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Members Calendar 路 Spring 2014

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Members Highlights

Members-Only Events The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux Supporting,* Sustaining, Friend previews, Tuesday, March 4–Sunday, March 9, Museum hours. Family/Dual, Individual, Associate previews, Wednesday, March 5–Sunday, March 9, Museum hours. Supporting* viewing and reception, Monday, March 10, 6:00–8:30. Sustaining viewing and reception, Tuesday, March 11, 6:00–8:30. Lost Kingdoms: Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century

Supporting,* Sustaining, Friend previews, Tuesday, April 8–Sunday, April 13, Museum hours. Family/Dual, Individual, Associate previews, Wednesday, April 9–Sunday, April 13, Museum hours. Supporting* viewing and reception, Tuesday, April 15, 6:00–8:30. Sustaining viewing and reception, Thursday, April 17, 6:00–8:30. Charles James: Beyond Fashion Supporting,* Sustaining, Friend, Family/Dual, Individual, Associate previews, Tuesday, May 6–Wednesday, May 7, 10:00–5:00. Free Members Lectures Supporting,* Sustaining, Friend, Family/Dual. The Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium. Please present your Membership card for admission. Advance registration is not required. Pacific Visions: Oceanic Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art Sunday, March 2, 1:00 p.m. and Wednesday, March 5, 11:00 a.m. Eric Kjellgren, Evelyn A. J. Hall and John A. Friede Associate Curator, Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas. Early American Guitars: Talk and Performance Wednesday, April 23, 11:00 a.m. and Sunday, April 27, 1:00 p.m. Jayson Dobney, Associate Curator and Administrator, Musical Instruments, and Dick Boak, C. F. Martin & Co. Spring Shopping Evening All Members. Wednesday, April 16, 6:00–8:30. Enjoy refreshments, viewings of select galleries, and a 20% discount in The Met Store (select items and phone and mail orders excluded). Patrons Lounge The Patrons Lounge will be closed weekdays from Monday, April 7– Friday, April 18. Please visit The Balcony Lounge during your visit.

Save the Date Summer Fête Supporting,* Sustaining, Friend, Family/Dual. Black-tie dinner and dancing in The American Wing. Thursday, June 12. For more information, call 212-570-3909. Young Members Party for Members ages 21–35. Thursday, July 10. For more information, e-mail youngmembers@metmuseum.org.

Private Celebrations Members may rent one of four elegant rooms for private parties throughout the year. Please e-mail privatedining@metmuseum.org or visit metmuseum.org/celebrations. *Supporting includes President’s Circle, Patron Circle, Patron, Sponsor, Donor, Contributing, Met Family Circle, Apollo Circle Patron, and Apollo Circle Members. On the cover: Ugolino and His Sons (detail), 1865–67, by Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux, Saint-Béat marble. Purchase, Josephine Bay Paul and C. Michael Paul Foundation Inc. Gift, Charles Ulrick and Josephine Bay Foundation Inc. Gift, and Fletcher Fund, 1967 (67.250)

Dining at the Met Members Dining Room overlooking Central Park is exclusively for Members. Call 212-570-3975 to make a reservation or book a table online by signing in to the MyMet section at www.metmuseum.org/mymet. Petrie Court Café Sunday–Thursday, 11:30–4:30. Friday–Saturday, 11:30–9:00 (last seating at 8:30). For reservations or parties of five or more, call 212-570-3964. American Wing Café Sunday–Thursday, 10:00–4:30. Friday–Saturday, 10:00–8:30. The Cafeteria Monday–Thursday, 11:30–4:30. Friday, 11:30–7:00. Saturday, 11:00–7:00. Sunday, 11:00–4:30. Great Hall Balcony Bar Friday–Saturday, 4:00–8:30 (last call at 8:00).

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From the Director

Contents Members Highlights • 2 Exhibitions and The Collection • 4

Dear Members and Friends,

March Programs • 11

The Met is famous for organizing exhibitions that no one else can, and this season two exceptional shows certainly continue that tradition. For Lost Kingdoms: Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century, our world-renowned Asian art department has worked a miracle bringing together these 160 magnificent sculptures. Included are a significant number of designated national treasures lent by the governments of Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, and, for the first time ever, Myanmar. This beautiful, groundbreaking show is not to be missed. Another example, a major retrospective of the gifted and passionate 19th-century sculptor Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux, is the first big exhibition devoted to the artist in almost 40 years. It stands out for its presentation of not only sculptures but also preparatory works, drawings, and paintings that illuminate Carpeaux’s genius for depicting flesh and blood in stone. A highlight every spring is the annual Costume Institute exhibition, and this year’s presentation of the life and work of Charles James, the legendary 20th-century couturier who designed with a sculptor’s eye and scientist’s logic, is especially significant: It inaugurates the new Anna Wintour Costume Center, a completely redesigned complex that includes technologically advanced galleries, a conservation laboratory, and one of the world’s foremost fashion libraries. Completing the celebration of the 75th anniversary of the founding of The Cloisters branch for medieval art is an exhibition of stained glass from England’s historic Canterbury Cathedral. Created in 1178–80, the luminous panels have never before left the cathedral precincts. Wonderful glimpses of 19th-century Paris are on view in the first exhibition to examine comprehensively the life and career of Charles Marville, one of the period’s most talented photographers. And photographs of the modern era, along with a range of idiosyncratic objects and an intriguing perspective, are on view in an exhibition of the work of Lucas Samaras (b. 1936). With these offerings and more on view, it’s an amazing spring. See you soon.

May Programs • 16

April Programs • 14

Guided Tours • 19 The Cloisters Museum and Gardens • 20 Programs for Families, Teens, Teachers, and Visitors with Disabilities • 21 Ways to Give • 22 Plan Your Visit • 23 Travel with the Met • 23

Open 7 Days Both the Museum’s main building and The Cloisters museum and gardens are now open 7 days a week. See pages 20 and 23 for hours. Evening Hours Visit the Museum on Friday and Saturday until 9:00 p.m. when the galleries are less crowded.

AUD I O G UI D E Sponsored by The Audio Guide is a recorded guide to selected special exhibitions and the permanent collection. It is free for visitors who are blind, partially sighted, or hard of hearing; neck loops and large-print scripts are available. The fees below include sales tax. All-in-One Player $7.00 General public $6.00 Members $5.00 Children under 12

Guides are “$5 after 5” on Friday and Saturday evenings. Rent four Audio Guides, and the fifth one is free with a Frequent User Card!

Ganesha, late seventh to eighth century, Temple E5, My Son, Quang Nam province, Vietnam, sandstone. The Museum of Cham Sculpture, Da Nang, Vietnam

Thomas P. Campbell Director General Information: 212-535-7710 | 3

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Exhibitions and The Collection

The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux March 10–May 26, 2014 Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Exhibition Hall, 2nd floor

For this exhibition, 160 works, including sculptures, paintings, and drawings, have been organized around the major projects that Carpeaux (1827–1875) undertook during his brief career. Groupings of drawings and models trace the evolution of such masterpieces as the Musée d’Orsay’s marble Prince Impérial with his Dog Nero and the Metropolitan’s own Ugolino and His Sons, also in marble. The artist’s genius for portraiture and modeling in clay shines particularly in this moving, major retrospective. Made possible by the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation. Additional support provided by the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund and the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund. Organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Musée d’Orsay.

Ugolino and His Sons (detail), 1865–67, by Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux, Saint-Béat marble. Purchase, Josephine Bay Paul and C. Michael Paul Foundation Inc. Gift, Charles Ulrick and Josephine Bay Foundation Inc. Gift, and Fletcher Fund, 1967 (67.250)

Lost Kingdoms: Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century April 14–July 27, 2014 The Tisch Galleries, 2nd floor

The religious sculpture of first millennium Southeast Asia is among the most compellingly beautiful produced anywhere in the early Hindu-Buddhist world. In this first international loan exhibition devoted to the early art of Southeast Asia, 160 sculptures from Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), and Vietnam provide a unique window on the art of the region’s “lost kingdoms.”

Buddha (detail), first half of the seventh century, Central Thailand, sandstone. National Museum, Bangkok, Thailand

Made possible by the Placido Arango Fund, the Fred Eychaner Fund, the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, the Henry Luce Foundation, the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional support provided by Jim Thompson America, Inc. and Bangkok Broadcasting & T.V. Co., Ltd.

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Exhibitions and The Collection

Goya and the Altamira Family April 22–August 3, 2014 European Paintings, 2nd floor

One of the Metropolitan’s most beloved Old Master paintings, the so-called Red Boy by Goya, is among five portraits of members of the Altamira family on view in this small exhibition. All but one are by Goya; the fifth is by Agustín Esteve. This is the first time these family portraits—now dispersed in public and private collections in Spain and the United States—are being seen together as a group. Made possible by the Placido Arango Fund. Don Vicente Isabel Osorio de Moscoso, 1787–88, by Goya (Francisco de Goya y Lucientes), oil on canvas. Private collection

Charles James: Beyond Fashion May 8–August 10, 2014 New Lizzie and Jonathan Tisch Gallery, Carl and Iris Barrel Apfel Gallery, Anna Wintour Costume Center, ground floor, and Special Exhibition Gallery, 1st floor

This inaugural exhibition of the newly renovated Costume Institute examines the career of the legendary 20th-century AngloAmerican couturier Charles James (1906– 1978), whose revolutionary ball gowns and innovative tailoring continue to influence fashion designers today. Approximately 100

of James’s most notable designs are presented in two locations. The first-floor galleries spotlight his ball gowns from the postwar period, worn by such notable clients as Gloria Vanderbilt, Millicent Rogers, and Austine Hearst. The new Costume Institute galleries use technology to dramatize James’s biography and design evolution through archival pieces including garments, sketches, muslins and paper patterns, ephemera, and partially completed works from his last studio in New York City’s Chelsea Hotel. Video animations in both locations illustrate anatomically considered dresses that sculpted and reconfigured the female form. Made possible by AERIN. Additional support provided by Condé Nast.

Charles James Ball Gowns, 1948. Photograph by Cecil Beaton, Beaton / Vogue / Condé Nast Archive. Copyright © Condé Nast

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 5

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Exhibitions and The Collection

Lucas Samaras: Offerings from a Restless Soul Through June 1, 2014 Modern and Contemporary Art, mezzanine

Lucas Samaras (born 1936) was among the first artists to exploit the Polaroid photograph and was a key player in many of the early Happenings staged by Claes Oldenburg, Allan Kaprow, and Jim Dine. He has created a highly idiosyncratic body of work, much of it based on

self-depiction. A highly skilled draftsman, painter, sculptor, and filmmaker, he is also a creator of brilliantly colored, phantasmagoric photographs manipulated on the computer. Drawn from the Met’s rich holdings of Samaras’s work, including a new gift of several works from across the artist’s career, this dynamic installation has been designed with the help of the artist.

Box #10, 1963, by Lucas Samaras, mixed media. © Lucas Samaras, courtesy Pace Gallery. Photograph by Ellen Page Wilson, courtesy Pace Gallery

Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris Through May 4, 2014 Drawings and Prints, 2nd floor

Lauded for his documentation of “Old Paris” at the moment of its historical transformation during the second Empire, Charles Marville (1813–1879) was a versatile and gifted photographer who worked in many genres, from romantic portraits and artistic studies to extraordinary views of architecture and compelling images of “New Paris” made in the 1860s and ’70s. This international loan exhibition and its accompanying catalogue, both of which include seldom seen works, stand as the first to examine Marville’s life and career in their entirety. Made possible in part by Jennifer S. and Philip F. Maritz. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in association with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Also of interest and designed to complement the Marville show is the installation Paris as Muse: Photography, 1840s–1930s. On view through May 4, it features approximately 40 photographs, all from the Met’s collection.

Hôtel de la Marine, 1864–70, by Charles Marville, albumen silver print from glass negative. National Gallery of Art, Washington, Diana and Mallory Walker Fund

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Exhibitions and The Collection

Radiant Light: Stained Glass from Canterbury Cathedral Through May 18, 2014 The Cloisters

Completing the celebration of the 75th anniversary year of the founding of The Cloisters, a branch of the Metropolitan devoted to the art and architecture of the Middle Ages, this exhibition features a splendid array of six near-life-size enthroned figures in stained glass from England’s historic Canterbury Cathedral. The brilliantly colored panels come from one of the great surviving series of medieval stained glass, and the exhibition represents the first time they have left the cathedral precincts since their creation in 1178–80. Founded in 597, the cathedral is one of the oldest Christian structures in England. Made possible by the Ruddock Foundation for the Arts.

Lamech, from the Ancestors of Christ Windows, Canterbury Cathedral, England, 1178–80, colored glass and vitreous paint; lead came. Image © Robert Greshoff Photography, courtesy Dean and Chapter of Canterbury

The Flowering of Edo Period Painting: Japanese Masterworks from the Feinberg Collection Through September 7, 2014 Asian Art, 2nd floor

This exhibition of one of the finest private collections of Japanese paintings outside Japan focuses on more than 90 masterworks dating to the Edo period (1615– 1868). It demonstrates how Japanese artists diverged from Chinese models and created innovative styles of pictorial art reflecting indigenous aesthetic sensibilities. Many of the works on view, which toured Japan in 2013, are being exhibited for the first time in America.

Race at the Uji River (detail), ca. 1760–67, by Soga Shoˉhaku, six-panel folding screen; ink, color, and gold-leaf on paper. Feinberg Collection

Made possible by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Foundation Fund. General Information: 212-535-7710 | 7

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Exhibitions and The Collection

Last Chance Jewels by JAR Through March 9, 2014 Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932–1947 Through March 2, 2014

Out of Character: Decoding Chinese Calligraphy—Selections from the Collection of Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang April 29–August 17, 2014 Asian Art, 2nd floor

With more than 40 outstanding examples of calligraphy created by many of the leading masters from the 14th through the 19th centuries, this exhibition presents artworks of the highest quality to introduce key concepts of format, script type, and style. The exhibition encompasses the entire spectrum of calligraphic possibilities, from towering scrolls designed to fill reception halls to works of great intimacy meant to be enjoyed by a lone scholar in his studio. Thousand Character Essay in clerical script (detail), 1561, by Wen Peng, 85 leaf album, ink on paper. Courtesy Guanyuan Shanzhuang Collection

The Pre-Raphaelite Legacy: British Art and Design from the Metropolitan’s Collection May 20–October 26, 2014 Robert Lehman Wing, 1st floor

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood sought to revitalize mid-19th-century British painting with the sincerity and vivid intensity they admired in medieval and early Renaissance art. This exhibition unites some 30 works— paintings, drawings, furniture, textiles, prints, and illustrated books—from across the Met’s collections to Lady Lilith, 1867, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Henry Treffry Dunn, watercolor and gouache on paper. Rogers Fund, 1908 (08.162.1)

highlight the transformation of Pre-Raphaelite ideals from the 1860s through the 1890s, focusing on the key figures Edward BurneJones, William Morris, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Made possible by the Lillian Goldman Charitable Trust.

Unique by Design: Studio Jewelry in The Donna Schneier Collection May 13–August 31, 2014 Modern and Contemporary Art, 1st floor

The approximately 100 pieces of international contemporary jewelry on view in this exhibition date from the 1960s to the present and are from the Donna Schneier Collection, given to the Metropolitan in 2007 and 2013. The period in focus saw dramatic change in jewelry making. Jewelers broke with tradition and began aligning their works within larger artistic movements, such as abstraction and conceptualism, and became interested in new materials and forms. Among the collection’s 88 artists are modern master jewelers as well as avant-garde jewelry makers, all of whom have contributed to the contemporary jewelry movement of today. Necklace, 2011, by Attai Chen, paper, paint. Gift of Donna Schneier, 2013 (2013.602.7)

The Roof Garden Commission: Dan Graham May–October 2014 The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden

This spring, Dan Graham (born 1942, Urbana, Illinois) installs the second in a new series of site-specific commissions for the Museum’s Roof Garden. Since the publication of his landmark photo-essay “Homes for America” in 1966, Graham’s work has engaged with issues of urbanity, public space, and the viewer’s own experience within it through a multidisciplinary practice that includes writing, photography, video, performance, and the creation of sculptural environments of mirrored glass and metal. Made possible by Bloomberg. Additional support provided by Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon B. Polsky.

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Exhibitions and The Collection

Making Pottery Art: The Robert A. Ellison Jr. Collection of French Ceramics (ca. 1880–1910) Through August 18, 2014 European Sculpture and Decorative Arts, 1st floor

Technically experimental and aesthetically ambitious, the vases made by French potters in the years around 1900 pushed the boundaries of the ceramic medium. The recently acquired Robert A. Ellison Jr. Collection includes pieces by the master ceramists Ernest Chaplet, Auguste Delaherche, and Jean Carriès, works of imposing size, beautiful in shape, and dazzling in their glazes. Also presented are works that inspired them. Bowl with two panthers, 1894–95, by PierreAdriene Dalpayrat, stoneware. Robert A. Ellison Jr. Collection, Purchase, Acquisitions Fund; Louis V. Bell, Harris Brisbane Dick, Fletcher, and Rogers Funds and Joseph Pulitzer Bequest; and 2011 Benefit Fund, 2013 (2013.482)

Antonio Canova: The Seven Last Works Through April 27, 2014 Robert Lehman Wing, 1st floor

The great neoclassical sculptor Antonio Canova (1757–1822) remains famous above all for his elegant nude mythological subjects carved in marble. But he also worked on religious subjects in a deeply serious, deceptively simple style. This less familiar Canova is revealed in an extraordinary series of full-scale plaster models illustrating episodes from the Old and New Testaments. Newly restored, they are being lent for the first time to the United States and constitute Canova’s last, profoundly moving masterworks. Made possible in part by Hester Diamond and Jon and Barbara Landau.

The Creation of Adam (detail), 1821–22, by Antonio Canova, plaster. Venice, Gallerie dell’Accademia

The American West in Bronze, 1850–1925 Through April 13, 2014 The American Wing, 1st floor

Through 65 bronze sculptures, this exhibition explores the aesthetic and cultural impulses behind the creation of statuettes with American western themes at the turn of the 20th century. Representations of American Indians, cowboys and cavalry, pioneers and prospectors, and animals of the plains and mountains served, then as now, as visual metaphors for the Old West. Included are representative sculptures by such archetypal artists as Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell, among others. Made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation, the Henry Luce Foundation, the Terra Foundation for American Art, and the Enterprise Holdings Endowment. Organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in collaboration with the Denver Art Museum. The Moqui Prayer for Rain (detail), 1895–96, cast ca. 1897, by Hermon Atkins MacNeil, bronze. Daniel and Mathew Wolf, in memory of Diane R. Wolf

Also of interest is the installation American Indians by American Artists: Works on Paper from the Collection, on view through April 13.

Early American Guitars: The Instruments of C. F. Martin Through December 7, 2014 Musical Instruments, 2nd floor

Christian Frederick Martin, founder of the great American guitar firm C. F. Martin & Co., learned to build instruments in the style of the famed Johann Georg Stauffer. In 1833 he moved to the U.S. and encountered the Spanish-style guitar, incorporating elements from that tradition into his own Viennese-style of instrument construction. The result was a new and distinctly American form of the guitar. The 35 instruments on view are from the Martin Museum in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, the Metropolitan, and several private collections. Made possible by The Martin Guitar Company. General Information: 212-535-7710 | 9

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Exhibitions and The Collection

Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China Through April 6, 2014 Asian Art, 2nd floor

With works created during the past three decades by 35 artists born in China, this exhibition reveals how China’s ancient pattern of seeking cultural renewal through the reinterpretation of past models remains a viable creative path. Through four thematic groupings—the written word, new landscapes, abstraction, and beyond the brush— it demonstrates how select artists have radically transformed their sources through new modes of expression while retaining valuable links to China’s artistic past. Family Tree (detail), 2001, by Zhang Huan, nine chromogenic prints. Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Leonard C. Hanna, Jr., Class of 1913, Fund

Italian Renaissance Drawings from the Robert Lehman Collection May 13–September 1, 2014 Robert Lehman Wing, ground floor

This installation features masterpieces of Central and Southern Italian drawing spanning the 15th and 16th centuries. Florentine drawings are well represented by such celebrated Renaissance masters as Leonardo da Vinci and Antonio Pollaiuolo. Highlighting a broad range of drawing techniques and functions, the works illustrate the varying ways that Renaissance artists employed drawing. The installation explores the evolving role of the medium during a period in

Also on View Early Renaissance Drawing in Verona March 10–June, 8 2014 Metropolitan Vanities: The History of the Dressing Table Through April 13, 2014 William Kentridge: The Refusal of Time Through May 11, 2014 Tibet and India: Buddhist Traditions and Transformations Through June 8, 2014 The Nelson A. Rockefeller Vision Through October 5, 2014

which drawings were increasingly valued as expressions of artists’ creative processes and as objects worthy of collecting.

Piero della Francesca: Personal Encounters Through March 30, 2014 European Paintings, 2nd floor

Through a special collaboration with the Gallerie dell’Accademia, Venice, and the Galleria Nazionale delle Marche, Urbino, the Metropolitan is hosting a focused presentation on the devotional paintings of Piero della Francesca, addressing Piero’s work for private devotion for the first time. The four works on view have never before been brought together, promising an important contribution to the study of this major figure of the Renaissance. Made possible by the Foundation for Italian Art & Culture (FIAC). Organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in collaboration with FIAC, in celebration of the opening of the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800. The loan of the Madonna di Senigallia is by arrangement with the Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo and the Italian Carabinieri Command (CCTPC), working together with la Soprintendenza per i Beni Storici Artistici ed Etnoantropologici delle Marche – Urbino, as part of 2013 – Italian Year of Culture in the United States. Madonna di Senigallia (detail), ca. 1470, by Piero della Francesca, tempera and oil on panel. Galleria Nazionale delle Marche, Urbino

Cleopatra’s Needle Through June 8, 2014 Egyptian Art, 1st floor

Celebrating the planned program by the Central Park Conservancy to conserve the park’s obelisk of Thutmose III, this exhibition explores the meaning of obelisks in ancient Egyptian divine and funerary cults and considers how these massive monuments were created and erected. Through a selection of prints, paintings, textiles, and other objects, it also shows the impact of this ancient architectural form on western culture and how it ultimately led to the reerection of the Central Park obelisk. Made possible by Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman. Cleopatra’s Needle, Central Park

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March Programs The Museum presents programs related to exhibitions and the collections as listed on the following pages. All programs are subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, check www.metmuseum.org or the information desks upon arrival. Films require no tickets unless otherwise noted. Gallery Talks and Tours (indicated by “G” in the listings) are presented by Museum curators, conservators, educators, outside scholars, and advanced students of art history. They start in Gallery 534, Vélez Blanco Patio, unless noted as EE (“exhibition entrance”) or another location. Lectures (free with Museum admission) by curators, scholars, conservators, and artists are presented on Sunday afternoons and occasional weekdays September–June. Subscription lectures by leading authorities on art, music, and historical topics are presented weekdays and evenings October–May. Met Museum Presents is the 2013–14 season of performances and talks. Note these two special ticket offers: 30 & Under Rush $15 tickets for audience members 30 years and younger when purchased the day of the event (subject to availability). Call 212-570-3949 or visit the box office. Events are designated with a <30 . Bring the Kids! Selected concerts have $1 tickets available for children (ages 7–16) when accompanied by an adult with a fullprice ticket. Call 212-570-3949 or visit the box office. Events are designated with a .

Program:

C Concert G Gallery Program L Lecture M Members Event P Performance S Symposium SC Short Course SW Studio Workshop Location:

BJSLH Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall CFH Carson Family Hall EE Exhibition Entrance GRR Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium MSH Medieval Sculpture Hall

Saturday, March 1 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris. Marian Cohen. EE G 7:00 Borders and Boundaries in European Paintings. Elizabeth Perkins. Limited to 30 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. Sunday, March 2 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Piero della Francesca: Personal Encounters. Inés Powell. See “Special Ticketing” note below. EE Special Ticketing

Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Tickets distributed 15 minutes prior at exhibition entrance. M

G

Access Symbols

ASL

Assistive listening devices available American Sign Language

Membership Categories

Met Net (MN) Individual (IN) Family/Dual (FA/DU) Sustaining (SU) National Memberships

Associate (AS) Friend (FR) Supporting Memberships (SUP)

Contributing (CO) Donor (DO) Apollo Circle (AC) Apollo Circle Patron (ACP) Met Family Circle (MFC) Sponsor (SO) Patron (PA) Patron Circle (PC) President’s Circle (PR)

1:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU Members lecture, “Pacific Visions: Oceanic Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.” See page 2 for details. 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—String and Sound: Musical Instruments. Gallery 684 Sunday at the Met—Radiant Light: Stained Glass from Canterbury Cathedral

L

3:00 Journey to Canterbury Cathedral to learn about ongoing conservation efforts to preserve the structure and its stained glass windows. With Timothy Husband, Léonie Seliger, and Dean Robert Willis. Excerpts from The Canterbury Tales recited by Tom Lee. GRR

Tuesday, March 4 M 10:00–5:00 SUP, SU, FR Members. Preview of The Passions of JeanBaptiste Carpeaux G 11:00 Religious Sculpture in African Art. Kristen Windmuller-Luna L 11:00 “The Canticle of the Birds” of the Poet Attar. Michael Barry, Princeton University, illuminates the symbolism of the manuscript’s art in light of Islamic paintings from the Persian and Indian General Information: 212-535-7710 | 11

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March Programs regions, all in the Museum’s collections. $30. GRR Wednesday, March 5 M 10:00–5:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux M 11:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU Members lecture, “Pacific Visions: Oceanic Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.” See page 2 for details. G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—The Flowering of Edo Period Painting. John Carpenter. EE C 2:30 Gallery Concert. Kakande Quartet playing music of West Africa. Concert immediately followed by tour of the department’s galleries. Gallery 350 L 6:00 What’s Chinese About Contemporary Chinese Art? Maxwell Hearn, MMA. Part of the Met Salon series. $30; refreshments served. BJSLH Thursday, March 6 M 10:00–5:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux G 11:00 Carving the Divine: The Sculpture of Oceania. Eric Kjellgren. L 6:00 Spark: Plato at The Met. What would Plato say about issues like sexuality, child rearing, and the reason for existence if he were alive today? Novelist and philosopher Rebecca Neuberger Goldstein and psychologist Stephen Pinker investigate. $30. GRR Friday, March 7 M 10:00–8:15 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Metropolitan Vanities. Caroline Hannah. See ticketing box, page 11. EE L 4:00 Friday Focus—Reimagining the Indian and Tibetan Buddhist Traditions: A Conversation. Tenzing Rigdol, artist; Kurt Behrendt, MMA; and Donald Lopez, University of Michigan. BJSLH The Observant Eye

These gallery programs, indicated with a “G,” are for college and graduate students, along with other young adults. To register, e-mail observanteye@metmuseum.org. G

6:30 Viewing Japanese Art through the Eyes of PixCell-Deer#24. Joseph Loh

G

7:00 The Observant Eye—Stepping Out of the Frame: Three-Dimensionality in the New Galleries for European Paintings. See box below left. CFH

Saturday, March 8 M 10:00–8:15 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux G 11:00 Chinese Buddhist Sculpture. France Pepper G 1:00–5:00 Stories and Art of the American West: A Festival for All Ages. Details at www.metmuseum.org. G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Early American Guitars. The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments G 7:00 Ancient American Sculpture. Lauren Ebin Sunday, March 9 M 10:00–5:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux G 10:30 Exhibition Tour���Piero della Francesca: Personal Encounters. Inés Powell. See ticketing box, page 11. EE G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Early American Guitars. The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments Sunday at the Met—The Monuments Men: Fact and Fiction L

3:00 Explore how the actions of Monuments Men James Rorimer, George Stout, and others protected and recovered stolen art during World War II. GRR

Monday, March 10 M 6:00–8:30 SUP Members. Reception and viewing, The Passions of JeanBaptiste Carpeaux Tuesday, March 11 G 11:00 Heavenly Light, Sacred Art. Betsy Gibbons L 11:00 Innocents Abroad: NineteenthCentury American Painters in Europe. H. Barbara Weinberg, MMA, examines the work of American artists in England: Whistler, Sargent, and others. $30. GRR M 6:00–8:30 SU Members. Reception and viewing, The Passions of JeanBaptiste Carpeaux Wednesday, March 12 G 10:30 Gallery Conversation—Culture and Politics in Ink Art. Maxwell Hearn and Orville Schell. Limited free tickets available at www.metmuseum.org/ events/programs/talks.

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March Programs Thursday, March 13 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Elena Carrara. EE Friday, March 14 G 2:00 Conversation with a Curator— Terracotta Column-Krater. Joan Mertens L 5:00 Friday Focus—Annual Lecture on South and Southeast Asian Art: Lost Kingdoms. John Guy, MMA. BJSLH G 5:30–8:30 Friday Evening Gallery Event—What Moves You? Chart your path through The Passions of JeanBaptiste Carpeaux. Explore bold movements and expressive gestures through performances, artist demonstrations, and short talks. Meets in Gallery 999. Saturday, March 15 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—An Artist’s Perspective on The Passions of JeanBaptiste Carpeaux. Jeff Hesser. EE Sunday, March 16 G 11:00 Chinese Buddhist Sculpture. France Pepper G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—String and Sound: Musical Instruments. Gallery 684 Sunday at the Met—Early American Guitars: The Instruments of C. F. Martin P

2:30 Learn how Christian Frederick Martin created a uniquely American form of the guitar and, through the company he founded, influenced 180 years of American music. With performances by Douglas Back and others on historic and modern Martin guitars. GRR

Tuesday, March 18 G 11:00 Stories in Sculpture. Molly Kysar L 3:00 Shaping the African Art Canon: From the Museum to the Classroom. Kate Ezra, Yale University; Chika OkekeAgulu, Princeton University; and Z. S. Strother, Columbia University. BJSLH Wednesday, March 19 L 6:00 The American Bison: Live and Sculpted. Thayer Tolles, MMA, and Patrick Thomas, Bronx Zoo, examine the impact and interconnectedness of artistic representations and conservation efforts, past and present, involving this iconic animal. Part of the Met Salon series. $30; refreshments served. BJSLH Thursday, March 20 G 10:30 Gallery Conversation—An Artist’s Perspective on Tibet and India.

Tenzing Rigdol and Kurt Behrendt. EE Friday, March 21 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The American West in Bronze. Thayer Tolles. See ticketing box, page 11. EE L 4:00 Friday Focus—At the Vanity: Modern Women and Self-Transformation. Kathy Peiss, University of Pennsylvania. BJSLH G 6:30 Artists on Artworks—Ubaldo Vitali. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Shared Memory: Sculptural Ancestral Objects from Oceania. See box on page 12. CFH Saturday, March 22 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Ink Art. Xin Wang. See ticketing box, page 11. EE G 7:00 Rodin and Realism. Emmanuel ASL With voice interprevon Schack tation Sunday, March 23 G 11:00 Ancient American Sculpture. Lauren Ebin Sunday at the Met—The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux L

3:00 Enter the world of this 19thcentury French sculptor and learn how his demanding personality gave rise to such masterpieces as Ugolino and His Sons. With Elena Carrara, James Draper, and Patricia Mainardi. GRR

Tuesday, March 25 L 11:00 Innocents Abroad: NineteenthCentury American Painters in Europe. H. Barbara Weinberg, MMA, examines the work of American artists in Germany: Leutze, Chase, and others. $30. GRR Wednesday, March 26 G 11:00 Unexpected Encounters in Modern Sculpture. Marianna Siciliano Thursday, March 27 G 11:00 Medieval Sculpture. Christine Brennan Friday, March 28 G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator—A Medieval North Italian Crucifix. Jack Soultanian, Jr. L 4:00 Friday Focus—Canova’s Reliefs for the Tempio in the Context of His Career. Christina Ferando, Harvard University. BJSLH General Information: 212-535-7710 | 13

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March / April Programs G

G G

6:15 Beauty and Innovation: Understanding Islamic Art. Debra Cole ASL No voice interpretation 6:30 Egyptian Sculpture. Diana Patch 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Figure and Structure: Carpeaux. Gallery 999

Saturday, March 29 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Metropolitan Vanities. Caroline Hannah. See ticketing box, page 11. EE G 7:00 Women of Myth and Legend in American Sculpture. Jessica Murphy Sunday, March 30 G 11:00 Borders and Boundaries in European Paintings. Elizabeth Perkins. Limited to 30 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. Sunday at the Met—Cleopatra’s Needle L

3:00 Explore the meaning of obelisks in ancient Egypt and discover how a longstanding fascination with this ancient architectural form led to the erection of Cleopatra’s Needle in Central Park. With Dieter Arnold, Diana Craig Patch, Bob Brier, and Marie Warsh. GRR

Tuesday, April 1 G 11:00 European Sculpture in the Robert Lehman Collection. Dita Amory. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. L 6:00 The Nexus of Islamic Art, Culture, and Politics. Robert Silvers, New York Review of Books, and other contributors examine the living traditions of the Islamic world in the context of modern conflict and variations in Muslim culture. $30. GRR Wednesday, April 2 G 11:00 Southeast Asian Sculpture from a Scientist’s Perspective. Federico Carò L 11:00 Detective Work on Metropolitan Treasures. Anne Higonnet, Barnard College, explores narratives and underlying stories of three works in the Met’s collections. $30. GRR C 2:30 Gallery Concert. Vinayak Sharma, sitar. Concert immediately followed by tour of the department’s galleries. The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments

Thursday, April 3 SC 2:00–4:00 Short Course—19th-Century Sculpture: Masterpieces by Canova, Carpeaux, Rodin. Discover what makes these masterworks of sculpture in this three-session course led by Met experts, offered in conjunction with the exhibition The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux (sessions 2 and 3 are on April 10 and 17). $150, Museum admission included. To register, visit www.metmuseum.org/ courses-and-workshops. Friday, April 4 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Now You See It: Photography and Concealment. Mia Fineman. EE L 4:00 Friday Focus—El Greco: The Modernity of His Technique. Carmen Garrido, Prado Museum. BJSLH G 6:30 The Unexpected Object: Sculpture in Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Sculpture, Illusion, and Imagination in The Wrightsman Galleries. See box on page 12. CFH Saturday, April 5 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Elena Carrara. EE G 7:00 Religious Sculpture in African Art. Kristen Windmuller-Luna Sunday, April 6 G 11:00 19th-Century Sculpture: Before and After Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Jane Becker G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—Painted Panels: European Painting. Gallery 601 Sunday at the Met—Art in Crisis: Mali L

3:00 Learn how a regional crisis in Mali is impacting its cultural heritage. Hear from Mali’s National Museum director about what is being done to preserve and protect its visual and performing arts. With Holland Cotter, Banning Eyre, Alisa LaGamma, Samuel Sidibé, and a performance by Siya, a trio of Mande griot musicians from Mali featuring virtuoso kora player Yacouba Sissoko. GRR

Tuesday, April 8 M 10:00–5:00 SUP, SU, FR Members. Preview of Lost Kingdoms G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Making Pottery Art. Elizabeth Sullivan. EE L 11:00 Innocents Abroad: NineteenthCentury American Painters in Europe. H. Barbara Weinberg, MMA, examines

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April Programs the work of American artists in France: Eakins, Cassatt, and others. $30. GRR Wednesday, April 9 M 10:00–5:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of Lost Kingdoms G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Tibet and India. Kurt Behrendt. EE L 11:00 Detective Work on Metropolitan Treasures. Anne Higonnet, Barnard College, explores narratives and underlying stories of three works in the Met’s collections. $30. GRR Thursday, April 10 M 10:00–5:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of Lost Kingdoms G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris. Douglas Eklund. EE Friday, April 11 M 10:00–8:15 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of Lost Kingdoms G 6:15 Life in Ancient Egypt. Emmanuel von Schack ASL No voice interpretation G 6:30 Stories in Sculpture. Molly Kysar G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Volume and Form: Southeast Asian Art. Gallery 249 Saturday, April 12 M 10:00–8:15 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of Lost Kingdoms SW 10:30–4:30 Studio Workshop— Metalworking: Armor-Inspired Jewelry and Sculpture. Learn to articulate metal in this two-part course and make a small wearable or sculptural object inspired by historic armor (session 2 is on April 19). Tam Tran, artist. $195, plus $20 for materials, Museum admission included. To register, visit www.metmuseum.org/artmaking. G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Italian Tempera Painting. New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 G 7:00 Ancient American Sculpture. Lauren Ebin Sunday, April 13 M 10:00–5:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of Lost Kingdoms G 11:00 Women of Myth and Legend in American Sculpture. Jessica Murphy G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Italian Tempera Painting. New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 Tuesday, April 15 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Now You See It: Photography and Concealment. Mia Fineman. EE

11:00 Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Style. Walter Liedtke, MMA, explores the similarities and interplay between style in these two leading 17th-century painters and inherited or shared schemes of “picture-making” in their work. $30. GRR M 6:00–8:30 SUP Members. Reception and viewing, Lost Kingdoms L

Wednesday, April 16 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Lost Kingdoms. John Guy. EE L 11:00 Detective Work on Metropolitan Treasures. Anne Higonnet, Barnard College, explores narratives and underlying stories of three works in the Met’s collections. $30. GRR Thursday, April 17 G 11:00 Unexpected Encounters in Modern Sculpture. Marianna Siciliano M 6:00–8:30 SU Members. Reception and viewing, Lost Kingdoms Friday, April 18 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Flowering of Edo Period Painting. Midori Oka. EE G 6:30 Artists on Artworks—Alarm Will Sound: Michael Harley. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Sculpting Buddha: Cross-Cultural Exchange and Transition in a Chinese Buddha. See box on page 12. CFH Saturday, April 19 G 3:00 Gallery Conversation—Poetry and Ancient Sculpture. Anne Waldman and Pamela Lawton G 7:00 19th-Century European Sculpture: Before and After Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Jane Becker Sunday, April 20 G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—Decorative Arts in The Flowering of Edo Period Painting. Monika Bincsik. EE G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—Painted Panels: European Painting. Gallery 601 Tuesday, April 22 G 11:00 Sculpture from a Conservator’s Perspective. Beth Edelstein L 11:00 Rembrandt, Vermeer, and Style. See April 15, 11:00, for description. $30. GRR Wednesday, April 23 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Elena Carrara. EE General Information: 212-535-7710 | 15

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April / May Programs M

11:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU Members lecture, “Early American Guitars: Talk and Performance.” See page 2 for details.

Thursday, April 24 G 11:00 Sculpture in Reverse: Cylinder Seals of Mesopotamia. Yelena Rakic L 11:00 The Life and Times. Rebecca Rabinow, MMA, discusses Juan Gris’s Violin and Playing Cards on a Table (1913). $30. GRR Friday, April 25 L 4:00 Friday Focus—An Artist’s Perspective: The Robert A. Ellison Jr. Collection of French Ceramics. Michelle Erikson, ceramist. BJSLH G 6:30 Transformation: Sculpture from Himalayan Asia and India. David Bowles G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Negative and Positive Space: American Ceramics. Gallery 707 Saturday, April 26 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Lost Kingdoms. John Guy. EE SW 10:30–4:30 Studio Workshop—Figure Sculpting: Essential Forms in Clay. Explore the structure and dynamics of form that lie at the foundation of all figure sculpture in this two-part workshop (session 2 is on April 27). Jeff Hesser, artist. $195, plus $20 for materials, Museum admission included. To register, visit www.metmuseum .org/artmaking. G 7:00 Borders and Boundaries in European Paintings. Elizabeth Perkins. Limited to 30 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. P 7:00 Sculpting Sound: The Music of Carpeaux’s Circle with Susan Graham, mezzo-soprano. $65–$75. GRR Sunday, April 27 G/P 11:00 Gallery Performance and Conversation—Italian Renaissance Music and Art. Troubadours Grant and Priscilla Herreid perform songs of life, love, and laughter. A gallery talk follows with Rebecca Arkenberg. Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Meets in Gallery 607. G/P 1:00 Gallery Performance and Conversation—Italian Renaissance Music and Art. See above, 11:00. M 1:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU Members lecture, “Early American Guitars: Talk and Performance.” See page 2 for details.

Sunday at the Met—Goya’s Portraits: Painters and Patrons L

3:00 A new look at Goya and his relationship to three of his most important and unique aristocratic patrons. With Xavier Bray, Susan Grace Galassi, Manuela Mena Marqués, and Xavier Salomon. GRR

Tuesday, April 29 G 11:00 Egyptian Sculpture. Marsha Hill Wednesday, April 30 G 10:30 Gallery Conversation—Lost Kingdoms. John Guy and Tansen Sen. EE L 6:00 Spark: It’s About Time. Melanie Holcomb, MMA, describes how a day is compressed into a few square feet in a medieval frieze; astrophysicist and art historian SeungJung Kim explores the double Greek notions of chronos and kairos; Rebecca Stead bends time in her novel When You Reach; and performance artist Laurie Anderson meditates on time and space. $30. GRR Thursday, May 1 G 11:00 Sculptures of Hybrid Origin. Jacqueline Terrassa L 11:00 The Life and Times. Rebecca Rabinow, MMA, discusses Henri Matisse’s The Three O’Clock Sitting (1924). $30. GRR Friday, May 2 G 11:00 European Sculpture in the Robert Lehman Collection. Dita Amory. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. SW 5:00–8:30 Studio Workshop—Painting from the Masters. Set up your studio in the galleries in this five-part workshop series focused on painting directly from works of art (sessions 2–5 are on May 9, 16, 23, and 30). João Brandão, artist. $300, plus $75 for materials, Museum admission included. To register, visit www.metmuseum.org/artmaking. G 6:30 Unexpected Encounters in Modern Sculpture. Marianna Siciliano G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Painting in Relief: Sculptural Qualities in Renaissance Portrait Painting. See box on page 12. CFH C 7:00 18th Annual Lighthouse at the Met Concert. The Filomen M. D’Agostino Greenberg Music School of Lighthouse Guild performs music inspired by the Museum’s collection. GRR

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May Programs Saturday, May 3 SW 1:00–5:00 Studio Workshop—Costume Design: From Design to Drape. Sketch, shape forms, and create a sense of character through costume in this three-part workshop (sessions 2 and 3 are on May 10 and 17). Karen Young, artist. $195, plus $20 for materials, Museum admission included. To register, visit www. metmuseum.org/artmaking. SW 2:00 Exploring Color in Abstract Painting. ASL No voice interpretation. Free; reservations required. Visit www.metmuseum.org/events/ visitorsdisabilities. G 7:00 Ancient Greek and Roman Sculpture. Jean Sorabella Sunday, May 4 G 11:00 The Unexpected Object: Sculpture in Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—Shaping Fabric: Ancient Art. Leon Levy and Shelby White Court Tuesday, May 6 M 10:00–5:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of Charles James: Beyond Fashion G 11:00 Carving the Divine: The Sculpture of Oceania. Eric Kjellgren Wednesday, May 7 M 10:00–5:00 SUP, SU, FR, FA/DU, IN, AS Members. Preview of Charles James: Beyond Fashion G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Elena Carrara. EE C 2:30 Gallery Concert. Paul Vasile, organ. Concert immediately followed by tour of the department’s galleries. The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments, Gallery 683 L 6:00 Edmund de Waal in Conversation. De Waal and Sheena Wagstaff, MMA, in a dialogue between art and architecture. $30. Part of the Met Salon series. GRR Thursday, May 8 G 11:00 Transformation: Sculpture from Himalayan Asia and India. David Bowles P 7:00 Judy Collins: Coming Home. Celtic folk songs and stories. $75. GRR Friday, May 9 G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator—Se, A Chinese Stringed Instrument. Susana Caldeira L 4:00 Friday Focus—Reading and Looking: The Pleasures of Chinese

G G

Calligraphy. Robert Harrist, Jr., Columbia University. BJLSH 6:30 Exhibition Tour—Tibet and India. Kurt Behrendt. EE 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Interiors Through Light: European Period Rooms. Gallery 524, The Wrightsman Galleries

Saturday, May 10 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Lost Kingdoms. John Guy. EE G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Islamic Tilework. Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia G 7:00 Religious Sculpture in African Art. Kristen Windmuller-Luna Sunday, May 11 G 1:00 Love Speaks: A Day of Art and Poetry from the Muslim World. Celebrate Mother’s Day by exploring the many facets of love through poetry performances, workshops, and artist demonstrations in the Islamic Art galleries, followed by a special Sunday at the Met. Co-organized with Poets House and City Lore. Details at www.metmuseum.org. G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Islamic Tilework. Galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and Later South Asia. Sunday at the Met—Love Speaks: A Day of Art and Poetry from the Muslim World L

3:00 Presentations by Marie Howe and Frances Pritchett. Poetry reading by Kazim Ali. GRR

Tuesday, May 13 G 11:00 19th-Century European Sculpture: Before and After Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Jane Becker Wednesday, May 14 G 11:00 Stories in Sculpture. Molly Kysar L 11:00 Friends and Demons: The Life and Work of Carpeaux. Jim Draper, MMA, examines the sculptor’s persona. $30. GRR Thursday, May 15 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Out of Character: Decoding Chinese Calligraphy. Joseph Scheier-Dolberg. EE Friday, May 16 G 10:30 Gallery Conversation—Lost Kingdoms. Robert Brown and John Guy. EE General Information: 212-535-7710 | 17

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May Programs L

G

G

4:00 Friday Focus—Lectures in Cycladic and Ancient Greek Art. Color: The Fourth Dimension of Classical Sculpture. J. Lesley Fitton, The British Museum. BJSLH 6:30 Artists on Artworks—Alarm Will Sound: Nigel Maister and Kate Soper. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. 7:00 The Observant Eye—Senses of Sculpture: Baroque Sculpture. See box on page 12. CFH

Saturday, May 17 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux. Elena Carrara. EE S 10:30 New Perspectives on HinduBuddhist Sculpture, 5th to 8th Century. Noted curators and scholars explore issues relating to the exhibition Lost Kingdoms in this daylong public symposium. Free with Museum admission; tickets and reservations not required. GRR G 7:00 Ancient Greek and Roman Sculpture. Jean Sorabella Sunday, May 18 G 11:00 European Arms and Armor. Richard Gradkowski G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—Shaping Fabric: Ancient Art. Leon Levy and Shelby White Court Sunday at the Met—Spotlight on a Masterpiece: Albrecht Dürer’s Melencolia I L

3:00 Celebrate the 500th anniversary of Dürer’s masterful engraving Melencolia I and uncover the origins of this mysterious, mathematically inspired image. With Angela Campbell, Susan Dackerman, Laurinda Dixon, Mitchell Merback, and Nadine Orenstein. GRR

Tuesday, May 20 G 11:00 Color in the Ancient Near East. Fiona Kidd and Jean-François de Lapérouse L 11:00 Journeys to Divinity. Kurt Behrendt, MMA, explores art that emerged from the Buddhist communities on the vast flood plains of the Ganges River and how contemporary Tibetan artists continue to weave their creative vision into reality. $30. GRR Wednesday, May 21 G 11:00 Medieval Sculpture. Christine Brennan

Thursday, May 22 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Goya and the Altamira Family. Xavier Salomon. See ticketing box, page 11. EE Friday, May 23 G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—The Flowering of Edo Period Painting. John Carpenter. EE G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Sound and Mark: Alarm Will Sound. Gallery 921 Saturday, May 24 G 11:00 European Arms and Armor. Richard Gradkowski G 2:00 Sculpture from an Artist’s Perspective. Steven Montgomery Sunday, May 25 G 11:00 Ancient Greek and Roman Sculpture. Jean Sorabella Tuesday, May 27 G 11:00 Women of Myth and Legend in American Sculpture. Jessica Murphy Wednesday, May 28 G 11:00 Sculptures of Hybrid Origin. Jacqueline Terrassa Thursday, May 29 G 11:00 Southeast Asian Sculpture from a Scientist’s Perspective. Federico Carò P 7:00 Gloria—A Pig Tale. Alan Gilbert, New York Philharmonic, conducts and Doug Fitch, Giants Are Small, sets the scene for this humorous opera that explores life in excess through the imaginative world of a heroine pig, Gloria. $60. GRR Friday, May 30 G 11:00 Color in the Ancient Near East. Fiona Kidd and Jean-François de Lapérouse G 6:30–8:00 Friday Evening Gallery Event—Seven Deadly Sins. Chart your own path through the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800, and discover wrath, pride, lust, and other sins through interactive experiences with art. Meets in Gallery 600, The Dr. Mortimer D. Sackler and Theresa Sackler Gallery. P 7:00 Gloria—A Pig Tale. See May 29 for description. $60. GRR Saturday, May 31 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Making Pottery Art. Elizabeth Sullivan. EE G 7:00 The Unexpected Object: Sculpture in Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull

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Guided Tours Free guided tours of the Museum’s collections are offered daily by Museum-trained volunteers. Tours run through Saturday, June 7, 2014. A limited holiday schedule is available for Monday, March 17, through Friday, March 28; Saturday, April 19; Sunday, April 20; Saturday, May 24; and Sunday, May 25. There are no tours offered on Monday, May 5, or Tuesday, May 6. Inquire at the information desks for points of departure. For the full schedule, see the Museum’s website.

1:15

Weekday Guided Tours Check the information desk for days of the week. 10:30 Museum Highlights 10:45 Masterpieces of the Middle Ages 11:00 Great Paintings 11:15 Hindu/Buddhist Vision in Indian/ Southeast Asian Art 11:30 Museum Highlights 11:45 Great Sculpture 12:00 American Paintings and Sculpture 12:00 Arts of China 12:15 The Cradle of Civilization: Art of the Ancient Near East 12:15 Musical Instruments: East and West 12:30 Old Master Paintings 12:30 Arts of Ancient Greece and Rome 12:45 Impressionism and Post-Impressionism 1:00 Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas 1:00 Fashion in Art 1:15 Great Rooms: Life Styles of the Rich and Royal

6:30

1:30 1:45 1:45 2:00 2:15 2:30 2:45 3:15

Arts of Japan Museum Highlights Robert Lehman Collection: Renaissance to Impressionism American Rooms, American Stories: 1680–1914 Arts of Ancient Egypt Arts of the Islamic World Museum Highlights Modern and Contemporary Art Museum Highlights Museum Highlights (Friday only)

Saturday and Sunday Tours Tours are chosen from the following topics: Museum Highlights (also offered in Japanese); American Art; Arms and Armor; Arts of Ancient Egypt; Arts of Ancient Greece and Rome; Arts of the Islamic World; Asian Art; Impressionism and Post-Impressionism; Modern and Contemporary Art; Old Master Paintings; and Robert Lehman Collection. Check at the information desks for times. International Guided Tours Chinese/Mandarin Museum Highlights, Monday, Thursday, Friday, 1:30 French Museum Highlights, daily, 11:00. Modern and Contemporary Art, Tuesday, 1:30. Islamic Art, Monday, 1:30 German Museum Highlights, Tuesday, Wednesday, 11:15 Italian Museum Highlights, Monday, Thursday, 12:00 Japanese Museum Highlights, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 11:15. Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, Thursday, 2:00 Korean Museum Highlights, Monday, Tuesday, Friday, 11:00 Portuguese Museum Highlights, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 12:00 Russian Museum Highlights, Thursday, Friday, 2:30. Arts of Ancient Greece and Rome, Thursday, 1:00 Spanish Museum Highlights, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 11:30 All tours are subject to change.

Pierced Jug with Harpies and Sphinxes, dated A.H. 612/A.D. 1215–16, Iran, probably Kashan, stonepaste; openwork decoration, polychrome painted under turquoise glaze. Fletcher Fund, 1932 (32.52.1)

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The Cloisters Museum and Gardens The Cloisters museum and gardens is the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe. For information, call 212-923-3700 or visit www.metmuseum .org/cloisters. Hours: Daily 10:00–5:15 (March–October). Highlights Tours of the Collection for individual visitors: Monday–Friday and Sunday at 3:00. Garden Tours: Daily at 1:00 (May–October). Admission: Free to Museum Members. Recommended contribution same as main building, includes admission to both on the same day. All groups of 10 or more require advance reservations; call 212-650-2280. Directions: Subway: A to 190th Street, then walk through Fort Tryon Park; or, transfer to M4 bus for one stop. Bus: M4 (Madison Avenue) to last stop (Fort Tryon Park–The Cloisters). Car: Henry Hudson Parkway north to exit “Fort Tryon Park–The Cloisters.” Accessibility: Limited access for mobilityimpaired visitors. Call 212-923-3700. Gallery Talks are presented at noon and 2:00 and are free to individual visitors with Museum admission. No reservations are necessary. For information, call 212-650-2280. March 1 The Art of the Anglo-Norman World. Lauren Mancia 2 Fire in Medieval Material Culture. Jeanne-Marie Musto 8 The Ancestors of Christ: Stained Glass Windows from Canterbury Cathedral. Sigrid Goldiner 15 Dressing the Part: Medieval Costumes for Biblical Prophets and Ancestors. Jennifer Ball 22 New Saints, New Shrines: Thomas Becket and Contemporary Medieval Saints. Katherine Boivin 29 The Medieval Domestic Interior. Scott Miller

April 5 Stained Glass at The Cloisters. Elizabeth Parker 6 Materials and Techniques of Medieval Stained Glass. Leslie Bussis Tait 12 Prophecies Fulfilled: Old and New Testament Typology. Mary Halbach 26 Strewn with Flowers: A Close Look at the Falconer’s Bath. Rika Burnham

May 3 Medieval Romance: Love, Marriage, and Sexuality in the Middle Ages. Jessamyn Conrad

4 Framing Light: Windows in Medieval Architecture. Nancy Wu 10 Mothers in Medieval Art. Heather Horton 17 Medieval Tapestries. Emma Wegner 31 Four Cloisters. Carol Schuler

Conversation with a Curator/Conservator

20-minute informal conversations presented at 2:00. March 7 Timothy Husband April 4 Drew Anderson May 2 Charles Little Gallery Workshops for Families Hour-

long programs for children ages 4–12 and their families; free with Museum admission. Meet in the Main Hall at 1:00. March

Columns and Capitals. Christina DeLeón Strike a Pose! Maggie Dougherty 15 Stories in Glass. Emma Wegner 1 2

April 5 Kings, Queens, Lords, and Ladies. Gwen Mayhew 6 Medieval Travelers. Maggie Dougherty

May

A Medieval Menagerie. Gwen Mayhew A-Hunting We Will Go. Sean Rubin 17 Medieval Entertainment. Sarah Harshman 24–25 Family Festival: Falcons and Friends 3 4

La Experiencia Medieval: Talleres bilingües e educativos para familias / Bilingual gallery workshops for families

Niños de 4 a 12 años de edad y sus familiares están invitados a participar en visitas guiadas y proyectos de arte de una hora de duración. Encuéntrenos el último sábado de cada mes a la 1:00 de la tarde en la sala de recepción. 29 de marzo El color y la luz en la Edad Media/Color and Light in the Middle Ages. Begonia Santa-Cecilia 26 de abril Historias Medievales/Medieval Stories. Begonia Santa-Cecilia 31 de mayo Magia y Milagro/Magic and Miracles. Begonia Santa-Cecilia Concerts at The Cloisters

For tickets and information, call 212-570-3949. April

Blue Heron: Music for Canterbury Cathedral. $40 19 Pomerium: Passion and Resurrection Motets of the Renaissance. $40 27 Sequentia: Frankish Phantoms: Echoes from the Carolingian Palaces. $40 13

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Programs for Families, Teens, Teachers, and Visitors with Disabilities These drop-in programs are free with Museum admission unless otherwise noted. Children must be accompanied by an adult. For further information or to confirm details, call 212-650-2217 or go to www.metmuseum .org/events/programs/family-programs. All programs meet in Carson Family Hall, Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education, unless otherwise noted. For Families with Children Ages 18 Months–3 Years Toddler Storytime in Nolen Library. Monday–Friday, 10:30–11:00 (no program May 26). Look, listen, and have fun with picture books. Museum admission is not required. Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Nolen Library, Uris Center for Education For Families with Children Ages 3–7 Start with Art at the Met. Thursday afternoons, Saturdays, and Sundays, 1 hour. Sketch, explore, listen to stories, and discover the meaning of art.

Start with Art at the Met Plus. Monthly, Sunday afternoons, 90 minutes. Gallery experiences plus art-making activities. Storytime in Nolen Library. Sunday, 2:00– 2:30; Monday–Friday, 3:00–3:30 (see the website for schedule exceptions). Hear stories and then explore the galleries on a self-guided hunt. Museum admission is not required for the library portion of this program. Space is limited; first-come, firstserved. Nolen Library, Uris Center for Education For Families with Children Ages 5–12 Art Trek. Thursday afternoons, Saturdays, and Sundays, 1 hour. Be an art explorer! Take a new voyage around the globe every time you visit the Met.

Art Trek Plus. Monthly, Sunday afternoons, 90 minutes. Gallery experiences, performances, and more. Charles H. Tally Holiday Monday Family Programs. Monday, March 24, April 14, May 26; multiple 1-hour sessions. Take a day to play at the Met and enjoy fun discussion and sketching! For Teens Ages 11–18 Explore, create, and connect with art across cultures and time periods. Join Museum educators, artists, and other teens in free classes devoted to understanding art through gallery conversations, sketching, and studio workshops. For event dates, class descriptions, and to register, go to www.metmuseum.org/learn/for-teens.

For Visitors of All Ages See pages 11–18 for topics and locations.

Sunday Studio. Sunday, March 2 and 16; April 6 and 20; May 4 and 18. Try your hand at creating works of art in the galleries. Each session focuses on a different art form with family-friendly activities led by an artist. Drop in; art supplies provided. Ongoing instruction, 1:00–4:00. Stories and Art of the American West: A Festival for All Ages. Saturday, March 8, 1:00–5:00. An afternoon of family activities. Visit www.metmuseum.org for details. How Did They Do That? Saturday and Sunday, March 8 and 9; April 12 and 13; May 10 and 11. Learn hands-on how works of art were created. 30-minute sessions, 1:00–4:00. (No 1:30 or 2:30 p.m. sessions on May 11.) Meet in the galleries. Artist Demonstrations. Friday, March 14, 5:30–8:30; Sunday, May 11, 1:00–3:00. Experience art making up close as you watch artists create in the galleries. Drop in. Drop-in Drawing. Friday, March 28; April 11 and 25; May 9 and 23. Join talented art instructors in the galleries for fun, informal sketching. Come and go as you like between 6:30 and 8:30. For Teachers The Museum offers a wide variety of programs. Call 212-570-3985 or visit www.metmuseum.org/educatorprograms.

For information about the Children’s Reading Room and the Teacher Resource Center, call 212-570-3788 or visit www.metmuseum.org/nolen.

For Visitors with Disabilities The Museum offers a range of scheduled and by-request programs and accommodations, including touch and descriptive tours and drawing classes for people with visual impairments; Met Escapes for people with dementia and their care partners; Discoveries for people with developmental and learning disabilities and those on the autism spectrum; and tours in ASL for Deaf visitors. Call 212-650-2010, e-mail access@ metmuseum.org, or visit www.metmuseum .org/events/visitorsdisabilities. Gallery Workshops for Families at The Cloisters Museum and Gardens, p. 20.

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Ways to Give

Members and friends of The Metropolitan Museum of Art help sustain this institution in countless crucial ways: by visiting our permanent collections, our special exhibitions, our concerts, and our lectures; by adding energy and vitality to our programs; and above all, by providing vital financial support that makes it possible for the Met to continue collecting, preserving, interpreting, publishing, and displaying great works of art. To learn more about how you can help, or to make a gift, please call 212-570-3956 or visit “Give and Join” at metmuseum.org

Planned Giving

For more information and to learn more about Planned Giving at the Metropolitan Museum and The William Society, a group formed to thank those friends of the Museum who provide for it in their estate plans, contact the Planned Giving program at 212-5703796 or by e-mail at planned.giving@ metmuseum.org. You can also visit the Museum’s website, www.metmuseum .org, in the Planned Giving section under “Give and Join.”

Judith Greenfield recently celebrated the birth of her third grandchild and knew that when major life events happen, it is always a good idea to review one’s estate plan. Judith made an appointment with her attorney, not only to update the provisions for her grandchildren in her will, but also to finalize her charitable giving arrangeChildren in Woods, 1905, by Frank W. Benson, oil on canvas. Bequest of Miss Adelaide Milton de Groot ments. She, her (1876–1967), 1967 (67.187.210) children, and her grandchildren all love the Metropolitan Museum, and Judith was Note: This example is for illustration purposes only. Judith Greenfield is based on a composite of committed to supporting the future of donors to the Museum. the Met. During the meeting with her attorney, Attention All Budding and Future Judith was reminded that there are many Art Connoisseurs—Join the Met ways to add a charitable contribution Family Circle! to her estate plan without affecting the The Met Family Circle, a membership arrangements she was considering for her group for families with children up to age family in her will. Judith’s attorney sug12, offers the opportunity to learn more gested that she could name the Museum as about the Metropolitan’s treasures and proa beneficiary of a retirement plan, insurance vides a valuable introduction to the Musepolicy, savings account, or donor-advised um’s vast collections. Personal family tours, fund, all of which would provide a future daytime workshops, evening family events, gift for the benefit of the Metropolitan. and art activities are designed to create Judith decided to name the Museum as the memorable experiences for all. Members beneficiary of a savings account that she also receive complimentary tickets to the believed she would not need during retireannual Family Benefit and the Met Family ment. These gifts, sometimes called Totten Circle Pajama Party. Parents receive speTrusts, can be arranged easily by asking cial privileges as well, including invitations your bank for the appropriate form. Judith to exhibition previews and access to the would retain complete control over the Patrons Lounge, Members Dining Room, assets in the account until her death, at and The Balcony Lounge. Annual memberwhich point she knew the gift would pass ship dues are $4,000. directly to the Met without affecting her For more information, contact Kristin bequests. Judith was delighted to know MacDonald, Deputy Chief Development that her plan provided for both her family Officer for Events, at 212-650-2372 or and the future of the Museum that they all e-mail family.circle@metmuseum.org. enjoy so much. 22 | www.metmuseum.org

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Plan Your Visit Hours Open 7 days a week. Sunday– Thursday, 10:00–5:30; Friday, Saturday, 10:00–9:00. Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25, January 1, and the first Monday in May. Recorded information, 212-535-7710. Members Admission Skip lines! Admission stickers are available at the membership desks in the Great Hall and Burke Hall. Non-Member Admission Recommended: adults, $25; seniors (65 and older), $17; students, $12. Purchase express admission in advance at www.metmuseum.org/visit.

Accessibility

> Street-level entrances are at Fifth Ave. and 81st St. and the Museum parking garage. Taxicabs and other vehicles may drop off passengers with disabilities on the south plaza on Fifth Ave. > Wheelchairs are available at coat-check areas. Pick up an access brochure and map at the information desks. > Induction loops may be found at select information and admission desks. Please use T-switch. > FM assistive listening devices are available for tours and programs. > Sign language interpreters may be requested. > For more information for visitors with disabilities, e-mail access@metmuseum.org or call 212-650-2010. Garage 80th St. and Fifth Ave. Validate parking tickets at the Uris Center Membership Desk for a reduced fee. Designated parking spaces are available for visitors with disabilities. Visitors with vehicles over 6'6" should call 212-650-9165.

Concerts and Lectures To order tickets,

visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212570-3949, fax 212-650-2253, or stop by the box office in the Great Hall. Community Programs Tours are offered by request for adult community groups within New York City. For more information, call 212-396-5170. Group Visits Call 212-570-3711 or visit www.metmuseum.org for information. Libraries For libraries and study room information, call 212-535-7710. The Thomas J. Watson Library is open to college-level researchers; 212-650-2225. Nolen Library, Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education, welcomes readers of all ages and has a special Children’s Reading Room; 212-570-3788. Helpful Hints

> Food and drink, other than water in plastic bottles, cannot be brought into the Museum. > Flash photography and video cameras cannot be used inside the Museum. > Sketching in the galleries is permitted with pencil only; pens, markers, and pointers are prohibited. > Strollers are allowed in all galleries, unless otherwise noted. > Lost and Found: 212-570-3981. Save Time by Traveling Light

Backpacks and packages must be checked. Avoid waiting in lines by leaving backpacks and packages at home. Coats and small umbrellas may be carried into the galleries. Large umbrellas must be checked. Luggage, carry-on bags, and oversize backpacks are not allowed in the Museum and cannot be checked.

Travel with the Met South American Highlights October 15– 29, 2014 From San Pedro de Atacama, Chile, explore the Atacama Desert before flying to Easter Island to marvel at its moai statues. Admire colonial architecture and Precolumbian treasures in Santiago, then continue to Cusco, Peru, to discover its Inca monuments. Conclude with a scenic train ride to Machu Picchu and a tour of this remarkable site with a former resident archaeologist. Land rate: $13,995.

Vietnam and Cambodia October 31– November 16, 2014 See Hanoi’s temples and museums and enjoy an overnight cruise in Halong Bay. View royal tombs in Hue and ancient architecture in Hoi An. In Da Nang, tour the Cham Museum before exploring Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon). In Phnom Penh, see treasures of Khmer art and architecture. Conclude in Siem Reap to explore Angkor Wat, Ta Prohm, the Roulons group, and Angkor Thom. Land rate: $9,995.

For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/travel, call 212-650-2110, or e-mail travelwiththemet@metmuseum.org. Volume 46, Number 4, Spring 2014. © 2013 by The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Members Calendar is published quarterly by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028-0198. Address correspondence concerning this publication to The Members Calendar, Communications Department. E-mail: communications@metmuseum.org. Send change of address information to membership@metmuseum.org. General Information: 212-535-7710 | 23

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Members Calendar Spring 2014

Young Members Party

Benefit Parties Summer FĂŞte

Lectures Pacific Visions: Oceanic Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art Early American Guitars: Talk and Performance

Previews and Receptions The Passions of Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux Lost Kingdoms: Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia, 5th to 8th Century Charles James: Beyond Fashion Spring Shopping Evening

1000 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10028-0198


Members Calendar: Spring 2014