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ALMANAC

September 14 – 20 Mazama Winthrop Twisp River

High 76 81 79

Low 43 41 41

Precip. .44” .27” .50”

Full moon A fine mix of clouds, showers and sun September 22 this week as we cross the autumnal equinox into the next season of the year.

Walk-up art

Fair winners

Twisp turns into a pedestrian-only art gallery Saturday

Local crafters, bakers, artists and 4-H kids score ribbons galore

ARTS & CULTURE Page A5

FAIR Page B2

Methow Valley News

PUBLISHED WEEKLY SINCE 1903

TWISP, WASHINGTON

Twisp council to ponder mayor issue By Ann McCreary Twisp Mayor Bill Boosman said he will include a discussion of restructuring town government on the Twisp Town Council meeting agenda for Tuesday (Sept. 28). Boosman announced earlier this month that because of the heavy workload he has encountered during his nine months as mayor, he would resign unless the town council approved a significant increase in the amount he is paid as mayor, which is currently a $400 monthly stipend. The council called a special meeting on Sept. 10 to discuss the compensation issue, but took no action. Council members and Boosman said they wanted to hear public input on the issue before taking any action. This week Boosman said that “focusing on my compensation is getting the cart before

the horse. What we should be talking about is whether we are going to restructure and what form that would be.” The council has been researching the idea of restructuring the town government by hiring a part-time administrator, an approach taken by many municipalities. Boosman suggested at the Sept. 10 meeting that the council consider paying him $25,480 per year, an amount that has been proposed as a possible salary for a part-time administrator position. Even if the council were to approve hiring a parttime town administrator, who would take over many of the administrative duties now performed by the mayor, Boosman said that he would still resign. He said that process of hiring and transitioning an administrator into the new job See TWISP on Page A2

Twisp hires new public works head available here. “I felt like I could probably Twisp’s new Public Works help the town out,” Moss said Superintendent comes to his on Monday (Sept. 20), his first day on the job. job with more than Moss described 30 years of public Milton-Freewater as works experience in “very proactive.” As a considerably larger public works supercommunity. intendent his duties Howard Moss included supervising worked for 32 years a staff of 22 yearfor the town of Milround employees, ton-Freewater in Orsewage treatment egon, not far from facilities, a landfill, an Walla Walla. For 20 of Howard Moss 18-hole golf course, those years he served as superintendent of public an aquatics center and a motor works for Milton-Freewater, pool that serviced town vehicles which has a population of and school buses. Moss has held certificaabout 7,500. He retired in 2008 and tions for operating wastewater bought and sold real estate, but treatment plants in Oregon when he heard that Twisp was that exceed the requirements looking for a new public works needed for Twisp’s facility, and superintendent, he was lured expects no problems obtainout of retirement. Moss said ing the required Washington he was drawn to the Methow certifications. Lack of required Valley because he has friends certifications has posed probwho live in the area and he lems for Twisp’s Public Works enjoys the outdoor recreation See MOSS on Page A2

VOL. 108 NO. 19

75¢

SEPTEMBER 22, 2010

Bears making themselves at home in Mazama the bears released closer to where they were trapped, Bears. marked by ear tags, “They’re evwere discovered to erywhere,” said have returned to state Department the neighborhood of Fish and Wildlife shortly afterward. officer Cal Treser. “I Bear hunting don’t think you can season, which is go to Edelweiss or open until Nov. 15, Mazama and talk cannot really affect to anyone without the nuisance bears, a bear story this which are hanging year.” out in neighborTreser said he hoods where hunthas been dealing ing is not allowed. with bear issues Treser said ressince May, mostly in idents of the upper the West Chewuch, valley are reportRendezvous and ing that bears are Mazama areas. He breaking into sheds has trapped and and garages to get relocated at least a Photo courtesy of Laura Brumfield to garbage cans. dozen black bears since then, and has This black bear has been seen several times marauding about in the Edel- They are hanging around homes and had to kill three weiss community. weiss, Larry Halford said a bear has lying down on people’s lawns. Bears that became threats to public safety. In the past month, bears have broken learned to open his car door, and con- have confronted numerous residents. “The bears have become habituated into at least six cars in the Edelweiss/ tinually tries to get in even when it is to humans,” said Treser. “They’re no Mazama area, eating food and in one locked. A black bear was trapped at the Hal- longer afraid of humans or the smell of case, tearing through the back seat to access the trunk, where it found more ford residence this week, and Treser said humans. They’re no longer afraid of dogs. he carted it over Rainy Pass to a spot near Nothing seems to scare them anymore” food. In a note to his neighbors in Edel- Granite Creek and released it. Some of See BEARS on Page A2 By John Hanron

By Ann McCreary

County to use public land base to satisfy state call for agriculture, resource lands By Marcy Stamper Okanogan County has the third-highest acreage in the state for apples and pears and the fifth for cherries. It also comes in fifth for number of cattle, according to the 2007 Census of Agriculture. Agriculture employs more people than any other industry in the county, at 16 percent of the population, according to the Washington State Employment Security Department. How much land is necessary to sustain this industry – the fruits and vegetables, the

cattle, the packing sheds and feed stores? What inputs does a farmer or rancher need to be successful – good soil and irrigation, summer range and winter pasture? Okanogan County planners and commissioners have been trying to answer these questions, with help from farm organizations and citizens, for almost a year, as they update the comprehensive plan. Since Okanogan County does not plan under the state’s Growth Management Act, county officials have considerable latitude in formulating those answers. But one of the state’s requirements is the designation

Winthrop bridge back at square one By Carol Stull

Primitive skills teacher banished

By John Hanron

A primitive skills instructor who pleaded guilty to operating a winter skills course without a Forest Service permit has been banished from Eastern Washington national forests for a year. Lynx Vilden, owner of Four Seasons Prehistoric Projects, which has been operating mostly on private land up the Twisp River for four years, agreed to a plea bargain in July along with former partner Rico Meleski. The two pleaded guilty to one count of operating a guided winter course on the forest without a permit and another misdemeanor count of cutting or damaging trees without a permit. Meleski was given the same sentence at a hearing in August. The charges stemmed from a three-year investigation

into the school, which offers training in primitive skills such as hide tanning, flint knapping, basket making and wool felting. An undercover government agent registered for a five-day winter course put on by Vilden and Meleski in 2008 and documented the group’s activities on national forest land. Both Vilden and Meleski were banned from Eastern Washington national forests for one year, have a one-year unsupervised probation, must give 30 hours of community service and together had to repay the government the $550 class fee paid by the undercover agent. “I accept my sentence,” said Vilden this week. “I gladly embrace the new opportunities provided by universal law, knowing that nothing can crush a free spirit.”

of resource lands for agriculture, forestry and minerals to preserve the economic viability of those industries. Agriculture is so important in the county that the commissioners recently updated the right-to-farm ordinance, which requires that anyone subdividing land adjacent to a farm “be prepared to accept such inconveniences or discomfort as a normal and necessary aspect of living in a County with a strong rural character and a healthy agricultural sector.” Nevertheless, there is concern that See RESOURCE LAND on Page A3

Photo by Marcy Stamper

Zuke rockets Ilo Curtis, left, and Jasper Bard were among the dozen participants who tested their aerodynamic and aesthetic design sense, pitting mobile zucchinis against one another at the annual derby at the Farmers Market Saturday. Gary Kominak (in gray) lifted the official box to start the race. Bard’s marigold-studded squash-mobile was one of two winners of the creativity contest.

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It looks like Winthrop could be starting over on the construction phase of its Spring Creek Bridge project. And town officials feel fairly confident that state funding will be extended through the end of 2011. With plenty of criticism and caution last Wednesday, Sept 15, the town council somewhat reluctantly gave Mayor Dave Acheson permission to prepare for finding another builder – if necessary – to design and construct a pedestrian bridge over the Methow. To date, employees of the former Sahale, LLC – now bankrupt following the sudden death of principal owner Carroll Vogel – have been financially unsuccessful in attempts to reform and meet contract terms for completing Winthrop’s suspension bridge. In fact, Acheson reported that Sahale and its restart Seattle Bridge Builders currently are, and have been for some time, in breach of contract. The reason: failure to supply the town with a performance bond. After a Labor Day weekend

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update consult with Winthrop’s project manager John Battle of OAC, a Seattle consulting firm, the mayor advised council that the town intends to deliver Sahale official notice of violation unless the problem is cured by Sept. 23. Saying it seems “unrealistic” that this will happen, Acheson anticipates the town will be able to terminate the contract and begin advertising for new project proposals. According to the mayor, since Sahale had completed just 60 percent of the bridge design, new requests for proposals would be sought for all phases of the project. Town planner Rocklynn Culp explained this week that Winthrop could use original design concepts but a new contractor would need to prepare more detailed drawings. Beginning the board’s list of worries, councilman Rick Northcott said he is “disappointed we gave this (contract) to a company not strong enough to withstand” financial problems. He also wondered why project manager Battle had not foreseen such potential difficulty. Councilwoman Mort See WINTHROP on Page A2

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Wednesday, September 22, 2010

TWISP

In brief Burn ban lifted in county Cool, wet weather has prompted the Okanogan County Commission to lift its countywide burn ban affective immediately. Okanogan County Fire District 6 chief Don Waller said the county took action after the state Department of Natural Resources announced Tuesday (Sept. 21) that it was lifting its statewide burn ban because heavy rains and low temperatures have decreased fire danger. The National Weather Service is forecasting abovenormal precipitation and below-normal temperatures for the remainder of the month. Twisp fire chief Keith Comstock said he would lift the burn ban in town as the county has, but reminded people that conditions could change after a few days of dry, warm weather. The burn ban in the town of Winthrop is dictated by ordinance and will remain in place until Oct. 15, Waller said. In addition, the Industrial Forest Precaution Level for woods workers has dropped to a Level 1 valleywide.

Rain quenches fall burns Wet weather doused plans for more prescribed burning this week in forests around the Methow Valley, after one area near Mazama was ignited last week. Forest Service officials are watching the weather forecast to determine whether forest conditions will dry out enough to allow other planned prescribed burns, said Meg Trebon, who manages the prescribed burning program for the Methow Valley Ranger District. “We’re in a wait-and-see mode. I’m not ready to call the season yet,” Trebon said. The Forest Service has plans to complete additional burns in the Twisp River, Leecher Mountain, and McFarland Creek areas this fall. A128-acre area southeast of Mazama between Fawn Creek and Rendezvous Pass was ignited Wednesday, Sept. 15. Even if things remain too damp for more prescribed burning, the Forest Service plans to burn piles of woody debris in the Eightmile drainage, around Edelweiss, Goat Creek, Lucky Jim Bluff, near the Loup Loup Summit and Benson Creek in coming weeks, Trebon said. Burning piles requires damper conditions to make sure fires stay contained. For more information about the prescribed fire program on the Methow Valley Ranger District, call 996-4040.

Public lands are free Saturday Saturday (Sept. 25) is National Public Lands Day, when federal agencies waive day-use and parking fees at most trailheads, picnic areas and other sites where day-use fees are charged. The day is an attempt to encourage more people to visit national forests and grasslands, according to a press release sent out from the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Fees will not be waived at campgrounds.

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Methow Valley News From Page A1

would take too long. Boosman is currently not employed and is focusing on completing his general education degree through an online college program. He said his financial situation allows him about three more months to complete his education before he will need to find a job. If he were paid more than a stipend as mayor, he said, he could extend the time he has to complete his degree. “I have limited opportunity to finish up my school work and can’t wait for things to slowly shake out,” Boosman said Tuesday (Sept. 21). “I’m in the unfortunate position where doing what I see needs to be done for the town, I can’t support my family. Conversely, if I support my family the way I need to I can’t do the work the town needs to have done.” The loss of three department heads in recent months has increased the workload for the mayor, who oversees personnel issues for the town.

Two of those positions are now filled – Howard Moss began work this week as the new superintendent of public works, and Ty Sheehan is serving as acting police chief. The town is reviewing applications for a clerk/treasurer to replace Colleen Storms, who is working half-time for Twisp before she moves to another job in November. The town plans to hire a part-time accountant/ grants administrator as well. Twisp is also seeking a resident to fill a council position that is vacant following the resignation of Tom Mulgrew, and is asking residents to serve on the Planning Commission and the Parks and Recreation Commission. If Boosman resigns Sept. 30 as he said he would if he did not get a raise, the mayor’s position would be filled by a council member, creating another vacancy on the council. The council will meet Tuesday (Sept. 28) at 7 p.m. in Twisp Town Hall.

MOSS

From Page A1

Department in recent years and contributed to the resignation of the town’s previous public works superintendent. He said he is familiarizing himself with some of the challenges facing Twisp, including water rights issues and budget challenges.

Moss said he looks forward to having more “hands-on” opportunities in his work for Twisp than he did in his previous job. “I think some housekeeping is in order on some of the facilities,” Moss added. “I like to be an organized person.”

Photo courtesy of Laura Brumfield

This black bear was trapped Monday and transported to the west side of Rainy Pass.

BEARS

From Page A1

But Treser said, as illustrated by last week’s mauling of a man walking his dogs in his Lake Wenatchee driveway, bears are dangerous. “We don’t need anyone else mauled by a black bear,” he said. “I just hope that that’s a wake-up call to people. Bear are not furry little creatures that are fun to pet. They will hurt you. They are wild animals and they are dangerous. He said many people in the valley are starting to respond with measures like taking down bird feeders, trying to secure garbage cans, even putting up electric fence wire around compost piles, trash cans and porches. “They need to associate pain with humans so they are afraid of people again,” he said. “We have to condition those bear that when they see humans, they are afraid.” In an effort to discuss the bear problem with the community, hear stories from residents and brainstorm ways to decrease encounters, Treser and Ray Robertson, Okanogan County field coordinator with the Grizzly Bear Outreach Project, are hosting a meeting at the Mazama Community Center Monday (Sept. 27) at 7 p.m. For more information about bears in the North Cascades, visit the GBOP website at bearinfo.org.

WINTHROP

From Page A1

Banasky too wondered why “red flags” had not been spotted. Northcott said he worried about moving forward if state [Department of Transportation] funding ran out. Councilman Lance Christensen was even more concerned about money. “Are we bankrupting the town?” he asked, wondering “how much Winthrop would be “on the hook for” if grant funds ran out in the middle of the project. Unanticipated extra expenses include retaining OAC – whose original contract runs out this month – to shepherd a second round of bidding. The mayor noted Battle

has offered to lower his rates in exchange for spending more time on the job. And Culp noted the consultant has already given more hours than expected in the original agreement. The mayor and town clerk advised that OAC has been paid with grant funds, that all bills have been paid so far. Culp also said that “as far as we know,” Winthrop expects to continue receiving state funding which was committed several years ago. Transportation money (which supplies slightly more than half of required project funds) will need to be re-allocated by next year’s legislature. And

the Recreation and Conservation Office – which covers the balance – has verbally pledged to extend its grant beyond the end of this year, according to Culp. An alternative, Christensen said, is to not build the bridge,” he said, adding, “lots of people in the valley are nervous about this.” The mayor said he intends to begin advertising that the town is again seeking requests for proposals as soon as results of the Sept 23 notice to dismiss Sahale are known. In the end council offered no objections for taking this first step

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Methow Valley News

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

RESOURCE LAND designating specific parcels as agricultural resource lands may create “undue restrictions,” according to county commissioner Bud Hover. Instead, the county is planning to fulfill the state’s requirement by designating only public land and land protected by conservation easements, he said. “Just because we’re not designating every piece of land now in agriculture doesn’t mean agriculture is not important and won’t continue to thrive,” he said. “We’re satisfying our obligation to the state.” “There are no required development regulations that would constitute restrictions on lands” for jurisdictions that only partially plan under the GMA, according to Dee Caputo, senior planner with the state’s Growth Management Services. “They are encouraged to come up with measures to protect agricultural resource lands – particularly incentive

programs,” she said. While the designations would not impose specific restrictions, Hover is concerned that taking land out of the resource designation in the future could be cumbersome. With 57 percent of the county’s 3.4 million acres owned by state and federal agencies, designating public land seemed like a way to satisfy the state requirement without an additional layer of regulation, according to the commissioners. By far, the most significant contribution of public land to agriculture is for grazing, with an estimated 800,000 acres of U.S. Forest Service land and almost 300,000 of land managed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources used for seasonal grazing. Nevertheless, the Forest Service requires ranchers to have a base property with livestock-handling facilities, according to Dean McFetridge, range management specialist for the Methow Valley Ranger District. Because agencies and scientists quantify the ways land is used for agriculture for different reasons, the numbers do not always match. The Washington State Department of Agriculture maps irrigated pastureland and cropland, primarily to figure out where pesticides may be used, according to Perry Beale, senior crop mapping specialist with WSDA. Their most recent data is from 2006, when they

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found 25,418 acres devoted to orchards, 21,576 for wheat, and 16,333 for alfalfa and pastures. DNR leased 1,374 of its 307,000 acres in the county for orchards and another 1,300 for other crops, both dryland and irrigated, according to Paul Penhallegon, DNR’s assistant division manager for upland leasing and rights of way. The county commissioners turned to the Okanogan County Farm Bureau for numbers. Bureau president Jon Wyss found that 30,000 cow-calf pairs are necessary for a viable industry. Since typical grazing leases issued by the Forest Service or DNR allow more than five pairs per acre and there are 1.1 million acres of public land, Wyss concluded that the existing acreage is more than adequate. Similarly, he found that the available public lands are sufficient for the 27,600 acres needed for the tree-fruit and vine industries. Wyss said he had been asked to calculate whether available public acreage was adequate, without looking at the nature of those lands or whether they are currently used for or available for agriculture. He projected that leases could be negotiated with DNR for suitable orchard lands, for example. The county is also including conservation easements in its agricultural designations. Some easements specifically protect agricultural lands – 22

percent of the Methow Conservancy’s 6,629 protected acres are agricultural easements – but other easements, such as the Conservancy’s 24 percent for riparian attributes, are generally not suitable for agriculture. Other conservation easements in the county are held by the Okanogan Valley Land Council, most of which protect wildlife habitat and forests and allow grazing, and by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, generally for wildlife habitat. Planning director Perry Huston said the county is starting with public lands and conservation easements but would fine-tune those numbers with a soil analysis. “What we’re doing is creating your defensible record,” he said last month at the commissioners’ study session on resource lands. “This is the bright line – the gong we have to ring – since we’ve now established these numbers and, at this point, they haven’t been refuted.” Huston is currently working on a revised draft of the comp plan and designations. Hover said he hoped the process, including public hearings, would be complete by the end of the year. Although Growth Management Services does not have to sign off on the county’s designations, they can be challenged in court, according to Caputo.

Comments sought on shoreline use The public has the opportunity to provide more input on the county’s Shoreline Master Program, which governs the use, development, protection and enhancement of shoreline areas. The program regulates building setbacks from waterways, recreation and boating, and other uses of rivers and lakes in the county. County planners may also review the prohibition on building in the 100-year floodplain in the Methow, which does not apply in the

rest of the county. The Okanogan County planning commission will take verbal testimony and written comments, either at the hearing or at ahubbard@co.okanogan.wa.us. The latest draft is available from the planning department at www.okanogancounty.org under SMP/CAO or by calling (509) 422-7160. The hearing is Monday (Sept. 27) at 7 p.m. in the commissioners’ hearing room in Okanogan.

In brief Chamber hosts candidates The Twisp Chamber of Commerce will be hosting candidates for two countywide elected positions at its luncheon meeting Thursday (Sept. 23). County commission candidates Jim DeTro and Becki Andrist will be attending, along with county clerk candidate Charleen Groomes and a representative for clerk candidate Rae Jean Kelly. The meeting takes place at the Community Covenant Church, on the north side of town, at noon and lunch reservations need to be made by calling Wanda Iverson at 997-9455 by today (Sept. 22). Visitors are also welcome to attend the meeting without buying lunch.

Meet the candidates The 10 candidates running for all contested county offices are coming to Twisp for a forum, where they will introduce themselves and take questions from the audience. People are encouraged to bring prepared written questions in the interest of efficiency, but questions will also be collected from the audience at the forum. If there are many questions on the same topic, they may be consolidated to save time, according to co-organizer Wendy Braden. The forum is being organized by the Twisp Valley Grange. Candidates will have the first hour for introductions, with the question-and-answer period in the second half. The most time will be devoted to the commissioner’s and sheriff’s races, said Braden. Candidates for the following offices will be present: County commissioner: Becki Andrist and Jim DeTro Sheriff: Frank Rogers and Dave Yarnell Treasurer: Leah Mc Cormack and Pamela Wyllson Superior Court clerk: Charleen Groomes and Rae Jean Kelley Okanogan County District judge (Position 2): Henry (Hank) Rawson and Rick Weber The forum is Monday, Oct. 4, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., at the Twisp Valley Grange.

Explosives unearthed A woman on East Buttermilk Creek Road called authorities when, in the process of leveling some ground on which to park an RV, she discovered what she believed was an explosive substance. Sheriff Frank Rogers said that while digging in the dirt Thursday morning (Sept. 16) a family member at the home of Betty Davis unearthed a white satchel with a cloth bag inside. Davis reported to police that her late husband used to do blasting for the Forest Service, and she suspected he had tried to dispose of the material by burying it. The Washington State Patrol Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team came from Yakima to dispose of the substance, which Rogers said included two pounds of Kinepak, a two-part explosive that needs to be mixed before becoming active, along with another “fertilizer-type substance.” Rogers said the EOD team was able to gather up the substance without blowing it up, and carted it off to a safe location for disposal.

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Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Opinion Editorial Suck it up

Twisp Mayor Bill Boosman is correct when he says that the job of mayor is not adequately compensated. There is a heavy pile of responsibilities overseeing staff and implementing policies set by the town council. It is a daunting task. Back during his campaign for the position last year, Mr. Boosman made the observation that the town might benefit from looking at restructuring its model to include a paid professional town manager to administer policy and oversee staff. “Our structure is dependent on virtually untrained, and almost unpaid volunteers,” he wrote in July 2009 in response to an interview question before the primary election. He was, no doubt, referring to the five town council positions and that of the mayor, for which he was running – the rest of the town staff are paid professionals. So it is curious that Mr. Boosman, presumably knowing that the mayor’s job involved very little financial compensation, would be surprised that he was not getting paid adequately for his time. (Similarly, when Mr. Boosman served on the Methow Valley School Board, he attempted to institute higher compensation for board members, claiming the responsibility of attending meetings was too taxing on his personal budget. The proposal was rejected by the board.) His July 2010 mayor’s report to the council (available at www.townoftwisp.com) reveals that he has misunderstood the spirit behind the mayoral stipend of $400 a month. In the report, Mr. Boosman starts with an assumption that he would be paid $25 an hour – “a reasonable rate (based on the importance of the position and relative to the department head rates subordinate to the mayor’s)” – then goes on to list the estimated time of various tasks over the course of a month, coming up with 64 hours a month, times $25 an hour or $1,600 a month. Well, that’s all reasonable math, but the job does not pay $25 an hour; it pays $400 a month. He knew that when he ran for the position. And while the hours are not specified anywhere, Mr. Boosman’s now-dashed assumption, as quoted in last week’s MVNews, that he would only need to work five hours a week seems ludicrous. That’s a bit of information the voters should have had last fall. Most of the issues that the mayor is facing – with the exception of a somewhat extraordinary number of personnel transitions in the last couple of months – are not new. Many have indeed been put on the back burner over the years and certainly the town could benefit from a proactive mayor or city manager that could spend more time working on some of the challenges facing the municipality. But by giving the town council an ultimatum – “Give me a raise or I quit” – Mr. Boosman has essentially turned his back on the community service that he signed up for when he was elected. He knew what he was going to be paid (not much) and he should have known what the job was going to entail (a lot). If he didn’t, he didn’t do his homework. He should suck it up and see his $400-a-month term through the next 15 months, and in the meantime, help the council work to set up a better model of town government to leave to his successor. With everything that the town council has to deal with right now, it should not have to worry about replacing the mayor and filling yet another council seat. There is some logic to his argument that, since the council is considering hiring a part-time administrative assistant to help the mayor with his tasks, why not just give him the money and allow him to do those tasks and be duly compensated? But while it may be logical, it comes across as being disingenuous. The town council has not ruled it out, though four motions at a special meeting Sept. 10 to offer the mayor more money died for lack of a second. The council wants to hear from the townsfolk. They will meet Tuesday (Sept. 28) at 7 p.m. at Town Hall. – John Hanron Send letters to: Methow Valley News, P.O. Box 97, Twisp, WA 98856; or fax: 509-997-3277; or e-mail: editor@methowvalleynews.com; or drop by the office, 101 N. Glover St. in Twisp.

Methow Valley News PUBLISHED WEEKLY SINCE 1903 101 N. Glover St., P.O. Box 97, Twisp, WA 98856 Telephone: (509) 997-7011 FAX: (509) 997-3277 E-mail: editor@methowvalleynews.com Homepage: www.methowvalleynews.com Paul Butler, PUBLISHER John Hanron, EDITOR Sue Misao, ARTS EDITOR Carol Stull, REPORTER Marcy Stamper, REPORTER Ann McCreary, REPORTER MIke Maltais SPORTS

Marilyn Bardin, OFFICE MANAGER Robin Doggett, AD SALES MANAGER Callie Fink, AD SALES Janet Mehus, OFFICE ASSISTANT Dana Sphar, AD DESIGN/PRODUCTION Linda Day, AD DESIGN Jay Humling, DISTRIBUTION CONTRIBUTORS

Bill Biddle, Erik Brooks, Tania Gonzalez Ortega, Sally Gracie, Patrick Hannigan, Jim & Jane Hutson, Rosalie Hutson, Ashley Lodato, Patrick McGann, Sam Owen, Bob Spiwak, Amy Stork, Solveig Torvik, Dave Ward, E.A. Weymuller Display advertising deadline for this newspaper is on the Friday previous to publication at 5 p.m. Classified advertising deadline is Monday at noon. The deadline for news items is Monday at noon. Member of the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association. THE METHOW VALLEY NEWS (USPS Publication No. 343480) is published weekly by Methow Valley Publishing, LLC, 101 N. Glover St., Twisp, WA 98856. Subscription rates: $30 inside Okanogan County, $40 outside of Okanogan County and $50 outside of Washington State per year (in advance). Periodical class postage paid at Twisp, Washington, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE METHOW VALLEY NEWS, P.O. Box 97, Twisp, WA 98856. THE METHOW VALLEY NEWS does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that the newspaper might fail to meet its obligation to publish each week of the individual subscription period, in which case the prorated cost of those issues missed would be refunded.

Box 97: Letters to the editor

Methow Valley News

Tania Gonzalez Ortega

One mad local Editor, Having been born and raised in Winthrop, and being an avid hunter all my life, I’m mad as hell that local and non-local bowhunters have no respect for “Hunting by permission only” signs. I am referring to the fact that seven vehicles invaded our property on opening morning of bow season and hunted on our property without permission. Not one of you bothered to call or ask. Now, with the opening of doe season, one of you hunting on our property without permission managed to put two arrow holes in the back of my shop building. Because of your lack of respect, I am closing off the property and road. This is why the hunting areas are shrinking in the Methow Valley. I do not like “No Trespassing” signs and have avoided taking this action, but due to your disregard of private property and your inability to ask, you will see many more private properties closing and owners following this pattern. John Northcott Winthrop

Wilderness protected To the editor: Birch Berman’s “Violations of the Pasayten” column (My Turn, Sept. 15) criticizing outfitters who pack into wilderness areas is disingenuous. He refers to the “untrammeled” character of the wilderness called for by the Wilderness Act. I assume he means untouched. He was an outfitter using burros for 25 years. Does he think that they left no trace? Hooves are pretty much going to disturb soil, whether they belong to deer, moose, donkeys or horses. Oh, and donkeys eat, too. If he has repented for taking stock into the wilderness he didn’t mention it in the column. He refers to the condition of the camps as evidence that something is “terribly wrong” and cites the current Okanogan Forest Plan’s standard for no more than 400 square feet of bare ground per campsite. That is inadequate for even a couple of animals and a tent. This unrealistic limitation is being addressed by the Forest Service. For perspective, 400 square feet is less than 1/100 acre. Even if campsites are 10 times that size, with more than half a million acres in the Pasayten Wilderness, each camp would affect less than .00002 percent of the wilderness area. By contrast, trails that Mr. Berman apparently wants every user to walk in on

occupy more than 15,000 square feet per mile. With more than 600 miles of trails, that amounts to over 200 acres of bare ground. Talk about trammeling! The areas of the Pasayten most desirable to visit are 15 miles or more from the wilderness boundary. As a healthy middle-aged person, I value the opportunity to access those areas. Outfitters provide that opportunity to a larger group than the few super-fit. I am acquainted with three of the local outfitters. The idea that they would allow filthy campsites is ridiculous – it would destroy their businesses. They work unbelievably hard in a grueling and hazardous occupation. They are the people I would hope would be nearby if I needed help while in the wilderness. I support reasonable regulation of this activity, but believe that our wilderness areas are abundantly protected. Let’s worry about the rest of the planet…. Gina McCoy Winthrop

Accept Islam or die! Editor, The World Trade Center and scores of Muslim-generated genocides have inspired America’s future values. Specifically, these hostile, imported religions must be preferred and enshrined in American law: 1. Jihadist or genocidal religions 2. Family honor-killing religions 3. Female oppressive religions 4. Random-terror religions 5. Suicide-bombing religions 6. Flogging, mutilating and amputating religions

7. The stoning of rape-victims religions 8. Beheading of dissidents religions 9. Harsh Sharia-law religions 10. Mob-action religions. 11. Forcible female circumcision religions. 12. Dhimmi-infidel-status religions. All these “noble” and progressive religions should be equal or better. Only the ACLU-banned Christian religion should be branded fraudulent and debased for practicing fidelity, compassion, charity, patience, equity, forgiveness, responsibility, humility, decency, veracity, endurance and accountability – which are all clearly unacceptable to our 12 new master religions. Won’t you teach your children to be good Muslims in these 12 ways? It is soon to be our mandatory state-religion but is still in utero now. Don’t be a dhimmi infidel. Accept it or die! Do you see the light? Allah Akhbar! Living two years in a Muslim country taught me a lot. Islam is all-contagious and deadly. You risk both your life and sanity. Ward Hartzell Twisp

Notable quotable "It is more shameful to distrust our friends than to be deceived by them." ~ Confucius

Liberal myopia fails to see threat in Islam American liberalism tends to run in trends and vogues. Sometimes these are useful advances like the abolition of slavery, the evolution of the American woman and the de-persecution of homosexuality. Less enlightened or progressive have been liberalism’s leading roles in communism, socialism, defeatism, eugenics, the breakdown of the American family, black economic enslavement, Indian economic enslavement, anti-Christian secular bigotry, the moral and human atrocity of abortion, the drug “culture,” the collapse of Ameri- William Slusher can educational superiority, the corruption of our legal system, the overpricing of American labor, and state budgetary crises derived of union blackmail and runaway socialistic entitlement programs there was never the money to pay for. American liberalism seems to reserve its contempt for the one country that protects and nurtures it most. Perhaps this is because America is the only country where treason has been relativised into meaninglessness, or maybe it’s just a useful theme to justify avoiding national service in harm’s way. One has to wonder why, as Thomas Ricks of The Washington Post writes, conservatives outnumber liberals in the all-voluntary American military 23 to 1. One of American liberalism’s recent and least enlightened or progressive vogues has become the notion that America has no enemy but Republicans. The Ground Zero mosque proposal has again brought forth the usual pious

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liberal scolds proclaiming how only an American rightist bigot could not wish to see the modern world’s most bigoted religion build a monument to itself in close proximity to its most obscene expression of that bigotry. The tired old psychobabble about anti-Muslim “hate” just won’t fly here. It is the mark of a weak intellect to assign pejorative motives like “hate” and “fear” to arguments one cannot refute on merit. Moreover, all religion is simply the largest and most damaging mental illness afflicting mankind. How else to explain the perfect fit of theology with the clinical definition of psychosis? How else to explain the mass brainwashing by all the world’s religions of millions of children from infancy such that by the time those kids are mature enough to think independently of religion most no longer have the capacity? Still, I profoundly believe and have often written: Respect they who love their god, just beware they who insist you must love it too. Not from hate or fear of any religion do I maintain that modern radical Islam is the single biggest threat, not only to America, but to any form of freedom that does not fit the fundamentalist dictates in the Quran. Christianity had its day in the murderous mode, but the threat now is the worldwide spread of fundamentalist Islam, backed by the righteous faith of far too many believers that killing “infidels” is the mandate of Allah. Only the consciously or congenitally myopic can fail to see the cancer metastasizing: hit contracts on authors for writing opinions deemed insufficiently worshipful of Muhammad, global Muslim mayhem and murder for the free-press publishing of cartoons not compatible with Islamic

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correctness, damnation of the pope and his threat-forced “apology” for merely quoting what some scholar once wrote about Islam, the disgraceful cowardice of the world media which should have masspublished the censored cartoons on the front page of every paper in the world to cry the independence of free speech without which no other freedoms endure. Then there is Yale University (and so many others) shamefully cowed too, redacting the cartoons from one of their scholar’s books on the subject for the confessed fear of “offending” Islam. Similarly there was the rush of the liberal media and the Obama administration to the defense of an avowed Muslim mass killer (Hasan of Ft. Hood, lest he be confused with so many others) and his proclaimed religion, rather than to the obviously Muslim religious contribution to the tragedy and how to analyze that factor in prevention of another such attack. These examples but scratch the surface of the prevailing political correctness lunacy. As with a drunk, one cannot appease or reason with a fundamentalist disciple of any god. Regrettably, it is that fanatic contingent of Muslims that is attempting the world over to cow into submission not only “infidels” but the moderate and tolerant fringe of Islam. If freedom and constitutional rights really mean what so many voices on the left and right proclaim, then we are all bound to recognize that basic, inalienable rights around the globe do have an avowed, deadly enemy today, and whatever America’s flaws real or perceived, it is not us. William Slusher is a writer from Okanogan. His latest book is Cascade Chaos or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse (www.cascadechaos.com).

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Methow Valley News

By Ann McCreary Downtown Twisp will become a pedestrian-only, art-friendly zone this Saturday (Sept. 25) during an evening Art Walk from 4-8 p.m. Glover Street, from Cinnamon Twisp to Mick & Miki’s, will be closed to traffic during the community celebration of the arts. The public is invited to stroll from one venue to another, enjoying music, refreshments and plenty of art. KTRT radio will have a DJ booth set up in the street to provide music to set the festive mood, and Blue Star Coffee will offer beverages to get the crowd buzzing. The streets and sidewalks will be transformed into art through a Sidewalk Chalk Art Contest organized by Robin Nelson-Wicks, Liberty Bell High School’s new art teacher. Beginning at 1 p.m., the community is invited to join local artists and high school students in creating sidewalk chalk art for display during the Art Walk. Nelson-Wicks will be downtown providing

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Arts & Culture chalk and instructions for the contest. “We have some fabulous prizes,” said NelsonWicks’ mom, Charlotte Nelson. Awards for different categories (youth, family, etc.), include tickets from Methow Arts to a performance of Rainbow Dance Theater on Oct. 23. Participants should bring knee pads and towels to sit on. For information, contact Nelson-Wicks at rnelsonwicks@ methow.org. A new exhibit opens at Confluence Gallery with a reception during the Art Walk. Called “Nature Always Wins,” the exhibit explores the unsettled relationship between humans and nature. “Nature Always Wins” features paintings by Twisp artist and exhibit curator Tori Karpenko, mixed media art by Jason Sabottka, and abstract art by Stephen Filla. Confluence’s solo gallery displays new work by photographer Ann Osin. The Studio hosts an exhibit opening for “Round Movement Portals,” featuring round prints by Twisp artist Laura Gunnip depicting the form and

Raptor fest from Pateros to Harts Pass By Mike Maltais

Photo by Sue Misao

Artwork by Jason Sabottka lines the walls behind a plant-topped sculpture by Tori Karpenko at Confluence Gallery. The two, movement of dance. Peligro Metal Gallery presents an exhibit of paintings by Steve Ward of Twisp, called “Dark Genius.” On display at Cinnamon Twisp Bakery are watercolor paintings by expeditionary artist Maria Coryell-Martin of Twisp, and live music by Jazz Journey. The bakery will be serving up soup, milk-

joined by Stephen Filla and Ann Osin, will exhibit their work at an opening reception during Saturday evening’s Art Walk.

shakes, smoothies, desserts and espresso. The Methow Valley Inn invites people to stroll through an exhibit of Garden Art in the Inn’s courtyard, and the Merc Playhouse hosts an open mic for all ages. Documentaries of Methow artists Bernard Hosey, Cloudbird and others will be presented at the Methow Arts offices

Okanogan County needs leaders who will honor and protect our traditional values

next to the Twisp Commons, along with refreshments and a raffle for free tickets to Rainbow Dance Theater. Door No. 3 Print and Book Arts Studio in the Methow Valley Community Center hosts an Artist Book Exhibit, introducing viewers to books as art, and offering cake and coffee. Cheryl Wrangle and Sue Marracci host an open studio on 3rd Avenue in the Sun Country Building. At the Twisp River Pub, panoramic landscapes by Matt Firth and paintings by Ginger Reddington, both local artists, are on display, and music by the Druthers begins at 8:30 p.m. with no cover charge.

Becki Andrist has demonstrated integrity and personal responsibility both as a successful business owner and as a community volunteer. She believes in learning from the past while developing new solutions for the future. Her background in journalism, business and government service qualifies her to address the challenges our county faces in agriculture, resource use, and economic diversification.

A day-long festival for raptor lovers is scheduled for Saturday (Sept. 25) at the Pateros Memorial Park to coincide with the peak southward migration of raptors at Chelan Ridge, considered the best place in Washington to view fall’s migrating birds of prey. The free family event is a joint project of HawkWatch International, the Methow Valley Ranger District and the North Central Washington Audubon Society to allow the public an opportunity to view raptors migrating to winter territories. Field trips via shuttle from Pateros to the Chelan Ridge Raptor Migration Site will also be available through pre-registration at (509) 731-4790. More information is available online at www.ncwaudubon.org/ or by email: festival@ncwaudubon.org. The celebration will continue Sunday (Sept. 26) at North Cascades Basecamp in Winthrop, with a pancake breakfast, short slide show presentation by regional birding expert Andy Stepniewski, and a display of live raptors by the WSU Raptor Club. This will be followed by a field trip to Harts Pass, known to be an excellent place to view migrating raptors. The cost of the breakfast is $5. The trip to Harts Pass is free. To learn more call (509) 996-2334 or visit www.North CascadesBasecamp.com.

Having grown up here, Becki understands that Okanogan County voters are independent thinkers. She is prepared to listen, respect and respond to all.

Becki Andrist

Okanogan County Commissioner, Dist. 3, GOP Learn more at www.andristforcommissioner.com

‘Government can deliver the protections and services we need without trouncing on our freedoms and emptying our wallets. Please vote for me, BECKI ANDRIST.’

Important notice to CenturyLink customers Paid for by ANDRIST FOR COMMISSIONER, Box 273, Omak WA 98841

invites you to enjoy a

The Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission designated CenturyLink as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier or ETC within its service area for universal service purposes. The goal of universal service is to provide all ashington citizens access to essential telecommunications services.

CenturyLink provides single party residential and business services for rates from $8.90 to $17.50 per month for residential customers and $17.85 to $35.00 per month for business customers. This includes access to long distance carriers, Emergency Services, Operator Services, Directory Assistance and Toll Blocking. Use of areas will be provided upon request.

Saturday, October 2

Join us for a four-wine, three-course dinner with owner/importer Basilio José Rodriguez Grueso of Casa Ventura.

Service if they meet certain low-income eligibility requirements. Lifeline Service includes a monthly discount up to $8.25 for basic phone charges, as well as toll blocking at no charge and a waiver of the deposit if toll blocking is selected by qualifying customers. Link-Up Service provides a discount on installation charges and charges to move service.

If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call CenturyLink at 1-800-201-4099 or visit www.centurytel.com/lifeline with questions or to request an application for the Lifeline/Link-Up programs.

$65/person + gratuity & tax. Reservations required. Please call the Dining Room,

(509) 996-4707

Winthrop, WA www.sunmountainlodge.com

lifeline NON-SAU

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www.centurylink.com

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Wednesday, September 22, 2010

What’s Happening

Thursday Sept. 23

CANDIDATES: Candidates for county commissiomer and county clerk at Twisp Chamber luncheon at Community Covenant Church. RSVP (509) 429-1973. Noon PIPESTONE ORCHESTRA: Strings, woodwinds, brass and percussion players’ first meeting at MV Community Center, Twisp. 997-9355. 6:30-9pm

Sept. 23-27

SASKATOON: Primitive and traditional living skills gathering at Skalitude Retreat Center, Carlton. $80$185. 997-9077.

Friday Sept. 24

FUNK/HIP HOP: Eclectic Approach performs at the Old Schoolhouse Brewery, Winthrop. Free. 996-3183. 7pm GREENLAND: Artist Maria Coryell-Martin presents “High Latitudes, Art and Science in the Arctic” at Confluence Gallery, Twisp. Free. 997-2787. 7:30pm

Saturday Sept. 25

Methow Valley News

RAPTOR FESTIVAL: View raptors from Pateros Memorial Park as they migrate south. Reserve a field trip shuttle to Chelan Ridge Raptor Migration Site (above Black Canyon) (509) 731-4790. 8am-4pm FARMERS MARKET: Local vendors, farmers and crafters in the MV Community Center parking lot. 9am-noon PLEIN AIR: Watercolor class with Maria CoryellMartin at Chickadee Trailhead, Sun Mountain. $100. 997-2787. 10am-3pm GARLIC: Planting Fall Garlic class at Local 98856. $15. RSVP 997-0978. 1-2:30pm CIDER SQUEEZE: Methow Conservancy celebrates harvest season at Sabold’s house, Winthrop. 996-2870. 2-4pm TWISP ART WALK: Art and music throughout the town of Twisp. 997-2787. 4-8pm FUNK/HIP HOP: Eclectic Approach at Old Schoolhouse Brewery, Winthrop. Free. 996-3183. 7pm

LIVE MUSIC: The Company Band performs at BJ’s Branding Iron in Twisp. Free. 997-0040. 9pm-1am

Meetings and weekly things Wednesday 9/22

Sunday Sept. 26

MV SCHOOL BOARD: Meeting at MV Elemen-

MARATHON: 26.2-mile run in Winthrop. Volunteers needed. 996-8033. RAPTOR FESTIVAL: Pancake breakfast ($5) and speaker at NC Basecamp, and field trip to Harts Pass to veiw migrating raptors. Reservations 996-2334. ARTISAN MARKET: Local vendors, farmers and artisans in the Winthrop park. 341-9102. 10am-2pm NATURE JOURNALING: Learn nature journaling with Maria Coryell-Martin at Confluence Gallery, Twisp. $45/family of four. 997-2787. Noon-3pm WOMEN’S WORKSHOP: “What Do You Really Want?” workshop for women at Local 98856, Twisp. Free. Reservations (253) 886-3082. 1-3pm

Monday Sept. 27

BEAR FACTS: Experts host public discussion of local bear stories and on preventing bear/human conflicts. Meet at Mazama Community Center. 7pm CASCADIA CHORALE: Rehearsal for annual Christmas Concerts. Meet at MV United Methodist Church. 923-9367. 7pm

Tuesday Sept. 28

CAR SEAT ROUND-UP: Bring used/expired carseats for recycling to Hank’s Harvets Foods. 997-4013. 10am-3pm CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION: Eight-week class with midwife Blue Bradley begins at Room One, Twisp. $120. 341-4256. 6-8pm

Wednesday Sept. 29

BLOOD DRIVE: American Red Cross collects your blood at the Winthrop Barn. Walk-in or make appointment: 1-800-733-2767. 10am-3pm LBHS OPEN HOUSE: Meet teachers, visit classrooms and more. 996-2215. 7pm

tary School board room. 996-9205. See agenda: www.methow.org, click “school board and staff.” 5:30pm MV EAGLES AERIE #2584: Meeting at Eagles Hall, Twisp. 997-8133. 7pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Calvary Church, Twisp. 997-0356. 7pm

Sunday 9/26

BREAST CANCER: Support group meets in Room

One, Twisp. Drop-ins welcome. 997-2819. 3-5pm NA: Narcotics Anonymous meets at Horseshoe Mobile Home clubhouse, 305 Magers, Twisp. 9970158. 4pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Masonic Hall, Twisp. 997-0356.6:30pm

Monday 9/27

Thursday 9/23

TWISP CHAMBER: Luncheon meeting at Com-

munity Covenant Church, Twisp. (509) 429-1973. Noon SPINNERS & WEAVERS: Meet at 137 Old Twisp Highway. 997-5666. 1pm FOOD BANK: “More than just food” at The Cove, 128 Glover St., Twisp. 997-0227. 1-4pm VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTERS DISTRICT 6:

Training and meetings at local fire halls. 997-2981. 7pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Friendship Church, Twisp. 996-8174. 7pm NA: Narcotics Anonymous meets at Horseshoe Mobile Home clubhouse, 305 Magers, Twisp. 9970158. 7pm

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: Open meeting, 123

Fifth Ave. N., Okanogan. (509) 422-7100. 9am-5pm

TWISPWORKS: Board meeting at the PDA office. 997-3300. 4pm SPEAK FRENCH: Revive or improve your

French in the Twisp PDA boardroom. 997-6242. 4:30-5:30pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Masonic Hall, Twisp. 997-0356.6:30pm NAMI: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill free family support group meets at United Methodist Church, 130 N. Cedar, Omak. Info 997-0272. 6:30-8pm CASCADIA CHORALE: Rehearsal for annual Christmas Concerts. Meet at MV United Methodist Church. 923-9367. 7pm

Tuesday 9/28

Friday 9/24

DOCTOR: Free health care to uninsured people

18 and under at The Country Clinic, Winthrop. Appointment: 996-8180. SCHOOL RETIREES: Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association meeting and no-host luncheon at Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala Ave., Omak. Features antiques expert Linda Lewis. (509) 4223393. 11am FREESTYLE DANCE: Heart-centered dance at The Studio, Twisp. $5. 997-7337. 5:30-7pm BINGO: Play at the Eagles Hall, Twisp. 9978133. 6pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets in the Electric Co-op building, 93 W. Chewuch, Winthrop. 9968174. 7pm NA: Narcotics Anonymous meeting at Twisp Masonic Hall. 997-0158. 7pm

Saturday 9/25

BUYING A HOME: Seminar at Community Action

in Okanogan to help you learn how to buy a home. Free. (509) 422-4041. 9am-3pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets in the Forest Service building, Winthrop. 996-8174. 7pm

TOPS: Take Off Pounds Sensibly at MV United

Methodist Church, between Twisp and Winthrop. 997-0102. 8:30-10am COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: Open meeting, Okanogan County Admin. Bldg., 123 Fifth Ave. N., Okanogan. (509) 422-7100. 9am-5pm TWISPWORKS: Tour the site in Twisp. 997-3300. 11am HEALTHY STEPS: Classes in therapeutic exercise, with instructor Nancy Farr at Twisp Valley Grange. 996-2017. Noon-1pm QUILTERS: Open studio, 309 Highway 20, Twisp. Free. 997-7020. 5-9pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Masonic Hall, Twisp. 997-0356.6:30pm TWISP TOWN COUNCIL: Meets at Town Hall. 997-4081. 7pm ELECTRIC COOP: Board meeting at the OCEC office, Winthrop. 996-2228. 7pm

Wednesday 9/29

PLEIN AIR: Join other painters in various outdoor

settings. 997-0172. 9am-3pm AA: Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Calvary Church, Twisp. 997-0356. 7pm

TS AR ST IDAY FR

1 hr 40 min

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90 min

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125 min R

MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING

presents an

y Fridake Karao

Tuesday , September 28

Join us for an interactive three-course Italian wine pairing dinner with Executive Chef J. Russell Bradshaw, CEC and Wine Director Don Elsing. Start with passed hors d’ oeuvres and a Campari and soda. Each guest will participate in making a 3 course dinner while the chef demonstrates. $45/person + gratuity & tax. Includes a glass of wine with each course. 6 PM. Reservations required. Please call Don Elsing,

Pull Tabs

(509) 996-4770

Winthrop, WA ~ www.sunmountainlodge.com

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Sports

Methow Valley News

and

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

By Mike Maltais

The Chelan Goats brought a “kick-and-run” style offense to the Liberty Bell soccer pitch Tuesday (Sept. 14) and used that strategy to shutout the Mountain Lion girls 2-0. Coach Mike Wilson described the Chelan approach as having Goats defenders, or backs, gain control of the ball when it gets into their territory and kick the ball high and long downfield toward the opponent’s goal. While the ball is in

Sports briefs Bike Fest is coming Oct. 1 The annual Fall Bike Festival will take over Winthrop Friday, Oct. 1 through Sunday, Oct. 3. The film and bike festival, entering its 24th year, is one of the longest running events of its type in the country and is presented by the Methow Valley Sport Trails Association. New this year is a major sponsor, Timberland, and a cycling film presentation featuring “some truly incredible cycling films from up and coming amateur filmmakers and seasoned veterans,” according to Kristin Smith, MVSTA’s marketing director. The three-day event will include self-guided bike tours, a raffle of a custom Curtlo bike frame, kids’ rodeo, films at the Barn and more. For information and a detailed schedule of events, visit www.bikethemethow.com or call 996-3287.

Winthrop hosts first marathon Marathoners will get an opportunity to tour the terrain north of Winthrop Sunday (Sept. 26) if they sign up for the first 26.2-mile Winthrop Marathon. The event is certified by United States Track & Field and is also a Boston Marathon qualifier. The course begins at 8 a.m. at a 3,300-feet elevation starting point about 26 miles up the West Chewuch Road and ends in the town of Winthrop. Along the way it loses 1,550 feet of elevation and winds though 18 miles of national forest, seven miles of county roads and finally a mile of town streets. All but the first three miles are on asphalt. Drivers on both sides of the Chewuch River should be aware that the runners will be on the West Chewuch Road above the Johnson Bridge crossing about six miles north of Winthrop. From there, the racers will follow the East Chewuch Road down to town. Registration for this event closes at 5 p.m. Friday (Sept. 24). For more information visit the Databar Events website at databarevents.com. Photo by Mike Maltais

Senior hitter Ari Watson, backed up by teammates Taylor Casey (11) and Paige Stevie, goes high off the home court to drive the ball over a Filly defender in last week’s league game against Bridgeport. The Fillies were no match for the poised and powerful Liberty Bell girls, who won the series three games to one. Shockers could do no better this time, only winning one game, number three 25-20, before the Lions put away that series well with wins in game one, 25-22; two, 25-12; and four, 25-22. The Lions, sitting at the top of the NCW

2B conference ranking, descended from their perch to play the Oroville Hornets yesterday (Sept. 21) and will host a tough Pateros team Thursday (Sept. 23) at 5 p.m. Next Tuesday (Sept. 28) Liberty Bell meets the Manson Tigers in Manson at 4 p.m.

Lions take one on the chin from Goats By Mike Maltais

B

Recreation

Lions thrash Shockers, tame Fillies

Their toughest conference opponents remain ahead of them, so the Liberty Bell girls’ varsity volleyball players sharpened their skills in three separate home matches last week, two against Waterville and one against Bridgeport. In all three contests the Mountain Lions came out on top, winning each best-of-five series three games to one. The Waterville Shockers had beaten the Lions in both games of an eight-school tournament held in Bridgeport Saturday, Sept. 11. They expected to repeat when they met the Lions again on Tuesday, Sept. 14 on Liberty Bell’s home court. However, coach Kim Frey had used the tournament to study the strengths and weaknesses of the other teams while liberally substituting and trying different combinations with her own players. As a result, the Lions were ready for Waterville and took early control of the match by thrashing the Shockers 25-13 in game one. Waterville regrouped long enough to tie the series with a 25-21 win in game two, but the efficient passing and setting of Paige Stevie, Natalie Rodriguez, Christina Purtell and Taylor Casey, combined with the strong hitting of seniors Amber Reggiatore, Nicole Labanauskas and Ari Watson was too much for the Shockers to handle. The Lions took games three and four 25-23 and 25-12. On Thursday (Sept. 16) it was Bridgeport’s turn to face the more dominant Lions. Coach Frey’s team had easily handled the Fillies during the earlier tournament, even with junior varsity subs in the lineup. Bridgeport lost its strong contingent of senior players to graduation and their absence showed in the younger, less experienced team. Again, the Lions set the pace by winning games one and two 25-14 and 25-17 before the Fillies rallied to barely take game three 25-23. Once more, game four went to the Lions 25-17. Waterville returned to the LBHS home court on Saturday (Sept. 18) intent on demonstrating their previous loss to the Lions was a happy accident. However, the

Section

flight, the offense – forwards or strikers – race downfield to get behind the opposition defenders for close shots on goal, a technique that works well for older, faster players. Chelan used the tactic to attempt almost three times as many shots on goal, 16-6, as the Lions were allowed. Two of those shots, one in 36 minutes of the first half and the second 61 minutes into the game, found the target. Wilson refused to be drawn into the Chelan offensive style.

Lions are best of Bs at Moses Lake

By Mike Maltais

“Our girls kept their composure in spite of the temptation to adopt the kick-and-run attack, too,” Wilson said. “They know that what we are trying to do this year is all about next year,” he said of his young and building team. To cite an example, Wilson recalled Liberty Bell’s first girls’ soccer team made up of 16 players, many who had never played the game before and eight of whom were freshmen. “The first year they took some lumps and ended

Thursday, Sept. 23 Volleyball: Pateros @ LBHS Friday, Sept. 24 Football: Entiat @ LBHS Saturday, Sept. 25 XC running: LBHS @ Wenatchee Invite Sunday, Sept. 26 Running: Winthrop Marathon, West Chewuch Tuesday, Sept. 28 Soccer: LBHS @ Manson Volleyball: LBHS @ Manson

5 pm 7 pm 10 am 8 am 4 pm 5 pm

with four wins and 10 losses,” Wilson said. “The second year they went 8-8. The third year record was 20-6 with a fourth place at State.” The current Lions team, with only one senior and two juniors on the roster, is working toward a similar goal. The Lions were scheduled to play their first league game at Oroville yesterday (Sept. 21). Their second league contest is at Manson Tuesday (Sept. 28) at 4 p.m.

Turnovers toast Lions at Bridgeport line when a bad snap from center got away from quarterback Josh Dennis and the Mustangs converted the error into their second touchdown. Later in the quarter the Lions were again in Mustang territory when another errant snap was recovered by Bridgeport and resulted in their third TD. While the Lions were winning the offensive battle, gaining almost four yards to every one for Bridgeport, the Mustang defenders were taking advantage of Liberty Bell errors to win the scoring battle. In the second quarter the Lions added another two points to their side when they caught Bridgeport in its own end zone for a safety. The Mustangs were then held scoreless through the second and third quarters but in the fourth, a fumble by Lions running back Cesar Dominguez gave Bridgeport the means and momentum to score their final touchdown. Myers came through one last time for Liberty Bell with a nine-yard score later in the fourth quarter. Schulz kicked his second extra point, but it was too little and too late to catch the runaway Mustangs. It was the first conference game of the season for the Lions. Liberty Bell will host its second league game against the Entiat Tigers, Thursday (Sept. 24) at 7 pm.

By Mike Maltais The Liberty Bell cross-country team placed first among B-school competitors and high among the estimates of coaches at the Moses Lake Invitational Saturday (Sept. 18). Moses Lake, a 4A school, attracted 14 A-school teams and four from the B-school category for its 3.1-mile or 5-kilometer event. Liberty Bell placed 11th overall and ahead of Lake Roosevelt, Oroville and Wellpinit. “I told the kids we were going to make a statement,” said coach Craig Herlihy, referring the young team’s growing recognition from the coaching ranks. Clancy Mitchell led the Lions’ contingent with a time of 18 minutes, 47 seconds to take 26th overall in the race. Not far behind, Liam Daily crossed the finish line four spots behind to take 30th in a time of 19:11. Taylor Woodruff placed 77th in 21:26; Tim Lewis took 84th in 22:23 and Nolan Jensen was 89 at 23:14. Team member Colton Skelton did not compete. Brita Ness raced in the girls’ event and took 38th place in 24:15. Herlihy said he wants to work on closing the gap between his first and fifth-place boys since team scoring is based on the average times of five individual times. The Lions were scheduled to host the Liberty Bell Invitational yesterday (Sept. 21), followed by a team fundraiser later that day at Pearrygin Lake State Park. On Saturday (Sept. 25) the team will travel to Wenatchee to compete in the Wenatchee Invitational.

This week in sports

The Bridgeport Mustangs conjured up an almost illusory manipulation of poor offensive yardage to pull a win from their helmets last Friday (Sept. 17) and defeat the visiting Liberty Bell Mountain Lions 27-16. With some sleight-of-hand help from the Lions’ offense, the Mustangs turned three Liberty Bell turnovers into touchdowns and transformed what should have been a defeat into a victory. “We should have won,” said Lions’ coach Rick McCauley, noting the yardage difference between the two teams. “We gained 334 yards on offense and Bridgeport only managed to gain 94.” The Mustangs’ defense made the magical difference. Liberty Bell set the stage early when the Lions took the opening kickoff, ran four minutes off the game clock and scored on a 27-yard pass to fullback Chuck Myers. Nic Schulz kicked the extra point and the score was 7-0 Lions. Bridgeport answered with their own 60-yard run, in what would be their only significant offensive yardage play of the game, to score a touchdown of their own. Then came the slight of hand. The Lions were deep in Mustang territory on about Bridgeport’s 20-yard

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MVN, pg 1

Photo by Mike Maltais

Smooth putt The day was wet, cold and overcast as 44 golfers in teams of four teed off in the eighth annual Winthrop Chamber Golf Tournament at the Bear Creek Golf Course last Saturday. Golf carts careened around the course like bumper cars as teams competed in a best ball scramble format. The winners were the team of Doug Potter, Ned Hawks, Steve Wilson and Dave Fretwell. Here, Jodi Gardner makes a nice, arcing putt on the third green.

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Page B2

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Methow Valley News

Okanogan County Fair results Arts and Crafts Catherine Lewis: Grand champion spinning; reserve champion weaving. Chelsie McFetridge: Grand champion quilt. Katie Swanson: Grand champion knitting (cardigan sweater); grand champion weaving (fiber arts – scarf). Betty Vintin: Grand champion quilted wall hanging. Kyle Cramer: Grand champion junior open color pencil. Lauren Kurtz: Grand champion small craft (4-H barn). Erin Frey: Blue ribbon wood CD shelf. Dana Anderson: Red ribbon photography, ink drawing. Josh Frey: Red ribbon wood book end.

bread; reserve grand champion and blue ribbon rum raisin sour cream walnut apple pie; special award and blue ribbon Linzer cookies; blue ribbon snickerdoodles, candied ginger scones. Timothy Darwood: Grand champion canned peaches. Andrew Reggiatore: Grand champion red onions; blue ribbon red potatoes; red ribbon green beans, yellow onions, corn, pumpkin; white ribbon green peppers. Shelby Scott: Grand champion sweet hot pepper; reserve grand champion raspberry jam. Quincy Scott: Grand champion slicing cucumber, concord grapes. Carter Darwood: Reserve grand champion canned pears. Trent Skelton: Blue ribbon chocolate chip cookies red ribbon zucchini.

Horticulture

Food Dana Anderson: Grand champion molasses cookies; blue ribbon no bake cookies. Judy Brezina: Grand champion and blue ribbon buttermilk sourdough

Dana Anderson: Grand champion floriculture dahlia; blue ribbon coreopsis, 4-H record book; red ribbon carrots. Andrew Reggiatore: Blue ribbon

marigolds, cosmos, yellow sunflower, red sunflower; red ribbon zinnias.

Judging Dana Anderson: Grand champion team livestock judging. Katherine Tannehill: Grand champion team livestock judging. Erin Frey: Grand champion junior poultry judging. Josh Frey: Grand champion intermediate poultry judging. Lauren Kurtz: Reserve champion intermediate poultry judging. Emmett Fink: Blue ribbon (third place) team livestock judging. Meritt Fink: Blue ribbon (third place) team livestock judging. Andrew Reggiatore: Blue ribbon (third place) team livestock judging. Trent Skelton: Blue ribbon (third place) team livestock judging.

Poultry Sage McFettridge: Grand champion educational display. Camas McFetridge: Reserve grand champion educational display. Tim Lewis: Grand champion poultry; grand champion senior

herdsmanship; grand champion senior judging, grand champion senior fitting & showing; best conditioned. Rian Darwood: Grand champion pre-junior judging; best of breed champion – bantam. Carter Darwood: Best of breed champion – goose. Josh Frey: Reserve champion intermediate fitting & showing; blue ribbon for bird; red ribbon educational poster, record book. Erin Frey: Blue ribbon fitting & showing, bird, record book; red ribbon educational poster.

Swine Andrew Reggiatore: Reserve grand champion record book; blue ribbon fitting & showing; herdsmanship, market class, educational poster; producer of merit award. Dana Anderson: Blue ribbon fitting & showing, herdsmanship, market class, educational poster, public presentation; producer of merit award. Emmett Fink: Blue ribbon fitting & showing, herdsmanship, 4-H record book, market class with a “call back”,

educational display; producer of merit award. Meritt Fink: Blue ribbon fitting & showing, herdsmanship, 4-H record book, market class, educational display; producer of merit award. Trent Skelton: Blue ribbon fitting & showing, herdsmanship, swine market class, educational poster, public presentation, record book; producer of merit award. Katherine Tannehill: Blue ribbon fitting & showing, herdsmanship, market class, educational display, public presentation; red ribbon record book.

Rabbits Lauren Kurtz: Grand champion intermediate educational display. Kandee Sims: Reserve grand champion junior educational display.

Sheep Tylie Super: Grand champion lads & lassies pre-junior; special ribbon little people for fitting & showing. Austin Eiffert: Special ribbon little people for fitting & showing.

Service Directory Service & Health Directories ~ Deadline for ad placement & changes is Friday at 5 pm for insertion in the next Wednesday’s paper. Directory ads are $8 per column inch. Additional charges may apply for color. To have your service listed please call 997-7011. ATTORNEYS

CONTRACTORS

EXCAVATION, cont.

IRRIGATION

PEST CONTROL

ROOFING, cont.

WATER WELL SERVICES

SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

TWISP FEED & RENTAL AUTO PARTS/TOWING

Beaver Creek Well Services, LLC Professional Service Since 1998

New water system installations Solar/generator alternatives Irrigation pumps & meters Pump & system repairs Well testing Jim & Jake Whipple

ROAD BUILDING / GRADING / GRAVEL EXCAVATOR / BACKHOE / DOZER ROCK WALLS / TOP SOIL / SAND SEPTIC / WATER & MORE

509-997-6394

PROPANE SALES

“WE DIG IT!”

509-997-2219 • 800-253-0269 BEAVECW940R2

#MCHUGEI036KL

SHULL’S TOWING

www.hiltonconstruction.com

“We buy wrecked cars”

TWISP FEED & RENTAL

Auto Wrecking • New & Used Parts Hours: M-F 8am-5:30pm; Sat 9am-1pm

Brewster

WELL DRILLING

FEED DEALERS

1-800-822-5761

All your excavation & construction needs.

996-2884 cell 509-322-3032

Feed, Seed, Ranching, Fencing & Garden supplies Rental Equipment & Small Engine Repair

TREE SERVICE

Over 20 years local experience

PALM*GL125P6

www.palmconstructioninc.com

997-3621

Corner of Highway 20 & 2nd Ave., Twisp

GARBAGE COLLECTION

Full Service Garbage Collection

BUILDING DESIGN

Reasonable rates, flexible pickup schedules GRAVEL & SAND

ALL

YOUR BUILDING NEEDS Boom Truck

Boom Truck Services Available Brian Baseler, General Contractor

509-923-2477 Lic. #BYROCI*01OJE

THE DIRT DOCTOR

WE DELIVER North Valley Lumber

996-2264 www.nvlumber.com Horizon Flats, Winthrop

Watch

Complete Excavation Service 509-996-2033

ALL WORK FULLY GUARANTEED FREE on site estimates #WHISTWD920D5

Caretaking, Security, Cleaning/ windows Landscape / handyman

997-8862

Owner/Operator, Rick Bynum 509-997-0650 Cell: 509-322-4970

Licen./Bonded/Insured

For All Your Concrete Needs

MVM QUALITY DRILLING

996-2435

casconcrete@methownet.com

RECYCLING

Horizon Flats, Winthrop EXCAVATION

32 years well drilling experience in the Methow Valley

996- 2883

Specializing in Concrete

BUILDING SUPPLIES

Well Drilling

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

House

BYRO CONSTRUCTION • Foundations • Slabs • Daylight Basements • Retaining walls • & More

Whistle’s

STORAGE

WATER WELLS & PUMPS AIR ROTARY DRILLING PROMPT, HONEST & PROFESSIONAL

HEATING & COOLING

GEOLOGIC SITE ANALYSIS

STOVES

Quadra-Fire • Vermont Castings Dovre • Pads & Pipes

Longest Continuous Service in North Central Washington

Cascade Pipe

Owned & Operated by: Marshall & Charles Miller Lic#: MVMQUDLO33MM

Twisp Mon-Sat 8-5:30 997-0720

TAXES ROOFING

Locally owned and operated since 1995 MEMBER: BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU • WA LIC. #DOUGHE1003JN

TOLL FREE (888) 682-1010 PATEROS SHOP (7-8:30am)

923-2073

BREWSTER OFFICE

689-0909

ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC Office (509) 422-0295 Cell (509) 429-0417 Installed Insulation & Garage Doors

CHELAN OFFICE - 682-1122

B & B Excavating, Inc. Backhoe Dozer Dump Truck Excavator

www.mvmqualitydrilling.com

997-0082 Lic. #BBEXCI*000PL

Serving the Methow Valley for Over 25 Years

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MVN, pg 2

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Methow Valley News

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Page B3

Classifieds CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - 997-7011

24.................... FOR RENT, Con’t.

E-MAIL TO frontdesk@methowvalleynews.com All classifieds to be prepaid. Weekly: $6.75 for 15 words or less. $8.75 with email or web site address. 20 cents for each additional word. Deadline: Monday, Noon. CLASSIFIED SPECIAL: Buy 3 weeks and get 4th week free. No refunds or changes please. Classified display ads: $10.00 per column inch. Deadline: Friday, 5 p.m. Deadline for LEGAL NOTICES: Friday, 5 p.m.

Directory FOR SALE ................................10 YARD SALE ..........................14 FARM EQUIPMENT ..............15 AUCTIONS ............................16 REAL ESTATE ..........................20 MOBILE/MFD. HOMES ........22 FOR RENT ............................24 WANTED TO RENT ..............25 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ..30 EMPLOYMENT .........................31 WORK WANTED ..................32 SERVICES ............................34 CARS & TRUCKS .....................40 RVS .......................................42 ANIMALS ..................................50 LIVESTOCK ..........................52 HORSES ...............................54 PETS .....................................56 MISCELLANEOUS ...................70 WANTED ...................................75 THANK YOU .............................80 COMMUNITY EVENTS .............83 PERSONALS ............................85 FREE .........................................90 LOST & FOUND........................95

10.................................FOR SALE

SUPER NICE horse hay. Alfalfa & grass/alfalfa & some grass hay, 2 string small bales, 1st & 2nd cutting, no rain, Omak area. Call 509.750.7346. 20 1981 13’ S&S CAMPER. Eve r y t h i n g w o r k s . B e s t o f f e r. 509.996.3737. 20 VERMEER BRUSH CHIPPER. Requires 3 point hitch & PTO. Excellent condition -$2,000, 509.996.9897, 996.2427. 22 CORN, TOMATOES, CHILES and more at Fitzgerald Produce. 4 miles south of Malott on Old Hwy 97. Open daily 11-7. 20 PELLET STOVE. Quadra Fire-Mt. Vernon. 60,000 BTU. Cost $4,500. Now with thermostat & accessories ) $1,200. 509.997.4904. 21 LUNDGREN RANCH raised beef steroid and hormone free. Half or whole, also individual cuts will be available at the ranch in June. All USDA inspected. 5-lb boxes of hamburger patties ready now. Our family has been ranching in the Methow Valley since 1956 raising quality beef. Call 509.341.4178 or 509.996.3494. 20 LASER PRINTER, Lexmark E322 monochrome (for PC), cable, manual. $50.00, 509.997.7011, ask for Marilyn. 5tf ATTENTION GARDENERS/ Landscapers: Topsoil, manure, 50/50 “mixed”, sand, gravel, road material and excavating services. Eagle Excavating, licensed and bonded/Hank Rogers 509.997.6302. 20 14............................ YARD SALES

ESTATE SALE. 144-C E. Chewuch, 10-4, Sat. & Sun. No earlies. Some antiques, Fred Hubbard artwork, household goods, and outdoor. 19 20.......................... REAL ESTATE

PUBLISHER'S NO TICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800927-9275.

MOST AFFORDABLE riverfront access. 1 ac. W. Chewuch Rvr views. 200 yd. path to 300+ ft. of riverfront private beach. Screamin’ deal! $89,000 terms. Anne Eckmann, Agent, Blue Sky Real Estate. 509.421.7127. 21 SWEET TWISP RIVER Homestead for sale. 6.4 acres of beautiful, undulating benchland six miles west of Twisp. Solar-powered, 3BR 1BA, post-and-beam/straw bale home (1,760 sq. ft.), fenced garden, spring with irrigation rights, seasonal creek. Easy access to public land. Sunshine, trees and privacy - $325,000. 509.341.4411 or hanron@methownet.com . 19tf

HISTORIC WATERFRONT Ranch. 64 acres near Twisp. 1,500 feet of creek front. Restored farmhouse, large barn and outbuildings. Excellent water rights and soils, yearround pond. Peaceful. Sustainable. Irreplaceable. Please see website: www.oldschoolhouseranch.com for more information. 509.997.0819. 10tf BY OWNER APPROX. 4.8 wooded acres, large upper building site developed with power, well, septic system, with phone service available. Full hook-up RV site. Backs to USFS land, road maintained by county. $97,750. More photos and info. available. Cell 509.679.8873. 13tf

24................................ FOR RENT

EXQUISITE NEW HOME for rent, Winthrop - includes furniture, no pets, no smoking. $1,500/mo. 360.774.6268. 22 WINTHROP HOUSE (Back on the market.) 237 Corral St., 2+BR, 2BA, full basement, 2-car garage with small shop, 1/2 acre in town, available Nov. 1. NSNP, $750/month, $500 deposit. 206.940.0401. 22 RETAIL/COMMERCIAL store front for rent on Riverside Ave in Winthrop. Ground level, 800+ sq. ft. w/ ½ bath - $750/mo. Call 360.378.4802. 22 LAKEFRONT ROOM available for month to month rental at retired Arrowhead Lodge B&B. Fly fish from your front yard. Private entrance, private bath. King size bed. $550/mo., includes utilities & DSL. chaundy17@netzero.com, 509.996.3754. 19 FOR LEASE: (2) 550 sq ft offices/ shops - $600 month each, on Hwy 20, Twisp. New energy efficient building, great visible location, great parking and signage. Each has handicap bathroom, individual heat pumps for heating and cooling. 509.668.0908. 21 BEAUTIFUL VIEW! Brand new! On the river in Winthrop. 2 office spaces now available with highspeed internet, fiber optics, plus common kitchenette and conference room. Chewuch Professional Bldg., 509.996.2820. 3tf PRIME LOCATION, TWISP! Cascade Center next to NCNB, office space for rent. Two units left - from $200/mo.Call Andy at 509.997.3262. 7tf HOUSE FOR RENT. W. Chewuch. 2BR on sunny sm. acreage. 1BR in loft. Peaceful, artistic - $680, 1st/last/ dep. 509.996.9969. 20 EDELWEISS CHALET, 3 bedroom, W/D, Wood and Elect. Heat, Storage, $ 750 no dogs/smoking, 360.779.8008. 19

TWISP MINI STORAGE

Rent a unit & get the first

month FREE! 997-8072

Airport Road, Twisp

LEGAL ADS

LEGAL ADS, Cont.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Trustee’s Sale. I. Notice Is Hereby Given that the undersigned Trustee, Peg R. Callaway, will on the 1st day of October, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 o’clock a.m., at the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 North 3rd Avenue, in the City of Okanogan, County of Okanogan, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to-wit: Lots 9A and 9B Wolf Ridge Ranch Plat Alteration, as per Plat thereof recorded in Drawer 5, Section 1, Page 99, records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust from Louis R. Childers and Gabrielle S. Childers, husband and wife, the original Grantors, and LandAmerica Transnation Title Insurance Company, the original Trustee, and American Equities, Inc., a Washington Corporation, the original Beneficiary, under that certain Deed of Trust dated May 6, 2003, and recorded May 9, 2003, Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3060491, and in which Deed of Trust the present Beneficiary is American Eagle Mortgage 100 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, pursuant to those Assignments of Deed of Trust, to-wit: from American Equities, Inc., a Washington Corporation, to West Coast Bank, dated May 6, 2003, and recorded May 9, 2003, Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3060492; from West Coast Bank to American Equities, Inc., a Washington Corporation, dated August 13, 2003, and recorded August 18, 2003, Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3064857; and from American Equities, Inc., a Washington Corporation, to American Eagle Mortgage 100 LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, dated August 13, 2003, and recorded August 18, 2003, Okanogan County Auditor’s File No. 3064858; and in which the Beneficiary substituted Peg R. Callaway as Trustee pursuant to a Substitution of Trustee recorded with the Okanogan County Auditor on April 30, 2010, Auditor’s Instrument No. 3154426. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts, which are now in arrears: A. Failure to pay monthly payments of $815.00 each due on the 6th day of each month, for the months of January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November and December 2009, and January, February, March, April, May and June, 2010; as well as the balloon payment that was due on May 6, 2008; the amounts now due and owing are as follows: balloon payment principal $107,580.69, plus interest from November 3, 2008 to June 21, 2010 $15,805.09, plus a per diem from and after June 22, 2010 in the amount of $26.527, plus late fees through June 21, 2010 of $733.68, plus AEI administrative fees of $750.00, for a total due and owing as of June 21, 2010 in the amount of $124,869.46. B. Failure to pay delinquent real property taxes as follows: Parcel #7960000901: 2007 $1,354.35; 2008 - $1,227.88; 2009 - $1,062.98; 2010 - $906.13. Parcel #7960000902: 2007 -

$1,354.35; 2008 - $1,227.88; 2009 - $1,062.98; 2010 - $906.13. For a total amount of $9,102.68, which amount includes interest, penalty and statutory foreclosure costs, as applicable. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $107,580.69 together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured from the 3rd day of November, 2008, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on the 1st day of October, 2010. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 20th day of September, 2010 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 20th day of September, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), the defaults as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 20th day of September, 2010 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal, interest, default interest, late charges and fees secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address: Louis R. Childers and Gabrielle S. Childers, 412B Wolf Creek Road, Winthrop, WA 98862, by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested, on May 7, 2010, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above (one copy posted at 42 Wolf Ridge Lane, Winthrop, Washington, and one copy posted at 44 Wolf Ridge Lane, Winthrop, Washington) on May 7, 2010, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Notice To Guarantor: A) The Guarantor may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the trustee’s sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust. B) The Guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the Grantor in order to avoid the trustee’s sale. C) The Guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the trustee’s sale. D) Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action

34.................................SERVICES

24.............. REAL ESTATE, Con’t.

FSBO: (2) DOUBLE residential lots on Marble St. in Twisp. Close to proposed river trail. Sewer on site, water avail. $55,000 and $59,000. 509.997.1011. 21 11,000 SQ. FT. double lot in Twisp on Twisp Avenue. $52,500. Water and sewer on site. 509.997.2424. 19 10 ACRES N.WINTHROP, high bank river frontage, prime location. Well and power. 509.422.0516. 20 W. CHEWUCH RIVERFRONT. Beautiful riverfront lot w/750 sq.ft. yurt and bathhouse. All utilities are in, and wireless - $289,000. Call 509.996.4400 or www.kristindevin. com/yurt.html . 19

24............. EMPLOYMENT, Con’t.

WANTED: WAITPERSON experienced in fine dining service. Call John at Tappi. 509.997.3345. 19 NANNY WANTED. Childcare experience (toddler) preferred. CPR trained (or willing to obtain), professional references, non-smoker. 20 hrs/wk, pay DOQ. 509.996.3339. 19 CALL ME! Tree service, rigging, falling, topping, on-site chipping, 60’ bucket truck available. Dennis Jones, 509.997.2007, 449.1022 cell. 32

30 ...BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

FOR SALE. THE Outdoorsman in Winthrop. Hunting, fishing, camping and gift supply store. Great location and great lease. All reasonable offers considered. 509.996.2649. 19 DAILY BUSINESS in Twisp. Office products, art supplies and copy services for the Methow Valley. $170k + inventory. As part of the business purchase the Twisp building is available by lease or sale. Call 509.996.3493 to speak with Jerome or Kim. 33

Omak Saw & Tool Sharpening for:

Machine shop tools Chipper knives • Carbide saws & tools Kitchen tools & band saw blades

We do it right! 53 years experience!

210 E. Riverside, Omak 31......................... EMPLOYMENT

DELI COUNTER HELP position, Boulder Creek Deli. 509.996.3990, bcdeli@hotmail.com . 20 TOWN OF TWISP Part-time Accountant/Grant Administrator. Pay Range: $16.56-$24.84/hr. We are seeking qualified applicants for a position up to 20 hrs/week. Ideal candidate will have a 2-yr accounting degree with a minimum of three years experience in government or non-profit accounting and federal and state grant reporting. Additional closely related experience may be approved as substitute for college. Must be proficient in Word, Excel and computerized accounting software, excellent verbal and written skills, and ability to work with multiple deadlines and under sometimes stressful situations. Must be able to read and interpret complex regulations. Contact Town for application by: see www.townoftwisp.com , email: deputyclerk@townoftwisp.com; Ph 509.997.4081. 20 METHOW VALLEY SCHOOL District has openings for the following coaching positions: assistant high school football, head high school boys’ soccer, asst. high school boys’ soccer, head JH track, asst JH track, and seventh grade girls’ basketball coach. To apply, send a letter of interest, a district application and a resume of relevant experience to: Dr. Mark Wenzel, Supt., Methow Valley School District, 18 Twin Lakes Rd., Winthrop, WA 98862. Application forms are available at www.methow.org . Closes Sep. 29, 2010 at 4:00pm. Positions open until filled. 509.996.9205. EOE. 19 METHOW VALLEY SCHOOL District seeks applicants for the following part-time positions: school counselor, early childhood specialist and elementary academic support. Please visit the district website at www.methow.org for complete job descriptions. The deadline for applications is Sep. 29, 2010. 509.996.9205. EOE. 19 NORTH CASCADE HELI, INC. is hiring for the position of assistant office manager. Candidates should be fluent working in a PC or Mac environment, have solid communication and customer service skills, be able to multi-task, prioritize and problem solve, and be available three to four days a week from early Jan. to late March. No relocation or housing is offered for this seasonal position. Please email cover letter and resume to info@heli-ski.com. No phone calls, please. 19tf NOW HIRING Production Assistant and Shipping Receiving Clerk. MemoryHub is looking to add reliable self-starters to our team. Production Assistant: Must have general knowledge of running computers and be detail-oriented, organized, multi-tasker, independent and selfmotivated. Shipping Receiving Clerk: General knowledge of running computers, detail oriented and customer service skills. FT positions with benefits after 90 days. Please send resume and cover letter to hott@memoryhub.com . For more information on employment http:// www.stashspace.com/jobs/ . 22 ADMIN ASSISTANT: Part time (3 days min) office support for John L. Scott - Methow Valley. Strong customer service skills, computer and Microsoft applications, QuickBooks, and internet required. Immediate availability is a must. Salary DOE. Call Linda Schmal at 509.996.3360. Email resume to lindaschmal@johnlscott.com . 19

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40..................... CARS & TRUCKS

1966 JEEP 2.5 TON 6X6 water truck, runs and operates well - $1500, 509.996.9897, 996.2427. 22 1994 FORD EXPLORER Sport2 door, 4x4, 5 speed, 6 cyl., P/W, P/L, plus 4 snow tires - $2000 OBO. 509.449.2351. 15tf 44.......................MOTORCYCLES

2006 SUZUKI DR-Z 125. $950. Helmet, boots, accessories also available. 509.996.2897. 19 STATEWIDE ADS ADOPTION ADOPT -- Adoring couple, Doctor & Lawyer promise your baby unconditional love, laughter & happiness. Expenses paid. 1-800-933-1975 BUILDINGS STEEL ARCH BUILDINGS Huge Savings on some of our Summer Clearance Buildings Selling for Balanced Owed plus Reps. 16x20, 20x24, 25x30, etc. Supplies Won’t Last! 1-866-339-7449 MISC FOR SALE FASTER INTERNET! No access to cable/DSL? Get connected with High Speed Satellite Internet. Call now for a limited time offer from WildBlue -- 1877-369-2553 NEW Norwood SAWMILLS- LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mills boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N EDUCATION-INSTRUCTION ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. Call 866-483-4429; www.CenturaOnline.com EVENTS-FESTIVALS BIG DISCOUNTS from over 200 Antique Dealers, 28th Anniversary, September 24-26 Historic Snohomish Star Center Mall (360) 568-2131 www. myAntiqueMall.com ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,000. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (800) 563-3005. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED WARM, CARING HOST FAMILIES needed for high school exchange students. Volunteer today! Call 1 (866) GO-AFICE or visit afice.org. HELP WANTED -- TRUCK DRIVERS. DRIVERS: CDL-A Drivers & Owner Operators. Drive for the Nation’s Largest Tank Carrier! *Lease Purchase Available* Above Average Pay, Benefits * Plate, Permit & Insurance Programs Available. * Paid Orientation. Call for Details: 866-921-9651 or 866-9222691. www.Work4QC.com REEFER DRIVERS NEEDED? Experienced Drivers and Class A Commercial students welcome! Our incredible Freight network offers plenty of miles! 1-800-277-0212 www.primeinc.com DRIVERS -- Company Drivers Up to 40k First Year. New Team Pay! Up to .48c/mile CDL Training Available. Regional Locations. (877) 369-7105. www.centraldrivingjobs.net REAL ESTATE 20 ACRE RANCH Foreclosures only $99/mo. $0 Down, $12,900, great deal! Near Growing El Paso, Texas. Owner Financing, No Credit Checks, Money Back Guarantee. Free Map/Pictures 800-343-9444 ARIZONA big beautiful lots $89/mo. $0 down, $0 interest. Golf Course, Nat’l Parks. 1 hours from Tucson Intl’t Airport. Guaranteed Financing. No credit check Pre-recorded msg. (800) 631-8164 code 4044 www.sunsiteslandrush.com

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Page B4

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Methow Valley News

LEGAL ADS, Cont.

LEGAL ADS, Cont.

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brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the trustee’s sale, or the last trustee’s sale under any Deed of Trust granted to secure the same debt. E) In any action for a deficiency, the Guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the trustee’s sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the trustee’s sale, plus interest and costs. X. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. XI. Notice To Occupants Or Tenants. The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale, the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. Dated: June 21, 2010. (Substitute) Trustee: Callaway & DeTro PLLC. By: /s/ Peg R. Callaway; WSBA #13786, 700-A Okoma Drive, Omak, WA 98841 (509)826-6316. Published in the Methow Valley News September 1 and 22, 2010.

LEGAL NOTICE Determination of NonSignificance on Proposed nonproject Action. Twisp Shoreline Master Program (SMP) Adoption. Notice is Hereby Given that the town of Twisp has completed the mandatory environmental review for the Twisp Shoreline Master Program update in compliance with the Shoreline Management Act and amendments thereto, including the SEPA checklist. As lead agency for this proposal, the Town of Twisp has determined that it does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required under RCW 43.21C.030 (2)(c). This decision was made after review of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with the lead agency. This information is available to the public on request. This DNS is issued under WAC 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will not act on this proposal for a minimum of 14 days during which appeals may be made. Appeals of this DNS may be sent to Town Hall: PO Box 278, Twisp, WA 988560278. Date of this DNS: Sept 22, 2010. Appeals of DNS due: Oct. 6, 2010. Date of notice of action on SMP adoption: June 9, 2010. Final Comments on SMP due date: Oct. 12, 2010. Project Description: The Town of Twisp Planning Commission, serving as a Shoreline Advisory Committee, developed a draft SMP for Twisp based on the Okanogan County Regional Cities and Towns Shoreline Master Program update process. The updated plan serves as a land use control, regulating use and activities on

lands within 200’ of the Twisp and Methow Rivers. The Master Program establishes policies for land uses within the shoreline, provides provisions for public access to the shorelines, and protects shoreline ecological function through mandatory setbacks, vegetation buffers, dimensional standards, and land clearing and grading standards. Documents: Final documents are available for viewing at Town Hall: 118 S. Glover St or online at www.townoftwisp.com/ planning. Comments: Comments or questions on the final SMP may be submitted until Oct. 12, 2010 to Town of Twisp, Town Planner: Sarah Schrock, 9974081 or via email townplanner@ townoftwisp.com. Existing Environmental Documents: Town of Twisp Shoreline Master Program and associated appendices in the updated plan. Public Hearing: A final public hearing for adoption is scheduled for Oct. 26, 2010, 7pm, Twisp Council Chambers. Published in the Methow Valley News September 22, 2010 LEGAL NOTICE Pack and Saddle Stock Outfitter-Guide Special Use Permit Issuance. Notice of Opportunity to Comment. Draft Environmental Impact Statement. The District Ranger for the Methow Valley Ranger District, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, announces the availability of the Pack and Saddle Stock Outfitter-Guide Special Use Permit Issuance Draft Environmental Impact Statement for public comment. Alternative 2 of the Pack and Saddle Stock Outfitter-Guide Special Use Permit Issuance Draft Environmental Impact Statement is the proposed action and the preferred alternative.

It would issue 10-year special use permits to pack and saddle stock outfitter-guides, with a total of 4,620 service days. The permits would be issued to the existing holders who are in good standing at the time of the decision, or replacements who meet term permit requirements. This alternative would amend the Okanogan and Wenatchee Forest Plans to prohibit pack and saddle stock outfitter-guides from increasing the amount of barren core in any established campsite. In campsites where the existing amount of barren core exceeds 5,250 square feet, outfitter-guides shall not use more than 5,250 square feet, and shall use the same area on successive visits. The project area is located, on the Tonasket, Methow Valley, and Chelan Ranger Districts. Project area includes all Forest Plan MA 15B areas (trailed) in the Pasayten and Lake ChelanSawtooth Wilderness Areas on the Okanogan National Forest, and the portion of the Lake Chelan-Sawtooth Wilderness on the Wenatchee National Forest allocated to Transition, Primitive, and Semi-Primitive, and the North Cascades, Sawtooth Backcountry, Bear/ Ramsey/Volstead, Middle Methow, and Alta Lake areas. Comments on the project must be postmarked no later than 45 days after the date of publication of this legal notice of availability in the Federal Register on September 17, 2010 and should be addressed to the Responsible Official, Michael Liu, c/ o Jennifer Zbyszewski, Methow Valley Ranger District, 24 West Chewuch Road, Winthrop, WA 98862 (Phone: (509)996-4021; FAX: (509)996-2208; e-mail address: comments-pacificnorthwest-okanogan-methowvalley@fs.fed.us). Those submitting hand-delivered comments may do so during regular office

hours, 7:45am to 4:30pm, Monday through Friday, except legal holidays. Those submitting electronic copies must do so only to the e-mail address listed above, must put the project name in the subject line, and must either submit comments as part of the e-mail message or as an attachment only in one of the following three formats: Microsoft Word, rich text format (rtf), or Adobe Portable Document Format (pdf). E-mails submitted to e-mail addresses other than the one listed above or in other formats than those listed or containing viruses will be rejected. It is the responsibility of all individuals and organizations to ensure their comments are received in a timely manner. For electronically mailed comments, the sender should normally receive an automated electronic acknowledgement from the agency as confirmation of receipt. If the sender does not receive an automated acknowledgement of the receipt of the comments, it is the sender’s responsibility to ensure timely receipt by other means. Only those who submit timely comments will be accepted as appellants. For appeal eligibility, each individual or representative from each organization submitting substantive comments must either sign the comments or verify their identity upon request. All comments must be fully consistent with the requirements of the June 4, 2003 regulations at 36 CFR 215.6(3). Anyone wishing to review the project or obtain additional information on the project should contact Jennifer Zbyszewski at (509)996-4021. The USDA Forest Service is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Published in the Methow Valley News September 22, 2010.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice Registration Deadlines and Availability of Voting Aids for Disabled Voter Access for the November 2, 2010 General Election, Okanogan County, Washington. Notice Is Hereby Given, that the registration deadlines for online registrations, mail-in registrations and transfers is twenty nine (29) days prior to the General Election to be held on Tuesday, November 2, 2010. That deadline date is October 4, 2010. Any qualified elector who is not registered to vote in the State of Washington may register to vote in person at the Auditor’s Office up to the 8th day before the Election which is October 25, 2010. Voters who need assistance with voter registration forms or voting, may call (509)422-7240 for assistance. Voters, who are unable to use the mail in ballot, may use the Disability Access Unit available at the County Auditors Office at the Courthouse, from 9:00AM to 4:00PM, weekdays, starting October 13, 2010 through November 1, 2010. On Election Day, November 2, 2010, the Disability Access Unit is available from 7:00AM to 8:00PM. The following districts and/ or precincts are involved: All precincts in Okanogan County. The notice of registration deadlines and handling of registrations and transfers are being done in accordance with RCW 29A.08.140. Dated this 13th day of September, 2010. Laurie Thomas, Okanogan County Auditor and Ex-Officio Supervisor of Elections. By /s/ Mila M Jury, Chief Deputy and Certified Election Administrator. Published in the Methow Valley News September 22, 2010.

Real Estate PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

What’ s Your Methow Valley Dream?

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Methow Valley News

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Page B5

Community

Senior news Things haven’t slowed down any at the rummage room, so we are still passing our overstock on to customers for a $1 a bag. With all the rain it’s hard to keep the free pile going. People get into the wrong stuff and others set their donations in the free things. If and when we get the porch finished, we hope to take care of the problem by having a donation area and a free area. Thanks to Art Zink for all the

tasty peaches, pears and apples; we are enjoying them. I am staying home away from people so I won’t share my cold. First one I’ve had in a year – not sure where I got it or who gave it to me, but I would rather not share it with you. Oh, well, ’tis the season. Take care, stay healthy and don’t forget it’s flu shot season. Rosalie Hutson

Obituaries

Celebration of life

Mary Ann Layfield Mary Ann Layfield, 80, services. She worked in the of Winthrop, passed away Bellingham Police Dept., at her home Sept. 1, 2010. and also with the Dept. She was born July 25, 1930, of Corrections in Tacoma, to Homer and Ruth Bothell Olympia, and Monroe. Upon retirein Snohomish. ment, Mary Ann Mary Ann moved to the spent time as a Methow Valley child in various and worked for the towns while her U.S. Forest Service family followed work during the in the Winthrop Depression and Ranger Station. It war. She attended is here that she fell Mary Ann high school at Mt. Layfield in love with the people and beauty Baker, and graduated from Bothell High of the North Cascades, and School. She enjoyed many enjoyed the love and supyears in the Virgin Islands port of the community. Mary Ann often spoke snorkling, and tour guiding while raising her children. of the beauty and nature she In her 50s, after being a bank would see on her drives, teller for many years, Mary the great friends she gained Ann returned to school, while working with the Forearning her B.A. in social est Service, and the friends

Bring old car seats to Hank’s Like many things, childrens’ car seats expire over time. The expiration date can be found on the manufacturer’s label or in the owner’s manual. The second annual car seat roundup is Tuesday (Sept. 28) from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hank’s Harvest Foods in Twisp. Brian McAuliffe of

the Okanogan County Fire Department and Theresa Remsberg of Aero Methow Rescue Service will collect used and expired car seats to disassemble and recycle the parts, and provide car seat installation checks and answer questions. For more information, call 997-4013.

Student news Washington State University announced that Kellie J. Brennan of Methow received her bachelor of science degree in zoology.

Wade McCullough Friends and family are welcome to a potluck celebration of life for Wade McCullough at 318 B Lodge Lane, Wolf Creek Road, at 5 p.m. on Saturday (Sept. 25). Weddings, births, obituaries, bat/bar mitzvahs, engagements, significant anniversaries, 90th birthdays, graduations, family reunions: Send it to sue@methowvalleynews.com

Senior menu

School menu

Thur, Sept. 23: Deluxe cheeseburger, vegetable pasta salad, melon, cake. Fri, Sept. 24: Turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, vegetable salad, green beans, cranberry sauce, bread, puddding. Mon, Sept. 27: Cheese and bacon quiche, green beans, tomatoes, fruit, muffin, cookies. Thur, Sept. 30: Country fried steak, mashed potatoes, broccoli, spinach salad, bread, Jell-O.

Mon, Sept. 27: Corn dog, baked beans, salad, fruit, milk. Tue, Sept. 28: Chicken fajitas with peppers and onions, salad, fruit, milk. Wed, Sept. 29: Chili, whole wheat roll, salad, fruit, milk. Thur, Sept. 30: Baked potato bar, broccoli, apple crisp, roll, fruit, milk. Fri, Oct. 1: Burrito, salad, fruit, milk.

Harts Pass

by Erik Brooks

and activities she enjoyed at the Senior Center. Mary Ann is survived by her sons, Ken Layfield (Jenne) of Winthrop and Tim Layfield (Chris McCarthy) of La Conner; daughters, Kris Short (Mike) of Hayden, Idaho and Becky Layfield of Omak/Okanogan; and several grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents; her sister Anita Bishop; and her daughter Anita Hawkins. She was incredibly strong and loving and will be greatly missed. Memorial services are Friday (Sept. 24) at 3 p.m. in the Community Center in Twisp.

Bruce Elden Olson Our beloved Bruce lost his short but incredibly courageous nine-month battle with pancreatic cancer on Sept. 14, 2010, at age 54. His “greatest achievement” in his life was his two beautiful daughters Cori (21) and Shelby (18). He was passionate in his role as their father. He was a loving soul mate to his fiancée Amy Cram (Mill Creek), a caring and loving son to his mother Barbara Olson (Winthrop) and respectfully devoted to his mother’s long-time companion Art Davis (Winthrop), whom he loved as a father and who helped raise Bruce since childhood. Bruce was born in Longview, Wash., and grew up first in the Seattle area and later in Bothell, where he lived for most of his life. He graduated from Bothell High School in 1975. His two daughters also graduated from Bothell High School and Bruce was so proud of their achievements. He

worked professionally as a Bruce remained positive carpenter and loved to golf, and continued to thank God as it was his passion to be every night before going to surrounded by the beauty sleep for his loved ones and and his closest friends on for the life that he loved. He the golf course. truly felt blessed for what Bruce left his mark on he had. Bruce was preceded in this world by being a warm genuine human being, fa- death by his father Russell Olson. In addither, son, brother, tion to those listed friend and loving above, Bruce is companion. The survived by his room would light older and much up when Bruce l o v e d b ro t h e r entered. He had John “Butch” Ola warm, engagson (wife Ruth), ing personality younger sister and made those J u l i e B o d m e r, around him smile Bruce Olson whom he loved with his wit and sincere interest in their and cherished so very much lives. He was easy to talk (husband Joe), Tracy Olson to, people could confide in (beloved mother of Shelby him, he made people laugh, and Cori), Mariana Thien, and everybody gravitated who he loved as his own daughter (husband Khom) toward him. Bruce nourished his and many wonderful nieces relationships with family and nephews. A private service will be and friends and was always there for whomever needed held to celebrate his wonhim. He was a man who derful life. Remembrances wasn’t afraid to tell his can be sent to the Pancreatic friends that he loved them. Cancer Action Network, Even after being diagnosed, www.pancan.org.

Health Care Directory Service & Health Directories ~ Deadline for ad placement & changes is Friday at 5 pm for insertion in the next Wednesday’s paper. Directory ads are $8 per column inch. Additional charges may apply for color. To have your service listed please call 997-7011. AA MEETINGS Twisp: 509-997-0356 • 509-923-9130 Sun, Mon, & Tues: 6:30pm at Masonic Lodge Wed: 7pm at Calvary Chapel Winthrop: 509-996-8174 Thurs: 7pm at the Friendship Church Fri: 7pm at the OK Co-op Bldg. Sat: 7pm at the Forest Svc. Bldg. Methow: Sat: 9am at Tim’s Cafe Al-anon Twisp: 509.997.0356 Sun: 5:00pm at the Masonic Hall

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Aero Methow Rescue Office: 997-4013

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Page B6

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Methow Valley News

Valley Life

In bear news, a small black black bear was trapped in Edelweiss in a humane trap over the weekend. This is thought to be one of a pair of sibling black bears, Bob Spiwak one of which is a cinnamon black bear that is still at large. The black black bear may be the one that had Sheila Coe running for her life a couple of weeks ago. We got hit – well, our garbage can

did – twice in the past week. On one occasion, the marauding raider left a scat the likes of which I have never seen before: along with the seed-filled gooey mess was a yellowish orange souvenir in the configuration of a huge sausage. One of the sages of SLIME suggested this was the result of eating pumpkins. Anyhow, now we wait until the last few minutes to put the can out on the roadside for collection. The reason being if we see the bruin coming, we can tell it to “shoo.” Sure. We almost got hit more literally last Thursday night. It was a dark and stormy night, (really!) as we drove from the coast over the North Cascades Highway: steady rain, foggy, and I was getting tired. There was

Andrew Kominak was the grand prizewinner of the annual Great Zucchini Race, held last Saturday at the Farmers Market. His winning racer was a 13-pounder, the size that would Sally Gracie make 10 loaves of zucchini bread or feed a whole lot of chickens for a week. The enthusiasm of the crowd around the racetrack rivaled that of the infield crowd at the Preakness. Andrew isn’t a big guy, and he and the other smaller kids had racing teams of older boys (or parents) that carried their cars to the starting line at the top of the ramp and rescued them at the bottom. I was convinced that Jasper Bard’s smaller bodied racer with big wheels would win the final heat, but the weight of the chassis of Andrew’s racer seemed to be the determining factor. Semi-finalists were Bryn Jones, Tyson Coleman, and Owen Bard. I’ve suggested to Willie Getz, market master, and Nancy Lince, market master assistant, that the market hold a Great Pumpkin Throw on the Commons at the final market of the year on Oct. 30. Anyone else think that might be fun? When I returned from last Saturday’s market, my market bag was full. These were the items I arranged on the counter into a still life worthy of a Dutch painter: two yellow peaches from Smallwood Farms; three pears from Mary Ann and Mark Applebee’s Mountain View Pears; one potato from Crown S Ranch; one apple, one Seckel (sickle) pear from the Murrays’ Twisp River Organics orchard; two heirloom tomatoes, one package of

cherry tomatoes form Morningstar’s River Song Farm in Tonasket; two Gala apples from George Driskell and Sandra Moses’ Brewster orchard; two cucumbers from Heidi Bard, and two yellow squash from Rubio’s Produce. I knew all the growers by name or by custom except for George and Sandra, whom I met for the first time. At three stalls, I took more than I’d paid for. “Oh, take one of these, too, and let me know which you like best,” Heidi said. Mary Ann put three pears in the bag when I’d asked for just two. I love the market, and I’m so grateful to all these farmers whose fruits and produce make my meals tasty and healthy. Where was everyone of Friday night that they missed Love Letters, the benefit at the Merc Playhouse? Jack Bannon and Ellen Travolta donated their performances to the cause. Both actors have a long career in television and theater. The script of Love Letters, a reader’s theater presentation, developed the lives and personalities of two friends over a lifetime. The audience was small but enthusiastic. The dessert buffet was scrumptious. You are invited to join Sandra Strieby and friends in a discussion of The Journey of Little Gandhi by Elias Khouri on Sept. 30 at 7:30 p.m. Sandra was a member of Trail’s End Bookstore’s Literature Book Club. Since the store no longer sponsors the club, Sandra and a few other people would like to revive it and find new members. Call Sandra about the meeting place, or if you’re interested in joining, at 997-2576. Pancakes, “real” maple syrup and butter! Homemade blueberry syrup and pear sauce. Bacon. Sausage. Yep, the Grange is at it again. Join the fun from 8 to 11 a.m. this Saturday, Sept. 25. Adults, $6; Kids (5-10) $3; really little kids, FREE!

Welcome to the latest installment of the Carlton confabulation, a capitalistic endeavor to boost the economy using the always popular timeSue Misao tested practice of “buy low, sell high.” You see, I got a great deal on these very words when I was young, and, after saving them up all these years, finally sold them to my boss today so he could turn around and sell them to you tomorrow. I assume you’re getting a good deal. Now that you own these words, I hope you will treasure them, use

them wisely, or even re-sell them at a reasonable profit. If nothing else, maybe you could recycle them by uttering some of them in any sentences you may construct in your otherwise feeble attempts at communication. I recommend “Carlton” and “great” and “feeble” as words that are semiinteresting without being overly complicated. “Utter” is nice, too. So, it’s been raining. Rain is fine. It makes everything green and green is fine. Rain doesn’t really make everything green, for instance my house got rained on but it’s still brown. And, to be truthful, the green stuff was already green before it rained so you can’t really say the rain turned everything green. For every statement of fact there is an anti-statement of fact to go with it. Rain is fine until it interferes with your plans and then it becomes your

suddenly this apparition in front of the car and my immediate mental response was that I was hallucinating, seeing a wall in front of me, and then realized it was a huge bull moose just ambling across the road, unconcerned about headlights and the mass behind them. Luckily, we were in Ms. Gloria’s car and I was able to swerve into the other lane just about grazing the animal’s hind end. His back was, as the saying can now go, “Taller than a Toyota.” While we are in the wildlife genre, don’t forget that Saturday in Pateros will be the first annual Hawk Migration Festival. There’ll be vendors in town, and rides up to the mountaintop to see the migrating birds. In the same vein, Kim Bondi

reminds us that Sunday the North Cascades Basecamp will be having a pancake breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m. ($5) including a talk by Andy Stepniewski, a raptor expert, and a visit from the WSU Raptor Club, which will be bringing live birds. At 10 a.m., there will be a free, carpooled trip to Harts Pass to view the departing birds. This should go no later than 3 p.m. From Peregrines to packrats we go. Stephanie Fitkin last week livetrapped a wood rat and took it yonder to release it into the wild. These critters do not like to be dumped out of the traps, but after some shaking, it fell out. Rather than fleeing from the human ratnapper, it turned around and attached itself to her leg. So, according

Photo by Mike Maltais

What a bargain A “very pretty” rooster was looking for a new home at last Saturday’s Farmers Market, according to a homemade advertisement by his owner, Caitlyn Cooley, age 6, of Twisp. The handsome fellow was just one among many attractions at the weekly market, that, on this occasion, also included the Great Zucchini Race. The Farmers Market is open from 9 a.m. to noon every Saturday through the end of October. Cooley was able to find a home for the rooster. enemy, but you can’t tell anyone in the Methow that because of all the farmers, who are the only people legitimately authorized to determine the goodness or badness of any particular day’s weather. Weather is mostly good even when it’s bad because around here it rarely kills anyone. No one’s obituary ever says “He died from the rain.” And anything that doesn’t kill you is not so terribly bad. But rain is excellent for making up excuses because nobody really knows if you’re telling the truth. You can say it rained at your house and other people around the valley will just believe you. Last winter I had my neighbors up the road believing it was 70 degrees at my house when they were getting snow. This is not to endorse lying about weather, but an occa-

sional exaggeration won’t disturb the universe too deeply and sometimes you just want your neighbors to be jealous of you, or, if that doesn’t work, to feel sorry for you. It’s a psychology thing. Completely healthy. Not to worry. Inventors, there is a meeting for you on Thursday (Sept. 30) at 6 p.m. in the Country Town Motel in Carlton. I only mention it because, well, I’m not sure why. Call (509) 670-4561 and ask them. As I type this, military jets are screaming overhead. You’d think there was a fire somewhere. One of these days a pilot will sneeze and Twisp will disappear in a fireball. It will be spectacular for a nanosecond. No one will be around to report it. That’s why I’m reporting it now. It’s called “pre-reporting” or “preporting.” OK.

to husband Scott, she took the rat, put it back in the trap, moved elsewhere and again shook it out. This time the cute little rodent did not stop at her leg, but as she was retreating it climbed up to her back. A pair of cyclists happening by, seeing this woman cavorting on the trail trying to get rid of the rat, asked if she needed help, and finally, the furry fellow fled. Wolfman Scott Fitkin wryly observed, “We’ve never had this problem with wolves.” Ms. Gloria had a release experience as well last week, the rat started toward her, then disappeared into the slash pile where it had been released. Said Gloria, “The secret is to give them someplace to go more appealing than your leg.”

Friends and family gathered for a BBQ at Big Twin LakeCampground on Saturday the 11th to celebrate Dorothy Johnson’s 90th birthday. Ashley Lodato Family came from Seattle,Wenatchee, Bellingham, Gig Harbor, and Selah, including all nine of her great-grandchildren! Dorothy grew up in Montana and first came to the valley after World War II when she married Frank Johnson, whose family has been on Big Twin Lake since 1902. After Frank passed in 1995, Dorothy moved to the valley full time to live with her daughter Kathy Corrigan and Kathy’s husband, Mike. Not being one to let entering her 10th decade slow her down, Dorothy continues to ride the access van three times a week to the Senior Center for lunch. Congratulations and happy birthday, Dorothy! Earlier this year I wrote about Darel and Dona Martin of Piggy D’s BBQ, our own Methow Valley championship BBQ competition team. The most recent stop along their BBQ journey found Darel and Dona finishing their 13th competition, competing at the Tree Top Apple 50th Anniversary Skewered Apple BBQ Championship 2010 in Yakima. Seventy teams cooked up their best BBQ for the judges to sample. Piggy D’s finished 3rd, bringing home a big trophy and prize money. Darel and Dona, who always cook up meat from Thomson’s Custom Meats in Twisp, will be heading to Kansas City, Mo., later this year to compete in the American Royal Invitational BBQ Competition: the largest BBQ competition in the country. Let’s wish them the best. Dan Kuperberg cranked out the Wasatch Front 100 run over the weekend, finishing in the top 20 percent of runners. Although he just missed out on being awarded the Royal Order of the Crimson Cheetah belt buckle, Dan’s 28-hour finish qualified him for the solid brass turquoise inlaid Spirit of the Wasatch buckle, which will undoubtedly offer him more wardrobe versatility. One of the most unusual aspects of the Wasatch 100 is that entrants are required to complete eight hours of trail work for their local Forest Service in order to be accepted into the race, in order to be stewards of the mountain trails that they use and love.

Jim DeTro

Commissioner for Common Sense The Methow Valley and Okanogan Valley have unique differences & similarities, as your County Commissioner I will work to balance the needs of both Valleys within Okanogan County as a whole.

a special Thank You to the

North Central Home Builders Assoc. for your endorsement and confidence in me

Jim DeTro

509-322-6326 www.jimdetro.com

Endorsed by the Okanogan County Republican Party

Paid by Committee to Elect Jim DeTro, Okanogan County Commissioner Dist #3 Republican - 70 Crumbacher Rd. Tonasket WA 98855

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Methow Valley News Sept. 22 issue