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Recalling the P A S T Mental Health Remember When...? The Value of Reminiscing By: Sandi Comer-Cooper All people reminisce. Remembering times past is a pleasant diversion, stimulates the mind, and helps give us perspective and a sense of who we are. As a recent study from the Association for Psychological Science states, “Nostalgia is now emerging as a fundamental human strength.” Reminiscing, the process of “life review,” is an important part of old age. As seniors recall their accomplishments and come to terms with past conflicts and disappointments, they achieve a heightened sense of personal identity and meaning in life. Reminiscing also enhances self-esteem. Studies suggest that seniors who are encouraged to share events from their lives with others experience an increased sense of peace and self-worth. We all have a lifelong need to see ourselves as unique individuals, and the recollection of pleasant experiences, past accomplishments, and triumphs over adversity is part of this. Reminiscing can be especially important for cognitively impaired persons. Those with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia can often recall long-past occasions better than the events of the current Healthier Atlanta Magazine day, since the disease affects long-term less than short-term memory. Interactions that include the recollection of events past can have a positive effect on the dementia patient’s emotional well-being. Why Does My Loved One Repeat the Same Stories? Sometimes family members and friends are concerned if the older adult repeats stories, returning to the same ones again and again. But recognize that this, too, is part of the life review process: the repeated stories are probably those that the person finds the most pleasant to recall, or may concern events that he or she is “working through.” Remember that a response from you is not necessarily required; he or she may just need you to listen in a non-judgmental manner. Sometimes an older adult may seem to dwell upon life experiences that cause sadness, anger or 404-629-0446 frustration. Understand that this, too, is a way of dealing with the past and can be a sign of emotional health. Older adults are a treasury of stored experience. Life review and discussing “the good old days” is a beneficial, purposeful activity that helps older adults maintain a positive outlook. Caring Right at Home Newsletter - 2009 When looking for quality in home care for your parent or loved one, choose Right at Home. The mission of Right at Home is to improve the quality of life for those we serve. Call 404-522-0029 for a personal consultation. Aug–Sep–Oct (Quarterly) 13

Reminiscing Article

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