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Members Calendar 路 Fall 2013

Members Highlights

Members-Only Events Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800 Supporting,* Sustaining

previews, Tuesday, September 10–Sunday, September 15, Museum hours. Family/Dual, Individual previews, Wednesday, September 11–Sunday, September 15, Museum hours. Supporting* viewing and reception, Wednesday, September 11, 6:00–9:00. Sustaining viewing and reception, Thursday, September 12, 6:00–9:00. Balthus: Cats and Girls—Paintings and Provocations Supporting,* Sustaining preview, Tuesday, September 24, Museum hours. Supporting* viewing and reception, Wednesday, October 2, 6:00–9:00. Free Members lectures: Supporting,* Sustaining, Family/Dual Wednesday, October 23, 11:00 a.m., or Sunday, October 27, 1:00 p.m. Advance registration is not required, but you must present your Membership card for admission. 82nd & Fifth All Members. Thursday, September 26, 6:30–9:00. Join Met curators for enlightening short talks on works in the collection, accompanied by live music, studio art programs, and receptions throughout the galleries. $125. For more information, call 212-570-3887. Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom Supporting,* Sustaining previews, Tuesday, October 29– Sunday, November 3, Museum hours. Family/Dual, Individual previews, Wednesday, October 30–Sunday, November 3, Museum hours. Supporting* viewing and reception, Wednesday, November 6, 6:00–9:00. Free Members lectures: Supporting,* Sustaining, Family/Dual Thursday, November 21, 11:00 a.m., or Sunday, November 24, 1:00 p.m. Advance registration is not required, but you must present your Membership card for admission. Jewels by JAR Supporting,* Sustaining preview, Tuesday, November 19, Museum hours. President’s Circle, Patron Circle, Patron, Sponsor reception, Wednesday, November 20, 6:00–9:00. Double Discount Days All Members. 20% discount in all Met Stores and online. Monday, November 25–Monday, December 2 (select items and phone and mail orders excluded). Holiday Shopping Evening All Members. Monday, November 25, 6:00–9:00. Preview the Annual Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche and enjoy refreshments, exclusive viewings of special exhibitions with complimentary Audio Guides, and a 20% discount in The Met Store (select items and phone and mail orders excluded).

Save the Date: Winter Events An Annual Benefit to Support the Museum’s Acquisitions Program 16th annual black-tie dinner to benefit the Acquisitions Fund of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Wednesday, December 11. To request an invitation or for more information, call 212-570-3948. Holiday Reception: Lighting of the Christmas Tree and Viewing of the Neapolitan Baroque Crèche Supporting,* Sustaining reception with light supper and dessert.

Thursday, December 5. Gala Holiday Dinner at The Cloisters Supporting,* Sustaining black-tie dinner, dancing,

and gallery tours. Thursday, December 12, 7:00–11:00. Tickets $400. For more information, call 212-570-3887. *Supporting includes President’s Circle, Patron Circle, Patron, Sponsor, Donor, Contributing, Met Family Circle, Apollo Circle Patron, and Apollo Circle Members. On the cover: Thérèse, 1938, by Balthus (Balthasar Klossowski), oil on cardboard mounted on wood. Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. Allan D. Emil, in honor of William S. Lieberman, 1987 (1987.125.2) © Balthus

Dining at the Met Members Dining Room overlooking Central Park is exclusively for Members.

Call 212-570-3975 to make a reservation or book a table online by signing in to the MyMet section at www.metmuseum.org/mymet. Petrie Court Café Sunday–Thursday, 11:30–4:30. Friday–Saturday, 11:30–9:00 (last seating at 8:30). For reservations or parties of five or more, call 212-570-3964. American Wing Café Sunday–Thursday, 10:00–4:30. Friday–Saturday, 10:00–8:30. The Cafeteria Monday–Thursday, 11:30–4:30. Friday, 11:30–7:00. Saturday, 11:00–7:00. Sunday, 11:00–4:30. Great Hall Balcony Bar Friday–Saturday, 4:00–8:30 (last call at 8:00). Roof Garden Café and Martini Bar Open May 14–November 3, 2013, weather permitting. Sunday–Thursday, 10:00–4:30. Friday–Saturday, 10:00–8:30; Martini Bar, 5:30–8:30 (last call at 8:15). 2 | www.metmuseum.org

From the Director

Contents Members Highlights • 2 Exhibitions and The Collection • 4

Dear Members and Friends,

September Programs • 11

This season’s offerings encapsulate what has become for me a favorite way of thinking about the Museum: “One Met. Many Worlds”— a place where you can journey through the world’s great art and many cultures. Balthus: Cats and Girls—Paintings and Provocations, for example, is the first American exhibition of the artist’s work in almost 30 years. It focuses on his fascination with felines and the transition between childhood and adolescence—subjects of his paintings from the mid-1930s to the 1950s. Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500– 1800 tells the important story of the flowering of an abundant textile trade, with its many breathtaking designs and techniques. Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom introduces the fascinating and complex culture of ancient Korea. Many of the works on view, including spectacular gold regalia and exquisite Buddhist art, are being shown in the U.S. for the first time. The story of the modernization of the ancient tradition of glass blowing is told in Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932–1947. Scarpa was an influential architect who also collaborated with master glass blowers to create many new styles and in the process pioneered techniques, silhouettes, and colors. A superb sense of color and craftsmanship is also on view in Jewels by JAR. With more than 300 pieces by the acclaimed jewelry designer Joel A. Rosenthal, it is the first retrospective of his work in America. The Met is also home this season to a stunning selection of medieval church treasures from Hildesheim Cathedral. The works represent one of the most complete surviving ensembles of church furnishings in Europe and include many masterpieces. Providing a wonderful complement as only the Met can is Janet Cardiff: The Forty Part Motet, a sound installation at the Museum’s Cloisters branch for medieval art and architecture. By Canadian artist Cardiff (b. 1957), it is the first presentation of contemporary art at The Cloisters and part of a year-long celebration of its 75th anniversary. It’s an exciting fall. Come visit soon—to explore, be challenged, or view old favorites.

November Programs • 16

October Programs • 13

Guided Tours • 19 The Cloisters Museum and Gardens • 20 Programs for Families, Teens, Teachers, and Visitors with Disabilities • 21 Ways to Give • 22 Plan Your Visit • 23 Travel with the Met • 23

Open 7 Days Both the Museum’s main building and The Cloisters museum and gardens are now open 7 days a week. See pages 20 and 23 for hours. Evening Hours Visit the Museum on Friday and Saturday until 9:00 p.m. when the galleries are less crowded.

AUDI O G UI D E Sponsored by The Audio Guide is a recorded guide to selected special exhibitions and the permanent collection. It is free for visitors who are blind, partially sighted, or hard of hearing; neck loops and large-print scripts are available. All-in-One Player $7.00 General public $6.00 Members $5.00 Children under 12

Guides are “$5 after 5” on Friday and Saturday evenings. Rent four Audio Guides, and the fifth one is free with a Frequent User Card!

Orange peel and orange blossom brooch, 2001, by JAR, garnets, diamonds, and enamel; silver and gold

Thomas P. Campbell

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 3

Exhibitions and The Collection

Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800 September 16, 2013–January 5, 2014 The Tisch Galleries, 2nd floor

With works from across the Museum as well as international loans, Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500– 1800 highlights an important design story

that has never been told from a truly global perspective. The golden age of European navigation in search of spice routes to the east brought about the flowering of an abundant textile trade. Textiles often acted as direct currency for spices and other desired goods. During this period, textiles and textile designs made their way throughout the globe. Because trade textiles blended the traditional patterns and skills of the cultures that produced them, and reflected the tastes of the countries that received them, the result was objects that are both beautiful and historically fascinating. Made possible by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund, The Coby Foundation, Ltd., The Favrot Fund, the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund, and the Quinque Foundation.

Hanging (detail), after 1761, India, for the English market, cotton, drawn and painted resist and mordant, dyed. Courtesy of Titi Halle

Janet Cardiff at The Cloisters September 10–December 8, 2013 The Cloisters Fuentidueña Chapel

Janet Cardiff: The Forty Part Motet, featuring a 2001 sound installation by Canadian artist Cardiff (born 1957), is the fi rst presentation of contemporary art at The Cloisters. Regarded as the artist’s masterwork, and consisting of 40 high-fidelity speakers positioned on stands in an oval configuration throughout the acoustically superb Fuentidueña Chapel, the 14-minute piece continuously plays an 11-minute reworking of the 40-part motet Spem in alium numquam habui Left: Janet Cardiff, The Forty Part Motet (2001). Photo: Atsushi Nakamichi / Nacása & Partners Inc. Courtesy of the Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, 2009. Right: Fuentidueña Chapel at The Cloisters museum and gardens 4 | www.metmuseum.org

(1556?/1573?) by Tudor composer Thomas Tallis (ca. 1505–1585). Visitors are encouraged to walk among the loudspeakers and hear the individual unaccompanied voices—one part per speaker—as well as the polyphonic choral effect of the combined singers in an immersive experience. Organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art from the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Support provided in part by Sarah Peter and Rosamond Ivey.

This installation is part of a year-long celebration of The Cloisters’ 75th anniversary.

Exhibitions and The Collection

Medieval Treasures from Hildesheim September 17, 2013–January 5, 2014 Wrightsman Exhibition Gallery, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts, 1st floor

Designated a UNESCO world cultural heritage site in 1985, Hildesheim Cathedral has one of the most complete surviving ensembles of church furnishings and treasures in Europe, with many masterpieces made between 1000 and 1250. A major renovation of the cathedral provides an opportunity for an extraordinary exhibition of medieval church treasures. The first section focuses primarily on Bishop Bernward of Hildesheim (960–1022), one of the greatest patrons of the arts in the Middle Ages. In addition to the famous monumental bronze doors and the column in Hildesheim Cathedral that cannot travel, Bernward commissioned many precious works of art, among them the Golden Madonna, a silver crucifix and candlesticks, and numerous illuminated manuscripts, which will be part of the exhibition. Made possible by the Michel David-Weill Fund. Supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Hezilo Cross, before 1079, German (Hildesheim), gold, copper, pearls, gems; wood core covered in silk. Dom-Museum Hildesheim, on loan from the collegiate church Zum Heiligen Kreuz in Hildesheim

Balthus: Cats and Girls—Paintings and Provocations September 25, 2013–January 12, 2014 Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Exhibition Hall, 2nd floor

Balthus is best known for his series of pensive adolescents who while away their time in rooms closed to the outside world. Cats are usually their sole playmates. Focusing on the artist’s finest works, this exhibition includes paintings dating from the mid-1930s to the 1950s. Between 1936 and 1939 Balthus painted his celebrated series of portraits of Thérèse Blanchard—his young neighbor in Paris—alone, with her cat, or with her two brothers. In Switzerland during World War II, he replaced the austerity of his Paris studio with more colorful interiors in which different girls daydream, read, or nap. The exhibition concludes with images he created of Frédérique Tison, his favorite model during the 1950s. Never before shown in public are the series of 40 small ink drawings for

The Game of Patience, 1954, by Balthus (Balthasar Klossowski), oil on canvas. Collection Bettina Rheims, Paris. © Balthus

Mitsou in which the 11-year-old Balthus evoked his adventures with a stray tomcat and that were published by the German poet Rainer Maria Rilke in 1921. Made possible by the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust, the Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, and Diane Carol Brandt. General Information: 212-535-7710 | 5

Exhibitions and The Collection

Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom November 4, 2013–February 23, 2014 Special Exhibition Gallery 199, 1st floor

The fi rst exhibition in the West to focus exclusively on the art of the fascinating Korean kingdom of Silla, this show presents spectacular gold regalia, exquisite Buddhist sculpture, and exotic goods from the Silk Road, all created between 400 and 800 A.D. It traces Silla’s rise from a small polity to a cosmopolitan presence both on the peninsula and in a broader Eurasian context. Drawn from the holdings of the National Museums of Korea in Seoul and Gyeongju, the 100 objects include National Treasures and works never before shown in the United States. Made possible by Samsung. Additional support provided by the Korea Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Museum of Korea and Gyeongju National Museum, Korea. Seated Amitabha Buddha, Silla Kingdom (57 B.C.–935 A.D.), Middle period, before 706, excavated from pagoda at Hwangboksa Temple site, Gyeongju, gold. National Museum of Korea, National Treasure 79

Incisi (engraved) glass vases, ca. 1940–42, designed by Carlo Scarpa for the Venini glassworks. Both in private collections

Venetian Glass by Carlo Scarpa: The Venini Company, 1932–1947 November 5, 2013–March 2, 2014 Robert Lehman Wing, ground floor

This exhibition is devoted to the work in glass of the influential Italian architect Carlo Scarpa (1906–1978), whose abilities can be traced to an earlier stage in his career. In 1932 Scarpa was hired by Paolo Venini, founder of Venini Glassworks, to be an artistic consultant to the company. 6 | www.metmuseum.org

Until 1947, he worked closely with Venini master glass blowers and Mr. Venini himself to create over two dozen styles, in the process pioneering techniques, silhouettes, and colors that thoroughly modernized the ancient tradition of glass blowing. Presented here are the results of this unique collaboration, featuring nearly 300 carefully selected works that highlight the significant contribution that Scarpa made to the art of Venetian glass. Made possible in part by the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund.

Exhibitions and The Collection

Jewels by JAR November 20, 2013–March 9, 2014 The Helen and Milton A. Kimmelman Gallery, Lila Acheson Wallace Wing, 1st floor

design, the quality of their stones, and their remarkable craftsmanship, but above all for their fearless beauty. Made possible by Phaidon Press Limited, Nancy and Howard Marks, and The Ronald and Jo Carole Lauder Foundation.

With more than 300 pieces by the most acclaimed jewelry designer of the last 35 years—Joel A. Rosenthal, who works in Paris under the name JAR—this exhibition is the fi rst retrospective in America of his work. Born in New York and educated at Harvard, Rosenthal moved to Paris soon after his graduation in 1966 and began experimenting with jewelry making, eventually opening JAR in 1978 on the Place de Vendôme, the same space he occupies today. His works quickly became known for their unique Butterfly earrings, 1993, by JAR, rubies, blue and violet sapphires; amethysts and diamonds; silver and gold Four butterfly brooches, 1991, by JAR, rubies, sapphires, amethysts, tourmalines, citrines, aquamarines, garnets, and brown and white diamonds; silver and gold

New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 Now Open 2nd floor

The Met’s world-renowned collection of European Old Master paintings from the 13th through the early 19th century have reopened after an extensive renovation and reinstallation. This is the fi rst major renovation of the galleries since 1951 and the fi rst overall reinstallation of the collection

since 1972. Almost one third larger, the space now accommodates the display of more than 700 paintings in 45 galleries, including a rotating special exhibition gallery. The galleries are organized both chronologically and geographically to provide an overview of painting in Italy, France, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, and Great Britain. The suites of galleries unfold with a new logic and grandeur, and sculpture, medals, ceramics, and other decorative arts have been judiciously incorporated where their presence adds a layer of meaning to the display of paintings. Key works have been conserved or embellished with period frames. Important loans complement the permanent collection and celebrate the reinstallation.

New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800, view of Gallery 615 looking into Gallery 614. General Information: 212-535-7710 | 7

Exhibitions and The Collection

Artists and Amateurs: Etching in Eighteenth-Century France October 1, 2013–January 5, 2014 Drawings and Prints, 2nd fl oor

Featuring works by Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, Hubert Robert, and many others, Artists and Amateurs embarks on a fresh exploration of how etching flourished in ancien régime France, shedding new light on artistic practice and patronage at that time. Treating such topics as technique and practice, experimentation, the influence of Italy, and the crucial role of the amateur, the exhibition establishes the unique place of etching in the shifting social terrain of 18th-century Paris, and explores an artistic context in which conventional hierarchies of genre and medium were increasingly breached to brilliant effect. Made possible by The Schiff Foundation. Study of Thirteen Heads, 1770, by Jean Jacques de Boissieu, etching; second state of three. The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1967 (67.793.25)

Feathered Walls: Hangings from Ancient Peru September 16, 2013–March 2, 2014 Lila Acheson Wallace Wing, 1st floor

them with elegance and luxuriousness. Twelve panels are on view; the installation includes documentation of their excavation in 1943 and of their complex, multi-step manufacturing process. Made possible by the Friends of the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas.

Masterpieces of Tibetan and Nepalese Art: Recent Acquisitions September 17, 2013–February 2, 2014 South and Southeast Asian Art, 2nd floor

The 13 newly acquired masterworks in this installation date from the 11th to the 17th century and include sculptures that are among the rarest and most important such objects to enter a Western collection, as well as spectacular examples of the finest Tibetan and Nepalese paintings known. All come from the pioneering collection of Jack and Muriel Zimmerman. Almost every major exhibition of Himalayan art mounted over the past four decades has featured works from this collection. Buddha Sakyamuni, central Tibet, 12th–13th century, brass with color pigments. Purchase, Lila Acheson Wallace, Oscar L. Tang, Anthony W. and Lulu C. Wang and Annette de la Renta Gifts, 2012 (2012.458)

The Nelson A. Rockefeller Vision: In Pursuit of “The Best” in the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas October 8, 2013–October 5, 2014 Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, Special Exhibition Gallery 359, 1st floor

Feathered Hanging, 7th–10th century, feathers on cotton, camelid fiber. The Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Collection, Bequest of Nelson A. Rockefeller, 1979 (1979.206.470)

Among the most spectacular and unusual works created by ancient Peruvian textile artists are panels—probably hangings— completely covered in a bold quadrant pattern of vibrant blue and yellow macaw feathers. Made by the Wari peoples of southern Peru between the 7th and 10th centuries, the panels, averaging seven feet by two, display a strikingly contemporary aesthetic; they may have been displayed on special occasions on the stone walls of Wari structures, imbuing 8 | www.metmuseum.org

In 1969 Governor Nelson Rockefeller announced that his collection of nonWestern art that had been housed at The Museum of Primitive Art (MPA) would be given a permanent home at the Met. A generation before “globalism” became a mainstream word, Rockefeller’s vision for the “Baby” Figure, 12th–9th century B.C.E., Mexico, Mesoamerica, ceramic, cinnabar, red ochre. The Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Collection, Bequest of Nelson A. Rockefeller, 1979 (1979.206.1134)

Exhibitions and The Collection MPA was to make evident the enormous spectrum of artistic expression that had until then been absent from the Museum’s holdings. Through Collection highlights and unpublished archival documents, this presentation considers the significant formative fi ne arts vision—“the best of everything,” as MPA curator and AAOA’s fi rst department head, Douglas Newton, described it—underlying The Michael C. Rockefeller Wing.

Annual Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche November 26, 2013–January 6, 2014 Medieval Sculpture Hall, 1st floor

The Museum continues a long-standing holiday tradition with the annual presentation of its Christmas tree, a favorite of New Yorkers and visitors from around the world. A vivid 18th-century Neapolitan Nativity scene, embellished with a profuse array of diminutive, lifelike attendant figures and silk-robed angels hovering above, adorns the candlelit spruce. Recorded music and lighting ceremonies add to the enjoyment of the holiday display. Made possible by gifts to The Christmas Tree Fund and the Loretta Hines Howard Fund. Annual Christmas Tree and Neapolitan Baroque Crèche display.

Fifty Years of Collecting Islamic Art September 24, 2013–January 2014 The Hagop Kevorkian Fund Special Exhibitions Gallery, 458, 2nd floor

In 1963 the Department of Islamic Art was established as a separate entity. Over the following 50 years, the collection has grown through gifts, bequests, and purchases. The works of art in this exhibition are grouped to highlight the trends and broadening focus in collecting Islamic art at the Met—from ceramics, glass, and metalwork to carpets and contemporary art. Made possible by The Hagop Kevorkian Fund.

The Roof Garden Commission: Imran Qureshi Through November 3, 2013 The Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Roof Garden

Imran Qureshi (b. 1972, Hyderabad, Pakistan) is renowned for his reinterpretations of traditional miniature painting that first flourished in the Mughal courts of the Indian Subcontinent at the end of the 16th century. He is equally adept at creating large-scale environments in which foliate motifs sourced from miniature landscapes transform the site. Qureshi’s commission is complemented by a new installation of his small-scale paintings in The Gioconda and Joseph King Gallery (916), hung together with historic miniatures from the Museum’s collection. Made possible by Bloomberg. Additional support provided by Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon B. Polsky. Installation view of And How Many Rains Must Fall Before the Stains Are Washed Clean (2013)

Julia Margaret Cameron August 19, 2013–January 5, 2014 The Howard Gilman Gallery, Photographs, 2nd floor

One of the greatest portraitists in the history of photography, Julia Margaret Cameron (1815–1879) blended an unorthodox technique, a deeply spiritual sensibility, and a Pre-Raphaelite–inflected aesthetic to create vivid portraits and a mirror of the Victorian soul. This is the fi rst New York museum show devoted to her work in nearly a generation and the fi rst ever at the Met. Its 35 works are drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, including major works from the Rubel Collection acquired in 1997 and the Gilman Collection acquired in 2005. Made possible by The Hite Foundation, in memory of Sybil Hite. Mrs. Herbert Duckworth, 1867, by Julia Margaret Cameron, albumen silver print from glass negative. Gilman Collection, Purchase, Alfred Stieglitz Society Gifts, 2005 (2005.100.26) General Information: 212-535-7710 | 9

Exhibitions and The Collection

Last Chance Ken Price Sculpture: A Retrospective Through September 22, 2013 Bashford Dean and the Creation of the Arms and Armor Department Through September 29, 2013

Brush Writing in the Arts of Japan

existence. The works on view range from the countercultural questioning of conventions in art and life by Conceptual artists to recent works by young artists who combine process and product in novel ways.

Small Delights: Chinese Snuff Bottles Through February 17, 2014

Through January 12, 2014

Charlotte C. Weber Galleries for the Arts of Ancient China, 2nd floor

Arts of Japan Galleries, 2nd floor

Snuff bottles hold a unique place in the history of Chinese art. Their broad range of materials, techniques, and artistic styles represent almost every art form developed during the five millennia of Chinese civilization, including stone, porcelain, ivory, lacquer, metalwork, glass, and even painting and calligraphy. This exhibition, drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, features many works that have not been shown in decades. These exquisite miniatures not only illustrate the technical virtuosity and artistic sensibility of the craftsmen, but also provide a window on life in late imperial China.

This installation focuses on premodern Japanese works that were inspired by classical Chinese or Japanese literature. Included are ink landscapes and calligraphy created in the context of medieval Zen monasteries, as well as works that draw inspiration from ancient Heian court culture. Other highlights include screen paintings, deluxe lacquerware and textiles, and a selection of contemporary prints and calligraphy.

Snuff Bottle with Scene of a Lotus Pond, Qing dynasty (1644–1911), late 18th to early 19th century, overlay glass with coral stopper. Bequest of Benjamin Altman, 1913 (14.40.454a, b)

Made possible by The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Foundation. Hotei (detail), dated 1616, by Kano Takanobu, hanging scroll; ink and color on paper. Funds from various donors, 2006 (2006.115)

Everyday Epiphanies: Photography and Daily Life Since 1969 Through January 26, 2014

Also on View

Joyce and Robert Menschel Hall for Modern Photography, 2nd floor

Italian Renaissance and Baroque Bronze Sculpture from the Robert Lehman Collection Through November 17, 2013 Eighteenth-Century Pastels Through December 29, 2013 Legends of the Dead Ball Era (1900–1919) in the Collection of Jefferson R. Burdick Through December 1, 2013

This exhibition examines the ways in which artists have used the camera to explore subjects close to home—the quotidian, intimate, and overlooked aspects of everyday

Empty Shoebox, 1993, by Gabriel Orozco, silver dye bleach print. Gift of the artist, 1995 (1995.564) © Gabriel Orozco 10 | www.metmuseum.org

September Programs The Museum presents programs related to exhibitions and the collections as listed on the following pages. All programs are subject to change. For the most up-to-date information, check www.metmuseum.org or the information desks upon arrival. Films require no tickets unless otherwise noted. Gallery Talks and Tours (indicated by “G” in the listings) are presented by Museum curators, conservators, educators, outside scholars, and advanced students of art history. They start in Gallery 534, Vélez Blanco Patio, unless noted as EE (“exhibition entrance”) or another location. Lectures (free with Museum admission) by curators, scholars, conservators, and artists are presented on Sunday afternoons and occasional weekdays September–June. Subscription lectures by leading authorities on art, music, and historical topics are presented weekdays and evenings October–May. Met Museum Presents is the 2013–14 season of performances, talks, and special gallery tours. Note these two special ticket offers: 30 & Under Rush $15 tickets for audience members 30 years and younger when purchased the day of the event (subject to availability). Call 212-570-3949 or visit the box office. Events are designated with a <30 . Bring the Kids! Selected concerts have $1 tickets available for children (ages 7–16) when accompanied by an adult with a fullprice ticket. Call 212-570-3949 or visit the box office. Events are designated with a . Access Symbols

Assistive listening devices available ASL

American Sign Language

Membership Categories

Met Net (MN) Individual (IN) Family/Dual (FA/DU) Sustaining (SU) National Memberships

Associate (AS) Friend (FR) Supporting Memberships (SUP)

Contributing (CO) Donor (DO) Apollo Circle (AC) Apollo Circle Patron (ACP) Met Family Circle (MFC) Sponsor (SO) Patron (PA) Patron Circle (PC) President’s Circle (PR)

Program:

C Concert F Film G Gallery Program L Lecture M Members Event P Performance SC Short Course S Symposium SW Studio Workshop Location:

BJSLH Bonnie J. Sacerdote Lecture Hall CFH Carson Family Hall EE Exhibition Entrance GRR Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium MSH Medieval Sculpture Hall

Sunday, September 1 G 11:00 Movement in European Paintings. Page Knox. Limited to 30 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. Tuesday, September 3 G 11:00 Native American Art in Motion. Judith Ostrowitz Wednesday, September 4 G 11:00 Spin, Twist, Splatter: Movement in Modern and Contemporary Art. Marianna Siciliano C 2:30 The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments. Tour of the Musical Instruments Galleries immediately follows concert. Thursday, September 5 G 11:00 Voyaging in Oceania: Moving through This World and Beyond. Eric Kjellgren Friday, September 6 G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator—The Hunt of the Frail Stag: Five Medieval Tapestry Fragments. Giulia Chiostrini G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Volume and Form: Precolumbian Art. Samuel H. and Linda M. Lindenbaum Gallery G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—Brush Writing in the Arts of Japan. John Carpenter. EE Saturday, September 7 G 11:00 Movement in Ancient Greek ASL Vases. Emmanuel von Schack With voice interpretation Sunday, September 8 G 11:00 Movement and Meaning: The Art of Dance. Lauren Ebin G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—Paper and Fiber: African Art. The Benenson Gallery Monday, September 9 L 2:00 The Charles K. Wilkinson Lecture Series: The Art of Burial. Three lectures General Information: 212-535-7710 | 11

September Programs hosted by the Departments of Ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, and Islamic Art. Speakers are Kim Benzel, Lisa Golombek, and Ann Macy Roth. GRR Tuesday, September 10 M 10:00–4:15 SUP, SU Members. Preview of Interwoven Globe G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—EighteenthCentury Pastels. Katharine Baetjer. EE Wednesday, September 11 M 10:00–4:15 SUP, SU, FA/DU, IN Members. Preview of Interwoven Globe G 11:00 Gallery Conversation with guest expert M 6:00–9:00 SUP Members. Reception and viewing of Interwoven Globe Thursday, September 12 M 10:00–4:15 SUP, SU, FA/DU, IN Members. Preview of Interwoven Globe M 6:00–9:00 SU Members. Reception and viewing of Interwoven Globe Friday, September 13 M 10:00–8:15 SUP, SU, FA/DU, IN Members. Preview of Interwoven Globe G 11:00 Stillness and Movement in American Landscape Painting. Alice Schwarz G 6:30 Bodies in Motion: Egyptian and Greek Figures. Marissa Schlesinger G 7:00 The Observant Eye—From Movement to Stasis in the Arts of Africa. See box below. CFH The Observant Eye

These gallery programs, indicated with a for college and graduate students, along with other young adults. To register, e-mail observanteye@metmuseum.org.

“G”, are

Saturday, September 14 M 10:00–8:15 SUP, SU, FA/DU, IN Members. Preview of Interwoven Globe G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—Lacquerware in Brush Writing in the Arts of Japan. Monika Bincsik. EE G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Degas’s Bronze Dancers. 19th- and Early 20thCentury European Paintings Galleries G 3:00 Gallery Conversation—Miniature Paintings. Ian Alteveer and Roof Garden Commission artist Imran Qureshi. Gallery 916 G 7:00 Motifs in Motion in Islamic Art. Erica Ehrenberg

12 | www.metmuseum.org

Sunday, September 15 M 10:00–4:15 SUP, SU, FA/DU, IN Members. Preview of Interwoven Globe G 11:00 Motifs in Motion in Islamic Art. Erica Ehrenberg G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Degas’s Bronze Dancers. 19th- and Early 20thCentury European Paintings Galleries SW 1:00–5:00 Studio Workshop— Bookmaking: Japanese Techniques. Create folding albums, pop-ups, and cutting techniques in this one-day workshop inspired by Japanese art. Sonya Blesofsky, artist. $65, plus $10 for materials, Museum admission included. To register, visit www.metmuseum.org/artmaking. Sunday at the Met—Imran Qureshi: Tradition and Reinvention in Contemporary Miniature Painting L

3:00 Met curators Ian Alteveer, Maryam Ekhtiar, and Navina Haidar and Roof Garden Commission artist Imran Qureshi discuss the rich history of miniature painting and its deep resonances for contemporary artists working in Pakistan, India, and beyond. GRR

Tuesday, September 17 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Julia Margaret Cameron. Malcolm Daniel. EE G 2:30 Gallery Talk and Demonstration— Roentgen Furniture. Gallery 553 P 8:00 The Grand Tour. Four Concerts in four galleries by leading Renaissance and Baroque musicians TENET, Dark Horse, Quicksilver, and Jory Vinikour. $100. Wednesday, September 18 G 11:00 Moving through the Day: Art and the Everyday. Jacqueline Terrassa P 8:00 The Grand Tour. Four concerts in four galleries by leading Renaissance and Baroque musicians TENET, Dark Horse, Quicksilver, and Jory Vinikour. $100. Thursday, September 19 G 11:00 Bodies in Motion: Degas’s Dancers and Bathers. Molly Kysar Friday, September 20 G 2:00 Conversation with a Curator— Vishnu Riding on Garuda from Nepal. John Guy G 6:30 Artists on Artworks—Lisa Corinne Davis. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio.

September / October Programs G C

6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Following Line: Egypt. Gallery 110 7:00 Patti Smith. A tribute to 12thcentury German writer and polymath Hildegard of Bingen. $40. GRR

Saturday, September 21 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Everyday Epiphanies. Marian Cohen. EE G 7:00 Movement in European Paintings. Page Knox. Limited to 30 people, tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. Sunday, September 22 G 11:00 Beyond the Mask: Movement and the African Masquerade. Kristen Windmuller-Luna G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—Paper and Fiber: African Art. The Benenson Gallery Sunday at the Met—Gardens and Architecture of The Cloisters: A 75th-Anniversary Celebration L/F

3:00 Journey back to the Middle Ages at The Cloisters to explore its horticultural and architectural features and learn how the Fuentidueña Apse was transported to New York. With Deirdre Larkin, Leslie Bussis Tait, and Nancy Wu and premiere screening of The Fuentidueña Apse: A Journey from Castile to New York. GRR

Tuesday, September 24 M 10:00–4:15 SUP, SU Members. Preview of Balthus: Cats and Girls G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—Flora and Fauna in Korean Art. Chorong Shim. EE L 11:00 My Met: Curator Keith Christiansen on the recent reinstallation of the European Paintings collection. $30. GRR <30 Wednesday, September 25 G 10:30 European Textiles in Interwoven Globe. Melinda Watt. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. Thursday, September 26 G 11:00 Moving West: 19th-Century American Painting. Karen Plemons M 6:30–9:00 82nd & Fifth. See page 2 for details on this special Members-only event. Friday, September 27 G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—Masterpieces of Tibetan and Nepalese Art. John Guy. EE G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—Lacquerware in Brush Writing in the Arts of Japan. Monika Bincsik. EE

G

7:00 The Observant Eye—Graceful Movement in the Greek and Roman Collection. See box on page 12. CFH

Saturday, September 28 P 10:00–7:00 John Zorn. A Museumwide celebration marking the musician’s 60th birthday. Visit www .metmuseum.org/johnzorn for more information. Free with Museum admission. Sunday, September 29 G 11:00 Cross-Cultural Movement in Mesoamerican Art. Taryn Matusik Sunday at the Met—Brush Writing in the Arts of Japan L

3:00 Learn how Japanese calligraphers use elegant brush writing and decorated papers to enhance the beauty and presentation of poetry. With John Carpenter, Curator of Japanese Art, and demonstrations of calligraphy and paper folding. GRR

Tuesday, October 1 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Balthus: Cats and Girls. Rachel Nelson. EE Wednesday, October 2 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Interwoven Globe. Amy Bogansky. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. C 2:30 The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments (north balcony). Tour of the Musical Instruments Galleries immediately follows concert. L 6:00 Adam Gopnik. Why Europe Committed Suicide. Cultural life in Western Europe a century ago. First in the series 1913: The World Implodes. $30. GRR <30 M 6:00–9:00 SUP Members. Reception and viewing of Balthus: Cats and Girls Thursday, October 3 G 10:30 Indian Textiles in Interwoven Globe. Sylvia Houghteling. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. L 11:00 My Met: Curator Keith Christiansen on the recent reinstallation of the European Paintings collection. $30. GRR <30 SC 2:00–4:00 Short Course—Italian Paintings. Discover masterworks of Italian painting in the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 in this threesession course (sessions two and three are on October 10 and 17) led by Met experts. $150, Museum admission General Information: 212-535-7710 | 13

October Programs

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included. To register, visit www .metmuseum.org/courses-andworkshops. 6:00 Barry Lewis. Grand Central Terminal – A Century of Greatness. An icon of American urbanism and modernist efficiency. $30. GRR <30

Friday, October 4 S 10:30 Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800. A daylong symposium with international scholars explores the impact of the burgeoning textile trade in the early modern period, focusing on specific aspects of how trade textiles influenced global economics, social history, and design aesthetics. Free with Museum admission. GRR G 2:00 Conversation with a Curator— Armor Garniture, Probably of King Henry VIII of England. Pierre Terjanian G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Abstracting Form: African Art. The Benenson Gallery G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—Julia Margaret Cameron. Malcolm Daniel. EE Saturday, October 5 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Artists and Amateurs. Perrin Stein. EE G 1:00–5:00 ¡Fiesta! Celebrating Hispanic and Latin American Cultures. Details at www.metmuseum.org. G 7:00 The Moving Eye: Pattern in Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull Sunday, October 6 G 11:00 Bodies in Motion: Egyptian and Greek Figures. Marissa Schlesinger G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—Stone and Metal: Etruscan Art. Gallery 170, 1st floor mezzanine SW 1:00–5:00 Studio Workshop—Block Printing: Pattern and Print on Fabric. Design and carve printing blocks and produce textile patterns in this threesession workshop (sessions two and three are on October 13 and 20) inspired by the exhibition Interwoven Globe. Nazanin Hedayat Munroe, artist. $195, plus $20 for materials, Museum admission included. To register, visit www.metmuseum.org/ artmaking. Sunday at the Met—Medieval Treasures from Hildesheim L/F

3:00 Explore the transformative nature of the arts of alchemy within medieval metalwork. Screening of Lions, Dragons, and Other Beasts and a conversation

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with conservator Pete Dandridge and silversmith Ubaldo Vitali. GRR Monday, October 7 C 4:30 American guitar maker Paul Reed Smith gives a custom-made electric guitar to the Museum. Demonstration by legendary player John McLaughlin. The Temple of Dendur in The Sackler Wing Tuesday, October 8 G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—Brush Writing in the Arts of Japan. John Carpenter. EE Wednesday, October 9 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—The Nelson A. Rockefeller Vision. Yaëlle Biro. EE L 6:00 Adam Gopnik and Sebastian Smee. Why New Art Mattered. The 1913 Armory Show and Modernism in America. Part of the series 1913: The World Implodes. $30. GRR <30 Thursday, October 10 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Artists and Amateurs. Perrin Stein. EE L 11:00 Patriots, Pashas, and Peasants. Kathryn Calley Galitz, Museum educator, on Drawing Lines: Classicism versus Romanticism. $30. GRR <30 L 6:00 Masterworks from the Met. Jerrilynn D. Dodds explores works from the Met’s collection in a threepart series. This week: Caravaggio (The Denial of St. Peter, 1571–1610). $30. GRR <30 Friday, October 11 G 11:00 Spin, Twist, Splatter: Movement in Modern and Contemporary Art. Marianna Siciliano L 4:00 Friday Focus—Triumphs and Tribulations: The Growth of the Met’s Etruscan Collection. Richard De Puma, University of Iowa. BJSLH G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—Interwoven Globe. Amy Bogansky. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Action! Jackson Pollock’s Process and Painting. See box on page 12. CFH C 7:00 Alarm Will Sound: The Permanent Collection. Music by György Ligeti, Richard Wagner, and Arnold Schoenberg. $35. GRR <30 Saturday, October 12 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Balthus: Cats and Girls. Deborah Goldberg. EE G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Medieval Manuscript Illumination. Medieval Art Galleries

October Programs G

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7:00 Beyond the Mask: Movement and the African Masquerade. Kristen Windmuller-Luna 7:00 Calder Quartet, Bartók Quartet Cycle 1 and 5 and Péter Eötvös Korrespondenz. $40. GRR <30

Sunday, October 13 G 11:00 Movement in Decorative Arts. Deborah Krohn G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Medieval Manuscript Illumination. Medieval Art Galleries Tuesday, October 15 G 11:00 Moving through the Day: Art and the Everyday. Jacqueline Terrassa G 2:30 Gallery Talk and Demonstration— Roentgen Furniture. Gallery 553 Wednesday, October 16 G 11:00 Stillness and Movement in American Landscape Painting. Alice Schwarz L 2:00 Dr. Albert Barnes and the Barnes Collection. Marlene Barasch Strauss considers how Barnes assembled his collection during the Great Depression in the United States. $30. GRR <30 L 6:00 Adam Gopnik and Alain de Botton celebrate the centenary of the first publication of Proust’s In Search of Lost Time. Part of the series 1913: the World Implodes. $30. GRR <30 L 6:00 Interwoven Globe. Curators and scholars discuss the relationship between the textile trade, industry, and world economics. $30. BJSLH <30 Thursday, October 17 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Balthus: Cats and Girls. Rachel Nelson. EE L 11:00 Patriots, Pashas, and Peasants. Kathryn Calley Galitz, Museum educator, on Channel Crossings: British Influences in French Painting, 1820–1840. $30. GRR <30 Friday, October 18 G 2:00 Conversation with a Conservator—Cover for L’Estampe Originale by Toulouse-Lautrec. Lisa Conte G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Space and Atmosphere: European Paintings. Gallery 638 G 6:30–8:00 Friday Evening Gallery Event—The Beer Tour and the Wine Tour. Chart your own path as you experience the New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 on a visual tasting tour along the beer and wine routes. Meets in Gallery 600.

Saturday, October 19 L 10:00–6:00 TEDxMet. x= independently organized TED event. A daylong celebration of signature buildings, singular stories, modern lives, and medieval beliefs, featuring speakers and performers from a range of disciplines. $100. GRR G 11:00 Cross-Cultural Movement in Mesoamerican Art. Taryn Matusik G 2:15 Arts of the Ancient Americas. Debra Cole ASL No voice interpretation G 7:00 Movement in European Paintings. Page Knox. Limited to 30 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. Sunday, October 20 G 11:00 Bodies in Motion: Degas’s Dancers and Bathers. Molly Kysar G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—Stone and Metal: Etruscan Art. Gallery 170, 1st floor mezzanine Sunday at the Met—Artists and Amateurs: Etching in EighteenthCentury France L

3:00 What distinguishes an amateur from a professional printmaker artist? When is a copy not a copy? Discover the answers in the context of 18th-century France with Jonathan Bober, Rena Hoisington, and Perrin Stein. GRR

Tuesday, October 22 G 11:00 Moving West: 19th-Century American Painting. Karen Plemons Wednesday, October 23 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—EighteenthCentury Pastels. Marjorie Shelley. EE M 11:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, Balthus: Cats and Girls L 6:00 Adam Gopnik and Kwame Anthony Appiah. Untangling the moment when America and Europe became aware of Africa as a generative force, and the continuing impact of this awareness. Part of the series 1913: The World Implodes. $30. GRR <30 Thursday, October 24 G 10:30 Metalwork in Medieval Treasures from Hildesheim. Peter Barnet and Pete Dandridge. EE L 11:00 My Met: Curator Keith Christiansen on the recent reinstallation of the European Paintings collection. $30. GRR <30 L 6:00 Masterworks from the Met: Jerrilynn D. Dodds explores Velázquez (The Supper at Emmaus, 1622–23) $30. GRR <30 General Information: 212-535-7710 | 15

October / November Programs Friday, October 25 G 10:30 American Textiles in Interwoven Globe. Amelia Peck. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. G 6:30 Artists on Artworks—Kate Loudoun-Shand. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Movement and Narrative in European Still-Life Painting. See box on page 12. CFH Saturday, October 26 G 10:30 Chinese and Japanese Textiles in Interwoven Globe. Joyce Denney. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. G 7:00 Movement and Meaning: The Art of Dance. Lauren Ebin Sunday, October 27 G 11:00 The Moving Eye: Pattern in Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull M 1:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, Balthus: Cats and Girls Sunday at the Met—Pioneering Globalism: Africa, Oceania, and the Americas and the Rockefeller Legacy L

3:00 Consider how three landmark creations by artists from Africa, Oceania, and the Americas given by Nelson Rockefeller to the Metropolitan revolutionized the canon of art history from the perspective of artists, critics, and curators. GRR

Tuesday, October 29 M 10:00–4:15 SUP, SU Members. Preview of Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom G 11:00 Stillness and Movement in American Landscape Painting. Alice Schwarz Wednesday, October 30 M 10:00–4:15 SUP, SU, FA/DU, IN Members. Preview of Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom G 11:00 Beyond the Mask: Movement and the African Masquerade. Kristen Windmuller-Luna Thursday, October 31 M 10:00–4:15 SUP, SU, FA/DU, IN Members. Preview of Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—Masterpieces of Tibetan and Nepalese Art. Tinley Fynn. EE

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Friday, November 1 M 10:00–8:15 SUP, SU, FA/DU, IN Members. Preview of Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom G 2:00 Conversation with Research Scientists—Two Paintings by Francesco Granacci. Julie Arslanoglu and Silvia Centeno L 4:00 Friday Focus—In and Out of the Light: Bouguereau’s Nymphs and Satyr. Sarah Lees, Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. BJSLH G 6:30 Movement in European Paintings. Page Knox. Limited to 30 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Proportions: Chinese Art. Gallery 208 C 7:00 Calder Quartet, Bartók Quartet Cycle 3 and 4, with newly arranged compositions performed by David Longstreth of Dirty Projectors. $40. GRR <30 Saturday, November 2 M 10:00–8:15 SUP, SU, FA/DU, IN Members. Preview of Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom G 2:00–4:00 Bodies in Motion: Exploring European Sculpture. ASL No voice interpretation. Uris Center for Education G 7:00 Bodies in Motion: Egyptian and Greek Figures. Marissa Schlesinger C 7:00 American Contemporary Music Ensemble (ACME). Arnold Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire (1912) and new work (TBD, 2013). Part of the series 1913: The World Implodes. $40. GRR <30

Sunday, November 3 M 10:00–4:15 SUP, SU, FA/DU, IN Members. Preview of Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom G 11:00 Cross-Cultural Movement in Mesoamerican Art. Taryn Matusik G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—Thread and Cloth: Ottoman Art. Gallery 460, Koç Family Galleries Tuesday, November 5 G 11:00 Native American Art in Motion. Judith Ostrowitz L 6:00 Spark: Fabric Changes Everything. Amelia Peck, Paul van Zyl, and Eileen Fisher unravel a story of empires, espionage, poverty, and a fabric trade that upended social order. First in the new conversation series Spark. $30. GRR <30

November Programs Wednesday, November 6 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom. Soyoung Lee and Denise Patry Leidy. EE C 2:30 The André Mertens Galleries for Musical Instruments. Tour of the Musical Instruments Galleries immediately follows concert. M 6:00–9:00 SUP Members. Reception and viewing of Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom Thursday, November 7 G 11:00 Voyaging in Oceania: Moving through This World and Beyond. Eric Kjellgren L 6:00 Masterworks from the Met: Jerrilynn D. Dodds explores Rubens (Venus and Adonis, mid- or late-1630s) $30. GRR <30 Friday, November 8 G 11:00 Moving West: 19th-Century American Painting. Karen Plemons L 4:00 Friday Focus—Syria: The Forgotten Heir of History. Nasser Rabbat, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The lecture will be dedicated to the memory of Professor Maan Madina. BJSLH G 6:00–8:30 Artist Demonstrations— From Fiber to Fabric: Weaving, Dyeing, and Embroidery. Watch weavers create in the galleries, dip into plant-based dyes, and try your hand at simple stitching. All ages welcome. G 6:30 A Textile Designer’s Perspective in Interwoven Globe. Kevin O’Brien. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Stillness: Depictions of Nature in Japanese Art. See box on page 12. CFH Saturday, November 9 G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—Brush Writing in the Arts of Japan. John Carpenter. EE G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Old Master Oil Painting. New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800 C 7:00 Duo Amal. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 (1813) and Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring (1913) arranged for two pianos and four hands. $40. GRR <30 Sunday, November 10 G 11:00 Movement and Meaning: The Art of Dance. Lauren Ebin G 1:00 How Did They Do That? Old Master Oil Painting. New European Paintings Galleries, 1250–1800

SW

1:00–5:00 Studio Workshop—Painting: Figure and Ground Explorations. Discover multiple ways to paint the figure in this three-session course inspired by the modern artist Balthus (sessions two and three are on November 17 and 24). Jaqueline Cedar, artist. $195, plus $20 for materials, Museum admission included. To register, visit www.metmuseum.org/artmaking.

Tuesday, November 12 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Artists and Amateurs. Perrin Stein. EE L 6:00 Spark: Painting and Provocation. Curator Sabine Rewald with Simone Dinnerstein and psychologist Deborah Tolman talk about the book Dilemmas of Desire in which teenage girls speak candidly, with particular reference to the Balthus painting Thérèse Dreaming. $30. GRR <30 Wednesday, November 13 G 10:30 American Textiles in Interwoven Globe. Amelia Peck. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. L 6:00 Spark: Out of Darkness. Andrea Bayer and Michael Gallagher discuss their findings after a technical examination of Jacopo Bassano’s The Baptism of Christ. $30. GRR <30 Thursday, November 14 G 11:00 Gallery Conversation with guest expert Friday, November 15 G 11:00 Northern Renaissance Paintings. Maryan Ainsworth. Limited to 30 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. G 2:00 Conversation with a Curator— Mahakala, Protector of the Tent from Tibet. Kurt Behrendt L 4:00 Friday Focus—The Moody and Willful Adolescent Models of Balthus. Sabine Rewald, MMA. BJSLH G 6:30 Drop-in Drawing—Pattern and Repetition: Islamic Art. Koç Family Galleries G 6:30 Exhibition Tour—Everyday Epiphanies. Marian Cohen. EE Saturday, November 16 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Interwoven Globe. Amy Bogansky. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. G 7:00 Bodies in Motion: Degas’s Dancers and Bathers. Molly Kysar General Information: 212-535-7710 | 17

November Programs L

7:00 Alarm Will Sound: All Steve Reich Concert. Clapping Music; Piano Counterpoint; City Life; Four Genesis Settings; New York Counterpoint; Radio Rewrite (New York Premiere). $50. GRR <30

Sunday, November 17 G 11:00 Exhibition Tour—Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom. Elizabeth Hammer. EE G 1:00–4:00 Sunday Studio—Thread and Cloth: Ottoman Art. Gallery 460, Koç Family Galleries Sunday at the Met—Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom L

2:00 What is gold and how has it inspired innovation and creativity across cultures? Discover what gold objects can reveal about the Korean kingdom of Silla through presentations and a live demonstration of sophisticated gold-working techniques. GRR

Tuesday, November 19 M 10:00–4:15 SUP, SU Members. Preview of Jewels by JAR G 10:30 European Textiles in Interwoven Globe. Melinda Watt. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. G 2:30 Gallery Talk and Demonstration— Roentgen Furniture. Gallery 553 Wednesday, November 20 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Medieval Treasures from Hildesheim. Peter Barnet. EE L 11:00 Patriots, Pashas, and Peasants. Kathryn Calley Galitz, Museum educator, on Lure of the Exotic. $30. GRR <30 C 6:00 Concerto Köln: Bach and the Italians. $60. GRR <30 M 6:00–9:00 PR, PC, PA, SO Members. Reception for Jewels by JAR Thursday, November 21 G 11:00 Rembrandt’s Paintings. Walter Liedtke. Limited to 30 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. M 11:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom

Friday, November 22 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Julia Margaret Cameron. Malcolm Daniel. EE L 4:00 Friday Focus—Pilgrimages, Peaks, and Plumage in the Andes. Colin McEwan, Dumbarton Oaks. BJSLH G 6:30 Artists on Artworks—David Brooks. Limited to 45 people; tickets are distributed 30 minutes prior at Vélez Blanco Patio. C 7:00 Calder Quartet and Iva Bittová, Bartók Quartet Cycle 2 and 6, Janacek, and improvisations. $40. GRR <30 G 7:00 The Observant Eye—Caught in the Moment: Narrative in the New European Paintings Galleries. See box on page 12. CFH Saturday, November 23 G 11:00 The Moving Eye: Pattern in Islamic Art. Richard Turnbull G 7:00 Exhibition Tour—Balthus: Cats and Girls. Deborah Goldberg. EE C 7:00 The Declassified: Line and Expression. Momentum and interplay through the use of musical line. Music by Rameau, Adès, Golijov, Muhly, Pärt, and Couperin. $30. GRR <30 Sunday, November 24 G 11:00 Gallery Performance and Conversation—Dutch Music and Art. Hear Daphna Mor and Grant Herreid play 17th-century Dutch music on recorder and lute, followed by a talk about related paintings with Rebecca Arkenberg. Limited to 70 people. Gallery 637 G 1:00 Gallery Performance and Conversation—Dutch Music and Art. See 11:00. M 1:00 SUP, SU, FA/DU Members lecture, Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom Tuesday, November 26 G 10:30 Exhibition Tour—Jewels by JAR. Caroline Hannah. Limited to 25 people; tickets are distributed 15 minutes prior at EE. Wednesday, November 27 G 11:00 Spin, Twist, Splatter: Movement in Modern and Contemporary Art. Marianna Siciliano Saturday, November 30 G 11:00 Graduate intern talk G 7:00 Graduate intern talk

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Guided Tours Free guided tours of the Museum’s collections are offered daily by Museum-trained volunteers Tuesday, September 10, through Saturday, June 7. Inquire at the information desks for points of departure.

Weekday Guided Tours: Tours run Monday through Friday except where noted. 10:30 Museum Highlights 10:45 Masterpieces of the Middle Ages (except Monday) 11:00 Great Paintings (except Tuesday) 11:15 Hindu/Buddhist Vision in Indian/Southeast Asian Art (except Wednesday) 11:30 Museum Highlights 11:45 Great Sculpture (Monday and Wednesday only) 12:00 American Paintings and Sculpture (except Friday) 12:00 Arts of China (except Monday) 12:15 The Cradle of Civilization: Art of the Ancient Near East (except Tuesday) 12:15 Musical Instruments: East and West (except Monday and Wednesday) 12:30 Old Master Paintings (except Thursday) 12:30 Arts of Ancient Greece and Rome (except Wednesday) 12:45 Impressionism and PostImpressionism (except Friday) 1:00 Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (except Monday) 1:00 Fashion in Art 1:15 Great Rooms: European Decorative Arts (except Wednesday) 1:15 Arts of Japan (except Thursday) 1:30 Museum Highlights 1:45 Robert Lehman Collection: Renaissance to Impressionism 1:45 American Rooms, American Stories: 1680–1914 (except Monday and Friday) 2:00 Arts of Ancient Egypt 2:15 Arts of the Islamic World 2:30 Museum Highlights 2:45 Modern Art (except Friday) 3:15 Museum Highlights (except Wednesday and Thursday) 6:30 Museum Highlights (Friday only)

Weekend Tours Saturday and Sunday tours are chosen from the following topics: Museum Highlights (also offered in Japanese); American Art; Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas; Arts of Ancient Egypt; Arts of Ancient Greece and Rome; Arts of the Islamic World; Asian Art; Impressionism and PostImpressionism; and Old Master Paintings. Check the information desks for times. For the full schedule, visit the Museum’s website.

International Guided Tours Chinese/Mandarin Museum Highlights, Monday, Thursday, Friday, 1:30 French Museum Highlights, daily, 11:00. Modern Art, Tuesday, 1:30. Islamic Art, Monday, 1:30 German Museum Highlights, Tuesday, Wednesday, 11:15 Italian Museum Highlights, Monday, Thursday, 12:00 Japanese Museum Highlights, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 11:15. Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, Wednesday, 2:00 Korean Museum Highlights, Monday, Tuesday, Friday, 11:00 Portuguese Museum Highlights, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 12:00 Russian Museum Highlights, Thursday, Friday, 2:30. Arts of Ancient Greece and Rome, Thursday, 1:00 Spanish Museum Highlights, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 11:30 All tours are subject to change.

Hunters in a Landscape (detail), ca. 1575–95, by Anonymous, wool, silk. Purchase, Walter and Leonore Annenberg Acquisitions Endowment Fund, Rosetta Larsen Trust Gift, and Friends of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts Gifts, 2009 (2009.280) General Information: 212-535-7710 | 19

The Cloisters Museum and Gardens The Cloisters museum and gardens is the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to the art and architecture of medieval Europe. For information, call 212-923-3700. Hours: Open 7 days a week. March– October: 10:00–5:15. November–December: 10:00–4:45. Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25, and January 1. Highlights Tours of the Collection for individual visitors: Monday–Friday and Sunday at 3:00. Garden Tours: Daily at 1:00 (May–October). Admission: Free to Museum Members. Recommended contribution same as the main building, includes admission to both on the same day. Groups of 10 or more require advance reservations: call 212-650-2280. Directions: Subway: A to 190th Street, then walk through Fort Tryon Park; or, transfer to M4 bus for one stop. Bus: M4 (Madison Avenue) to last stop (Fort Tryon Park–The Cloisters). Car: Henry Hudson Parkway north to exit “Fort Tryon Park–The Cloisters.” Accessibility: Limited access for mobility impaired visitors. Call 212-923-3700. Gallery Talks are presented at noon and 2:00 and are free to individual visitors with Museum admission. No reservations necessary. For information, call 212-650-2280. September 1 Water in Medieval Life and Culture. Jeanne-Marie Musto 7 Exquisite Monuments: Microarchitecture in the Middle Ages. Scott Miller 14 The Art of Being Queen. Michelle Hearne Arthur 21 Glittering Gold and Sparkling Silver. Sigrid Goldiner 28 Medieval Devotion and Visual Imagination. Anne Rice

October 5 Portraying Presence: Representing the Self and the Divine in Medieval Art. Katherine Boivin 6 The Narrow Path: Avoiding Hell in the Middle Ages. Carol Schuler 12 Medieval Painting from Wall to Book to Panel. Joseph Ackley 19 Monks, Mendicants, and the Art of Reform. Holly Flora 26 Varieties of Medieval Religious Experience. Lauren Mancia

Sexuality in the Middle Ages. Jessamyn Conrad 9 Magic and Miracles in the Middles Ages. Elizabeth Monti 16 In the Presence of the Holy: Relics and Reliquaries. Jennifer Kalter 23 Cloistered Threads: Sisters Making Textile Art. Desiree Koslin 30 A Medieval Feast. Elizabeth Williams Conversation with a Curator or Conservator

20-minute informal conversations presented at 2:00. September 6 Lucretia Kargère October 4 Beth Edelstein November 1 Helen Evans Gallery Workshops for Families Hour-long programs for children ages 4–12 and their families; free with Museum admission. Meet in the Main Hall at 1:00. September

Making Faces. Eileen Dirks Birds! Sean Rubin 21 The Medieval Garden. Jennifer Kalter 1 7

October

Heroes and Heroines. Nathalie Rochel 6 Medieval Voyagers. Katherine Werwie 19 Medieval Knights. Dustin Aaron 5

November

Shields and Symbols. Gwen David Mythical Beasts of the Middle Ages. Sarah Harshman 16 The Medieval Imagination. Lauren Mancia 2 3

La Experiencia Medieval: Talleres bilingües y educativos para la familia en Español/Bilingual Gallery Workshops for Families

Los niños (entre los 4 y 12 años de edad) y sus familias están invitados a participar en el taller educativo en español. El taller es de una hora de duración y es gratis con la admisión al museo. Nos reuniremos a la 1:00 p.m. en la sala de recepción. 28 de septiembre Historias Medievales/ Medieval Stories. Begonia Santa-Cecilia 26 de octubre El castillo medieval/The Medieval Castle. Christina DeLeón 30 de noviembre Artistas de la Edad Media/Artists of the Middle Ages. Begonia Santa-Ceciliar

November 2 Doors and Windows in Medieval Art. Jenny Shaffer. 3 Medieval Romance: Love, Marriage, and 20 | www.metmuseum.org

The Trie Café, located in the covered walkway surrounding the Trie Cloister, is open from April to October.

Programs for Families, Teens, Teachers, and Visitors with Disabilities These drop-in programs are free with Museum admission unless otherwise noted. Children must be accompanied by an adult. For further information or to confirm details, call 212-650-2217 or go to www.metmuseum .org/events/programs/family-programs. All programs meet in Carson Family Hall, Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education, unless otherwise noted. For Families with Children Ages 18 Months–3 Years Toddler Storytime in Nolen Library. Monday–Friday, 10:30–11:00 (no programs on September 2, October 14, November 5, 11, 28, 29). Look, listen, and have fun with picture books. Museum admission is not required. Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Nolen Library, Uris Center for Education For Families with Children Ages 3–7 Start with Art at the Met. Thursday afternoons, Saturdays, and Sundays, 1 hour. Sketch, explore, listen to stories, and discover the meaning of art.

Start with Art at the Met Plus. Monthly, Sunday afternoons, 90 minutes. Start with Art at the Met gallery experiences plus artmaking activities. Storytime in Nolen Library. Sunday, 2:00– 2:30 (no programs September 1, October 13, November 10); Monday–Friday, 3:00– 3:30 (no programs on September 2, October 14, November 5, 11, 27–29). Hear stories in the library and then explore the galleries on a self-guided treasure hunt. Museum admission is not required for the library portion of this program. Space is limited; first-come, first-served. Nolen Library, Uris Center for Education For Families with Children Ages 5–12 Art Trek. Thursday afternoons, Saturdays, and Sundays, 1 hour. Be an art explorer! Take a new voyage around the globe every time you visit the Met.

Art Trek Plus. Monthly, Sunday afternoons, 90 minutes. Art Trek gallery experiences, performances, and more. Charles H. Tally Holiday Monday Family Programs. Monday, September 2, October 14, November 11, multiple 1-hour sessions. Take a day to play at the Met and enjoy fun discussion and sketching! For Teens Ages 11–18 Explore, create, and connect with art across cultures and time periods. Join Museum educators and artists, along with other teens in free classes devoted to understanding art through gallery conversations, sketching, and studio workshops. For event

dates, class descriptions, and to register, go to www.metmuseum.org/learn/for-teens. For Visitors of All Ages See pages 11–18 for topics and locations.

Sunday Studio. Sunday, September 8 and 22; October 6 and 20; November 3 and 17. Try your hand at creating works of art in the galleries. Each session focuses on a different art form with family-friendly activities led by an artist. Drop in; art supplies provided. Ongoing instruction, 1:00–4:00. How Did They Do That? Saturday and Sunday, September 14 and 15; October 12 and 13; November 9 and 10. Learn hands-on how works of art were created. 30-minute sessions, 1:00–4:00. Meet in the galleries. Drop-in Drawing. Friday, September 6 and 20, October 4 and 18, November 1 and 15. Join talented art instructors in the galleries for fun, informal sketching! Come and go as you like between 6:30 and 8:30. ¡Fiesta! Celebrating Hispanic and Latin American Cultures. Saturday, October 5, 1:00–5:00. Museum-wide festival. Visit www.metmuseum.org for details. Artist Demonstrations. November 8, 6:00– 8:30. Experience art making up close as you watch artists create in the galleries. Drop in. For Teachers The Museum offers a wide variety of programs. Call 212-570-3985 or visit www.metmuseum.org/events/programs/ k12-educator-programs.

For information about the Children’s Reading Room and the Teacher Resource Center, call 212-570-3788 or visit www.metmuseum.org/learn/for-educators.

For Visitors with Disabilities The Met offers a range of programs, including touch and descriptive tours for visitors with visual impairments and Met Escapes for those living with dementia. Registration required. Call 212-650-2010, e-mail access@metmuseum.org, or visit www .metmuseum.org/events/visitorsdisabilities.

Discoveries. For visitors with developmental disabilities. Selected Sundays, 90 minutes. Picture This! For visitors who are blind or partially sighted. Adult workshops on selected Thursdays; family workshops on selected Saturdays and Sundays, 90 minutes. Gallery Workshops for Families at The Cloisters Museum and Gardens, p. 20.

General Information: 212-535-7710 | 21

Ways to Give

Members and friends of The Metropolitan Museum of Art help sustain this institution in countless crucial ways: by visiting our permanent collections, our special exhibitions, our concerts, and our lectures; by adding energy and vitality to our programs; and above all, by providing vital financial support that makes it possible for the Met to continue collecting, preserving, interpreting, publishing, and displaying great works of art. To learn more about how you can help, or to make a gift, please call 212-570-3956 or visit metmuseum.org/Ways_to_Give/donate.

Planned Giving

Museum, contact the Planned Giving Program at 212-570-3796 or by e-mail at planned.giving@metmuseum.org. You can also visit the Museum’s website, www.metmuseum.org, in the Planned Giving section under “Ways to Give.”

IRA Rollover Provision Extended Through 2013 Charles Goodman moved to New York City many years ago. He worked as a journalist and became a Member of the Museum, and Note: This example is for illustration purposes found himself spending more time at the only. Charles Goodman is based on a composite Met after his retirement. When Charlie of donors to the Museum. turned 70, he called his Calling All Budding accountant because he knew and Future Art he would soon be required to Connoisseurs—Join the make annual withdrawals Met Family Circle! from his Individual RetireThe Met Family Circle, a ment Account (IRA) and membership group for famiwasn’t sure about his options. lies with children up to age Charlie was pleasantly sur12, offers the opportunity to prised to learn of a way to learn more about the Metsupport the Museum that ropolitan’s treasures and could have a positive impact The Writing Master, 1882, by Thomas provides a valuable introducon his own tax situation. Eakins, oil on canvas. John Stewart tion to the Museum’s vast Charlie’s accountant told Kennedy Fund, 1917 (17.173) collections. Personal family him Congress had reinstated tours, workshops, and art activities are the IRA charitable rollover provision designed to create memorable experiences through 2013. Charlie did not need the for all. Parents receive special privileges income from his IRA this year, so his as well, including invitations to exhibition accountant felt this would be an ideal way previews and access to the Patrons Lounge, to make a gift. The provision allows individMembers Dining Room, and The Balcony uals to make tax-free charitable contribuLounge. Annual membership dues are tions of up to $100,000 per taxable year $4,000. directly from an IRA that may be excluded For more information, contact Kristin from the individual’s gross income, provided MacDonald in the Development Office at that the owner of the IRA is at least 70 ½ 212-650-2372 or e-mail family.circle@ when the distribution is made; the gift is metmuseum.org. from a traditional or Roth IRA; distributions are made by December 31, 2013; the Education at the Met donor directs the IRA manager to transfer With more than 20,000 programs each funds directly to a public charity such as the year, Education at the Met encourages Museum; and the charity does not provide visitors of all ages to experience art from any goods or services in return for the gift around the world and across the centuries. (the gift cannot be used for Memberships, Programs range from hands-on art activities Friends Groups, etc.). for families with children and photography Charlie directly transferred his distribuclasses for visitors with visual impairments tion to the Metropolitan and was able to to workshops for K–12 teachers, internavoid tax on the amount. He was pleased ships for high school students, and many to make a significant gift to the Museum others. For more information on how you and looks forward to visiting the Met often can support these innovative and engaging in the coming months. programs, contact the Development Office For more information about how to at 212-650-2104. support the future of the Metropolitan 22 | www.metmuseum.org

Plan Your Visit Hours Open 7 days a week. Sunday–

Concerts and Lectures To order tickets,

Thursday, 10:00–5:30; Friday, Saturday, 10:00–9:00. Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25, January 1, and the first Monday in May. Recorded information, 212-535-7710. Members Admission Skip lines! Admission stickers are available at the membership desks in the Great Hall and Burke Hall. Non-Member Admission Recommended: adults, $25; seniors (65 and older), $17; students, $12. Purchase express admission in advance at www.metmuseum.org/visit.

visit www.metmuseum.org/tickets, call 212570-3949, fax 212-650-2253, or stop by the box office in the Great Hall. Community Programs Tours are offered by request for adult community groups within New York City. For more information, call 212-396-5170. Group Visits Call 212-570-3711 or visit www.metmuseum.org for information. Libraries For libraries and study room information, call 212-535-7710. The Thomas J. Watson Library is open to college-level researchers; 212-650-2225. Nolen Library, Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education, welcomes readers of all ages and has a special Children’s Reading Room; 212-570-3788.

Accessibility

> Street-level entrances are at Fifth Ave. and 81st St. and the Museum parking garage. Taxicabs and other vehicles may drop off passengers with disabilities on the south plaza on Fifth Ave. > Wheelchairs are available at coat-check areas. Pick up an access brochure and map at the information desks. > Induction loops may be found at select information and admission desks. Please use T-switch. > FM assistive listening devices are available for tours and programs. > Sign language interpreters may be requested. > For more information for visitors with disabilities, e-mail access@metmuseum.org or call 212-650-2010. Garage 80th St. and Fifth Ave. Validate parking tickets at the Uris Center Membership Desk for a reduced fee. Designated parking spaces are available for visitors with disabilities. Visitors with vehicles over 6'6" should call 212-650-9165.

Helpful Hints

> Food and drink, other than water in plastic bottles, cannot be brought into the Museum. > Flash photography and video cameras cannot be used inside the Museum. > Sketching in the galleries is permitted with pencil only; pens, markers, and pointers are prohibited. > Strollers are allowed in all galleries, unless otherwise noted. > Lost and Found: 212-570-3981. Save Time by Traveling Light

Backpacks and packages must be checked. Avoid waiting in lines by leaving backpacks and packages at home. Coats and small umbrellas may be carried into the galleries. Large umbrellas must be checked. Luggage, carry-on bags, and oversize backpacks are not allowed in the Museum and cannot be checked.

Travel with the Met Mexico City and the Zona Maco Art Fair

February 1–10, 2014 Attend Latin America’s most important contemporary art show. Tour the studios of Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. See murals by Rivera, Siqueiros, and Orozco. Discover Mexico’s heritage at the pyramids of Teotihuacan, Templo Mayor, and the Xochimilco Floating Gardens. Conclude in Oaxaca to visit the Contemporary Art Museum and prominent local art galleries. Land rate: $7,995

Rajasthan in Depth February 9–27, 2014 Explore fortresses and temples in Udaipur, Chittorgarh, Mount Abu, and Ranakpur. Marvel at the Mehrangarh Fort in Jodhpur, and in Jaipur, see Amber Fort and Jantar Mantar Observatory. Discover Fatehpur Sikri, a deserted 16th-century city, and continue on to the Taj Mahal. Conclude in Delhi to visit Humayun’s Tomb and the Red Fort. Land rate: $14,895.

For more information, visit www.metmuseum.org/travel, call 212-650-2110, or e-mail travelwiththemet@metmuseum.org. Volume 46, Number 2, Fall 2013. © 2013 by The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Members Calendar is published quarterly by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10028-0198. Address correspondence concerning this publication to The Members Calendar, Communications Department. E-mail: communications@metmuseum.org. Send change of address information to membership@metmuseum.org. General Information: 212-535-7710 | 23

Previews and Receptions Interwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500–1800

Holiday Shopping Evening

Double Discount Days

Lectures Balthus: Cats and Girls—Paintings and Provocations Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom

Balthus: Cats and Girls—Paintings and Provocations 82nd & Fifth Silla: Korea’s Golden Kingdom Jewels by JAR

Members Calendar Fall 2013

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Members Calendar: Fall 2013