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FACTBOOK

C O N T E N T S

2013 - 2 014

Published by the Marietta Daily Journal

12 LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER

EXECUTIVE

15 COMMUNITY City profiles,

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famous residents, maps and more

PUBLISHER

Otis Brumby III

GENERAL MANAGER V.P. ADVERTISING

Lee B. Garrett

Wade Stephens

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Jay Whorton

E D I T O R I A L S TA F F

60 BUSINESS Commerce in Cobb continues to rise

DIRECTOR OF MAGAZINES

Mark Wallace Maguire MANAGING EDITOR NEWS EDITOR

81 GOVERNMENT Elected officials, important numbers and facts you need to know

93 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Cobb continues drive to reel in more business

Billy Mitchell

Leo Hohmann

LAYOUT AND DESIGN

Mark Wallace Maguire, Stacey L. Evans, Billy Mitchell Lindsay Field, Jon Gillooly Sarah Chambers, Sally Litchfield, John Bednarowski, Kathy Goldsberry, Rachel Miller, Katy Ruth Camp, Joel Groover, Stacey L. Evans, Meredith Pruden, Michael Pallerino, Sheri Kell

CONTRIBUTORS

PHOTOGRAPHY Emily Barnes, Kelly Huff, Todd Hull, Jennifer Carter, Laura Moon

101 EDUCATION Your comprehensive guide to Cobb’s public and private schools, colleges and universities

COPY DESK

Emily Boorstein, Brent Adams, Brent Ashworth, Gloria Love MAPS AND CHARTS

Beth Poirer, Jennifer Hall, Leigh Hall

131 ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT A look inside Cobb’s arts and entertainment scene

A DV E R T I S I N G S TA F F COBB ADVERTISING MANAGER

Becky Opitz

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

149 HEALTH AND FITNESS From yoga to golf courses, your guide to well-being options in Cobb

Paula Milton, Becky Opitz, Katelyn Ledford, Candace Hallford, Liz Ridley, Dawne Edge, Kim Fowler, Tara Guest, Kelly Miears, Stephanie DeJarnette, Charlene Kay, Allison Bentley GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

167 SENIOR LIVING What Cobb offers senior citizens

Beth Poirier, Jennifer Hall

PRODUCTION CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Leigh Hall

179 REAL ESTATE Looking to buy? We’ve got you covered

101 149

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

Matt Heck I N F O R M AT I O N Factbook is published annually by The Marietta Daily Journal and distributed to more than 23,500 homes and businesses. SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES

To request a copy or to subscribe, contact us at 770.795.5000 or email us at subscriber services@mdjonline.com. ADVERTISING:

To advertise, contact Wade Stephens at 770.795.4001

NEWS TIP:

Contact Billy Mitchell at 770.428.9411 x207

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Welcome to the 2013-14 Factbook n June 2014, Cobb County will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. The war left most of downtown Marietta and Acworth in ashes and much of the rest of the county devastated. Yet Cobb has overcome the ruinous impact of war and Reconstruction to stand as one of the premier counties in Georgia. Today it is the envy of the rest of the state. Why? Quite simply, Cobb is the complete package. We boast a growing population, six unique cities, a dynamic business community, good public and private schools, major universities, unrivaled healthcare, thriving arts and entertainment, efficient businessand homeowner-friendly governments, proximity to Atlanta and Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and a solid quality of life. The Marietta Daily Journal is proud to bring you the 2013-2014 Factbook featuring nearly 200 valuable pages of facts, figures, and key information to help newcomers and longtimers navigate the best Cobb County has to offer throughout the year. Our largest Factbook ever is divided into eight sections – community, business, government, education, economic development, arts and entertainment, health and fitness, and real estate – that highlight the unique areas of

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our vibrant county. More than 700,000 individuals choose to call Cobb home. Cobb’s diverse mix of community, business, and entertainment options give us quality of life second to none in the Southeast. With the Great Recession in the rear-view mirror, Cobb continues to recover, grow, adapt and thrive in today’s competitive marketplace. Decades of strong business, civic and political leadership have positioned Cobb for continued success in the years to come. If you are new or considering Cobb, we want to welcome you and hope you will use these pages to see why we are proud of our community. For life-long residents, these pages are a reminder of all Cobb has to offer. Be sure to take note of our advertisers who help make this edition possible and play a large role in the success of Cobb. We hope you enjoy reading this year’s Factbook and find it a useful reminder of why Cobb is THE place to live, work and play.

Publisher MARIETTA DAILY JOURNAL

The Marietta Daily Journal – All Access Subscription One Account. All Access.

Tablet App

e-edition

Home Delivery

mdjonline.com

Mobile App

The Marietta Daily Journal offers more platforms for you to stay connected with news and events in your community than ever before. Cobb County’s award winning, local news source delivers all access with one subscription. Call 770-795-5000 or go online at www.mdjonline.com and start your all access subscription.

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INDEX OF ADVERTISIERS 9 Round Marietta 163 Acorn Home & Garden 39 Acworth Women's Center 23 Advanta Total Health & Med Spa 153 Advantage Dental, Inc. 156 Allure Dance Studio 57 American Auto Paint & Body Shop 78 AquaGuard Basements 30 Arlene McCoy & Associates Remax Around Atlanta 189 Aroma Ridge Coffee 57 AT & T 75 Atherton Place 157 Atlanta Ballet 135 Atlanta Ballet Centre for Dance Education 144 Atlanta Communities 190 Atlanta Fine Homes - Jim Glover 188 Atlanta Kung Fu and Sanda Center 161 Atlanta Lyric Theatre 143 Barry Morgan For Solicitor General 51 Blackwell’s Jewelers 67 Body Core Neuropathy & Spine Group 159 Bow Wags 16 Brookwood Christian 127 Carol Ann King - Harry Norman Realtors 189 Carolyn Ponder- Re/Max Around Atlanta 191 Champion Air Systems, Inc. 49 Chapman Hall Realtors 104 Chattahoochee Technical College 128 Children's Healthcare of Atlanta 9 City Fit 16 City of Acworth 23 City of Austell 84 City of Marietta 87 City of Smyrna 85 Cobb Antique Mall 24 Cobb Chamber of Commerce 80 Cobb County Government 89 Cobb Drivers Ed 117 Cobb EMC 82 Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre 130 Cobb GOP 84 Cobb Hardware 52 Cobb Hearing Aid Services 158 Cobb Library Foundation 144 Cobb Travel & Tourism 55 Cochran Shutters & Blinds 27 Conyngham & Wernz Harry Norman Realtors 187 Copeland’s 59 Cornerstone Prep 127 County Line United Methodist Church 163 County Line UMC Weekday Ministries Preschool & MMO 122 Covenant Presbyterian Church 144 Crist Roofing & Construction 6 & 180 Cumberland Diamond Exchange 64 Dallas Theater & Civic Center 137 Dance Stop Studios 139 Dave Poe's BBQ 34 David Hylton - Re/Max Around Atlanta 191 Debbie Redford - All Atlanta Realty 186 Decorating Den Interiors 25 Delmar Gardens of Smyrna 166

Dermatology Consultants Diamonds R Forever Direct Lenders, LLC - John West Dogma Dog Care Dogwood Forest Assisted Living Community Eagle Vending Company, Inc. Eastside Christian School Emory Adventist Hospital Faith Lutheran Church & School First Baptist Church Marietta Center For Early Education Fleming Carpet Distributors, Inc. Fresh N Fit Cuisine Gabriel’s Restaurant & Bakery Gail Holman - Re/Max Around Atlanta Gaines Park Senior Living Geico Georgia Aquarium Georgia Memorial Park Funeral Home & Crematory Georgia Trade School Georgia's Own Credit Union Going Gear Gone with The Wind Museum Gracepointe School Harry Norman Realtors Cobb Marietta Office Helen Durrence- Re/Max Around Atlanta Henry's Louisiana Grill Heritage of Brookstone Heritage of Sandy Plains Highland Commercial Bank Inga's Skin & Body Care Salon Jennifer Prange & Gay Locke Re/Max Around Atlanta Jett Auto Care Johnny Sinclair - Harry Norman Realtors Johnny Walker - Harry Norman Realtors Johnson Ferry Baptist Church Juleps Home Décor K. Mike Whitle Kennestone Dental Designs Kids R Kids Learning Academy KSU Continuing Education Leah Stankiewicz - Re/Max Around Atlanta Life Grocery & Café Life University Lockheed Martin Loud Security Systems Luxury Wash Manders Dental Center Marietta/Cobb Drivers Education Marietta FUMC Weekday Ministry Preschool & Kindergarten Marietta Hearing Center Marietta Housing Authority Marietta Museum of History Marietta Podiatry Group Marietta Power and Water Marietta Toyota Marietta Wrecker Mayes Ward-Dobbins Funeral Home Metro Bank

154 120 178 45 170 58 108 155 113 33 18 163 33 190 173 66 4 34 120 98-99 165 132 122 183 191 137 171 177 79 63 184 16 183 54 37 51 35 160 129 195 191 152 100 69 39 57 173 117 106 42 92 50 54 94 91 66 194 73

Mini Maid 186 Miracle Method Surface Refinishing 141 Mount Paran Christian School 123 Mt. Bethel Christian Academy 109 Nam Dae Mun Farmers Market 8 Norman Medford-Peden Funeral Home & Crematory, Inc. 53 North Cobb Christian School 121 North Cobb Spine & Nerve 148 North Georgia State Fair 193 Northside Hospital 5 Okinawa Hibachi & Sushi Restaurant 147 Omega Learning Center 111 Omega Private Academy 119 Otter's Chicken 104 Parc @ Piedmont - East Cobb 176 Peach State Insurance Services, Inc. 46 Peregrine's Landing at Peachtree Creek 171 Piedmont Physicians 150 Pigs & Peaches BBQ Festival City of Kennesaw 134 Pinnacle Orthopedics 196 Plastic Surgery Center of the South 40 Podiatry Group of Georgia 161 Presbyterian Village 168 Primerose Schools 102 Re/Max Around Atlanta 191 Resurgens Orthopaedics 10 Robbins Realty 182 Roswell Street Baptist Church 14 Sam's BBQ 1 49 Shelia Marshall - Re/Max Around Atlanta 191 Shen Yun Ballet - New Times Culture 138 Shiloh Hills Christian School 119 Shorter University 118 Soliel 174 Southern Museum 145 Southern Polytechnic State University 3 Speedpro Imaging 77 St. Joseph Catholic School 116 Sterling Estates Assisted & Independant Living 175 Sue Hilton - Keller Williams Realtors 185 Sundial Plumbing 61 Superior Plumbing 7, 97, & 192 Suzie Crowe - Harry Norman Realtors 152 Tapestry Hospice 178 TechZel 16 The Bottoms Group 19 The Chance Team - Robbins Realty 185 The Framery 141 The Rashidi Law Firm 77 The Walker School 110 Things of Joy 41 Tricia Pridemore For Congress 31 Vespucci's Pizza Pasta Grill 53 Video Impact 44 Vinings Bank 71 Vittles Restaurant 57 Wee One World Daycare & Early Childhood Center 111 WellStar 2 West Cobb Funeral Home & Crematory, Inc.29 Winnwood Retirement 172 Woodstock Market 187 Workout Anytime 16

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community

Above left: Marietta resident John Tate finishes his hike up and down Kennesaw Mountain on a beautiful Saturday afternoon. Above right, Caden Gambon, 5, son of Tim Gambon of Kennesaw, and Erin Gambon, 8, daughter of Michelle Gambon of Marietta, look at a Civil War-style musket during a re-enactment at Kennesaw Mountain.

150 YEARS Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park will celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War battle at Kennesaw Mountain from June 21 through June 29, 2014. The weeklong celebration will feature events ranging from guided hikes to concerts to a kickoff parade. The park, which already is the most visited battlefield

park in the country, is expected to host hundreds of thousands of visitors that week, according to Chief Ranger Anthony Winegar. “We’re already very heavily visited by the local populous anyway,” Winegar said. “There have been people following the sesquicentennial (of the Civil War) all

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Marietta residents Nicola and Dave Long exit the Kennesaw Mountain Visitors Center and head toward the trails to hike the mountain.

throughout the country.” The festivities will kick off Saturday, June 21, 2014, with a parade scheduled to travel from the Marietta Square down Kennesaw Avenue before ending at the park, Winegar said. There also will be guided hikes ranging in difficulty from easy to moderate to challenging, living history events where volunteers recreate moments in the battle with cannon firings and cooking demonstrations, and a Civil War-era fashion show among many other events. The celebration’s pinnacle will be Saturday, June 27, 2014, which is the exact anniversary of the battle on Kennesaw Mountain. “The second Saturday night at the Illinois Monument in the Cheatham Hill part of the park, we will have what we call our premiere event,” Winegar said. “We will have a number of VIPs invited. It’s also the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Illinois Monument so we’re going to rededicate the monument.” Winegar and the roughly 15 other permanent park staff plan to utilize buses and local school and business parking lots to deal with the influx of visitors throughout the celebratory week. Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park was established as a national park in 1935. The visitor center estimates that about 500 to 1,000 people visit the park’s museum on a daily basis. The national park also 17 total miles of trail systems that are available to visitors year round. Holidays and holiday weekends attract larger crowds to the national park. About 1,300 people visited Kennesaw Mountain on Memorial Day 2013, according to Winegar. The park also offers a variety of volunteer opportunities ranging from visitor center front desk volunteers to trail ambassadors who guide hikes and greet hikers along the trails. More information about the 150th Anniversary of the Kennesaw Mountain battle, varying operating hours and volunteer opportunities can be found online at www.nps.gov/kemo.

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park 900 Kennesaw Mountain Drive Kennesaw, GA 30152

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www.nps.gov/kemo (770) 427-4686 2013/14 COBB FACTBOOK

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community

What’s Cobb’s best-kept secret?

Nathan Bohannon Acworth

Kimberly Danielle Kennesaw

Dee Tackett Marietta

“I would have to say Mountain Biscuits is the best kept secret in Cobb County because they have delicious biscuits and it’s right next to Kennesaw Mountain.”

“I just moved here, but I’d definitely say Lulu’s Grill (in Acworth).”

“We like the Avenue of West Cobb because there’s a variety of stores. There’s something for everyone.”

Jennifer Bennett Smyrna “I would absolutely say Smyrna Food Truck Tuesday. You can gather in the park with your friends and family, and it’s like nothing else you could experience.”

COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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Staff / Laura Moon

“Our great quality of life has enabled us to remain Cobb County’s fastest-growing city and a community in which our citizens and our businesses love to call home. — Mayor Tommy Allegood

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Acworth is Cobb’s northernmost city

Staff/Todd Hull

Above: Mayor Tommy Allegood stands in front of the phase two Senator Russell Street construction project that will add new parking and a public courtyard in Downtown Acworth. Left: The classic rail car downtown.

and home to more than 20,000 residents. The city is the fastest growing city in Cobb, and leaders boast a great quality of life. The city is governed by the mayor and its Board of Aldermen, though the mayor only votes in case of a tie. The city manager oversees day-to-day operations. The city was incorporated in 1860 and is known for its many historic assets. The Dixie Highway, known as “the granddaddy of Interstate 75,” was the first interstate to reach the south and is Acworth’s Main Street. Acworth is designated as a Georgia Main Street city and is part of the Main Street America program. As a result, the city aims to preserve the historical significance of its downtown district buildings. Two lakes, Lake Acworth and Lake Allatoona, surround the city and offer four different beaches, fishing, boating and camping. There are also 12 parks that surround Acworth for picnicking and family fun. Nestled along the banks of Lake Acworth is Cobblestone Golf Course.

Acworth…There's No Place Like Home!

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Current Free Services Offered: Pregnancy Tests Post Abortion Care Options Counseling Men’s Counseling Women’s Counseling Prenatal Classes Mentoring Earn While You Learn Clothes Closet Future Services Available: STI Testing Ultrasound Parenting Classes

4805 South Main Street | Acworth, GA 30101 678.574.5466 | acworthwomenscenter.com

Dear Citizens of Cobb County, Acworth has something for everyone! Our historic downtown offers award winning restaurants, an assortment of boutiques, spas and galleries. Highway 41 is also home for every national retailer and restaurant. Acworth flourishes with economic growth and is a great location for a variety of businesses within the Northern Growth Corridor. Picturesque beachfronts and parks for recreational activities make Acworth a great place to visit.

We thank our citizens and visitors for making Acworth home! Mayor Tommy and the Board of Aldermen

COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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Acworth City Hall is at 4415 Senator Russell Ave., Acworth, GA 30101 (770) 974-3112 www.acworth.org  The Board of Aldermen meets at 7 p.m. the first and third Thursday of every month at City Hall, in the council chambers.

Gene Pugliese Alderman (678) 801-4004 gpugliese@acworth.org Bob Weatherford Alderman (770) 974-3533 bweatherford@acworth.org Albert (Butch) Price Alderman (770) 974-4321 bprice@acworth.org

Tommy Allegood Mayor (770) 974-3112 tallegood@acworth.org

Tim Richardson Alderman (770) 974-5259 trichardson@acworth.org

Wayne Dennard Chief of Police (770) 974-1232 wdennard@acworth.org

Tim Houston Alderman (770) 917-1883 thouston@acworth.org

Estimated population: 21,215 Household Populations: 7,470 Average Household Size: 2.66 Total Housing Units: 8,360 Median Family Income: $52,0722 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Staff / Laura Moon

Places of interest: Downtown historic district. Acworth has four beaches and 15 parks. Annual events: Largest women’s triathalon in Georgia, August; Taste of Acworth, October; International wakeboard tour, May; Cobb’s largest Independence Day celebration, July. A bit of history: Acworth started as a little railroad town, and the city became Acworth in 1860. There are more than 300 historic buildings in the city.

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2013/14 COBB FACTBOOK

What’s new in Acworth: City leaders have implemented a downtown redevelopment initiative designed with a historic look. By 2014, the city hopes to be the only city in Cobb to have all five railroad crossings officially designated as silent crossings, which means trains don’t blow their horns as they come through town because other safety precautions have been put in place.

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Staff/Laura Moon

Joe Jerkins was elected Mayor of the city of Austell in 1989. After almost 25 years in office, Jerkins, 71, is beginning to look into retirement. The city named a road running behind City Hall Joe Jerkins Boulevard to honor the leader who did not accept a salary for 14 years. Sitting in his office, Jerkins said, “I care about the citizens. I was born 3 miles from here.” Austell is Cobb County’s smallest city with 6,782 residents. Nestled along the southern border with Douglas County, the city is known for its railroad lines and the Sweetwater Creek that winds through the city. Austell first became known for the restorative mineral-rich waters in the area, which people originally reached by horse and carriage. The completion of a railroad line allowed better access.

Recently, Jerkins strongly supported the revitalization of Austell’s downtown business district with a $1.8 million Livable Centers Initiative grant and $312,000 in matching funds from the city. The five-year project is now complete and includes a tree-lined median, brick streetscapes and black metal light posts to hint at the classic feel of a small Southern town. Austell is home to the beautifully restored multiuse Coats and Clark Threadmill Complex that has a large interior fountain and offices lined with large glass windows. In 1904, the Clark Thread Company, a Scottish textile company, purchased the old Acworth Hosier Mill. The mill’s thread-making enterprise ended in 1983, but the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places. In 2001, the city pur-

Austell Mayor Joe Jerkins stands at the entrance of the Louise Suggs Memorial Community Recreation Area which consists of a walking trail and will later have a frisbee golf course and more picnic areas. chased the building and now uses the complex for a mixture of numerous government offices and private businesses. A unanimous vote by the city council authorized using $8,000 from community improvement funds to develop a nine-hole golf course at Louise Suggs Memorial Park on Spring Street. Jerkins cut a yellow ribbon to open the Frog Rock disc golf course in May 2013. The city plans to add the remaining nine holes as the park is further developed over the next year. It is estimated that the course will have about 500 to 1,000 weekly players that will crisscross the 50 acres of park landscape dotted by large trees.

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community Austell City Hall 2716 Broad St., Austell, GA 30106 www.austell.org

Martin Standard Ward 3 (678) 458-3600 mstandard@austell.org

Trudie A. Causey At-Large, Post 1 (678) 458-4186 tcausey@austell.org

R. G. Starrett Police Chief (770) 944-4329 auspd@bellsouth.net

 City Council meets at 7 p.m. the first Monday of every month in the council chambers of City Hall.

Virginia A. Reagan Ward 4 (770) 948-7303 vreagan@austell.org

Suzanne A. Thomason At-Large, Post 2 (678) 665-4964 sthomason@austell.org

Timothy J. Williams Fire Chief (770) 944-6133 twilliams@austell.org

Joseph L. Jerkins Mayor (770) 944-4328 mayor@austell.org Kirsten Anderson Ward 1 (678) 229-7284 akaustell@aol.com Scott S. Thomas Ward 2 (770) 739-6681 sst627@aol.com Place of interest: Six Flags Over Georgia offers thrill rides, a kids’ area, entertainment, food and souvenirs. Annual events: Fourth of July fireworks celebration and Christmas tree lighting. Famous residents: Louise Suggs won the U.S. Women’s Open golf tournament in 1949 with a current record of 14 strokes. Singer/songwriter Ray Stevens became a producer in Nashville, making several appearances on The Andy Williams Show. Estimated population: 6,782 Median age: 30.7 years Household Populations: 2,283 Average Household Size: 2.82 Total Housing Units: 2,737 Owner-occupied Housing Units: 1,393 Renter-occupied Housing Units: 890 Vacant Housing Units: 141 Labor Force (16 years and older): 4,696 Median Family Income: $54,180 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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“KENNESAW has a rich history dating back to the Civil War, which we showcase through a focus on historic preservation as well as through our

Smithsonian-affiliated Southern Museum. We balance that with a thriving business community, attractive neighborhoods and abundant recreational resources, all of which pave the way for a

PROGRESSIVE FUTURE.” — Mayor Mark Mathews

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community he city of Kennesaw has nearly 30,000 residents and is perhaps best known for Kennesaw State University and the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History. The mayor is the chief executive officer of the city, but only votes in the case of a tie. All five city council members are elected citywide. The town was originally known as Big Shanty,

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and was one of several small towns founded in the mid-1800s after a railroad line was built to connect Terminus (Atlanta) to Cartersville. One other aspect of the city also comes to mind when many think of Kennesaw, and that is the city’s gun law. In 1982, the city unanimously passed a law requiring “every head of household to maintain a firearm together with ammunition.” And that’s still a law in the ’Saw.

Places of interest: The Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History; Smith-Gilbert Gardens, a 16-acre arboretum Annual events: The Big Shanty Festival, in April; Pigs & Peaches BBQ Festival in August is a Georgia State Championship BBQ cookoff. A bit of history: In the 1830s, the Georgia legislature authorized the construction of a rail line through Cobb County, and the town of Big Shanty was founded. During the Civil War, the town became famous as the site of the start of the Great Locomotive Chase, in which the locomotive General was stolen by Yankee soldiers hoping to disrupt Confederate supply lines. Famous residents: Sean O’Pry, a top American male model. What’s new: Weekly ‘Dinner at the Depot.’ Every Monday evening, weather permitting, about a half dozen food trucks congregate in Depot Park downtown for folks to pick up dinner and picnic, if they wish. The city is currently constructing a skate park to be built inside Swift-Cantrell Park. It will contain elements modeled from a competitive Street League skate park plaza design and is scheduled to open late summer 2013.

At West Cobb Funeral Home, we have been committed to serving the families of our community for the past 18 years. Recently, we have renovated and added a tranquil pavilion which adjoins our spacious family reception room. See why more families are choosing our home, our services and our facilities.

COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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Estimated population: 30,990 Household populations: 11,092 Average household size: 2.59 Homeownership rate: 68.9 percent Total housing units: 12,328 Median family income: $60,288 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Kennesaw City Hall 2529 J.O. Stephenson Ave., Kennesaw, 30144 (770) 424-8274 www.kennesaw-ga.gov City Council meets at 6:30 p.m. the first and third Monday of every month in the council chambers of City Hall.

Mark Mathews, Mayor (770) 424-8274 mmathews@kennesaw-ga.gov Cris Eaton-Welsh Council Post 1, Mayor Pro Tem (678) 266-0885 cwelsh@kennesaw-ga.gov Tim Killingsworth Council Post 2 (678) 873-7146 tkillingsworth@kennesaw-ga.gov Bruce Jenkins Council Post 3 (678) 251-6381 bjenkins@kennesaw-ga.gov Matthew Riedemann to serve in the seat until the Nov. 5 2013 election. Council Post 4 Jeff Duckett, Mayor Pro Tem Council Post 5 (678) 480-1340 jduckett@kennesaw-ga.gov Steve Kennedy City Manager (770) 429-4554 skennedy@kennesaw-ga.gov William Westenberger Chief of Police (770) 429-4535 wwestenberger@kennesaw-ga.gov 30

2013/14 COBB FACTBOOK

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community

Photos by Staff / Laura Moon

M

arietta is 15 miles northwest of Atlanta and is Cobb County’s most-populous city, with more than 58,000 residents. The social center of the city is the historic Marietta Square, which offers a gathering place for people working in the area — complete with a gazebo, children’s playground and three-tier fountain. Many weekends, the Square’s Glover Park conducts festivals and concerts on a permanent Victorian-styled stage. As the heart of city, the Square and surrounding downtown areas are constantly improving to provide a higher quality of life for the people who live, work and play in Marietta. The surrounding businesses

offer a variety of antique shops, restaurants, museums and theaters. This includes a large farmers market, with more than 60 vendors, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. Johnny Fulmer and his wife, Susie, started the Marietta Square’s Farmers’ Market more than 11 years ago to promote restaurants using local goods. A new restaurant at 25 North Park Square, The Butcher, The Baker, opened in March of 2012 by Micah and Katie Pfister to focus on local produce. “We rely completely on the farmers, which makes it harder for us sometimes, but it is worth it,” Pfister said. The Butcher, The Baker offers “Snack and Share” appetizers ranging from chicken liver pate to fried pork belly options, as well as trendy standards such

Mayor Steve Tumlin stands at Atherton Square located just outside of the Marietta Square, which will undergo renovations including brick sidewalks, restrooms, signage, a handicap entrance to the Marietta Welcome Center and a 'Southern garden' feel to the area.

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“We have one

of the most active squares in the world. The events

we host draw thousands of people and represent the culture of Marietta. We are rich in history and have beautiful historic homes and a beautiful national and Confederate cemetery.” Staff /Jennifer Carter

·r y· est a ur a n t & b a k er

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Marietta City Hall 205 Lawrence St., Marietta, 30060 (770) 794-5506 www.mariettaga.gov City Council meets at 7 p.m. the second Wednesday of every month in the council chambers of City Hall.

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Steve Tumlin Mayor (770) 794-5501 stumlin@mariettaga.gov Annette P. Lewis Ward 1 (770) 429-0963 alewis@mariettaga.com Griffin L. Chalfant Ward 2 (770) 351-7035 gchalfant@mariettaga.gov Johnny V. Sinclair Ward 3 (770) 605-4755 jsinclair@mariettaga.gov G.A. (Andy) Morris Ward 4 (770) 527-2785 amorris@mariettaga.gov

Georgia Memorial Park Funeral Home & Cemetery, serving the metro area for over fifty years, is devoted to delivering the highest level of service and satisfaction possible to families.

Georgia Memorial Park Funeral Home & Cemetary 2000 Cobb Pkwy SE • Marietta, GA 30060 770.432.0771 • 770.952.4478 www.georgiamemorialpark.com Greg Free - General Manager

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Estimated population: 58,300 Median age: 32.5 years Anthony C. Coleman Ward 5 (770) 794-5526 acoleman@mariettaga.gov Jim W. King Ward 6 (770) 509-2521 jimking@mariettaga.gov Philip M. Goldstein Ward 7 (770) 428-5322 pgoldstein@mariettaga.gov Daniel Flynn, Police Chief (770) 794-5333 dflynn@mariettaga.gov Jackie Gibbs, Fire Chief (770) 794-5451 jgibbs@mariettaga.gov

Household Populations: 23,565 Average Household Size: 2.35 Total Housing Units: 26,928 Owner-occupied Housing Units: 10,099 Renter-occupied Housing Units: 13,466 Vacant Housing Units: 3,363 Labor Force (16 years and older): 34,450 Median Family Income: $44,046 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

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as goat cheese and risotto. Marietta’s rich history has risen from the ashes. In 1851, the Georgia Military Institute was built on Powder Springs Road, and the city was booming as the Civil War began in 1861. But during the summer of 1864, Union forces under Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman occupied the town. For the next five months, Marietta was pillaged by day and ravaged by night, before it was finally burned during the March to the Sea. The CSX freight trains between Atlanta and Chattanooga still run a block west of the town square, past the train depot — which is now the Visitors Center. It is one of only four buildings in Marietta that was not burned to the ground in Sherman’s March to the Sea. Marietta turned into an industrial city in the 1940s, when the Bell bomber plant (now Lockheed) brought in jobs from a new industry which was mostly agriculture before. Joanne Woodward, an Academy Awardwinning actress who was married to Paul Newman, lived with her family as a child in Marietta. Travis Tritt was born in Marietta on February 9, 1963. Newt Gingrich, the 58th Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and 2012 candidate for the Republican Party presidential nomination, moved to Marietta while he was a representative for Georgia’s 6th congressional district. Alan Ball, writer, director and producer for television and film, including American Beauty, True Blood and Six Feet Under, attended high school in Marietta.

community

Alton Brown, television personality, celebrity chef and author lives in Marietta. Marietta is home to many of the Cobb County government offices, including the Cobb County Superior Court and the Board of Commissioners. City Hall is overseen by the mayor and a seven-member city council, though the mayor only votes in case of a tie. A city manager oversees daily operations of the city.

Places of interest: The Marietta Square, including the Gone With The Wind Museum; the many historic districts, including a Christmas Home Tour that showcases six private restored homes decorated for the season; and Six Flags White Water, the largest water park in the South with 50 attractions and one of the world’s tallest free-falls. Annual events: A Taste of Marietta in April; the NAACP’s Juneteenth celebration; July 4 Parade; Art in the Park over Labor Day weekend; MUST Ministries Thanksgiving Gobble Jog; Christmas Tree Lighting with Santa Claus at the beginning of December. What’s new in Marietta: A bike trail from Kennesaw Mountain through the Square all the way to the Chattahoochee River.

156 Church Street Marietta, Ga. 30060 www.kmikewhittledesigns.com

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community

T

he City of Powder Springs is in Cobb’s southwest corner, and is a family-friendly home to nearly 14,000 people. Powder Springs boasts about the city’s safety — with a Gang Resistance Education & Training program and neighborhood watches, as well as recent workshops covering gun safety and teaching area teens safe driving habits. Also known for its outdoor amenities, the 59-mile Silver Comet Trail runs across Georgia, passing through Powder Springs. Built on an abandoned rail rightof-way, this paved trail accommodates bicyclists, skaters, joggers and horseback riders. Powder Springs also has the large 25,470 Ron Anderson Recreation Center.

Powder Springs is receiving proposals for the first phase of Linear Park, which could include a playground, a covered picnic area and a concession stand. The 35-acre park will be built over four stages. The city was incorporated as Powder Springs in 1859, and the old town has kept some aspects of its quaint history in its downtown square. Originally known as the Town of Springville, Powder Springs was incorporated in 1838 and so named for the seven medicinal mineral springs surrounding the area. The mineral water from these springs caused the sand around the springs to turn black like gunpowder. Today, volunteers from the Seven Springs Historical Society operate the Seven Springs Museum on Brownsville Road.

Staff / Laura Moon

Below, Powder Springs Mayor Patricia Vaughn stands in a park that will soon have a playground next to the Silver Comet Trail in Powder Springs.

is a delightful city with lots of community events, a city trail system, parks, rich history and new developments.” — Mayor Pat Vaughn Staff / Emily Barnes

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community Powder Springs City Hall 4484 Marietta St., Powder Springs, 30127 (770) 943-1666

Cheryl Sarvis Ward 1 (770) 943-8001 ext. 322 ward1@cityofpowdersprings.org

www.cityofpowdersprings.org

Al Thurman Ward 2 (770) 943-8001 ext. 323 ward2@cityofpowdersprings.org

City Council meets at 7 p.m. the first and third Monday of every month in the council chambers of City Hall. Patricia Vaughn Mayor (770) 943-1666 mayor@cityofpowdersprings.org Charlie Sewell Chief of Police (770) 943-1616 csewell@cityofpowdersprings.org

Nancy Hudson Ward 3 (770) 943-8001 ext. 324 ward3@cityofpowdersprings.org Rosalyn G. Neal Post 1 — At Large (770) 943 8001 ext. 321 post1@cityofpowdersprings.org Chris Wizner Post 2 — At Large (770) 943-1666 post2@cityofpowdersprings.org

Annual events: July 4 celebration, Powder Springs Day in October and the Lighting of a Christmas tree in December Famous residents: Southern author Lauretta Hannon published a memoir titled “The Cracker Queen.” Robyn Elaine Lively was a young actress who appeared on Punky Brewster, and in the 1990s had recurring roles on Twin Peaks and Doogie Howser, M.D.

Estimated population: 14,253 Median age: 38.7 years Household Populations: 4,875 Average Household Size: 2.8 Total Housing Units: 5,477 Owner-occupied Housing Units: 4,117 Renter-occupied Housing Units: 758 Vacant Housing Units: 660 Labor Force (16 years and older): 10,729 Median Family Income: $65,046 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

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community

“ S M Y R N A has a hometown feel. I’ve lived all my life in Smyrna. We’ve had an influx of folks from all over the world make Smyrna their home, but we still have a small-town feel. Smyrna has a little bit to offer everyone.”

Staff / Laura Moon

More than 51,000 people live in the city of Smyrna, which is also known as the “Jonquil City” for the thousands of jonquils that line its streets each spring. The mayor and the seven-member city council govern city operations, and a city administrator manages daily business. Max Bacon has been the elected mayor for more than two decades. The city of Smyrna was incorporated in 1872. Among sites

in the heart of the city is the 20th Century Veterans Memorial, which is adjacent to the only city-owned public library of its kind in Georgia. Smyrna provides its own police and fire protection in the city. In March 2012, the Taylor-Brawner House and Brawner Sanitarium, on Atlanta Road, were named to the National Register of Historic Places. Brawner Sanitarium is now known as Brawner Hall.

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Smyrna City Hall 2800 King St., Smyrna, 30080 (770) 434-6600 www.smyrnacity.com City Council meets at 7:30 p.m. the first and third Monday of every month in the council chambers of City Hall. A. Max Bacon Mayor (770) 319-5302 mbacon@smyrnaga.gov Melleny Pritchett Mayor Pro-Tem/Ward 1 Councilwoman (770) 319-5306 mpritchett@smyrnaga.gov Andrea Blustein Ward 2 (770) 319-5307 ablustein@smyrnaga.gov Teri Anulewicz Ward 3 (770) 319-5308 tanulewicz@smyrnaga.gov Charles Welch Ward 4 Councilman (770) 319-5309 cwelch@smyrnaga.gov Susan Dease Wilkinson Ward 5 (770) 319-5310 swilkinson@smyrnaga.gov

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Wade Lnenicka Ward 6 (770) 319-5311 wlnenicka@smyrnaga.gov Ron Fennel Ward 7 (770) 319-5312 rfennel@smyrnaga.gov Jason Lanyon Fire Chief/Emergency Management Director (770) 319-5365 jlanyon@smyrnaga.gov Stanley E. Hook Police Chief (678) 631-5100 shook@ci.smyrna.ga.us

Estimated population: 51,271 Median age: 33.5 years Household Populations: 22,914 Average Household Size: 2.19 Total Housing Units: 25,320 Owner-occupied Housing Units: 12,848 Renter-occupied Housing Units: 10,066 Vacant Housing Units: 2,406 Labor Force (16 years and older): 31,616 Median Family Income: $54,603 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Places of Interest: The Market Village in downtown. Annual events: City Birthday Celebration on the first Saturday in August; Spring and Fall Jonquil Festival; Taste of Smyrna in September. A bit of history: Smyrna was incorporated in 1872. It was the first city north of Atlanta. In the middle to late 1980s, Smyrna took on a revitalization of downtown. What’s new in Smyrna: The largest Kroger in the southeast United States recently opened in Smyrna on South Cobb Drive. New restaurants have been opening downtown. There is a large Civil War collection that is going to be on display in Brawner Hall.

HOURS Tuesday - Saturday 10am to 6pm • Sunday 12:30pm to 5:30pm Mondays by chance

770.426.9840 www.acornhomeandgarden.com 3870 Due West Road NW, Marietta 30064 COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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community

A HELPING HAND

W

40

hen someone loses a job as a result of a corporate downsizing or otherwise finds themselves down on their luck, they have a place in Cobb County to turn to for help getting their life back on track. Roughly 60 homeless people are participating in MUST Ministries’ new Volunteer Case Management Program. This program, started in January 2013, assigns each homeless person to a volunteer case manager who will mentor them and help them set and achieve goals that will ultimately result in a job and a place to live. “We talk about goals, we talk about their past and we talk about where they want to be in five years,” said Martha Fodroczi, one of six volunteer case managers. “We try to create goals that are specific so they will be manageable and that we can track so that they can feel like they’re making progress and they won’t get discouraged.” Harris said it is important not to set too lofty of a goal at first because this may discourage the client and dissuade them from participating in the program. “One of the things we talk about with the case managers is we don’t need you handholding, but at the same time we need you to allow them to achieve goals that they can achieve,” said Cozelle Harris, MUST’s client intake coordinator. “Like one of the guys was saying that he needed identification and with no identification, there isn’t anything you can do. So, his first goal might not be housing, his first goal might be getting some ID.” One of MUST Ministries’ “clients” is Jerry, whose last name is being withheld. Jerry became homeless in December 2011 after losing his job with the U.S. Postal Service, and he knew he needed to seek help to get back on his feet. Jerry said he just recently began working with a case manager at MUST and has set small, attainable goals with his case manager. 2013/14 COBB FACTBOOK

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Left, MUST Ministries volunteer Anne Madigan of Marietta hands out breads and sweets to clients at the Marietta location. Opposite page, MUST Ministries case manager Martha Fodroczi of Marietta meets with James, a client at the nonprofit organization. Fodroczi has been volunteering at MUST Ministries for the past two years.

“Housing is the main thing because it is a major part of having a life and having a better life,” Jerry said. “Even for employment you need housing. Even though MUST Ministries provides services like hygiene and stuff, at the same time you need a place to live.” MUST has helped more than 1,600 people find jobs since the economic recession began in 2008, according to MUST spokeswoman Kaye Cagle. In addition to the roughly 60 clients in the Volunteer Case Management Program, MUST also provides clothing, food and educational and occupational seminars to nearly 40 to 60 homeless people each day. Seminar topics range from how to create an email to holding mock job interviews. MUST Ministries was founded in 1971 by the Rev. Wayne Williams with the mission of tutoring and engaging alienated young people, and providing bus services for the elderly to go grocery shopping. Now, MUST helps more than 300 homeless people find homes and jobs each year, Cagle said. Like many who participate in the Volunteer Case Management Program, Jerry said he will continue to meet with his case manager until he graduates from the program by reaching his ultimate goal of finding a home and a job. MUST asked those interested in volunteering for the Daily Intake Program and the Volunteer Case Management Program to visit its website, mustministries.org for more details.

MUST Ministries Elizabeth Inn Campus

®

101 Pueblo Ct., Unit 1014 | Waleska, GA 30183 | 770-479-9569

Non-Profit State of GA 8-14-2009

HAITI ORPHANAGE

KALNINGRAD RUSSIA ORPHANAGE

We need financial gifts to help us continue to send Eppie dolls to suffering children in the USA and around the world. Please visit our website: www.thingsofjoy.com, to learn more about the work of Eppie Everywhere, Inc. With the help of our volunteers who sew, stuff, and dress the Eppies, we have sent 4000+ Eppies to Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Belize, and around the USA including the Sandy & Oklahoma Disasters from January 2009 to June 2013.

Please give Gwen a call to see how you can help us prep Eppie Dolls to send in the USA and AROUND THE WORLD... VOLUNTEER, DONATE FABRIC, ETC.

55 Elizabeth Church Road Marietta, Georgia 30060

Eppie is sold locally at Chamber House in Canton, Three Sisters Gifts in Hickory Flat, Beverly’s Day Spa in Woodstock, Kreations Hair Salon in Waleska, The Personal Touch in Atlanta, Day Dreams in Celebration, FL, on our website at www.thingsofjoy.com and our EBAY store at http://stores.ebay.com/A-Eppie-Soft-Doll-Health-Teddy-Bear; OR call Gwen Lord at 770-479-9569

www.mustministries.org (770) 427-9862

100% of ALL Profits from Sales is used to send Eppie Dolls. COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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community

WHERE TO WORSHIP? A guide to some of Cobb’s largest congregations:

Mount Bethel United Methodist Church 4385 Lower Roswell Road, Marietta 30068 (770) 971-2880 Members 9,124

St. Ann Catholic Church 4905 Roswell Road, Marietta 30062 (770) 552-6400 Members: 15,000

Johnson Ferry Baptist 955 Johnson Ferry Road, Marietta 30068 (770) 973-6561 Members: 7,745

Roswell Street Baptist Church 774 Roswell St., Marietta 30060 (770) 424-9800 Members: 9,144

Turner Chapel AME 492 North Marietta Parkway, Marietta 30060 (770) 422-6791 Members: 6,517

First United Methodist 56 Whitlock Ave. SW., Marietta 30064 (770) 429-7800 Members: 4,000 First Presbyterian of Marietta 189 Church St., Marietta 30060-1629 (770) 427-0293 Members: 2,400 North Star Church 3413 Blue Springs Road, Kennesaw 30144 (770) 420-9808 Members: 2,300 Liberty Church 1285 Cobb Parkway, Marietta 30062 (770) 423-7316 Membership: 2,000 East Cobb United Methodist Church 2325 Roswell Road, Marietta 30062 (770) 971-3643 Members: 1,000

Synagogues Congregation Etz Chaim 1190 Indian Hills Parkway, Marietta 30068 (770) 973-0137 Members: 650 Temple Kol Emeth 1415 Old Canton Road, Marietta 30062 (770) 973-3533 Members: 500

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Chabad of Cobb 4450 Lower Roswell Road, Marietta 30068 (770) 565-4412 Membership: 200

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COBB PLACES

Colleges 1. Kennesaw State University 2. Southern Polytechnic State University 3. Life University 4. Chattahoochee Technical College (Mountain View Campus) 5. Chattahoochee Technical College (Marietta Campus) 6. Chattahoochee Technical College (South Cobb Campus)

Shopping Hotspots 1. Town Center at Cobb www.simon.com 2. Cumberland Mall www.cumberlandmall.com 3. Merchant’s Walk www.edens.com 4. The Avenue East Cobb www.shoptheavenue.com 5. The Avenue West Cobb www.shoptheavenue.com

Places of Interest 1. Kennesaw Mountain 2. Marietta National Cemetery 3. White Water 4. Six Flags Over Georgia 5. Marietta Square 6. The Big Chicken

Hospitals 1. WellStar–Kennestone 677 Church St, Marietta www.wellstar.org

3. WellStar–Cobb 3950 Austell Rd, Austell www.wellstar.org

Full-service, acute care hospital and Level II trauma center with open-heart surgery program, women’s center, oncology center & other medical specialties. 633 beds.

Full-service, acute care hospital with children’s emergency services, comprehensive oncology programs, wound care center & other medical specialties. 382 beds.

2. WellStar–Windy Hill 2540 Windy Hill Rd, Marietta www.wellstar.org

4. Emory-Adventist 3949 S. Cobb Dr, Smyrna www.emoryadventist.org

Long-term acute care facility with a sleep center, outpatient services, ambulatory surgery & other specialized services. 115 beds.

A non-profit hospital operated by Adventist Health Systems as a joint venture with Emory Healthcare. 88 beds.

COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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community

NEW RESIDENT INFORMATION Georgia Driver’s License A Georgia driver’s license must be obtained within 30 days of becoming a Georgia resident. When: Tuesday-Saturday Where: 2800 Canton Road, Piedmont Village Shopping Center, Marietta, 30066 or at 1605 County Services Parkway, Marietta, 30008 How: You’ll need several items to obtain your new license that include a valid out-of-state license (must be less than two years old), your Social Security Number, proof of Georgia residency (a bank statement, utility bill or employment verification), proof of identity (birth certificate, passport, immigration card or military identification). More info: www.dds.ga.gov or (770) 528-5400

Registering Your Vehicle New residents have 30 days to register their vehicle. When: Monday-Friday Where: Cobb County Tag Office, 700 South Cobb Dr., Marietta 30060 How: You must bring original documents to the tag office, including a valid Georgia driver’s license, a tag/title application, proof of ownership, a Georgia emissions certificate, the current odometer reading; proof of insurance in Georgia and proof of your Cobb County residency. More info: www.cobbtax.org

Register to Vote You must be a U.S. citizen, 18 years old by voting day and a legal resident of Georgia and the county you register in. How: Mail in an application to register to vote. You can also download an application at http://sos.georgia.gov/elections /vrinfo.htm. More info: Call Cobb Elections at (770) 528-2581 or visit www.cobbelections.org

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Utilities

community

Water Austell Water System (770) 819-2302 Cobb Water System (770) 423-1000 Marietta Power and Water (770) 794-5150 Powder Springs Water System (770) 943-8000 Smyrna Utility Services (678) 631-5338 Electric Acworth Power (770) 917-8903 Cobb EMC (770) 429-2100 Georgia Power (888) 660-5890 GreyStone Power (770) 942-6576 Marietta Power and Water (770) 794-5150 Gas Austell is the only city in Cobb that supplies natural gas to residents via Austell Gas System, (770) 948-1841. Other county residents may contract with a private marketer. Among the largest are: SCANA Energy (1-877) 467-2262; Georgia Natural Gas (770) 850-6200; and Gas South (1-866) 563-8129. A complete list of all gas providers is at www.psc.state.ga.us Cable All Cobb residents contract with individual companies. Major providers are BellSouth Multimedia (770) 360-5000, Comcast (1800) COMCAST, Direct TV (888) 7772454, and Dish Network (800) 825-2557.

Trash and Recycling Unincorporated Cobb Residents must contract with a private hauler. Acworth Trash pickup twice weekly by Acworth Sanitation. No curbside recycling. (770) 917-8903 Austell Trash pickup each Monday by the city of Austell, (770) 944-4336. Recycling pickup each Wednesday through Republic Services, (404) 693-9200. Kennesaw Trash and recycling pickup weekly by the city of Kennesaw. (770) 421-8552 Marietta Trash and recycling pickup weekly by the city of Marietta. (770) 794-5595 Powder Springs Trash and recycling pickup weekly by the city of Powder Springs. (770) 943-8010 Smyrna Trash and recycling pickup weekly by the city of Smyrna. (770) 431-2850 COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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community

FESTIVALS & COMMUNITY EVENTS Spring

Summer

 Spring art festival in Acworth  The Big Shanty Festival is one of the largest arts and crafts fairs in the southeast, attracting more than 60,000 visitors annually in Kennesaw.  A Taste of Marietta — held annually the last Sunday in April  First Friday Art Walk: Every store on The Marietta Square stays open and most have entertainers.  Spring Jonquil festival in Smyrna  Annual international pro-wakeboard tour in Acworth

June  Acworth Business Association’s summer concert series  First Friday Art Walk: Every store on The Marietta Square stays open and most have entertainers. July  Acworth Business Association’s summer concert series  July 4 fireworks display at Cauble Park in downtown Acworth  July 4th parade in Marietta  First Friday Art Walk  July 4 celebration in downtown Powder Springs

August  Pigs & Peaches BBQ Festival is the Georgia State Championship BBQ cook-off in Kennesaw  First Friday Art Walk: Every store on The Marietta Square stays open and most have entertainers.  Birthday Celebration is first weekend in August to celebrate the birth of Smyrna. Lots of food vendors, bands, a giant birthday cake and fireworks.

Fall September  Taste of Smyrna October  Powder Springs Day: There is a parade, entertainment throughout the day, different children’s events.  A Taste of Acworth  Fall Jonquil festival in Smyrna  Great Lake Allatoona Cleanup, Acworth

Winter November  Must Ministries Thanksgiving Gobble Jog in Marietta December  Santa Comes to Town for children on the first Friday in December in Acworth  Lighting of the Christmas Tree the first Friday in December in Austell  Annual lighting of the Christmas tree, carriage rides and Santa Claus comes to Powder Springs  Coming Home for the Holidays — a lighting of the Christmas Tree celebration in Smyrna

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R

enowned residents

Cobb has a rich in a history of not only

producing, but also being home to dozens of influential and notable people.

We can’t fit them all in, but here is a quick look at some of our county’s finest exports in the last few decades. arts and culture

tv and film

Jen Carfagno is a host on The Weather Channel. The nationally-seen meterologist is a resident of west Cobb.

Kenny Leon has also made his mark. The Vinings resident has directed on Broadway, directed television shows and been nominated for prestigious Tony awards. Who has he worked with? Denzel Washington, Sean Combs and Phylicia Rashad, just to name a few.

The multi Grammyaward-winning, Dove-award-winning Christian rock band Third Day, right, is from Cobb. The band got their start at McEachern High in Powder Springs.

mus ic

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spo r t s In the sports arena, natives have achieved national and international success including, tennis pro Melanie Oudin, Houston Texans quarterback T.J. Yates, below, PGA star Larry Nelson, Atlanta Braves General Manager Fredi Gonzalez and Atlanta Braves President John Schuerholz.

tv and cinema

Other names of note include UGA quarterback and NFL veteran Eric Zeier, Pittsburgh Steeler Jonathan Dwyer and current Atlanta Hawk Al Horford. And then there is Atlanta Braves phenom Jason Heyward, below, who has been a force for the home team the past two seasons.

Of course, Cobb’s most famous export is starlet Julia Roberts, who hails from Smyrna. Need we say more?

tv and cinema Home and garden and makeover merlin heartthrob Ty Pennington is from Cobb, and his mother still practices psychiatry in the greater Atlanta area.

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pol it ic a l a nd g ove r n m e n t

U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson

tv and cinema

Here are just four of the latest notable political leaders the county has produced on both the state and national scene. Others include Gen. Lucius D. Clay, who led the famed Berlin Airlift during the Cold War. Clay, who reFormer congressman, speaker of the mains a legendary House and GOP presidential candidate figure to Germans Newt Gingrich and Americans, was the military governor of Berlin and U.S. commander-in-chief in Europe during that area’s tenuous postWorld War II setting.

Current state Attorney General and former Cobb County Chairman Sam Olens

Former Gov. Roy Barnes

Watch the Food Network? Then you’ve probably seen the foodie mad genius Alton Brown. Brown, above, has a home in Marietta.

arts and culture Cobb is also home to dozens of authors including writers Lauretta Hannon and Joshilyn Jackson. Thomas Arvid is primarily known for his amazing, realistic paintings of wine and wine-related objects.

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community

BY JOAN DURBIN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER CARTER

Veggie Venture KENNESAW COUPLE FINDS SUCCESS IN PRODUCE CO-OP

wo onions … one cantaloupe … one cucumber … six apples.” It’s 9 a.m. and a dozen volunteers are playing beat the clock as they pack

“T

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hundreds of black plastic crates with fruits and vegetables and double check the contents. The pace is quick but not frantic as they break down cartons of produce

from the morning’s trip to the state farmers market in Forest Park and distribute the contents for customer pick up starting at 10 a.m. Tom and Kristina Plauche, owners and founders of Farmers Market Baskets, are right in the thick of things, organizing the work flow and pitching in wherever another pair of hands is needed. Flats of mangoes, boxes of Brussels sprouts and packs of organic strawberries vie for warehouse space with bags of oranges and heads of hydroponic lettuce. Many of the baskets will be delivered to designated group pick up spots in Cobb and Cherokee counties. Others are for individuals who make a weekly or biweekly trip to the Kennesaw warehouse to collect their bounty. All of the baskets have been preordered and paid for online, with prices ranging from $10 to $13 for a small basket and $15 to $18 for a regular size container of 10 to 14 different fruits and vegetables that vary from week to week. All-organic produce is also available for up to $23 for the small basket and up to $33 for a large one. Based in Kennesaw, Farmers Market Baskets is a produce co-op in which members can enjoy the benefits without being required to put in any work or commit for more than one order. Anyone who has a yen for fresh produce is welcome to participate. It makes a little money for the Plauches, although it’s not quite a living for them — yet. “When I first started this, my goal was 200 baskets a week. That was with no rent and no employees,” Kristina said. “Right now we’re at over 1,000 baskets. That’s held steady the past few years.”

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But that may change. Recently, in a huge leap of faith, they moved from a 3,000-square-foot warehouse to a 10,000-square-foot facility off Chastain Road, not far from McCollum airport. It’s a long way from where they began, in the Plauches’ garage in 2009. The couple has eight children and Farmers Market Baskets is a direct result of a desire to get more fresh produce into their diet. To keep costs down, Kristina got together with some friends and neighbors to enable them to make bulk purchases at the state farmers market. Kristina offered to manage everyone’s schedule, handle the order, pick up the produce, coordinate the sorting and keep track of the money for a few dollars a basket. Soon they expanded the co-op to the community at large. Tom, whose background is in commercial construction, quit his job three years ago to devote to the co-op full time. Customers can put their orders in online and then come to the warehouse to pick up their baskets. The company will also make group deliv-

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eries for neighborhoods, offices or other designated spots. Fruit that will end up in the baskets include bananas, apples, oranges, plums, pears, peaches, lemons, strawberries, pineapple, mangoes, kiwi, melons and blueberries. Among the many veggies are lettuce, onions, tomatoes, kale, cauliflower, broccoli, carrots, red, green, yellow and orange bell peppers, poblano peppers and summer and winter squash. The emphasis at Farmers Market Baskets is freshness, not organic, the Plauches explained. “We want to buy the most healthy produce that most people can afford. It’s a huge step just getting yourself to eat more fresh fruits and vegetables,” Kristina said. “Our basket orders are just 10 percent for organics, maybe less.” The savings the average customer experiences is significant. “We costed it out and our baskets are about half of what you’d pay for the same produce at the grocery store,” Kristina said.

Tom and Kristina Plauche. Farmers Market Baskets is at 1500 Lockhart Drive in Kennesaw. Information: (678) 460-7710 or visit http://farmersmarketbaskets.com.

25 years as a Career Prosecutor. Managed the successful completion of 1.6 million criminal cases since 1998. Supervised a staff of 70 people for over 20 years. Developed and conservatively managed a $4 million budget for over 20 years. Elected by fellow prosecutors to two non-consecutive terms to The Prosecuting Attorneys Council. Served as President of the Georgia Association of Solicitor’s General. Served as Vice-Chair of The Prosecuting Attorneys Council for 4 years.

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COBB LIBRARIES Acworth Library 4569 Dallas St., Acworth, 30101 (770) 917-5165 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Thursday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday-Sunday: Closed Central Library 266 Roswell St., Marietta, 30060 (770) 528-2320 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed East Cobb Library 4880 Lower Roswell Road, Suite 510-B, Marietta, 30068 (770) 509-2730 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed

East Marietta Library 2051 Lower Roswell Road., Marietta, 30068 (770) 509-2711 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Thursday-Friday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday: 1 - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed Gritters Library 880 Shaw Park Road, Marietta, 30066 (770) 528-2524 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Thursday-Friday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday: 1 - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed Kemp Memorial Library 4029 Due West Road NW, Marietta, 30064 (770) 528-2527 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Thursday-Friday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday: 1 - 6 p.m.

Sunday: Closed Kennesaw Library 2250 Lewis St., Kennesaw, 30144 (770) 528-2529 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Thursday-Friday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday: 1 - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed Lewis A. Ray Library 4500 Oakdale Road, Smyrna, 30080 (770) 801-5335 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Thursday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday-Sunday: Closed Mountain View Regional Library 3320 Sandy Plains Road, Marietta, 30066 (770) 509-2725 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed

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COBB LIBRARIES Powder Springs Library 4181 Atlanta St., Bldg. 1, Powder Springs, 30127 (770) 439-3600 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Thursday-Friday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday: 1 - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed

Stratton Library 1100 Powder Springs Road, Marietta, 30064 (770) 528-2522 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Thursday-Friday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday: 1 - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed

Sibley Library 1539 South Cobb Drive, Marietta, 30060 (770) 528-2520 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Thursday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday-Sunday: Closed

Sweetwater Valley Library 5000 Austell-Powder Springs Road, Suite 123, Austell, 30106 (770) 819-3290 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Thursday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Friday-Sunday: Closed

South Cobb Regional Library 805 Clay Road, Mableton, 30126 (678) 398-5828 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed

Vinings Library 4290 Paces Ferry Rd., Atlanta, 30339 (770) 801-5330 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. Thursday-Friday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.

community Saturday: 1 - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed West Cobb Regional Library 1750 Dennis Kemp Lane, Kennesaw, 30152 (770) 528-4699 Monday-Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sunday: Closed Smyrna Public Library * This library is not part of the Cobb County system. 100 Village Green Circle, Smyrna, 30080-3478 (770) 431-2860 Monday-Thursday: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Friday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday: 1 - 6 p.m.

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New police HQ in the works for Acworth By Megan Thornton ACWORTH - A new police headquarters is in the works for the city of Acworth, which will be the first planned police station built in the city since 1934. The new two-story, approximately 22,000-square-foot building, which will be adjacent to the city's 4400 Building on Acworth Industrial Drive, replaces the city's 5,000-square-foot station, which wasn't initially built to house a police department. "It was originally just a metal building in a business park," Acworth Police Chief Wayne Dennard said of the present facility, which has housed Acworth P.D. since 1995. "The city purchased the pre-constructed building and built out some office space inside." The old Acworth Jail on Senator Russell Avenue also housed police until 1995. The former jailhouse was built with President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal Money, Dennard said.

Dennard said the additional square footage will allow room for expansion over the next several decades, as the 54 employees are now sharing close quarters. "We're busting at the seams," he said. "There's people sharing office space on top of each other. ... Our hope is for this new facility to take care of our needs for many years to come." Mayor Tommy Allegood said the project will cost about $3.8 million and be paid for with recent SPLOST collections. Allegood said Acworth continues to be the fastest-growing city in Cobb County, expanding from about 6,000 residents in 1998 to about 23,000 in 2010, according to the most recent U.S. census data. "We just outgrew the space," he said. "Well, we outgrew it probably six or seven years ago. But now we're building a station that will be able to accommodate police services for the next 50

years." Dennard said he and other members of the department spent the last year visiting other police stations to get a feel for what they would like to see in Acworth. "We tried to get ideas from these other agencies and what would work well for us and incorporate that into how we operate," Dennard said. Jim Croft, founder of Kennesaw-based Croft & Associates, designed the headquarters to incorporate an existing 3,000square-foot building already on the site to save money. On the inside, the building will have separate offices for command staff, criminal investigations, community affairs, special operations and the patrol division. A main feature of the new design is a large community room, which Dennard said will be used for police training and police-sponsored programs like the Citizen's Police Academy.

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PET ADOPTION Cobb County Animal Control 1060 Al Bishop Drive, Marietta, 30008 (770) 499-4136 Tuesday through Saturday: 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 2 – 5 p.m. Humane Society of Cobb County 148 Fairground St. SE, Marietta, 30060 (770) 428-9882 www.humanecobb.com Adoptions are by appointment

Georgia House Rabbit Society 2280 Shallowford Road, Marietta, 30066 (678) 653-7175 www.houserabbitga.com Animals Deserve Better Inc. 770-402-0297 www.animals deservebetter.com Adoptions are every Sunday, noon to 5 p.m., at PetSmart, 1285 Johnsons Ferry Road, Marietta

Good Mews Cat Adoption Center 736 Johnson Ferry Road, Suite A3, Marietta, 30068 (770) 499-2287 Goodmews.org Adoptions are Saturdays from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. and most Sundays from 1 - 4 p.m. Mostly Mutts www.mostlymutts.org Adoptions are every Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., at PetSmart, 860 Cobb Place Blvd., Kennesaw

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What’s Cobb’s best-kept secret?

Paige Williams Marietta

Greco Marietta

Mary Jane Lewis Smyrna

“I would say the Vineyard Café in Marietta.”

“We really like La Familia and Taqueria Tsunami in Marietta. We go there a lot.”

“I’d have to say Ray’s on the River (in east Cobb). It’s a staple here.”

Brenda Curtis Kennesaw “I think Kennesaw State University is the best kept secret in Cobb. We have theater performances; we have music performances; we have a new museum that’s opened up and people just aren’t aware of all that we have to offer here on our campus.” 56

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Becky Buday Marietta

“Kennesaw Mountain. I love hiking to the top of Kennesaw Mountain because you can do it with your grandchildren or your children or friends and there’s a wonderful view up there.”

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Silence, darkness can’t stop man from helping the blind, deaf

NAVIGATE THE WORLD Working in a small office on a weekday morning in Smyrna, Frank Levine of Austell resembles any other worker going about his daily business. Except in this case, the office in which he repairs broken Braille typewriters is engulfed in pitch blackness. That is often the way Levine navigates through his life — void of sight and sound because of a rare, genetic condition known as Vision Rehabilitation Services CEO and Executive Director Sharon Croyle, right, uses tactile signing with Frank Levine, who lost his hearing earlier in life and then his vision. Levine is the owner and operator of Atlanta Brailler Repair and runs the business at Vision Rehabilitation Services in Smyrna.

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Eagle Vending Company, Inc.

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(770) 426-1969 58

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Usher Syndrome. According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Usher Syndrome is the most common condition that affects both hearing and vision. The syndrome is characterized by deafness and gradual vision loss, and it affects about four babies in every 100,000 births in the United States. There is no cure for Usher Syndrome. “Sometimes I have a hard time, but always find a way to beat it,” Levine said. A native of South Africa, Levine is an expert in the repair of the Perkins Brailler, the most widely used Braille typewriter in the world according to the company, which says it has sold more than 300,000 machines in more than 170 countries since the invention of the device in 1951. Levine is the owner and operator of Smyrna-based Atlanta Brailler Repair, a company he established in January 2002, after the state Department of Labor’s Vocational Rehabilitation program sent him to receive basic training at the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults in New York. Now, Levine can disassemble and reassemble an entire Braille typewriter. “We write Braille information such as personal records, recipes, important information and letters,” Levine said in explaining the uses of braillers in an interview via email. “I offer nationwide service. Wisconsin was the furthest state I recently repaired a brailler (from).” Levine’s office — dotted with braillers in various states of disrepair — is on South Cobb Drive at King Springs Road at Vision Rehabilitation Services of Georgia. People most often mail their braillers to him. “After repairing them, I leave the boxes of braillers in the front lobby for the post office mail carrier,” Levine said. “If UPS is required, my wife, Rita, drives me to the nearest branch.” Founded in 1983 by a Cobb resident who lost her vision, VRS provides training to blind and visually impaired individuals to help them function independently. The organization’s relationship with Levine began about a decade ago when it provided mobility training for him and his guide dog, Dakota. “When he’s working, it gets noisy,” said Marla Shavin, public education director at VRS. “He’s banging away on that equipment and some of the Braille machines are pretty old.” Shavin said the primary mission of VRS is to help people become safe and independent in all of their environments. “Whatever it takes to keep them feeling

relevant, still, so that they’re not becoming shut-ins and not doing the things that they love to do,” she said. Shavin said clients range from young to old and are with VRS for 18 months to two years, but receive a lifetime commitment from the organization because many vision conditions are progressive. “I was born deaf but never knew that I had Usher Syndrome until about 1983,” said Levine, who immigrated in 1977 to America and became a citizen eight years later. “Since my birth, I could see until that year but my full visual impairment started about 2001.” Before then, Levine learned independent living during a six-month residential program in the early 1990s at the Helen Keller National Center. He learned how to read and write Braille, operate a computer, cook, take care of plants, do woodwork and tactile sign language. A primitive form of tactile finger spelling, in which each word is spelled out with a finger on the palm of a recipient’s hand, is how people unfamiliar with sign language commonly communicate with Levine. He now can only detect bright lights, such as street lights, car headlights and room lights, through his limited vision. Perhaps the best and easiest way he communicates is through email, using a Braille display keyboard. People who are deaf and blind often use a Braille display attached to a computer to review the text he or she enters and the text others send in reply. Dr. Brandy Hobbs, who performs low vision exams at VRS, said there is a wide array of technology to help those who are visually impaired function independently, such as electronic magnifiers and eyeglasses with telescopes. Tablet computers and e-book readers have also grown in popularity. But Levine said such recent technology and innovations in braillers haven’t slowed down his business just yet. “It probably will happen in the future,” he acknowledged. “However, most blind people use the braillers for their second usage. I have the latest Braille devices and still use a brailler just like you have a computer and (still) use a pencil.” To further aid his business, Rhonda McBerry, a state vocational rehabilitation counselor in Marietta, assisted Levine in obtaining newer equipment and three weeks worth of technology training at the Helen Keller National Center. For more information about Atlanta Brailler Repair, visit www.atlantabrailler repair.com.

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Staff/Laura Moon

From left, Scott Heden and Will Avery of Burnt Hickory Brewers.

GLASS ACTS Cobb’s craft brewing industry takes off

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business BY MEGAN THORNTON

Over the past few years, Cobb County has grown from opening its first brewery to earning a reputation as an up-andcoming destination for small-scale craft alcohol. Following the success of Marietta-based Red Hare Brewery and Moondog Growlers, nearby Kennesaw also has jumped on the business opportunity and now boasts a nanobrewery focusing on craft offerings and soon will be the home of metro Atlanta’s first whiskey distillery. With all of the efforts spearheaded by Cobb residents, the passion for quality beverages with a local flavor soon will put Cobb on the map and create a new industry in trying economic times. “The craft beer culture in Atlanta and in northwest Cobb has really gone to a new level where people are seeking out local products,” said Scott Hedeen, owner of Burnt Hickory Brewery in Kennesaw. Now that’s news worth raising your glass to. MARIETTA Red Hare owners Roger Davis and Bobby Thomas began brewing up small batches in Davis’ Marietta kitchen in 2008. Their experiment evolved into a 11,200-square-foot space on Delk Industrial Boulevard with a 220-barrel brewing capacity, where Hedeen and his head brewer work to create everyday offerings like the Long Day Lager, Gangway IPA and Watership Brown. Since Georgia breweries can’t sell beer on site, fans can head over to Moondog Growlers to pick up a 32- or 64-ounce jug for $5 each and fill up the growler for anywhere between $10 and $20. After opening in 2012, Moondog brought the growler trend outside of Atlanta and into the homes of suburban beer lovers. “As the saying goes, ‘A rising tide raises all ships,’” Davis said. “Since about March (2011), this (growler) trend has really boomed, and as people come and try out new beers, we’re hoping they’ll try ours, try the others, like ours, like the others, and we’ll all benefit.” Red Hare’s hours are Thursday and Friday from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. and Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. Moondog Growlers is open Tuesday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from 12:30 to 6 p.m. KENNESAW Though folks in Kennesaw won’t be getting their hands on any locally made whiskey for a little while, they do have their own COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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brewery to brag about. Burnt Hickory Brewery takes its name from a Kennesaw Mountain trail and offers beers with names that reflect Hedeen’s taste in punk rock music and fondness for local history. “I’m just putting together the things I love — beer, music and history,” the Acworth resident said. Each of the beers feature a twist on traditional flavors, from a blood orange-flavored Imperial Pale Ale to a porter that tastes like red velvet cake. Hedeen met brewmaster Will Avery at Moondog Growlers, where they connected over the idea of pushing the limits. “There are rules to brewing,” Avery said. “Our mentality is you’ve got to know the rules to break the rules. We know the rules so well that we can kind of do something twisted up, a little catawampus.” This year, Hedeen is looking to take his 2.5 barrel system to more than 20 barrels by moving into some space next door, qualifying Burnt Hickory as a microbrewery on par with Red Hare. The brewery usually has Wednesday tastings from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Just down the road in a house built in the late 1800s, Mark Allen of Acworth is in the process of securing permits to get Lazy Guy Distillery up and running by the end of the year. “It’s a small-batch product, so the taste isn’t like anything else out there,” Allen said. “My recipes will vary based on grain availability, but I’ll have something that tastes like a bourbon.” Allen’s historic-themed distillery will be the first craft whiskey distillery to open in metro Atlanta and only the fourth in Georgia.

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moving forward with its own master plan. “The three hottest areas in District 2 are where the three plans are,” Ott said. “The reason I think that they’re so successful is it tells the development community exactly what the community is interested in having there, and it gives them a guideline as to how to work with the community — because one of the big unknowns for a developer is ‘We have this great idea, well, what’s the community reaction going to be?’” “If you can develop within the confines of the plan, you will receive support from the community,” he added. Ott anticipates 1,100 upscale apartment units to be constructed in the Cumberland district during the next two years estimated to bring 1,500 new residents that would have a significant economic ripple effect for the area. “The apartments in Cumberland core will be the highest rents in the area,” he said. In the Powers Ferry corridor, several commercial projects have culminated from the master plans’ mission to attract and create desirable activity centers. Ott says a

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former empty, run-down shopping center was rebuilt and renovated and now features LA Fitness as its anchor tenant with a Starbucks under construction. At the corner of Delk and Powers Ferry roads, an empty dry cleaners and gas station were demolished and replaced with a Fast Trac Car Wash. “That is a corner people told me I would never be able to redevelop,” Ott said. In the Johnson Ferry corridor in the heart of east Cobb, groundbreaking recently took place for the WellStar East Cobb Health Park, a $74 million project that includes 250,000 square feet of medical space situated on 23 acres between Roswell and Providence roads. The health park is expected to eventually employ 250 people and will open in September 2014. And 33 acres of rare pasture land on Johnson Ferry Road sold for $12 million in late 2012 to GEIC4, a developer/investor group assembled by Brooks Chadwick Capital. Todd Thrasher, managing partner of Brooks Chadwick, said 125 lots will include 40 townhomes and 85 single-family

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business homes. Ashton Woods will be the exclusive builder and Thrasher said the townhomes will be priced in the $400,000 range and single-family homes will be priced from $500,000 to $800,000. He said the project currently is in the permitting phase. The project is one of three the company has under way in District 2. Thrasher said in Atlanta Country Club, the company paid $2 million for the 4.5 acre former Chattahoochee Plantation Club that it has redeveloped into 11 home sites. Thrasher says there are only three lots left and homes start at $1.5 million. Off Woodlawn Drive, between Paper Mill and Lower Roswell roads, the company purchased 6.5 acres for $1.9 million and plans call for 21 homes starting at the mid-$700,000 range. “We have a waiting list of 40 people,” Thrasher said. Thrasher said his company is now looking at assemblages in east Cobb, including entire neighborhoods that are 60 to 70 years old, in order to provide home sites. “Demand outstrips supply and the school districts are the best; taxes are low and there is easy access to job centers,” he said. “We are low on inventory.” Ott says that he is talking with developers about additional potential projects in his district. How high will District 2’s pendulum rise? Only time will tell.

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BEYOND CLOUD NINE

Staff/Laura Moon

Jim Geiger — founder, chairman, president and CEO of Cbeyond Inc. — stands among several awards and honors his company has received. Cbeyond provides voice, data and enterprise applications hosted in its cloud data centers to more than 60,000 small and medium-sized businesses in 14 markets across the country. Geiger says the next wave of cloud activity is the marriage of network and cloud services.

BY SHERI KELL

Jim Geiger

— founder, chairman, president and CEO of Cbeyond Inc., a publicly-traded cloud and communications services provider based in Cobb County — has used his avid work ethic to build a company that was recently named one of Forbes’ magazine’s top most trustworthy companies in America. The Syracuse, N.Y., native has worked since his youth — first, delivering newspapers each morning and evening, and later unloading produce from boxcars at his local farmers market. “I had a hard time in school and mostly was drawn to work,” he said. “By the time I was a junior, I was leaving by noon and working 40 hours a week.” After college graduation, Geiger earned his accounting degree and landed a job at accounting giant Price Waterhouse (now PwC) in Rochester, N.Y. Drawn to innovation, when competition in long distance telephone service

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was legalized in 1984 and a new industry emerged, Geiger became the controller at a Rochester N.Y.-based telephone company. “I immersed myself in the products and the regulatory environment and through that union of regulatory, financial expertise and burgeoning products, I left accounting behind and started developing products for that company,” Geiger said. When his entrepreneurship could be contained no longer, Geiger founded FiberNet, a company that built fiber networks in metropolitan areas. He sold the company to Intermedia Communications in 1996 and moved to Tampa, Fla., to join the management team and head Digex, Intermedia’s Web hosting subsidiary. In 1999, seeing a niche opportunity in the small business space, Geiger moved to Atlanta and founded Cbeyond. “We started installing broadband pipe in small businesses for email, Web hosting and a package of goods and services that back then were not easy for small businesses to aggregate,” he said. “Peo-

ple wanted a single provider to bring them a package of productivity. We built a better mousetrap.” In 2005, Cbeyond went public, opening at $12 a share. With each technological advance, the company built additional mousetraps, including the world’s first 100 percent voice-over Internet protocol network. The year 2010 would become a banner one — the company opened its 14th branch office, a second customer care and technical support call center in Denver, Colo., and expanded into cloud services by purchasing cloud service providers MaximumASP, based in Louisville, Ky., and Aretta, based in Roswell, for a combined $40 million. The acquisitions were combined to create a new division, called Cbeyond Cloud Services. Today, Cbeyond provides voice, data and enterprise applications hosted in its cloud data centers to more than 60,000 small and medium-sized businesses in 14 markets across the country.

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Staff/Jennifer Carter

Tad Leithead — chairman of the Cumberland CID — stands near the Kennedy Interchange, which helped provide new routes to boost economic growth in the area.

CIDs making strides in Cobb BY JENNIFER HAFER CUMBERLAND — In the shadow of the Great Recession, an easy question to ask would be, “Why would a group of property owners volunteer to pay higher property taxes?” The answer can be found in the rebounding tax digests within Cobb County’s two Community Improvement Districts, Cumberland and the Town Center Area. “In 2012, the property tax digest increased in value in both CIDs, and these were the only areas in the county that experienced increases during that calendar year,” said Tad Leithead, chairman of the Cumberland CID. In fact, the TCACID tax digest grew from almost $583 million in 2011 to $602 million in 2012, resulting in a 3 percent increase in taxes collected. The Town Center Area CID is located near the busy

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Town Center Mall in Kennesaw, fronted by Ernest Barrett Parkway and nestled between Interstates 75 and 575. The CID’s boundaries extend, roughly, from Chastain Road to the north, Barrett Parkway to the south, Bells Ferry Road to the east and Cobb Parkway to the west. “We have the ability to generate money and use that money in the ways that we find to be most advantageous to our district,” said TCACID Chairman Mason Zimmerman. “CIDs are unique that way.” A CID is formed when a group of property owners in a defined area agree to pay higher property taxes in order to fund improvements in the region. Frequently, these changes are transportation-related and aimed at relieving traffic and congestion. Such was the case with the recently completed Big Shanty Connector, a road that reconnects an old route bro-

ken in the ’70s to allow for I-75. The corridor provides an east-west alternative to congestion on Chastain Road and Barrett Parkway. “The Big Shanty Connector is a great example of how we as a CID leveraged a small amount of resources to gain greater resources to make a bigger difference,” Zimmerman said. “This was a project conceived by the CID, but it was designed and funded in a collaborative effort for the benefit of the community.” Cobb County and the Georgia Department of Transportation partnered with the TCACID to make the $26 million project a reality. Another example of leveraging TCACID money to accomplish a greater goal is the Skip Spann Connector. The TCACID has invested $1.6 million of the $24 million funded for the new bridge over I-75 connecting Frey Road to Busbee Drive, just north of Chastain Road.

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The project is expected to reduce daily traffic on Chastain Road and the I-75 interchange by 19 percent. “Since 1997, we have leveraged $30 million into $100 million worth of improvement projects,” Zimmerman said. While those are big numbers, the state’s oldest CID has leveraged $100 million in investments into half a billion dollars in roads, transit, commuter services and more. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, the Cumberland CID is the state’s most successful. “CIDs exist in six-year periods,” said Leithead. “No CID has ever gone out of Mason business. Once people see the results Zimmerman that CIDs produce, they become eager to continue to make that investment.” When asked what project over the last 25 years he is most proud of, Leithead doesn’t hesitate to respond: the Kennedy Interchange. “The Kennedy Interchange opened massive development opportunities in the district, and it had a huge impact on the

mobility and accessibility of the Cumberland/Galleria area,” he said. “Almost half of the $1 billion is the Kennedy Interchange and related projects.” The Cumberland area has a huge economic impact, not only in Cobb County, but also in Georgia as well. Its impact amounts to 5 percent of Georgia’s economy and 33 percent of Cobb County’s economy. There are 76,400 jobs in the greater Cumberland area, with 50,600 in the Cumberland CID. The area produces 164,800 total jobs around the state and $22.8 billion in output. Authorized through 2018, the Cumberland CID has no plans to slow down. With 50 projects under way, rebuilding the Windy Hill intersection with I-75 is next on the Cumberland CID’s list. “The intersection of 75 and Windy Hill was built 30 years ago when that area was essentially rural, and there was not a lot of traffic,” Leithead said. “This intersection desperately needs to be rebuilt to support the kind of traffic it’s supporting.” Leithead hopes construction can start in a couple of years.

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COBB COUNTY TOP 10 EMPLOYERS The Home Depot

20,000

Cobb County Schools

14,027

WellStar Health System

11,785

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics

7,568

Cobb County Government

4,162

Kennesaw State University

3,400

Publix Supermarkets

2,973

Wal-Mart

2,750

Six Flags Over Georgia

2,386

The Kroger Co.

2,150 — Cobb Chamber of Commerce

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CAN-DO ATTITUDE Staff/Laura Moon

Jack Clark, vice president and chief technical officer for Kennesaw-based Novelis Inc. in Kennesaw, stands in front of a map of global operations of the company created by recycled aluminum cans.

BY SHERI KELL TOWN CENTER — Jack Clark, vice president and chief technical officer for Kennesaw-based Novelis Inc., was immersed in both engineering and aluminum from early childhood. The Pittsburgh, Pa., native grew up building sailboats as a hobby with his engineer father. “He made every part on the boat himself,” recalls Clark. The family sailed each summer on Lake Erie. “Of course, the boats were all made out of aluminum.” Following in his father’s footsteps, Clark graduated from Purdue University with a degree in mechanical engineering and went to work with the same company, Alcoa (Aluminum Company of America), the world’s third largest producer of aluminum.

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“I think there is no doubt the countless hours I spent fixing and building things with my father influenced me,” he said. “I imagine part of it is in the DNA, too.” Clark began working at the company as an intern between his junior and senior years of college. “I figured if it was good for Dad, it had to be good for me,” he said. His initial eight years with Alcoa were spent in Davenport, Iowa. During that time, Clark started a homebuilding business in his spare time because he was fascinated with the mechanics of homebuilding. In total, he built 26 houses while working full time and rearing young children. Clark moved his family eight times while with Alcoa — including a threeyear stint in Venice, Italy, after the company purchased the aluminum industry from the Italian government.

“Every day was a new adventure both professionally and personally,” he said. “It was our job to figure out how to make the plants profitable.” Next, in Louisville, Ky., Clark became the plant manager for Alcoa’s Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil plant. “That was a different part of the business,” he said. “It was the first time I was in charge, as the CEO of the location.” Clark moved a final time to Shanghai, China, as vice president of operations for Alcoa China Rolled Products. All three of his children graduated from Shanghai American School. “Moving was good for our family. ... People need to be mobile in this day and age,” he said. In 2010, after 29 years with Alcoa, Clark left to join Novelis, the world’s largest producer of rolled aluminum, as director of global engineering in the

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company’s Atlanta office. “It was time to go,” he said. In June of 2012, Novelis opened its $30 million, 160,000-square-foot global research and technology headquarters at 1950 Vaughn Road, near Barrett Parkway and Cobb Parkway in Kennesaw. Clark was promoted to the top spot at the new center. Novelis supplies rolled aluminum for the automotive, beverage-can, consumer electronics and architecture markets. Its top customers include Coca-Cola, Jaguar, BMW and Samsung. The company reported fiscal 2012 revenues of $11 billion. The Kennesaw center contains office space, an aluminum testing lab and a beverage can-making line where customers, like Coca-Cola, can test advanced can designs in a simulated manufacturing environment. Currently, the company has 100 employees in Kennesaw. Clark says the company’s top goal is to increase the amount of recycled metal in its products to 80 percent by the year 2020. It is currently at 42 percent, and the company is the world’s leading aluminum recycler. “The big winner is the environment,” said Clark. “We are really a technology company that, at the end of the day, produces aluminum.” Greg Koch, who was Clark’s supervisor at Alcoa, says it was Clark’s work ethic that separated him from his peers. “When there was a tough job to do, Jack was often asked to do it, because we knew it would get done,” he said. “Jack demonstrated an ability to work across cultures, with increasingly responsible assignments in Europe and Asia. These traits, along with excellent judgment and professional knowledge, have given Jack a foundation for executive positions in a multinational company.” COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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The 6-4-3 Way Unique business works to change lives and strengthen the game of up and comers Staff/Jennifer Carter

From left, Danny Pralgo of Marietta, Ryan Sterling of Roswell and David Carr of Smyrna.

BY MICHAEL J. PALLERINO The scene is something atypical of a Major League Baseball game. To support breast cancer awareness, the players are all decked out in pink-accented jerseys, stirrups and caps. But this is not a Major League game. The players are part of 6-4-3 DP Athletics, a group of young athletes who wear the symbolic color of hope and inspiration like a badge of honor. For the fourth consecutive Mother’s Day, 6-4-3 has partnered with the City of Marietta to help lead the charge on the cause, spearheaded by DJ and Marla Huyck, parents of players in the baseball organization. Along with its support of a cause that transcends sports, the event has other symbolic meanings. The relationship between 64-3 and the City of Marietta is an alliance that continues to grow. It is the kind of relationship that Danny Pralgo, founder of 6-4-3, envisioned when he created the full-service sports organization as a place where players could get everything they needed for their development as athletes, and as young men and women. Working from the Aviation Sports Complex in Marietta, Pralgo is creating one of the area’s best resources for young players by garnering the support of both strong baseball and business minds. “We are thrilled to be in partnership with the City of Marietta,” says Pralgo, who founded the group as the 6-4-3 Baseball Academy in 2007 (it became 6-4-3 DP Athletics in 2010). “We work hard every day to show Marietta’s leadership and residents that we’re a dedicated partner and advocate for this great city.” By becoming a baseball resource, 6-4-3 continues to attract relationships from local and national organizations alike. For example, 6-4-3 works with local baseball organizations such as Oregon Park Baseball, East Marietta National Little League and

Shaw Park Baseball, as well as organizations like the Marietta Boys and Girls Club and Marietta Fire and Police departments. On the national level, 6-4-3 produces a number of high profile tournaments with partners such as Triple Crown Sports, USSSA and Perfect Game. It also works with organizers of the DeMarini Top 96 showcase to play host to a national college coaches’ baseball clinic for high school and junior college/community college players. On the corporate side, 6-4-3 has joined forces with Pro Core Solutions, Rawlings, Mizuno, Jonquil Sporting Goods, ESIX (Entertainment and Sports Insurance eXperts) and Rapid Sports Performance. “Partnerships require accountability,” says David Carr, COO of 6-4-3. “It is a great reminder for us to prove ourselves and our value every day. These partnerships give us a greater worldview. They push us outside of the travel ball environment and give us perspectives that challenge us to improve.” In 2013, 6-4-3 DP Athletics is slated to facilitate 23 baseball teams for ages 8-18 and the Sun Belt Baseball League, a summer wood bat league for some of the area’s collegiate players at the Aviation Sports Complex. 6-4-3 also will play host to about 50 baseball and fast pitch softball tournaments and showcases, as well as continue to serve as a partner in other community/charitable events. In addition, the organization will provide a slate of instructional training for thousands of kids through private, group and team lessons, camps and clinics. The 411 on 6-4-3 6-4-3 DP Athletics 455 Aviation Road Marietta 678.354.3199 www.643dpathletics.com

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ASSOCIATIONS

O

wn a small business in Cobb? Want to find ways to better advertise your product? Looking to network with fellow business owners? Cobb has 10 business associations across the county — each with the goal of supporting and promoting the businesses in Cobb.

Acworth Business Association www.acworthbusiness.org (770) 423-1330 Meets for lunch the fourth Thursday of each month at NorthStar Church, 3413 Blue Springs Road in Kennesaw. Membership is $75 a year. Austell Business Association www.austellbusinessassociation.org Meets for lunch the third Tuesday of each month at the Threadmill Complex, 5000 AustellPowder Springs Road in Austell. Membership is $50 a year. Cobb Chamber of Commerce cobbchamber.org 240 Interstate North Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30339 (770) 980-2000 The Cobb Chamber is one of the largest non-profit chambers and business advocacy organizations in the Southeast with 2,641 member companies. The Chamber has several events each month. Residents can log onto their website for more information. East Cobb Business Association www.eastcobbba.com Meets for lunch the third Tuesday of each month at Hollycrest Hall, 2235 Sewell Mill Road in Marietta. Membership is $75 a year. Kennesaw Business Association www.kennesawbusiness.org. Meets for lunch the second Tuesday of each month at the Kennesaw State University Continuing Education Building, 3333 Busbee Drive in Kennesaw. Membership is $85 a year. Marietta Business Association www.mariettabusiness.biz. Meets for breakfast the third Thursday of the month at the Marlow House, 192 Church St. in Marietta. Meets for lunch the second Thursday at the Mansour Center, 995 Roswell St. in Marietta. Membership is $175 a year, $95 a year if you pay for each meeting you attend, or $50 quarterly. Smyrna Business Association www.smyrnabusiness.org Meets for lunch the first Thursday of each month at Smyrna Community Center, 200 Village Green Circle, Smyrna. Membership is $100 a year. Northeast Cobb Business Association www.northeastcobbba.com Meets for lunch the third Wednesday of each month at Piedmont Church, 570 Piedmont Road, Marietta. Membership is $75 a year. South Cobb Business Association www.sc-ba.org Meets for lunch the first Wednesday of each month at the Lions Club Community Center, 620 Lions Club Drive, Mableton. Membership is $80 a year for businesses, $120 for banks. West Cobb Business Association www.westcobbbusinessassociation.com Meets for lunch the fourth Tuesday of each month, except for November and December, at Lost Mountain Baptist Church, 5400 Old Dallas Road, Powder Springs. Membership is $75 a year. Vinings Business Association www.viningsbusiness.com Meets for lunch the first Tuesday of each month at 11:30 a.m. at the Social Vinings restaurant, 3621 Vinings Slope, Atlanta. Membership is $95 a year.

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BANKS WITH H E A D Q U A R T E R S

IN COBB Community Bank of the South 3016 Atlanta Road Smyrna, 30080 (770) 436-4567

Highland Commercial Bank 3411 Ernest Barrett Parkway Marietta, 30064 (678) 569-4250

First Landmark Bank 307 North Marietta Parkway Marietta, 30060 (770) 792-8870

Vinings Bank 4135 Atlanta Road Smyrna, 30080 (770) 437-0004

Georgia Commerce Bank 3625 Cumberland Blvd., Building 2 Atlanta, 30339 (678) 631-1240

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Credit Unions: Energy One Federal Credit Union 1165 Allgood Road, Suite 8 Marietta, 30062 (678) 560-4856 Georgia Florida United Methodist Federal Credit Union 1991 Lower Roswell Road Marietta, 30068 (770) 565-3794

Community & Southern Bank 3333 Riverwood Pkwy SE 30339 (888) 475-3396

LGE Community Credit Union 430 Commerce Park Drive SE Marietta, 30060 (770) 424-0060 Maco Educators Federal Credit Union 69 South Ave. SE Marietta, 30060 (770) 422-8100 WellStar Credit Union Inc. 675 Campbell Hill St. NW #2 Marietta, 30060 (770) 793-7110

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FORTUNE 500 The Home Depot * 2455 Paces Ferry Road, Atlanta, 30339 * The Home Depot is the world's largest home improvement specialty retailer. * At the helm: Frank Blake, chairman and CEO * Employees: 340,000 * 2012 revenues: $74.8 billion * www.homedepot.com Genuine Parts Co. * 2999 Circle 75 Parkway, Atlanta, 30339 * Genuine Parts Company distributes automotive replacement parts, industrial replacement parts, office products and electrical/electronic materials. It’s perhaps best known for NAPA Auto Parts. * At the helm: Thomas C. Gallagher, chairman and CEO * Employees: 31,900 in North America * 2012 revenues: $13 billion * www.genpt.com Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. * 2500 Windy Ridge Parkway, Atlanta, 30339 * CCE is one of the largest Coca-Cola bottlers in the world. It buys syrup concentrate from The Coca-Cola Co. and combines it with the other ingredients. It sells in Western Europe, including Belgium, Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, Norway and Sweden. * At the helm: John F. Brock, chairman and CEO * Employees: 13,250 worldwide * 2013 revenues: $8 billion * www.cokecce.com HD Supply Holdings Inc. * 3100 Cumberland Blvd., Atlanta, 30339 * HD Supply is an electrical, plumbing and hardware wholesaler * At the helm: James Berges, chairman * Employees: 15,000 * 2013 revenues: $8 billion * www.hdsupply.com

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WHAT’S NEXT?

Chairman Tim Lee shares his vision for the county’s future

BY JON GILLOOLY

Cobb County is in a position of excellence, chairman Tim Lee told a group of community leaders at Vinings Bank during a state of the county update in June. “We’re in a great position here in Cobb County with the best educational system, some of the best financial indicators showing that things are great,” Lee said. “We are in a position to take a hold of the opportunities that are in front of us and make them happen so we can be successful. I do not want you to hesitate any more. Do not hesitate any more in your plan for expansion, growth and making things happen in Cobb County

because we are ready to go.” The county, Lee said, has a tradition of doing more with less. “We have a smaller budget than other counties our size,” Lee said. “We have fewer employees than counties of our size, and of course, we expect the best, from the best employees in the Southeast.” The county closed out its fiscal 2012 budget year in September with reserves up $9.6 million, revenues up $1.7 million and expenses down $17.3 million, Lee said. For fiscal 2013, it added 25 public safety jobs to help ensure the safety of the 700,000 county population. With more than 1 million people visiting the county every year — whether to enjoy Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park, the county’s ball fields, Six Flags or the Big Chicken — Cobb’s No. 1 industry is tourism. The county continues to maintain its coveted AAA rating from bond agencies. And its 1 percent special purpose local option sales tax collections are up $14.2 million over projections.

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“That’s huge,” Lee said. “That’s a great indicator of consumer spending here in Cobb County.” Real estate-related fees are up $2.8 million. “That’s significant,” Lee said. “Those are commercial and residential.” Commercial permits for 2013 are at 2008 pre-recession levels, which is another good indicator, while residential permits are also close to 2008 levels. “I have real estate people coming to me. They have a shortage of new homes in Cobb County. What an incredible position to be in. And here we are in June of 2013,” Lee said. In September 2012, the Board of Commissioners adopted a fiscal 2013 budget of $321.8 million, down slightly from the $321.9 million adopted for 2012. The 2013 budget shows Cobb with 4,432 employees. Transportation Cobb’s international gateway is the county-owned McCollum Airport, an engine that contributes $112.4 million in local economic impact, with a total of 842 jobs that are dependent on airport activity. There are about 225 aircraft

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based at McCollum Field, and about 186 takeoffs or landings every day. The county is building a new $2.5 million control tower at McCollum Field expected to open fall 2014. The tower will replace the outdated one built in 1995. Another improvement is the new 100,000 square feet of hangar space under construction known as Corporate Row, built by the airport’s fixed-based operator Atlanta Executive Jet Center. The $7 million project has space to house about 25 midsize corporate jets. Some Corporate Row hangars are occupied with others to open soon. The county is also set to begin construction this fall on a U.S. Customs and Border Protection office at the airport expected to open in early 2014. “It’s an economic driver for the region, it’s a flagship for the county in terms of an indicator that we’re a progressive, active, involved community with business retention and business development,” Lee said. “By having a corporate hangar and having the operations to support it to include the new custom’s office, it says to the business community that has flight operations that we’re here to do business on

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Staff/Laura Moon

Cobb Chairman Tim Lee is upbeat about the county’s future, including airport upgrades the county is set to start building in 2014. Lee says they will be an ‘economic driver’ for the area. Another reason for optimism are the reversible lanes that are slated to open on Interstate 75 in a couple of years, freeing up traffic.

government

an international level. It’s very attractive, we’ve invested a lot of money making sure the runway has the infrastructure that supports corporate jets, and it’s going to continue to be an economic driver for Cobb County and an attraction that Cherokee and Paulding and Douglas and DeKalb don’t have that we do, and that is an asset to our community.” Traffic congestion remains the No. 1 problem for Cobb, but Lee said over the coming year he plans to listen to what the community wants while designing the county’s new transportation plan which he hopes to have finished by next summer. Cobb is set to have traffic relief with the $951 million “reversible lanes” toll-road project along Interstates 75 and 575 through Cobb and Cherokee counties scheduled to open to traffic in 2018. The county will be able to place its Cobb Community Transit buses on the new lanes and take commuters to and from Atlanta, Lee said. Secondly, there is the proposed $1.1 billion bus rapid transit option under consideration that would take commuters from Kennesaw State University to Midtown. A $1.8 million “Northwest Corridor Alternatives Analysis” study led by Croy Engineering recommended that proposal. The county is in the middle of a $3 million environmental study of the project by Kimley-Horn and Associates, which is expected to be complete by the spring or summer of 2014. COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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COBB COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS Cobb County is governed by a five-member Board of Commissioners. Four commissioners are elected by and represent one of four districts within the county, and the chairman is elected county-wide. The Chairman’s job is full-time, while the district commissioners are part-time. All terms are for four years. These are the commissioners through Dec. 31, 2016. The chairman’s seat is up for election in 2016, as are commissioners in Districts 2 and 4. The county government is headquartered at 100 Cherokee Street, Marietta.

COMMISSION CHAIRMAN Tim Lee tlee@cobbcounty.org 770-528-3305

DISTRICT 1, NORTHWEST COBB Commissioner Helen Goreham hgoreham@cobbcounty.org 770-528-3313

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DISTRICT 2, SOUTHEAST COBB Commissioner BOB OTT bob.ott@cobbcounty.org 770-528-3316

DISTRICT 3, NORTHEAST COBB Commissioner JoAnn Birrell joann.birrell@cobbcounty.org 770-528-3317

DISTRICT 4, SOUTHWEST COBB Commissioner Lisa Cupid lisa.cupid@cobbcounty.org 770-528-3312

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COBB COUNTY CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS

Tom Price U.S. Representative, R-Roswell GEORGIA’S 6TH DISTRICT 3730 Roswell Road, Suite 50, Marietta, 30062 (770) 565- 4990 Visit: tomprice.house.gov/contact-me

All seats are up for election in 2014.

Phil Gingrey

David Scott

U.S. Representative, R-Marietta GEORGIA’S 11TH DISTRICT District Office: 219 Roswell Street, Marietta, 30060 (770) 429-1776 gingrey.ga@mail.house.gov

U.S. Representative, D-Smyrna GEORGIA’S 13TH DISTRICT 888 Concord Road, Suite 100, Smyrna, 30080 (770) 432-5405 Visit: davidscott.house.gov and click the contact us e-mail COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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COBB COUNTY HOUSE DISTRICTS

Ed Setzler

Earl Ehrhart

REPRESENTATIVE, RKENNESAW House District 34 (678) 383-7002 charles@ charlesgregory.com

REPRESENTATIVE, RACWORTH House District 35 (404) 656-0178 Ed.setzler@ house.ga.gov

REPRESENTATIVE, RWEST COBB House District 36 (404) 463-2247 Earl.ehrhart@ house.ga.gov.

Rich Golick

Michael Smith

Stacey Evans

REPRESENTATIVE, RSMYRNA House District 40 (404) 656-5943 Rich.golick@ house.ga.gov

REPRESENTATIVE, DMARIETTA House District 41 (404)652-9227 michaelandresmith@yahoo.com

REPRESENTATIVE, DSMYRNA House District 42 (770) 410-4087 stacey@ staceyevans.org

Sam Teasley

David Wilkerson

REPRESENTATIVE, RMARIETTA House District 37 (404) 656-0177 Sam.teasley@ house.ga.gov

REPRESENTATIVE, DAUSTELL House District 38 (404) 656-0116 David.wilkerson@ house.ga.gov

Sharon Cooper

Don Parsons

Matt Dollar

John Carson

Sheila Jones

Roger Bruce

REPRESENTATIVE, RMARIETTA House District 43 (404) 656-5069 Sharon.cooper@ house.ga.gov

REPRESENTATIVE, RNORTHEAST COBB House District 44 (404) 656-9198 repdon@ donparsons.org

REPRESENTATIVE, REAST COBB House District 45 (404) 656-0254 Matt.dollar@ house.ga.gov

REPRESENTATIVE, RNORTHEAST COBB House District 46 (404) 656-0287 John.carson@ house.ga.gov

REPRESENTATIVE, DSOUTH COBB House District 53 (404) 656-0323 Sheila.jones@ house.ga.gov

REPRESENTATIVE, DSOUTH COBB House District 61 (404) 656-0314 Roger.bruce@ house.ga.gov

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Alisha Thomas Morgan

Charles Gregory

REPRESENTATIVE, DAUSTELL House District 39 (404) 656-0109 alisha@ alishamorgan.com

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IMPORTANT NUMBERS County Government Service Centers Cobb has two government service centers where residents can transact business or receive information about services. Both centers contain full-service tag offices. Hours of operation: Business Offices: Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tag Offices: Mon. - Fri. 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., with main office remaining open until 6 p.m. on Tuesdays. Lines may close 15 minutes early in peak periods of heavy walk-in traffic.

•Precinct 3: Southeast Cobb/Galleria Hawk.Hagebak@cobbcounty.org 1901 Cumberland Parkway, Atlanta, 30339 (770) 499-4183 •Precinct 4: Northeast Cobb Jerry.Quan@cobbcounty.org 4400 Lower Roswell Road, Marietta, 30067 (770) 499-4184

government •Precinct 5: West Cobb Barry.Little@cobbcounty.org 4640 Dallas Highway, Powder Springs, 30127 (770) 499-4185 Special Operations Robert.Sampson@cobbcounty.org 2380 North Cobb Parkway, Kennesaw, 30152 (770) 499-3987

East Cobb 4400 Lower Roswell Road, Marietta, 30068-4233 (770) 499-4447 (770) 499-4409 Fax South Cobb 4700 Austell Road, Austell, 30106-2004 (770) 499-4494 (770) 590-5519 Fax There is also a West Park Government Center, which houses some county offices. West Park Government Center 736 Whitlock Ave., Marietta, 30064 Departments/Services: (Hours may vary by department) Cobb Board of Elections and Registration Office: (770) 528-2581 Cobb Police Crimes Against Children Unit: (770) 801-3470 SafePath Children’s Advocacy: (770) 8013465 Tax Assessor’s Office: (770) 528-3100 Board of Equalization: (770) 528-2000 Tax Commissioner’s Office: (770) 528-8600 County Fire, Emergency Services Emergency, dial 911 Fire Chief Sam Heaton 1595 County Services Parkway, Marietta, 30008 (770) 528-8000 www.fire.cobbcountyga.gov County Police Emergency, dial 911 Chief John Houser 140 North Marietta Parkway, Marietta, 30060 (770) 499-3900 www.police.cobbcountyga.gov Deputy Chief R. L. Prince 140 North Marietta Parkway, Marietta 30060 (770) 499-3900 Deputy Chief C. T. Cox 140 North Marietta Parkway, Marietta 30060 (770) 499-3900 •Precinct 1: Northwest Cobb Jeff.Patellis@cobbcounty.org 2380 Cobb Parkway, Kennesaw, 30152 (770) 499-4181 •Precinct 2: Southwest Cobb Jeffrey.Adcock@cobbcounty.org 4700 Austell Road, Austell, 30106 (770) 499-4182

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COBB COUNTY SENATE DISTRICTS All seats are up for election in 2014. Some district numbers have changes.

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Hunter Hill SENATOR, R-SMYRNA Georgia’s 6th District (770) 855-2454 hunter@votehunterhill.com

Barry Loudermilk SENATOR, R-NORTH COBB Georgia’s 14th District (404) 656-0034 barry@barryloudermilk.com

Judson Hill SENATOR, R-EAST COBB Georgia’s 32nd District (404) 656-0150 judson@judsonhill.com

Steve Thompson SENATOR, D-MARIETTA Georgia’s 33rd District (404) 656-0083 Steve.thompson@senate.ga.gov

Lindsey Tippins SENATOR, R-WEST COBB Georgia’s 37th District (404) 657-0406 Lindsey.tippins@senate.ga.gov

Horacena Tate SENATOR, D-SOUTH COBB Georgia’s 38th District (404) 463-8053 Horacena.tate@senate.ga.gov

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County eyes hiring more firefighters By Jon Gillooly Cobb County Fire and Emergency Services plans to hire new firefighters over the coming months to fill its 47 vacancies. Fire Chief Sam Heaton said he will begin a recruit school Aug. 19 where he hopes to have a class of 25. “Recruit school is when we hire new hires, they go through recruit school, and in recruit school one side of it is the fire training that they get, and the other side is the EMS skills that they get,” Heaton said. The school lasts about 28 weeks. Heaton said he is in the process of final interviews for that class with the

county’s human resources department still wrapping up some background checks. That first batch has already completed the entry-level tests needed for consideration. A new test will be administered for a second batch of potential hires from Aug. 20 to Aug. 22. “Now this new test that we’ll be giving in August will actually be setting up for the next class that will be starting in spring of 2014,” Heaton said. “In that case, we’ll be looking at 22 plus (hires).” Starting pay is $38,355. To be considered for employment, applicants must complete a written test, pass a physical ability test, an indepth background investigation, a

polygraph examination, a psychological examination, medical examination and drug screening. About $60 million of the department’s fiscal 2013 budget of $70.3 million goes to salaries and benefits. The department employs 683 personnel of which 650 are sworn firefighters. “The dedicated men and women of Cobb Fire have done an incredible job through tough economic times over the last few years — at times with staffing at a very minimum,” Heaton said. “We appreciate the support of the citizens and the elected officials and we look forward to getting our staffing back to 2008 numbers so we can better serve our citizens and communities.”

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IMPORTANT NUMBERS

government Sheriff’s Office Sheriff Neil Warren Phone: (770) 499-4200 Website: www.cobbsheriff.org Email: neil.warren@cobbcounty.org.

Suite 140, Austell, 30001 (770) 941-7402 Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m, Monday through Friday

Headquarters 185 Roswell St., Marietta, 30060 (770) 499-4600

Jail 1825 County Services Parkway, Marietta, 30008 (770) 499-4200

Station A 5000 Austell-Powder Springs Road,

Tax Commissioner’s Office Tax Commissioner Gail Downing

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AND GETTING BETTER EACH YEAR

BOARD MEMBERS FRAN SUTTON LARRY STEVENS Chairman MITCH HUNTER MICHELLE KEN DOLLAR COOPER KELLY CHERVONTA Vice Chairman “TAYE” PUGH RAY BUDAY

JOE REECE

DOROTHY HUIEL

Executive Director

Contracting

Mentoring

DINAH KING

MARK WRIGHT

SCOTT CAMPBELL

Adminstrative/HR

Finance

Home Ownership

PAT BENNETT

JIM RATTRAY

BRENDA MARTIN

Operations

Housing Choice Voucher

Information Technology

PETE WALDREP

ELLA MURPHY

Development

Public Housing

MARIETTA HOUSING AUTHORITY 95 COLE ST • MARIETTA, GA 30060 WWW.MARIETTAHOUSINGAUTHORITY.ORG

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Chief Clerk Carla Jackson www.cobbtax.org The Office of the Tax Commissioner is responsible for every phase of collecting and disbursing ad valorem property taxes, titling and registering motor vehicles and mobile homes, administering homestead exemptions and levying on property for delinquent taxes. There are two divisions, which are housed in separate offices. The Property Tax division issues property tax bills, collects taxes, and is responsible for auditing, accounting, disbursing and reporting of collections, processing homestead exemption applications and levying on property for delinquent taxes. Each year tax bills are mailed around Aug. 15 to the Jan. 1 owner. Payment is due within 60 days or by Oct. 15. Exemption applications must be filed by April 1 to affect the current tax year. Main Office: West Park Government Center, 736 Whitlock Ave., Marietta, (770) 528-8600 (open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday; open until 6 p.m. Tuesdays between Aug. 15-Oct. 15) Taxpayers may also pay taxes and file for exemptions at the two Government Service Centers located at 4400 Lower Roswell Road Marietta, 30068-4233 and 4700 Austell Road Austell, 301062004 (open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday). The Motor Vehicle tag division is responsible for the registration and titling of motor vehicles and the collection of all registration fees, taxes and penalties specified by Georgia law. Ad valorem taxes, if due, are collected when the vehicle is registered. Vehicles new to the state and newly acquired vehicles must be registered within 30 days of the day you move to Georgia or the day you purchase the vehicle, respectively. Out-ofstate tags expire 30 days after you move to Georgia, regardless of the date shown on the tag. Only two exceptions: Non-resident military personnel and full-time college students. Main Office: 700 South Cobb Drive, Marietta, 30060. Satellite Tag offices: East Cobb Govt. Service Center, 4400 Lower Roswell Road, Marietta 30068. Market Square Shopping Center, 2932 Canton Road NE, Suite 300, Marietta 30066. South Cobb Govt. Service Center, 4700 Austell Road, Acworth 30101. Cobb County Fire Station #28, 3858 Kemp Ridge Road, Acworth 30101. All offices are open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday, and the Main Tag Office is open until 6 p.m. on Tuesdays. Lines may close 15 minutes early in peak periods of walk-in traffic. Tag Helpline at (770) 528-TAGS (8247) Driver’s License Customer Service Centers New residents should obtain a Georgia’s driver’s license within 30 days of establishing residency. A Social Security card, birth certificate, two recent utility bills and a current license are required. For detailed information, visit the state Department of Driver Services by phone at (678) 413-8400 or online at www.dds.ga.gov. There are two centers in Cobb: 605 County Services Parkway, Marietta 30008 Phone: (770) 528-3250 Tuesday: Friday 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday: 7:30 a.m. – noon

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economic development

NEW BRIDGES, REPAIRS UNDERWAY IN COUNTY BY JON GILLOOLY Cobb County is in bridge building mode. An October groundbreaking is planned for a new $17.3 million bridge over Interstate 75 north of Chastain Road. The bridge will link Kennesaw State University’s campus off Frey Road to the Town Center business community at Busbee Drive. If all goes as planned, the bridge will Staff/Laura Moon open in spring 2015. Work began this year on east Cobb’s The bridge will have two westbound Sope Creek Bridge. lanes and two eastbound lanes. In addiwill greatly reduce traffic tie-ups on Chastion, on the west end at KSU, it will have a left-turn lane from the bridge westbound tain Road. The bridge is being paid for with county to Frey Road and southbound toward special purpose local option sales tax dolChastain Road with two lanes going into lars, federal dollars and dollars from the KSU. Town Center Community Improvement The bridge also will have walking and District and university. biking lanes. While the Board of Commissioners In connection with the Big Shanty Connector, which opened last year, KSU Pres- hired Tucker-based Sunbelt Structures Inc. to complete three other bridge projident Dan Papp said the new connector

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ects this year with SPLOST money. Originally built in 1962, the Hopkins Road Bridge over Wildhorse Creek, between Macedonia and Powder Springs Roads in west Cobb, will be replaced for $828,631. Built in 1972, the New Chastain Road Bridge’s two-lane westbound section over Noonday Creek in north Cobb off Canton Road will be replaced for $1.2 million. Originally built in 1925, with a new deck installed in 1970, the Paper Mill Road Bridge over Sope Creek in east Cobb south of Lower Roswell Road will be replaced for $2.12 million. “Bridge infrastructure is important, and we monitor them periodically just to give ratings to make sure it’s safe for truck traffic — you know, the bigger, heavier vehicles,” county Chairman Tim Lee said. “When we got ready for the SPLOST, we identified several bridges that, because of their age and their use, need to be replaced, and those are the three that we’re moving forward on here.”

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new avenues

Toll lanes approved in Cobb on I-75; to open in 2018

BY LEO HOHMANN The federal government gave final environmental approval in the spring of 2013 to a long-debated project that would add toll lanes to Interstates 75 and 575 through Cobb and Cherokee counties. The almost $1 billion project includes the extension of tolled managed lanes along I75 from Interstate 285 to Hickory Grove Road and along Interstate 575 to Sixes Road in Cobb and Cherokee counties. The project has had strong support from both chambers of commerce and local governments in Cobb County and its six cities. Cobb Board of Commissioners Chairman Tim Lee said the additions will relieve congestion and “significantly improve our quality of life by having an alternative transportation mode.” Lee said once the project is completed it also will enhance the Xpress bus service to downtown Atlanta. “I think that project is ab-

solutely wonderful for Cobb County and the community,” Lee said. Lee said the corridor has been in discussion for many years and has the backing of Gov. Nathan Deal. The Federal Highway Administration has signed a Record of Decision giving final environmental approval to the project, also called the “Northwest Corridor Project,” DOT officials announced in late May. The announcement clears the way for rights-of-way acquisition, with the design process starting later this year and construction scheduled to begin in 2014. It is scheduled to open to traffic in 2018. Deal called the project “a vital part of a system-wide transportation effort to address congestion, mobility and livability concerns in metropolitan Atlanta and the state.” The project is the first in the state to be built using the “public-private partnership” model.

MetroBank opens Kennesaw Branch MetroBank opened a new branch in Kennesaw in July. “We think that the Kennesaw branch will be our largest business location in the next five years," said Ken Barber, chairman and CEO of MetroBank. "We believe that the growth in the Northwest Cobb Corridor has so much opportunity for business growth." The bank, at 2454 Kennesaw Due West Road, will be focusing on commercial, rather than residential, lending.

The Kennesaw location is the largest business location for Northwest Corridor and has the most opportunity for business growth, said bank officials. MetroBank has total assets of $170 million. The bank is primarily owned by shareholders living in Douglas, Cobb and Carroll counties. Metro Bank is focused on MetroBank leaders stand with a rendering of the new bank. offering products and services From left, CEO Ken Barber, Mike Henderson, president of Cobb to the businesses and entrepre- Division and Rocky Lipham, senior vice president of head of neurs in our local markets. community banking.

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ON THE CUTTING

BY JON GILLOOLY

EDGE

ounty Chairman Tim Lee’s core strategy to bring jobs to the county and keep the ones that are already here kicked off in March. The Cobb Competitive Economic Development for a Growing Economy initiative — EDGE for short — is a five-year economic development strategy housed at the Cobb Chamber of Commerce in the form of a 501(c)(3). By the end of the five-year term, EDGE’s goal is to have created 7,500 new jobs, increased payroll earnings and income by $420 million and $7,000 per capita in Cobb County, reduced unemployment to 5.5 percent, increased the public school graduation rate by 4 percent and increased the number of collegebound students in Cobb by 7 percent. Mason Zimmerman, chairman of the Town Center Area Community Improvement District, believes the strategy is the right one for the county. “I think this is exactly what Cobb needs to be doing because everybody else is doing it, and we’ve got a lot of assets, and we need a way to cleanly and effectively promote the county,” Zimmerman said. Brooks Mathis, a vice president with the Chamber, was named EDGE’s executive director this year. He and his staff of five are responsible for carrying out the goals of EDGE. Mathis said as of June the nonprofit had raised $1.6 million to help achieve its checklist. EDGE starts with improving Cobb County through its “Seven Seeds for Success,” which are focused on making improvements that will stimulate the local and regional economies. A group of community leaders has agreed to work on each action team.

C

Staff/Laura Moon

Members of Cobb’s EDGE group at the official kickoff. From left are Lockheed Martin Vice President Shan Cooper, Cobb Chamber of Commerce President and CEO David Connell, Cobb Board of Commissioners Chairman Tim Lee, Cobb Chamber Executive Director Brooks Mathis, WellStar Senior Vice President of Public and Government Affairs Kim Menefee and Dan Styf, vice president of operations at Piedmont WellStar Health Plan. Georgia Power Company’s Nicole Faulk is leading Seed 1, which is Retaining & Expanding Existing Business. Sundial Plumbing’s Mitzi Moore chairs Seed 2: Encouraging Entrepreneurship & Aiding Small Business. MDJ Publisher Otis Brumby chairs Seed 3: Marketing Cobb & Projecting a Positive Image. Manpower’s Beth Herman is leading Seed 4: Developing, Re-

cruiting & Retaining Talent. Croy Engineering’s Greg Teague chairs Seed 5: Investing in Transportation Infrastructure & Traffic Relief. Metropolitan Worship Church’s Bryan Crute is leading Seed 6: Support & Coordinate Redevelopment Efforts; and Lanie Shipp and Mary Lou Stephens with the Town Center Area CID are leading Seed 7: Cultivating Community Identities & Sense of Place.

County still eyeing express bus service to Atlanta BY JON GILLOOLY The Cobb Board of Commissioners has spent millions studying a bus line from Kennesaw State University to Midtown Atlanta. Actually building the bus line would come with a $1.1 billion price tag. The first study commissioners paid for was headed up by CROY Engineering. That Northwest Corridor Alternatives Analysis study, which cost $1.8 million, recommended the bus rapid transit route from KSU to Atlanta.

But one study wasn’t enough. The Board of Commissioners, led by county chairman Tim Lee, then opted to do an environmental study of the bus route, hiring Kimley-Horn and Associates to carry out the $3 million project, which is expected to be complete in the spring or summer of 2014. Faye DiMassimo, the county’s transportation director, said it would take 10 to 12 years for the bus system to be operational, assuming the Board of Commissioners give it the green light.

“You could probably be under construction if everything went perfectly in maybe five to seven years,” DiMassimo said. “I wouldn’t think we would actually be up and running until maybe 10 to 12.” The study recommends bus service from KSU to Midtown, a 25.3mile stretch, using routes along both Interstate 75 and Cobb Parkway. The proposal would use two kinds of bus service — express bus service, which are the buses the county currently uses for its

CCT system; and bus rapid transit, which are buses that have the ability to carry more passengers. Express bus service is intended for commuters who want to get from their homes to their jobs as quickly as possible. To that end, there would likely only be three stops along the way for that service utilizing Gov. Nathan Deal’s imminent reversible lane project on I-75. The bus rapid transit system would have more connectivity with perhaps 20 stops along Highway 41, DiMassimo said.

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education

Scott and Laurie Genevish and their sons, first-grader Thomas and his brother, fifth-grader Donnie, who have been students at Kennesaw Charter Science & Math Academy since kindergarten, enjoy the education opportunities at the school, which is off Cobb Parkway in Kennesaw.  Staff/Kelly J. Huff

INTERACTIVE LEARNING Marietta family fell in love with teaching style at Kennesaw Charter School By Lindsay Field After taking advice from a friend, one Marietta couple is happy that they chose to send their sons to Kennesaw Charter School. “A friend of mine at day care, who had a child a year older than my oldest, said ‘You gotta check out this school; it’s great and you’ll love it!’” said Laurie Genevish. She and her husband, Scott,visited the school and immediately fell in love with not just the teachers but the way children are taught. The couple’s 10-year-old son Donnie will be starting fifth grade in August and Thomas, who is 6, will begin first

grade. Both boys started at Kennesaw Charter in kindergarten. “I tell people that I would have had straight A’s if I had learned this way,” she said. Being a charter school, Kennesaw is able to be more flexible with a number of things, including class size, teaching style and bringing in other extracurricular programs. “In a regular public school, it’s sit down and read and not as much interaction, and here they learn through games or songs,” she said. “This past year, they dissected a shark in science class, too, and how often does a kid get to do that?” COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14 103

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education Another thing Genevish said she’s enjoyed about her children’s lessons is that when they are assigned a project, they are not told to do it one way or another, but to choose how it would best help them learn and be presented. “They have those choices, depending on what a child’s interests are and it allows them to have different ways to succeed,” she said. Donnie also is involved in the school’s chess team and is a gifted student in the Quest program, and Thomas participates in Zumba. Kennesaw Charter School, which serves students in kindergarten through sixth grade, opened originally in 2003 and until last school year was housed at a small make-shift school that encompassed two buildings and four trailers at 1370 Lockhart Drive in Kennesaw. But in 2010, the school started preparations for the construction of a new facility, which would move them out of

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their 30,000-square-foot home and into an 110,000-square-foot school. It cost around $17 million and was financed with a 30-year municipal bond with the help of Denver financier Russell

INFORMATION Kennesaw Charter School 3010 Cobb Parkway NW Kennesaw, 30152 (678) 290-9628 www.kennesawcharter.com International Academy of Smyrna 2144 South Cobb Drive SE Smyrna, 30082 (770) 431-7643 www.iasmyrna.org

Caldwell, who also serves on the Georgia Charter School board. Principal Kay Frey said they had 800 students last school year but will be at full capacity at 920 this school year, with 500 on the waiting list. They’ve had to increase their staff by 10 to accommodate the continued growth this coming year, from 42 to 52. The Kennesaw school is one of two in Cobb. The second is what’s now called the International Academy of Smyrna, which is an International Baccalaureate directed school, and is off South Cobb Drive. It opened in 2007 as Imagine International Academy but changed its name last year under the direction of its Board of Directors. The school also underwent a massive renovation using a $17 million bond and can accommodate up to 1,200 in kindergarten through eighth grade.

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education

By Megan Thornton

Staff / Kelly J. Huff

ECO-FRIENDLY

EDUCATION

Chattahoochee Tech programs offer lessons in sustainability he largest technical college in Georgia is looking a little greener these days. Chattahoochee Technical College, which has campuses in Cobb and five other surrounding counties, is focusing on sustainability in terms of jobs, education and the economy. Over the past year, the college has introduced new programs aimed at protecting resources through new industry practices.

T

Taught at the North Metro campus on South Cobb Drive, the environmental technology program prepares graduates for careers in both the public and private sectors with course studies in biology, chemistry and industrial safety and environmentally-specific classes. Instructor Bejie Herrin said students are eager to learn more about the issues associated with the field. “They are finding that the subject is

Above: Sidney Chandler of Acworth, Tyler Day of Powder Springs and Harrison Smith of Marietta follow along as their teacher, Chattahoochee Technical College Alternative Fuels class instructor Carl Mustari, explains a electrical wiring harness inside the engine compartment of a 2008 Prius. COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14 105

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“We’re delving into the

scarcity of resources,

the laws that have already been created and proposals for new regulations, as well as other issues

that affect the air we breathe and the water we drink.”

Staff/ Kelly J. Huff

Chattahoochee Technical College Alternative Fuels class instructor Carl Mustari demonstrates to students Kenneth Bushway of Dallas, Katelynn Crum of Marietta and Josh Guest of Forest Park how to measure voltage in a lead acid battery pack from a 1994 Geo Metro, as they learn about alternative methods to power automobiles.

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much deeper than just talking about green products or recycling,” Herrin said. “We’re delving into the scarcity of resources, the laws that have already been created and proposals for new regulations, as well as other issues that affect the air we breathe and the water we drink.” Aside from the new program, courses aligned with technical colleges for generations also are making moves towards ecofriendly instruction. Chattahoochee Tech’s automotive technology program has added courses where students can learn about alternative fuel vehicles by working on hybrid cars, Associate Dean Shane Evans said. In the same program, instructors teaching industrial maintenance and electric technology are working with a tool aimed at saving energy by reducing the load on electric engines. “There are natural fits between sustainability and the programs at Chattahoochee Technical College, like environmental technology and horticulture,” Evans said. “But basically every program at the college can justify having an environmental focus in its curriculum.” But Evans said “green” buzz words like “sustainability” and “eco-friendly” are worth more than just a passive nod, as companies that embrace sustainable practices are better stewards of scarce resources — saving both the company’s money and the environment. However, the biggest advantage to students is the jobs they will be qualified for with a greater environmental awareness. “Companies that emphasize sustainability will be hiring employees who are familiar with those techniques and technologies and will have the money to do it,” Evans said. “Being a technical college in Georgia affords us the ability to address those market demands and changes while building a well-educated workforce for this community.” For more information on programs, admission and financial aid at Chattahoochee Technical College, call (770) 528-4545 or log on to www.chattahoocheetech.edu.

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A GUIDE TO ...

Cobb / Marietta Elementary Schools

Marietta City elementary schools 2013 CRCT Scores: Percentages of students who met or exceeded standards. 1. A.L. Burruss Elementary 325 Manning Road Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 87

Students: 457

(770) 429-3144 Teachers: 36

CRCT Reading Grade 3 96

Language 92

Math 88

Science 82

Social 88

CRCT Reading Grade 5 96

Language 94

Math 96

Science 84

Social 79

2. Dunleith Elementary 120 Saine Drive Marietta, GA 30008 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 87

Students: 647

(770) 429-3190 Teachers: 49

CRCT Reading Grade 3 90

Language 83

Math 76

Science 72

Social 82

CRCT Reading Grade 5 100

Language 98

Math 99

Science 86

Social 92

3. Hickory Hills Elementary

CCRPI*: 74

500 Redwood Drive SW Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: K-5 Students: 487 CRCT Reading Grade 3 88

Language 78

Math 69

Science 62

Social 70

CRCT Reading Grade 5 92

Language 91

Math 80

Science 72

Social 72

4. Lockheed Elementary 1205 Merritt Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: K-5

Cobb County Schools

(770) 429-3125 Teachers: 39

Michael Hinojosa, superintendent

CCRPI*: 78

Students: 820

(770) 429-3196 Teachers: 61

CRCT Reading Grade 3 86

Language 87

Math 80

Science 69

Social 84

CRCT Reading Grade 5 84

Language 84

Math 84

Science 68

Social 72

(770) 426-3300 www.cobbk12.org

Marietta City Schools

5. Marietta Center for Advanced Academics CCRPI*: 103 311 Aviation Road Marietta, GA 30060 Grades: K-5

Students: 299

(770) 420-0822 Teachers: 16

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 100

Math 100

Science 100

Social 100

CRCT Reading Grade 5 100

Language 100

Math 100

Science 100

Social 100

6. Park Street Elementary 105 Park St. SE Marietta, GA 30060 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 78

Students: 616

(770) 429-3180 Teachers: 47

CRCT Reading Grade 3 91

Language 85

Math 86

Science 74

Social 84

CRCT Reading Grade 5 90

Language 95

Math 88

Science 72

Social 60

7. Sawyer Road Elementary 840 Sawyer Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 86

Students: 756

(770) 429-9923 Teachers: 55

CRCT Reading Grade 3 89

Language 87

Math 82

Science 75

Social 80

CRCT Reading Grade 5 96

Language 100

Math 98

Science 85

Social 92

8. West Side Elementary 344 Polk St. NW Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: K-5 CRCT Reading Grade 3 100 CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Students: 487 Language 96 Language 97

Math 90 Math 97

(770) 422-3500 www.marietta-city.k12.ga.us

Cobb elementary schools 9. Acworth Intermediate 4220 Cantrell Road Acworth, GA 30101 Grades: 2-5

CCRPI*: 86

Students: 828

(770) 975-6600 Teachers: 29

12. Austell Elementary 5600 Mulberry St. Austell, GA 30106 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 85 (770) 819-5804 Teachers: 18

Students: 463

CRCT Reading Grade 3 95

Language 93

Math 79

Science 77

Social 83

CRCT Reading Grade 3 81

Language 84

Math 69

Science 71

Social 76

CRCT Reading Grade 5 95

Language 97

Math 95

Science 83

Social 79

CRCT Reading Grade 5 89

Language 91

Math 83

Science 61

Social 63

10. Addison Elementary 3055 Ebenezer Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 95

Students: 595

(770) 578-2700 Teachers: 26

13. Baker Elementary 2361 Baker Road, NW Acworth, GA 30101 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 93 (770) 975-6629 Teachers: 28

Students: 751

CCRPI*: 91

CRCT Reading Grade 3 97

Language 94

Math 89

Science 90

Social 94

CRCT Reading Grade 3 96

Language 94

Math 84

Science 90

Social 92

(770) 429-3172 Teachers: 35

CRCT Reading Grade 5 97

Language 97

Math 97

Science 92

Social 93

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 99

Math 98

Science 88

Social 94

Science 95 Science 93

Social 91 Social 97

*The College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI) is a 100-point scale the Georgia Department of Education is now using to determine a school’s performance. Source: Georgia Department of Education

Emily Lembeck, superintendent

11. Argyle Elementary 2420 Spring Road Smyrna, GA 30080 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 70

Students: 650

(678) 842-6800 Teachers: 20

CRCT Reading Grade 3 87

Language 87

Math 72

Science 70

Social 76

CRCT Reading Grade 5 93

Language 90

Math 77

Science 69

Social 71

14. Bells Ferry Elementary 2600 Bells Ferry Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 93 (678) 594-8950 Teachers: 24

Students: 591

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 97

Math 89

Science 93

Social 98

CRCT Reading Grade 5 97

Language 99

Math 92

Science 83

Social 89

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15. Bellmont Hills Elementary 605 Glendale Place Smyrna, GA 30080 Grades: K-5

12:09 AM

Page 108

CCRPI*: 79

Students: 477

(678) 842-6810 Teachers: 9

20. Bryant Elementary

CCRPI*: 76

6800 Factory Shoals Road Mableton, GA 30126 Grades: K-5 Students: 966

(770) 819-2402 Teachers: 32

25. Clay Elementary 730 Boggs Road Mableton, GA 30126 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 79 Students: 349

(770) 819-2430 Teachers: 14

CRCT Reading Grade 3 85

Language 78

Math 67

Science 57

Social 76

CRCT Reading Grade 3 90

Language 79

Math 68

Science 68

Social 82

CRCT Reading Grade 3 87

Language 83

Math 61

Science 59

Social 76

CRCT Reading Grade 5 86

Language 96

Math 95

Science 66

Social 69

CRCT Reading Grade 5 92

Language 95

Math 90

Science 76

Social 74

CRCT Reading Grade 5 98

Language 95

Math 85

Science 71

Social 80

16. Big Shanty Elementary 1575 Ben King Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 82

Students: 767

(678) 594-8023 Teachers: 26

21. Bullard Elementary

CCRPI*: 91

3656 Old Stilesboro Road Kennesaw, GA 30152 Grades: K-5 Students: 933

(678) 594-8720 Teachers: 36

26. Compton Elementary

CCRPI*: 61

3450 New Macland Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: K-5 Students: 546

(770) 222-3700 Teachers: 20

CRCT Reading Grade 3 96

Language 94

Math 86

Science 88

Social 90

CRCT Reading Grade 3 99

Language 96

Math 93

Science 94

Social 94

CRCT Reading Grade 3 85

Language 83

Math 63

Science 61

Social 66

CRCT Reading Grade 5 97

Language 96

Math 92

Science 81

Social 83

CRCT Reading Grade 5 97

Language 98

Math 98

Science 88

Social 89

CRCT Reading Grade 5 81

Language 84

Math 74

Science 63

Social 66

17. Birney Elementary

CCRPI*: 65

775 Smyrna-Powder Springs St. Marietta, GA 30060 Grades: K-5 Students: 774

(678) 842-6824 Teachers: 25

22. Chalker Elementary 325 North Booth Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 90

Students: 686

(678) 494-7621 Teachers: 28

27. Davis Elementary 2433 Jamerson Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 96

Students: 546

(678) 494-7636 Teachers: 21

CRCT Reading Grade 3 87

Language 84

Math 66

Science 64

Social 62

CRCT Reading Grade 3 99

Language 98

Math 91

Science 89

Social 90

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 98

Math 88

Science 97

Social 96

CRCT Reading Grade 5 92

Language 92

Math 89

Science 73

Social 65

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 99

Math 96

Science 85

Social 88

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 99

Math 99

Science 97

Social 97

18. Blackwell Elementary 3470 Canton Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 89

Students: 697

(678) 494-7600 Teachers: 25

23. Cheatham Hill Elementary

CCRPI*: 88

1350 John Ward Road SW Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: K-5 Students: 1,161

(678) 594-8034 Teachers: 45

28. Dowell Elementary

CCRPI*: 83

2121 West Sandtown Road Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: K-5 Students: 964

(678) 594-8059 Teachers: 31

CRCT Reading Grade 3 96

Language 92

Math 78

Science 86

Social 90

CRCT Reading Grade 3 97

Language 93

Math 88

Science 86

Social 90

CRCT Reading Grade 3 91

Language 89

Math 74

Science 79

Social 84

CRCT Reading Grade 5 97

Language 98

Math 98

Science 94

Social 94

CRCT Reading Grade 5 96

Language 98

Math 96

Science 88

Social 89

CRCT Reading Grade 5 94

Language 94

Math 87

Science 84

Social 85

19. Brumby Elementary

CCRPI*: 75

1306 Powers Ferry Road Marietta, GA 30067 Grades: K-5 Students: 1,012

(770) 916-7070 Teachers: 32

24. Clarkdale Elementary 4725 Ewing Road Austell, GA 30106 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 71

Students: 594

(770) 819-2422 Teachers: 23

29. Due West Elementary 3900 Due West Road Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 96

Students: 541

(678) 594-8071 Teachers: 22

CRCT Reading Grade 3 89

Language 87

Math 73

Science 76

Social 88

CRCT Reading Grade 3 88

Language 87

Math 61

Science 70

Social 75

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 99

Math 89

Science 93

Social 97

CRCT Reading Grade 5 92

Language 96

Math 88

Science 73

Social 83

CRCT Reading Grade 5 90

Language 94

Math 82

Science 75

Social 76

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 100

Math 99

Science 92

Social 92

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30. East Side Elementary 3850 Roswell Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: K-5

12:08 AM

Page 109

CCRPI*: 97

Students: 1,219

(770) 578-7200 Teachers: 48

35. Garrison Mill Elementary

CCRPI*: 97

4111 Wesley Chapel Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: K-5 Students: 710

(770) 642-5600 Teachers: 27

40. Hollydale Elementary 2901 Bayberry Drive Marietta, GA 30008 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 66

Students: 684

(678) 594-8143 Teachers: 24

CRCT Reading Grade 3 98

Language 97

Math 95

Science 96

Social 98

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 99

Math 93

Science 97

Social 97

CRCT Reading Grade 3 95

Language 83

Math 69

Science 74

Social 83

CRCT Reading Grade 5 98

Language 97

Math 97

Science 95

Social 97

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 99

Math 99

Science 97

Social 97

CRCT Reading Grade 5 86

Language 89

Math 81

Science 68

Social 67

31. Eastvalley Elementary

CCRPI*: 87

2570 Lower Roswell Road Marietta, GA 30067 Grades: K-5 Students: 661

(770) 578-7214 Teachers: 29

36. Green Acres Elementary 2000 Gober Ave. Smyrna, GA 30080 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 69

Students: 860

(678) 842-6905 Teachers: 28

41. International Academy of Smyrna 2144 South Cobb Drive Smyrna, GA 30080 Grades: K-8 Students: 946

CCRPI*: 77 (678) 370-0980 Teachers: 67

CRCT Reading Grade 3 94

Language 91

Math 79

Science 84

Social 80

CRCT Reading Grade 3 77

Language 72

Math 69

Science 64

Social 70

CRCT Reading Grade 3 95

Language 92

Math 79

Science 79

Social 88

CRCT Reading Grade 5 94

Language 95

Math 92

Science 82

Social 83

CRCT Reading Grade 5 86

Language 90

Math 89

Science 67

Social 66

CRCT Reading Grade 5 98

Language 95

Math 96

Science 89

Social 88

CCRPI*: 88

CRCT Reading Grade 8 96

Language 95

Math 78

Science 52

Social 67

32. Fair Oaks Elementary 407 Barber Road Marietta, GA 30060 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 73

Students: 842

(678) 594-8080 Teachers: 36

37. Harmony-Leland Elementary 5891 Dodgen Road Mableton, GA 30126 Grades: K-5

Students: 676

(770) 819-2483 Teachers: 28

42. Keheley Elementary

CCRPI*: 97

CRCT Reading Grade 3 94

Language 90

Math 86

Science 80

Social 85

CRCT Reading Grade 3 95

Language 87

Math 77

Science 74

Social 80

1985 Kemp Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: K-5

CRCT Reading Grade 5 90

Language 94

Math 96

Science 68

Social 60

CRCT Reading Grade 5 94

Language 93

Math 97

Science 78

Social 79

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 99

Math 96

Science 96

Social 96

CCRPI*: 80

CRCT Reading Grade 5 95

Language 99

Math 97

Science 98

Social 95

33. Ford Elementary 1345 Mars Hill Road Acworth, GA 30101 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 97 Students: 710

(678) 594-8092 Teachers: 29

38. Hayes Elementary 1501 Kennesaw-Due West Road Kennsaw, GA 30152 Grades: K-5 Students: 987

(678) 594-8127 Teachers: 34

Students: 472

43. Kemp Elementary

(678) 494-7836 Teachers: 17

CCRPI*: 98

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 100

Math 96

Science 99

Social 100

CRCT Reading Grade 3 95

Language 85

Math 81

Science 79

Social 85

865 Corner Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: K-5 Students: 960

CRCT Reading Grade 5 100

Language 100

Math 100

Science 96

Social 97

CRCT Reading Grade 5 91

Language 95

Math 91

Science 82

Social 76

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 98

Math 96

Science 98

Social 99

CCRPI*: 98

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 99

Math 99

Science 95

Social 96

34. Frey Elementary 2865 Mars Hill Road Acworth, GA 30101 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 92 Students: 735

(770) 975-6655 Teachers: 32

39. Hendricks Elementary 5243 Meadows Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: K-5 Students: 571

(678) 594-8158 Teachers: 41

(770) 819-2387 Teachers: 21

CRCT Reading Grade 3 99

Language 99

Math 89

Science 96

Social 96

CRCT Reading Grade 3 92

Language 91

Math 82

Science 83

Social 85

CRCT Reading Grade 5 97

Language 96

Math 97

Science 93

Social 95

CRCT Reading Grade 5 94

Language 93

Math 89

Science 74

Social 74

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44. Kennesaw Charter School 3010 Cobb Parkway Kennesaw, GA 30152 Grades: K-5

12:05 AM

Page 110

CCRPI*: 85

Students: 920

(678) 290-9628 Teachers: 52

49. Lewis Elementary

CCRPI*: 90

4179 Jim Owens Road Kennesaw, GA 30152 Grades: K-5 Students: 745

(770) 975-6673 Teachers: 27

54. Mountain View Elementary

CCRPI*: 97

3448 Sandy Plains Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: K-5 Students: 841

(770) 578-7265 Teachers: 32

CRCT Reading Grade 3 95

Language 84

Math 72

Science 79

Social 88

CRCT Reading Grade 3 94

Language 90

Math 86

Science 85

Social 90

CRCT Reading Grade 3 98

Language 94

Math 90

Science 92

Social 96

CRCT Reading Grade 5 97

Language 99

Math 97

Science 100

Social 93

CRCT Reading Grade 5 95

Language 97

Math 89

Science 80

Social 80

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 100

Math 97

Science 98

Social 95

45. Kennesaw Elementary 3155 Jiles Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 Grades: K-2

CCRPI*: 97

Students: 720

(678) 290-9628 Teachers: 25

No scores available.

46. Kincaid Elementary 1410 Kincaid Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 92

Students: 729

(770) 578-7238 Teachers: 31

CRCT Reading Grade 3 97

Language 96

Math 92

Science 93

Social 95

CRCT Reading Grade 5 97

Language 96

Math 91

Science 91

Social 92

47. King Springs Elementary 1041 Reed Road Smyrna, GA 30082 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 97

Students: 796

(678) 842-6944 Teachers: 35

50. Mableton Elementary 5220 Church Street Mableton, GA 30126 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 89

Students: 942

(770) 819-2513 Teachers: 37 Social 89

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 98

Math 90

Science 95

Social 98

CRCT Reading Grade 5 90

Language 91

Math 91

Science 69

Social 72

CRCT Reading Grade 5 100

Language 100

Math 98

Science 93

Social 97

51. McCall Primary 4496 Dixie Avenue Acworth, GA 30101 Grades: K-1

CCRPI*: 96 Students: 432

(770) 975-6775 Teachers: 17

No scores available.

52. Milford Elementary 2390 Austell Road Marietta, GA 30008 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 70

Students: 555

(678) 842-6966 Teachers: 20

Social 91

CRCT Reading Grade 3 81

Language 73

Math 70

Science 63

Social 78

CRCT Reading Grade 5 96

Language 96

Math 96

Science 89

Social 88

CRCT Reading Grade 5 86

Language 87

Math 86

Science 67

Social 63

(678) 842-6955 Teachers: 16

53. Mount Bethel Elementary

CCRPI*: 99

1210 Johnson Ferry road Marietta, GA 30068 Grades: K-5 Students: 985

(770) 578-7248 Teachers: 40

CRCT Reading Grade 3 88

Language 78

Math 64

Science 64

Social 77

CRCT Reading Grade 3 99

Language 98

Math 93

Science 96

Social 97

CRCT Reading Grade 5 92

Language 93

Math 87

Science 64

Social 67

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 100

Math 100

Science 99

Social 98

110

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(770) 509-5071 Teachers: 33

Science 77

Science 90

Students: 479

Students: 837

Math 72

Math 89

CCRPI*: 70

CCRPI*: 98

Language 86

Language 94

230 Cresson Drive Marietta, GA 30060 Grades: K-5

2320 Murdock Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: K-5

CRCT Reading Grade 3 88

CRCT Reading Grade 3 97

48. LaBelle Elementary

55. Murdock Elementary

56. Nicholson Elementary

CCRPI*: 93

1599 Shallowford Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: K-5 Students: 512

(770) 928-5573 Teachers: 21

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 99

Math 97

Science 92

Social 92

CRCT Reading Grade 5 98

Language 100

Math 94

Science 91

Social 95

57. Nickajack Elementary

CCRPI*: 79

4555 Mavell Road SE Smyrna, GA 30082 Grades: K-5 Students: 1,045

(678) 842-5814 Teachers: 44

CRCT Reading Grade 3 91

Language 88

Math 73

Science 77

Social 83

CRCT Reading Grade 5 97

Language 98

Math 92

Science 89

Social 85

58. Norton Park Elementary 3041 Gray Road Smyrna, GA 30082 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 64

Students: 788

(678) 842-5833 Teachers: 26

CRCT Reading Grade 3 79

Language 74

Math 68

Science 63

Social 72

CRCT Reading Grade 5 88

Language 91

Math 91

Science 60

Social 64

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59. Pickett’s Mill Elementary

12:55 AM

Page 111

CCRPI*: 96

6400 Old Stilesboro Road Acworth, GA 30101 Grades: K-5 Students: 721

(770) 975-6673 Teachers: 28

69. Shallowford Falls Elementary 3529 Lassiter Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: K-5

Students: 653

CCRPI*: 99 (770) 642-5610 Teachers: 25

CRCT Reading Grade 3 99

Language 97

Math 91

Science 95

Social 94

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 98

Math 94

Science 95

Social 98

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 98

Math 98

Science 93

Social 93

CRCT Reading Grade 5 100

Language 99

Math 95

Science 94

Social 94

60. Pitner Elementary

CCRPI*: 85

4575 Wade Green Road Acworth, GA 30101 Grades: K-5 Students: 945

(678) 594-8320 Teachers: 33

CRCT Reading Grade 3 96

Language 94

Math 82

Science 79

Social 81

CRCT Reading Grade 5 96

Language 99

Math 96

Science 89

Social 90

61. Powder Springs Elementary 4570 Grady Grier Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: K-5 Students: 786

CCRPI*: 72 (770) 222-3746 Teachers: 26

CRCT Reading Grade 3 92

Language 84

Math 74

Science 69

Social 77

CRCT Reading Grade 5 94

Language 92

Math 86

Science 67

Social 70

62. Powers Ferry Elementary

CCRPI*: 71

403 Powers Ferry Road Marietta, GA 30067 Grades: K-5 Students: 471

(770) 578-7936 Teachers: 20

CRCT Reading Grade 3 89

Language 83

Math 68

Science 71

Social 80

CRCT Reading Grade 5 89

Language 90

Math 91

Science 77

Social 75

63. Riverside Intermediate

CCRPI*: 59

285 South Gordon Road Mableton, GA 30126 Grades: 2-5 Students: 1,098

(770) 819-2553 Teachers: 41

CRCT Reading Grade 3 77

Language 73

Math 61

Science 60

Social 75

CRCT Reading Grade 5 87

Language 86

Math 78

Science 62

Social 60

64. Riverside Primary

CCRPI*: 96

461 South Gordon Road Mableton, GA 30126 Grades: K-1 Students: 668

(770) 819-5851 Teachers: 26

No scores available.

70. Smyrna Elementary

CCRPI*: N/A

1099 Fleming Street Smyrna, GA 30080 Grades: K-5

(678) 842-6741 Teachers: 27

Students: N/A

Opens August 2013

71. Sope Creek Elementary

CCRPI*: 98

3320 Paper Mill Road Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: K-5 Students: 1,159 CRCT Reading Grade 3 98

Language 96

Math 95

Science 96

Social 97

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 99

Math 97

Science 96

Social 96

72. Still Elementary

CCRPI*: 97

870 Casteel Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: K-5 Students: 761

CCRPI*: 98

2400 Rocky Mountain Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: K-5 Students: 616

(770) 591-5050 Teachers: 25

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 98

Math 97

Science 98

Social 99

CRCT Reading Grade 5 100

Language 100

Math 100

Science 96

Social 98

66. Russell Elementary 3920 South Hurt Road Smyrna, GA 30082 Grades: K-5

CCRPI*: 77

Students: 733

(770) 437-5937 Teachers: 28

CRCT Reading Grade 3 88

Language 83

Math 68

Science 74

Social 75

CRCT Reading Grade 5 94

Language 93

Math 85

Science 81

Social 66

67. Sanders Elementary

CCRPI*: 61

1550 Anderson Mill Road SW Austell, GA 30106 Grades: K-5 Students: 833

(770) 819-2568 Teachers: 32

CRCT Reading Grade 3 88

Language 76

Math 68

Science 66

Social 73

CRCT Reading Grade 5 86

Language 80

Math 83

Science 60

Social 67

68. Sedalia Park Elementary

CCRPI*: 91

2230 Lower Roswell Road Marietta, GA 30067 Grades: K-5 Students: 827

(770) 509-5162 Teachers: 33

CRCT Reading Grade 3 95

Language 94

Math 86

Science 85

Social 96

CRCT Reading Grade 5 97

Language 98

Math 97

Science 89

Social 91

(678) 594-8287 Teachers: 29

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 98

Math 91

Science 91

Social 95

CRCT Reading Grade 5 99

Language 99

Math 99

Science 92

Social 97

73. Teasley Elementary 3640 Spring Hill Road Smyrna, GA 30080 Grades: 2-5 CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

CCRPI*: 85

Students: 731 Language 94

Math 94

(770) 437-5945 Teachers: 31 Science 90

Social 97

CRCT Reading Language Math Science Social Grade 5 99 99 95 86 90 *This school will be housed at 2 locations for the next 2 school years. *Total enrollment & teachers for 2013-2014

74. Teasley Primary 3265 Brown Road Smyrna, GA 30080 Grades: K-1 Students: N/A *Formerly Brown Elementary

75. Timber Ridge Elementary

65. Rocky Mount Elementary

(770) 916-7085 Teachers: 44

(770) 642-5621 Teachers: N/A

CCRPI*: 99

5000 Timber Ridge Road Marietta, GA 30068 Grades: K-5 Students: 615

(770) 642-5621 Teachers: 25

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 100

Math 98

Science 100

Social 100

CRCT Reading Grade 5 100

Language 99

Math 97

Science 97

Social 99

76. Tritt Elementary

CCRPI*: 98

4435 Post Oak Tritt Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: K-5 Students: 918

(770) 642-5630 Teachers: 34

CRCT Reading Grade 3 100

Language 100

Math 97

Science 98

Social 99

CRCT Reading Grade 5 100

Language 100

Math 98

Science 98

Social 99

77. Varner Elementary

CCRPI*: 82

4761 Gaydon Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: K-5 Students: 740

(770) 222-3775 Teachers: 26

CRCT Reading Grade 3 97

Language 92

Math 75

Science 82

Social 91

CRCT Reading Grade 5 96

Language 97

Math 97

Science 89

Social 84

78. Vaughn Elementary

CCRPI*: 93

5950 Nichols Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: K-5 Students: 675

(678) 594-8298 Teachers: 26

CRCT Reading Grade 3 98

Language 98

Math 89

Science 92

Social 93

CRCT Reading Grade 5 98

Language 99

Math 99

Science 94

Social 88

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A GUIDE TO ...

Cobb / Marietta Middle and High Schools

Marietta City middle schools 1. Marietta Sixth Grade Academy 340 Aviation Road SE Marietta, GA 30060 Grades: 6 No scores available.

Students: 656

2. Marietta Middle School

CCRPI*: 80

121 Winn Street Northwest Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: 7-8 Students: 1,176 CRCT Reading Grade 8 97

Language 94

CCRPI*: 89 (770) 429-3115 Teachers: 45

Math 76

(770) 422-0311 Teachers: 84 Science 68

Social 78

Cobb middle schools 3. Awtrey Middle School 3601 Nowlin Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 Grades: 6-8 CRCT Reading Grade 8 97

CCRPI*: 91

Students: 842 Language 94

Math 95

4. Barber Middle School 4222 Cantrell Road Acworth, GA 30101 Grades: 6-8

Language 98

Math 84

5. Campbell Middle School

Language 93

Math 84

6. Cooper Middle School 4605 Ewing Road Austell, GA 30106 Grades: 6-8

Language 93

Math 82

7. Daniell Middle School 2900 Scott Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: 6-8

Language 95

Math 81

8. Dickerson Middle School 855 Woodlawn Drive Marietta, GA 30068 Grades: 6-8 CRCT Reading Grade 8 100

Math 99

9. Dodgen Middle School

Language 99

Math 99

10. Durham Middle School

Language 98

Math 96

11. East Cobb Middle School 380 Holt Road Marietta, GA 30068 Grades: 6-8 CRCT Reading Grade 8 97

112

Michael Hinojosa, superintendent

(678) 842-6873 Teachers: 42 Science 73

(770) 426-3300 www.cobbk12.org

Social 68

Science 69

Social 74

 Percentages of students who met or exceeded standards.

Emily Lembeck, superintendent

(678) 594-8048 Teachers: 30 Science 75

(770) 422-3500 www.marietta-city.k12.ga.us

Social 81

(770) 578-2710 Teachers: 37 Science 94

Social 98

(770) 578-2726 Teachers: 36 Science 97

Social 98

(770) 975-6641 Teachers: 34 Science 91

Social 94

12. Floyd Middle School 4803 Floyd Road Mableton, GA 30126 Grades: 6-8 CRCT Reading Grade 8 97

CCRPI*: 79

Students: 876 Language 90

Math 80

(770) 819-2453 Teachers: 27 Science 70

Social 71

CCRPI*: 75

5235 Austell-Powder Springs Road Austell, GA 30106 Grades: 6-8 Students: 858 CRCT Reading Grade 8 94

Language 92

Math 75

14. Griffin Middle School

Language 94

Science 42

Social 50

CCRPI*: 77

4010 King Springs Road Smyrna, GA 30082 Grades: 6-8 Students: 1,153 CRCT Reading Grade 8 94

(770) 819-2466 Teachers: 25

Math 82

(678) 842-6917 Teachers: 39 Science 73

Social 80

CCRPI*: 81

Students: 1,269 Math 77

(770) 578-2740 Teachers: 40 Science 73

2013/14 COBB FACTBOOK

Social 72

16. Lindley Sixth Grade Academy 1550 Pebblebrook Circle Mableton, GA 30126 Grades: 6 Students: 542

CCRPI*: 77

50 Veterans Memorial Highway Mableton, GA 30126 Grades: 7-8 Students: 1,076 CRCT Reading Grade 8 96

Language 92

Math 79

CRCT Reading Grade 8 100

Language 99

Math 99

CCRPI*: 100 (770) 578-72251 Teachers: 31 Science 97

Social 98

(770) 819-2496 Teachers: 34 Science 73

Social 74

18. Lost Mountain Middle School

CCRPI*: 95

700 Old Mountain Road Kennesaw, GA 30152 Grades: 6-8 Students: 939

(678) 594-8224 Teachers: 29

CRCT Reading Grade 8 100

Language 99

Math 96

19. Lovinggood Middle School 3905 Post Oak Tritt Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: 6-8 Students: 993

CCRPI*: 76 (770) 578-7225 Teachers: 17

No scores available.

17. Lindley Middle School 13. Garrett Middle School

15. Hightower Trail Middle School

Language 93

Marietta City Schools

(770) 819-2438 Teachers: 29

CCRPI*: 96

2891 Mars Hill Rod NW Acworth, GA 30101 Grades: 6-8 Students: 1,092 CRCT Reading Grade 8 100

Social 77

CCRPI*: 98

1725 Bill Murdock Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: 6-8 Students: 1,190 CRCT Reading Grade 8 100

Science 83

CCRPI*: 99

Students: 1,214 Language 100

(770) 975-6764 Teachers: 29

CCRPI*: 85

Students: 984

CRCT Reading Grade 8 99

Cobb County Schools

CCRPI*: 79

Students: 960

CRCT Reading Grade 8 96

Social 83

CCRPI*: 71

3295 South Atlanta Road Smyrna, GA 30080 Grades: 6-8 Students: 1,301 CRCT Reading Grade 8 95

Science 75

CCRPI*: 87

Students: 971

CRCT Reading Grade 8 99

(770) 975-6615 Teachers: 25

3825 Luther Ward Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: 6-8 Students: 1,335 CRCT Reading Grade 8 100

Language 99

Math 96

Science 92

Social 95

CCRPI*: 96 (678) 331-3015 Teachers: 44 Science 93

Social 90

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20. Mabry Middle School 2700 Jims Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: 6-8 CRCT Reading Grade 8 100

Students: 846 Language 99

Math 99

Language 98

Math 91

22. McClure Middle School

Language 100

Math 96

23. Palmer Middle School

CRCT Reading Grade 8 99

Students: 964

Language 98

Math 93

2720 Pine Mountain Circle Kennesaw, GA 30152 Grades: 6-8 Students: 705 Language 96

Math 87

25. Simpson Middle School 3340 Trickum Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: 6-8 CRCT Reading Grade 8 100

Math 98

26. Smitha Middle School

Language 92

Math 80

27. Tapp Middle School

Language 95

Social 88

(678) 331-8131 Teachers: 34 Science 87

Social 86

(770) 591-5020 Teachers: 29 Science 82

Social 88

CCRPI*: 86 (678) 594-8252 Teachers: 21 Science 69

Social 74

(770) 971-4711 Teachers: 28 Science 96

Social 94

(678) 594-8267 Teachers: 30 Science 67

Social 65

32. Hillgrove High School

CCRPI*: 93

4165 Luther Ward Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: 9-12 Students: 2,085 # Taking SAT 349

SAT Reading 516

SAT Math 513

33. Kell High School

SAT Reading 503

SAT Math 515

34. Kennesaw Mountain High School 1898 Kennesaw-Due West Road Kennesaw, GA 30152 Grades: 9-12 Students: 2,136 # Taking SAT 367

SAT Reading 531

SAT Math 533

35. Lassiter High School

SAT Reading 549

SAT Math 556

36. McEachern High School 2400 New Macland Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: 9-12 Students: 2,213 # Taking SAT 371

SAT Reading 457

SAT Math 440

37. North Cobb High School 3400 Highway 293 North Kennesaw, GA 30144 Grades: 9-12 Students: 2,555 # Taking SAT 454

SAT Reading 487

SAT Math 475

38. Osborne High School 2451 Favor Road Marietta, GA 30060 Grades: 9-12 # Taking SAT 174

(678) 494-7844 Teachers: 44 SAT Writing 489

Total 1507

CCRPI*: 89 (678) 594-8190 Teachers: 66 SAT Writing 508

Total 1572

(678) 494-7863 Teachers: 58 SAT Writing 531

Total 1636

CCRPI*: 80 (770) 222-3710 Teachers: 68 SAT Writing 429

Total 1326

CCRPI*: 87 (770) 975-6685 Teachers: 75 SAT Writing 464

Total 1426

39. Pebblebrook High School

CCRPI*: 68

991 Old Alabama Road Mableton, GA 30126 Grades: 9-12 Students: 2,000 # Taking SAT 248

SAT Reading 436

SAT Math 414

(770) 819-2521 Teachers: 59 SAT Writing 428

40. Pope High School 3001 Hembree Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: 9-12 # Taking SAT 394

CCRPI*: 94

Students: 1,742

SAT Reading 545

SAT Math 462

SAT Writing 538

41. South Cobb High School 1920 Clay Road Austell, GA 30106 Grades: 9-12 # Taking SAT 255

(770) 819-2611 Teachers: 56

Students: 1,928

SAT Reading 450

SAT Math 441

SAT Writing 432

SAT Math 501

(770) 578-3200 Teachers: 51 SAT Writing 483

43. Walton High School

SAT Reading 580

SAT Math 597

(770) 578-3225 Teachers: 77 SAT Writing 566

44. Wheeler High School 375 Holt Road Marietta, GA 30068 Grades: 9-12 # Taking SAT 346

SAT Math 418

(770) 578-3266 Teachers: 59

SAT Math 555

SAT Writing 521

(770) 437-5900 Teachers: 52 SAT Writing 398

Total 1230

Math 79

(770) 222-3758 Teachers: 24 Science 64

Open House:

Social 72

Dec. 8, 2013 | 2-4PM Jan. 26, 2014 | 2-4PM Feb. 11, 2014 | 9AM-12PM March 16, 2014 | 2-4PM

Marietta City high school and Cobb high schools 2012 SAT Scores Scores for each section of the test can range from 200 to 800 points. 28. Marietta High School

CCRPI*: 73

1171 Whitlock Avenue Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: 9-12 Students: 1,976 # Taking SAT 246

SAT Reading 486

SAT Math 496

29. Allatoona High School

SAT Reading 509

SAT Math 503

30.Campbell High School 5265 Ward Street Smyrna, GA 30080 Grades: 9-12 # Taking SAT 317

SAT Math 489

31. Harrison High School

SAT Reading 524

(770) 529-7743 Teachers: 49 SAT Writing 483

Total 1495

Celebrating 54 Years of Success in Classes for 2 Year Olds through 8th Grade

STRENGTHENING CHILDREN ACADEMICALLY IN A CHRIST-CENTERED ENVIRONMENT • National Accreditation • Small Teacher to Student Ratio • Physical Education & Athletics

• Music , Band, Choir, Handbells • Drama, Art and Spanish • Before and After School Care • Summer and Holiday Camps

(678) 842-6850 Teachers: 70 SAT Writing 482

Total 1458

CCRPI*: 94

4500 Due West Road Kennesaw, GA 30152 Grades: 9-12 Students: 1,935 # Taking SAT 497

Total 1459

CCRPI*: 71

Students: 2,248

SAT Reading 487

SAT Writing 477

CCRPI*: 89

3300 Dallas-Acworth Highway Acworth, GA 30101 Grades: 9-12 Students: 1,731 # Taking SAT 336

(770) 428-2631 Teachers: 132

SAT Math 531

(678) 594-8104 Teachers: 57 SAT Writing 506

Total 1743

CCRPI*: 79

Students: 1,985

SAT Reading 535

Total 1495

CCRPI*: 94

1590 Bill Murdock Road Marietta, GA 30062 Grades: 9-12 Students: 2,598 # Taking SAT 628

Total 1323

CCRPI*: 88

2525 Sandy Plains Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: 9-12 Students: 1,775 SAT Reading 511

Total 1645

CCRPI*: 68

42. Sprayberry High School

# Taking SAT 281

Total 1278

(770) 578-7900 Teachers: 52

CCRPI*: 69

Students: 1,751

SAT Reading 414

Total 1528

CCRPI*: 94

2601 Shallowford Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: 9-12 Students: 1,955 # Taking SAT 461

SAT Writing 499

CCRPI*: 83

1171 Whitlock Avenue Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: 9-12 Students: 1,554 # Taking SAT 312

(678) 331-3961 Teachers: 64

CCRPI*: 82

3900 Macedonia Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 Grades: 6-8 Students: 773 CRCT Reading Grade 8 96

Science 88

CCRPI*: 82

2025 Powder Springs Road Marietta, GA 30064 Grades: 6-8 Students: 987 CRCT Reading Grade 8 96

(770) 928-5560 Teachers: 21

CCRPI*: 99

Students: 880 Language 100

Social 96

CCRPI*: 92

24. Pine Mountain Middle School

CRCT Reading Grade 8 98

Science 97

CCRPI*: 94

3660 Old Stilesboro Road Kennesaw, GA 30152 Grades: 6-8 Students: 1,089

690 North Booth Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 Grades: 6-8

(770) 928-5546 Teachers: 25

CCRPI*: 97

4080 Maybreeze Road Marietta, GA 30066 Grades: 6-8 Students: 682

CRCT Reading Grade 8 99

Page 113

CCRPI*: 98

21. McCleskey Middle School

CRCT Reading Grade 8 98

12:51 AM

Total 1561

2111 Lower Roswell Road • Marietta, GA • 770-973-8921 • faithlcms.org

Total 1611

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Cobb and Marietta Private Schools 1. 2.

3. 4. 5. 6.

7. 8. 9.

10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

24.

Atlanta Classical Christian Academy 505 Atlanta Street SE, Marietta, GA 30060 770-874-8885 | www.accak12.org Brookwood Christian School 4728 Wood Street, Acworth, GA 30101 678-401-5855 | www.brookwoodchristian.com Carman Adventist School 1330 North Cobb Parkway, Marietta, GA 30062 770-424-0606 | www.caschool.org Casa Montessori School 150 Powers Ferry Road, Marietta, GA 30067 770-973-2731 | www.casamontessori.com Cobb County Christian School 545 Lorene Drive, Marietta, GA 30060 770-434-1320 | www.openbibleministry.org Cornerstone Preparatory Academy 4310 Moon Station Lane, Acworth, GA 30101 770-529-7077 | www.cornerstoneprep.org Covenant Christian School 3130 Atlanta Road, Smyrna, GA 30080 770-435-1596 | www.ccssmyrna.org Covered Bridge Academy 488 Hurt Road, Smyrna, GA 30082 770-801-8292 | www.coveredbridgeacademy.com Cumberland Christian Academy 2356 Clay Road, Austell, GA 30106 770-423-0404 | www.cumberlandchristian.org Dominion Christian School 4607 Burnt Hickory Road, Marietta, GA 30064 770-420-2153 | www.dominionchristian.org East Cobb Christian School 4616 Roswell Road, Marietta, GA 30062 770-565-0881 | www.eccs.org Eastside Christian School 2450 Lower Roswell Road, Marietta, GA 30068 770-971-2332 | www.eastsidechristianschool.com Faith Lutheran School 2111 Lower Roswell Road, Marietta, GA 30068 770-973-8921 | www.faithmarietta.com First Baptist Christian School 25. 2958 North Main Street, Kennesaw, GA 30144 770-422-3254 | www.fbcskennesaw.com Foundations for the Future 1500 Stanley Road NW, Kennesaw, GA 30152 26. 770-429-4799 | www.foundationscorp.com Furtah Preparatory School 5496 Highway 92, Acworth, GA 30102 678-574-6488 | www.furtahprep.org 27. Grace Point School 2005 Stilesboro Road, Kennesaw, GA 30152 678-815-5344 | www.gracepointschool.org 28. Harvest Baptist School 3460 Kellogg Creek Road, Acworth, GA 30102 770-974-9091 29. Mableton Christian Academy 6485 Factory Shoals Road, Mableton, GA 30126 770-948-7971 | www.mabletonchristianacademy.com 30. Midway Covenant Christian School 4635 Dallas Highway, Powder Springs, GA 30127 770-590-1866 | www.midwayschool.org 31. Mount Bethel Christian Academy 4385 Lower Roswell Road, Marietta, GA 30068 770-971-0245 | www.mtbethelchristian.org 32. Mount Paran Christian School 1275 Stanley Road, Kennesaw, GA 30152 770-578-0182 | www.mtparanschool.com 33. North Cobb Christian School 4500 Lakeview Drive, Kennesaw, GA 30144 770-975-0252 | www.ncchristian.org Omega Private Academy Acworth 34. 5330 Brookstone Dr. NW, Suite 320, Acworth, GA 30101 770-792-7431 | www.omegaprivateacademy.com Omega Private Academy East Cobb 35. 2960 Shallowford Road, Suite 308 Marietta, GA 30066 770-973-0209 | www.omegaprivateacademy.com 36. Omega Private Academy Acworth 5330 Brookstone Dr. NW, Suite 320, Acworth, GA 30101 770-792-7431 | www.omegaprivateacademy.com

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Omega Private Academy East Cobb 2960 Shallowford Road, Suite 308 Marietta, GA 30066 770-973-0209 | www.omegaprivateacademy.com Praise Academy 4052 Hiram-Lithia Springs Road Powder Springs, GA 30127 770-943-2484 | www.praiseacademy.com SAE School 6688 Mableton Parkway, Mableton, GA 30126 678-310-9136 | www.saeschool.org Shiloh Hills Christian School 260 Hawkins Store Road, Kennesaw, GA 30144 770-926-7729 | www.shilohhills.com Shreiner Academy 1340 Terrell Mill Road, Marietta, GA 30067 770-953-1340 | www.shreiner.com St. Catherine of Siena Catholic School 1618 Ben King Road, Kennesaw, GA 30144 770-419-8601 | www.scsiena.org St. Joseph Catholic School 81 Lacy Street, Marietta, GA 30060 770-428-3328 | www.stjosephschool.org The Walker School 700 Cobb Parkway N., Marietta, GA 30062 678-581-6891 | www.thewalkerschool.org The Wood Acres School 1772 Johnson Ferry Road, Marietta, GA 30062 770-971-1880 | www.woodacresschool.org TLE Christian Academy 2765 South Main Street, Kennesaw, GA 30144 770-218-1790 | www.tleacademy.com Whitefield Academy 1 Whitefield Drive SE, Smyrna, GA 30126 678-305-3000 | www.whitefieldacademy.com Youth Christian School 4967 Brownsville Road, Powder Springs, GA 30127 770-943-1394 | www.youthchristian.org

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education

A REAL GEM Brooke Donnelly lauded for academic, athletic, civic leadership roles By Lindsay Field Marietta High senior Brooke Donnelly got to the top of her class by taking seriously her academics, athletics and leadership roles, yet with a heart full of compassion. "I love Brooke for her commitment to Marietta High School," said Student Council Faculty Adviser Kibbie DeJarnett. "I wish all students could have the same loyalty to their role as a leader, as well as a student. Washington and Lee has a gem coming their way." The 2013 Marietta High School valedictorian will be attending Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Va. She is only one of a handful of incoming freshmen who received the school's Johnson Scholarship valued at almost $60,000 a year. The 18-year-old, who chose to attend Marietta High because of its International Baccalaureate program, jumped into high school and hit the ground running from the very beginning. "The IB program brought me to Marietta High School, but also the experience that my brother (Cole

Donnelly) had when he was there because he really loved it there, helped me decide to go there," she said. Donnelly has served on her school's student council and played tennis for the school team since ninth grade and is also a member of 11 other school organizations, including Beta Club, Spanish Club and the Environmental Club. And if there's anything she's learned about being so heavily involved in her school, it's been what she refers to as "internal motivation." "At the end of the day, it's about what you're willing to do," she said. "It's not about how much your parents push you, but what you're going to do to take initiative ... start out being motivated from the beginning, don't wait till your senior year to try to do things." Her involvement stretches beyond the walls of Marietta High, though. She also participates in The Bert Show's Big Thank You! Project, Wounded Warrior Project, Keep Marietta Beautiful and CAS (Creativity, Action and Service). "It's been busy and the IB program keeps me working really hard

Marietta High School valedictorian Brooke Donnelly speaks at graduation. and the classes are very challenging but that's good," she said. She is hoping to take that excitement, involvement and heavy participation on to her college experience. "I think I'm more excited than nervous about going to college," Donnelly said. "It'll be nice to take classes in college that I'm more interested in and I'm excited about playing college tennis and having a little bit more flexibility." Donnelly is still undecided on a major but is thinking about pre-law. "I have a lot of interests still so I haven't narrowed it down," she said.

Ne w p rin cip a l appoi nted to H i l l gr o ve Hi g h By Megan Thornton The Cobb Board of Education has appointed Christian Suttle, a former Walton High School assistant principal, as the new principal of Hillgrove High School. Suttle has been at Walton for the last nine years and served as both the school’s assistant principal and athletic director since 2008. He previously was assistant administrator from 2007 to 2008 and a graduation specialist the previous year. From 2003 to 2006, he was a teacher at Walton

after beginning his teaching career at Eastside Elementary School in 2000. Suttle’s previous salary was $75,268.20. His new salary is $98,832. Suttle said his first task is getting to know the Hillgrove community. “The big thing is just learning the community and all the new principal stuff, like having the opportunity to meet with the students and teachers and finding out how I can best serve them as the principal,” he said. He replaces former Princi-

pal Robert Shaw, who moved to Riverwood High School in Fulton County. Suttle said he hopes to continue Shaw’s history of success. “Hillgrove High School is doing very well academically, athletically and in the fine arts,” Suttle said. “I just want to continue the traditions that have already been set by the former principals.” Hillgrove serves a total of 2,085 students. The school is about 61 percent white, 29 percent black, 6 percent Hispanic, 2 percent Asian and 2 percent multi-racial.

The Christian Suttle file  AGE: 37  RESIDENCE:

Kennesaw  FAMILY: Married, five children  EDUCATION: bachelor’s degree from Miles College, master’s degree from Jacksonville State University, education specialist’s degree from Walden University

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CUTTING EDGE OF CULINARY Staff / Kelly J. Huff

Kennesaw State University Culinary and Hospitality Services Campus Executive Chef Billy Skiber harvests lettuce for a dish he is preparing for students in the dining facility at The Commons on campus. The staff harvests more than 700 heads of lettuce every three weeks, growing them hydroponically.

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KSU a pioneer in sustainability and hospitality program By Rachel Miller Kennesaw State University is the first college in the United States to offer a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Culinary Sustainability and Hospitality, which will include a course on plant-based cuisine. Christian Hardigree, director of the Institute for Culinary Sustainability and Hospitality, expects to enroll 150 students in the program’s first year and upwards of 400 students by the fourth year. The degree will teach the economic benefits of the farm-to-table trend, including energy savings and lowering food waste. The degree requires 600 hours of handson experience with an internship at a KSU facility, where the skill set can be controlled and benefited from a state-of-the-art facility on campus. One option is the Commons that was built four years ago and is the nation’s largest LEED-Gold certified collegiate dining facility. Gary Coltek, director of Culinary and Hospitality Services, played a big role in designing The Commons. He said the key is small-batch cooking, where the staff makes much of the food by order, not in large quantities to constantly heat in vats. Coltek’s goal is to buy as much local produce as possible. The Commons serves 5,000 to 8,000 students every day during the regular school

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education

Staff / Kelly J. Huff

Top left: Kitchen worker Alex Nava pours in fresh food grade corn to be ground in the Gristmill into flour and grits for students to eat at The Commons on campus. Top right: Kennesaw State University student Emily Barnes gets a fresh made cupcake made with locally grown ingredients for lunch inside The Commons on campus. year, and each station offers vegetarian dishes or meat options, which can be requested rare and seared. Cases of baked goods are made from scratch, and pizzas are served using heirloom ingredients. Hydroponic gardens and a germination tank were installed next to groups of tables in The Commons, which allows food service staff to pick vegetables to be prepped and placed on the salad bar 20 feet away. Around the back is a 2,500-square-foot herb garden, which includes white oak logs injected with shitake mushroom spores that the chefs collect for their recipes. The facility composts 60,000 pounds of food waste per month and uses wet waste to irrigate the 65 acres of farmland KSU owns, including 42 honeybee hives, throughout three different counties. In the future, Haridgree sees the Institute for Culinary Sustainability being the authority on how to incorporate sustainability and healthy choices in all aspects of the food industry, including meals provided at hospitals, retirement homes and schools. “Food is the great equalizer,” Hardigree said about the basic need for food and the desire to enjoy it. “It fuels us, in every sense.”

Marietta City Schools and Cobb County School District offer drivers education classes at different high schools throughout the county. Classes are open to all high school students. • 30 hours of classroom / 6 hours behind the wheel • Low cost ($375) • Taught by Cobb County / Marietta certified school teachers • Meets the Joshua’s Law requirements • Qualifies for the Teen Drivers Education Insurance Discount For class locations and to register go to:

www.mariettacommunityschool.com You may register online or by fax using Visa, MasterCard or Discover cards, or mail a check made payable to Marietta Community School with the completed registration form.

Marietta Community School

developing safe drivers since

1985

1171 Whitlock Ave. • Marietta, GA 30064 Phone: 770-429-3170 • Fax: 770-429-3178 COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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HIGHER LEARNING A look at Cobb’s colleges and universities

CHATTAHOOCHEE TECHNICAL COLLEGE Main campus: 980 South Cobb Drive Marietta, GA 30060 (770) 528-4545 www.chattahoocheetech.edu

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Number of Students: 11,500

Tuition per credit hour: $85

In-state tuition by semester: Undergraduate: $1,175 (15 credit hours)

Most popular programs/ departments: health sciences

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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY 1000 Chastain Road Kennesaw, GA 30144 (770) 423-6000 www.kennesaw.edu Number of students: 24,604 In-state tuition by semester: Undergraduate: $4,852 (15 credit hours) Graduate: $6,200 (12 credit hours) Most popular programs/ departments: nursing, psychology, communications, management, early childhood education, biology, accounting

ACCREDITED PRIVATE SCHOOL K-12

Struggling In Public School? Try an 8 Student Classroom! • SACS accredited • Certified Teachers • Individualized Instruction • GSNS Provider • Scholarships Available

2960 Shallowford Rd. #308 • Marietta, GA 30066

770-973-0209 • OmegaPrivateAcademy.com COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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SOUTHERN POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY

1100 South Marietta Parkway Marietta, GA 30060-2896 (678) 915-7778 www.spsu.edu Number of students: 6,200 In-state tuition and fees per year (full-time student): Undergraduate: $6,810 (15 hours) Graduate: $5,544 (9 hours) Most popular programs/ departments: architecture, computer science, construction management, electrical engineering technology 120

2013/14 COBB FACTBOOK

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LIFE UNIVERSITY

education

1269 Barclay Circle Marietta, GA 30060 (770) 426-2600 www.life.edu Number of Students: 2,655 Tuition by quarter: Undergraduate: $200 per credit hour + $249 quarterly fee Graduate: $227 per credit hour + $249 quarterly fee Chiropractic: $307 per credit hour + $249 quarterly fee Most popular programs/ departments: College of Chiropractic, largest single-location chiropractic college in the world, nutrition, sport health science, psychology

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education

KSU, EDGE partner for job growth BY JON GILLOOLY Whether it’s starting a business from scratch or expanding existing ones, Kennesaw State University and Cobb’s Competitive EDGE are partnering to help entrepreneurs grow jobs in the county. “What we really want to do is leverage what we already do and get it out to more people,” said Dr. Ken Harmon, Kennesaw State’s provost and academic affairs vice president. Take, for example, a Marietta resident who wants to copy his uncle’s successful Arkansas business here, said David Connell, CEO of the Cobb Chamber of Commerce. “Questions that Mariettans

may have are, ‘How do I get started? Where do I go? Who do I call?’” Connell said. “There’s a lot of different sources of advice and counsel that doesn’t cost people a dime or a very minimum cost, and what we want to do is put an umbrella around that, so if they get a call or we get a call we direct people to the right avenue to go.” One such avenue is KSU’s Small Ken Harmon Business Development Center, which helps entrepreneurs grow their business by providing free consulting and offering a

variety of low-cost educational programs. Another, housed at the Cobb Chamber, is SCORE, a nonprofit that brings in working and retired executives and business owners who donate their time as business counselors, providing confidential counseling and mentoring. EDGE, which stands for Economic Development David Connell for a Growing Economy, is county Chairman Tim Lee’s signature economic development initiative. By the end of a five-

year term, EDGE is expected to have created 7,500 new jobs, increased payroll earnings and income by $420 million and $7,000 per capita in Cobb, reduced unemployment to 5.5 percent, increased the public school graduation rate by 4 percent and increased the number of college-bound students in Cobb by 7 percent. Connell said inquiries from new and Brooks Mathis veteran entrepreneurs should be directed to EDGE Executive Director Brooks Mathis at (770) 859-2358.

GRACEPOINT School Serving students with dyslexia in a quality Christian environment

We offer a comprehensive, high quality education program that combines remediation with enrichment and acceleration. Interested in teaching or working as a paraprofessional? Applications are available on on the school website.

Tours available upon request

Contact GRACEPOINT at 678-815-5344

2005 Stilesboro Road | Kennesaw, GA 30152 678-815-5344 | www.gracepointschool.org 122

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By John Bednarowski

education

Life athletic programs building for future When people think of Life University athletics, the first two things that may come to mind are basketball and rugby. That's understandable for two reasons. First, those are the two national programs on campus. The men's basketball team won NAIA titles in 1997, 1999 and 2000. The rugby squad has competed at the highest level against club teams from all around the country, and even found itself on NBC last June. The other reason is basketball and rugby have been the only programs on campus the last few years. But that is changing. With the addition of wrestling and women's cross country this year, Life University is trying to rebuild a storied athletic program that was dismantled when the school temporarily lost its accreditation in 2002-2003. With the athletics rebuilding program underway — volleyball will begin in the 2013-14 school year — Life gives the college bound residents of Cobb County more opportunities to compete, while staying

close to home and getting their education. “That's what we want to do,” said Life women's cross country coach Dr. Cathy Faust, herself a five-time All-American in cross country and track at Eastern Kentucky University. "We want to make this a community based program. Our intent is to pull from the (Cobb) community." The wrestling program also came out of the gates hard and continued to improve as the season went on. In order to compete at the NAIA level, universities have to offer at least six sports.

When volleyball comes online in the fall, that will bring Life to a total of five (rugby, as a club sport, does not count as a NAIA program). Associate Athletic Director Bill Finnbach said that once cross country is competing with a full squad it will be a natural progression to bring on women's track. He said women's golf and tennis are additional possibilities, which could also lead to the men's counterparts. Finnbach said he expects to have at least the minimum of six programs by the beginning of the 2015 school year. With the sports programs on the way back, Faust said the challenge going forward will be to get the word out and entice the local Cobb community to help bring Life athletics to the forefront and convince them that the university is more than just a nationally renowned chiropractic school. “We are a total university,” Faust said about the school offering 13 undergraduate and seven graduate programs. “We have a lot of things other than chiropractic.”

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COBB COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Cobb County schools educate more than 106,000 students in 114 school buildings across the county. It is the second-largest district in Georgia, and the 26th largest in the United States. Board members are all elected to represent a section of the county. They are elected to four-year terms on a staggered basis, and the board members elect the chairman and vice chairman each year.

Board Chairman

SUPERINTENDENT

Randy Scamihorn

Dr. Michael Hinojosa

rscamihorn.boardmember@ cobbk12.org (770) 337-8553

michael.hinojosa@cobbk12.org 770-426-3452

POST 1

Tim Stultz POST 2

David Morgan POST 3

tstultz.boardmember@ cobbk12.org 678-773-1877

dmorgan.boardmember@ cobbk12.org 404-803-9975; 404-702-1857

Vice Chairman

Kathleen Angelucci POST 4

David Banks POST 5

Scott Sweeney POST 6

Brad Wheeler

kangelucci.boardmember@ cobbk12.org 678-896-6399

dbanks.boardmember@ cobbk12.org 404-725-3394

ssweeney.boardmember @cobbk12.org 678-646-2470

bwheeler.boardmember@ cobbk12.org (770) 335-5982

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POST 7

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MARIETTA CITY SCHOOL BOARD Marietta City Schools enroll more than 7,000 students in its 12 schools. Its central office is at 250 Howard St., in Marietta. School board members represent one of seven wards of the city, and are elected to four-year terms. These are the board members through Dec. 31, 2013.

Vice Chairman

SUPERINTENDENT

Brett Bittner

Dr. Emily Lembeck

brett@bittnerformarietta.com (404) 492-6524

tfasola@bellsouth.net (770) 425-1257

whatapane@bellsouth.net (770) 427-4956

Jill C. Mutimer WARD 4

Stuart Fleming WARD 5

Tom Cheater WARD 6

Irene Berens

jcmutimer@comcast.net (770) 422-4316

stuart.fleming@live.com (770) 630-0840

tom@tomcheater.com (678) 575-2644

Rberens140@aol.com (770) 428-2710

elembeck@mariettacity.k12.ga.us (770) 422-3500, ext. 253

WARD 1

N. Tony Fasola

WARD 2

Randy Weiner WARD 3

Chairman

WARD 7

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IN THE MIX

Staff/Todd Hull

Southern Polytechnic State University senior Colin Sarratt compares the results from different reactions during a biology lab.

Southern Poly to add two bachelor’s programs BY RACHEL MILLER Southern Polytechnic State University will offer two new bachelor of science degrees next fall, with one in environmental engineering technology, a first for Georgia, and one in environmental science, a first for the Atlanta region. Environmental engineering has been a concentration of SPSU’s civil engineering school since the university began, said Zvi Szafran, vice president for academic affairs. The subject was placed into a standalone program to meet a rising interest in the environmental science field. Jeff Ray, dean of engineering technology and management, attributes the increased attention to a new generation of students “looking for social concerns as a way to give back.” This type of “social engineering” attracts more women and minorities who want to use the degree to improve communities, Ray said.

The two 123-credit-hour programs will have separate curriculums, but will share introductory courses and a range of advanced electives. Ray said intertwining the two departments makes the new degrees unique. All engineering degrees have advanced math and science courses, but SPSU will now go a step further to teach about environmental impact, Ray said. This will include environmental regulations, as well as construction methods for water and soil conservation, for example. Not many environmental science programs require students to take engineering classes, Ray said. Choosing to synchronize environmental science studies with civil engineering techniques came from within the university and not from an outside model, Szafran said. “It was a desire to utilize our strengths,” Szafran said. Szafran said SPSU’s goal is to expose students to the same partnership between the dis-

ciplines that exists in the job market. “SPSU is well known for producing graduates who are ready to hit the ground running,” Szafran said. Carlos Ortiz, a professor of civil engineering at SPSU, helped develop the program to address challenges he saw as a contractor, specifically in water waste and treatment. He said there is a need for professionals with four-year degrees in science to manage facilities, as well as state and federal agencies. Szafran said obtaining a degree in one of SPSU’s two new programs can lead to a job that protects the environment and helps a business to succeed. Companies rely on these fields to determine environmental impact, Szafran said. He added there is a large incentive to prove a business is green, which often results in tax benefits based on certifications. “You get a chance to get a good job and do a good thing. What can be better than that?” Szafran said.

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A NEW CHAPTER Legally blind teen eager for ‘harder work’ in college achromatopsia, which means he is color blind and photophobic. As a result, he has 20/200 vision. “I have worn sunglasses pretty much Being legally blind hasn’t hindered since birth,” he said. “It’s like being a one South Cobb High School graduate vampire I suppose. The from pursuing his light hurts a lot.” love for literature and It wasn’t until De’Shun writing. De’Shun Brown Brown was 5 years old, “He would get in though, that his parents retrouble for reading at  High school: South Cobb ceived a doctor’s confirmaschool,” said 18-year-  Age: 18 tion about what their son old De’Shun Brown’s  College: KSU  Major: Undecided has. mother Tamara “We just never found a Brown. “He would doctor that would tell us finish his work, pass what the issue was,” Tamara Brown it in, and he’d sit there with a book, and they would always write him up for that. said. “A lot of doctors said, ‘He’ll grow out of it or he’s faking it.’ One doctor They thought he wasn’t paying attensaid to take home the eye chart and let tion.” him memorize it.” De’Shun Brown was born with

education

By Lindsay Field

Staff/Todd Hull

De’Shun Brown admits he has a passion for reading. ‘He likes the big 700-plus page books,’ says his mother, Tamara Brown.

The little red school house at the corner of North Main and Wood Street in Historic Downtown Acworth

Personalized Education Experience for students with Learning Differences in Reading and Math CREATIVE • NURTURING UNPRETENTIOUS www.brookwoodchristian.com

678.401.5855 COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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Her son has learned to adapt to the syndrome and described it as a survival-type mode that he has had to go into. It wasn’t until the family moved to Cobb County when he was in third grade that teachers even knew how to help him. The struggle to see hasn’t kept De’Shun Brown’s spirits down. He continues to read pretty much anything he can get his hands on, and in first grade, he began reading the Harry Potter series. “He likes the big, 700-plus page books,” Tamara Brown said with a big smile. A few of his other favorites include books by James Patterson, Brian Jacques, Dean Koontz and Dan Brown. Reading online texts, or books with bigger words can help De’Shun Brown read the books better, but he doesn’t like to do that. “It just feels like it’s taking something away from it,” he said. “The smell of the book, actually sitting there turning the pages, you get marks on the papers … it’s just a thing.” He also loves writing, specifically poetry, short stories and essays. “It’s just something I’ve always liked doing,” he said. “And I write about whatever pops up in my head at that time. I’ll write a poem about it or a really, long, drawn out essay explaining how I feel about it.” His passion for writing has been recognized by teachers at South Cobb High. “From the moment he came into class and I started reading his essays and hearing him participate in discussions about literature, I knew he was different,” said teacher Lisa Cherry, calling him a “deep thinker.” “He is able to see the big picture,” she said. “He just has that artistic sensibility, that quality you can’t put into words but you know it when you see it. He is also so good natured about his disability. I think he smiles all the time.” While the teenager loves writing, it’s not a career path he plans to take in college. “I do have this undying interest for the studies of psychology, business administration, anatomy and physiology … even wildlife biology,” he said. “I can’t decide but I do know that my goal is to be able to adequately provide and care for my future family without the worry of living paycheck to paycheck.” He will start at Kennesaw State University in the fall and will be living on campus. De’Shun Brown turned down full and partial scholarships to Dartmouth College, Cornell University and Howard University. “I can adapt to going anywhere, it’s just that I don’t want to,” he said, referencing his blindness. His parents also were a little worried about how tough it might be for him to attend a school far from home, but he’s content going to a local college. “One reason I’m really interested in going into college is because I’ll have harder work,” he said. “Something I’ll have to actually think about to do.”

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North Georgia State Fair celebrates 81 years

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The smell of cotton candy and hot dogs, squeals of delight coming from brightly lit Ferris wheels and plenty of rows of plush, colorful stuffed animals — it’s fair time! Superior Plumbing will present the 81st annual Georgia State Fair from Sept. 19 to 29 at Jim R. Miller Park at 2245 Callaway Road in Marietta. This event, the largest fair in metro Atlanta, attracts almost 300,000 people each year. The fair features live music, free attractions and shows, farm animals, flower shows, blue ribbon competitions, local entertainment and a variety of food. There are also rides on the Great James H. Drew Exposition midway that features the Wildcat Rollercoaster. The Georgia Lottery concert series is open to fair attendees. Phillips Craig and Dean will perform Sept. 20; followed by Lauren Alaina on Sept. 21; Lee Brice on Sept. 25; Loretta Lynn on Sept. 26; Colt Ford on Sept. 27; and Jerrod Niemann on Sept. 28. Concerts will take place in a covered arena at 8 p.m. They are free with fair admission. Fair admission is $7 daily. Children 10 and younger will be admitted free. Ride tickets are $1.25 each, or $20 for 21 tickets, $50 for 55 tickets or $100 for 120 tickets. Parking is $3. Discount tickets will be available at all metro Atlanta Walgreens stores from Aug. 20 to Sept. 20. Prices are $3.50 for adults and $11 for 21 ride tickets. Advance tickets can be purchased for $5 for adults and $11 for a book of 21 tickets. There will be a $1 fee for postage and handling. They are on sale now at www.northgeorgiastate fair.com. Tickets are also available by sending a check or money order to North Georgia State Fair, P.O. Box 777, Kennesaw, Ga. 30156. There will also be ride specials. The “PayOne-Price” ride special is Sept. 23 ($15), Sept. 19, 24 and 25 ($18), and Sept. 21 and 28 ($25) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (Good till close). Fair hours are Monday to Thursday from 4 to 11 p.m., Fridays from 4 p.m. to midnight, Saturday from 10 a.m. to midnight, and Sundays from 12:30 to 10 p.m. For more information, call (770) 423-1330 or (770) 528-8989 after Sept. 2, or visit www.northgeorgiastatefair.com.

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BY LINDSAY FIELD

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TODD HULL

One west Cobb resident gets his artistic inspiration from his love for jazz music, family heritage, black history and what he calls

the human spirit. “I’m kind of all over the place,” 49-year-old Sidney Carter said about the topics of his paintings. “I like to tell people that art chose me. It is what I am supposed to be doing.” His gallery, “Sidney’s Creations,” is located off New Macland Road in Powder Springs, and it’s where he’s been painting, using an acrylic medium, for the last 20 years. “After graduating from college, I was doing what people called black art at the time and it was really booming in Atlanta and this is where I was making most of my money, so I moved here in the early 1990s,” Carter said.

He is originally from Panama City, Fla., but played football in college at the University of Tennessee at Martin, where he earned his four-year degree in computer graphics. The youngest of 10 children, Carter said he acquired his love of art from two of his older brothers. “My oldest brother, Randall, guided me toward art,” he said. “He would bring me up to Washington, D.C., enter me in different contests.” His brother hasn’t been fortunate enough to make a living out of painting, though. “I’m able to take care of my family with this,”

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arts and entertainment Carter said. “It’s been a blessing.” Carter’s paintings capture a variety of topics, including instruments, flowers and portraits. “I like to paint family-oriented pieces, a lot of it is my past, a lot of the things I went through and experienced,” he said. One of his favorite artists is Norman Rockwell. “That’s who I sort of have patterned myself after,” he said. “All of his pieces told a story.” Carter’s early pieces are mostly of his home, his two sons and even a painting of the founding fathers of his fraternity in college. His art has not gone unnoticed by the public either. Carter sells many pieces on the road each year at jazz festivals all over the country, and a few professional athletes and celebrities have bought his work, including NBA player Alonzo Morning, NY Giants General Manager Jerry Reese, Tra Thomas with the NFL and director and writer Spike Lee. He also mentors young artists and recently announced that he will be teaching art lessons at his gallery. “My goal is to open my doors to other young artists and be able to show them that they can be successful and how to be successful at it,” he said. “They may have the talent, but not the business part of being an artist.” To sign up for art lessons or see more of Carter’s work, check out his website at www.sidneycarter.net.

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New auditorium set to open at MHS By Lindsay Field

nd id.

Members of the Marietta City Schools community are excited about the near completion of its long-awaited performing arts auditorium at Marietta High School. “The arts are a very significant portion of the student body at Marietta High School and the Marietta City community,” said David DuBose, Marietta High’s art department chair. The theater, which was part of the school’s original plan in 2000 but was delayed because of funding, will be used for school functions, performances, rehearsals, competitions and festivals, community events, lectures and staff development meetings. “Ever since it was cut, the original plan was that as soon as we had enough money, we’d build an auditorium,” said Marietta City board member Irene Berens. “I’m just so excited to see this thing come to fruition.” Over time, Berens worked to keep it on the district’s radar, and she was thrilled last March when Marietta voters approved a $7 million, five-year obligation bond to fund the $8.5 million, 750-seat theater. “People are amazed that we were able to pass a bond referendum,” she said. The other $2 million will come from the district’s building fund and with the approval of SPLOST IV this past March, the auditorium debt will be paid within five years. Construction began shortly after the bond was approved and should be completed by the last week in July, and open to the school and public starting in the 2013-2014 school year. There are almost 300 students in the school’s band program, and about180 in each of the dance, drama and choral programs. COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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M

ike McQueen has big

By Joel Groover Photography by Jennifer Carter

love for tiny things.

He zips around south Cobb on Italian-made Vespa scooters and dotes on his beloved parrots Pistachio, Twinkie, Fat Baby and Beaky. But as the owner of Uke Republic, which opened its first brick-and-mortar store in Austell’s historic Threadmill Mall in April 2012, McQueen is famous for one obsession in particular.

Those in the know refer to it simply as UAS. “That stands for Ukulele Acquisition Syndrome,” McQueen explains.

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At any given time, McQueen’s 750-square-foot store brims with up to 200 finely crafted ukuleles. Many of the guitar-like instruments bear exotic names such as Ko’olau, aNueNue or LoPrinzi. They come in a pleasing variety of colors, shapes and sizes and hang from the walls like tiny works of art. And when McQueen heads home from the shop after a day of filling orders from as far away as a research station in Antarctica, more ukes await. “I probably own about 30 ukuleles,” says the south Cobb native. “The oldest is a Hawaiian-made instrument from the 1930s. But my collection is pretty small. Some people have hundreds.” Buying ukes is certainly part of the fun. But for McQueen and his fellow ukulele-lovers, the primary point is to play. “The style of music I play? Really anything,” McQueen says. “I was into punk rock in the 1980s, so I like a good punk tune on a ukulele,” he says. “But I love Tin Pan Alley music, too. Ukuleles are kind of like noodles — they go with anything.” McQueen played a plastic uke as a child, but moved on to play classical music on the much-heftier guitar. It wasn’t until the mid1990s that McQueen truly fell in love with the sonorous strum of a well-played uke. “I was in Ireland and heard Iz on the radio,” he recalls, referring to Hawaii’s Israel “Iz” Kamakawiwo ole. “When I got back home, I started doing research on ukuleles. It was difficult to find a quality instrument. Everything was either very expensive or just horribly made.” With the online launch of Uke Republic in 2007, McQueen aimed to bridge this price and quality gap by collaborating with a new breed of ukulele makers. Some of these U.S.-based brands — names like Kala, Mainland, Ohana and Big Island Ukuleles — were starting to manufacture high-quality, affordable ukuleles by exporting rigid quality controls to overseas factories. These days, Uke Republic also sells higher-end instruments by artisanal makers such as Ko’olau, DaSilva and Augustino LoPrinzi, to name a few, and the shop even has its own Sailor Brand custom ukulele. “You can get a nice instrument for as little as $50, on up into the thousands,” McQueen says. Uke Republic has also benefitted from the rising popularity of the ukulele itself. Over the past few years, hugely popular artists like Zac Brown, Dave Matthews, Jack Johnson and Paul McCartney have been knocking out more tunes on ukes. Viral YouTube videos have also catapulted the likes of Jake Shimabukuro, the Hawaiian ukulele virtuoso, to global fame. “The ukulele was popular in the 1920s and again in the ’50s,” McQueen says. “This is kind of the third wave. There is a real renaissance happening.” Locally, McQueen and his wife, Donna, support a thriving community of ukulele fans by staging various concerts and jams, says Bry Harris of Acworth, who owns five ukes and even wrote a song about the shop. The McQueens are also passing their passion to another generation. “The ukulele is a standard part of the music curriculum in Hawaii and Canada,” Donna explains. “We’re working to bring it to Georgia as well through a program called Ukulele in the Classroom. We’ve already got schools working with us in Rabun, Paulding, Coweta and Clarke counties.” For such a tiny instrument, the ukulele clearly has an outsized reach. For more information, go to www.ukerepublic.com, email mikem@ukerepublic.com, or call (770) 235-6606. COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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Reign on the way By Michael Pallerino Photos courtesy of Angela Reign

This is serious business — this life of a country music singer. And right now, nobody lives that life harder than Angela Reign. On a recent weekend, Reign tore it up as a finalist at Hard Rock International’s Battle of the Bands, and then spent the weekend with her agent/husband, Mike Waller, driving from gig to gig before jetting off to Los Angeles. The touring, music and more touring is what Reign dreamed of when she left her high-powered management consultant job and hit the road to chase her country music dream. It’s your typical budding country music star story: One minute you’re consulting with some major corporation on how to add millions to its bottom line, and the next you’re performing before a throng of screaming fans during a pregame concert at the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championship in the Georgia Dome. “I was making a significant financial impact with my day job, but all I kept thinking about were those 20 people I had entertained the weekend before,” Reign says. “Entertaining fed my soul.” As the consultant-by-day-singer-by-night mantra hit full stride, it was Reign’s boss who finally encouraged her to pursue music full time. The consulting job would be there if she needed it, her boss promised. Well, you can officially transfer Angela Reign’s name from your LinkedIn contacts to your iPod playlist. Eight of Reign’s songs have aired on mainstream radio. Over the past year or so, she has performed 50-plus events at major venues from Atlanta to Nashville, Tenn., including gigs at the country music capitol’s vaunted Bluebird Café. Her single, “I Wanna Ride the Bull,” which was released on a five-song CD with country music star Kip Moore’s No. 1 hit, “Beer Money,” continues to garner mass appeal. Along with being the inspiration for a line dancing class taught weekly at Electric Cowboy and Wild Bill’s, it has been put into rotation in 250 dance clubs across the country. The Georgia Music Awards also nominated the song’s video for “Best Music Video of the Year.” “I’m not your traditional female country artist,” says Reign, who recently was nominated as “Best Female Country Artist of the Year” by the Georgia Music Awards. “I’m a wild woman on stage. I’m a chameleon. I’ll sing a love ballad with utter passion, and then follow it up with a hard-hitting, in-your-face rock anthem. I’m unique, and a number of people I respect have convinced me to embrace that uniqueness.”

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Getting to know Angela Favorite Singer: Stevie Nicks

Like many truly gifted singers, Reign started singing in the church choir at an early age. She continued her passion on and off through the years with cameos in local bands and performing in community theatres. It wasn’t until 2009, after singing with an ex-Nashville guitarist at a private event, that she began performing again regularly. “After hearing me sing, he made it clear I was wasting my true talent,” Reign recalls. “It has been such a blessed time with so many fun memories.” But Reign is not just about taking everything that’s given her. She believes in giving back, too. Over the past year, her band has conducted benefit concerts for the American Cancer Society, The Strand Theatre, MS Society and the Wounded Warrior

organization. “Giving back through my music is hugely important to me. It has always been a part of who I am as a person. I want to use my music to inspire people and encourage them for whatever they might be going through. You can be having the absolute worst day of your life and music can bring you back to a better time and place.” This is the legacy that Angela Reign inspires to leave — one that has taken her from corporate raider to compassionate songstress. “Today my band is my family; my music is my full-time job and the stage is my home. I can’t imagine doing anything else. Will our uniqueness bring us continued success? Only time will tell, but we’re absolutely enjoying the journey.”

Favorite (All-Time) Song: “Conviction of the Heart” (Kenny Loggins). Best On Stage Moment: Singing Zac Brown’s “Free” with her bass player, Rick Sinclair. Your Duet Wish List: Kenny Loggins. Favorite Celebrity Moment: Hanging backstage with actor/comedian Steve Martin after his performance with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. Singer You’d Most Like to Meet: Madonna. One Thing Everybody Should Know About You: I’m a science nerd. The One Song You'd Love to Record: “Don’t Stop Believin’” (Journey)

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by stacey l. evans

in Bloom

Ea st Cobb with ar rival o f b es t- s el l i n g aut h o r Cla i re Cook’s s u n n y d i s p o s i tio n and seeds of wi s d o m Though she has published nine books in a decade, one of which was made into a Hollywood movie, bestselling author Claire Cook is just as down-to-earth as the characters she writes about. She’s friendly and has a genuine zest for life. “I think who I am and what I write are really in sync and I think there is a lot of power in that. I hope there is a spirit of fun in both,” she said. “Life is here, we might as well enjoy it.” Cook’s novels, from Must Love Dogs, which was made into a movie starring John Cusack and Diane Lane, to her latest, Time Flies (published in June), are perhaps best categorized as Chick Lit, mostly lighthearted stories about everyday women reinventing themselves. “I think there is enough pain and suffering in the world without me adding to it,” she said. “I get to write the fun books, the books that people sit out by the pool or take to the beach on vacation and read.” Cook and her husband, Jake Jacobucci, recently moved to east Cobb from a small beach town in Massachusetts, to be closer to her daughter, Garet Green, who lives in the same neighborhood, and two sisters

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and a stepmother who live in metro Atlanta. Her son, Kaden Jacobucci, also moved to the area shortly after Cook. “I absolutely love living in east Cobb,” she said. “The people are friendly, practically everybody I meet is in a book club and the gardening is fabulous. It feels like home already, and it's great to be so close to family.” For Cook, who was raised with seven siblings, family is important. “Holidays are wonderful but to me there is nothing like that walk after dinner or the spontaneous times to just be able to get together and trade things from your garden or fun things like that. It’s those day-to-day things that I think are most important,” she said. Maybe it’s her Irish roots, but Cook repeats how lucky she is, not only in regards to her success, but in having two adult children that she enjoys spending time with. “They are two of my favorite people in the whole world to hang out with. They are just great. I can’t imagine being luckier — you put your time in when you’re parents and suddenly it all comes back and it’s

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pretty great. Nothing beats bringing two cool people into the world and having them turn out well.” Family plays a pivotal role in her novels as well. “I really think what I’m capturing in my books is a slice of real women’s lives and I think our lives are important enough to celebrate,” she said. “We live our lives as family, so (the novels) are always multigenerational and the narrator is usually that middle generation.” Cook’s writing is so well in tune with the everyday lives of women because she draws from her own life, as well as her readers.’ The outgoing personality stays connected to her fans through Facebook, Twitter and a blog on her website, www.clairecook.com, often asking them for feedback or to answer questions that pertain to the novel she is writing at the moment. “Those authentic details make your work come alive,” she said. “When my readers get to be a part of it they are so thrilled. I just love that. The two things I hear the most are, ‘Oh my God, you’re writing my life’ and ‘I can’t remember the last time I laughed out loud.’ Those are the reasons I write.” Cook’s novels always have a healthy dose of comedy, ripe with mishaps, quirky characters and typically a protagonist whose self-deprecating attitude is both relatable and humorous. “I think in all of us is this insecure person just hoping we don’t trip and fall,” Cook said. But along with the humor are very real, sometimes emotional, stories. “Sometimes something that’s sad or embarrassing, if you tweak it just a little bit it becomes funny. Throwing things a little off balance is often what makes it funny. It’s just how I view the world — I choose to look at the world that way. And that’s what I want to bring to the world (through my novels). I get so many emails from people saying, ‘This book got me through something really tough.’” So many of her stories are about reinvention because that was the story of her own life. Now that she’s pumping out about a novel a year, it’s hard to imagine Claire Cook suffering from writer’s block. But although she knew she wanted to be a writer since elementary school, it wasn’t until her early 40s that she began writing her first novel, Ready to Fall. “I was absolutely hiding from the thing I wanted to do most in my life but was afraid to go for,” she said. “And then suddenly decades had passed and I found myself sitting outside my daughter’s swim practice at 5:30 in the morning, and it just hit me like a ton of bricks that I might just live my whole life and never try. So one cold New England winter I sat in the minivan and wrote the first draft and it ended up selling to the first publisher who asked to read it. So decades of procrastination, and I was the only one standing in my way.” That theme resonates with many in her fan base — following those “buried dreams” are often the topic of discussion at Cook’s lectures and book signings. She was even featured on a Today Show segment in 2009 about reinvention. Cook is delighted to be a motivator, using her life as an example. “This is the career I almost didn’t have, so I feel so lucky to have it. You go through life and you’re taking care of families and you just put (those dreams) aside and then you ask, ‘Can I still do this?’ I like to be able to tell people, ‘Yes, you absolutely can.’”  COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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By Meredith Pruden

Since the mid-1970s, when he moved from Tallahassee to attend Clark Atlanta University, Kenny Leon has been a Southern t r a i l b l a z e r proud to call the metro area his home base — no matter where the road takes him. Now a Vinings resident, the nationally recognized actor and award-winning director is often hailed as a local champion for artistry, diversity and philanthropy.

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At Clark, Leon earned an undergraduate degree in political science and set his sights on attending law school in California. Once on the West Coast, however, this college theatre minor took center stage when he began working on television commercials. It wasn’t long before Leon was back in metro Atlanta and working with the Academy of Music & Theatre. At the Academy, he worked on theater projects during the day and spent evenings giving back to the local community through the arts. “We did legitimate theater during the day,” Leon said. “At night we would do things in prisons or schools or with homeless people and give them the money we made from the performances. Politics, community and the arts have always been a part of my life and that’s reflected in the projects I choose to do.” After almost a decade with the Academy of Music & Theatre, Leon was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship. “I had applied to the Alliance Theatre around that time because there wasn’t any diversity there,” he said. “But, the committee for the National Endowment in New York wanted me to leave Atlanta.” Leon once again left Atlanta — this time to study in Baltimore, Md. and San Jose, Calif. While in San Jose, Leon got the call he had wanted before receiving the Endowment — an invitation to do a play at the Alliance. “I was invited by the Alliance to do a play called T-Bone and Weasel and, at the end of that year, I was offered the associate artistic director job,” he said. “Two years later, I was named artistic director. I had a great time. Atlanta gave me my start, and I could never say, ‘thank you’ enough. But, I was losing myself as an artist so I left Alliance thinking I was moving to New York City.” After an 11-year run as artistic director at the Alliance Theatre, Leon set his sights on the Big Apple. But Leon’s friend, Chris Manos, a wellknown producer, had other plans. “Chris encouraged me to start a theater company,” Leon said. “There was a need for a company that focused on issues of diversity, so Jane Bishop and I started that.” As founding artistic director of True Colors Theatre Company, Leon built what has become an Atlanta institution

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while remaining constantly in pursuit of becoming a better artist. It certainly seems Leon has been successful in that venture, garnering numerous accolades throughout his career. He’s directed 10 world premieres for the Alliance, including Elton John’s Aida. He racked up five Tony nominations for August Wilson’s Gem of the Ocean on Broadway. He won a Tony for his work on Lorraine Hansberg’s A Raisin in the Sun on Broadway, which, several years later, was translated into an epynonymous network television adaptation with Sony and ABC starring Sean Combs and Phylicia Rashad. He was named one of People magazine’s 50 Most Beautiful People, and has been presented Martel Cognac’s Rise Above Award and the MIT Eugene McDermott Award in the Arts. Still, Leon is very much an everyman - especially when at home in Vinings. “When I come home I walk in my neighborhood and jog at the Silver Comet Trail,” he said. “I’m a golfer, and the number of public and private courses here can’t be matched. There are great churches all over, and fantastic restaurants. It’s just a great place to come and live and slow down.”

Sean Combs and Kenny Leon on the set of ‘A Raisin in the Sun.’

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arts and entertainment

Cobb has many venues for live music. Here are just a few of the more popular ones: Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre 2800 Cobb Galleria Pkwy., Atlanta 30339 Number: (770) 916-2800 Website: www.cobbenergycentre.com

Mable House Barnes Amphitheatre 5239 Floyd Road SW, Mableton 30126 Phone: (770) 819-3285 Website: www.mablehouse.org/ amphitheatre.html

120 Tavern & Music Hall 1440 Roswell Road, Marietta 30062 Phone: (770) 509-3320 Website: www.120tavern.com

Glover Park Concert Series 50 Park Square, Marietta 30060 Phone: (770) 794-5601 Website: http://www.mariettaga.gov/city/ residents/parks

Cobb County Civic Center, Jennie T. Anderson Theatre 548 S Marietta Parkway SE, Marietta 30060 Phone: (770) 528-8450 Website: http://prca.cobbcountyga.gov/ civiccenter.htm

Earl Smith Strand Theatre 117 North Park Square, Marietta 30060 Phone: (770) 293-0080 Website: www.earlsmithstrand.org

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by katy ruth camp

meet acworth’s

PENNY

BALL designer extraordinare

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Penny Ball

is a Southern-twanged, red-glasses-framed, ball-

of-joy, cancer-surviving example that it is never too late to follow your dreams. At the age of 65, Ball has launched her own high-end accessories company called Penny Ball Collections. The company offers unique handbags and jewelry, all designed by Ball and many of the items are backed by the spirit of charitable giving.

“I always had dreams of a career in the fashion world, but my path took a different turn,” the Acworth resident said. “I supported my husband’s career throughout our marriage and stayed at home to raise our three children. But after a few years, I thought, maybe it’s my turn.” Ball said she was focused on raising three good, well-adjusted children so when she felt that was accomplished, she began to explore the idea of starting her own handbag and jewelry line. But she was sidelined by yet another focus-shifter in 2008 when she was diagnosed with breast cancer and faced a tough road of chemotherapy and cancer. “I had to put everything on the shelf to fight that off, which I did, but it was the diagnosis that really ignited my spirit and brought out my creativity,” Ball said. “It steered the focus of the brand to include philanthropy with fashion. I felt we as women needed to celebrate and embrace the true beauty of a woman, and that’s her individuality. And I felt that very strongly after battling cancer.” Ball grew up as the daughter of a jeweler, so when it came time to design a logo, she decided she would use one of her favorite pieces of jewelry made by her father and given to her decades ago — a gold pin with her initials designed with fun, zany letters. See the full Penny Ball collection at http://pennyballcollection.com or call 404.731.3783.

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Attention Sciatica and Low Back Pain Sufferers... Could One Hour With Our Doctors Give You The Answer To Your Disc Pain? Now, in Acworth, GA, Dr. Erin Arnold, D.C. & Dr. Amy Valente, D.C. have what may be the most important breakthrough in non-surgical back pain treatment. Before and after MRI studies have shown disc bulges shrink in size - even with the most painful cases of L4-L5 & L5-S1 herniations. If you've had disc problems for years, recently injured your back,or you're suffering with sciatica,you must hear about these new studies.Scientific studies tell us that spinal discs are responsible for most of the aches and pains people suffer from. Discs act like a cushion between our backbones and allow for a space at each level so the nerves can exit the spinal column. When these discs get injured or wear out from bad posture, they begin to degenerate and cause pain. Bulging and herniations begin to form, pressing on the nerve roots. If the herniations occur at L4-L5,they can severely compromise the large sciatic nerve, causing muscle weakness, tingling, and severe pain. The most common invasive treatment for disc herniations is surgery. This costs quite a bit of money. Even with health insurance the patient is left with their own portion of the bill, in excess of $10,000-$15,000, and sometimes more. The recovery time and missed work can be anywhere from 3 to 6 months, not to mention the obvious severe risks associated with all surgery. But here's the biggest problem… there is a high failure rate of back surgery. One medical study found that on average, 53% of L5-S1 back surgeries fail to produce relief of symptoms (International Orthop 1987.) Before You Go Under The Knife And Opt For Spinal Surgery… You should seriously consider a less invasive approach called spinal decompression. Non-surgical spinal decompression is a new technology that has been proven to reverse disc herniations. It creates a vacuum effect on the disc, which pulls the disc back into its normal position and brings in a fresh blood supply to promote healing. Do You Have A Disc Problem? If you experience any of the following in your back or neck, chances are your pain is due to a disc bulge, herniation or degeneration: • A vice-like squeezing feeling in your back • Sitting causes back or leg pain • Stabbing pain at the belt line or in your neck • Can't turn over in bed without hurting • Numbness in your toes or fingers • Fire down your legs • Searing pain radiates into your arm • Prickling in your leg or toes Finally, Some Good News…… If you've been suffering with back pain or arm/leg pain caused by a disc bulge, disc herniation or squashed or compressed discs. Until recently, the only advice for many of you suffering in pain was to try what you've been told: • Try exercising • Try physical therapy • Try pain medications • Try muscle relaxers • Try pain shots • Try dangerous back surgery • Just live with it If you're like most, none of these have worked for you or you are afraid of what could happen if you do try some of these. Exercising makes you hurt more, pain medications and muscle relaxers cover up the problem and give you side effects. Pain shots can cause more pain, don't work or don't last very long or FIX the problem, back surgery didn't work, or made you worse. Or maybe you were one of the lucky ones that back surgery actually helped, but now the problem is back with a vengeance. Whatever your situation, you owe it to yourself to check into a Breakthrough Computerized Non-Surgical Treatment for back pain and sciatic or leg pain caused by a bulging, herniated or squashed disc or discs. It has helped hundreds of people who

were suffering just like you.This new treatment machine we are calling "the squashed disc machine." How "Good" Discs become "Bad" Discs Over time the discs in your back tend to get squashed or compressed,especially if you've played certain sports when younger or have a job that requires lots of sitting or standing in one place for long periods of time. Car accidents, lifting things, very physical jobs just to name a few. It's kind of like a cookie with cream filling, and the cream filling will start to ooze out from between the sides of the cookie if pressure is applied on top of the cookie (like gravity on our spines). Eventually this happens to a lot of us. Statistics show over 80% of Americans will suffer with back pain some time in their life. Spinal decompression treatments are very gentle. In fact, every once in a while I even catch a patient sleeping during treatment! How Does This Machine Work? Haven't you ever had the thought…"Gosh, if somebody could just pull me apart…I would feel a whole lot better." Yeah, we know you have. And it kind of makes a bit of sense. Well someone else, actually a medical manufacturer, back pain specialists, neurosurgeons and engineers have come up with just that. A machine that gently pulls you apart, stretches the disc to a certain point that causes a drop in pressure inside the disc (like a little vacuum in the middle of the cream filling) causing the cream filling to suck back in! You'll simply lie on your stomach or back, whichever is comfortable, and then a specialized belt is gently put around your waist. We'll set the machine to focus on your problem area - then the advanced decompression computer system will do the rest. Most patients feel better with just a few treatments, and best of all there will be no dangerous drugs, no invasive procedures, and no painful exercises. Does Decompression really work? Absolutely! When you come in we will provide you with studies that show why decompression is a preferred method of treatment. But what provides the best "proof" on how well decompression works is what patients say about it: Just Listen to What Our Patients Had to Say: I started at North Cobb Spine & Nerve Institute for pain in my low back that traveled down my right leg. The pain felt like a burning sensation down my leg and numbness into my toes. I was unable to walk my normal 5 miles. Since starting the spinal decompression therapy I am now able to walk again without any pain. The pain and numbness down my right leg is completely alleviated. I was surprised to find that I am even sleeping better at night and that the tension in my upper back has also been relieved. The staff here has treated my great and is very caring! Thanks - Bill Norman Before I started getting spinal decompression therapy I was having severe pain in my low back and numbness down my leg constantly. I had been suffering with this for 3 years. I had two nerve abrasions, multiple steroid shots in my back, pain killers, PT and water therapy and nothing worked. After the first spinal decompression treatment I could stand up straight with very little pain. I can now sleep through the night and exercise again. I am 90-100% better and I am so thankful I found this office. Thanks, John Ratledge As you can see, spinal decompression has a high success rate with helping disc herniations, sciatica, and back pain. In just a matter of weeks you could be playing golf, enjoying your love life, or traveling again. Feel the Improvement - and Say "Yes" to Life Again With my "Decompression Evaluation" we'll be able to find the problem and then get to work on it.Think of how you'll feel in PA I D A DV E RT I S I N G

Dr. Amy Valente just a few short weeks. See and feel your life change for the better. Start your body on the way to pain-free, normal living, feel tight joints rest, relax, free up, muscles tied in knots will become more supple and strength in your muscles may increase. You're able to live life like a normal person again, without back pain - able to play with your kids, enjoy time with friends, and finally get a good night's rest. The Single Most Important Solution To Your Sciatica and Back Pain It's time for you to find out if spinal decompression will be your sciatic and back pain solution. For 15 days only, we're running a very special offer where you can find out if you are a candidate for spinal decompression. What Does This Offer Include? Everything we normally do in our new patient evaluation. Just call before Aug. 31st, and here's what you'll get… • An in-depth consultation about your health and well-being where the doctor will listen…really listen…to the details of your case. • A complete neuromuscular examination. • A full set of specialized x-rays to determine if a spinal problem is contributing to your pain or symptoms. • A thorough analysis of your exam and x-ray findings so we can start mapping out your plan to being pain free. • An extensive review of your MRI. • You'll get to see everything first hand and find out if this amazing treatment will be your pain solution, like is has been for so many other patients. Until Aug. 31st, you can get everything listed here for $20. The normal price for this type of evaluation including x-rays is $250, so you're saving a considerable amount by taking us up on this offer. Here's What To Do Now: Due to the expected demand for this treatment, we suggest calling our office at once at 678-574-5678.

CALL TODAY!

678-574-5678 North Cobb Spine & Nerve Institute 3451 Cobb Pkwy Ste. 4 Acworth, GA 30101

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health & fitness

Takin’ it to the streets

From yoga on the Square to the farmers market, ‘Live Well Marietta’ will be promoting healthy habits Story by Rachel Miller

A

new wellness campaign dubbed “Live Well Marietta” will be launched in September 2013 by WellStar Kennestone Regional Medical Center and the city of Marietta. The goal is to strengthen the health of area residents with such

programs as yoga on the Square and recommendations for healthy choices at local restaurants. Mayor Steve Tumlin said “Live Well Marietta’s” proactive plan “to bring education out into the streets is something Marietta is proud to be a part of.”

Above: The pro-wellness campaign ‘Live Well Marietta’ will kick off in September. Many of the activities spread throughout the year will be hosted on the Square in Marietta. WellStar is the only medical provider sponsoring the initiative, and is funding the entire project without any tax money. The first event will include free health screenings for risk factors of heart disease and diabetes. Medical professionals will test the blood of people registering for cholesterol and glucose levels, as well as measure body fat and blood pressure levels. COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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health & fitness

Staff/file

Yoga in the Dark on the Marietta Square has become a very popular exercise during which residents can have fun while learning a healthy new discipline.

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Tumlin said people

have come forward in the past with ideas but he wanted something on a large scale that would be ongoing. “We live in a health-conscious society,” Tumlin said. “We didn’t want a flash but something that would last.” The initial launch will include 16 months of activities, including a “Lunch and Learn” quarterly series with expert talks on nutrition and sleep disorders, as well as a bi-monthly yoga classes on the historic Marietta Square. Tumlin said he was impressed with WellStar’s strategy to change the habits of Marietta citizens by incorporating the ambiance of the Square, especially the farmers market, “where people are already thinking healthy.” A strategy to improve the quality of life for people in the community began as discussions with his personal friend and WellStar CEO Reynold Jennings. This venture is designed specifically for Marietta, and Tumlin added that he was overwhelmed with WellStar’s quick momentum. Tumlin said the original idea was never meant to be exclusive, but that WellStar is a natural fit as Marietta’s biggest employer. A symbol uniting WellStar’s logo with the city of Marietta’s logo will alert the public about Live Well Marietta activities. Beginning in early 2014, “Phase 2” involves working with local restaurants to offer healthier menu items indicated by the “Live Well Marietta” symbol.

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health & fitness

CANCER

the fight against

should always begin at the

KITCHEN TABLE

Eat a “mixed” breakfast that includes foods containing a little carbohydrate, a little protein and a little fat. For example, eggs and a bowl of fruit or a protein shake with soy milk and a banana includes three essential macronutrients, provides energy and tastes good, too.

Don’t!

Do!

Eat sugary foods in the morning. A burst of refined sugar on an empty stomach will trigger a flood of insulin that suppresses the immune system and feeds any abnormal cells.

By Kathy Goldsberry

As rates of obesity rise in the U.S. and around the world, so does the spread of cancer. Weight loss guides and tips permeate our culture and can be found in most magazines and newspapers on any given day. But beyond superficial reasons, maintaining a healthy weight also is important for reducing the risk for cancer. Based on rates from 200709, 41.24 percent of men and women born today will be diagnosed with some type of cancer some time during their life. This means that almost 1 in 2 men and women will be diagnosed with cancer in their life, according to the National Cancer Institute. Environment and lifestyle factors are attributed to about 90 to 95 percent of all cancer cases. The evidence indicates that of all cancer-related deaths, as many as 30 to 35 percent are linked to diet, according to U.S. National Library Brooke of Medicine. Schembri “Healthy eating is tied to healthy weight,” said Brooke Schembri, a registered dietitian with WellStar. “Excessive fat is tied to many cancers. People who tend to eat fruits and vegetables also tend to be a healthy weight.” Eating fruits, vegetables, whole grains and beans are important to preserving lean body mass, which in turn leads to a reduced risk for many cancers. Schembri also suggests avoiding alcohol, red meat and processed meat and sugary and fatty foods. There is convincing evidence that being overweight or obese as an adult increases the risk of cancers of the bowel, oesophagus, pancreas, kidney, endometrium and breast, according to the World Cancer Research Fund International.

Caring professionals dedicated to being "your guide to optimal health"

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advantatotalhealth.com COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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health & fitness

Emory-Adventist cited for quality Hospital ranks among top in state in health care coverage Emory-Adventist Hospital in Smyrna has been named to the Georgia Hospital Association’s Partnership for Health and Accountability Core Measures Honor Roll. Emory-Adventist Hospital is one of 27 hospitals in Georgia to be placed in the Trustee category, one of the highest on the list. The honor roll is based on clinical data provided by the federal Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services, which administers the nation’s Medicare and Medicaid programs. The data was collected from October 2011 to September 2012. Hospitals are required to submit care data to CMS, which details how well a hospital’s caregivers adhere to a list of Value-Based Purchasing core measures.

These measures are the clinical processes of care that are known to be the most effective methods of treatment for surgical patients and patients who have suffered heart attacks, pneumonia and heart failure. For instance, a recommended treatment to help prevent a heart attack is to take aspirin either before or upon arrival at the hospital, as well as at discharge. A suggested treatment for pneumonia is to administer an antibiotic within four hours of a patient’s arrival. It is recommended that surgery patients are given an antibiotic one hour prior to surgery to prevent infection. The VBP core measure is a composite measure that determines whether or not a

patient received the right care at the right time. A hospital’s adherence to these recommended clinical practices usually leads to better outcomes. “We are pleased to recognize EmoryAdventist Hospital’s commitment to patient safety,” said Joseph Parker, president of GHA. “Compliance with these important core measures ensures that every patient receives the best, most effective health care possible.” “We constantly strive to maintain the highest standard of patient care,” said Dennis Kiley, chief executive officer of Emory-Adventist Hospital. “This honor is a tribute to the dedication of the staff members who ensure that great patient care is made even better.”

Emory-Adventist receives prestigious Stage 7 award HIMSS Analytics has awarded Emory-Adventist Hospital with the acute care Stage 7 award. The award represents attainment of the highest level on the Electronic Medical Record Adoption Model℠, which is used to track EMR progress at hospitals and health systems. HIMSS Analytics developed the EMR Adoption Model in 2005 as a methodology for evaluating the progress and impact of electronic medical record systems for hospitals in the HIMSS Analytics™ Database. There are eight stages (0-7) that measure a hospital’s implementation and utilization of information technology applications. The final stage, Stage 7, represents an advanced patient record environment. As of May 31, 115 U.S. hospitals, or 2.1 percent, of the more than 5,400 U.S. hospitals in the HIMSS Analytics® Database, have received the HIMSS Analytics Stage 7 Award. “Patient safety is Emory-Adventist Hospital’s highest priority. This designation affirms that we are fully using information technology to protect our patients through our use of electronic medical records,” said Dennis Kiley, president and CEO of Emory-Adventist Hospital.

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The WellStar way Health system offers multiple locations and innovative procedures

Staff/Laura Moon

WellStar Health System CEO Reynold Jennings and Board of Trustees Chairwoman Janie Maddox look through a copy of ‘Life Well-Lived,’ a book about the 20-year history of WellStar Health System, which includes a timeline of the founding and interviews from more than 150 individuals. The health system recently celebrated its 20th year at Marietta Country Club.

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With five hospitals, more than 100 physicians’ offices and groundbreaking medical procedures, WellStar Health Systems provides a host of services for residents throughout Cobb County and beyond. Keith Bowermaster, director of public relations, said the health care facilities are strategically located to conveniently serve the communities of northwest metro Atlanta. “We know it is important to receive highquality health care close to home,” he said. WellStar’s Health Parks initiative, a one-stop shot for outpatient services, is an example of this. The first facility opened in Acworth last year with the second, in east Cobb, to open in 2013. “The Health Parks bring together physician offices and outpatient services such as outpatient surgery, urgent care and diagnostic imaging, along with health and wellness offerings,” Bowermaster said. “The Health Parks are not attached to a hospital and thus provide visitors with essential outpatient services right in their own communities.” The medical system continues to be a site of firsts. On May 17, a team performed two percutaneous aortic valve replacement surgeries, making WellStar one of few facilities nationwide to do so. The aortic valve allows blood to exit the left ventricle. A diseased valve cannot fully open and will need to be replaced. Patients who have had previous heart surgeries and/or other medical conditions can be deemed inoperable for traditional valve replacement surgery. However, this new procedure gives them another option for increased health. Dr. Richard Myung, heart surgeon, said, “Once they have these valves replaced, they’ll be able to enjoy a much more fruitful life. They will have more energy.” Bowermaster said health care is constantly changing, and WellStar offers the most cuttingedge technology available. “Our world-renown physicians perform innovative procedures every day,” he said, “Also, physicians from all over the world train at our facilities.”

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Information Below are listings for some of WellStar’s other facilities in Cobb. A complete list can be found at www.wellstar.org or by calling (770) 956-7827. WellStar Kennestone 677 Church St. Marietta, 30060 (770) 793-5000 WellStar Windy Hill 2540 Windy Hill Road Marietta, 30067 (770) 644-1000 URGENT CARE CENTERS Cooper Lake 4480 North Cooper Lake Road Suite 100 Smyrna, 30082 Hours of Operation Sunday to Saturday: 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Kennesaw 3805 Cherokee St. Kennesaw, 30144 Hours of Operation Sunday to Saturday: 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Delk Road 2890 Delk Road Marietta, 30067 Hours of Operation Sunday - Saturday: 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Shallowford 3600 Sandy Plains Road Marietta, GA 30066 Hours of Operation Sunday - Saturday: 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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health & fitness

Cobb is the place FORE prime golf courses

As the dog days of summer approach, Cobb County golf courses are trying to get as many players on the links as possible.

158

Courses at City Club Marietta, Cobblestone and Legacy/Fox Creek are offering specials and promotions to help entice area players to come out and enjoy themselves. All of the clubs offer variations on camps and classes for junior and adult golfers who want to learn how to play the sport or improve their knowledge of golf. Most classes or clinics are offered once a week — fees vary by course — and camps give junior golfers opportunities to make friends like one would at other camps, and to learn alongside other promising golfers. “We have our ‘Get Golf Ready’ clinics,” Cobblestone head pro Mickey Harris said. “We take some beginning golfers and we give them five golf lessons that are on-the-course training. Lessons include etiquette on the course and scheduling tee times as well as other standard beginning golfer training. We accept all levels and ages.” Legacy and Fox Creek junior summer camps and adult beginner golf classes will also help golfers improve their play on the links. 2013/14 COBB FACTBOOK

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“We have lots of camps and clinics for kids and adults,” Legacy and Fox Creek head pro Al Morrison said. “Both of our courses are executive golf courses. They aren’t regulation length, so they’re shorter than normal, but they are maintained very well. “Legacy is shorter than Fox Creek, so that’s really the only difference between the two. I thought managing two courses would be tough, but it’s not. We do the same things for both as far as specials and promotions go, but I have two different staffs to help me manage.” And for those players that really want to put in the practice time, Legacy and Fox Creek offers driving range plans to purchase $120 worth of range balls for $100, $190 worth of balls for $150 or $260 worth of balls for $200. Each golf course offers promotions and specials for members and non-members to help entice support from patrons. Currently, the City Club Marietta offers a free round of golf on your birthday if you register to participate in their “eClub.” Registration is available online. It also offers an online special for those that would like to make a weekend getaway. Two players can play two rounds of golf, stay overnight at the Hilton Hotel and have breakfast for $260. Another online special is for juniors. Those players ages 17-and-under can play for just a cart fee if accompanied by a paying adult. City Club also offers a loyalty program for golfers who frequent the course. Cobblestone uses the “Cobblestone Card” as a means to promote its specials. According to their website, the card is designed to give customers significant savings over normal weekly rates, and they are designated by color — red, white and blue. Red cards are savings for players interested in playing Monday through Friday, and costs $19 for Cobb County residents. Those card members can earn as much as $20 for a round of golf. White cards cost $59 for county residents and are good for $20 off a round of golf Monday through Friday, and on weekends after 12 p.m. Blue cards are $99 for country residents and offer $20 off a round anytime. Each of the

health & fitness

cards also allow the player to save money on twilight rates and offers discounts in the proshop. The Marietta Golf Center, which is a driving range, provides spring, summer and Fall five-week clinics for ages 5-7, 8-12, 13-17 and 18-and-over, according to its website. Clinics teach the basic skills of traditional golf using modified equipment that allows a child to transfer proper mechanics to regular clubs. As is the case with all of the public courses, golfers can get personalized golf instruction from their professionals.

ARE YOU

SUFFERING FROM?

• Stabbing Pain • Numbness • Burning sensation

• • • •

Cold feet Loss of balance Weakness Muscle atrophy

• Shooting Pain • Hypersensitivity areas of the skin

Most Common Causes of Neuropathy: Diabetes • Post Surgery • Chronic back issues • Post chemo Cholesterol Drugs side effects • Toxin exposure For many people who suffer from the chronic pain of peripheral neuropathy, powerful pain medication may seem like the only option but Dr. Crusse’ at Body Core Neuropathy & Spine Group offers patients innovative new treatments that can stop pain and restore function without the need for drugs. Body Core Neuropathy & Spine Group is offering a new FDA cleared light treatment for peripheral neuropathy. The painless prcedure uses low-level light therapy to open blood vessels and awaken small peripheral nerves that have been damaged.

CALL NOW for a highly specialized

Advanced NeuroFoot Analysis™ to see if we may be able to help. For only $37, we may be able to tell you if my

Neuropathy Relief Program will be effective for you.

Chiropractic • Decompression • Neuropathy Care

Dr. Alicia Crusse’, D.C. Ollie Schneiderjans, who played at Lassiter High School in east Cobb and now plays at Georgia Tech, recently was named a Golf Coaches Association third team All-American. Top, Bentwater Golf Club in Acworth measures more than 7,000 yards and treats players to a meandering layout through rolling hills, towering pines and plenty of water features.

(770) 993-6010 3855 Shallowford Road, Suite 510 • Marietta

www.bodycoreneuro.com Proud member of the Neuropathy Treatment Centers of America

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health & fitness

Are you ready for some football? KSU will be in 2015 By John Bednarowski

Brian Bohannon grew up around football, and from his middle-school days on, he had a short list of things he wanted to accomplish. Those who know him best say he accomplished them all through hard work. Bohannon was so sure of his projected path in life, he wrote a report about his life’s ambition in the seventh grade that his mother kept. “It is my desire to be a winner,” he wrote. “I want to play football, and be a football coach.” At age 42, the Griffin native and

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Woodstock resident has already gone beyond his list. And now, he is the first head football coach at Kennesaw State University. “I grew up on a football field,” Bohannon said. “I had a lot of conversations (with my dad). He’s been a rock.”

They know Bo! New KSU coach Brian Bohannon hit the ground running and already has two area players and one Cobb standout signed to play for the Owls in 2015.

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Former Georgia head football coach and athletic director Vince Dooley — right, greeting new KSU coach Brian Bohannon — helped organize the KSU football committee.

His father, Lloyd, was the longtime coach at Griffin High School, compiling a career record of 156-58-1 from 197895. As a youngster, Brian would go with his father to practice after school, eventually playing for him from

1986-89. Bohannon went on to letter four years at Georgia. He started his junior and senior seasons and was part of the 1992 team that won 10 games, tied for the Southeastern Conference’s Eastern Division

championship and won the Citrus Bowl. Brian Bohannon left a coaching stint at West Georgia when he got his first full-time coaching job as the wide receivers coach at GardnerWebb, but his stay there was a short one. The following year, he was hired by Paul Johnson at Georgia Southern. “We went 62-10 at Georgia Southern (from 1997-2001),” Bohannon said. “We won two national championships and played for a third. One day, he comes in and says, ‘I have this opportunity to go somewhere,’ and he asked, ‘Do you want to go with me?’ And I said yes.” In 2002, Johnson and Bohannon landed at the Naval Academy, a place that puts order above everything else. Six years later, Johnson —

health & fitness

and Bohannon — had another opportunity. This one was to come back to Georgia — not to coach the Bulldogs, but to go to their archrival, Georgia Tech. Now, Bohannon’s family — wife Melanie and children Blake, Braden and Brooke Anna — are Owls. Bohannon said he has spent 17 great years with Johnson, and there were many other people who helped him to get where he is. His longtime mentor was happy that Bohannon was able to become Kennesaw State’s first coach and offered him some advice as he embarks on his new challenge. “He said, ‘Be who you are,’” Bohannon said. “He’s been unbelievably good to me. I owe a lot to coach Johnson.”

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Discover the best kept secrets to getting a firm butt, smaller waist, toned arms, and lean sexy muscles. All without long hours wasted in the gym! • Personal Attention without the high price • No class times because of our convenient circuit format. • Work every muscle in just 30 minutes with our 9 station workout! • Have a trainer every time at no extra cost!

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Boring Cardio! The convenience of a circuit allows you to walk in the door and start your workout whenever YOU get there! East Lake Pavilion • 470-377-4285 2100 Roswell Rd. Ste. #2186 Marietta, GA 30062

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COBB COUNTY OUTDOORS

Kickball

Archery

Shooting

Kennworth Park 4100 Highway 293, Acworth 770-911-5160

Pitner Road Park 2302 Pitner Road, Acworth 770-528-8890

Nick’s Guns and Range 2727 Canton Road, Suite 410, Marietta 770-425-8461

Flag Football

Bicycle Motocross

Rock Climbing

Fair Oaks Park 1460 W. Booth Road, Marietta 770-528-5450

1. Noonday Park 489 Hawkins Store Road, Kennesaw 770-591-3160

1. Escalade Climbing Gym 3694 Kennesaw S. Industrial Dr., Kennesaw 770-794-1575

2. Wild Horse Creek Park 3820 Macedonia Road, Powder Springs 770-528-8816

2. Smoky Mountain Adventure Camp 1378 Arden Drive, Marietta 866-876-CAMP (2267)

Disc Golf Oregon Park 145 Old Hamilton Road, Marietta 770-528-8890

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Northside Hospital expands services From staff reports

Northside Hospital continues to serve Cobb County with full-service medical facilities nearby. The Northside/East Cobb Medical Campus, Northside Hospital in Sandy Springs and Northside Hospital-Cherokee in Canton, along with additional outpatient facilities in nearby Alpharetta, Holly Springs, and Woodstock, offer a wide variety of health care services to Cobb residents including imaging, cardiology/angioplasty, emergency services, cancer care, surgery, maternity, urology, sleep disorder services, and much more.

Atlanta consumers have voted Northside ‘Most Preferred Hospital for Overall Healthcare Services’ for 16 consecutive years and the hospital is the only Atlanta hospital chosen by the National Cancer Institute to be a Community Cancer Center. In recent years, Northside has rapidly expanded its services at its Northside/East Cobb Medical Campus.

Conveniently located at the intersection of Woodlawn and Johnson Ferry roads, the campus provides excellent care for

patients seeking almost any medical specialty. Services include Northside/East Cobb Imaging, a state-of-the-art imaging center that offers a comprehensive array of advanced technology such as digital screening mammography and X-ray, MRI, multi-slice CT, bone densitometry and ultrasound. All exams are performed by a team of specialty-trained technologists and are interpreted by an on site, board-certified radiologist. The east Cobb campus also houses a wide variety of physician practices including urgent care and family medicine, cardiology, primary care, orthopedics, pediatrics, OB/GYN and more.

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Kaiser Permanente delivers for fourth straight year From staff reports

For the fourth consecutive year, Kaiser Permanente of Georgia, the state’s largest nonprofit health plan, ranks highest in member satisfaction in the South Atlantic region, accord-

ing to the J.D. Power and Associates 2013 U.S. Member Health Plan Study. The South Atlantic region includes Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. Receiving a total of 757 points on a 1,000-point scale,

Kaiser Permanente scored 60 points above the South Atlantic region’s average for overall member satisfaction. Kaiser Permanente also received the region’s highest scores in the following categories: coverage and benefits, customer service,

information and communication, claims processing and statements. For more information on the organization and a list of addresses for the 25 Cobb County facilities, visit kaiserpermanente.org.

Staff/file

Marietta resident Carolyn Storey buys fresh tomatoes from Andrew Dunn of Red Earth Organics at the Marietta Farmers Market.

Farmers connect with community at markets From staff reports

Almost every city and small town in Cobb County plays host to a local farmers market. These weekly open-air markets connect a community through a more intimate shopping experience.  THE MARIETTA SQUARE Farmers Market is open all year and fills much of the downtown Historic Marietta Square. This market is open Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon, as well as Sundays from noon until 3 p.m.  THE ACWORTH Farmers Market is located in historic downtown Acworth near the railroad tracks on Main Street. The market runs from the end of May through October on Fridays from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m.  THE KENNESAW Farmers Market has been operating for almost 10 years and is at the Adams Park soccer field at 2753 Watts Drive.  THE SMYRNA Fresh Market, near First Baptist Church at 1275 Church St., is open from the spring to the fall on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.  THE FARMERS ATLANTA ROAD Market (FARM) is available during the same season Tuesdays from 4 to 7 p.m., and is at the St. Benedict’s Episcopal Church at 2160 Cooper Lake Road SE.

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Judy Greunfelder, also known as Queen to the rest of the Red Hat Society, hands out cake to the ladies of the Golden Living Nursing Home to brighten their day and give them company.

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RED HAT SOCIETY BRINGS JOY TO SENIORS By Sally Litchfield

The Adorable Fedora Belles chapter of the Red Hat Society dress to the nines in their red hats and boas bringing cheer to residents at Golden LivingCenter. “The Red Hat Society is social organization for women primarily over 50 years of age. It gives you someone to play with after you retire,” said Judy Gruenfelder — known as “Queen Floozy J” of the Adorable Fedora Belles. The Marietta chapter has 12 members and meets at least once a month for social activities such as going to plays, movies and lunch. The ladies always dress in their red hats, purple dresses and jewelry. “Our colors are purple and red,” the Marietta resident said. The Red Hat Society was started by Sue Ellen Cooper in California who was inspired by the poem “Warning” by Jenny Joseph, which depicts older women in purple clothing and red hats. Cooper gave her friend Linda Murphy a bright red fedora and copy of the poem for her birthday. Linda loved the gift, so Cooper gave numerous other friends the same thing, and the society evolved. Today, there are chapters worldwide. The organization’s website is www.redhatsociety.com. Though the Marietta chapter makes frolic and fun, there is more to this group of women. After reading newspaper stories about different organizations giving back to the community, Gruenfelder, who has been a member of the society for 10 years, said, “I decided we needed to give back to the community.” Three years ago, the chapter approached Golden LivingCenter, a skilled nursing facility in Marietta (behind WellStar Kennestone Hospital), about volunteering. “We liked them and they liked us. We started working there,” said Gruenfelder.

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Laura Moon/Staff

94-year-old Charlie Duncan of Marietta celebrated his birthday by participating in the water aerobics class at the McCleskey East Cobb Family YMCA.

For many seniors, retirement is a time to

REINVENT AND REINVIGORATE Story by Lindsay Field

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Staff/Laura Moon

Members of the East Cobb Steppers perform.

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hoever said retirement is when you sit back, relax and laze around didn’t know some of our Cobb residents who pride themselves in staying active at any age, especially in their 80s and 90s. Charlie Duncan of Marietta is 94 years old and attributes his good health to water aerobics, something he’s been doing for more than 20 years.

“I do nothing but water aerobics,” he said. “I don’t touch any of the machines on the count of having arthritis in my hips and back. It’s the best thing in the world.” Duncan works out three days a week at the McCleskey-East Cobb Family YMCA off East Piedmont Road. He also enjoys square dancing with his wife of the last 36 years, Mary. Eighty-two-year-old Joan O’Connor of Kennesaw also has found that passion for life and healthy living in dance, performing with the East Cobb Kickers for the last 20 years. “I always wanted to take dancing classes but I was one of eight children and I could never afford the classes and when I read about the Kickers after they organized, I thought, ‘I can finally take dance classes,’” she said. She also loves the comradery the

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group shares and how they are there for each other and their audiences. “It keeps us all fit and we boost each other … the morale of each other,” she said, with regards to members having knee replacements, pace makers, kidney surgeries, etc.” Exercising the mind and body and building friendships as a senior, like Duncan and O’Connor have, is something Dawn Reed with Aloha to Aging said is important to a healthy senior lifestyle. Throughout Cobb, DeKalb, Cherokee and Fulton counties, Reed teaches a number of exercise and brain game classes in various churches and retirement communities to help continue strengthening seniors’ bodies and minds. “We focus on healthy eating, the importance of laughter, creating new routines

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senior living If you thought an

Alzheimer’s Diagnosis meant institutional Care...Think Although our care is highly individualized based on your loved one’s needs, we provide a number of signature programs that are desiged to stimulate one’s long-term memory such as:

Spiritual Programs. Our spiritual director offers both denominational and non-denominational prayers and services to uplift and comfort the community.

Legacy Stories. Together, we record in writing each resident’s personal biography.

Again!

Peregrine University.

Around The World.

We have interesting and entertaining lectures on topics familiar to the residents.

On a monthly basis we explore different cultures of teh world through dining, dress and music.

Time Capsules.

Radio Days.

We work with residents to create a safe-box of keepsakes to calm, stimulate, and lift residents’ spirits.

Classic radio programs from the past are provided to facilitate memories from the 30’s and 40’s.

Call Kimberlee or Joe to schedule a tour now at

770-803-0100 4375 Beech Haven Trail SE Smyrna, GA 30080

http://www.peregrinepeachtree.com

Staff/Kelly Huff

Aloha to Aging owner Dawn Reed walks Lola Lingerfelt of Marietta to a waiting volunteer vehicle after Lingerfelt completed a class.

and being in a social environment,” she said. They do chair yoga, work with exercise balls, bands and weights and allow the participants to work at their own levels, and all to some of their favorite music. “Muscle loss often happens at their age, so this definitely can increase muscle mass, which is going to help with balance and other activities of daily living,” she said. And there isn’t a “too old” age for exercising and taking good care of one’s body. “You can build muscle at any age,” she said. “It’s an overall plus for your mental and physical wellbeing.” Reed also teaches a Parkinson’s support group, where members work on their mobility, which has been proven to improve symptoms. For more information on Aloha to Aging’s activities, visit alohatoaging.org or call Reed at (678) 439-1177. COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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OLLI offers seniors a chance to keep learning BY SARAH CHAMBERS hen Ann Jordan heard about the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Kennesaw State University, she knew it would be an opportunity to expand her education and meet new people her age who have similar interests. “It’s just nice to have this time to come here and be surrounded by people who are the same age and at the same point in life as you are,” Jordan said. A division of the university’s College of Continuing and Professional Education, OLLI was established in 1998 as Kennesaw State Senior University. It was renamed OLLI in 2004 and received its first endowment from the Bernard Osher Foundation in 2005, which aims to improve the quality of life for senior students through continuing education. The program offers a wide variety of

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courses ranging from health classes that focus on nutrition and aging to Spanish classes to seminars covering how to sell items on eBay. Jordan is enrolled in beginners Pencil, Pen and Ink Drawing, and said she plans to begin the advanced subsequent drawing class in July. Sitting in a classroom in the KSU Continuing Education building on Busbee Drive, Jordan and her classmates, all of whom are at least 50 years old, show off their drawings and work diligently. “Would you believe they’re all beginners?” asked William Singleton, the class’ 87-year-old instructor. OLLI’s eight-week long classes allow students ages 50 years old or older to indulge their passions and interests without having to worry about grades, exams or research papers.

About 560 students were enrolled in OLLI classes from April to June and about 3,000 students enrolled in OLLI courses over the last year, said Davia Rose Lassiter, marketing and public relations representative for KSU. In addition to the diverse classes, OLLI conducts four themed socials each year, which usually include food and live bands. OLLI will conduct an end-of-summer luau Aug. 2 at the KSU College of Continuing and Professional Education. Tickets will cost $10 per person. In addition to socials, OLLI hosts a winter open house called Donuts and Notes, which features donuts, coffee, local performers and artists showcases. More information about the OLLI program, classes and events can be found at kennesaw.edu/oll

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Senior Citizen Council of Cobb works to better the lives of retirees BY SALLY LITCHFIELD

T

he Senior Citizen Council of Cobb County, a nonprofit, promotes the general welfare of seniors in Cobb. “The Council was formed in 1973 as an independent membership-based organization to unite seniors of Cobb who are 55 years or older and find out their needs,” said President of Senior Citizen Council Nysia Lanier, 78. The council organizes and sponsors activities. “We develop community programs and activities for the mutual benefit and enjoyment of senior citizens. We work with government agencies for education programs and social and civic organizations to advocate and improve the general wellbeing of the senior citizens,” Lanier said. The council has organized an annual

fashion show, Enrichment of Life Movement, Cobb Information Fair and Cobb Senior Idol. It works closely with the five Senior Centers in Cobb, having donated $37,680 to the new Senior Wellness Center. Lanier estimated the organization has 3,000 members. Annual membership is $10 but groups such as assisted living centers get reduced rates. Business sponsorships are available as well. Members receive a monthly bulletin with class schedules and other information about the county’s five multi-purpose senior centers. “(The council) gets the seniors in the county more quality of life. It gives the seniors something that they normally wouldn’t have,” said Lanier, who has been involved since 2003. The council is involved in various programs around the county, such as Vial of Life Program, in which donated vials with

medical forms are given to seniors. Seniors fill out the form and place the vials in their refrigerator. They also receive an identifying sticker on their front door. “When an EMT goes there and sees that sticker, they know immediately where to go to see what that patient’s problems are, what their medical history may be. We know that this has saved lives.” “We just get involved all over the county if we can,” Lanier said. The council was recently nominated for the 2013 Creating Community Awards, a program that honors those making a difference in the community. “We get the seniors involved. We give them an outlet. To see these seniors being so enthusiastic and doing things is what gives me satisfaction,” Lanier said. The Senior Wellness Center is at 1150 Powder Springs St., Marietta. To learn more, call (770) 528-5355 or (770) 528-1447.

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COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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Cobb County Private Senior/Assisted Living Homes Amedisys Hospice Care of Kennesaw 1701 Barrett Lakes Blvd. NW #280 Kennesaw, 30144 (866) 921-1668 (770) 423-1316 Arbor Terrance at East Cobb 886 Johnson Ferry Road Marietta, 30068 (770) 977-4420 Lee Mohler, Marketing (770) 313-6347 cell

Delmar Gardens of Smyrna 404 King Springs Village Parkway Smyrna, 30082 (770) 432-4444 Ali Metcalf, Assistant Apartment Director ametcalf@delmargardens.com Dogwood Forest of Acworth 4500 South Main Street, Suite 101 Acworth, 30101 Nicolle Williams (678) 831-4999 www.dogwoodforest.com

Atherton Place 111 Tower Road NE Marietta, 30060 (770) 421-7300 Tani Loyd, Leasing Coordinator tani.loyd@wellstar.org

Flora’s Assisted Living Home 3215 New Rutledge Road Kennesaw, 30152 (678) 574-6093 Floraspersonalcare.com

Barrington Square Apartments 4799 Baker Grove Road Acworth, 30101 Krystal Echoles (770) 966-8536

Gaines Park Senior Living 1740 Old Hwy. 41 Kennesaw, 30152 Dan Day and Debbra Stephens Gainespark.com

DayBreak Village 3056 Cherokee Street Kennesaw, 30144 (770) 218-6166 www.daybreakvillage.com

Green Park Personal Care Home 5292 Bells Ferry Road Acowrth, 30102 (877) 318-0055 www.greenparkpch.com

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Heritage of Brookstone 5235 Stilesboro Road Kennesaw, 30152 Kay Sims (888) 321-4641 www.seniorlifestyle.com/heritage-of-brookstone.aspx Heritage of Sandy Plains 3089 Sandy Plains Road Marietta, 30066 (770) 973-7303 Lauren Sagaas, director of Sales lsagaas@seniorlifestyle.com Renee Nixon, executive director rnixon@seniorlifestyle.com Hospice Advantage 300 Chastain Center Blvd. #345 Kennesaw, 30144 (770) 218-1997 www.hospiceadvantage.net Laurel’s Edge 3950 Frey Road NW Kennesaw, 30144 Krystal Echoles (770) 427-1217

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Cobb County Private Senior/Assisted Living Homes Lawson Home Care 4812 Wilkie Way Acworth, 30102 (770) 529-3754 Life Well Lived Services 5052 Womack NW Ave. Acworth, 30101 (770) 529-3754 www.lwls.org Our Family Home 4778 Cemetery Road Acworth, 30101 (770) 924-4287 Parc at Piedmont 999 Hood Road Marietta, 30068 (770) 565-8828 Porter Scogin, director of sales and marketing pscogin@parccommunities.com Ellen Weidmann, assistant eweidmann@parccommunities.com Presbyterian Village 2000 East-West Connector Austell, 30106 (770) 819-7000

Michelle Morris, director of marketing mmorris@pvaustell.org

segitton@sterlingstates.com Marshall Gill, Executive Director mgill@sterling-estates.com

Robin’s Nest Adult Daycare 470 North Sessions St. Marietta, 30060 (770) 919-8580 Robin Cleveland, owner robin@robinsnestadultdaycare.net Joe Cleveland, Owner jcleveland@visitingangels.com

Tapestry Hospice of Kennesaw 3056 Cherokee Street NW Kennesaw, 30144 Donna Brown (770) 218-6185

Ross Memorial Health Care Center 1780 Old Hwy. 41 Kennesaw, 30152 (770) 427-7256 Rossmemorial.com Shady Grove Manor 1790 Old Hwy 41 Kennesaw, 30152 (770) 424-5475 Sterling Estates Senior Living Community 4220 Lower Roswell Road Marietta, 30068 (770) 678-4454 Sharon Egitton, Assistant Executive Director

The Sancutary at Northstar 3250 Quick Water Landing NW Kennesaw, 30144 Ben Brackett (678) 574-6941 www.alcco.com/location/the-sanctuary-atnorthstar Wellington Place of Kennesaw 2800 Jiles Road Kennesaw, 30144 (770) 514-9966 www.brookdalelilving.com/welling-place-ofkennesaw.aspx Winnwood Retirement Community 100 Whitlock Avenue Marietta, 30064 (770) 428-6200 info@winnwoodretire.com

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senior living Carol Young of Kennesaw makes her way across the pool during the Arthritis Aquatics Class at the McCleskey-East Cobb Family YMCA.

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Cobb Senior Centers and Senior Services Administrative Offices (770) 528-5355 Fax: (770) 528-5378 1150 Powder Springs St., NW Suite 100 Marietta, 30064

Staff / Laura Moon

Mailing address: P.O. Box 649 Marietta, 30061 Executive Director: Jessica Gill (770) 528-5366 Administrative Coordinator: Mary Boyd (770) 528-5366 Manager of Operations: Linda Parrott (770) 528-5383 Social Services Division Care Support- Information & Referral: (770) 528-5364 Program Coordinator: LaTronda Perry, (770) 528-5368 Nutrition Services Program Coordinator: Jobcy Alexander, RD (770) 528-5396 Volunteerism & Advocacy Program Coordinator: Shelia Perkins (770) 528-1445 RSVP Assistance Line: (770) 528-1448

Multipurpose Centers: East Cobb Senior Center 3332 Sandy Plains Road Marietta, 30066 (770) 509-4900 C. Freeman Poole Senior Center 4025 South Hurt Road Smyrna, 30082 (770) 801-3400

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North Cobb Senior Center 4100 Old Highway 41 Acworth, 30101 GPS: 3900 Old Highway 41, Acworth, 30101 (770) 975-7740 2013/14 COBB FACTBOOK

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senior living Multipurpose Centers: West Cobb Senior Center 4915 Dallas Highway Powder Springs, 30127 (770) 528-8200 Neighborhood Centers Program Coordinator Geneva Eddington: (770) 528-5352 Austell Senior Center 4915 Austell-Powder Springs Road Austell, 30106 (770) 819-3200 Marietta Senior Center 1150 Powder Springs St., NW Marietta, 30064 (770) 528-2516 North Cobb Senior Center 4100 Old Hwy 41, Acworth, 30101 GPS: 3900 Old Hwy 41, Acworth, 30101 (770) 974-2984

Senior Wellness Center Program Coordinator: Sandee Panichi (770) 528-4088 1150 Powder Spring St, NW Marietta, 30064 (770) 528-5355

Website: www.cobbseniors.org Facebook: https://www.facebook. com/CobbSeniors Volunteer Ann Sullivan of Marietta, walks Bill Ziegler out to a waiting family member after he completed the Aloha to Aging exercise program in East Cobb. Staff / Kelly J. Huff

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Isakson Living proposes $200M senior development BY JON GILLOOLY MARIETTA — This fall, the Cobb Board of Commissioners is expected to consider a zoning request for a $200 million senior residential development proposed by Isakson Living, a firm with family ties to U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson. Kevin Isakson of east Cobb, the senator’s son and marketing director for Isakson Living, said his firm has a 53.7-acre property on Roswell Road adjacent to East Cobb Park under contract to develop a 987-unit senior community. Construction could begin next summer at the earliest, with the first part of the development to possibly open in the spring of 2016. One-, two- and three-bedroom homes for seniors ages 62 and older are planned in four-story buildings. Homes will range from 1,800 square feet to 2,500 square feet. Isakson anticipates 240 homes will be built in the first phase, complemented by about 75,000 square feet of amenity space for dining, fitness and other activities. The plan is for a 10-year build out. The model Isakson Living is using is similar to the 398-unit senior development it built in Stone Mountain in 2004 called Park Springs. The property is under contract with owner Wylene Tritt, who has lived there for 60 years. “She has a beautiful piece of property and preserving that beauty is impor-

Laura Moon/Staff

From left, developer Kevin Isakson and County Commissioner Bob Ott speak about possible development ideas while inspecting a property owned by Wylene Tritt. tant to us not only as an amenity for those that will live in our community, but also for the surrounding area,” Isakson said. Of the 53.7 acres, 21.5

acres will be undisturbed green space, he said. “What’s enabling us to do that are certain elements of going to four-story buildings,” Isakson said.

Located in Historic Kennesaw 2933 Cherokee Street

770-218-6185 www.tapestryhospice.com

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Staff/Kelly J. Huff

Milan and Marion Savic in front of their historic home in Marietta.

By Leo Hohmann

Lovers of historic houses, if they live in metro atlanta, often find there’s no place like Marietta and Cobb County to find the house of their dreams. Just ask Milan and Marion Savic. They had lived quite happily for 10 years in a typical Marietta subdivision. But when they were smitten with a historic home on Forest Avenue, just off the Marietta Square, in 2009, it changed their life. They bought the place out of foreclosure in 2009 for about $150,000 and spent more money than they’d like to admit restoring it to its former glory. “We haven’t been able to verify it but we’ve seen records back to 1904, so we know it’s at least that old,” said Marion. The couple had actually been scouring the city for the perfect historic property for six months, working with Realtor Johnny Sinclair.

Their home is in the Cherokee-Church Streets Historic District, which is one of five historic districts in Marietta listed on the National Register of Historic Places. “Marietta has several times more historic homes than Atlanta, so we’ve usually got a good inventory of them on the market and they are in very good neighborhoods,” said Sinclair, an agent with Harry Norman Realtors. “So we are lucky to have the real strong historic districts close to the Square plus, we have a square that a lot of people want to be near.” Sinclair said prices of historic homes in Marietta depend on how much updating has been done, particularly to the kitchens and bathrooms. The oldest homes in Marietta date

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real estate back to the 1840s and 1850s, with most of these being on or just off of Whitlock and Kennesaw avenues. “We have more pre-Civil War houses just along Whitlock than the entire city of Atlanta has,” Sinclair said. Most pre-Civil War homes sell for between $300,000 and $1 million when they hit the market. “There might be four or five really première houses in Marietta that are on large tracts of land that people think of when they think of the grand old South that would go for $1 million-plus, but none of those have traded hands recently,” Sinclair said. “We’ve got a good amount of cute bungalows that have some great historic character to them that are close to the downtown that you can get for $400,000 and under.” The city has an active Historic Preservation Commission and Cobb County has several nonprofits that promote the preservation of historic assets, such as Cobb Preservation Foundation Inc. and the Cobb Landmarks and Historical Society, which owns the historic Root House. Sinclair said Marietta’s historic districts at-

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tract people who like living in a place where they have a strong sense of community. “That goes a long way. It’s not suburbia,” he said. The Savics looked at more than a dozen properties before they settled on 227 Forest Ave. “This one just had a great neighborhood and the house, even though it was in really bad shape — it had been a boarding house and a rental since about the 1940s — it had good bones,” Marion Savic said. “The woodwork was original and the fireplace mantels were all original, and it has beautiful heart pine floors.” Marion Savic stripped all of the trimwork down to the original wood and refinished it. “There were six original fireplaces and we added two wood-burning fireplaces,” she said. “We took everything down to the wood. That is just something I love, old raw wood. And something I actually did myself.” Everything else was farmed out to a contractor. The project soon got more involved

than the Savics had originally imagined. “We ended up having to lift the foundation up and pour a perimeter foundation, so the house is actually sitting on concrete instead of rotted wood,” Marion Savic said. “We had to take off the back of the house where the 8 by 8 beams were just feathered with rot, from termite and water damage. The dining room floor had sunk 8 inches in one corner.” They also restored the staircase and made it a focal point of the home. “When we bought the place it had no formal staircase, it was behind a door,” Marion Savic said. “Both of the bathrooms and the downstairs kitchen you could put your foot through the floors.” But once the work was done, the Savics said it was worth it. “We just loved the house so much and the neighborhood so much we decided to go for it,” Marion said. “We’re in the Forest Hills community and we have a great little neighborhood association. We do things throughout the year.” Projects still on the drawing board include interior decorating.

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ON THE RISE Residential housing market experiencing significant jump BY SHERI KELL ith available inventory of single-family residential homes at a historic low in Cobb County, Realtors, builders, appraisers and construction workers alike are breathing a collective sigh of relief. At the end of May 2013, there was 3.2 months’ worth of inventory available for purchase—down significantly from the seven months that is considered normal. John Hunt, senior analyst with Smart Numbers, a Marietta-based residential real estate analysis and forecasting company, said the lack of inventory is driving

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new construction in Cobb, “That is unheard of. ... There is an extreme and acute lack on inventory, which is why new construction is way up.” Cobb County and its cities reported 383 permits for new construction were issued in the first quarter of 2013, a 51 percent rise from the 253 permits issued first quarter of 2012. In May, in unincorporated Cobb and its six cities, 125 permits were issued, an increase of 42 percent from May, 2012. In unincorporated Cobb, 84 permits were issued; with Smyrna leading the cities with 24. Marietta issued seven permits;

Kennesaw, five; Acworth, four and Austell, one. Powder Springs reported zero for the month. A Sellers’ Market According to Georgia MLS numbers, as of May, there were 2,047 active listings for sale in Cobb County at an average list price of $333,902. In May of 2013, 1,043 homes went under contract at an average sales price of $257,399. The number sold rose 75 percent from May 2012, when 596 homes sold at an average price of $198,253. Wendy Bunch, broker and owner of RE/MAX PURE on the Marietta Square,

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real estate said, “If a home is priced according to the market, has been maintained, and shows well, the average time to sell is less than 60 days.” Sellers are also getting higher prices. In 2012, the average sale price was $8,100 less than the average list price. In May of 2013, the average home sold for $6,700 less than its original list price. Hunt says in analyzing Cobb’s top selling neighborhoods from April 2012 to March 2013, the top four represent a mix of single-family homes, townhomes and condominiums. Vinings Main, a condominium development off of Paces Ferry Road came in No. 1 with 40 closings. Single-family neighborhoods ranked second and third —Woodbridge Crossing in Vinings, followed by Rockford Township, off of Whitlock Road. Battery on Paces, a townhome development off of Paces Ferry in Vinings, came in fourth. According to Carey Cox, senior loan officer for Marietta's Mortgage South Lenders, his company’s year-to-date

purchase loan closings have increased 47.8 percent over 2012. “The trend on resale homes is once a home hits the market, it has multiple offers as long as it is reasonably priced and is in good condition.” Bunch says her agency doubled sales and inventory from this time last year. “And last year was my best year in 16 years,” she said. “The market has shifted, we are seeing less foreclosures and short sales and more fair market value home resales.” Cox added, “The combination of reasonable lending guidelines with the economic recovery has had a very positive impact that should remain constant throughout the year,” he said. “We have pre approved borrowers looking for homes but a shortage on inventory.” Location, Location, Location According to Eugene James, regional director for Metrostudy, a national housing intelligence and consulting firm that maintains a primary database on residential construction in the U.S.

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housing market, construction starts are up by 31 percent, year over year in Cobb. National home builder Lennar has opened and closed seven Cobb communities since opening an Atlanta office in 2010, and currently has five subdivisions on the market. Todd Jones, president of the Atlanta division of Lennar, said, “We’ve really focused in Cobb County on building the right home for the neighborhood. In east Cobb it’s been about luxury homes in more intimate communities to coincide with the higher cost of land. But we just opened our first community in West Cobb, called Westpark, where the focus is a little more on families and affordability.” “Last year was a great year for Lennar in Cobb County, but our sales thus far in 2013 have been even stronger because of much higher demand,” he said. “In fact, right now it feels like we’re selling homes faster than we can build them.” Gregg I. Goldenberg, president and CEO of Acadia Homes says land in prime locations is scarce. “It really is getting tougher and tougher to find land in Cobb's best school districts,” he said. “We are focused on keeping a presence in Cobb but land and lot availability is keeping a lid on our plans.” Acadia’s strategy has been building for different buyer groups. His company developed Arbor Green in Kennesaw for active adults; Reece Farms and Eagle's Crest in West Cobb for executives and Sherwood Park in Smyrna for the infill buyer. Goldenberg expects steady improvement over 2012 numbers. “To be honest, after what happened from 2006 through 2011 we are glad to see just some stability and measurable growth,” he said. Lessons Learned from the Crash Cox says due to current lending guidelines and strict appraisal processes, another housing bubble is not likely. “The current lending guidelines are reasonable, but not liberal like the non-conforming loans originated during the housing bubble,” he said. “The non-conforming loans fueled the rapid and unsustainable increase in home prices as they flooded the marketplace with buyers that should not have been extended credit to purchase a home.” Lennar’s Jones says he is also seeing a positive financial trend with buyers. “Banks are still pretty demanding when it comes to mortgage lending, but we are seeing that buyers are much more qualified than in recent years,” he said. “The average credit score for a Lennar homebuyer is improving each month, which reflects the overall economic improvement here in Atlanta.”

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BY SALLY LITCHFIELD

real estate

T A G TEAMS

Moms partner with and mentor their children at Harry Norman Realtors in Marietta

It takes a special bond for a parent and child to go into business together. Today we look at two success stories at Harry Norman Realtors.

Staff/Kelly J. Huff

Harry Norman Realtors Andrew Turner and his mother, Suzie Crowe, both carry company signs, drive vehicles with hatchbacks and are having successful careers in the market.

Joanna Conyngham and daughter Carson Wernz Joanna Conyngham grew up working in a family business, Owens Flower Shop on Whitlock Avenue. “I worked with my mother and my father and sisters and brothers. Making (real estate)

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a family venture was very normal for me. It was a very easy decision for me to ask Carson to join me,” said Joanna, a sales associate for Harry Norman Realtors for 20 years. Carson, who worked with an advertising agency for three years, changed careers and joined Harry Norman seven years ago as a sales associate. With the relationships established by her mother, Carson brought marketing and technology skills to the partnership. “It's been fun to know her on a different level as a business partner instead of just a mom. We get along great. Sometimes we have our issues, but for the most part we get along well and make a really good team,” said Carson, a Marietta resident. She has been married to her husband, Jeff, for five years and they have one son, 22month-old Henry. “It's been the best decision career-wise I've ever made,” Carson said. The mother-daughter team splits the responsibilities and rewards 50-50. “We share everything,” Carson said. “We are a definite tag team. We started our partnership knowing everything would be 50-50. We basically offer a great deal for our buyers and sellers because if one of us isn't available, the other one is,” Joanna said. “We feel like they get two for one.”

“No matter what there's always one of us who can go take care of a client,” Carson said. Their arrangement provides flexibility to Carson as a young mother, and gives Joanna the opportunity to spend more time with her grandson. “I have the best of both worlds. I get to be a grandmother and have a very rewarding career,” said Joanna, a Marietta resident who has been married to Paul for 43 years. The Conynghams also have a grown son, Cotters. Joanna said the hardest part is stepping back from wanting to be Carson's friend. “The Harry Norman office is one big family. We do a lot of things together. We hang out together. We help each other. If anything I have to pull back and remember I have my own friends I need to do things with. I don't try to mother Carson unless she asks my advice,” she said. Suzie Crowe and son Andrew Turner While attending college at Kennesaw State University, Andrew helped his mother in her real estate business. “(Andrew) helped me put signs in, helped me go look at houses. I think he developed a love for real estate at that point,” Suzie said After graduating, Andrew worked in the

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insurance industry while referring friends to his mom, who has worked with Harry Norman Realtors for nine years. “I would help her preview homes for my friends and I just really loved the business,” Andrew said. Like his mother, Andrew has a cheerful and positive personality, making real estate a natural fit. Two years ago, the 2003 North Cobb High School graduate joined his mother at Harry Norman as a sales associate, drawing from his large network of friends. This year, Andrew was chosen as Harry Norman's Rookie of the Year. “It's great to be with my mom every day and have her mentor me and teach me everything that she knows. She is one of the top agents at our office, and I've learned so much from her,” said Andrew, who is married to Ivey. They live in Kennesaw. Suzie and Andrew share the same office, reviewing contracts, brainstorming and marketing together. Although they share some clients and cover for each other when necessary, they retain their autonomy. “We're together every day and we're in the same office but we still have our different clients. We do a lot of things separate and a lot of things together,” said Suzie, who is married to Barry.

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COBB REALTORS 2012 Multi-Million Dollar Club

TOP INDIVIDUALS 1. John Sherwood — Worthmoore Realty 2. Pat Steph — The Realty Group 3. Donna King — Harry Norman REALTORS 4. Terry Burger — RE/MAX Unlimited 5. Susan Edwards — Heritage Real Estate Brokers 6. Steven Lee — Traton Homes 7. Helen Durrence — RE/MAX Around Atlanta 8. B.J. Martin — Harry Norman REALTORS 9. Denise Ogden — Overlook Brokers LLC 10. Johnny Sinclair — Harry Norman REALTORS

2012 Multi-Million Dollar Club

TOP TEAMS 1. David C. Vaughn — David C. Vaughn & Company 2. Tina Robbins — Robbins Realty 3. Deborah Ratchford — Keller Williams Cityside 4. Courtney Newton — Keller Williams Cityside 5. Wendy Bunch — RE/MAX Pure 6. Angela Barner — RE/MAX Unlimited 7. Debbie Redford — All Atlanta Realty 8. Sue Hilton — Keller Williams Signature Partner 9. Matthew Hester — RE/MAX Greater Atlanta 10. Jim Glover — Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby’s International Realty 11. Bob Wolf — Keller Williams Realty Partner

COBB FACTBOOK 2013/14

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real estate

BACK TO THE FUTURE

East Cobb couple discover note from the past in home

By Sally Litchfield Staff / Emily Barnes

Jim Sensenbrenner walks through the entrance to the bomb shelter he built in his house, which is now owned by the Ames family. Above right: Sensenbrenner kept a record of his house project.

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hen Lisa and Drew Ames renovated the basement of their east Cobb home they found the unexpected — a note to the future. Written by the original builder James Sensenbrenner, the note was a link between past and present. “I thought the note would be something nice to leave to the future. I thought eventually someone would tear that house down because time does pass and houses do get old. I just thought it would be good to write the note,” 86-year-old Sensenbrenner stated. The Ames purchased the home built by Sensenbrenner, located 3 miles away from their previous residence on a short sale in 2011. The fourth owners of the home, the Ames were attracted to it because of school system, the large 2-acre tract of land where it is situated, and because it is a ranch, the style of their dream home. “The house and yard was in a bit of disarray. There was certainly some work we needed to do. We had a vision when we bought the house. It was just going to be a matter of time,” Drew Ames stated. The family moved in and hired a contractor to renovate the basement and terrace area. During the demolition the contractor found a handwritten note on a board behind the bar that read: “A Note to the FutureToday is August 6th 1970. My name is James Sensenbrenner — age 43. As of now I have spent 7 years building this house by myself. It cost approximately $53,000.00. To you, who someday tear it down — Remember that many, many hours of work went into building it. It was a grand home to all who lived here — Treat it with care — I love her.” The Ames wanted to meet the author of the

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Staff / Emily Barnes

Jim Sensenbrenner stands with current homeowners Lisa and Drew Ames in front of the trellis he built behind the house he constructed. note. “It’s unique and the most solidly built home we’ve ever experienced. We were so intrigued by who would take such care and diligence to build such a solid home,” Ames said. The couple has three children Emily, 12, and 8-year-old twins Gracie and Charlie. “The house is so special. We’ve had so many contractors do work on the house and say, ‘This is the most solidly built house we’ve every seen,’” said Ames, who relocated his family to Cobb County in 2002 from Manhattan Beach, Calif. Drew works for FishNet Security, and Lisa for Pfizer Pharmaceutical Company. A 2-foot foundation of granite stone, a fully encased granite bomb shelter in the basement (a future wine cellar) and 20 inches of reinforced concrete overhead are evidence of the home’s solid construction. After renovating the home to a point, the Ames searched for Sensenbrenner on Ancestry.com and other websites and located him in White, Ga. “We knew his name. We knew how he spelled his name. We knew it was 1970 and he was 43 years old (when he wrote the note),” Ames said. Before Christmas 2012, Lisa contacted Sensenbrenner’s daughter-in-law Laura, who arranged for him to visit the Ames at their home. “(James) was elated,” Ames said. Sensenbrenner, an engineer who worked for Lockheed 40 years, gave the Ames the original floor plans along with a 3-ring binder of pictures documenting the building process. “I drew the house plans,” 86-year-old Sensenbrenner stated. Sensenbrenner also built the house. “I started the home 50 years ago. At the time I wrote that note I had already worked on that house for 7 years,” explained Sensenbrenner, who sold the home after remarrying following a divorce. He moved to Bartow County in 1986. “I was excited when (the Ames) called. It brought back memories. You don’t build a house by yourself without having some memories,” he said. “It’s real good to know that something you started is going to be taken care of for a long time by a great couple,” Sensenbrenner said.

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real estate

Townhome living for almost empty nesters By Sally Litchfield When Jane Manning and John Hornyak moved from an older home on Kennesaw Avenue in city limits to a townhome within walking distance of the Marietta Square, they made a lifestyle change without giving up the things they loved. The couple kept the Marietta location when they purchased their new home. “We enjoy being within walking distance of the (Marietta) Square. We still had the Marietta location but the living was different,” Jane Manning stated. The major benefit gained in townhome living is that outside maintenance of the gated community is taken care of by the homeowners association. “We were soon-to-be empty nesters and

wanted something with less maintenance,” she explained. “When I went home to the other house every day after work there was something to be done. This one you come in, kick off your shoes and just enjoy it,” Manning said. The couple was attracted to the layout of the five-floor townhome in the neighborhood established in 2004. They purchased the model home in January 2011. The 4000-plus square foot home with its four bedrooms, 4 ½ baths and two rooftop terraces offers ample domestic and private space for the blended family that includes their seven children, Will and Marielle Manning and Alex, Benjamin, and Grace Hornyak and Ryan Abbe and Drew Abbe. The rooftop terraces off the sunroom on the fifth floor are a

Staff/Todd Hull

favorite part of the home. One rooftop terrace has a view of downtown during the winter and the other side has a view of the National Cemetery.

Jane Manning, John Hornyak and their son Alex,17, enjoy living in their five story townhome in Marietta.

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Cobb Factbook 2013-2014