session two is on July 27). Maya Valladares, artist. $150, plus $15 for materials, Museum admission included. Register at www .metmuseum.org/events/programs/ workshops-and-courses. G 10:30–12:00 Exhibition Tour— Photography and the American Civil War and The Civil War and American Art. Visit both exhibitions to compare how the war was portrayed in different mediums. Jeff L. Rosenheim and Page Knox. Vélez Blanco Patio I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, July 21 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Painterly Portraits. European Paintings galleries, 2nd floor Tuesday, July 23 G 11:00 Revolutionizing the Figure: Alberto Giacometti. Jacqueline Terrassa Wednesday, July 24 G 10:15 Exhibition Tour—Ken Price Sculpture. Marla Prather. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Thursday, July 25 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Plain or Fancy? Ellenor Alcorn. EE I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk

Saturday, July 13 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich. Gallery 963 Private James House with Fighting Knife, Sixteenth Georgia Cavalry Battalion, Army of Tennessee, 1861– 62(?), by Unknown, ambrotype, sixth-plate; ruby glass. David Wynn Vaughan Collection. Image: Jack Melton

I

3:30 Summer graduate intern talk

Friday, July 19 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator —Islamic Glass. Lisa Pilosi G 5:00–8:00 Artist Demonstrations— Painting from the Past. Drop in; all ages welcome. European Paintings galleries, 2nd floor

Friday, July 26 G 11:00 Punk Music and Contemporary Art. Ian Alteveer and Vivien Goldman G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Light and Dark Shadows. Pamela Lawton. Gallery 621 G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—Birds in the Art of Japan. John Carpenter. EE G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Revolutionary Vision. See box on page 15. CFH G 7:30–8:30 Friday Evening Gallery Event—Birds in the Art of Japan. Encounter a spectacular array of real and fanciful birds featured in works of art during interactive experiences. EE

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 17

July / August Programs Saturday, July 27 I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, July 28 G 11:00 From Washington to Lincoln in The American Wing. Lois Stainman Tuesday, July 30 G 11:00 From Performance and Ritual Objects to Museum Artworks. Monica Mariño Wednesday, July 31 G 11:00 Early Netherlandish Painting: The Legacy of Jan van Eyck. Sandra Hindriks I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Thursday, August 1 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia. Fiona Kidd. EE I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Friday, August 2 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 2:00 Conversation with a Curator and a Conservator—The Roentgens’ Berlin Secretary Cabinet. Wolfram Koeppe and Mechthild Baumeister G 6:30 Illusion in European Paintings. Page Knox

August Programs 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Abstract Mark Making. Maya Valladares. Galleries 922 and 923 G 6:30 Cycles of Change in the Art of the Silk Road. David Bowles G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Battle Cries and Demon Spies: Manuscript Pages from the Ramayana. See box on page 15. CFH G

Saturday, August 10 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich. Gallery 963 G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Musical Wind Instruments. Musical Instruments galleries, 2nd floor I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk

Tuesday, August 6 G 11:00 Marie Antoinette and the French Revolution. Molly Kysar Wednesday, August 7 G 11:00 From Performance and Ritual Objects to Museum Artworks. Monica Mariño I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Thursday, August 8 G 11:00 Maiolica to Porcelain: Revolution or Evolution? Deborah Krohn I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Friday, August 9 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk

18 | www.metmuseum.org

2:00 Gallery Talk and Demonstration— Roentgen Furniture. Gallery 553 G 6:30 The Revolution of the Unfinished. Allan Doyle

G

Saturday, August 17 G 11:00 Modernism and a Changing Society. Catherine Fukushima G 7:00 Illusion in European Paintings. Page Knox

Saturday, August 24 G 11:00 In with the New: Iran and Early Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull G 7:00 Evolutions and Revolutions: Ancient Art of Egypt and the Middle East. Erica Ehrenberg

Sunday, August 18 G 11:00 Quiet Revolutions in Early and Medieval Chinese Art. Dora Ching G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Experimenting with Color. Modern and Contemporary Art galleries, 2nd floor

6:30 Artists on Artworks—Shaw Osha. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio.

Sunday, August 25 G 11:00 Evolutions and Revolutions: Ancient Art of Egypt and the Middle East. Erica Ehrenberg

Sunday, August 11 G 11:00 Turning Points in 20th-Century Art. Julie Reiss G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Musical Wind Instruments. Musical Instruments galleries, 2nd floor

Tuesday, August 20 G 11:00 Cycles of Change in the Art of the Silk Road. David Bowles

Tuesday, August 27 G 11:00 The Changing Face of Rome: Portraiture from Republic to Empire. Michael Norris

Wednesday, August 21 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich. Gallery 963

Wednesday, August 28 G 11:00 Celebrating 100 Years of Arms and Armor: Japanese Armor. Richard Gradkowski

Tuesday, August 13 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Everyday Epiphanies. Marian Cohen. EE

Thursday, August 22 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Living in Style. Femke Speelberg. EE

Thursday, August 29 G 11:00 The Revolution of the Unfinished. Allan Doyle

Friday, August 23 G 11:00 Celebrating 100 Years of Arms and Armor: Japanese Armor. Richard Gradkowski G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Drawing From O’Keeffe. Michelle Hagewood. The Esther Annenberg Simon Gallery

Friday, August 30 G 11:00 Marie Antoinette and the French Revolution. Molly Kysar

Saturday, August 3 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, August 4 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Experimenting with Color. Modern and Contemporary Art galleries, 2nd floor

G

Saturday, August 31 G 7:00 Celebrating 100 Years of Arms and Armor: Japanese Armor. Richard Gradkowski

Empty Shoebox, 1993, by Gabriel Orozco, silver dye bleach print. Gift of the artist, 1995 (1995.564) © Gabriel Orozco

Wednesday, August 14 G 11:00 The Changing Face of Rome: Portraiture from Republic to Empire. Michael Norris Thursday, August 15 10:30–12:00 Exhibition Tour— Photography and the American Civil War and The Civil War and American Art. Visit both exhibitions to compare how the war was portrayed in different mediums. Jeff L. Rosenheim and Page Knox. Vélez Blanco Patio Friday, August 16 G 11:00 Maiolica to Porcelain: Revolution or Evolution? Deborah Krohn

Black Hollyhock, Blue Larkspur (detail), 1929, by Georgia O’Keeffe, oil on canvas. George A. Hearn Fund, 1934 (34.51)

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 19

July / August Programs Saturday, July 27 I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, July 28 G 11:00 From Washington to Lincoln in The American Wing. Lois Stainman Tuesday, July 30 G 11:00 From Performance and Ritual Objects to Museum Artworks. Monica Mariño Wednesday, July 31 G 11:00 Early Netherlandish Painting: The Legacy of Jan van Eyck. Sandra Hindriks I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Thursday, August 1 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Cyrus Cylinder and Ancient Persia. Fiona Kidd. EE I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Friday, August 2 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 2:00 Conversation with a Curator and a Conservator—The Roentgens’ Berlin Secretary Cabinet. Wolfram Koeppe and Mechthild Baumeister G 6:30 Illusion in European Paintings. Page Knox

August Programs 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Abstract Mark Making. Maya Valladares. Galleries 922 and 923 G 6:30 Cycles of Change in the Art of the Silk Road. David Bowles G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Battle Cries and Demon Spies: Manuscript Pages from the Ramayana. See box on page 15. CFH G

Saturday, August 10 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich. Gallery 963 G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Musical Wind Instruments. Musical Instruments galleries, 2nd floor I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk

Tuesday, August 6 G 11:00 Marie Antoinette and the French Revolution. Molly Kysar Wednesday, August 7 G 11:00 From Performance and Ritual Objects to Museum Artworks. Monica Mariño I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Thursday, August 8 G 11:00 Maiolica to Porcelain: Revolution or Evolution? Deborah Krohn I 3:30 Summer graduate intern talk Friday, August 9 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk

18 | www.metmuseum.org

2:00 Gallery Talk and Demonstration— Roentgen Furniture. Gallery 553 G 6:30 The Revolution of the Unfinished. Allan Doyle

G

Saturday, August 17 G 11:00 Modernism and a Changing Society. Catherine Fukushima G 7:00 Illusion in European Paintings. Page Knox

Saturday, August 24 G 11:00 In with the New: Iran and Early Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull G 7:00 Evolutions and Revolutions: Ancient Art of Egypt and the Middle East. Erica Ehrenberg

Sunday, August 18 G 11:00 Quiet Revolutions in Early and Medieval Chinese Art. Dora Ching G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Experimenting with Color. Modern and Contemporary Art galleries, 2nd floor

6:30 Artists on Artworks—Shaw Osha. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio.

Sunday, August 25 G 11:00 Evolutions and Revolutions: Ancient Art of Egypt and the Middle East. Erica Ehrenberg

Sunday, August 11 G 11:00 Turning Points in 20th-Century Art. Julie Reiss G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Musical Wind Instruments. Musical Instruments galleries, 2nd floor

Tuesday, August 20 G 11:00 Cycles of Change in the Art of the Silk Road. David Bowles

Tuesday, August 27 G 11:00 The Changing Face of Rome: Portraiture from Republic to Empire. Michael Norris

Wednesday, August 21 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Civil War and American Art. Stephanie Herdrich. Gallery 963

Wednesday, August 28 G 11:00 Celebrating 100 Years of Arms and Armor: Japanese Armor. Richard Gradkowski

Tuesday, August 13 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Everyday Epiphanies. Marian Cohen. EE

Thursday, August 22 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Living in Style. Femke Speelberg. EE

Thursday, August 29 G 11:00 The Revolution of the Unfinished. Allan Doyle

Friday, August 23 G 11:00 Celebrating 100 Years of Arms and Armor: Japanese Armor. Richard Gradkowski G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Drawing From O’Keeffe. Michelle Hagewood. The Esther Annenberg Simon Gallery

Friday, August 30 G 11:00 Marie Antoinette and the French Revolution. Molly Kysar

Saturday, August 3 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 3:00 Summer graduate intern talk I 7:00 Summer graduate intern talk Sunday, August 4 I 11:00 Summer graduate intern talk G 1:00 Sunday Studio—Experimenting with Color. Modern and Contemporary Art galleries, 2nd floor

G

Saturday, August 31 G 7:00 Celebrating 100 Years of Arms and Armor: Japanese Armor. Richard Gradkowski

Empty Shoebox, 1993, by Gabriel Orozco, silver dye bleach print. Gift of the artist, 1995 (1995.564) © Gabriel Orozco

Wednesday, August 14 G 11:00 The Changing Face of Rome: Portraiture from Republic to Empire. Michael Norris Thursday, August 15 10:30–12:00 Exhibition Tour— Photography and the American Civil War and The Civil War and American Art. Visit both exhibitions to compare how the war was portrayed in different mediums. Jeff L. Rosenheim and Page Knox. Vélez Blanco Patio Friday, August 16 G 11:00 Maiolica to Porcelain: Revolution or Evolution? Deborah Krohn

Black Hollyhock, Blue Larkspur (detail), 1929, by Georgia O’Keeffe, oil on canvas. George A. Hearn Fund, 1934 (34.51)

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 19

The Cloisters Museum and Gardens

Programs for Families, Teens, Teachers, and Visitors with Disabilities

The Cloisters museum and gardens is the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe. For information, call 212-923-3700. Summer Hours: Through June 30, Tuesday– Sunday 9:30–5:15. Starting July 1, Monday– Sunday 10:00–5:15 (through October). Highlights Tours of the Collection for individual visitors: Through June 30, Tuesday– Friday, and Sunday at 3:00. Starting July 1, Monday–Friday, and Sunday at 3:00. Garden Tours: May 1 through June 30, Tuesday–Sunday at 1:00. July 1 through October 31, Monday–Sunday at 1:00. Admission: Free to Museum Members. Recommended contribution same as the main building, includes admission to both on the same day. All groups of 10 or more require advance reservations: call 212-650-2280. Directions: Subway: A to 190th Street, then walk through Fort Tryon Park; or, transfer to M4 bus for one stop. Bus: M4 (Madison Avenue) to last stop (Fort Tryon Park–The Cloisters). Car: Henry Hudson Parkway north to exit “Fort Tryon Park–The Cloisters.” Accessibility: Limited access for mobility impaired visitors. Call 212-923-3700. Gallery Talks at noon and 2:00. Free to individual visitors with Museum admission. No reservations necessary. For information, call 212-650-2280.

4  Plants from Hildegard of Bingen’s Physica. Elizabeth Ann Murphy 10  Interpreting the Middle Ages at The Cloisters. Lauren Mancia 17  Strewn with Flowers: A Close Look at The Falconer’s Bath. Rika Burnham 24  Reading the Windows of The Cloisters. Xavier Seubert 31  On the Trail of Marco Polo at The Cloisters. Mark Cruse

June

August

1  Garden

3  Heroes

Day 2  Classicism in Medieval Art and Architecture. Heather Horton 8  The Legend of the Unicorn. Mary Halbach 15  The Art of Healing in the Middle Ages. Sigrid Goldiner 22  Changing Perspectives on The Cloisters Collection. Elizabeth Parker 29  Animal Lore in the Middle Ages. Leslie Bussis Tait July 6  Four

Cloisters. Carol Schuler, lecturer 7  Representing Mary in Medieval Art. Johanna G. Seasonwein 13  Spanish Art at The Cloisters. Berfu Durantas 20  Medieval Tapestries. Emma Wegner 27  Getting Closer: Interpersonal Relationships in Medieval Art. Jessamyn Conrad August 3  The Hunt of the Unicorn Tapestries at The Cloisters. Nancy Wu

20 | www.metmuseum.org

Conversation with a Curator/Conservator

20-minute informal conversations presented at 2:00. June 7  Barbara Boehm July 5  Peter Barnet August 2  Emeline Baude Gallery Workshops for Families Hour-long programs for children ages 4–12 and their families; free with Museum admission. Meet in the Main Hall at 1:00. June 2  Strike

a Pose. Jennifer Kalter Bianca Niggli

15  Horses!

July 6  Medieval

Entertainment. Sarah Harshman Manuscripts. Sarah Harshman 20  A Medieval Menagerie. Samantha Rothberg 7  Marvelous

and Heroines. Christina DeLeón Miracle Workers. Katherine

4  Medieval

Werwie 17  Medieval Merchant Adventurers. Lauren Mancia

La Experiencia Medieval: Talleres bilingües educativos para la familia / Bilingual Family Gallery Workshops

Estos programas son para niños de 4 a 12 años y sus familias. Los talleres duran una hora y son gratis con su admisión al museo. Grupos se reúnen a la 1 p.m. en la sala de recepción. 29 de junio  Animales reales e imaginarios de la Edad Media / Real and Imaginary Animals of the Middle Ages. Begonia SantaCecilia 27 de julio  Columnas y capitales / Columns and Capitals. Christina DeLeón 31 de augusto  Historias Medievales / Medieval Stories. Begonia Santa-Cecilia

The Trie Café, located in the

covered walkway surrounding the Trie Cloister, is open from April to October.

These drop-in programs are free with Museum admission unless otherwise noted. Children must be accompanied by an adult. For further information, call 212-650-2217 or go to www.metmuseum.org/events/ programs/family-programs. All programs meet in Carson Family Hall, Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education, unless otherwise noted.

For Teens Ages 11–18 Explore, create, and connect with art across cultures and time periods. Join Museum educators, artists, and other teens in free classes devoted to understanding art through gallery conversations, sketching, and studio workshops. For class descriptions and to register, go to www.metmuseum.org/ learn/for-teens.

For Families with Children Ages 18 Months–3 Years Toddler Storytime in Nolen Library. June 4–28: Tuesday–Friday, 10:30–11:00. July 1– August 30: Monday–Friday, 10:30–11:00 (no program July 4). Look, listen, and have fun with picture books. Museum admission is not required. Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Nolen Library, Uris Center for Education

For Visitors of All Ages See pages 13–19 for topics and locations.

For Families with Children Ages 3–7 Start with Art at the Met. June 1–30: Thursday, 3:30–4:30; Saturday, 11:00–12:00 and 2:30–3:30 (no afternoon program June 8); additional program Sunday, June 30, 2:30–3:30. July 2–August 31: Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30–4:30 (no program July 4); Saturday, 2:30–3:30 (no programs July 13, August 10). Sketch, explore, listen to stories, and discover the meaning of art.

Start with Art at the Met Plus. Sunday, June 23, July 28, August 25, 2:30–3:30. Start with Art at the Met gallery experiences plus art-making activities. Storytime in Nolen Library. June 2–30: Tuesday–Friday, 3:00–3:30; Sunday, 2:00– 2:30. July 1–August 30: Monday–Friday, 3:00–3:30 (no programs July 3, 4, August 30); Sunday, 2:00–2:30 (no programs August 4, 11, 18, 25). Hear stories in the library and then explore the galleries on a self-guided treasure hunt! Museum admission is not required for the library portion of this program. Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Nolen Library, Uris Center for Education For Families with Children Ages 5–12 Art Trek. June 1–30: Saturday, 11:00–12:00 and 2:30–3:30 (no afternoon program June 8); additional program Sunday, June 30, 2:30–3:30. July 2–August 31: Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30–4:30 (no program July 4); Saturday, 2:30–3:30 (no programs July 13, August 10). Be an art explorer! Take a new voyage around the globe every time you visit the Met.

Art Trek Plus. Sunday, June 23, July 28, August 25, 2:30–3:30. Art Trek gallery experiences, performances, and more.

Sunday Studio. Sunday, June 2 and 16; July 7 and 21; August 4 and 18. Try your hand at creating works of art in the galleries. Each session focuses on a different culture and art form with family-friendly activities led by an artist. Drop in; art supplies provided. Ongoing instruction, 1:00–3:00. How Did They Do That? Saturday and Sunday, June 8 and 9; July 13 and 14; August 10 and 11. Learn hands-on how works of art were created. 30-minute sessions, 1:00–4:00. Meet in the galleries. Drop-in Drawing. Friday, June 7 and 21; July 12 and 26; August 9 and 23. Join talented art instructors in the galleries for fun, informal sketching! Come and go as you like between 6:30 and 8:30. Artist Demonstration—Painting from the Past. Friday, July 19. See artists paint in the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250– 1800. Drop in anytime between 5:00 and 8:00. For Teachers The Museum offers a wide variety of programs. Call 212-570-3985 or visit www.metmuseum.org/events/programs/ k12-educator-programs.

For information about the Children’s Reading Room and the Teacher Resource Center, call 212-570-3788 or visit www.metmuseum.org/learn/for-educators.

For Visitors with Disabilities The Met offers a range of programs, including touch and descriptive tours for visitors with visual impairments and Met Escapes for those living with dementia. Call 212650-2010, e-mail access@metmuseum.org, or visit www.metmuseum.org/events/ visitorsdisabilities.

Discoveries. For visitors with developmental disabilities. Selected Sundays. Reservations required. Call 212-650-2010. Gallery Workshops for Families at The Cloisters Museum and Gardens, p. 20. General Information: 212-535-7710 | 21

The Cloisters Museum and Gardens

Programs for Families, Teens, Teachers, and Visitors with Disabilities

The Cloisters museum and gardens is the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe. For information, call 212-923-3700. Summer Hours: Through June 30, Tuesday– Sunday 9:30–5:15. Starting July 1, Monday– Sunday 10:00–5:15 (through October). Highlights Tours of the Collection for individual visitors: Through June 30, Tuesday– Friday, and Sunday at 3:00. Starting July 1, Monday–Friday, and Sunday at 3:00. Garden Tours: May 1 through June 30, Tuesday–Sunday at 1:00. July 1 through October 31, Monday–Sunday at 1:00. Admission: Free to Museum Members. Recommended contribution same as the main building, includes admission to both on the same day. All groups of 10 or more require advance reservations: call 212-650-2280. Directions: Subway: A to 190th Street, then walk through Fort Tryon Park; or, transfer to M4 bus for one stop. Bus: M4 (Madison Avenue) to last stop (Fort Tryon Park–The Cloisters). Car: Henry Hudson Parkway north to exit “Fort Tryon Park–The Cloisters.” Accessibility: Limited access for mobility impaired visitors. Call 212-923-3700. Gallery Talks at noon and 2:00. Free to individual visitors with Museum admission. No reservations necessary. For information, call 212-650-2280.

4  Plants from Hildegard of Bingen’s Physica. Elizabeth Ann Murphy 10  Interpreting the Middle Ages at The Cloisters. Lauren Mancia 17  Strewn with Flowers: A Close Look at The Falconer’s Bath. Rika Burnham 24  Reading the Windows of The Cloisters. Xavier Seubert 31  On the Trail of Marco Polo at The Cloisters. Mark Cruse

June

August

1  Garden

3  Heroes

Day 2  Classicism in Medieval Art and Architecture. Heather Horton 8  The Legend of the Unicorn. Mary Halbach 15  The Art of Healing in the Middle Ages. Sigrid Goldiner 22  Changing Perspectives on The Cloisters Collection. Elizabeth Parker 29  Animal Lore in the Middle Ages. Leslie Bussis Tait July 6  Four

Cloisters. Carol Schuler, lecturer 7  Representing Mary in Medieval Art. Johanna G. Seasonwein 13  Spanish Art at The Cloisters. Berfu Durantas 20  Medieval Tapestries. Emma Wegner 27  Getting Closer: Interpersonal Relationships in Medieval Art. Jessamyn Conrad August 3  The Hunt of the Unicorn Tapestries at The Cloisters. Nancy Wu

20 | www.metmuseum.org

Conversation with a Curator/Conservator

20-minute informal conversations presented at 2:00. June 7  Barbara Boehm July 5  Peter Barnet August 2  Emeline Baude Gallery Workshops for Families Hour-long programs for children ages 4–12 and their families; free with Museum admission. Meet in the Main Hall at 1:00. June 2  Strike

a Pose. Jennifer Kalter Bianca Niggli

15  Horses!

July 6  Medieval

Entertainment. Sarah Harshman Manuscripts. Sarah Harshman 20  A Medieval Menagerie. Samantha Rothberg 7  Marvelous

and Heroines. Christina DeLeón Miracle Workers. Katherine

4  Medieval

Werwie 17  Medieval Merchant Adventurers. Lauren Mancia

La Experiencia Medieval: Talleres bilingües educativos para la familia / Bilingual Family Gallery Workshops

Estos programas son para niños de 4 a 12 años y sus familias. Los talleres duran una hora y son gratis con su admisión al museo. Grupos se reúnen a la 1 p.m. en la sala de recepción. 29 de junio  Animales reales e imaginarios de la Edad Media / Real and Imaginary Animals of the Middle Ages. Begonia SantaCecilia 27 de julio  Columnas y capitales / Columns and Capitals. Christina DeLeón 31 de augusto  Historias Medievales / Medieval Stories. Begonia Santa-Cecilia

The Trie Café, located in the

covered walkway surrounding the Trie Cloister, is open from April to October.

These drop-in programs are free with Museum admission unless otherwise noted. Children must be accompanied by an adult. For further information, call 212-650-2217 or go to www.metmuseum.org/events/ programs/family-programs. All programs meet in Carson Family Hall, Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education, unless otherwise noted.

For Teens Ages 11–18 Explore, create, and connect with art across cultures and time periods. Join Museum educators, artists, and other teens in free classes devoted to understanding art through gallery conversations, sketching, and studio workshops. For class descriptions and to register, go to www.metmuseum.org/ learn/for-teens.

For Families with Children Ages 18 Months–3 Years Toddler Storytime in Nolen Library. June 4–28: Tuesday–Friday, 10:30–11:00. July 1– August 30: Monday–Friday, 10:30–11:00 (no program July 4). Look, listen, and have fun with picture books. Museum admission is not required. Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Nolen Library, Uris Center for Education

For Visitors of All Ages See pages 13–19 for topics and locations.

For Families with Children Ages 3–7 Start with Art at the Met. June 1–30: Thursday, 3:30–4:30; Saturday, 11:00–12:00 and 2:30–3:30 (no afternoon program June 8); additional program Sunday, June 30, 2:30–3:30. July 2–August 31: Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30–4:30 (no program July 4); Saturday, 2:30–3:30 (no programs July 13, August 10). Sketch, explore, listen to stories, and discover the meaning of art.

Start with Art at the Met Plus. Sunday, June 23, July 28, August 25, 2:30–3:30. Start with Art at the Met gallery experiences plus art-making activities. Storytime in Nolen Library. June 2–30: Tuesday–Friday, 3:00–3:30; Sunday, 2:00– 2:30. July 1–August 30: Monday–Friday, 3:00–3:30 (no programs July 3, 4, August 30); Sunday, 2:00–2:30 (no programs August 4, 11, 18, 25). Hear stories in the library and then explore the galleries on a self-guided treasure hunt! Museum admission is not required for the library portion of this program. Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Nolen Library, Uris Center for Education For Families with Children Ages 5–12 Art Trek. June 1–30: Saturday, 11:00–12:00 and 2:30–3:30 (no afternoon program June 8); additional program Sunday, June 30, 2:30–3:30. July 2–August 31: Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30–4:30 (no program July 4); Saturday, 2:30–3:30 (no programs July 13, August 10). Be an art explorer! Take a new voyage around the globe every time you visit the Met.

Art Trek Plus. Sunday, June 23, July 28, August 25, 2:30–3:30. Art Trek gallery experiences, performances, and more.

Sunday Studio. Sunday, June 2 and 16; July 7 and 21; August 4 and 18. Try your hand at creating works of art in the galleries. Each session focuses on a different culture and art form with family-friendly activities led by an artist. Drop in; art supplies provided. Ongoing instruction, 1:00–3:00. How Did They Do That? Saturday and Sunday, June 8 and 9; July 13 and 14; August 10 and 11. Learn hands-on how works of art were created. 30-minute sessions, 1:00–4:00. Meet in the galleries. Drop-in Drawing. Friday, June 7 and 21; July 12 and 26; August 9 and 23. Join talented art instructors in the galleries for fun, informal sketching! Come and go as you like between 6:30 and 8:30. Artist Demonstration—Painting from the Past. Friday, July 19. See artists paint in the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250– 1800. Drop in anytime between 5:00 and 8:00. For Teachers The Museum offers a wide variety of programs. Call 212-570-3985 or visit www.metmuseum.org/events/programs/ k12-educator-programs.

For information about the Children’s Reading Room and the Teacher Resource Center, call 212-570-3788 or visit www.metmuseum.org/learn/for-educators.

For Visitors with Disabilities The Met offers a range of programs, including touch and descriptive tours for visitors with visual impairments and Met Escapes for those living with dementia. Call 212650-2010, e-mail access@metmuseum.org, or visit www.metmuseum.org/events/ visitorsdisabilities.

Discoveries. For visitors with developmental disabilities. Selected Sundays. Reservations required. Call 212-650-2010. Gallery Workshops for Families at The Cloisters Museum and Gardens, p. 20. General Information: 212-535-7710 | 21

Ways to Give

Plan Your Visit

Members and friends of The Metropolitan Museum of Art help sustain this institution in countless crucial ways: by visiting our permanent collections, our special exhibitions, our concerts, and our lectures; by adding energy and vitality to our programs; and above all, by providing vital financial support that makes it possible for the Met to continue collecting, preserving, interpreting, publishing, and displaying great works of art. To learn more about how you can help, or to make a gift, please call 212-570-3956 or visit metmuseum.org/Ways_to_Give/donate.

Planned Giving Picturing an Ideal Estate Plan

Beatrice Turner, a longtime member of the Metropolitan Museum and an amateur photographer, recently decided to review her will. Beatrice supported a family of four during her career as a journalist, and always enjoyed their visits to the Museum together. Since her retirement, Beatrice has been inspired by the photography exhibitions and Membership events she has attended and decided she would like to include a gift to the Museum in her estate plan. Over the years, Beatrice had purchased life insurance for herself and saved a significant amount in an Individual Retirement Account. She consulted with her attorney and learned that she could include the Museum in her estate plan by naming the Metropolitan as a beneficiary of her retirement plan, IRA, or life insurance policy. She needed only to Hippopotamus, ca. 1961– fill out a benefi1878 B.C., Middle Kingciary designation dom, Dynasty 12, first half, faience. Gift of Edward S. form from her plan Harkness, 1917 (17.9.1) provider, and there was no need to change her current will. Beatrice decided to leave her IRA to the Metropolitan because those accounts can be subject to a significant amount of estate and income taxes when left to an individual, resulting in a smaller gift. However, the Met, as a tax-exempt organization, pays no income tax, and therefore the entire amount benefits the Museum. Beatrice shared the news with the Planned Giving Program at the Museum and was invited to join The William Society, a recognition group for those who include the Museum in their plans. She was delighted to deepen her involvement with the Met and has the satisfaction of creating a legacy for the institution, which has meant so much to her over the years. To learn more about how to support the 22 | www.metmuseum.org

future of the Metropolitan Museum or about joining The William Society, contact the Planned Giving Program at 212-570-3796 or by e-mail at planned.giving@metmuseum.org. You can also visit the Museum’s website, www.metmuseum.org, in the Planned Giving section under “Ways to Give.” Note: This example is for illustration purposes only. Beatrice Turner is based on a composite of donors to the Museum.

Join or Give a Gift Membership to The Apollo Circle!

The Apollo Circle is a special membership group for individuals ages 21 to 39.  Named after the Greek god of youth, the arts, culture, and music, The Apollo Circle engages its members in a variety of educational and social activities and provides incomparable insights into the Museum’s collection and special exhibitions. An upper level of The Apollo Circle, The Apollo Circle Patrons, offers its members additional benefits and an extended schedule of more intimate programming. Annual dues are $1,200 (Apollo Circle) and $3,500 (Apollo Circle Patrons) for individuals or couples; individual members are welcome to bring a guest to Apollo Circle events. This makes a wonderful graduation present as well. For more information, contact Aiza Keesey in the Development Office at 212-650-2371 or e-mail apollo.circle@metmuseum.org. Curatorial Friends Groups

Joining a Curatorial Friends Group is a wonderful way to become more involved in the activities of a particular curatorial department. Friends programs include seminars and lectures, behind-the-scenes tours, visits to collections outside the Museum, and private receptions. In addition to being invited to these exclusive events, Friends also receive the benefits of complimentary upper-level Museum Membership. Dues range from $1,000 to $10,000. For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/ curatorialfriendsgroups, call 212-650-2075, or e-mail friends.groups@metmuseum.org.

Hours Through June 30, Sunday, Tuesday– Thursday: 9:30–5:30; Friday, Saturday, 9:30– 9:00. Starting July 1, open 7 days a week. Sunday–Thursday: 10:00–5:30; Friday, Saturday: 10:00–9:00. Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25, and the first Monday in May. Recorded information, 212-535-7710. Members Admission Skip lines! Admission buttons are available at the membership desks in the Great Hall and Burke Hall. Non-Member Admission Recommended: adults, $25; seniors (65 and older), $17; students, $12. Purchase express admission in advance at www.metmuseum.org/visit.

Accessibility

>> Street-level entrances are at Fifth Ave. and 81st St. and the Museum parking garage. Taxicabs and other vehicles may drop off passengers with disabilities on the south plaza on Fifth Ave. >> Wheelchairs are available at coat-check areas. Pick up an access brochure and map at the information desks. >> Induction loops may be found at select information and admission desks. Please use T-switch. >> FM assistive listening devices are available for tours and programs. >> Sign language interpreters may be requested. >> For more information for visitors with disabilities, e-mail access@metmuseum.org or call 212-650-2010. Garage 80th St. and Fifth Ave. Validate parking tickets at the Uris Center Membership Desk for a reduced fee. Designated parking spaces are available for visitors with disabilities. Visitors with vehicles over 6'6" should call 212-650-9165.

Concerts and Lectures To order tickets,

visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212570-3949, fax 212-650-2253, or stop by the box office in the Great Hall.

Community and Workplace Programs

Slide-illustrated lectures are presented to organized groups of adults and seniors within NYC; call 212-396-5170. Group Visits Call 212-570-3711 or visit www.metmuseum.org for information. Libraries For libraries and study room information, call 212-535-7710. The Thomas J. Watson Library is open to college-level researchers; 212-650-2225. Nolen Library, Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education, welcomes readers of all ages and has a special Children’s Reading Room; 212-570-3788. Helpful Hints

>> Food and drink, other than water in plastic bottles, cannot be brought into the Museum. >> Flash photography and video cameras cannot be used inside the Museum. >> Sketching in the galleries is permitted with pencil only; pens, markers, and pointers are prohibited. >> Strollers are allowed in all galleries, unless otherwise noted. >> Lost and Found: 212-570-3981. Save Time by Traveling Light

Backpacks and packages must be checked. Avoid waiting in lines by leaving backpacks and packages at home. Coats and small umbrellas may be carried into the galleries. Large umbrellas must be checked. Luggage, carry-on bags, and oversize backpacks are not allowed in the Museum and cannot be checked.

Now Open

The Balcony Lounge Exclusively for Sustaining and Supporting* Members, this sophisticated space, adjacent to the Great Hall Balcony, is the perfect place to relax during your visit. Enjoy snacks and beverages, available for purchase, as well as complimentary reading materials and Wi-Fi. Museum hours. For more information, visit metmuseum.org/balconylounge or call 212-650-2910. *includes President’s Circle, Patron Circle, Patron, Sponsor, Donor, Contributing, Sustaining, Apollo Circle, Apollo Circle Patrons, and Met Family Circle

Volume 46, Number 1, Summer 2013. © 2013 by The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Members Calendar is published quarterly by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028-0198. Address correspondence concerning this publication to The Members Calendar, Communications Department. E-mail: communications@metmuseum.org. Send change of address information to membership@metmuseum.org. General Information: 212-535-7710 | 23

Ways to Give

Plan Your Visit

Members and friends of The Metropolitan Museum of Art help sustain this institution in countless crucial ways: by visiting our permanent collections, our special exhibitions, our concerts, and our lectures; by adding energy and vitality to our programs; and above all, by providing vital financial support that makes it possible for the Met to continue collecting, preserving, interpreting, publishing, and displaying great works of art. To learn more about how you can help, or to make a gift, please call 212-570-3956 or visit metmuseum.org/Ways_to_Give/donate.

Planned Giving Picturing an Ideal Estate Plan

Beatrice Turner, a longtime member of the Metropolitan Museum and an amateur photographer, recently decided to review her will. Beatrice supported a family of four during her career as a journalist, and always enjoyed their visits to the Museum together. Since her retirement, Beatrice has been inspired by the photography exhibitions and Membership events she has attended and decided she would like to include a gift to the Museum in her estate plan. Over the years, Beatrice had purchased life insurance for herself and saved a significant amount in an Individual Retirement Account. She consulted with her attorney and learned that she could include the Museum in her estate plan by naming the Metropolitan as a beneficiary of her retirement plan, IRA, or life insurance policy. She needed only to Hippopotamus, ca. 1961– fill out a benefi1878 B.C., Middle Kingciary designation dom, Dynasty 12, first half, faience. Gift of Edward S. form from her plan Harkness, 1917 (17.9.1) provider, and there was no need to change her current will. Beatrice decided to leave her IRA to the Metropolitan because those accounts can be subject to a significant amount of estate and income taxes when left to an individual, resulting in a smaller gift. However, the Met, as a tax-exempt organization, pays no income tax, and therefore the entire amount benefits the Museum. Beatrice shared the news with the Planned Giving Program at the Museum and was invited to join The William Society, a recognition group for those who include the Museum in their plans. She was delighted to deepen her involvement with the Met and has the satisfaction of creating a legacy for the institution, which has meant so much to her over the years. To learn more about how to support the 22 | www.metmuseum.org

future of the Metropolitan Museum or about joining The William Society, contact the Planned Giving Program at 212-570-3796 or by e-mail at planned.giving@metmuseum.org. You can also visit the Museum’s website, www.metmuseum.org, in the Planned Giving section under “Ways to Give.” Note: This example is for illustration purposes only. Beatrice Turner is based on a composite of donors to the Museum.

Join or Give a Gift Membership to The Apollo Circle!

The Apollo Circle is a special membership group for individuals ages 21 to 39.  Named after the Greek god of youth, the arts, culture, and music, The Apollo Circle engages its members in a variety of educational and social activities and provides incomparable insights into the Museum’s collection and special exhibitions. An upper level of The Apollo Circle, The Apollo Circle Patrons, offers its members additional benefits and an extended schedule of more intimate programming. Annual dues are $1,200 (Apollo Circle) and $3,500 (Apollo Circle Patrons) for individuals or couples; individual members are welcome to bring a guest to Apollo Circle events. This makes a wonderful graduation present as well. For more information, contact Aiza Keesey in the Development Office at 212-650-2371 or e-mail apollo.circle@metmuseum.org. Curatorial Friends Groups

Joining a Curatorial Friends Group is a wonderful way to become more involved in the activities of a particular curatorial department. Friends programs include seminars and lectures, behind-the-scenes tours, visits to collections outside the Museum, and private receptions. In addition to being invited to these exclusive events, Friends also receive the benefits of complimentary upper-level Museum Membership. Dues range from $1,000 to $10,000. For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/ curatorialfriendsgroups, call 212-650-2075, or e-mail friends.groups@metmuseum.org.

Hours Through June 30, Sunday, Tuesday– Thursday: 9:30–5:30; Friday, Saturday, 9:30– 9:00. Starting July 1, open 7 days a week. Sunday–Thursday: 10:00–5:30; Friday, Saturday: 10:00–9:00. Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25, and the first Monday in May. Recorded information, 212-535-7710. Members Admission Skip lines! Admission buttons are available at the membership desks in the Great Hall and Burke Hall. Non-Member Admission Recommended: adults, $25; seniors (65 and older), $17; students, $12. Purchase express admission in advance at www.metmuseum.org/visit.

Accessibility

>> Street-level entrances are at Fifth Ave. and 81st St. and the Museum parking garage. Taxicabs and other vehicles may drop off passengers with disabilities on the south plaza on Fifth Ave. >> Wheelchairs are available at coat-check areas. Pick up an access brochure and map at the information desks. >> Induction loops may be found at select information and admission desks. Please use T-switch. >> FM assistive listening devices are available for tours and programs. >> Sign language interpreters may be requested. >> For more information for visitors with disabilities, e-mail access@metmuseum.org or call 212-650-2010. Garage 80th St. and Fifth Ave. Validate parking tickets at the Uris Center Membership Desk for a reduced fee. Designated parking spaces are available for visitors with disabilities. Visitors with vehicles over 6'6" should call 212-650-9165.

Concerts and Lectures To order tickets,

visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212570-3949, fax 212-650-2253, or stop by the box office in the Great Hall.

Community and Workplace Programs

Slide-illustrated lectures are presented to organized groups of adults and seniors within NYC; call 212-396-5170. Group Visits Call 212-570-3711 or visit www.metmuseum.org for information. Libraries For libraries and study room information, call 212-535-7710. The Thomas J. Watson Library is open to college-level researchers; 212-650-2225. Nolen Library, Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education, welcomes readers of all ages and has a special Children’s Reading Room; 212-570-3788. Helpful Hints

>> Food and drink, other than water in plastic bottles, cannot be brought into the Museum. >> Flash photography and video cameras cannot be used inside the Museum. >> Sketching in the galleries is permitted with pencil only; pens, markers, and pointers are prohibited. >> Strollers are allowed in all galleries, unless otherwise noted. >> Lost and Found: 212-570-3981. Save Time by Traveling Light

Backpacks and packages must be checked. Avoid waiting in lines by leaving backpacks and packages at home. Coats and small umbrellas may be carried into the galleries. Large umbrellas must be checked. Luggage, carry-on bags, and oversize backpacks are not allowed in the Museum and cannot be checked.

Now Open

The Balcony Lounge Exclusively for Sustaining and Supporting* Members, this sophisticated space, adjacent to the Great Hall Balcony, is the perfect place to relax during your visit. Enjoy snacks and beverages, available for purchase, as well as complimentary reading materials and Wi-Fi. Museum hours. For more information, visit metmuseum.org/balconylounge or call 212-650-2910. *includes President’s Circle, Patron Circle, Patron, Sponsor, Donor, Contributing, Sustaining, Apollo Circle, Apollo Circle Patrons, and Met Family Circle

Volume 46, Number 1, Summer 2013. © 2013 by The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Members Calendar is published quarterly by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028-0198. Address correspondence concerning this publication to The Members Calendar, Communications Department. E-mail: communications@metmuseum.org. Send change of address information to membership@metmuseum.org. General Information: 212-535-7710 | 23

Members Calendar Summer 2013

Programs for Adults

Registration for Fall Programs Children’s Art Classes

Lectures The Civil War and American Art Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective

Young Members Party

Summer Soirées for Members Summer Fête

Receptions The Civil War and American Art A Special Evening with the Director Spring Garden Party at The Cloisters New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 The Roof Garden Commission: Imran Qureshi and PUNK: Chaos to Couture

1000 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10028-0198

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage Paid The Metropolitan Museum of Art


Members Calendar: Summer 2013