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COLLEGE CATALOG 2011- 2012

Catalog 2011–2012

Statement of Publication This is an official publication of Massasoit Community College. Course offerings, dates, tuition, fees, and other college information are subject to change at any time. The information in this catalog is provided solely for the convenience of the reader, and the College expressly disclaims any liability that may otherwise be incurred. The information in this catalog is current for the 2011–2012 academic year. Any changes, additions, or deletions made after that date are available by visiting our website at www.massasoit.mass.edu. The rules, regulations, policies, fees, and other charges, courses of study, and academic requirements that appear in this catalog were in effect at the time of its publication. Like everything else in this catalog, they are published for informational purposes only, and they do not constitute a contract between the College and any student, applicant for admission, or other person. Whether noted elsewhere in this catalog or not, the College reserves the right to change, eliminate, add to any existing, (and introduce additional) rules, regulations, policies, fees, and other charges, courses of study, and academic requirements. Whenever it does so, the College will give as much advance notice as it considers feasible or appropriate, but it reserves the right in all cases to do so without notice. For the most up-to-date catalog information, including changes or corrections to curriculum, course descriptions, and tuition and fees, see the Massasoit Community College website at www.massasoit.mass.edu. Information in the Web Catalog supersedes the published version of the catalog. Massasoit Community College is a nonsectarian, publicly supported institution of higher learning.

Affirmative Action Policy Massasoit Community College is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, religion, color, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, genetic information, maternity leave, and national origin in its education programs or employment pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 151B and 151C, Title VI, Civil Rights Act of 1964; Title IX, Education Amendments of 1972; Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973; Americans with Disabilities Act, and regulations promulgated thereunder, 34 C.F.R. Part 100 (Title VI), Part 106 (Title IX) and Part 104 (Section 504). All inquiries concerning application of the above should be directed to the College’s Affirmative Action Officer and/or the College’s Coordinator of Title IX and Section 504, Executive Director of Institutional Diversity, Joyce Zymaris, at 508-588-9100, ext. 1304, Brockton Campus, Room A234. Inquiries may also be directed to the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, or to the Director, U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Region I, Boston, Massachusetts.

Catalog 2011–2012

Table of Selected Contents President’s Message 2 Board of Trustees 2 Department of Higher Education 2 Mission Statement 3 History 5 Accreditation 9 Admissions 11 Cost 27 Financial Aid 29 Policies 47 Program Advisory Committees 58 Disability Services 69 Workforce Development and Community Education 85 Course Descriptions 87 Full-Time Faculty 148 Professional Staff Directory 152 Staff Directory 157 Programs of Study 161

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Catalog 2011–2012

A Message from Dr. Charles Wall President, Massasoit Community College On behalf of Massasoit Community College’s faculty, staff, administration, students, and trustees, I wish to extend to you my warm, personal, and enthusiastic welcome to our vibrant, academic community. Massasoit Community College is a comprehensive institution offering a full range of degree programs, transfer and support services (including an extensive Academic Resource Center), and credentialed certificates in a wide array of fields. With a Massasoit education you can be ready for immediate employment in the workforce or transfer to a four-year college. I want you to come and tour both our Brockton and Canton campuses and our new Middleborough Center. Explore the many wonderful opportunities that Massasoit has to offer you and meet the people who will help you to transform your academic goals into the fulfillment of your educational and career dreams. I urge you to browse through our website and learn more about our College, our people, and our programs. And make sure to visit our website often, because things at Massasoit are constantly changing! Thanks for taking an interest in Massasoit Community College. Whatever your goal may be—degree, certificate, transfer, workforce training, or enrichment—the faculty and staff at Massasoit will do all that they can to help you reach it.

Charlie Wall

Board of Trustees Mary T. Brophy, M.D., M.P.H., Chair Pamerson O. Ifill, Vice-Chair Peter G. Asiaf, Jr., Secretary Anthony Simonelli, Asst. Secretary James M. Barrows, Jr., Trustee

Maria Jeanne Martins, Trustee David L. Phillips, Trustee Johanne M. Rone, Trustee Kerri Guillette, Student Trustee Judith C. Waterston, Trustee

Department of Higher Education Richard M. Freeland, Commissioner Nancy D. Harrington, Ed.D. Charles F. Desmond, Ed.D., Chairman Nancy Hoffman, Ph.D. Louis Ricciardi, Vice Chair, State University Trustee Angel Donahue-Rodriguez, Student Member, Representative State University Representative Mario Borunda, Ed.D. Keith J. Peden Jeanne-Marie Boylan, Community College Trustee Paul Reville, Ex Officio Representative C. Bernard Fulp Henry Thomas III, University of Massachusetts Paul Toner Trustee Representative

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Focused Mission Statement Massasoit Community College provides quality programs designed for immediate entry to the workforce or transfer to a baccalaureate degree program. The College also presents a wide exposure to the liberal arts and sciences as a key element in its mission to help students attain their personal and educational goals. Massasoit is committed to academic excellence, challenging its students to develop college-level competencies in computer skills, critical thinking, oral communication, mathematics, reading, and writing; it does so by integrating these competencies into courses throughout the curriculum. Accordingly, the College also challenges and supports its faculty in creating education outcomes based upon these competencies. Massasoit Community College promotes a supportive, student-centered, cross-cultural learning environment that respects the rights and affirms the dignity of all people. Massasoit offers a range of services dedicated to students’ success, including the Academic Resource Center, the College Experience Program, an Early Support System, ESL instruction, the Latch program, and the Children’s Center. With campuses in Brockton and Canton and an instructional site in Middleborough, the College’s focus is to provide the people of the Metro South and Greater Boston regions with state-of-the-art programs in applied technologies, human and public services, and health sciences. In close association with the leaders of local businesses and industry, the College has developed and offers a broad range of degree and certificate programs, such as Electronic Technology, Culinary Arts, Business Administration, Computer Information Systems. Criminal Justice, Nurse Education, Visual Arts, and a number of allied health sciences, including Dental Assistant. Massasoit Community College is committed to providing its community with relevant and meaningful educational opportunities through a variety of instructional delivery systems, many of which increasingly integrate teaching with advanced technology. Central to these new delivery systems are the Conference Center in Brockton, satelliteand cable-linked professional TV/radio studios, and teleconferencing rooms on both the Canton and Brockton campuses. In addition, community educational needs are met through formal partnerships with K–12 public school systems, other higher educational institutions, adult basic education programs, business, and industry. The Workforce Development Advisory Board maintains ongoing needs assessment and communication links with the business community and the public, allowing the College to respond rapidly to the need for training institutes and programs for companies and organizations as well as basic skills and work-readiness training for the community workforce. (Accepted by The Massasoit Community College Board of Trustees on December 15, 1998, to satisfy requirements of the Board of Higher Education)

Mission Statement We at Massasoit Community College pride ourselves in our tradition of excellence and in our historic mission of accepting all who desire to learn. We are dedicated to creating a challenging and supportive environment where the members of our community can attain their educational and personal goals. We encourage all to take responsibility for their learning, to discover their potential, and to achieve their ambitions. Recognizing that our diversity is an important source of our strength, we respond to the needs of our community and expect that everyone at Massasoit respects the rights and affirms the dignity of all people. We strive to construct a safe and trustful environment where together we can engage in open dialogue. To achieve this mission we set forth the following goals: 1. We will offer a wide range of quality, affordable associate degree, certificate, and short-term training programs to prepare our students for employment and/or transfer to baccalaureate institutions and to promote the development of critical skills. This goal will be accomplished by - promoting the mastery of basic competencies in all programs of study; - keeping class size small to encourage faculty and student interaction;

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Catalog 2011–2012

- generating high-quality library and learning resources; - providing individualized academic support services tailored to meet diverse student needs; - supplying technologically well-equipped classrooms, laboratories, facilities, and distance learning capabilities; - continuing to assess and improve the quality of our offerings.

2. We will continue our commitment to attracting, retaining, and supporting full and part-time faculty who are dedicated to teaching community college students by - providing professional development to inspire enthusiasm, expand knowledge, and effect innovation; - encouraging participation in classroom and college-wide research, professional organizations, and independent scholarship; - furnishing human and technical resources; - promoting professional standards and ethical practices. 3. We will create a supportive environment that encourages self-knowledge, community involvement, and global awareness by - recruiting, supporting, and retaining staff and students from all backgrounds; - strengthening the ability to work collaboratively; - providing personal support, health services, and career planning; - offering social, cultural, and athletic activities; - fostering appreciation for the fine and applied arts; - promoting multicultural and international activities and experiences. 4. We will assess and respond to the needs of our extended communities by - designing programs that include partnerships with business, industry, government, health care providers, and service organizations; - interacting with high schools, universities, and other colleges and creating fluent transitions for students; - projecting and targeting educational and employment opportunities and developing essential programs. 5. We will exercise managerial and fiscal responsibility by - attracting, supporting, and retaining dedicated administrative, professional, and classified staff; - managing our resources effectively, efficiently, and innovatively; - pursuing additional resources to improve our programs and services; - enhancing communications between campuses and among divisions, departments, and individuals; - assuring accessible, safe, and well-maintained campuses. Accepted by the Massasoit Community College Board of Trustees—September 19, 2007

Who was Massasoit? The person after whom the College is named is Massasoit, who was the Great Sachem (Great Chief ) of the Wampanoag tribe at the time of the Pilgrims’ arrival. Massasoit’s story has been enhanced by legend, but the help he afforded the first settlers is beyond dispute. One version of the story of Massasoit begins in March 1621 when an English-speaking Indian named Samoset entered the town of Plymouth and greeted the settlers with the words, “Welcome, Englishmen!’’ Samoset, Massasoit’s representative, prepared the way for the arrival of Massasoit, who proceeded to negotiate an agreement of nonaggression and mutual assistance with the English. This treaty has been called the first formal act of diplomacy in the history of New England. Massasoit is a symbol of mediation between different cultures. He also signifies commitment to dialogue rather than war as a way of settling differences among people.

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A Brief History of the College America is unique in its commitment to a wide range of postsecondary education, and nowhere is this better demonstrated than in the idea and development of the state-supported community college system. Its two overriding goals are to offer students higher education at a minimal cost and to meet the educational needs of the region each community college serves. Massasoit Community College was founded in 1966, but its origin can be traced to a 1947 study by the State Board of Education that determined the need for a low-tuition, state-supported system. The study proposed that twelve community colleges be established, one of which would serve the Greater Brockton, South Shore area. In 1961, a proposal was brought before the Brockton School Committee, and after a feasibility study, announcement of such a college was made in 1965. In September 1966, the College, consisting of 358 students and 22 faculty, held its first classes in the Charles M. Frolio School in North Abington, and in June 1968, the first graduation was held for 137 students. Additional campuses were later established at the former Howard School in West Bridgewater and the Miramar School in Duxbury. Ground breaking for the first five buildings of the permanent Brockton campus occurred in 1969, and by 1972 the campus was officially opened. During this time, the College received its first accreditation from the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. By 1978, the five remaining buildings of the campus were completed. Governance of higher education in Massachusetts underwent reorganization in 1980, replacing the Board of Regional Community Colleges and other state coordinating boards with the Board of Regents of Higher Education (now called The Board of Higher Education). As part of the change, in 1981, the Massasoit Board of Trustees assumed local control of the College. In 1985, the Blue Hills Technical Institute, itself in existence since 1966, formally merged with Massasoit Community College and is now the Canton campus. The Conference Center at Massasoit opened in 1997, offering 7,200 square feet of meeting space for local businesses and other community organizations. The Middleborough Instructional Site opened in fall 2010 and offers the following programs as approved by the Massachusetts Department of Higher Education and NEASC: Liberal Arts, Child Care Education, Business, and Criminal Justice.

Statement of Values Preamble Our nation is founded on the principle that each person is endowed with certain rights, the rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Perhaps nowhere in higher education is that principle more apparent than in the community college’s open-door policy. Massasoit Community College respects the inherent dignity and potential of each student. In its pursuit of excellence, the College also recognizes that this principle is demonstrated by the commitment and strength of its faculty and staff. Accordingly, the College affirms the following values and beliefs.

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Commitment to Students We believe that the first priority of the College is that students learn. We demonstrate this belief by striving to provide the finest instruction and support services possible to enhance student growth and development. Commitment to Access We believe that all people should have access to affordable, quality education. We believe that students should be engaged in challenging activities and that the College should provide supportive and developmental services to those who need them. Commitment to Diversity We believe that all people are entitled to educational services that allow them to develop their powers of body, mind, and spirit to the utmost. Therefore, we strive to reflect the diversity of our community in our student body, faculty, staff, and trustees. Commitment to Excellence We believe in creating a learning environment that is supportive and yet fosters high expectations for achievement. We aspire, therefore, to be recognized in our community as a caring institution, committed to high academic standards in our credit and non-credit offerings and dedicated to inspiring our students to reach their full potential. Commitment to the Community We believe that the College should be an integral part of the communities it serves, including the global community. We recognize the importance of enhancing the economic vitality and quality of life for all citizens in its service area. Commitment to Quality We believe in providing a working and learning environment that is devoted to innovation, creativity, and the open exchange of ideas. We strive to create a campus climate based upon openness and trust, integrity, clear communication, involvement in decision making, and respect for individuals. Commitment to Fiscal Responsibility We believe in being fiscally responsible to the public trust. We endeavor always to direct our human and material resources where they will provide the greatest benefit to the most students and to the communities we serve. Commitment to Accountability We believe that people achieve when they are held accountable. Accordingly, we set high standards of both behavior and achievement for students, faculty, staff, and trustees, and we support them in their efforts to reach those standards. (Adopted by the Board of Trustees on June 23, 1998)

Academic Advisement For purposes of course and program orientation, all students who are enrolled in day degree programs (matriculated) are assigned academic advisors.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Students are encouraged to consult their advisors concerning choice of courses, programs, and transfers to other institutions at any point in their academic careers. All full-time faculty are available to students, and all students are urged to visit their advisors as early and as regularly as possible. Classes are suspended for one day each semester in order to allow students to register for the subsequent term. Returning students should contact their advisors as early in the semester as possible to discuss career and transfer plans and to ensure that they are taking courses that fulfill their program requirements and meet their career plans. Students should regularly check their Massasoit email, the My Massasoit portal, and the Self-Service Banner for advising-related communication and information. Students should also consult their advisors or a member of the Advisement & Counseling staff before deciding to add or drop courses. Students can find their advisors’ names and office locations by checking a list posted in the cafeteria or by contacting the Dean of Academic Advising & Assessment. All students, whether they are matriculated or non-matriculated, or attend in the daytime or during evening hours, may also seek academic advising in the Advisement & Counseling Center located on the first floor of the Student Center. Massasoit Community College regards the advisement process as one of the critical vehicles of communication between the College and the student. At Massasoit, there are more than 60 programs of study (majors) offered with over 800 different courses to select from each year. With so many options available, the Advisement and Counseling Center can help students navigate which programs and courses to choose in order to meet their educational and career goals. From the student’s initial orientation right through graduation, the Center provides assistance on such topics as: * Program of study Selection * Course selection/sequencing * Course load * Change of program process Students interested in changing their program of study initiate the process in the Advisement and Counseling Center. Required paperwork is filled out during an interview with a counselor, and career counseling is provided if necessary. All completed requests for change of program are filed with the Registrar’s Office except for Selective Admission programs. Applications to these programs are submitted to the Admissions Office and may have a deadline.

Academic Degrees The Board of Higher Education has statutory authority to confer Associate Degrees to individual community colleges. Upon recommendation of the faculty, those candidates who qualify may be awarded a degree of Associate in Arts (A.A.), the degree of Associate in Science (A.S.), or the degree of Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.). A certificate is awarded to students who complete at least 30 credits in a Board of Higher Education–approved program. The College also offers in-house certificates of under 30 credits and a wide variety of non-credit certificate programs.

Academic Standing & Progress toward a Degree A student’s academic standing is determined by the student’s Quality Point Average (QPA). The cumulative QPA is the total of all Quality Points acquired divided by the total number of semester hours attempted.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Good Standing Students will be considered to be in Good Standing if they maintain a cumulative QPA as indicated: 1.0 upon the completion of 1–15 total semester hours 1.6 upon the completion of 16–30 total semester hours 1.75 upon the completion of 31–45 total semester hours 2.0 upon the completion of more than 45 total semester hours Grades of W, I, P, and AU are not completed courses. The minimum cumulative QPA for graduation is 2.0. Academic Probation Students who are not in Good Standing will be placed on academic probation. Students receiving financial aid are also required by government regulations to comply with additional standards. Students who are on Academic Probation are strongly encouraged to meet with a counselor. The purpose in meeting with the counselor is to consider one or more of the following options: (1) a reduction or change in the student’s intended course selection for the next probationary semester; (2) a reduction or change in intended work plans for the next semester; (3) tutoring and other academic support; (4) a program of regular, periodic meetings with the student’s new instructors, counselor, and/or faculty advisor; (5) career reassessment. If applicable, the student may finish his or her incomplete course work and possibly bring his or her academic record back into Good Standing before the beginning of the next semester. After one semester of Academic Probation, the student: (1) will be removed from Academic Probation and returned to Good Standing if the cumulative QPA is raised to or above that required for Good Standing status; (2) will be continued on Academic Probation if the probationary semester’s QPA is 2.25 or above, but the cumulative QPA stays below that required for Good Standing; (3) will have a status of academic deficiency if the semester’s QPA is below 2.25 and the cumulative QPA is below that required for Good Standing. Academic Deficiency A student with a status of Academic Deficiency will be removed from the program of study. The student may reapply to a program of study through the Admissions Office once he or she has demonstrated an ability to successfully complete academic work. This can be achieved by successfully completing courses at another institution or by continuing course work at Massasoit as a non-degree student. Students are urged to meet with an academic advisor or an admissions counselor.

Academic Resource Center — Brockton The Academic Resource Center, the ARC, offers a full range of tutoring and academic support services. Individual and small-group tutoring is available in most subject areas by appointment, and walk-in tutoring is available in several subject areas such as mathematics, accounting, computers, and science. Appointments are strongly recommended. Within the Academic Resource Center are the Writing Center and World Language Center, which provide tutoring for reading and writing across the curriculum and for ESL (English as a Second Language) students. Faculty, professional, special needs, paraprofessional, and student tutors work together to help students become more effective, more independent learners. Students are encouraged to use the ARC, Writing Center, and World Language Center as places to study, either individually or with classmates. Students have access to tutorial services as well as computers for word processing, Internet access, and tutorial software in certain subject areas. The ARC, Writing Center, and World Language Center in Brockton are located in the Student Center, lower level, 508-588-9100, ext.1801.

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Academic Resource Center — Canton The Academic Resource Center on the Canton campus provides support services for the liberal arts, career, and technical programs offered at the Canton campus. The ARC promotes student success by offering tutoring in many subject areas as well as providing students with assistance in becoming more effective learners. Trained professional, paraprofessional, and peer tutors will work with students individually or in a group setting. Tutoring appointments can be made in advance, or students may come in on a walk-in basis. Small study groups are also encouraged in the ARC, with tutoring assistance available for the groups. Referrals to additional student support services can also be made, if necessary. In the Canton ARC, students have access to several computers for word processing, graphic design, AutoCAD, Internet access, and tutorial software in many subjects. Two Macintosh computers are set up for Graphic Design students. These Macs have current graphic and web design software and also 3D animation software installed on them. A language lab with three computers complete with ESL software is also available for students in the ARC. Additional resources for students in the ARC include microscopes and Anatomy & Physiology anatomical models for students in biological science courses. The Canton campus ARC is located on the first floor in room 126, near the cafeteria and can be reached at 781-8212222, ext. 2516.

Accreditation Massasoit Community College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC), one of the six regional accrediting bodies in the United States. This is a non-governmental, nationally recognized organization whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools through collegiate institutions offering post-graduate instruction. Accreditation of an institution by the New England Association indicates that it meets or exceeds the criteria for the assessment of institutional quality periodically applied through a peer-group review process. An accredited school or college is one that has available the necessary resources to achieve its stated purposes through appropriate educational programs, is substantially doing so, and gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is also addressed through accreditation. Accreditation by the New England Association is not partial but applies to the institution as a whole. As such, it is not a guarantee of the quality of every course or program offered or the competence of individual graduates. Rather, it provides reasonable assurance of the quality of opportunities available to students who attend the institution. Inquiries regarding the status of an institution’s accreditation by the New England Association should be directed to the administrative staff of the school or college. Individuals may also contact the Association: Commission on Institutions of Higher Education / New England Association of Schools and Colleges, 209 Burlington Road, Suite 201, Bedford, MA 01730-1433, 781-271-0022, www.neasc.org. In addition, Massasoit Community College is approved by the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission; the United States Department of Education for listing in the Directory of Higher Education and for federal assistance from any unit of the Department of Education; and for Veterans’ Training. The program in Dental Assisting is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association. The Child Care program is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). The Respiratory Care program is accredited by Commission of Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC), and Radiologic Technology is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiology

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Catalog 2011–2012 Technology. These specialized accrediting bodies are recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and by the United States Department of Education. The program in Nursing is accredited by the National League for Nursing and is approved by the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing. Other professional affiliations include: American Association of Community Colleges American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers American Council on Education Association of American Colleges American Technical Education Association College Entrance Examination Board Cooperative Education Association Council for the Advancement and Support of Education National Council for Occupational Education National League for Nursing National Association of College and University Business Officers National Council on Resource Development New England Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers

Advisement & Counseling Center The mission of the Advisement and Counseling Center is to offer comprehensive support services that help students obtain their educational, career, or life goals and facilitate their growth and development. Counselors welcome the opportunity to discuss with students any topics that may contribute to a more satisfying college experience. Students who come to the Center commonly receive support in the following areas: * Career information / counseling * Academic advising * Transfer information / counseling * Personal counseling Career Information & Counseling Choosing a career can be an easy task for some students, while for other students the task can seem overwhelming. No matter which perspective a student may take toward career decisions, the Advisement and Counseling Center is an invaluable resource for any student needing career information and exploration. Counselors collaborate with students in their career decision-making processes, and may help them assess their career interests and values, select a program of study as it relates to a career, and research specific careers and their outlook in the workforce. There are numerous tools that counselors may employ when working with students regarding career and may include: * DISCOVER Career Guidance Software

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Catalog 2011–2012 * Career Assessments & Inventories * Career Library * Career-related websites * “Choosing a Major” (Powerpoint)

Admissions Admissions Policy Massasoit Community College has an open enrollment policy in keeping with the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education’s Open Door philosophy. That is, all high school graduates are offered the opportunity to pursue higher education. All applicants who have obtained a high school diploma or GED Certificate or have demonstrated the Ability to Benefit will be eligible to be admitted to the College for our open enrollment associate degree or certificate programs of study. Students who have completed a home-school diploma, please see Home Schooling Policy. The open enrollment policy does not apply to selective admissions programs of study such as Nursing and Allied Health, which may have specific deadlines, prerequisites, and other admissions criteria. Open Enrollment Program Information

• Applicants will be admitted to the College on a rolling admissions basis, which means first come, first served, as long the application is complete, all required documents have been received, and a vacancy exits in the applicant’s desired program of study.

• Applicants may apply for the Fall or Spring semesters; however, some programs may not be available every semester. Applicants should contact the Admissions Office for details.

• Some programs are offered both day and evening, and some programs may be offered in the day only or the evening only.

• Applicants are encouraged to apply as early as possible prior to the beginning of a semester since some programs may limit enrollment numbers.

• Applicants may choose either full-time or part-time study options.

Information Sessions and tours are available for prospective applicants. Students are encouraged to call the Admissions Office to schedule an appointment during the day with one of our Admissions Counselors. Please call: Brockton, 508-588-9100, ext. 1411; Canton, 781-821-2222, ext. 2114; Middleborough Center, 508-588-9100, ext. 4002. For evening appointments, call the Brockton campus at 508-588-9100, ext. 1311, or the Canton campus at 781821-2222, ext. 2671.

Application and Acceptance Procedures Day Students Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office, Brockton, Canton, or Middleborough.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Submit all official college transcripts from any other institutions attended.

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Catalog 2011–2012 When the Admissions file is complete and the credentials have been evaluated, the Director of Admissions will notify the applicant in writing with his or her status. The next step is to attend the required Orientation program, which is scheduled in January for the Spring semester and in the summer for the Fall semester. Students will take the College placement exams, meet with an advisor, and register for classes. Evening Students Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office, Brockton, Canton, or Middleborough.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Take the College placement exams in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics.

• Register for classes. (This will finalize the matriculation process.)

• There is a distinction between matriculation (applying to a degree program) and registration (enrolling in a course). Students are encouraged to apply as early as possible for an Evening Degree program prior to the start of the semester or while enrolled in classes.

• It is recommended but not required, for a student to make an appointment with a counselor in the Advisement and Counseling Center to review class selection and course requirements for graduation. Consulting with a counselor can assure a smoother, more productive college experience.

When the Admissions file is complete and the credentials have been evaluated, the Director of Admissions will notify the applicant in writing about his or her status.

Selective Admissions Programs The open enrollment policy does not apply to selective admissions programs of study, which may have specific deadlines, prerequisites, and other admissions criteria. Nurse Education (Application deadline date February 1)

• Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Submit all official college transcripts from other institutions attended.

• Submit TEAS Nursing Test results or copy of registration test date. All applicants must submit the TEAS results. Please call ATI to schedule a test date.

• Submit one letter of reference (optional) and one letter written by applicant stating why he or she would be a good candidate for the Nurse Education program.

• Attend the recommended Information Session.

• Priority consideration will be given to students who have successfully completed Anatomy and Physiology I, and Anatomy and Physiology II with a grade of B or better.

• Biological Principles: Although the 4-credit Biological Principles course is not a requirement of the nursing department, it is a prerequisite for each required science course at Massasoit (Anatomy & Physiology I, II, and Microbiology). Students must successfully pass this course or challenge it by examination in the Testing and Assessment Office.

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• All items must be submitted together to the Admissions Office before the deadline date of February 1. Incomplete applications received in the mail or in person or applications received after the deadline date will not be reviewed and will be returned.

LPN to Associate Degree Nurse Program (Application deadline date February 1)

• Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Submit all official college transcripts and LPN school transcripts from other institutions attended.

• Submit TEAS Nursing Test results or copy of registration test date. All applicants must submit the TEAS results. Please contact ATI to schedule a test date.

• Submit one letter written by applicant stating why he or she would be a good candidate for the program.

• Attend the recommended Information Session.

• All course prerequisites must be completed: Biological Principles, Anatomy and Physiology I, Anatomy and Physiology II, and General Psychology. Priority will be given to applicants receiving a B or better in all prerequisites.

• Applicants must hold current licensure as an LPN in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and submit a copy of licensure card.

• All items must be submitted together to the Admissions Office before the deadline date of February 1. Incomplete applications received in the mail or in person or applications received after the deadline date will not be reviewed and will be returned.

Radiologic Technology (Application deadline date February 1)

• Submit a completed Admissions Application to the Admissions Office.

• Submit official high school transcript (in a sealed envelope) certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Submit all official college transcripts (in a sealed envelope) from other institutions attended.

• Meet the Biological Principles prerequisite.*

• Submit one letter of reference and one letter written by the applicant stating why he or she would be a good candidate for the Radiologic Technology program.

• Attend the required Information Session (prior to the final application deadline).

• Priority consideration will be given to students who have successfully completed Biological Principles, Anatomy and Physiology I, and Anatomy and Physiology II with a grade of B or better.

• Priority consideration will be given to candidates who have completed MATH131 Introduction to Statistics or higher, with a B or better.

• All items must be submitted together to the Admissions Office before the deadline date of February 1. Incomplete applications received in the mail or in person or applications received after the deadline date will not be reviewed and will be returned.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Respiratory Care (Application deadline date June 15 )

• Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Submit all official college transcripts from other institutions attended.

• Submit one letter of reference and one letter written by the applicant stating why he or she would be a good candidate for the Respiratory Care program.

• Attend the required Information Session.

• Meet the Biological Principles prerequisite.*

• Priority consideration will be given to candidates who have completed Biological Principles, Anatomy & Physiology I, and Anatomy & Physiology II with a B or better.

• Priority consideration will be given to candidates who have completed English Comp. I with a B or better.

• All items must be submitted together to the Admissions Office before the deadline date of May 15. Incomplete applications received in the mail or in person or applications received after the deadline date will not be reviewed and will be returned.

Dental Assistant

• Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Submit all official college transcripts from other institutions attended.

• Attend the required Information Session.

• Take college placement exams in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics and test out of or complete any developmental courses prior to the start of the program.

• Submit one letter of recommendation.

Medical Assistant

• Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Submit all official college transcripts from other institutions attended.

• Attend the required Information Session.

• Take college placement exams in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics and test out of or complete any developmental courses prior to the start of the program.

Computerized Tomography

• Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

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Catalog 2011–2012

• Submit all official college transcripts from other institutions attended.

• Take college placement exams in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics.

• Submit one letter of reference and one letter written by the applicant stating why he or she would be a good candidate for the Computerized Tomography program.

• Submit a copy of your ARRT card.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

• Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Submit all official college transcripts from other institutions attended.

• Take college placement exams in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics.

• Submit one letter of reference and one letter written by the applicant stating why he or she would be a good candidate for the Magnetic Resonance Imaging program.

• Submit a copy of your ARRT card.

Phlebotomy

• Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Submit all official college transcripts from other institutions attended.

• Take college placement exams in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics and test out of or complete any developmental courses prior to the start of the program.

• Attend the required Information Session.

Polysomnographic Technology (Application deadline date May 15)

• Submit a completed application form to the Admissions Office.

• Submit official high school transcript certifying date of graduation or an official GED transcript.

• Submit all official college transcripts from other institutions attended.

• Submit one letter of reference and one letter written by applicant stating why he or she would be a good candidate for the Polysomnographic Technology program.

• Submit a copy of your CPR Certificate.

• Attend the required Information Session.

• Meet the Biological Principles prerequisite*.

• Priority consideration will be given to students who have successfully completed Biological Principles, Anatomy and Physiology I, and Anatomy and Physiology II with a grade of B or better.

• All items must be submitted together to the Admissions Office before the deadline date of May 15. Incomplete applications received in the mail or in person or applications received after the deadline

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Catalog 2011–2012

date will not be reviewed and will be returned.

*The Biological Principles prerequisite can be met by successful completion of the Biological Principles course, successful challenge of the Biological Principles examination given by the Testing and Assessment Office, or transferring in a 4-credit Anatomy and Physiology I course. Students who have transferred in Anatomy and Physiology I will be required to take Biological Principles in the first semester in order to meet the prerequisite for Anatomy and Physiology II, which is taken in the second semester.

Readmission Who Must Reapply? All students who are academically eligible and have not been in attendance for more than three consecutive semesters.

• All students who were academically deficient but are now in good standing.

• All health career applicants who are not enrolled in their health career programs.

• Readmitted students will follow new program requirements for the semester they are readmitted.

Allied Health applicants will be readmitted based on academic eligibility, space availability, and the recommendation of the department chairperson. The Director of Admissions will notify Readmitted Applicants in writing regarding their admissions status. How to Reapply Submit a Reapply form to the Admissions Office, Brockton, Canton or Middleborough. It is recommended, but not required, for students to make an appointment with a counselor in the Advisement & Counseling Center to review class selection and course requirements for graduation. You may also print out your own transcript and degree audit using the Massasoit Web site. Three-Semester Rule All students in a degree program who are academically eligible but who have not been in attendance for up to three consecutive semesters are eligible to maintain their degree status as long as they register for classes by the fourth consecutive semester (with the exception of Allied Health programs). Three-semester students do not need to reapply. Three-semester students will follow the program requirements for the semester that they were previously admitted.

Ability-to-Benefit Policy Applicants to Massasoit Community College who do not have a traditional high school diploma or an equivalent GED and are not currently enrolled in a high school curriculum may qualify for the Ability-to-Benefit option and be eligible to matriculate into a program and apply for Financial Aid. To be eligible under the Ability-to-Benefit (ATB) option, a student must be at least 16 years of age and pass a United States Department of Education approved ATB test. ATB affords an individual the opportunity to demonstrate that he or she can benefit from the educational experience at Massasoit Community College. There are now nine federally approved ATB tests. Massasoit will be administering an ATB version of the Accuplacer test. The components of the Accuplacer test are Reading, Sentence Skills, and Arithmetic. The student will need to

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Catalog 2011–2012 take all three components during the same testing session and pass all three components. The minimum scores mandated by the United States Department of Education to qualify for the Accuplacer Ability-to-Benefit test are as follows:

• Reading, 55

• Sentence Skills, 60

• Arithmetic, 34

ATB does not replace high school graduation. Individuals are encouraged to complete their high school diploma or the GED. (You may encounter issues transferring to another college or gaining employment unless the diploma or GED is earned.)

Home-Schooling Policy All home-schooled students without a high school diploma or GED are eligible to apply for admission to a degree or certificate program provided they have successfully completed an approved home-school program in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws or the laws of their home states. If a home-schooled student has not completed an approved home school program, then the student will not be eligible to enroll in a degree or certificate program until he or she has taken and passed a federally approved Ability-to-Benefit test. To determine whether a student has participated in an approved home-school program, the student shall submit, with the application for admission, evidence that the home-school program was approved by the student’s school district’s superintendent or school committee. Additionally, if the home-schooled student is under the age of compulsory attendance, which is 16 years old in Massachusetts, a letter from the student’s school district’s superintendent or school committee is required stating that the student is not considered truant and would not be required to attend further schooling or continue to be home-schooled if the student has completed his or her home school program before the age of 16. The College reserves the right to limit or deny enrollment to a student under the age of 16 in a course or program based on its case-by-case consideration of a variety of factors, including but not limited to: the student’s maturity, life experience, placement test scores, prior education, course content, instructional methodology, and risks associate with a particular course or program.

Dual Enrollment for High School Students What Is Dual Enrollment? Dual Enrollment is an arrangement whereby a student still enrolled in high school may enroll in a college course and receive college credit for that course as well as credits applicable to the high school diploma. These courses may be day or evening courses, online courses, or courses taught on-site at a local high school. Courses must qualify under the MassTransfer Block or be part of the curriculum under a MassTransfer approved Associate Degree program. Students who are first-generation college students and those interested in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines will be targeted for the Commonwealth Dual Enrollment Program. Student Eligibility

1. Students must be currently enrolled in Massachusetts public or non-public high schools, including an approved home school, and be a Massachusetts resident*. 2. Students must be recommended by high school guidance counselor or other school official.

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Catalog 2011–2012

3. Students must have a minimum of a 3.0 GPA and be in good academic standing**.

4. Students may enroll in day, evening, or online classes that qualify under the MassTransfer Block or are part of the curriculum of an approved transfer associate degree program under MassTransfer.

5. Students must have written approval by parent or guardian.

6. Students must take Massasoit’s college placement examination in Reading, Writing, and Mathematics, place out of all college preparatory courses, and meet all course prerequisites.

7. Students must earn both college and high school credit.

* Students under the age of 16 will also be required to meet criteria for the Youth Learner Policy. ** Students who do not possess the minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA may be considered eligible based upon a demonstration of their potential for academic success through review by the Dual Enrollment Coordinator of other appropriate indicators of success, such as steadily improving high school grades, a high class rank, special talent, strong grades in the field of the course, and strong recommendations by high school staff.

International Student Admission The following are the requirements to be enrolled as an International Student at Massasoit Community College. The term “International Student” refers to any student who is not a citizen or permanent resident of the United States. International applicants must be at least 18 years of age. Please use the items listed below as a checklist to ensure that you have gathered all the necessary documents for your application. The Admissions Office must receive ALL of the following documents by the stated Fall or Spring deadlines in order for an application to be considered complete. A thorough review of applicant admissions materials will be conducted before any decision on acceptance is made. Admissions Deadlines Fall semester: June 1

Spring semester: November 1

I. Application for Admission 1. Read the information on each page of the application carefully and fill out the application completely. Make sure that the Emergency Contact section of the application is someone with a local U.S. address. Please include your address in your country of origin. II. Proof of High School Graduation or Completion 1. Submit an official copy of your secondary school (high school) transcript including an official copy of your diploma or certificate. All academic records must be translated into English by a certified translator and notarized. 2. Submit an official copy of your postsecondary school (college/university) transcript(s) with diplomas, if applicable. Translations must be done by a certified translator. College transfer credit will be potentially awarded only with an official college transcript and an evaluated document. All academic documents must be evaluated and/or translated (if needed) by a certified center for evaluation. III. Proof of Financial Support Students/sponsors must show that there is monetary funding available to support the student while in the United States by completing the following:

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Catalog 2011–2012 1. The Massasoit Certificate of Financial Support, which must be signed by the sponsor and notarized. 2. A notarized bank letter on letterhead and with a signature from the bank showing a minimum amount of $20,000 U.S. dollars in the sponsor’s account. Both of the financial support documents described above may not be more than 60 days old. IV. Proof of English Proficiency Evidence of proficiency in English may be presented in one of the following ways: 1. A score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 500 on the written test or a minimum score of 173 on the computerized test is required. For the Internet TOEFL test, a minimum score of 61 is required. 2. An official transcript indicating successful completion of an academic program of study conducted entirely in the English language. 3. An acceptable score on an English proficiency test administered by Massasoit’s English as a Second Language Department (available only if you are presently in the United States; please call 508-588-9100, ext.1790, to schedule an appointment). V. Massasoit I-20 Application Form Additional Requirements B1/B2 (Visitors Visa), J-1 (Exchange Visa), Transfer Students If you are in the United States at the time of submitting your admission application, please submit a valid passport, visa, and I-94 card. B1/B2 Visa If you are on a B2 (Visitors) visa and plan to stay in the United States, you must request a change of status to an F-1 student visa upon fulfilling and receiving acceptance to Massasoit Community College as an International Student. It is only after you have received authorization from the United States government indicating that you have been awarded a change of status that you may begin taking classes at Massasoit. The process of applying for a change of status takes time. Change of status cases are decided by the United States Immigration Customs Enforcement and require specific additional paperwork from the student in order for the case to be reviewed by the government. In some cases, it is strongly recommended that the student return to his or her home country of origin to apply for a visa without doing a change of status. The Massasoit Admissions Office DOES NOT process visas or change of status requests (although information and forms may be obtained from the Admissions Office). Massasoit is not responsible for handling any change of status requests. The Final Admissions Deadlines for B1/B2 visa holders are May 15 for Fall and October 15 for Spring semesters. J-1 Visa If you are on a J-1 (Exchange) visa, you must apply for a change of status to a student visa (F-1) before your J-1 visa expires. If you have a J-1 visa that has expired, you have a 30-day period to change status before being considered out of status. J-1 visa holders should follow the regular Fall and Spring International Student admissions deadlines. Transfer Students If you are an F-1 student attending a United States college or university, please submit along with all other application requirements a copy of your current SEVIS I-20 form from the school you currently attend. You should also meet with

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Catalog 2011–2012 an Admissions Counselor to discuss the transfer process. The Final Admissions Deadlines for transfer students are July 15 for Fall and December 1 for Spring semesters. If you fall under a different visa category than listed above, please contact the Admissions Office for further information and details. A valid I-94 card is essential for admission and must be presented if a student is applying within the United States and/or on a current visa. If the I-94 length of stay has expired, Massasoit cannot admit the student unless extension of stay has been granted through the U.S. government. The College is authorized under the United States Federal Law Immigration and Naturalization Act to enroll nonimmigrant alien students. Therefore, the College will accept applications for admission from non-immigrant aliens. College admission requirements and the College academic calendar are available from the Admissions Office and which also provides application, credential deadlines and enrollment dates for International Students.

Adult Basic Education ESOL Programs Two of Massasoit’s key Adult Basic Education (ABE) offerings are its Stoughton ABE/ESOL (English as a Second Language) Program and the Transition to College Program. The ABE/ESOL Program, established in 2000 with support from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE), provides free-of-charge ESOL classes to Stoughton area residents. Then in 2005, the Transition to Community College Program, also funded by ESE, began at Massasoit. It offers free postsecondary education to former ABE students who never thought they had a chance of going on to higher education. The Stoughton ABE/ESOL Program strives to enhance the quality of life in the community of Stoughton and its surrounding areas by providing residents with free access to three levels of English language acquisition classes and other educational resources. Classes are held Tuesday and Thursday evenings at Stoughton High School. Intake sessions for new students are held several times throughout the year. The Transition to College Program gives qualifying students from the surrounding towns and Adult Learning Centers the opportunity to access postsecondary education. The program offers these students, who are mostly from a lower social economic status, the possibility of improving their life chances by providing the educational tools and emotional preparedness they require to enter and be successful in the College environment. Free developmental coursework in English and mathematics, computer classes, the College Experience Course, plus counseling and advising are all part of this first-year college program. Approximately 70% of our Transition students continue at Massasoit. For information on either of the programs above, please contact Director Linda Aspinwall at 508-588-9100, ext. 1301. GED Preparation Classes These classes are offered to individuals seeking a review course before taking the GED assessment. A free preassessment is given to determine students’ levels before they enter the GED Review classes. Students register through Community Education. Transitional ESOL Class (College Preparation Course) This 48-hour non-credit course is designed to bring students to the level of Massasoit’s college credit ESOL classes. Students who successfully complete this course may register for the first level of college credit ESOL courses in the following semester. This course focuses on speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Courses are usually offered in the evening during the Fall, Spring, and Summer sessions.

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Catalog 2011–2012 To register for the class, students must first take the ESOL assessment test to determine if their level of English proficiency is appropriate for this class. Please call 508-588-9100, ext. 1790, to schedule an ESOL assessment test.

Alumni Office of Development & Alumni Relations The mission of the Office of Development & Alumni Relations is to assist alumni and friends in their efforts to enhance the reputation of the College and to give back to the Massasoit community through active participation and financial support. The participation of alumni and friends in this mission helps the College in its ongoing pursuit of excellence. The Office of Development & Alumni works with the Massasoit Foundation and the Alumni Association to attract, support, and raise funds for furthering the College’s mission and to provide opportunities for involvement for the community. This office also assists with campus fundraising events, formulates multiyear fundraising plans, and prepares requests for matching funds when available from public and private sources. The Massasoit Community College Alumni Association meets every second Thursday of the month from September to June at 7:00 p.m. in the Student Center Conference Room, lower level of the Student Center Building. All alumni are encouraged to attend. If you have graduated from Massasoit and would like to receive correspondence, please email alumni@massasoit.mass.edu or call 508-588-9100, ext. 2602 or ext. 2603.

Articulation Agreements To provide a continuing education program that builds on past learning experiences and eliminates duplication of instruction, Massasoit Community College develops articulation agreements with high schools that have Career/ Vocational Technical Education (CVTE) programs that align with programs at the College. Articulation agreements award college credits to students who complete—with a grade of B or better—high school CVTE courses that align with Massasoit course requirements. Articulation agreements are reviewed and renewed annually. The following Massasoit articulation agreements are current in 2011: Broadcasting Technology to Liberal Arts/Media Option

• Quincy High School

Child Care and Administration

• Silver Lake Regional High School

• Weymouth High School

Culinary Arts

• Quincy High School

• Silver Lake Regional High School

• Weymouth High School

Diesel Technology

• Madison Park Technical Vocational High School

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Catalog 2011–2012 Electronic Technology

• Blue Hills Regional Vocational Technical High School

• South Shore Regional Vocational Technical High School

HVAC

• Bay Path Regional Vocational Technical High School

• Blackstone Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School

• Blue Hills Regional Vocational Technical High School

• Diman Regional Vocational Technical High School

• Southeastern Regional Vocational Technical High School

Visual Design and Communications

• Blue Hills Regional Vocational Technical High School

• Quincy High School

Athletics at Massasoit—Massasoit Warriors The objective of the Massasoit Community College Athletic Department is to provide students with the highest quality athletic, academic, and social experience. Our mission is to achieve competitive success in every program and develop and maintain an environment that promotes sportsmanship, teamwork, compliance, equity, and diversity. We strive to provide quality leadership and management to help our teams achieve a positive level of success. The teams have had success at the local level as well as the national level. The men’s soccer team has won two National Championships, 15 New England Titles, and has made 14 appearances in the NJCAA National Championships. The baseball team has won one National Championship and 8 New England Titles, as well as 5 State Championships. The women’s softball program has represented Massasoit in 1990 and 1991 at the National Championships and has won four New England Championships. The women’s soccer program represented the College at the 1989 National Championships and won the New England Championship in 1999. It was also New England Finalist in 1986, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1996. The 1984 women’s volleyball team won the New England Championship and represented the College at the National Championships. The women’s basketball team was a New England Finalist in 1996, 1997, 1998 and has six State Championships. The men’s basketball team was a New England Finalist in 1991, 1992, and 1993 and State Champions in 2004 and 2005. Our athletes have consistently been singled out for both athletic and academic merit, through League, Region, and All-American recognition. In the history of MCC athletics, All-New England awards have been given to 522 varsity athletes, and 125 athletes have been honored as All-Americans. The 1994 men’s soccer team was named NJCAA Academic Team of the Year.

Bookstore The Bookstore is privately owned and is located on the lower level of the SC Building on the Brockton Campus and on the Canton Campus in room 138.

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Catalog 2011–2012

Brockton Campus Our physical facilities include a 100-acre Brockton campus, which offers students a Fine Arts building with two theaters, a TV studio and a radio station; a Field House that houses a full-size swimming pool, raquetball courts, and a weight room; modern classroom buildings and laboratory facilities; and an extensive library facility.

Buckley Performing Arts Center Making the Arts Part of the Community What do ‘60s icons Arlo Guthrie and Richie Havens, ‘90s comedy stars Dana Carvey and Paula Poundstone, country music artists Mary Chapin Carpenter and Bill Monroe, and jazz greats The Dukes of Dixieland all have in common? They, and over a hundred others, have all appeared in Brockton on the stage of the Buckley Performing Arts Center as part of the Live! at Massasoit Performance Series; since 1983, it is the region’s longest running arts series. A Community Resource The Buckley Performing Arts Center, named for Senator Anna Buckley, who was instrumental in siting a community college in the City of Brockton, is the theatrical hub of the bustling Fine Arts Building. A resource for the College and the surrounding community, the Fine Arts Building is home to two modern theaters, a state-ofthe-art television studio, a radio studio, a painting studio, the Media Center, and the College’s Children’s Center, as well as classrooms and staff offices. Our Mission Statement The Buckley Performing Arts Center serves the College and surrounding communities by offering a first-class theater facility for a variety of uses, including theatre for adults and children, concerts, recitals, readings, lectures, meetings, and conferences. In addition, to promote cultural opportunities and awareness for the College community and the MetroSouth community, the Fine Arts Department produces and promotes a performance series throughout the year that encompasses contemporary and classical music, dance, and theatre, including a season of plays and musicals produced by the College-sponsored community theater, the Massasoit Theatre Company.

Campus Police Massasoit Police Department Massasoit Community College employs its own College Police Department, which is available at all times. The Police Station on the Brockton Campus is located on the bottom floor of the Student Center, Room SC-145, and on the Canton Campus on the second floor, Room 202. The Police Department telephone number is 508-427-1296 from off campus, and the emergency number from inside the College is ext. 911, general business ext. 1041. All members of the Massasoit Community College Community are required to report all criminal actions to the College Police Department immediately. The Massasoit Community College Police Department is here to protect and serve the College Community. The Police Department, as a partner with the entire College Community, will detect, deter, and apprehend criminal offenders. Massasoit Police Officers are licensed under Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 22, Section 63, by the State Police, granting them full powers of arrest while on property owned, used, and/or occupied by Massasoit Community College.

Canton Campus The Canton campus is a multi-level facility set on 18 beautiful acres. Many fully equipped modern laboratories and

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Catalog 2011–2012 classrooms and an extensive library are available. The campus is home to the Milton Art Museum and the Akillian Gallery.

Career Placement Services The mission of Career Placement is to provide comprehensive career development services to our students and alumni. We seek to empower individuals in achieving their career goals through collaborative relationships with faculty, staff, employers, and members of the business community. We fulfill our mission in a positive and professional manner by promoting career development as a lifelong learning process, with emphasis on career skill building, post-graduation employment, and internship opportunities

Career and Technical Education Career and Technical Education programs at Massasoit Community College are partially funded by the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006.

Change of Program A student wishing to change one program for another must make an appointment with a Counselor in the Advisement & Counseling Center, 508-588-9100, ext. 1461, on the Brockton Campus or 781-821-2222, ext. 2117, on the Canton Campus, who will advise the student and answer questions regarding transferability of courses from the current to the new program. Students who change and are accepted into new programs before October 15 (Fall semester) and March 15 (Spring semester) may apply the change to the current semester. Changes made after October 15 will apply to the upcoming Spring semester. Changes made after March 15 will apply to the upcoming Fall semester. Students should be aware that changes in course and program requirements that take effect in the upcoming Fall semester will apply if the student changes programs after March 15.

Children’s Center at Massasoit The Children’s Center at Massasoit Community College is a licensed campus facility. We service the children of our students, faculty, and staff. We provide a safe, quality learning environment in which to grow. Our classroom is designed to be consistent with our philosophy of learning. Its child-oriented design is conducive to creative learning. Our Philosophy We believe in the full potential of the child. Our purpose is to assist parents to reach their potential with the knowledge and confidence that their child is also reaching his or her potential. We believe it is important that parents and teachers share a cooperative role in fostering the growth and development of our children. Our philosophy toward learning is one of discovery by interacting in the classroom environment. Our Specific Goals We want the children in our care to have opportunities to develop and build self-esteem; to gain self-respect and respect for others; to feel special, accepted, and valued; to gain independence through mastery of self-help skills; to gain knowledge about themselves, others, and the world around them; to learn self-regulation; to respect other’s rights and property; to develop cognitive readiness skills and concepts that will lead to critical thinking and reasoning; to develop age-appropriate fine and gross motor coordination; to gain confidence through achievement of these goals. Eligibility, Admission, and Tuition Children ages 2 years and 9 months through 5 years of age will be eligible for admission. In order to ensure the fair and equitable selection of children for admission, a first-come, first-served basis will be used as a means of selection. To register a child, the parent may be required to pay a non-refundable registration

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Catalog 2011–2012 fee upon selection. Child care payments are due on the Monday of each week. Tuition may be paid in advance. Students make payments at the Student Accounts Office in the Administration Building on the Brockton Campus. Acceptable methods of payment are personal check, cash, Mastercard, Visa, or Discover. Students can make payment online at their MyMassasoit account. The Children’s Center at Massasoit Community College admits children from families of any race, cultural heritage, national origin, marital status, religion, political beliefs, disability, and sexual orientation to all rights and privileges, programs, and activities of the Center. No child will be denied enrollment due to his or her toilet-training status.

CHOICES A Program for Transitional Assistance and Low-Income Individuals The mission of the CHOICES program is to provide support services that meet the needs of Transitional Assistance students and other disadvantaged individuals. As a dedicated advocate, CHOICES promotes intellectual growth, realistic self-appraisal, enhanced self-esteem, career exploration, social responsibility, appreciation of diversity, and achievement of personal and educational goals for all CHOICES students. Through a group experience, career planning is designed to foster each person’s self- and occupational awareness and assist each participant in recognizing and understanding her/his vocational strengths and limitations. As a result, participants are better prepared to begin the process of choosing, finding, and keeping employment. The following is covered: •

Individual biographical data

Personal and career decision making

Harrington-O’Shea Career Decision-Making System

Career Ability Placement Survey

Accuplacer Computerized Placement Test

At the end of the three-day assessment period, participants receive individual career counseling. A decision is then made about whether the client prefers to be referred to short-term training, for a job search, or to enter the CHOICES program. For those clients choosing education, the program offers credited academic and vocational college level courses, in-house certificates, group and individual support, personal skill development, and academic advising. In order to ensure a holistic approach to education, students are encouraged to participate in tutoring, workshops, extracurricular college activities, and college clubs and organizations. The average CHOICES student participates in the program for one or two semesters before matriculating into the general college population. For eligible recipients, day care fee assistance may be available through the Department of Transitional Assistance.

Conference Center The Conference Center at Massasoit is conveniently located at 770 Crescent Street (Route 27) in Brockton, The Conference Center at Massasoit (formerly Christo’s II) opened in 1997 as a full-service facility for business meetings and civic, educational, state, cultural, profit, and non-profit organizations. With two full-service bars, new WiFi capability, and over 7,200 square feet of floor space, the Conference Center can accommodate all of your needs. A successful conference depends in large part on the quality of the learning environment and the physical and social comfort of the participants. To this end, the Conference Center at Massasoit offers a hotel-like setting with

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Catalog 2011–2012 comprehensive educational facilities and resources. Top-quality food service at reasonable prices ensures that conferees enjoy their time on campus. The convenient location in Brockton offers a refreshing escape. Our fulltime experienced staff stands ready to prepare and serve a wide variety of food and beverages.

Continuing Education The College offers credit and community education (non-credit) Continuing Education courses during its evening and summer sessions. Continuing Education provides members of the community with a means of pursuing their education on a part-time or full-time basis; students, if qualified, may elect courses that they feel will meet their specific needs and interests. Services and activities are characterized by the College’s Continuing Education’s policies of outreach, accessibility, and commitment to new educational prospects. Students who wish to attend the Continuing Education courses will find: College credit courses leading to degrees in Associate in Arts (AA), Associate in Science (AS), and Associate in Applied Science (AAS). The student must fulfill Core Curriculum requirements and complete a minimum of 60 credit hours in a program of study (some programs require more credits). In-house certificates are validated by the College rather than the Board of Higher Education, and they represent a coherent, competency-based concentration of courses.

Core Curriculum The Core is the center of our curriculum. It is a group of required courses that will assist the student to gain a foundation of knowledge, skills, and proficiencies that we believe every graduate of Massasoit should possess. This Core will assure employers and transfer colleges that our graduates have pursued a liberal arts education that is college level in the areas of communication, mathematics, science, social science, and humanities. A major benefit of the Core Curriculum is that it has been carefully designed to assist students to develop the prerequisite and corequisite skills needed to ensure success in their degree program (the Core does not pertain to Certificate programs unless otherwise specified by the individual program). The Core is competency-based. If a student is able to demonstrate that he or she already possesses these skills, he or she will be allowed to select courses of a higher level and/or a greater diversity of subject matter. A series of assessment tests will be employed to determine each student’s level of ability. Test results will dictate whether a student will be exempt from certain courses or placed in courses to assist the student in gaining the skills he or she needs. Preparing for College Reading I and II, Fundamentals of Math, Introductory Algebra, Intermediate Algebra & Trigonometry, and Introductory Writing do not fulfill Core requirements and are not credited toward the completion of an Associate degree. They are required for students who demonstrate insufficient skill on the mathematics, reading, and writing assessment tests. If students believe the scores on the assessment tests are not an accurate indicator of their skills, they may request retesting twice during the initial semester. Placement test scores are valid for a period of one year. Students who take and who score over 500 on the SAT 1 Verbal exam are exempt from the reading tests. Students who take and who score over 600 on the SAT 1 Verbal exam are exempt from both the reading and writing tests. All students must take the mathematics placement test. It is strongly recommended that students who place into Introductory Writing, Preparing for College Reading I or II, Introductory Algebra, Intermediate Algebra & Trigonometry, and/or Fundamentals of Mathematics take these courses immediately upon entrance to the College. Finally, the Core Curriculum has been designed to assist students to gain knowledge and skills that enhance and complement those of their chosen field. It will broaden life interests and equip a student to make more effective use of our world throughout life. We believe that it will help each student to keep growing as a person. We are proud of our Core Curriculum and trust that students, too, will share our belief when they have engaged in it. Students should note carefully developmental prerequisites for individual courses. There are actually three Cores; one for Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degrees, one for Associate of Science (AS) degrees, and one for Associate of Arts (AA) degrees. The minimum Core components for each are listed below.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Minimum Core Requirements Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degree: 6 Communications Credits; 3 Quantitative Credits; 3 or 4 Science Credits; 3 Social Science/Humanities Credits Associate in Science (AS) Degree: 6 Communications Credits; 3 Quantitative Credits; 3 or 4 Science Credits; 3 Social Science/Humanities Credits; 6 Liberal Arts Credits Associate in Arts (AA) Degree: 6 Communications Credits; 3 Oral Communication Credits; 3 Quantitative Credits; 8 Science Credits; 9 Social Science Credits; 6 Humanities Credits Additional information concerning the Core Curriculum may be obtained by contacting the Office of the Vice President of Faculty and Instruction.

Cost of Education Tuition and Fees Tuition and fees for each semester must be paid in full at the time of registration for each semester. They are subject to increase without notice. Tuition (2011–2012 rates) Massachusetts State Resident* Non-Resident

$ 24 per credit hour

$ 230 per credit

Fees General College Fee

$ 124 per credit hour

Technology Fee

$ 7 per credit hour

Return Check Fee

$ 10

Transcript (Inactive Students Only) $ 5 Course Fees Science courses $ 30 per course Allied Health courses

$ 20 per credit hour

Tuition and fees for all evening Allied Health Programs are $298 per credit hour. Insurance Student Health Insurance**

$ 928 annual rate

Massasoit Community College Student Accident & Sickness Insurance Program offered through University Health Plans, Inc. A Federal Tax Credit of up to $1,500 is available to students or parents who are eligible under the guidelines. Contact the IRS for more information. *A person is considered a resident if residency or domicile is bona fide and has been maintained for six continuous months. Residency can be determined by one of the following: copies of state income tax form or rent/mortgage receipts or utility receipts or school/college transcripts or verification of Massachusetts employment (earning statements).

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Catalog 2011–2012 The assessment fee is not refundable regardless of success or failure in the evaluation process. **This fee may be waived if comparable coverage is carried. Follow this link for more information: https://www.universityhealthplans.com/secure/waiver

Commitment to Sustainability Massasoit Community College has signed the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment and as such is deeply concerned about the unprecedented scale and speed of global warming and its potential for large-scale, adverse health, social, economic, and ecological effects. The College is committed to addressing the climate challenge by reducing global warming emissions and by integrating sustainability into the curriculum that will better serve our students and meet the social mandate to help create a thriving ethical and civil society. Massasoit Community College believes that by addressing climate change, the College will be able to stabilize and reduce its long-term energy costs, attract new sources of funding, increase the support of alumni and local communities, and attract excellent students and faculty.

Dean’s List Students who have earned a QPA of 3.40 or higher in a semester in which they have completed at least nine semester hours are considered candidates for the Dean’s List. Students who have received a Failure (F) or an Incomplete (I) cannot be included on the Dean’s List. However, students who make up work and whose I grades are changed by the professor may be added to the Dean’s List for that semester only.

Dean of Students The mission of the Dean of Students is to provide services that support the development and success of the whole student. Student responsibility, civility, and good citizenship are promoted. The Dean serves as an advocate for students’ rights, administers conduct standards in a fair and respectful manner, and educates students on college policies and procedures in order to provide a safe learning environment. The Dean of Students Office provides support for student concerns such as emergencies, illness, death in a family, problem solving, and conflict resolution.

Disability Services for Students Students with disabilities who will be enrolling at the College and will require support services and/or accommodations are encouraged to schedule an appointment with a disability counselor to discuss the need for specific services and accommodations. The Disability Services Office is located on the Brockton campus in the Student Center Building, lower level, 508-588-9100, ext. 1805 or ext. 1425.

Education Tax Credits There are a number of tax incentives to assist households with paying for college. These include the Hope, American Opportunity, and Lifetime Learning tax credits; deductions for tuition and fees, and work-related education expenses; exclusions for scholarship and fellowship income, tuition reductions, and employer-provided education benefits; and a personal exemption for student dependents aged 19 to 23. For additional information about these programs consult the Internal Revenue Service as www.irs.gov.

Financial Aid Massasoit Community College participates in a number of federal and state financial aid programs to assist students in financing the costs of their education. Financial aid awards (scholarships, grants, loans and employment awards) are made when personal and family resources are not sufficient to pay educational expenses.

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Catalog 2011–2012 The difference between the total cost of education (tuition, fees, books, transportation and living expenses) and the total family contribution is expressed as financial need. In general, higher family income requires greater expected contributions to educational costs. Particular family circumstances and student earnings also have a bearing on financial need. The Financial Aid Office follows the regulations in the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). All information provided to the Office of Financial Aid is regarded as confidential and cannot be released without the written consent of the student applicant and/or parent. A Release of Information Form may be completed by the student, for student information, or the parent, for parental information, and submitted to the Financial Aid Office for processing. Office Location and Contact Information The Office of Financial Aid in Brockton is located on the ground floor of the Administration Building. Telephone: (508) 588-9100, ext. 1479. The Office of Financial Aid in Canton is located in the Student Services area. Telephone (781) 821-2222 ext. 2008. Email address: FAO@massasoit.mass.edu Application Procedures and Eligibility Criteria Students who wish to be considered for all forms of financial aid must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The priority deadline is April 15 for each academic year (November 15 for the spring term). Applications received after the priority deadline will be considered, based on available funding, and late applicants may not receive their award decisions prior to the start of classes. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure that all forms are accurate and complete. Eligibility In general, you are eligible to apply for financial aid, if you meet all of the following criteria:

1. You must be a United States citizen or eligible noncitizen of the United States with a valid Social Security Number (SSN); 2. You must have a high school diploma or a General Education Development (GED) certificate, complete homeschooling, or pass an approved “ability to benefit” test; 3. You must enroll in an eligible program as a regular student seeking a degree or certificate; 4. You must be making satisfactory academic progress; 5. If you are a male between the ages of 18 and 25, you must register or already be registered with Selective Service. You must also register if you are not currently on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces. If you are a citizen of the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands or the Republic of Palau you are exempt from registering (see www.sss.gov for more information); 6. If you have been convicted for the possession or sale of illegal drugs for an offense that occurred while you were receiving federal student aid (such as grants, loans, or work-study), you must complete the Student Aid Eligibility Worksheet to determine if you are eligible for aid or partially eligible for aid. 7. You must not owe a refund on a federal grant or be in default on a federal education loan; 8. You must have financial need (except for unsubsidized Stafford Loans)

Part Time/Full Time Students can be enrolled either full (12 or more credits) or part time (1-11 credits) and be eligible to receive financial aid funds depending upon their demonstrated need and availability of funds.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Forms required * Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) * Other income information as requested by the Financial Aid Office (i.e. Federal tax returns,W-2s, official statements of all non-taxable income received, i.e., AFDC, Social Security, Veterans Benefits, Workmen’s Compensation, Child Support, etc. Award Process Every applicant for financial aid will first be considered for Pell Grant and Massachusetts State Grant eligibility. Other scholarships, grants, tuition waivers and loans are then awarded on the basis of remaining financial need. Those with the highest remaining need will receive primary consideration. Federal College Work Study funds are awarded to students with priority given to first-time degree candidates. Students who have already earned an associates degree from Massasoit Community College will be considered after all other students have had the opportunity to apply. Employment awards are made to those who request such consideration by completing an Application for Federal Work Study Employment at the Financial Aid Office. Unsubsidized Direct Student Loans will be awarded to those students meeting all eligibility requirements who do not exhibit financial need. Students are encouraged to view their required documents and financial aid awards on-line through their MyMassasoit account. Entering day students are given their login information at orientation. All students are given their access information at the time of registration. Award Notification Students are generally notified of a financial aid decision during the summer months. A complete application is required for consideration. All appeals and requests for reconsideration must be made in writing to the Director of Financial Aid. Students with severe extenuating circumstances and loss of financial resources (loss of job or benefits, death of parents, etc.) may file an “Income Reduction” form to explain their changed circumstances and appeal for reconsideration. Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy Standards There are three components, or standards of progress: completion rate or progress toward a degree, GPA, and maximum time frame. A student must maintain all three standards to continue receiving financial assistance. These requirements are considered separate from the academic requirements a student must maintain to remain as a degree student at Massasoit. 1. Completion Rate A student’s academic progress toward a degree or certificate is measured by comparing the number of earned credits with attempted credits. Credits earned divided by credits attempted equals completion rate percentage. For example, a student enrolls in or attempts 12 credits in the semester and then withdraws from one 3-credit course and passes the remaining three courses. That student’s completion rate is 9 credits divided by 12 credits equals 75 percent. Credits attempted include all courses taken by a student, whether paid for with financial aid funds or taken within a degree program, except as noted below. Credits earned are credits associated with classes successfully completed (received a grade of A, B, C, D, or P).

• A student must successfully complete at least 67% of those credits.

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Catalog 2011–2012 The following are considered when evaluating a student’s satisfactory academic progress:

• Withdrawals, incompletes, and failures are considered attempted but not earned hours. Students with Incomplete classes may be able to continue on probation for one semester while completing the course requirements.

• Passing credits received for pass/fail courses are considered attempted and earned credits; failing grades in pass/fail courses are considered attempted but not earned.

• Repeated courses are included in the calculation of both attempted and earned hours. A student is allowed to repeat a course according to federal course repeat policy (see the Repeat Course Policy).

• Audited courses are not considered credits attempted or earned.

• English as a Second Language (ESL) courses are included in the calculation of both attempted and earned hours.

• Transfer credits, including those received during consortium study, do not count in the calculation of the cumulative GPA but are included in the calculation of completion rate and maximum time frame to complete a degree (see item 3 below).

2. Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) A student must attain a minimum cumulative GPA based on the total number of credit hours attempted.

• 1.0 for 6–15 semester hours attempted

• 1.6 for 16–30 semester hours attempted

• 1.75 for 31–45 semester hours attempted

• 2.0 for 45+ semester hours attempted

3. Maximum Time Frame A student must complete his or her educational program within a time frame no longer than 150% of the published length of the educational program. At Massasoit Community College we count this time frame in credits rather than in time increments. All attempted hours are counted, including transfer hours, whether or not financial aid was received or the course work was successfully completed. Remedial courses may be excluded from the number of maximum time frame credits once a student appears to be exceeding the maximum time frame. A student will not be eligible to receive financial aid once he or she has attempted 150% of the credits required for his or her degree or certificate program or if it appears that he or she cannot attain a degree or certificate within this time frame. For example, a student in a program requiring 60 credit hours for graduation will be eligible for financial aid only during the first 90 attempted credit hours (60 credits x 150% = 90 credits). For students in programs with different credit hour requirements, the maximum time frame will be adjusted accordingly. Students must be taking courses that count toward their degree program to be eligible for financial assistance. Care should be taken to register only for courses listed on the appropriate degree requirements sheet for the student’s current degree or certificate program. SAP Reviews Satisfactory Academic Progress for financial aid will be reviewed after the spring semester each year. Students not meeting the requirements stated above will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension and be ineligible to receive

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Catalog 2011–2012 financial assistance. There is no warning period. Financial Aid Suspension If a student does not meet all of the above standards, he or she is no longer eligible for financial aid. If a student reaches the maximum time frame or it is determined to be mathematically impossible for the student to obtain the degree or certificate within the maximum time frame, he or she is no longer eligible to receive state or federal financial aid. Regaining Eligibility A student may regain eligibility by taking and paying for the classes and raising the cumulative GPA and completion rate to meet the above standards. Appeal Procedure To appeal the Financial Aid Suspension, a student should submit a signed and dated SAP Appeal Form to the Advisement & Counseling Center within ten days of being notified of his or her suspended status. Valid reasons for an appeal include extenuating circumstances such as a medical emergency, severe health issues, severe personal or family problems, financial or personal catastrophe, change of major, or return for a second degree or certificate. If a student bases an appeal on a change of program, only the hours from the previous program(s) that count toward the student’s new program requirements are included in the calculation of maximum time frame. Two program changes will be considered valid for financial aid SAP purposes. All courses from the third different program on will be counted toward a student’s maximum time frame. Students pursuing a second associate’s degree or transferring credits into Massasoit will have a maximum of ten courses from their prior degree and/or institution used to satisfy their second degree requirements. This is the same as Massasoit’s academic policy for all students pursuing a second associate degree or transferring credits. Documentation verifying the situation should be attached to the SAP Appeal Form (e.g., doctor’s letter, hospital records, police records, unemployment statements) SAP Appeals will not be considered if they are incomplete. If a student’s SAP Appeal is granted, one of two things will occur:

1. The student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation after Appeal and be given the opportunity to raise the cumulative GPA and/or completion rate to Good SAP Standing standards. This opportunity will only be given to students who can, through hard work, return to Good SAP Progress within one semester.

2. The student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation after Appeal and will develop with an academic advisor an Academic Plan to return him or her to Good SAP Progress standing within an appropriate time period.

While on Financial Aid Probation after Appeal, a student may continue to receive financial aid. At the end of each probationary semester the student will be:

• Removed from Financial Aid Probation after Appeal if the cumulative GPA is raised to or above that required to be in good standing, and a minimum completion rate of 67% is reached;

• Continued on Financial Aid Probation after Appeal if all the requirements of the Academic Plan are satisfactorily met, or

• Placed on Financial Aid Suspension if all the requirements of the Academic Plan are not met.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Reinstatement A student may be able to raise his or her cumulative GPA and/or satisfy credit deficiencies by taking additional coursework at Massasoit Community College while not receiving financial aid. Students may also consider whether a change in degree program is appropriate.

Financial Aid Sources Massasoit participates in the following federal and state financial aid programs. Federal Pell Grants – This federal program provides grants to students based on financial need as demonstrated on the FAFSA and their enrollment status (number of credits taken). Money may be available for study in the summer sessions. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office for more information. Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grant (SEOG) – Awarded to students eligible for a Pell Grant and showing exceptional financial need. Federal Direct Subsidized Loans – Federal loans available to eligible student borrowers who demonstrate financial need. These loans have a fixed interest rate of 3.4% for the 2011–2012 aid year. Interest and principal are subsidized by the government until the student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. Repayment begins six months after the student graduates, withdraws, or stops attending school at least half-time. Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans – Federal loans available to eligible student borrowers. These loans are not need based; however, FAFSA must be filed to determine eligibility. These loans have a fixed interest rate of 6.8%. The interest is NOT subsidized by the government and accrues during the in-school period. The borrower is responsible for all interest payments. Interest and principal may be deferred until the student ceases to be enrolled. Repayment begins six months after the student graduates, withdraws, or stops attending school at least half-time. Federal Direct Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) – For parent borrowers. This program provides additional loan funds for educational expenses. These loans have a fixed interest rate of 7.9%. PLUS loans are subject to credit approval. Federal College Work Study (FWS) – This is a federally funded student employment program. Students are placed with various academic and administrative offices throughout the College. There are also off-campus Work Study opportunities through our community service program. Student employees generally work 10 hours per week while classes are in session. The hourly wage is $8/hour on campus, and $10/hour off campus. Student employment guidelines and applications for the Federal Work Study are available in the Office of Financial Aid. Mass Grant – Provides assistance to Massachusetts residents who are studying full-time. The Office of Student Financial Assistance sends award notifications directly to the student but relies on the College Financial Aid Office to verify and adjust these awards. Maximum award is $900 annually. Deadline to file FAFSA and receive consideration for the Mass Grant is May 1 each year. MA Part-Time Grant – Funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, this program provides assistance to Massachusetts residents who are studying part time. Maximum award is $450 annually. MA Foster Furcolo Access Grant – A state-funded grant available to needy students on a first-come, first-served basis. Tuition Waivers Several kinds of tuition waivers are available to Massasoit Community College students. These waivers include, but are not limited to, National Guard, veteran, senior citizen, Native American, state employee, and ward of the state. Students must present documentation of eligibility, and may need to certify they meet all waiver requirements

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Catalog 2011–2012 prior to having their waiver accepted. Students eligible for waivers should obtain clarification from the Financial Aid Office before making course selections, Student eligible for the Senior Citizen Waiver need to certify US citizenship and MA residency, and present proof of age 60 years or more. Senior Citizen Waivers will not be accepted until late registration, which is one week before the start of classes, and enrollment of 15 students in the class is confirmed. For courses starting later in the semester, Senior Citizen Waivers will not be accepted until one week before the start of the class, and enrollment of 15 students in the class is confirmed. Waiver documentation must be submitted by the bill due date, or at the time of registration, whichever is later. Waivers will not be processed retroactively. Waivers are not refundable. Institutional Funds Massasoit Community College offers a number of need and non-need based grants and scholarships to students. The United Student Fund, MCC Fee Assistance Grant, and book vouchers are a few of the programs available. Some programs require completion of FAFSA, others require a scholarship application or written letter of appeal. Additional information on each program is available in the Financial Aid Office.

Financial Aid and Course Withdrawal Information Students receiving financial aid should be aware that withdrawing or failing to attend courses may have a significant impact on their current and future financial aid eligibility. Official Withdrawal Students financial aid eligibility is based on the number of credits they have as of the add/drop deadline. For the fall term, students are initially awarded as full-time. If they have fewer than 12 credits at the end of the add/drop period, their awards, including loan eligibility, will be adjusted. For the spring term, students are awarded based on the number of credits in which they were enrolled in during the fall. If students’ enrollment changes during the add/drop period, their awards, including loan eligibility, will be adjusted. Withdrawing from all courses after the drop/add deadline is considered withdrawing from the College. If students withdraw completely before 60% of the academic semester has passed, their financial aid eligibility must be recalculated according to federal and state regulations. This recalculation will determine how much of the financial aid has been earned during the weeks before the official withdrawal from courses. When the recalculation is done, a balance could be owed to the College. Unofficial Withdrawal The federal government mandates that students who fail all of their courses during an academic semester must be checked to determine if they continued their attendance in those courses past the 60% point of the semester. Massasoit complies with this requirement by requesting faculty to verify students’ participation during the semester. If a student is not participating in classes, the Financial Aid Office will recalculate financial aid eligibility, which may cause a balance to be owed to the College for the semester; this is true even when a refund check has already been issued to the student for the semester. Students need to remember that accumulated withdrawals could affect their eligibility for aid, as all course withdrawals decrease their completion rate for Satisfactory Academic Progress (see next section). In addition, students’ loan eligibility will be affected if their enrollment falls below half-time (6 credits) status.

Gateway to College The Gateway to College program is a unique alternative education opportunity. Students can earn a high school diploma with the added benefit of receiving college credits toward an Associate degree or certificate. Gateway

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Catalog 2011–2012 to College serves at-risk youth 16 to 20 years old who have dropped out or are on the verge of dropping out of high school. The program promotes student success and readiness for an adult learning environment by grouping students into learning communities and offering individualized support while maintaining rigorous academic standards. Students work with program staff on issues ranging from transportation and study habits to pathway selection. Because the program is offered on a college campus, students feel that they are treated as adults and respond well to the academic and behavioral expectations of the College environment. How Is Gateway to College Funded? In order to promote the Gateway to College model, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and its funding partners, the Carnegie Corporation, the Ford Foundation, and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, granted Portland Community College in Portland, Oregon, $13 million over seven years to replicate the program. Massasoit Community College, among other community colleges nationwide, has been selected to replicate the Gateway to College program. MCC has contracts with Brockton, Randolph, and Norton Public School districts to provide Gateway to College to students who have dropped out (or are in danger of dropping out) of high school. The program uses K–12 education funds to pay for college tuition, fees, and books, since students are completing high school at the same time they are earning college credits. Who Are Our Students? Gateway to College serves students 16 to 20 years old who have dropped out of school or have one foot out the door. They are a diverse group of young people facing many challenges. Our students are young people who feel they did not fit well in a traditional high school setting. Many of our students work part-time and live on their own. How Long Are Students in the Program? Students remain in Gateway to College for a minimum of two years, until they earn a high school diploma or turn 22. How Can a Student Get into the Program? The first step to take in applying for the Gateway to College program is to complete a preliminary application. To obtain a preliminary application you may contact our Gateway to College office at 508-588-9100, ext. 1688, or visit the website at http://gateway.massasoit.mass.edu. We look forward to hearing from you!

GED Test Information Please refer to Testing & Assessment, p.78.

Grading Grades are reported using a 4-point system. The following are included in the Grade Point Average (GPA): A 4.0 Excellent C 2.0 Satisfactory A- 3.7 C- 1.7 B+ 3.3 D+ 1.3 B 3.0 Good D 1.0 Less than Satisfactory B- 2.7 D- 0.7 C+ 2.3 F 0.0 Unsatisfactory The following grades are not included in the GPA; A Audit: Indicates permission for a student to participate in a class without the intent of earning academic credit. Audits in a course are allowed on a space-available basis. An audit status may not be changed to full registration,

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Catalog 2011–2012 nor may full registration be changed to an audit status, after the course begins. I Incomplete: Given by the instructor if at least a majority of the course work has been completed. In this event, the student is required to contact the instructor as soon as possible, certainly no later than 30 days after the semester, to determine how the work will be made up. The grade of Incomplete will remain open through the following semester (summer sessions excluded), at which time, if not changed by the instructor, the grade of Incomplete becomes a Failure. NG No Grade: Indicates that the faculty member did not submit a grade at the time that grades were rolled to a student’s academic history. P Pass: Given for successful completion of certain internships, practicums, community service courses, and other courses. This grade has no impact on the GPA, but the course may be counted toward graduation. W Withdrawn: Indicates withdrawal from a 15-week course by Friday of the 10th week of classes. The withdrawal period for courses meeting fewer than 15 weeks will be prorated accordingly. Students who withdraw from the College any time after the first week will receive Ws for all their courses. Failure to officially withdraw will result in a failing grade on a student’s transcript. Repeating a Course A course in which a student received a C- or below may be repeated without prior approval. A course in which a student received a grade of C or higher may be repeated only with prior approval. Waiver to Repeat a Course forms are available in the Registrar’s Office. Graduation with Honors Candidates for graduation whose cumulative GPA is 3.90 or higher will graduate with Highest Honors. Candidates for graduation whose cumulative GPA is 3.70-3.89 will graduate with High Honors, and those with 3.30-3.69 will graduate with Honors.

Graduation Requirements All candidates for graduation must: 1. Have satisfactorily completed all credits required for their program/certificate. a) Degree candidates must complete satisfactorily a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit, of which 30 hours of credit have been completed at Massasoit Community College. The maximum number of credit hours will depend upon the program in which the student is enrolled. b) Board Certificate candidates must complete satisfactorily a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit. 2. Achieve a cumulative QPA of at least 2.0. 3. Complete all required courses in a particular program. 4. Complete all Core course requirements of the particular degree. 5. Be free from disciplinary probation at the time of graduation. 6. Have met in full all financial obligations to the College. 7. Have completed all their program requirements prior to the graduation ceremony in order to participate in it.

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Catalog 2011–2012

Grants Department The Department of Grants works under the supervision of the Senior Vice President and Vice President of Faculty and Instruction to help faculty and staff obtain external funding that supports the College’s mission and programs. The department’s responsibilities include:

• Researching and identifying potential government and foundation funding sources

• Notifying faculty and staff about funding opportunities that align with their departments and areas of interest

• Providing assistance with all aspects of grant development, including concept formation, proposal writing and submission, and budget development

• Maintaining an up-to-date library of grant resources for the Massasoit community

• Providing faculty and staff with guidance and instruction in grant seeking and proposal writing

Massasoit faculty and staff who wish to pursue program funding should contact the grants department staff to discuss a project’s feasibility and the College’s grant application procedures. Communicating with the grants staff before seeking external funding is important to help ensure that Massasoit’s grants efforts are coordinated, that funders are not being approached by multiple individuals from the College, and that all necessary administrative approvals are obtained. The Grants Department is located in the LA Building on the Brockton campus. For more information please contact: Hollyce States, Director of Grants, 508-588-9100, ext. 1377, http://www.massasoit.mass.edu/admin_depts/grants/ index.cfm.

Green Key Green Key is an honorary activities society, established in 1968, designed to recognize the contributions made by students in the College and the wider community and to encourage involvement and participation in the life of the College. Although selection is primarily based on leadership, participation, and unselfish contributions of one’s time, energy, and ability, the student must also be making satisfactory progress in his or her academic pursuits. Membership in this organization represents the highest honor the College can bestow for outstanding leadership in both the College and the community.

Health Insurance An annual fee is required of all students taking nine credits or more per semester. This fee may be waived upon proof of existing health insurance. (Fee is subject to change; please see website for current information.)

Health Services The mission of Health Services is to provide primary and preventive health care, health education, and counseling to meet the needs of a diverse student population. Students are encouraged to accept responsibility for making informed decisions that lead to healthier academic and personal lives. The staff is committed to remaining aware of current health trends and information to assist in this process. The purpose of Health Services is to ensure that every student has the opportunity to enjoy, in health, the benefits of academic life. The College Health Service is available free to all students on a drop-in or appointment basis. These services include primary health care, health education, preventive care, and referral. Special programming is planned to meet current health concerns. Located on the Brockton Campus in the Student Center, Room SC 154 and on the Canton Campus in Room C136.

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Catalog 2011–2012

Honors Program An Honors course is any course of the College that is taught in an Honors format. This format involves a seminar style of teaching and learning, a high degree of student involvement in both class discussion and the presentation of reports, and ongoing consultations between student and instructor. Students admitted to a course on an Honors basis are usually recommended by one instructor of the department and, as a condition for entry, are interviewed by the instructor of the Honors course itself. Students may be asked to read course materials or texts before the first class of the course. Each course taken in an Honors format is so noted on the student’s transcript. All Honors courses are designated as Honors on students’ transcripts, identifying students as academically talented. The small size and intimate atmosphere of Honors classes appeal to students who seek a strong voice in their education. Students receive sustained assistance in planning their future educational goals, including transfer support and selection of courses that suit their needs. Access to the Honors Center The Honors Center is a place where students study, use computers, and meet with other students in the program. The Center also hosts receptions, film screenings, and other academic activities. $100 Tuition Waiver Students receive a $100 waiver for each three or four-credit Honors course. The Honors Program is coordinated by Professor Susan Martelli on the Brockton Campus at ext. 1836, Room H113, and by Professor David LaFontaine on the Canton Campus at ext. 2838, Room C311B. They are happy to talk with interested students any time during the year. Honors Program Highlights • Honors field trips • Extracurricular activities for cultural enrichment • Annual awards and recognition luncheon • Statewide undergraduate conference • Student presentation of original work in oral and visual form before peers, faculty, and the public Massasoit Community College is a member of the National Collegiate Honors Council.

Institutional Diversity Overseeing the Diversity Efforts at Massasoit Community College There are many formal resources, such as planned forums, diverse clubs, and survey data, available to Massasoit students, faculty, and staff. But Joyce Zymaris, Executive Officer for Institutional Diversity/Affirmative Action, also wants to personally offer her office as a place where any issue involving diversity or tolerance can be addressed. If you are a minority student, faculty, or staff member at MCC, are friends with someone who is, or are simply curious about multicultural issues, we hope you will take advantage of what the Office For Institutional Diversity has to offer. If you have a question about minority scholarships or professional opportunities, come to this office. If you are considering having a program celebrating an aspect of who you are, we may be able to offer advice. If you have suggestions for a forum, speaker, initiative, or a college procedure, please let us know. And, if you or someone you know has been a witness or the victim of intolerance, do not hesitate to get in touch with us.

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Catalog 2011–2012 The Office for Institutional Diversity wishes you a productive and enjoyable academic year. Drop by and pick up a semester diversity calendar!

Inter-Campus Shuttle Service Now with full handicapped access! The Inter-Campus Shuttle departs the Brockton Campus from the front entrance of the Student Center (next to the BAT bus stop). The Shuttle departs the Canton Campus from the front entrance of the Administration building. Regular Shuttle Schedule Departs Arrives Brockton @ 7:10 a.m. Canton @ 8:15 a.m. Canton @ 11:00 a.m. Canton @ 2:50 p.m.

Departs Arrives

BAT terminal @ 7:15 a.m. BAT terminal @ 7:20 a.m. Brockton @ 8:45 a.m. Brockton @ 10:00 a.m. Brockton @ 11:30 a.m. Brockton @ 2:00 p.m. Brockton @ 3:20 p.m.

Canton @ 7:55 a.m. Canton @ 10:45 a.m. Canton @ 2:30 p.m.

Keyboarding Competency As a requirement for graduation with an Associate Degree, every student at Massasoit Community College must demonstrate the ability to keyboard on a computer at 20 words per minute with no more than three errors on a two-minute test OR enroll in and complete a keyboarding course. Students who know they exceed the minimum standard should arrange to test out of the keyboarding requirement before enrolling in English Composition II. As indicated on the instructional pamphlet distributed at orientation, frequent test dates are scheduled throughout the semester. Why? You benefit from Massasoit’s required keyboarding competency in two major ways: First, keyboarding is likely to make you a more competent, higher-achieving student. In many of your courses (especially the writing courses that are required early in your academic career), you may be required to submit typed work. Research indicates that students work better and receive higher grades when their papers are typed. Keyboarding on a computer will further develop your ability to revise, edit, and enhance your work (and it’s a lot easier, too!). Second, computers are on the desk of almost everyone in today’s workforce! And keyboards are still the primary way people talk to their computers. Word processing is, and will continue to be, one of the most widely used computer applications. In today’s world, “writing” means using word processing on a computer. Familiarity and practice in using the computer keyboard will increase your job possibilities as well as your academic success. Knowing how to keyboard makes an important difference in employability after graduation. What? One of the core competencies at Massasoit, and a requirement for graduation, is keyboarding on a computer. The student must also demonstrate the following computer-related competencies: 1. Insert a disk 2. Use basic cursor movement with keys and mouse 3. Locate function keys 4. Edit using backspace and delete keys

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Catalog 2011–2012 5. Save a file 6. Retrieve a file You may demonstrate this competency at times that are set up before or during your first semester at Massasoit. Students who have not fulfilled this requirement will be required to enroll in Computer Keyboarding course (CTIM100) or CTIM148) when they register for English Comp. II. How? You can meet this competency in a variety of ways. You can arrange to take the competency test during your first semester. If you would like to attempt to learn about computer keyboarding on your own during your first semester, computers with self-teaching typing tutors are available in the Academic Resource Center (ARC). Students who do not pass the keyboarding competency test must register for a keyboarding course during their second semester. Students in programs with general electives may use the one-credit course (CTIM148) as one-third of a 3-credit general elective and combine it with two other 1-credit courses such as Internet, Word, Excel, Windows, Access, PowerPoint, and Physical Education courses. Some students may choose the higher-level 3-credit course, CTIM100 Computer Keyboarding for Non-Majors, to acquire this skill and meet a general elective requirement. Students with learning disabilities should consult with the Special Needs Coordinator concerning this requirement. No appointment is necessary to take the test! Please arrive at least 10 minutes prior to the time indicated and bring your driver’s license (for ID purposes).

Latch Program Latch is an academic support program that serves approximately 150 students each semester. Although Latch supports a variety of students, the most common is the first semester student in school looking for help adjusting to college generally and for help in reading, writing, or math skills specifically. Latch offers sections of Massasoit’s required courses in Reading, Writing, Math, and College Experience. The courses are identical to those offered throughout the College, but the program offers teachers with reputations for patience and clear communication. Latch offers tutoring on a drop-in basis from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in two tutoring rooms on the Brockton campus. Room T-435 focuses on reading and writing skills with special help available in social sciences, speech, basic computer skills, and other subjects. Room T-432 focuses exclusively on mathematics. A Latch student might go to one of the tutoring rooms just to work on homework, but often a student seeks one-to-one help understanding a difficult assignment. Latch offers counselors who are experienced at helping a student choose the right courses for that individual. The counselors in the program are also deeply committed to helping a student discover a career path or follow a career path the student feels strongly about. Latch students are formally invited to individual interviews with counselors at least twice during a semester. Teachers report on the progress of students, and if a student is struggling, Latch counselors will strive to contact the student and offer advice on the way to improvement. Latch offers workshops designed to help a student with such things as identifying a learning style, finding an appropriate career, or choosing a major course of study in college. Latch has a tradition of helping motivated and hard-working students achieve success.

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Catalog 2011–2012

Library Mission and Policies Statement The Massasoit Community College Library reflects the mission of the College by providing its diverse population with the information resources that support a wide range of transfer and career programs; by teaching the information-seeking skills needed for success in college and for lifelong learning; by preserving and making accessible the College’s historical materials; and by allowing the use of its facilities and collections to play a role in the intellectual and cultural life of the College community. Services: On and Off Campus The Library provides reference materials and circulating books as well as newspapers and periodicals in current (paper) and electronic formats. Reference materials, periodicals, and reserve books may be used only in the libraries; circulating books may be borrowed for three weeks. Professional reference assistance, reserve materials, and access to other libraries’ materials through interlibrary loan are available. The library’s website is rich with resources and online research tools, most notably LibGuides, which are guides to useful resources compiled by librarians for research. Many of the LibGuides are custom tailored to support faculty and their research assignments. The computers at all MCC learning sites provide students and faculty immediate electronic access to all the resources of the library, through the web address: http://www.massasoit.mass.edu/library/. Using the same web address from home, students and faculty can use their library barcode numbers (available through email) to access the databases. Online (email) and phone reference service is available during the hours a week that the library is open. Your current College ID card is your library card. Hours BROCKTON CAMPUS: Student Center, 508-588-9100, ext. 1941; hours are: Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m.; Friday, 8:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.; Saturday, 10:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m. Closed Sunday. CANTON CAMPUS: Room 302, 781-821-2222, ext. 2942; Monday–Thursday, 8:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.; Friday, 8:00 a.m.– 4:00 p.m. Closed Saturday & Sunday. When classes are not in session, please call the Brockton Library at ext. 1941 for hours.

Massachusetts Educational Opportunity Program at Massasoit Community College The Massachusetts Educational Opportunity Program (MEOP) at Massasoit has been committed to helping students prepare for college through comprehensive after- school programming since 1996. Participants come to Massasoit’s Brockton campus on Thursday afternoons for enrichment activities in four core areas: College Knowledge, Cultural Literacy, Career Exploration, and Cultivation of Character (leadership development). Families are a part of MEOP as well through parent workshops, children’s activities, field trips, and recognition ceremonies. The mission of MEOP is to promote early awareness of higher education opportunities and encourage participants to continue their education after high school. Is MEOP for you or a student you know? MEOP students • are dedicated to preparing for the future. • apply what they learn in entrepreneurial ways. • are committed to becoming leaders in the community. • are problem solvers in training, willing to make mistakes.

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Catalog 2011–2012 MEOP Program Activities • Group Projects • SAT Practice • College Tours • Guided College Planning • Guest Speakers & Interactive Lectures Program Admission Requirements • Excellent school attendance record • Recommendation from teacher or guidance counselor • Currently taking college prep–level courses Preference Given To • First-generation college students • Students of color • Students eligible for free or reduced school lunch Student Outcomes . Increased awareness of higher education opportunities . Better grades . Interpersonal skills development . Financial literacy or financial aid knowledge . Leadership experience . Understanding of college majors and career options How to Apply Applications for fall admission are accepted in September each year. Students who apply after September are encouraged to submit an application and will be notified if they are to be placed on the waiting list. Student applicants from the waiting list will be contacted if space becomes available during the school year. To apply, download, print, and complete the program application (PDF). Applications may be submitted to any Brockton High School Guidance Counselor or faxed to 508-427-1273. Contact: Amanda Huggon-Mauretti, Special Programs Coordinator

The MassTransfer Program Massasoit students who plan to transfer to the University of Massachusetts or one of the Massachusetts state universities can participate in MassTransfer, a statewide program designed to facilitate transfer within the public higher education system in the Commonwealth. MassTransfer provides Massasoit students who complete designated associate degree programs with the benefits of full transfer and applicability of credit, guaranteed admission (2.5 or higher GPA), and a tuition discount (3.0 or higher GPA). MassTransfer also provides students the intermediate goal of completing a portable general education transfer block, which will satisfy the general education, distribution, and core requirements across institutions. MassTransfer Programs at Massasoit Community College Business Administration Transfer

Liberal Arts Studies - Elementary Education

Child Care Education & Administration Transfer

Liberal Arts Transfer

Criminal Justice Transfer

Liberal Arts Transfer - Computer Science

Human Services Transfer

Liberal Arts Transfer - Science

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Catalog 2011–2012 Benefits of MassTransfer Students who graduate from a MassTransfer eligible program are eligible for the following benefits, based on their final grade point average. (Not all benefits or programs are available at all colleges and universities.) Minimum Final GPA / Benefits 2.0 No admission fee or essay Full transfer of credits applied to the bachelor’s degree Automatic satisfaction of the general education, distribution, or core requirements at the receiving institution, which can require no more than 6 additional credits or two courses

2.5

All of the above plus guaranteed admission

3.0

All of the above plus a 33% tuition waiver

Students who do not graduate from a MassTransfer eligible program but complete the MassTransfer Block with a GPA of 2.0 or higher and are accepted at one of the Massachusetts state colleges or universities or UMASS campuses are eligible for the following benefit: Automatic satisfaction of the general education, distribution, or core requirements at the receiving institution, which can require no more than 6 additional credits or two courses. MassTransfer Block English Composition/Writing Behavioral and/or Social Sciences Humanities and/or Fine Arts Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning

6 credits 9 credits 9 credits 3 credits

Natural or Physical Science (At least one lab science) Total

7 credits

34 credits

(MATH121, MATH122, MATH 131 OR MATH203 or Higher)

For more information, contact Massasoit’s Advisement & Counseling Center Brockton Student Center - lower level 508-588-9100, ext. 1461 Canton Student Affairs Office 781-821-2222, ext. 2114

MassaSports Camps for Kids All our MassaSports Camps include: • 10:1 Camper to Counselor Ratio MassaSports Camp T-shirt

• 1-1/2 hour Recreational Swim • Certificate of Merit for All Campers

Available for boys and girls ages 8–15. All camps run Monday thru Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. with a daily recreational swim from 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Campers will need to bring their own lunch. A complete health record is required for registration. For brochures and complete details call 508-588-9100, ext. 1443.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Boys’ Soccer Camp The program consists of the campers being taught the skills of the game: dribbling, passing, shooting, and receiving through individual and small-group play. Individual as well as team tactics will be taught: offensive-defensive positioning, when to make a run, creating space, and so on will be offered through the use of small-sided games as well as full-sided play. In addition, players will learn about conditioning, proper stretching techniques, equipment, and other aspects of the game. Girls’ Soccer Camp The daily schedule is designed to teach the fundamental skills of soccer. Dribbling, passing, shooting, receiving, and heading through individual play will be emphasized. Individual as well as team tactics will be taught. Offensivedefensive positioning, when to make a run, and so on will be mastered through small-sided and full-sided play. In addition, campers will learn about conditioning, proper stretching techniques, equipment, and other aspects of the game. Boys’ Baseball Camp The weekly schedule is designed to teach the basic fundamentals of baseball as well as team concepts. Throughout the camp, demonstrations and skills will emphasize the correct way to perform the skills of hitting, bunting, fielding, base running, pitching, and catching. In addition to skill work, campers will have an opportunity to play in a game every day. Girls’ Softball Camp The daily schedule is designed to provide fundamental instruction in the basic skills of throwing, catching, hitting, bunting, and base running. Positioning and defensive skills relative to playing each position will also be taught, along with proper warm-up and conditioning techniques. Boys’ Basketball Camp (2 Sessions) The daily schedule is designed to teach the fundamentals of basketball as well as team concepts. Lectures and drills will emphasize the correct way to execute the skills of ball handling, footwork, dribbling, shooting, passing, defensive positioning, offensive moves, and rebounding. In addition to skill work, players will compete in game situations, which emphasize the importance of team play. Girls’ Basketball Camp The daily schedule is designed to teach the fundamentals of basketball as well as team concepts. Lectures and drills will emphasize the correct way to execute the skills of ball handling, footwork, dribbling, shooting, passing, defensive positioning, offensive moves, and rebounding. In addition to skill work, players will compete in game situations, which emphasize the importance of team play.

Media Services Instructional Media Services Instructional Media Services (IMS) provides instructional services, technology, and support for all academic programs and events on campus. We encourage you to contact the staff for all your classroom support questions. Ordering Services Brockton and Canton Campuses Routine audiovisual orders should be received in Brockton two days before the scheduled date of use. A written form is available in Media Services and an electronic version is available within the MyMassasoit portal in the Faculty Info Channel. To ensure that we have complete order information, a written form is preferred over phone messages or hand-written notes to Media. Email requests can be sent to mediabrockton@massasoit.mass.edu or mediacanton@massasoit.mass.edu.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Semester-long reservations are available for those who will need services during every class period. Be sure to exclude class days that you know media equipment will not be required, such as field work days or exam days, and do include make-up days from snow or holiday interruptions. Canton requests will continue to be handled through Canton Media Services in the Canton library and on extension 2622. Overhead projectors and screens are available for most classrooms and would not require a reservation under normal circumstances. If your room is without an overhead projector, cart, or screen, please call Media Services. If you are planning a major campus event such as a workshop or conference, please schedule a meeting with Media to plan your event’s needs. Because it may become necessary to use a significant amount of equipment or specialized technology for your event, a meeting with media staff will permit planning ahead for unforeseen needs such as equipment rental, licenses, or permits. Training The Media staff offers training in the use of all classroom equipment. All faculty and staff wishing to use multimedia projectors, camcorders, built-in media systems, or laptop PCs are required to take a one-time brief training session in the safe operation of this technology. Please call the campus reservation number (ext. 1427, Brockton or ext. 2622, Canton) to schedule a session. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Normal operating hours are Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. and Friday until 5:00 p.m. Coverage in Brockton extends through Saturday, 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Ordering Services—Conference Center Conference Center media reservations are handled by the Conference Center staff. There are charges for equipment and personnel when used for non-academic conferences or meetings. A list of charges is available from the Conference Center Staff. Equipment VCR & Monitor - 1/2” VHS videotape recorder/player with TV/monitor 3/4” U-Matic videocassette recorder and monitor 1/2” VHS camcorder & monitor TV - for use with campus closed circuit system Audiocassette player/recorder Audio CD player Record player 35mm slide projector Filmstrip projector 16mm film projector Portable projection screen Flip-chart Easel Laptop PC with scan converter and video monitor Multimedia projector (with VHS, VCR, or PC) *Built-in multimedia projection systems in Brockton: B-544, B-546, LA-559, LA-560, and LA-562. *Built-in multimedia projection - Canton: 211 Built-in video/VCR systems in LA-561, LA-446, LA-447, FA-329 Specialized services (systems) Sound reinforcement systems Multi-microphone sound systems with mixer Built-in sound system in Brockton Upper Student Lounge Audio teleconferencing (in locations with telephone line access) Video teleconferencing: Canton 108, 100A; Brockton LA-555 (contact TV Studio, ext. 1981)

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Catalog 2011–2012 Production Services Audiotape duplication Videotape duplication - VHS (TV Studio, ext. 1981) Single color posters or banners (Brockton Media Center) Overhead transparencies Faculty and staff wishing to use the built-in multimedia systems must be checked out in advance for the safe use of these systems. A key will then be issued that will work with all multimedia classroom systems. No reservation of this equipment will then be necessary. Copyright Copyright clearances are required for materials to be reproduced, broadcast, or modified, unless fair use provisions apply. Not all pre-recorded videotapes are cleared for classroom use. Some tapes may be viewed only by individuals in the campus library. Check with Media/TV in advance of ordering. Guidelines at http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright/title17/1cont.html. Multimedia: http://www.libraries.psu.edu/avs/fairuse/guidelinedoc.html For clearances contact: Copyright Clearance Center 508-750-8400 or http://www.copyright.com. Media Library Collection Media Services’ video collection is located in the Brockton campus library. The library contains a collection of 1/2” VHS pre-recorded tapes and a collection of faculty reserved tapes and other media materials such as audiocassettes and CDs. The library has VHS players for student and faculty previewing. All material in the collection is available for classroom use by faculty.

Middleborough Center The Middleborough Center is our newly acquired, renovated facility where students are able to take a wide range of credit courses in pursuit of a degree in some of our most popular programs Liberal Arts, Business, Criminal Justice, and Child Care Education. Many non-credit courses and career training programs are also offered here.

Multicultural Center The mission of the Multicultural Center is to promote respect, understanding, and equality among the diverse world cultures existing in the student body, the faculty and staff, and the community at large. Our goal is to learn about others by sharing cultural experiences that contribute to global responsibility. The Multicultural Center assists with retention of students of other cultures whose native language is other than English through counseling, personal concerns, leadership development, career-related issues, programming and the use of campus resources, and developing and implementing thematic weekly or monthly programs.

Online Learning Massasoit offers two types of online learning courses: fully online courses and hybrid or blended courses. These options allow for students to customize learning experience to match educational goals, learning styles, and scheduling constraints. To learn more, visit www.massasoit.mass.edu/massasoit_online or call the Office of Online Learning at ext. 1614 or ext. 1650. A variety of online and hybrid courses run each semester. Orientation sessions are offered both online and through face-to-face orientations sessions on campus.

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Catalog 2011–2012

PLAN The PLAN (Proactive Learning Assistance Network) program is a TRIO Student Support Services Program funded under a grant from the United States Department of Education. Under the federal guidelines, students who are enrolled at Massasoit Community College may be eligible to participate in the PLAN program if they are low income, are first-generation college attendees, or have a documented disability. The goal of the program is to assist students with their academic and personal needs by providing an array of comprehensive support services. The PLAN Suite is located on the ground floor of the Student Center in room 174. The Canton campus office is located in room 114 and will be open every Monday and Tuesday from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Contact: Telephone: 508-588-9100, ext. 1061, Office hours: Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

POLICIES Absence Due to Religious Beliefs In accordance with Chapter 151C of the Massachusetts General Laws, any student in an educational or vocational training institution, other than a religious or denominational educational or vocational training institution, who is unable, because of his or her religious beliefs, to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study, or work requirement on a particular day shall be excused from any such examination, study or work requirement, and shall be provided with an opportunity to make up such examination, study, or work requirement that may have been missed because of such absence on any particular day, provided, however, that such makeup examination or work shall not create an unreasonable burden upon the school. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such opportunity. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student due to the provisions of this section. Affirmative Action Policy Massasoit Community College is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, religion, color, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, genetic information, maternity leave, or national origin in its education programs or employment pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 151B and 151C, Title VI, Civil Rights Act of 1964; Title IX, Education Amendments of 1972; Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973; Americans with Disabilities Act, and regulations promulgated thereunder, 34 C.F.R. Part 100 (Title VI), Part 106 (Title IX) and Part 104 (Section 504). All inquiries concerning application of the above should be directed to the College’s Affirmative Action Officer and/or the College’s Coordinator of Title IX and Section 504. Executive Director of Institutional Diversity, Joyce Zymaris at 508-588-9100, ext. 1304. Brockton Campus, Room A234. Inquiries may also be directed to the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, or the Director, U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Region I, Boston, Massachusetts. Alcohol and Drug Policy No alcoholic beverages may be consumed, served, sold or stored by students, guests, invitees, educators, administrators, or executives of the College at either the Brockton or Canton education campuses or athletic facilities or in any motor vehicle owned or leased by Massasoit Community College, without the advance (not more than 90 days) written approval of the College President. If, after the required written approval is obtained, alcohol is served or sold by anyone, then it must be served or sold strictly in accordance with applicable state law. All arrangements for the delivery, service, sale, storage, and removal of alcoholic beverages at the education campuses or athletic facilities of Massasoit Community College shall be coordinated with the Director of Food Services, and he or she shall identify and retain the name of the responsible person. No alcoholic beverages may be consumed, served, sold, or stored by outside organizations or off-campus entities

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Catalog 2011–2012 or their guests or invitees of the College using any Massasoit Community College education campus or athletic facility or in any motor vehicle owned or leased by the College without the advance (not more than 90 days) written approval of the College President. If, after the required written approval is obtained, alcohol is served or sold by anyone, then it must be served or sold strictly in accordance with applicable state law. All arrangements for the delivery, service, sale, storage, and removal of alcoholic beverages at the education campuses or athletic facilities of Massasoit Community College shall be coordinated with the Director of Food Services, and he or she shall identify and retain the name of the responsible person. No alcoholic beverages may be consumed, served, sold, or stored at the Massasoit Community College Conference Center in Brockton, without the advance (not more than 90 days) written approval of the College President. However, the President may delegate such function-granting authority to an authorized Leasing Agent or the Conference Center Manager or the Director of Food Services, provided such function-granting authorization is in writing and the agent’s authorization was dated within the past 12 months. If, after the required written approval to hold or conduct a function is obtained, alcohol is served, sold, or stored by anyone, then it must be served, sold, or stored strictly in accordance with applicable state liquor laws. All arrangements for the delivery, service, sale, storage, and removal of alcoholic beverages at the Massasoit Community College Conference Center in Brockton shall be coordinated with the Director of Food Services, and he or she shall identify and retain the name of the responsible person for each authorized function. Notwithstanding, the restrictions and limitations otherwise included in this Alcohol and Drug Policy, a duly licensed bar, cafe, pub, or other liquor-serving establishment may be operated at the Massasoit Community College Conference Center in Brockton. Whether such liquor-serving establishment is directly managed and operated by College personnel or by some other independent entity, it shall be subject to the general supervision of the President of the College and closely monitored and supervised on a continuing basis by either the authorized Leasing Agent or the Conference Center Manager or the Director of Food Services as may from time to time be determined by the President in writing. Any duly licensed bar, cafe, pub, or other liquor-serving establishment operated at the Massasoit Community College Conference Center in Brockton, shall strictly observe all state liquor laws, all applicable ordinances established by the City of Brockton, and all rules and regulations established in writing by the person designated by the President to closely monitor and supervise the liquor-serving establishment. No alcoholic beverages may be consumed, served, sold, or stored at any Massasoit Community College student group activity or function, whether held on campus or off campus. The only limited exception to this strict prohibition is for recognized religious ceremonies or situations where it is absolutely certain that every student present will be of legal drinking age and the advance (not more than 90 days) written approval of the College President has been secured. If, after the required written approval has been obtained, alcohol is served or sold by anyone, then it must be served or sold strictly in accordance with applicable state liquor laws. Notwithstanding the defined limited exceptions, no College funds, no College funds indirectly made available to students, and no student fees shall be used in support of any Massasoit Community College student group activity or function at which alcoholic beverages will be consumed, served, or sold, whether held on campus or off campus. No unlawful drug or illegal substance may be consumed, served, sold, stored, or used by students, guests, invitees, educators, administrators, or executives of the College at either the Brockton or Canton education campuses or athletic facilities or in any motor vehicle owned or leased by Massasoit Community College. No unlawful drug or illegal substance may be consumed, served, sold, stored, or used by outside organizations or off-campus entities or their guests or invitees using any Massasoit Community College education campus or athletic facility or in any motor vehicle owned or leased by the College. No unlawful drug or illegal substance may be consumed, served, sold, stored, or used at any Massasoit Community College Conference Center in Brockton. No unlawful drug or illegal substance may be consumed, served, sold, or used at any Massasoit Community College student group activity or function, whether held on campus or off campus. There are no exceptions to the College policy that no College funds, no College funds indirectly made available to students, and no student fees shall be used in support of any Massasoit Community College student group activity or function at which any unlawful

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Catalog 2011–2012 drug or illegal substance will be served, sold, or used, whether held on campus or off campus. Any person actually observed consuming, serving, selling, or storing alcoholic beverages on College property in violation of this Alcohol and Drug Policy or applicable state liquor laws and any person actually observed consuming, serving, selling, storing, or using any unlawful drug or illegal substance on College property in violation of this Alcohol and Drug Policy or applicable state drug laws or substance laws shall be required to immediately leave the property of Massasoit Community College. Such individuals are also subject to arrest and criminal penalties as provided by state law, and the College may report such apparent violations to law enforcement authorities for further investigation and prosecution. In addition, students and College personnel should be aware that they are subject to such civil penalties as may be deemed appropriate, under the particular circumstances, by the President of Massasoit Community College, including the distinct possibility of temporary suspension or even permanent dismissal from employment or attendance at the College. It is the official policy of Massasoit Community College to assist students and College personnel in dealing with problems they may be experiencing with alcohol, drugs, and chemical substances, provided that the student or employee acknowledges that he or she may have a problem and seeks to remedy the situation before the College administration decides that it must take action under this Alcohol and Drug Policy. It is not a violation of this Alcohol and Drug Policy for a student, guest, invitee, educator, or administrator to carry, consume, possess, or otherwise use a prescription drug or an over-the-counter drug or medicine in a lawful manner. No authorization to carry, consume, possess, or otherwise use a prescription drug or an over-the-counter drug or medicine need be sought or secured from the President or any other College official, provided such consumption or use is lawful and is reasonable under the circumstances involved. However, the College’s Alcohol and Drug Policy does not authorize or condone the abusive use of any lawful drug or medicine, whether obtained by prescription or over the counter, which could result in a drug overdose, chemical dependence, adverse health effects, or an accident to anyone on College property or in a College-owned or leased motor vehicle. While the President of Massasoit Community College may adopt a different standard for evaluating the circumstances involving the excessive consumption or abusive use of lawful prescription drugs and over-the-counter medicines and make a reasonable allowance for mitigating circumstances, the President may impose on college personnel and students such civil penalties as he or she may deem appropriate, under the particular circumstances, including the possibility of permanent dismissal from employment or attendance at the College. Students and College employees need to understand that Massasoit Community College is subject to various state and federal laws that deal with the abusive use of alcohol, drugs, and chemical substances, including specifically the federal Higher Education Act of 1965. Title XII, which was an amendment to this Act created by the DrugFree Schools and Communities Act of 1989, applies to every educational institution receiving federal funding. In addition, certain College employees, including those involved in federally funded grants and projects, are subject to the Drug-free Workplaces Act of 1988, and as a result the College may be a mandatory reporter of certain employee acts that could result in a criminal conviction. Once in each calendar year, the President of the College shall inform the Board of Trustees that he or she has caused this Alcohol and Drug Policy to be posted on each campus in at least one prominent place and has also taken such other appropriate measures to inform employees and students as a reasonably objective person would deem to be adequate and sufficient to accomplish the several objectives of this Alcohol and Drug Policy. The Student Handbook, which is to be distributed to all students at least once each year, shall contain a prominent reference to and a brief synopsis of the College’s Alcohol and Drug Policy and, in addition, shall contain such other details, material, and related information as the President of the College shall deem appropriate. Attendance and Discipline Policy Students are expected to attend all regularly scheduled classes and laboratory sessions on time. The professor at the beginning of the semester will clarify the attendance policy in writing on the course syllabus. The College reserves the right to dismiss a student for disciplinary as well as academic reasons when it considers

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Catalog 2011–2012 such action in the best interests of the College or the student. In all such cases, the College will state the reason and inform the student of his or her rights to a hearing. An instructor may terminate a student’s participation in a class or course if the student’s behavior disrupts the learning process. Prior to dismissal the student has a right to receive a warning from the instructor and once dismissed can request reasons for the dismissal. The student may request a hearing. Statement on Academic Honesty In accepting admission to Massasoit Community College, students also accept the responsibility for maintaining high standards of academic integrity and scholarly practice. Plagiarism—using another person’s words or ideas without acknowledgement—is strictly forbidden. This means that dependence on the ideas or language of others in a student’s oral, written, technical, and artistic work must be properly acknowledged and documented. Information on documentation is contained in most writing handbooks and is generally covered by an instructor in one of a student’s composition courses. Academic dishonesty also includes but is not limited to a student’s giving or receiving aid during examinations or in completing laboratory assignments, computer programs, or other work assigned in courses, unless given explicit permission by the instructor. It is the responsibility of the individual instructor to enforce this policy. If an infraction should occur, an instructor may take action that reflects the seriousness of the infraction and that could range from an informal verbal warning to, but not beyond, the issuance of a grade of F for the course. In addition to action taken relative to the specific course, the course instructor may bring any matter related to academic honesty to the Academic Dean, who may bring the matter to the Vice President of Faculty and Instruction for consideration of further disciplinary action. The student’s right to due process is guaranteed in any disciplinary action involving faculty members and the administration. If a student has a complaint or a grievance, he or she should contact the Dean of Students. The Student Grievance Procedure is contained in the Student Handbook, which is available in the Student Life Office and the Office of the Dean of Students. The procedure outlines the necessary steps a student must follow to file a grievance. Confidentiality of Student Records Policy The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. 1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access Students should submit to the Registrar, Dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The College official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may by inspected. If the records are not maintained by the College official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the College to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the College official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify

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Catalog 2011–2012 why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the College decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the College will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff ); a person or company with whom the College has contracted (such as an attorney, an auditor, or a collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Further, upon request, the College discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U. S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by an institution of higher education to comply with the requirements of FERPA. Such complaints may be filed with the Family Policy Compliance Office at the U. S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202-4605. 5. The College identifies the following student information as directory information: student name, address, College email address, telephone number, age, level of education (first year or second year), enrollment status (full- or parttime), and program of study. It may also include dates of attendance, degrees, and awards received from Massasoit (Dean’s List, athletics awards, etc.). Directory information may be released by the College to a third party requesting such student information without first obtaining the parent’s or eligible student’s consent. A parent or eligible student has the right to refuse to permit the College to identify some or all of those types of information about the student as directory information. A parent or an eligible student must notify the College’s Registrar within two weeks of the beginning of each academic semester if the parent or an eligible student does not want any or all of those types of information about a student designated as directory information. Notwithstanding the College’s definition of directory information, the Department of Defense, pursuant to the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations Act of 1997 (Solomon Amendment), identifies the following information as student recruiting information: student names, addresses, and telephone listings; and if known, students’ ages, levels of education, majors. If a parent or an eligible student chooses not to exercise his or her aforementioned right to refuse to permit the College to designate some or all of the student’s record information as directory information, the College will release to the Department of Defense, or an agency thereof, that student information which the Department of Defense has designated as student recruiting information. This may result in the nonconsensual disclosure of personally identifiable information. When student information is released pursuant to a Department of Defense request, notice of the request, and the release of student information in accordance therewith, will be posted in a conspicuous location in the College’s Registrar’s Office for the period of one academic year. The Registrar is the person responsible for the maintenance of records. Inquiries regarding such records should be directed to the Registrar or his or her designee. Students wishing to examine their records may be required by the institution to give written notice of such intent. Such requests must be honored by the institution within a period not to exceed forty-five days from the date of the notice of intent. When personally identifiable information is released to third parties under the provisions of this Act, it is done on the condition that such party will not permit

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Catalog 2011–2012 any other party to have access to such information without written consent of the student. Hazing Policy An Act prohibiting the practice of hazing was enacted by the Senate and the House of Representatives in General Court in 1985. Chapter 269 of the General Laws is hereby amended by adding the following three sections: Section 17. Whoever is a principal organizer or participant in the crime of hazing as defined herein shall be punished by a fine of not more than three thousand dollars or by imprisonment in a house of correction for not more than one year or by both such fine and imprisonment. The term hazing as used in this section and in sections 18 and 19, shall mean any conduct or method of initiation into any student organization, whether on public or private property, that willfully or recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of any student or other person. Such conduct shall include whipping, beating, branding, forced calisthenics, or exposure to the weather; forced consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug or other substance; or any brutal treatment or forced physical activity that is likely to adversely affect the physical health or safety of any student or other person or that subjects such students or other persons to extreme mental stress, including extended deprivation of sleep or rest or extended isolation. Section 18. Whoever knows that a person is the victim of hazing as defined in section 17 and is at the scene of such a crime shall, to the extent that such person can do so without danger or peril to himself or others, report such crime to an appropriate law enforcement official as soon as reasonably practicable. Whoever fails to report such crime will be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars. Section 19. Each secondary school and each public and private school or college shall issue to every group or organization under its authority or operating on or in conjunction with its campus or school, and to every member, plebe, pledge, or applicant for membership in such group or organization, a copy of this section and sections 17 and 18. An officer of such group or organization and each individual receiving a copy of said sections 17 and 18 shall sign an acknowledgment stating that such group, organization, or individual has received a copy of said sections 17 and 18. Each secondary school and each public or private school or college shall file, at least annually, a report with the regents of higher education and in the case of secondary schools, the board of education, certifying that such institution has complied with the provisions of this section and also certifying that said school has adopted a disciplinary policy with regard to those organizers and participants of hazing. The Board of Regents and, in the case of secondary schools, the Board of Education shall promulgate regulations governing the content and frequency of such reports and shall forthwith report to the attorney general any such institution which fails to make such report. The following Disciplinary Policy shall be applied to any organizer (individual or organization) and/or participants (individual or organization) of the practice of hazing with any affiliation to Massasoit Community College. Any individual or organization associated with Massasoit Community College that there is reason to believe may have been involved as an organizer or participant in the practice of hazing shall be subject to any or all of the following procedures: • A review by the Massasoit Community College Student and/or Faculty Judiciary Council • A review by the Massasoit Community College administrative and/or security staff, as deemed appropriate, subject to established College and statewide grievance procedures • Criminal prosecution by appropriate law enforcement and judicial agencies Should there be any questions concerning the College’s Hazing Policy, please contact the Dean of Students. Internet Policy Access to the Internet has been provided to staff and students for the benefit of the College and students. It allows access to information resources and databases around the world. Everyone using the Internet from the College represents the College while on the Internet. To ensure that the Internet is used in a responsible and productive manner, the following guidelines have been established for using the Internet.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Acceptable Uses of the Internet The College’s website, server, and all other related computer equipment and services may be used only for academic, educational, or professional purposes that are directly related to official College business and in support of the College’s mission. Students may use the Internet to research information or download files to be used in reports or presentations for class work. Students may use available lab systems to access their email or chat rooms on a spaceavailable basis. Students who need to access files or applications on the College network will be given preference for use of the lab computers. The staff may use the Internet in the course of their daily activities to access resources of the Commonwealth or research information to be used in the performance of their duties. Databases may be accessed for information as needed and email used for business contacts. Unacceptable Use of the Internet The Internet shall not be used for personal gain or advancement of individual views. This includes advertising for a personal non-college-related business or sending email to people to convince them of your opinion on a particular topic. In this case, the user should obtain an account from an Internet Service Provider (ISP) at one’s own expense. Pursuant to Massachusetts Campaign Finance Laws, no governmental resources (including computers, fax machines, modems, printers, and/or copy machines) may be used by any person (including a public employee, whether during work hours or otherwise) in order to promote or oppose a political candidate or ballot question or for the purpose of disseminating materials that advocate a particular vote on a ballot question or a political candidate. Further, in addition to a prohibition of any type of political fundraising on state property, a public employee is further prohibited from soliciting or receiving, directly or indirectly, any contribution for any political purpose. The Internet shall not be used to prevent others from being productive or to disrupt the operation of the College networks. This encompasses email spamming, sending harassing or threatening email, or sending messages under an assumed name. Harassment of any kind is prohibited. No member of the community, under any circumstance, may use the College’s computers or networks to libel, slander, or harass any other person. The following shall constitute computer harassment: (1) using the computer to annoy, harass, terrify, intimidate, threaten, offend, or bother another person by conveying obscene language, pictures, or other materials or threats of bodily harm to the recipient or the recipient’s immediate family; (2) using the computer to contact another person repeatedly with the intent to annoy, harass, or bother, whether or not any actual message is communicated, and/or where no purpose of legitimate communication exists, and where the recipient has expressed a desire for the communication to cease; (3) using the computer to contact another person repeatedly regarding a matter for which one does not have a legal right to communicate, once the recipient has provided reasonable notice that he or she desires such communication to cease; (4) using the computer to disrupt or damage the academic research, administrative, or related pursuits of another; and (5) using the computer to invade the privacy, academic or otherwise, of another or to threaten the invasion of privacy of another. Any malicious or illegal activity will not be tolerated. The College retains the right to notify the proper officials of any wrongdoing. A user may not access, download, store, or transmit child pornographic materials or obscene materials. Downloading Software To prevent computer viruses from being transmitted through the College network, users should exercise caution, have the latest virus protection software loaded on their systems, and download files and programs to only one directory. The directory should have a virus check performed before opening or attaching the downloaded material. Scan the file or object and, if a virus is detected, take action to prevent replication of the virus. Repair the contents of the file whenever possible. If you received a virus-infected file, notify the Internet site or user that he or she has a virus. Call Information Services at ext. 1139 if assistance is needed.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Copyright Issues Copyrighted material may not be used without the permission of the creator. This means you cannot send it through email or post it on a website. One copy of copyrighted material may be downloaded for your personal use in academic or professional research. Users are not permitted to copy, transfer, rename, add, or delete information or programs belonging to other users unless given the express permission to do so by the creator. Pursuant to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (Public Law 105-304) 17 U.S.C. 1203 (I)(1)(A), which was enacted into law on October 28, 1998, any user of the College’s computer system network who engages in copyright infringement shall have his or her access privileges terminated. Security Users are solely responsible for all materials viewed, stored, or transmitted by way of the College’s computer system. The College expects, however, that users will comply with all College rules and state and federal laws related to Internet use. Failure to do so may result in the suspension or revocation of a user’s access privileges. Further, users should have no expectation of privacy over email transmissions, and the College reserves the right to access email accounts for routine system maintenance, technical problems, or criminal investigations. Violations Violations of any guidelines listed above may result in disciplinary actions up to and including termination. If necessary, the College will advise appropriate legal officials of any violations. Any user who violates this policy will be subject to disciplinary action. Further, inappropriate use, whether intentional or not, may result in civil and/or criminal liability, and/or a violation of the Electronic Communication Privacy Act of 1986, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, Massachusetts wiretap and/or privacy laws, defamation, copyright and/or trademark infringement laws, and/or sexual harassment or discrimination laws. Specific Laboratory Use Policies The General Use Policies are designed for all faculty, staff, administrators, and students in most working or learning areas. However, specific laboratories, the Library, and work areas will need to develop policies specific to their unique environments. Library Internet Acceptable Use Policy The Massasoit Community College Library aims to develop collections, resources, and services that meet the educational, informational, cultural, and recreational needs of Massasoit’s diverse community. In response to these goals, the advances in technology, and the changing needs of the community, the Massasoit Library provides access to the Internet as a library reference tool. The Internet is a worldwide network of computers that provides access to a wide range of materials for educational, recreational, and reference use. The Massasoit Library does not control the content of the information that resides on the Internet, nor is there an outside central control over its use or content. The Massasoit Library does not use filtering software to block access to information resources and cannot protect its users from information or graphic images that they may find offensive. Internet access for research purposes is provided equally to all library users, regardless of age. Parents or guardians, not the library or its staff, are responsible for the Internet information accessed by their children. Parents—and only parents—may restrict their children—and only their children—from accessing Internet resources. We suggest that parents concerned about the types of materials available on the Internet supervise their children as they

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Catalog 2011–2012 explore Internet sites and help them select resources consistent with their family’s values. Massasoit can only be held accountable for information that appears on the World Wide Web pages produced by the library. These are identifiable by the Massasoit logo that appears on all of Massasoit’s pages. Like other information resources, not all sources on the Internet provide accurate, complete, or current information. Users need to be good information consumers, questioning and evaluating the validity of information that they find. For a complete list of responsibilities of the Library and its Internet users, please see Mission/Policies link/Internet on the Library homepage. Pluralism Policy The Community Colleges have historically been a major contributing element to the emergence of our nation as one of the most technologically and economically advanced societies of the world. The important role that the Community Colleges can play is profoundly dependent upon the extent to which they may draw from the full collective of intellectual resources within each College’s community of scholars, students, and administrators. Any condition or force that impedes the fullest utilization of the human and intellectual resources available represents a force of destructive consequence for the development of our Commonwealth and, ultimately, our nation. Community College students, faculty, staff, and visitors must be free from conduct that has the purpose or effect of interfering with an individual’s academic or professional performance and creating an intimidating, hostile, or demeaning educational or employment environment. Therefore, the Community Colleges establish a policy of unequivocal condemnation of all forms of ethnic, religious, cultural, or racial intolerance within the fifteen College communities. This policy condemns all conditions and all actions or omissions, including all acts of verbal harassment or abuse, which deny or have the effect of denying to an individual his or her rights to equality, dignity, and security in violation of his or her rights guaranteed under the law. The policy reaffirms the doctrine of civility, appreciation for pluralism, and the preeminence of individual human dignity as preconditions to the achievement of an academic community that recognizes and utilizes the resources of all persons while recognizing and reaffirming the tenets of academic freedom. The Community Colleges recognize their obligation to protect the rights of free inquiry and expression, and nothing herein shall be construed or applied so as to abridge the exercise of rights under the Constitution of the United States and other federal and state laws. The Community Colleges will vigorously strive to achieve diversity sufficiently reflective of our society. However, diversity alone will not suffice. There must be a unity and cohesion in the diversity that we seek to achieve, thereby creating an environment of pluralism. The Community Colleges bear a responsibility by edict and an obligation by social morality to promote understanding and acceptance of ethnic, cultural, religious, and racial diversity as we strive to create an atmosphere of dignity for all individuals and groups within our system of public higher education. The President will take reasonable measures to prevent and discourage harassment and will act positively to investigate alleged harassment and to effect a remedy or resolution when an allegation is determined to be valid. Smoking/Tobacco Policy Massasoit Community College is committed to providing a safe and healthy workplace and to promoting the health and well-being of its employees and students. As required by the state of Massachusetts and motivated by our desire to provide a healthy work and learning environment for our employees and students, this policy was implemented during the Fall 2011 semester. The smoking/tobacco policy applies to all Massasoit Community College employees, students, and visitors. The use of tobacco includes all tobacco products, including chewing tobacco. Successful implementation of this policy requires a College-wide cooperative effort. Smoking/tobacco will be allowed in designated parking lots: Lots 2 & 3 in Brockton, and Rear Parking Lot in Canton. Although education and smoking cessation programs are the preferred interventions, violators may be subject to disciplinary actions as identified in the appropriate collective bargaining agreements or personnel policies, as well as the

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Catalog 2011–2012 Massachusetts Community College Student Code of Conduct. Visitors to the campus will be directed to dispose of their cigarettes and tobacco products in the appropriate receptacles provided in designated areas. We believe that the spirit of thoughtfulness and cooperation that is characteristic of the college is adequate to resolve the vast majority of disputes that arise from this policy. Disciplinary measures would be expected to be reserved for repeat infractions and infractions that interfere with the College’s academic or workplace needs or responsibilities. The policy will be communicated to all members of the campus community. The College’s Smoking/Tobacco Policy will be included in formal orientation for all incoming students and employees and posted on the College website. In addition, all supervisors and department heads will communicate the Smoking/Tobacco Policy to everyone within their areas of responsibility. Solicitation Policy Commercial ventures are not permitted to operate or solicit on College property. The posting of advertisements on College property is subject to the College’s Bulletin Board Policy. College offices and committees appointed by the President of the College may conduct fundraising activities, which are directly related to their functional purposes. Materials produced for the promotion of the event must bear the name of the sponsoring office or committee. Web Privacy Policy Because your privacy is very important to us, we want you to understand our privacy procedures. This privacy statement discloses the privacy practices for Massasoit Community College’s website under the following domain and/or sub domains: admin.massasoit.mass.edu faculty.massasoit.mass.edu massasoit.mass.edu massasoit edu Information Collection and Use Massasoit Community College collects information from our users at several different points on our website. If you choose to share personal information with us—by sending us a message or filling out an electronic form with personal information—we will use the information only for the purpose authorized. Massasoit Community College is the sole owner of the information collected on this site and we will not sell, share, or rent this information to others in ways different from what is disclosed in this statement. All information electronically sent is collected under secure means (SSL) to ensure your privacy. Log Files When you visit our Web site, our server automatically recognizes only the Internet domain and Internet Protocol (IP) address from which you accessed our site. We use IP addresses to analyze trends, administer the site, and gather broad demographic information for aggregate use. We do this so that we can improve the content of our site. Since IP addresses are not linked to personally identifiable information, this does not result in the identification of your personal email address or other personal information. Sharing We will not share this aggregated demographic information with third parties. This is not linked to any personal information that can identify any individual person. We may partner with third-party companies to provide specific services to our community such as a credit card processing company to bill users for goods and services. These companies do not retain, share, store, or use personally identifiable information for any secondary purposes. These parties are not allowed to use personally identifiable information except for the purpose of providing these services.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Cookies A cookie is a piece of data stored on the user’s hard drive containing information about the user. Usage of a cookie is in no way linked to any personally identifiable information while on our site. Once the user closes the browser, the cookie simply terminates. For instance, by setting a cookie on our site, the user might not have to log in with a password more than once, thereby saving time while on our site. If a user rejects the cookie, he or she may still use our site. The only drawback is that the user might be limited in some areas of our site. Cookies can also enable us to track and target the interests of our users to enhance the experience on our site. Links This website contains links to other sites. Please be aware that Massasoit Community College is not responsible for the privacy practices of such other sites. We encourage our users to be aware when they leave our site and to read the privacy statements of each and every website that collects personally identifiable information. This privacy statement applies solely to information collected by this website. If you have any questions about our privacy procedures, send an email to webmaster@massasoit.mass.edu.

Phi Theta Kappa Being a member of Phi Theta Kappa not only recognizes your academic achievement at Massasoit Community College, it gives you the opportunity to give back to the community. If you have any questions, or would like some more information about Phi Theta Kappa, do not hesitate to contact one of the chapter advisors or officers. Spring Induction In the Large Theater, Fine Arts Building (inductees meet here at 6:00 p.m.) Charles Mastrangelo, Chapter Advisor, ext. 1934 Claire Krasnow, Chapter Advisor, ext. 1904 Copyright © 2009 by Phi Theta Kappa, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name, logo, and various titles have been registered with the U.S. Patent Office.

Program Advisory Committees Architectural Technology Program Advisory Committee 2010–2011 Russ Forsberg Braintree Building Inspector Ken Cimeno Dedham Building Commissioner Nick Cochis Walsh Cochis Architects Rob Currie Currie Designs Leo McCormack, AIA

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Shelia Gifford DRL Associates, Inc., Massasoit Alumna Doug Richardson Watersone Development B.D. Nyack, AIA Richardo Haynes Massasoit Alumna

Catalog 2011–2012 Al Kearney Al Kearney Architects

Adam Juszczak BKA Architects Business Administration Program Advisory Committee 2011–2012

Robin Carbonara City of Brockton Personnel Department Bryan Curran Boston Hub Real Estate Betsy Walorz Macy’s East

Julie Nichols Massasoit Student Derek Quigley Webster Bank Carole Martyn Vice President/Harbor One

Criminal Justice Program Advisory Committee 2011–2012 Carl Boen Old Colony Correctional Center

Major Arthur McLaughlin Massachusetts State Police Troop E

Chief William Conlon Brockton Police Department

Dr. Carolyn Petrosino Bridgewater State University

James McCarthy State Parole Board

Tom Shamshak Shamshak Investigative Services

Joseph Abber Assistant Chief Probation Officer

Brian Murphy Massasoit Student

Paul Chiano Plymouth County Sheriff’s Department Culinary Arts Program Advisory Committee 2011–2012 Jamie Schell Sysco Marketing Associate

Nick Calais, C.E.C. Director of F & B Operations/Corporate Executive Chef The Colonnade Hotel & Brasserie Jo

Janet Lightizer Chef/Instructor Tri County Voc Tech High School Franklin, MA

Christine Merlo Chef/Instructor Le Cordon Blue Cambridge, MA

Elizabeth Walkowitcz Executive Chef Jason Santos Executive Chef Gargoyles on the Square, Somerville, MA

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Colleen Martinez Pastry Chef Boston, Ma Massasoit Alumna

Catalog 2011–2012 Child Care Education Advisory Committee 2011–2012 Lorne Ranstrom Eastern Nazarene College Quincy, MA

Ann Marie Rush Early Childhood Consultant Weymouth, MA

Patti Plummer Wilson Brockton Day Nursery Brockton, MA

Bernadette Ippolito Family Child Care Provider Hingham, MA

Judith Ward El Fakahany Child Care Ed. Alumni Randolph, MA

Computer Technology and Information Management Program Advisory Committee 2011–2012 Jamison Abbott Cantor Exchange

Sean Muldowney Erickson Retirement

Stephen Buckley Wilmer Hale LPC, Massasoit Alumna

Dexter Robinson PC Doctor

Sheri Camuso Lexalytics, Inc., Massasoit Alumna

Pamela Spillane Podgurski Capone Brothers, Massasoit

Jeongsuk Son Lee Quincy District Court

Erik Sironen Cardinal Cushing Centers

Stephanie Lipinski Hanson Insurance Agency, Inc.

Kim Yohannan EMC

Mike Milos Results Oriented Management

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Catalog 2011–2012 Dental Assistant Program Advisory Committee 2011–2012 Dr. Stephen Straus Allied Health - MDS Norwood, MA

Dr. Patricia Chiu Orthodontist W. Roxbury, MA

Mrs. Dorothy Beveridge, CDA, RN Massasoit Community College Alumni Plymouth, MA

Dr. Gerald Winkler Dentist Stoughton, MA

Amy Jordan Mass Dental Society Southborough, MA

Dr. Gerard Maher Dentist, BOH Marshfield Marshfield, MA

Ms. Dawn Antul CDA MCC Dental Assisting Alumni Private Practice/General Dentistry Berkley, MA

Dr. Kevin Peruzzi Dentist Hingham, MA

Rebecca Horne CDA MCC Dental Assisting Alumni Private Practice / Orthodonitics Attleboro, MA

Mrs. Joan Powell, RDH Auxillary-Tufts Dental School Weymouth, MA

Dr. Steve Strauss Dentist N. Easton, MA

Ms. Diane Duddy, CDA Past President MDAA Wellesley, MA

Ms. Elizabeth Perry Elder Dental Program, Norfolk Adult Day Health Center Norwood, MA

Judith Shannon, CDA, RDH MCC Director of Dental Assisting Facilitator of Advisory Board

Diesel Technology Program Advisory Committee 2010–2011 Dr. Fred Kern Atlantic Applied Research, Inc.

Brian Coleman Cummins Northeast, Inc.

Bob Briscoe Cummins Northeast, Inc.

John Westerbeke Westerbeke Corp.

Bill Leary Southworth Milton Corp.

Paul Weckbacher Waste Management

Anthony Colton Ryder Commercial Leasing

John Carney Paul Revere Transportation

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Catalog 2011–2012 Richard Montgomery Blue Hill Regional Vocational High School

John Scholl Portable Hoisting Engineers Local 4

Michael Quirk Worcester Regional Transit Authority Electronic Technology Program Advisory Committee 2010–2011 Robert Andrews S&S Research

John Ferraro ADAC

Charles A. Calapa Massachusetts Water Resources Authority

Rafael Gutierrez, Jr. ABB, Inc.

John Campbell New Hampshire Technical College

Brian M. Kalfin NorthEast Electrical Distributors

Rick Champigny Braintree Electric Light Department

Bruce A. Metcalf Waters Corporation

Thomas Cihocki Eastern Edison Utilities

David Werkowski Foxboro Company

Joseph M. Silva Foxboro Company

David Winthrop Pacific Scientific

Richard Sitte Phillips Medical Systems

Ken Olsen Westinghouse Electric

Elementary Education Program Advisory Committee 2010–2011 Colleen Reynolds Norwood Public Schools

Dr. Lorne Ranstrom Eastern Nazarene College

Jaclyn Everson Massasoit Alumna

Dr. Judith Riordan (Smith) Superintendent, Retired

Janet Hansbury Brockton Public Schools

Eva Saccoach W. Mitchell Middle School

Susan Pratt Notre Dame High School

Darrin Reynolds Principal

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Catalog 2011–2012 Fire Science Technology Program Advisory Committee 2010–2011 Edward Mack Deputy Chief, Retired

Chief Timothy J. Grenno Whitman Fire Rescue & Emergency Services

Charles Doody Canton Fire Chief

Charles Foley Randolph Fire Department

David Santilli Massasoit Alumna

David Ladd Haz-Mat Response

Lance Benjamino Middleboro Fire Chief

Thomas Leonard Deputy Fire Marshall

Patrick A. Smith Massasoit Alumna

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Catalog 2011–2012 Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning Technology Program Advisory Committee 2010–2011 Kevin Todd EMCOR Services

Joseph Zagrobski HVAC Technology Faculty, Retired

Frank Lamparelli Lamparelli Oil Co.

Robert Persechini, Principal RDK Engineers James Blanchard E M Duggan Inc.

James Coughlin Empire Engineering Co.

Kevin Todd EMCOR Services

James Spearin James Spearing Heating & Air Conditioning

Leo McNeil N.E. Trane

Deborah Archer Self Help/Head Start

Human Services Program Advisory Committee 2011–2012

Michael Bambery Old Colony Y

Gina Millett Highpoint Treatment Center Sharon Washwell Womansplace Crisis Center

Robert Biela Brockton Area Association for Retarded Citizens

Joel West Plymouth County Juvenile Probation Department

Diane Dumont South Shore Industries

Mike Macmillan DDS Training Medical Assistant Advisory Committee 2011–2012

Linda Dente, B.S., C.M.A. (AAMA) Nancy Bauman, B.S., C.M.A., (AAMA) Anne Scalzo-McNeil, Ph.D., Division Dean, Nursing & Allied Health Myrtle Flight, J.D., B.S., M.Ed Paula Sullivan, L.P.N. Susan O’Halloran, C.M.A., (AAMA) Laura Berlinguet, C.M.A., (AAMA)

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Sharon King, R.T., B.S., M. Ed Kate Heitman, R.N. Cecil Hodges, R.N., B.S., N.P. Wilfredo Nieves, R.N., M.S., C.H.E. Julie Fraga, C.M.A., (AAMA) Dagmar Sjoquist, C.M.A., (AAMA) Jennifer O’Brien, C.M.A., (AAMA)

Catalog 2011–2012

Janet Madigan New England Sinai Hospital

Nurse Education Program Advisory Committee 2011–2012

Linda Curtin Caritas Good Samaritan Medical Center

Alice Masiello South Shore Hospital Doris Bertram-Morin Caritas Norwood Hospital

Gail Russell, Graduate Program University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth

Erika Cahill Massasoit Alumna

Peggie Griffin-Bretz (retired) Veterans Administration Medical Center

Antoinette Hays, Ph.D., R.N. Regis College School of Nursing, Science and Health Professions

Marybeth Pepin Southeastern Regional Technical School

Joanne Thomas, MS, RN, NEA-BC Brockton Hospital

Karen Carafoli Jordan Hospital

Mary Ann Corcoran, MS, RNC Curry College

Lorraine Kuplast, RN Brockton Public Schools

Elizabeth Kudzma Curry College

Judith Backoff St. Joseph’s Manor Nursing Home

Theresa Presley, B.S., RN VA Medical Center

Michelle Boulger Massasoit Alumna

Joan Kovach McLean Hospital

Cecilia Byron Massasoit Alumna

Carmen Concepcion, B.S., RN VA Medical Center

Susan Boulanger Brockton Hospital

Radiologic Technology Advisory Committee 2010–2011

Jay DiCarlo St. Anne’s Hospital

Ella Penny Brockton Hospital

Joanne Smith Falmouth Hospital

Lynne Cordery Cape Cod Hospital

Lynne Fillion Falmouth Hospital

Sandra Colby Good Samaritan Medical Center

Nadine Lopes Charlton Hospital

Michelle Grenache Jordan Hospital

Cheryl Economos Charlton Hospital

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Catalog 2011–2012 Gavin Steinman Jordan Hospital

John Gale Norwood Hospital

Christopher Sullivan Jordan Hospital

Margaret Connor Norwood Hospital

Sheila Beausoleil St. Luke’s Hospital Charlton Hospital Tobey Hospital

Maureen Schrock South Shore Hospital Kerri Brennan South Shore Hospital

Debra Desmaris St. Luke’s Hospital Charlton Hospital

Gail Grooremaat Sturdy Memorial Hospital

Michelle Januse Sturdy Memorial Hospital

Richard Tetrault Good Samaritan Medical Center

Marilyn Tremblay St. Luke’s Hospital

Craig MacMillan Member at Large Massasoit Alumna

Janet Santos St. Luke’s Hospital Cynthia Langille Morton Hospital

Scott Burgess Morton Hospital

Respiratory Care Program Advisory Committee 2010–2011

Neila Altobelli Massachusetts General Hospital

Joan Sousa St. Anne’s Hospital

Lisa Doten New England Sinai Hospital

Charles Arenti South Shore Hospital

Jane Gilson Massasoit Alumna

James Axford Tufts New England Medical Center

Matthew Healey Boston Medical Center

Manny Berthil Mediplex Rehabilitation Hospital

Joseph Higgins Quincy Medical Center

Henry Berube Signature Healthcare/Brockton Hospital

Bill Howard and Donna Kelly New England Medical Center

Faye Berzon Massasoit Nurse Education Faculty, Retired

Dr. Robert Kacmarek MA General Hospital

Cheryl Bunick Massasoit Alumna

Donna Kelly Floating Hospital, Boston, MA

Natasha Cardoza Boston Medical Center

Stephen Lauzier Massasoit Alumna

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Catalog 2011–2012 Harneen Chernow 1199 SEIU Training and Upgrading Fund

Laura Lusky Massasoit Alumna

Sharon Chernov South Shore Hospital

John Martin New England Medical Center

Jeanne Cohenna Caritas Good Samaritan Hospital

Manuela Moreira Massasoit Alumna

Michael Corn New England Sinai Hospital

Charles Morse Former Clinical Instructor

Ettore Mortarelli Massasoit Alumna

Eileen Wilkins South Shore Hospital

Michael DaSilva Massasoit Alumna

Pedro Nin-Martinez Radius Specialty Hospital

Tara Deschenes Massasoit Alumna

Richard Nichols Quincy Medical Center

Susan DeStefano St. Luke’s Hospital

Luanne Nowland Brockton Hospital

Kevin Doten New England Sinai Hospital

Charles O’Donnell Boston Medical Center

Regina Paquette Home Health Care

Kathy Petti New England Sinai Hospital

Alison Simmons 1199 SEIU Training and Upgrading Fund

Donna Sullivan New England Sinai Hospital

Valerie Cook Effie Noren Graphics

Eileen Wilkins South Shore Hospital Visual Arts Program Advisory Committee 2010–2011 Graphic Arts Option

Michelle Debatis-Killion Triad Advertising

Effie Noren Effie Noren Graphics Dan O’Brien Albert Basse Associates

Tom Neville Neville Design

Donna Tone-Pah-Hote Massasoit Alumna Fine Arts Option

Betty Bothereau L’Attitude Gallery/Sculpture Garden

Ellyn Moller Milton Art Museum

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Catalog 2011–2012 Noelle Foye Fuller Craft Museum

Amy Montague Audubon Visual Arts Center

Susan Kelley

Helene Zuckerbrod Massachusetts College of Art & Design

Quality Point or Grade Point Average (QPA or GPA) The number of Quality or Grade Points earned is determined by multiplying the grade point value earned by the credits granted for that course. For example, a student receiving a grade of C in a 3-credit course would receive 6 Quality or Grade Points (i.e., grade point value of 2.0 times the 3 credits successfully completed). The semester Quality or Grade Point Average is determined by dividing the total of the Quality or Grade Points earned in the semester by the sum of credits successfully completed. The cumulative Quality or Grade Point Average (QPA/GPA) is the total of all quality points acquired divided by the total of all credits attempted. For example, 26 quality or grade points divided by 13 credits equals a 2.0 QPA or GPA. Three-semester students will follow the program requirements for the semester that they were previously admitted.

Refund Policy Credit Courses Fall and Spring semesters Withdrawal before classes begin: 100% of tuition and fees minus $50. Withdrawal during the first week of class: 100% of tuition and fees minus $50. Withdrawal during the second week of class: 50% of tuition and fees Withdrawal after the second week of class: No refund. Students in courses meeting less than 15 weeks will receive a prorated refund based on the length of the course. (Summer refund policy is prorated due to the shorter length of the courses.) Recipients of Financial Aid funds who withdraw before 60% of the semester has elapsed will have their financial aid award prorated in accordance with the Federal and State Refund Policies. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for further information. Non-Credit Courses Withdrawal before the day of the first class: 100% refund Withdrawal after first class and before second class: Varies from 0%–50% depending on the length of the course.

Registration and Advising Get help in choosing a program that’s right for you. Meet with an advisor to discuss your course selection. You can schedule an appointment with an advisor by contacting the Advisement & Counseling Office at 508-588-9100, ext.1461, during the day and 508-588-9100, ext. 1311, during the weekend.

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Repeating a Course A course in which a student received a C- or below may be repeated without prior approval. A course in which a student received a grade of C or higher may be repeated only with prior approval. Waiver to Repeat a Course forms are available in the Registrar’s Office.

Financial Aid Repeat Course Policy Effective July 1, 2011, the Federal Department of Education revised its policies regarding repeat course eligibility for financial aid. The Financial Aid Repeat Course Policy does not match the College policy, but is based on new federal repeat course regulations. •

A student may receive financial aid to repeat without limit, any failed or withdrawn course until a passing grade is received.

Once a passing grade is received in a course, financial aid can be used one time to repeat that same course. Financial aid cannot be used to repeat this same course an additional time.

A student may not receive financial aid: •

to repeat any course for which they received transfer credit (“T”) unless it is a BIOL course which has expired (taken more than 7 years ago).

to repeat a course in which they have an active “I”(Incomplete). If a student wishes to receive financial aid, they need to make up the work and receive a grade for the course, or wait to receive an “F” before they retake it.

SACHEM Massasoit Community College is a fully participating member of the Southeastern Association for Cooperation in Higher Education in Massachusetts (SACHEM), a consortium of nine institutions of higher education in Southeastern Massachusetts whose purpose is to provide extended educational opportunities through cooperative programs and projects in a variety of educational and cultural endeavors. Of particular interest to students is the opportunity to enroll in selected courses at other SACHEM institutions at no additional cost. To qualify, a student must be enrolled as a degree student, on a full-time basis, in good academic standing. Registration through SACHEM is available only for Fall and Spring semester courses. The benefit is offered on a space-available basis, and students may enroll only in courses not offered at Massasoit. For more information, contact the Registrar’s Office. The schools included in this consortium are: Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater Bristol Community College, Fall River Cape Cod Community College, West Barnstable Dean College, Franklin Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Buzzards Bay Massasoit Community College, Brockton Stonehill College, North Easton University of Massachusetts, North Dartmouth Wheaton College, Norton

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Semester Hour A semester hour is a unit of credit earned for attending and successfully completing a course during a given semester. A class that awards three semester hours represents 150 minutes of instructional time per week for 15 weeks, with the expectation of at least two hours of additional work or the equivalent for each hour in class. Laboratory courses may carry additional credit hours, usually at the rate of 1 credit per two-hour lab. Sixty or more semester hours (but no more than 70) are required for graduation from degree programs, depending on the curriculum in which a student is enrolled. Certificate programs require fewer semester hours.

Senior Center The Senior Center provides opportunities during the Fall and Spring semesters for senior citizens who enjoy exciting and meaningful activities. Activities include: Arthritis Aquatics, History Book Club, Yoga, Humanities Speaker Series, Senior Chorus, and Senior Orchestra. The College also offers a tuition waiver on a seat basis for those 60 years of age and older. Call 508-588-9100, ext.1695 or 1304.

Services for Students with Disabilities The Goal of the Disability Service Providers The goal of the disability service providers at Massasoit Community College is to facilitate equal access to postsecondary education for students with disabilities and promote the standards set forth by the Association on Higher Education and Disabilities. How to Access Services Upon acceptance to the College, students with documented disabilities who require support services and/or accommodations are given the opportunity to identify a disability. As soon as possible, students are encouraged to contact one of the disability service providers and self-identify. It is recommended that students schedule an appointment with the disability provider to discuss the need for specific services and accommodations and bring the appropriate documentation with them to the meeting. How “Disability” Is Defined under the Law A person with a disability is defined as “any person who (1) has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more of such person’s major life activities, or (2) has a record of such an impairment, or (3) is regarded as having such an impairment.” Assistive Technology Available in ARC In the ARC (Academic Resource Center), we have a variety of technology designed to assist you with your studies. Please meet with a disability counselor to learn more available assistive technology. Dragon Naturally Speaking: Voice recognition computer program, which creates Word Documents from speech. You speak, it types. A great resource for students with dysgraphia or spelling and/or typing issues. Kurzweil 3000: Software program that scans documents and reads them. It also can assist writing. Will typically benefit students with reading and/or attention issues. Alpha Smart 3000: Small computerized note-taking device. These devices can be loaned out for the semester to help with classroom note taking.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Test Talker: Test-taking software reads exams aloud. Victor Reader RFBD Compatible CD Player: A CD player for use with RFBD CDs. Can be loaned out for the semester. Victor ReaderSoft: Software that read RFBD CDs. Kurzweil 1000: Scans documents and reads them; also allows writing functions. Designed for students with visual impairments. JAWS: Screen reader software. Designed for students who are blind or have limited vision. Braille Printer: Specialized printer that prints documents in Braille. MAGIC Software: Text enlarging software for computers. Individual Assistive Listening Devices: FM Loops. Device used to amplify sound. My Reader Closed Circuit TV: Magnification system for printed materials. Eligibility for Services Massasoit Community College is committed to achieving equal educational opportunity and full participation in all college programs and activities for persons with disabilities. As outlined by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, “No otherwise qualified person with a Disability in the United States shall, solely by reason of disability, be denied the benefits of, be excluded from participation in, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal assistance.” A “qualified person with a disability” is defined as one who meets the requisite academic and technical standards required for admission or participation in the postsecondary institution’s programs and activities. Section 504 protects the civil rights of individuals who are qualified to participate and who have disabilities such as, but not limited to, the following:

· blindness or visual impairments · cerebral palsy · deafness or hearing impairments · drug or alcohol addiction · epilepsy or seizure disorders · orthopedic impairment · specific learning disability · speech disorder · spinal cord or traumatic brain injury · chronic illnesses, such as AIDS, arthritis, cancer, cardiac diseases, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, psychiatric disabilities

Documentation of a Disability After receiving a letter of acceptance from the College, students who are requesting accommodations must provide current documentation of the disability to the disability service provider. Documentation furnished by the students “through medical, psychological, educational, and professional reports is considered confidential.” Specific guidelines regarding documentation are provided to students by the disability service provider.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Available Services Massasoit offers a range of support services to students with disabilities as defined by section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, which include: · academic, personal, transfer, and career advising · modified testing accommodations · individual or small-group tutoring · access to textbooks on tape · specialized support service programs · access to adaptive technology · referral to support service agencies and groups · prearranged interpreter services · accessible parking Procedures for Using Interpreters or CART Services Requests for interpreter or CART services must be made to Disability Services at least four weeks prior to the start of the semester. The College hires only appropriately credentialed and qualified interpreters. Students are expected and urged to become consumers of the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission. Due to the logistical demands of scheduling of interpreters or arranging for CART services, a student’s course schedule should be finalized as soon as possible. We strongly recommend meeting with a disability counselor to facilitate the student’s schedule. Massasoit Community College encourages students with disabilities to self-advocate in order to ensure academic success. Students seeking information or assistance relevant to disabilities and services may contact: Andrea Henry, Disability Counselor for Learning Disability Services Student Center Building, Room SC 104 Brockton Campus 508-588-9100, ext. 1805 Mary Berg, Physical Disabilities Counselor - Brockton Campus Disability Counselor - Canton Campus Brockton - SC101 A, ext. 1425 Canton - C129, ext. 2132

Special Studies The intent of special studies is to provide: (1) an alternative method for completing catalog courses (Directed Study); and (2) an opportunity to explore subject matter not presently offered (Independent Study). Students wishing to take special studies must fill out the appropriate form with a faculty member who is willing to guide their studies. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: Approval of the Department and Academic Dean.

Student Clubs and Organizations / Brockton Campus ANIME CLUB: A group that wants to make a friendly environment where like-minded people can come and learn about the world of anime and manga. The club would also like to introduce the culture from which anime and manga derive. It will occasionally show movies, bring in different foods, and have guest speakers who know the language and culture of Japan. At times the members will dress up in clothing styles including j-rock and visual kai. Advisor: Scott Ketcham, ext. 2906 BEYOND RECOVERY: Recovery from various forms of addiction is possible for everyone. All members of the Massasoit community are welcome to this safe and supportive group to share experiences and promote a lifestyle free of addiction. Advisor: Ryan Daily, ext. 1469

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Catalog 2011–2012 CREATIVE WRITING: A space for students to develop, share, and discuss their poetry, short fiction, memoirs, and more. Students bring their writing into a public forum and read and critique one another’s work honestly and fairly. The club also works to promote writing on campus, planning spoken word open mics and student writing publications. Advisor: Johanna Pittman, ext. 1975 CULINARY/HOSPITALITY CLUB: This club is made up of Culinary Arts majors, Hospitality Management majors, and students from the general population interested in food, hospitality, and interrelated topics. This includes developmental food presentations, food and bake sales, food and hospitality related tours and field trips, and community services. Advisors: Paul Weeden, ext. 1697 Donna Wright, ext. 1692 DRAMATIKOS: The student-run community Massasoit Theatre Co., which produces one or two shows a year including musicals, comedies, dramas, and children’s theatre. Performances take place at the Buckley Performing Arts Center. Students become involved in all areas of theater production, including acting, singing, dancing, stage management, sets, lights, sound, costuming, make-up, public relations, and advertising. Advisor: Ellen Kelly, ext. 1052 GAY-STRAIGHT ALLIANCE: This organization is dedicated to increasing awareness, tolerance, and acceptance of people of different sexual orientation. The purpose of the club is to help make Massasoit a place that is accepting of all people. Meetings are open to all gays, lesbians and bisexuals, and their family and friends. Advisor: To be determined HEARTS FOR HAITI: A social club whose purpose is to promote cultural awareness of the Haitian community, provide an opportunity for Haitian students and others to come together and form bonds of friendship and mutual understanding, and create a place where students can learn about Haitian cultures and mainstream American culture. This club is open to all students. Although it is not a service organization, Hearts for Haiti will be an active participant in programs that benefit the wider community. Advisor: Roland Blanchette, ext. 1706 HELPING HANDS: An organization dedicated to increasing the understanding and awareness of disability issues, through sponsoring activities and events in the College as well as the greater Massasoit community. It offers peer support where answers can be found and ideas can be explored. Open to all students, staff, faculty, and administrators. Advisor: Rebecca Gullak, ext. 1775 HONORS PROGRAM ASSOCIATION: This is an honorary club that promotes and furthers the mission of the honors program and provides services and support to its students. The Association shall provide its input to the Honors Program Council. Advisor: Kathleen Pahl, ext. 1850 INTERNATIONAL TOUCH CLUB: Open to all students. The purpose of the club is to represent and further the interests of the diverse student body, promoting multicultural understanding, encouraging selfdevelopment, and pursuing global responsibility and the cooperation of the entire college community. Advisor: Ida Cerezo-O’Donnell, ext. 1465 MARY E. BAKER UNITY CLUB: This organization was formed for the purpose of providing services to Massasoit Community College’s minority students. In celebration of diversity, ALL students, including those attending day programs, night programs, and Canton campus programs, are welcome to join this group. Advisor: Alvin Riley, ext. 1081 MEDIA CLUB: Students interested in radio production can become DJs, newscasters, announcers, and radio writers. Students involved in the television side of the Media Club can expect to get immediate quality hands-on training in television production. Such training includes audio engineering, non-linear editing, in-studio and field camera work, pre-production coordinating, technical directing, directing, producing, graphics, computer animation, audio editing, and a “boatload” of know-how. Along with providing fundraisers and field trips to other production

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Catalog 2011–2012 facilities, the media club provides a stepping-stone to those who are considering a career in any aspect of media communications. Advisors: Bob Bowers, ext. 1906 Virginia Hunter, ext. 1983 NEWSPAPER/STUDENT VOICE: To provide a means of informing students, faculty, and staff of news items of interest about Massasoit Community College and the surrounding community. Advisors: Bruce McCabe, ext. 3001 Eric Norment, ext. 1819 NURSES CLUB: Open to all nursing majors. The purpose is to encourage peer support, plan class projects, and act as liaison between students and faculty. Advisors: Two members of the nursing faculty are chosen each year to be advisors for first-year and second-year nursing students. PHI THETA KAPPA: Officially known as the International Honor Society of the two-year college. Students must have at least a 3.50 cumulative average and have completed at least 12 credits in a degree program. Advisors: Charles Mastrangelo, ext. 1918 Claire Krasnow, ext. 1904 RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY: Designed for students enrolled in the Radiologic Technology Program. Advisors: First-Year Students: Cheryl Burke, ext. 1764 Second-Year Students: Nancy Sutcliffe, ext. 1784 RESPIRATORY CARE CLUB: For those students already enrolled in the Respiratory Therapy program. Advisors: First-Year Students: Martha DeSilva, ext. 1787 Second-Year Students: Kathleen Wood, ext. 1765 SENIOR CENTER AT MASSASOIT: Provides opportunities for ageless learning among senior citizens looking to fulfill ambitions in the academic world. Social contacts and referral to town, city, state, and federal agencies provided. The Senior Center is located in the lower level of the Student Center on the Brockton Campus. Director: Joyce Zymaris, ext. 1304 Coordinator: Jennifer Murray, ext. 1064 STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION: The campus governance body that oversees the student activities program. Each student is a member and may vote and hold office in the association. Students interested in holding a position as a Student Senator may run for election each fall. The offices of the Student Senate are President, Vice President (one for each campus), Secretary (one for each campus), and a Treasurer. Advisor: Kathleen Reid, ext. 1480 VIDEO GAME CLUB: This club is open to all students who enjoy competing in video games. Students are encouraged to bring their own games, controls, and at times their own systems. Advisor: Janet Brown-Sederberg, ext. 1630 WARRIORS CHEERLEADING/STEP TEAM: Choreographs cheers, dance, and step routines to perform at Massasoit Community College athletic games and special events on campus. The team uplifts school spirit by generating encouragement, team sportsmanship, and overall enthusiasm. The team also promotes an awareness of the essential link between health and athletic development. Advisor: Elisabeth Dorsey, ext. 1183 WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER: Located on the lower level of the Student Center, Brockton, the Center sponsors a wide variety of activities that are of special interest to women. It offers students the opportunity to increase their knowledge, interest and appreciation of the needs, contributions, aspirations, and problems of women. Services are available from September to June, three days a week. Director: Joyce Zymaris, ext. 1304 Coordinator: Donna LeClair, ext. 1484

Student Clubs and Organizations / Canton Campus AlAS CLUB: American Institute of Architecture Students, Massasoit chapter, promotes excellence in architectural education, training, and practice and fosters an appreciation of architecture and related disciplines. Membership is open to all students currently enrolled in the College with an interest in Architecture or Engineering. Advisor: Irving Weiner, ext. 2626

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Catalog 2011–2012 ARTISTS’ UNION: Open to all students currently enrolled in the College who share an interest in Art and Design. Activities include field trips, visiting artist lectures and demonstrations, and informal social meetings. Advisor: Liangshu Han, ext. 2680 ASHRAE: This club promotes membership in the Massasoit Student Chapter of the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers and is a liaison to the Boston and national chapters of ASHRAE. The club serves as a vehicle by which students may network with professionals in the heating and air conditioning industry. All HVAC students are encouraged to join the club, but any student with an interest in the heating and air conditioning industry is welcome to join us. Advisor: John Fitzgerald, ext. 2161 BEYOND RECOVERY: Recovery from various forms of addiction is possible for everyone. All members of the Massasoit community are welcome to this safe and supportive group to share experiences and promote a lifestyle free of addiction. Advisor: Ryan Daily, ext. 1469 DENTAL ASSISTANT CLUB: Participation in this club is limited to those currently enrolled in the Dental Assisting Program. The purpose is to promote and sponsor activities and events that encourage a career in this field. Membership will encourage liaisons to professional associations, attendance at dental meetings, and the Yankee Dental congress, field trips, and community service projects for dental health education. Advisor: Judy Shannon, ext. 2754 ELECTRO CLUB: The purpose of this club is to promote interest in Electro-Mechanical Technology and Electronics Technology programs. Field trips to related industries and guest speakers are planned to expand an understanding of the job opportunities in these fields. Advisor: Paul O’Hara, ext. 2145 PHI THETA KAPPA: Officially known as the honor society for community and junior colleges. Students must have at least a 3.50 cumulative average and have completed a minimum 12 credits in a degree program at Massasoit. Advisors: Charles Mastrangelo, ext. 1918 Claire Krasnow, ext. 1904 STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION: The campus governance body that oversees the student activities program. Each student is a member and may vote and hold office in the association. Students interested in holding a position as a Student Senator may run for election each fall. The offices of the Student Senate are President, Vice President (one for each campus), Secretary (one for each campus), and a Treasurer. Advisor: Deb Connolly, ext. 2118

Student Internships Qualified students in selected areas may, with approval, receive college credit for experiential learning situations in a chosen subject or career area. The student internship experience allows the student to apply the theoretical skills learned in the classroom to actual on-site job situations. Internship opportunities currently exist in Child Care Education, Computer Information Systems, Human Services, Dental Assistant, Medical Assistant, Phlebotomy, Liberal Arts Transfer General, and Art and Graphic Design. Students wishing to participate in internship study may obtain information from the chairperson of their major department.

Student Life Office The mission of Student Life is to create an inclusive campus environment by assisting our students in discovering and utilizing their talents while acknowledging and respecting the talents of others. By offering comprehensive programming, college-sponsored organizations, and service opportunities, Student Life promotes a global community and the intellectual, social, and emotional growth of our diverse student body. Student Life understands the necessity of individual expression in successfully representing the Massasoit community. Students are encouraged to plan, organize, and implement programs that promote intellectual, social, and emotional growth for the benefit of the entire College community. Contributions from all individuals are welcome and never

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Catalog 2011–2012 underestimated. The Student Life Office understands the necessity of individual expression in successfully meeting the needs of Massasoit’s diverse student population. About Student Life Student Life offers many events and activities throughout the school year. Some are fun, some are educational and some are both! Check them out; we’re sure you will find something you like. Most of the events are held during the activity hour, which is on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from noon to 1:00 p.m. Most of the events are free of charge to students with a valid Massasoit ID. Events in the past have included mentalist Robert Channing; Veterans Day activities; poetry readings featuring local poets; a version of the game shows Jeopardy and Let’s Make a Deal; field trips to Canobie Lake Park, Whale Watching, and Eastern Expo; Spring cook-outs, Winter Wonderland with ice sculpting and hot cocoa; and guest lecturers. Please feel free to stop by the Student Life Office. In Brockton, Student Life is located inside the cafeteria in the Student Center. In Canton, Student Life is located in Room 138. Keep an eye on the digital TVs on the campuses and the Campus Events bulletin boards around campus for updated events and activities. We look forward to seeing you! Presidential Student Ambassador (PSA) Program Students chosen through an application process act as ambassadors for the College. PSAs assist with orientation, conduct campus tours, serve as hosts to campus VIPs, represent Massasoit in the community, and assist at special events at the College, when applicable. PSAs are also responsible for reaching out to prospective students through phone calls, meeting and greeting students as they enter the College, and maintaining contact with these students throughout their first semester. Students interested in serving as PSAs must demonstrate a record of academic achievement and leadership at Massasoit Community College by maintaining a minimum GPA of 2.5 and by being involved in leadership roles through college or community service. PSAs must be available during the summer and fall for orientations and campus tours. Students will be trained and compensated for their time.

Student Support Services The College provides a wide range of support services to students so that they may develop their academic, emotional, and social skills. We encourage all students to take advantage of the many programs and resources the College has to offer. Departments This administrative division offers a wide range of programs and services designed to promote student success from the onset of interest in higher education to the fulfillment of one’s academic goals. Admissions Multicultural Advisement & Counseling Public Relations Career Placement Registrar Choices Special Needs Offices Enrollment Management Student Assessment Financial Aid Student Life Health Services Dean of Students Marketing These offices are dedicated to helping students develop their potential through the effective use of the College’s resources. We encourage each student to take full advantage of our many services.

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Student Status - Freshmen are students who have completed fewer than 30 credits. Sophomores are students who have completed 30 or more credits. - Full-time students are those registered for at least 12 credits per semester. - Part-time students are those who register for less than 12 credits per semester. - Matriculating students are those who have been formally accepted in a program. - Non-degree students are those who are not in any academic program.

Study Abroad There may be opportunities for study abroad. Please contact the Division of Faculty and Instruction for current information.

Technology Office of Information Technology The Office of Information Technology (OIT) provides support for technologies to enhance learning and increase the efficiency of academic and administrative processes. In partnership with academic and administrative departments, OIT is a key contributor to the success of the College’s mission. We strive to promote partnerships and collaboration to achieve excellence in the use of information technology and we strive for responsiveness, reliability, and excellence in customer service. OIT assists the College community in the use of technology through service delivery and support; training opportunities for faculty and staff; maintenance of desktop, laptop, network, and server technology; and provision of Web services. We maintain academic computer labs, support desktop and laptop technology for faculty and staff, help ensure that the College’s technology infrastructure meets user needs, and support the delivery and receipt of distance learning. Scheduled Maintenance Scheduled maintenance occurs on Friday mornings between 7:00 a.m and 9:00 a.m. Any disruption in service affecting classes will be posted in advance. General OIT Policy and Procedures Hardware and Software Support Support is provided from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Monday, 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Tuesday through Friday, and 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday during the regular academic semester. All problem reports and requests for computing service assistance must be made through the Help Desk. Users should leave a detailed message with their name, room number, extension, and an explanation via email, by calling the Help Desk at ext. 1139, or by visiting in person Room T544 of the Technology Building. When a Help Desk request is received: • Each request is assigned a ticket number. You will receive email verification that the call has been recorded. • Requests are prioritized, with the highest priority assigned to network or system-down conditions and active classroom lab problems. Full details can be found in the Service Level Agreement. • The appropriate OIT staff person will respond to the problem. • If the user is not present, an email to the user will indicate what work was or was not performed.

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• When a request is closed, the user will receive confirmation via email.

Standard Support Policy All new hardware and software purchasing must be planned and coordinated with OIT. Faculty and staff should anticipate needs and request equipment from their department heads and division deans. Color cartridges are not supplied by OIT for printers even if purchased with College funds. Personal or home equipment is not supported even if the owner is a full-time employee of the College. Laptops purchased by the College for home or out-of- office use are an exception. Technical staff supports approved desktops, laptops, and licensed software. Specifics can be found in the Service Level Agreement. Support for other college services and equipment is provided as follows: • Audio visual equipment, including data projectors. This is handled by the Media department and requests should be routed through the Media Request lines in Brockton and Canton. • Installation of data lines for Internet connectivity or other network services. OIT coordinates the installation work which is done by College electricians. • Telephone services. For all problems and requests related to your telephone services, contact the operator.

Upgrades or updates

• Users must be present when a technician performs this work. A time when the user and the technician are available will be scheduled through the Help Desk. This is to ensure that the system or software is properly tested by the user and that the system is fully functioning at the completion of the work. • If the user is not available at the scheduled time, he or she will be asked to reschedule another time through the Help Desk. Users should notify the Help Desk as soon as possible if they are not able to keep this scheduled appointment.

Internet Use and Virus and Pop-up Protection If a machine is infested with Internet pop-ups or viruses that render the equipment unusable, OIT staff will take the following steps:

• On the first visit to correct the problem, a technician will verify that appropriate user privileges are set and install software to detect and remove data mining, aggressive advertising, browser hijackers, and other troublesome software.

• If the problem recurs with the same system, a technician will the take necessary action to make it impossible to accidentally disable a machine with a download or unsupervised installation of software.

Network accounts Accounts on the campus network are provided for all current faculty and staff. Student accounts are provided for all current students. Each student account has storage space set to 75 MB. Students should be aware that it is their responsibility to back up their files onto floppies or zip disks and maintain the space allotted. Email Accounts Massasoit email accounts are provided for all faculty, staff, and students. Adjunct faculty should request an email account through the dean and access email with the Outlook browser interface. Full-time staff and faculty members

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Catalog 2011–2012 will have one profile for email. If they need to access their email from a second machine, this will be done via the Internet. Student email is provided through the MyMassasoit web portal within Google Apps. Public Folders Public Folders are created by OIT for faculty or staff documents to be shared. Users must specify the folder name, any subfolders that will be needed, and who will need authoring access to the folder by contacting the Help Desk via email or by calling ext 1139. The email administrator will retain ownership of all Public Folders. Folders will be reviewed periodically by the administrator for currency, and those that are not maintained may be removed after notification of the folder author(s).

Testing & Assessment This department is in charge of the scheduling and the administration of various tests to serve the needs of our students, internal departments, and the community as a whole. Tests are scheduled periodically during the year and appointments are required. To schedule an appointment call 508-588-9100 and key in the appropriate extension: GED Exam - ext. 1994 GED Review Classes - ext. 1509 Placement Testing - ext. 1991 or 1992 Nursing Exams – Go on line to atitesting.com to schedule a Nursing Test. It is called TEAS. Biological Principles Challenge Exam - ext. 1990 ESL Testing - ext. 1811 GED Test Information GED (General Educational Development) is a test of high school equivalency. Even though you have not finished high school, you have probably gained knowledge and skills through experience, reading, and informal training. The GED Tests are designed to measure the important knowledge and skills, usually learned during four years of high school, that you may have obtained in a different manner. People who meet the standards established by both the American Council on Education / GED Testing Service and the Massachusetts Board of Education will receive a Massachusetts High School Equivalency Diploma. You can contact the GED Office between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, at 508-588-9100, ext. 1994. For GED Review Classes call 508-588-9100, ext. 1509. Placement Testing The Massachusetts Board of Higher Education wants all of us to be proud of the quality and rigor of the college-level programs and courses offered by the public colleges and universities in Massachusetts. The Board is also eager for students to succeed in their college-level work. Thus, the Board requires all students attending public colleges in Massachusetts to take a series of placement tests that assess skills in writing, reading, and mathematics. The tests are not evaluated in terms of passing or failing. Rather, the tests are used to decide which courses should be taken at the beginning of a student’s college career. Some students proceed directly into college-level courses, and some students will need to take skills-building courses in one or more areas to prepare for college-level work. Skills-building courses such as Introductory Writing, Preparing for College Reading I and II, Fundamentals of Mathematics, and Introductory Algebra are designed to help students succeed in their college courses. Although the credits earned by these courses do not count toward graduation, up to thirty (30) credits may be used when determining financial aid eligibility.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Assessments ACCUPLACER is an assessment developed to help students entering a Community College achieve their educational goals. ACCUPLACER will help you identify your academic strengths and needs so that you can plan an appropriate schedule of course work at Massasoit Community College. ACCUPLACER will give you information about your skills in reading and mathematics and will tell you at what level you need to begin your college studies. ACCUPLACER is administered on a personal computer. You will read the instructions and questions on the computer monitor and select your answers using the keyboard or mouse. After completing ACCUPLACER and receiving your scores, you will meet with an academic advisor to discuss your results and plan your schedule of courses. Types of questions on the Assessments Essay Writing You will be asked to write an essay of about 300 words. You will be given a choice of topics, and you will probably know something about at least one of them. You will have 50 minutes in which to write your essay. The evaluators of your writing sample will hope to see an essay that responds to the question that is asked, that sticks to its main idea, and that uses clear and logical examples to back up the idea. They will expect an essay with a sense of beginning, middle, and end, and they will hope to see that the essay is substantially correct in its grammar and usage. (They will not expect perfection because they understand that you have time only to write a first draft.) If your writing sample indicates that essay writing is still a substantial challenge for you, you will be placed into Introductory Writing. If you are ready to succeed in college-level writing, you will be placed in English Composition I. Reading Comprehension This test is designed to measure how well you understand what you read. It contains 20 questions. Some are of the sentence-relationship type in which you must choose how sentences are related. Other questions refer to reading passages of varying lengths. Arithmetic The arithmetic test measures your skills in three primary categories. The first is operations with whole numbers and fractions. This includes addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and recognizing equivalent fractions and mixed numbers. The second category involves operations with decimals and percents. It includes addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division as well as percent problems, decimal recognition, fraction, and percent equivalencies, and estimation problems. The last category tests applications and problem solving. Questions include rate, percent, and measurement problems; geometry problems; and distribution of quantity into its fractional parts. A total of 16 questions will be asked. Elementary Algebra There are three categories in the Elementary Algebra Test. The first category, operations with integers and rational numbers, includes computation with integers and negative rationals, the use of absolute values, and ordering. The second category is operations with algebraic expressions. It tests your skills in evaluating simple formulas and expressions and in adding and subtracting monomials and polynomials. Both of these categories include questions about multiplying and dividing monomials and polynomials, evaluating positive rational roots and exponents, simplifying algebraic fractions, and factoring. The third category tests skill in solving equations, inequalities, and word problems. These questions include solving systems of linear equations, quadratic equations by factoring, verbal problems presented in algebraic context, geometric reasoning, the translation of written phrases into algebraic expressions, and graphing. Twelve questions are presented.

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Catalog 2011–2012 Nursing Exams All applicants to the RN Nursing Program at Massasoit Community College are required to take a pre-entrance examination in order to be considered for selection into our program. Nurse Pre-Admissions Test All applicants to the Nurse Education program at Massasoit Community College must take the TEAS test through ATI testing. To schedule a test, students need to go online to atitesting.com and click TEAS and then click on the state and city. Payment of $30 is required by credit card or cash card. Massasoit only administers the Reading Comprehension portion of the exam. Students will have 58 minutes to answer 51 questions. This test measures basic essential skills in Reading Comprehension. Biological Principles Challenge Exam This test measures a student’s knowledge of Biological Principles, which is a prerequisite for most other 4-credit biology courses at the College. This instrument covers the basic foundations of biology. Some of the topics include scientific method, evolution, cellular and sub-cellular structure, basic cell chemistry, transport across cell membranes, mitosis, meiosis, metabolism, photosynthesis, DNA structure and replication, and protein synthesis and patterns of inheritance. Students who are considering taking this test should have taken a college-level biology course. The test involves 100 multiple-choice questions, and a student must answer three out of five essay questions. A student needs to answer 60% of the questions to pass. Fifty points are given for the essay and 50 points are given for the multiple-choice section. The textbook used for this course is Biology, 10th edition, by Campbell and Reece. This book is on reserve at the Massasoit Library. ESL/ESOL Testing Students whose first language is not English are assessed for English proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The assessment test takes approximately 30 to 45 minutes and is administered by an ESL faculty member. Potential ESL students are assessed for ESL proficiency instead of for placement into Introduction to Writing, English Composition, or Preparing for College Reading. Students not ready for Massasoit’s college ESL classes are directed to alternative community service programs for further development of their English skills. Massasoit’s college-credit ESL classes award graduation credit for General, Liberal Arts, or Humanities Electives in all programs at the College. To schedule an ESL Assessment test, please call extension 1790. The ESL assessment test is administered by appointment only on both the Brockton and Canton campuses.

Transcripts Transcripts are a cumulative record of a student’s grades at Massasoit. Students may need a copy of the transcript for an employer, for admission to a transferring institution, or for their personal records. Transcripts may be requested in numerous ways. Students can stop in at the Registrar’s Office (Administration Building, A240 for Brockton, 1st Floor for Canton) during business hours and fill out a Transcript Request form. They can also download the form, print it, and fill it out (making sure to print legibly and sign it), then bring it to the office, fax it, scan it to the Registrar email, or mail it. There is generally a one-week waiting period for transcripts. Transcripts for students not currently enrolled are $5 per transcript, paid by cash, check, or money order, made payable to Massasoit Community College, or credit card (Visa, MasterCard or Discover). Mail request to Registrar’s Office, Massasoit Community College, One Massasoit Blvd., Brockton, MA 02302-3996 Fax: 508-427-1246. Scan and email form to: registrar@massasoit.mass.edu.

Transfer Credit As outlined below, students may receive transfer credit at Massasoit for courses completed at other colleges, for

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Catalog 2011–2012 examinations, or for prior learning. Courses Completed Elsewhere Courses from an accredited college or university will be eligible for transfer to Massasoit Community College. The College most often accepts courses in transfer whose content is similar to a Massasoit course. A maximum of 10 courses or 30 credits (whichever is greater) may be applied in transfer to an associate’s degree, and a maximum of half the credits required for a certificate program may be applied in transfer. The student must provide a sealed, official transcript and/or certificate for evaluation by the Registrar before transfer credit can be awarded. Transcripts in any language other than English must be accompanied by supporting official translation into English. Additional information may be required of the student. Massasoit requires the following criteria for transfer credit: 1.

Courses graded above C- (Courses graded as pass/fail will require documentation of actual grade earned; audited courses will not be accepted in transfer.)

Courses designated as 3 or more semester hours.

2.

3.

College-level courses (developmental courses will not be accepted in transfer, but may be considered for placement purposes).

4.

Advanced Placement Exam scores must be 3 or higher to receive credit. (Advanced Placement high school credit will not be accepted in transfer.)

Once transfer credits are awarded, the student will receive a transfer credit evaluation of which courses were accepted in transfer and their Massasoit equivalents. Transfer credits are identified with a grade of T and are not calculated into the GPA. ACT PEP Test ACT PEP Tests for Microbiology and Anatomy & Physiology will be accepted provided that the student receives a grade of 45 or higher and demonstrates adequate laboratory experience as determined by the department on a case-by-case basis. Advanced Placement Test The College Board’s Advanced Placement Test will be accepted for credit for courses in departments that approve the test. The department will also specify for which course credit will be given and which score on the test is necessary to receive credit. Challenge Examinations The purpose of Challenge Examinations is to present the student with an opportunity to receive credit for knowledge in courses not evaluated by CLEP. This primarily means courses in career programs. Any student wishing to take Challenge Examinations should see the appropriate department chairperson. CLEP CLEP (College Level Examination Program) is a series of examinations designed to measure knowledge acquired through non-traditional methods of study. If students have any questions about CLEP credit, they should contact the Registrar or a Counselor. CLEP examinations are currently accepted in the following areas: General Examinations Computer Information Systems Humanities English Composition (Eng. Comp. I credit only, Dept. essay required) Mathematics Engineering Drafting

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Catalog 2011–2012 Natural Sciences Engineering Graphics Social Sciences—History English Literature Subject Examinations General Chemistry American Government General Psychology American History Geology Analysis and Interpretation of Literature Human Growth & Development Architectural Drafting Introduction to Business Management Biology Introduction to Macroeconomics Calculus with Analytic Geometry Introductory to Business Law College Algebra Introductory to Marketing College Algebra with Trigonometry Introductory Microeconomics American Literature Introductory Micro & Macroeconomics College French Introductory Sociology College Spanish Statistics Computer-Aided Design Western Civilization Credit for Prior Learning Credit for Prior Learning is a procedure through which students may, with the approval of the College, receive academic credit for certain life and work experiences. This procedure calls for the interested student to petition the Office for Prior Learning in the Division of Faculty and Instruction. College credit will be awarded to qualified students through a process of assessment and documentation arranged through consultation between the CPL Office and appropriate faculty. Students must pay for the assessment and any credit awarded. Students will not be permitted to apply for Part II of any skill-oriented, sequential course until credit has been granted for Part I, such as typing, word processing, or shorthand. Call 508-588-9100, ext. 1901. The Board of Higher Education has guidelines for Criminal Justice programs stating that Criminal Justice students are not eligible for Credit for Prior Learning. The Registrar’s Office reserves the right to adjust its transfer credit policy at any time.

Transfer Information Massasoit’s transfer programs: Business Administration Transfer, Child Care Education & Administration Transfer, Criminal Justice Transfer, Human Services Transfer, Liberal Arts Studies—Elementary Education, Liberal Arts Transfer, Liberal Arts Transfer—Computer Science, and Liberal Arts Transfer—Science allow you to complete the first two years of your four-year degree (for more information, see MassTransfer), p. 43. Students should be aware that courses are accepted for transfer by other colleges according to their own policies. Any questions concerning course transferability should be directed to the College the student wishes to attend.

Tuition Advantage Program Massasoit Community College graduates who qualify for the Tuition Advantage Program (TAP) receive a 33% tuition waiver to attend a state college or university provided the student has: 1. Graduated from a MassTransfer-eligible program 2. Earned a final cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher 3. Transferred into an approved and similar program or college at the four-year school 4. Majored in a program that is offered during the day

Tuition Remission (Commonwealth Employees) Any employee of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts who qualifies for tuition remission should consult the Board of Higher Education guidelines for proper enrollment procedures. These guidelines are available at your respective

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Catalog 2011–2012 places of employment and must be adhered to in order to receive the full benefits of this policy. All waivers must be presented at the time of registration.

Veterans Information Massasoit Community College is approved for the training of veterans and their dependents. The College maintains an Office of Veterans Affairs located in the Financial Aid Office. Veterans are assisted in obtaining educational benefits, work study positions, tutorial help, and other services. Veterans or dependents eligible for assistance under the Veterans Administration programs should contact the Office of Veterans Affairs after they are matriculated (enrolled) into a degree program at Massasoit and are ready to register for their classes. Veterans are allowed two semesters of non-degree (non-matriculated) status. Disabled veterans should note that the college campus is designed so that the physically disabled have access to facilities. To find out if you qualify for any Federal Veterans Benefits, call the Veterans Administration, 1-800-827-1000. Veterans applying for benefits for the first time must fill out an Application for Education Benefits (Form 22-1990) and provide a copy of their DD-214. Veterans who will be using the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill must also provide a certificate of eligibility (COE) and a degree evaluation to show that they will take only courses required for their degree or certificate program. Veterans who qualify for the Montgomery G.I. Bill, either Chapter 1606 (active) or Chapter 30 (discharged), must fill out a Veterans Information Sheet obtained in the Financial Aid Office. Dependents and survivors applying for benefits for the first time must fill out an Application for Survivor’s and Dependent’s Educational Assistance (Form22-5490). In addition to the above documentation, students using any veteran benefit must submit • • •

a Veteran Information Form (available in the Financial Aid Office)every semester along with a copy of their schedule, and a signed degree evaluation showing that all courses they are registered for count toward graduation (submit just once unless degree program is changed)

Veterans cannot be certified for courses that do not count toward their degree program as the VA only pays for required courses. If the student changes degree programs they must complete a Change of Program with the VA Clerk. If a student is not making academic progress according to College policy, they are not eligible for VA benefits until they are back in good standing. Note: The VA will pay for a course to be taken a second time only if a failure or withdrawal is received as a grade. Veterans eligible for Educational Assistance Benefits under the G.I. Bill will be certified for courses taken during each semester to the following schedule: 6 - 8 credits 9 - 11 credits 12 or more credits

1/2 Time 3/4 Time Full Time

For Post 9/11 benefits, “More than half-time” is 7 credits or more.

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State Veterans Tuition Waiver Program In addition to their G.I. Bill benefits, some veterans may also qualify for the State Veterans Tuition Waiver Program. Anyone who is deemed a state eligible veteran and meets certain criteria can receive this waiver. This could include a state qualified veteran whose G.I. Bill benefits may have expired. This program does not include Reservists and National Guard. For a copy of the State Veterans Waiver Program Guidelines, call the Office of Veterans Affairs at (508) 588-9100, ext. 1477.

Weekend College Weekend College at Massasoit Please contact the Registrar’s Office at 508-588-9100, ext. 1951, for more information regarding Weekend College at Massasoit. Massasoit offers Weekend College courses on Friday evening, Saturday and Sunday. Weekend College provides a way for you to customize your learning experience to match your educational goals, learning styles, and scheduling constraints AND earn a degree. By taking Weekend College courses you can complete a degree in Business Administration or Liberal Arts at the Brockton campus or the Visual Arts program at the Canton campus. All courses necessary to complete a Business Administration, Liberal Arts, or Visual Arts degree are being offered as a part of Weekend College.

Withdrawal Policy Withdrawal from the College Formal withdrawal from the College may be initiated at any time in a semester. To initiate the process, students must go to the Registrar’s Office and complete the appropriate forms. If a student stops attending classes but does not formally withdraw, the student will receive a failure (F) in any course involved. Failures are averaged into the GPA for all students. Withdrawal from a Course A student may formally withdraw from a course through the Friday of the 10th week of the semester. Contact the Registrar’s Office for the withdrawal period of courses meeting less than 15 weeks. A grade of W will be recorded on the student’s transcript after the official withdrawal procedure has been completed. Students are encouraged to speak to their advisors before withdrawing from any course. The procedure for course withdrawal includes getting the proper form from the Registrar’s Office and returning the completed form to the Registrar’s Office. Students are advised to keep a copy of the form as proof that they completed this process. Please be advised that ceasing to attend a class may result in an administrative withdrawal or a failing grade. Adding and Dropping Courses Students have a period of one week from the first class meeting to add or drop a course. Students who drop all courses during the first two weeks of classes may be assessed additional fees. For courses dropped after classes begin, students should contact the Registrar’s Office for clarification and to determine the impact on their student record. Financial Aid recipients should contact the Financial Aid Office to determine if a change in enrollment will affect the financial aid award.

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Women’s Resource Center What is the WRC? The Women’s Resource Center (WRC) at Massasoit Community College has a long and rich history that began in 1973. The WRC provides a supportive campus climate with a wide range of services to students, faculty, staff, and the community. These services support the WRC philosophy that all should be able to develop their potential and participate fully in society. Resources at the WRC

• Books and films for and about women’s issues • Information about women’s programs and services in the community • Career, scholarship, and resume resources • Coffee and conversation always available • Opportunity to plan and participate in workshops, discussion groups, book reviews, women’s history month, and community service projects

Workforce Development and Community Education The mission of the non-credit division of Workforce Development and Community Education is to establish and maintain strong community partnerships by creating programs that meet the professional and personal enrichment needs of businesses and citizens in our service area. Our work is organized around the Departments of Community Education, Professional Development Center (Corporate and Professional Training), and Adult Basic Education. We are always open to new ideas for innovative courses and training, and we welcome dynamic instructors with a specialized area of expertise. For more information, contact Division Dean Elaine Stewart at 508-588-9100, ext. 1560. Adult Basic Education (ABE) Adult Basic Education (ABE) programs include the Stoughton ABE program that provides free ESOL classes at three levels, the College Transitions program that provides free college courses and counseling for students moving from community-based adult education centers to the College, GED review classes for individuals preparing to take the GED exam, and Transitional ESOL classes designed to bring English language skills up to the College level. For more information on these programs, call the College at 508-588-9100, ext. 1301, Director Linda Aspinwall, for the Stoughton ABE and College Transitions programs, or extension 1509 for GED Review or Transitional ESOL classes. Community Education The Community Education Department offers evening non-credit courses that provide opportunities for career and personal enhancement. Individuals seeking a career change or promotion take one of our many career-building certificates in Human Resources, Marine Technician, Event Planning, or Interior Design, to name only a few. In the health area, courses such as CPR, Ophthalmic Assisting, and Fitness are offered. Art, travel, and personal interests include courses such as Watercolor Painting, Cooking, Modern Italy, and Photography. As new employment fields open and new areas of public interest evolve, Community Education continues to keep abreast of community needs and interests by developing new courses, work certificates, and programs. Community Education creates and provides non-credit certificate courses and programs that meet the needs of the business community as well as the interests of individuals. This dynamic process allows for the development of new courses and programs as the needs of the community change. Our course topics bridge areas of Arts and Music, Business, Computers, Education, Finance, Health and Fitness, Personal Interests, Sports and Recreation, and

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Catalog 2011–2012 Technical Training. Individuals update their skills and advance their careers by completing one of our certificate programs in Human Resources, Event Planning, QuickBooks, EMT, Electrician/D License, Veterinary Assistant, Marine Technician, Pharmacy Technician, or Ophthalmic Assistant. Other individual courses help employees maintain their employment licenses through continuing education credits in CPR, Home Inspection, and Real Estate Sales. For personal enrichment, area residents enjoy our Quilting, Reiki, Foreign Language, Water Aerobics, and Art classes. GED Review classes and Transitional ESOL classes are also offered through Community Education. Our courses are offered at all three college sites: Brockton, Canton, and Middleborough. For the latest offerings contact Director Rose Paquette, 508-588-9100, ext. 1307, or visit the College website www.massasoit.mass.edu. Corporate and Professional Training Corporate and professional training is offered directly to area businesses, industry, and organizations through our Professional Development Center. The focus of the department is individualized training that provides skill enhancement for employees at all levels–entry level to mid and upper management. Trainings are custom-designed, high quality, up-to-date, affordable, and convenient. Although most companies desire training at their sites, we also offer on-campus training that is open to all companies. Training topics include safety training, supervisory management, business skills, customer service, computer training, ESOL, human resources, and health training. To meet employee training needs, we have worked closely with hospitals and long-term care facilities, as well as manufacturers, biotechnology firms, food production companies, and small businesses. To learn more about training for your employees, contact Director Louise Howard, 508-588-9100, ext. 1302. Customized Corporate Training Our workshops, seminars, and management training programs are customized to assess and meet the individual needs of each organization. Because the training is designed to enhance employee skills and improve productivity, special attention is given to developing training schedules that minimize employee downtime. The Center is flexible in creating unique programs that fulfill a company’s ideal training package in terms of quality content, time, and location. For information please call: Louise Howard, Director of Corporate and Professional Training 508-588-9100, ext. 1302 Email: lhoward@massasoit.mass.edu

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Course Descriptions ACADEMIC FRESHMAN PROGRAM ACAD101 Freshman Seminar

are also covered. Methods of depreciation are included. The emphasis is on the sole proprietorship form of business organization for both service and merchandising firms. Computer applications are integrated. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

1 Credit

This course is concerned with helping first-semester students adapt to college life at Massasoit. It aids students in exploring their personal values and reasons for seeking a college education. The students become familiar with the college’s resources, policies, and procedures. Further, they develop skills in stress management, reduction of test anxiety, effective note-taking and test-taking techniques, career planning, decision making, and educational goal setting. ACAD103 College Experience

ACCT106 Principles of Financial Accounting II

This course further develops an appreciation of the role of principles, concepts, conventions, and ethics in today’s accounting environment. Long-term assets including plant and equipment, natural resources, intangibles, and investments are covered. Accounting for liabilities, both current and long-term, are explored. Partnership and corporate accounting are studied. Cash-flow statements and the techniques of financial statement analysis are presented. The tax consequences of various business decisions are examined. Relevant computer applications are integrated. Prerequisite: Principles of Financial Accounting I (ACCT105). Co-Prerequisite: Computerized Business Applications (ACCT302) or departmental approval.

3 Credits

This course is concerned with helping first-semester students adapt to college life at Massasoit. It aids students in exploring their personal values and reasons for seeking a college education. The students become familiar with the college’s resources, policies, and procedures. Further, they develop skills in stress management, reduction of test anxiety, effective note-taking and test-taking techniques, career planning, decision making, educational goal setting, mediation, and leadership. This course is required of all students who test into two or more developmental courses (Fundamentals of Mathematics [MATH010], Introductory Algebra [MATH101], Intermediate Algebra and Trig [MATH112], Preparing for College Reading I [ENG091], Preparing for College Reading II [ENGL092], or Introductory Writing [ENGL099]). Any full-time student (day or evening) taking 12 or more credits in a semester who tests into two or more developmental courses must take this course in the first semester. Any part-time student (day or evening) who tests into two or more developmental courses must take this course before proceeding beyond 9 credits. ACAD120 Self-Assessment and Career Planning

ACCT107 Principles of Managerial Accounting

3 Credits

ACCT111 Financial Statement Analysis

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of the process and purposes of analysis of financial statements (both external and internal). Coverage commences with an overview of the objectives of Financial Statement Analysis and the environment in which data is provided. Specific inclusions are short-term and long-term techniques for analysis of the balance sheet of business operations and of capital structure. Also included will be a comprehensive analysis of a prepared set of financial statements. Prerequisite: Financial Accounting II (ACCT106) or Managerial Accounting (ACCT107).

ACCOUNTING 3 Credits

ACCT112 Payroll Applications/QuickBooks

This is an accounting course designed for non-business majors. Emphasis is on recordkeeping systems for service and merchandising concerns. The accounting cycle through trial balance, adjustments, and financial reports are studied. Topics include control of cash receivables and payables as well as worksheets, bank reconciliations, and payroll. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099) and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. ACCT105 Principles of Financial Accounting I

4 Credits

This is an introductory course in the uses of accounting data for management decisions. It is concerned with identifying, measuring, developing, and communicating accounting information to management for the purposes of planning, information processing, controlling, and decision making. Topics include cost identification, cost behavior, costvolume-profit relationships, manufacturing costs and systems, budgeting, including master budgets and flexible budgets, responsibility accounting, cost control, time value of money, just-in-time systems, and not-for-profit accounting. Coverage also extends to cash flows and financial statement analysis. Computerized applications are assigned as part of the course requirements utilizing spreadsheets and other related applications. Prerequisite: Principles of Financial Accounting I (ACCT105). CoPrerequisite: Computerized Business Applications (ACCT302) or departmental approval.

This course is designed to enable each participant to appraise himself/herself in relation to his/her career choice. The course includes experiences that stimulate a more accurate appraisal of interests and abilities; a lessening of stress involved in choosing and then planning for a technical career; and an exploration of the various worlds of technical careers. The second part of the course focuses on the development of appropriate jobreadiness skills, attitudes, and behaviors. A variety of class experiences are involved, including group discussions, human relations and other simulation games, vocational and aptitude testing, assessment, and role-playing. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading I (ENGL091), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor.

ACCT103 Survey of Accounting

4 Credits

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to accounting applications that are commonly computerized in a business environment. Topics include coverage of payroll accounting systems and general ledger applications using QuickBooks. Other business applications may include inventory management and fixed asset tracking. This course provides students with the opportunity to apply the concepts to both a manual and a computerized accounting system using the computer facilities. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

4 Credits

This course is an introduction to accounting concepts and principles. Topics cover the accounting cycle, recording transactions, adjustments, the worksheet, financial statement preparation, and closing the accounts. Accounting systems, current assets, current liabilities, including cash, receivables, inventories, payables, and payroll,

ACCT201 Intermediate Accounting I

3 Credits

This course encompasses a review of accounting concepts and principles, the accounting cycle, and financial statement preparation. An in-depth study of assets including cash, 87

Course Descriptions temporary investments, receivables, inventories, plant and equipment, and intangibles completes the course. Spreadsheet applications will be used as a device to enhance the calculations and presentation of financial accounting data. Prerequisite: Principles of Financial Accounting II (ACCT106). ACCT211 Taxation

Principles of Accounting I (ACCT105). ACCT305 Peachtree Accounting II

This module is designed to demonstrate the application of a commercial general ledger software package to a retail firm. In addition to the topics discussed in module one, Peachtree will be used in the computer lab to open inventory accounts and record the purchase cycle, from preparing the purchase order to receiving the inventory to recording the vendor invoice and preparing cash payments to the vendors. Sales of merchandise for cash and on account receivable and preparation of a monthly customer statement and subsequent receipt of cash from the customer will be covered. Discounts like 2/10,N30 will be applied to both sales and purchases. Peachtree will be used to prepare income statements, statements of owner equity, and balance sheets on a monthly and annual basis. Prerequisite: Peachtree Accounting I (ACCT304).

3 Credits

This is a survey of federal tax structure as it applies to both individuals and corporations. In addition, there is a complete detailed exposure to tax responsibilities, tax calculations, tax implications, and tax filing for individuals at the state and federal levels. Current taxation practices are of prime concern as well as the implications of tax considerations on future individual decisions. When time allows, partnership and special tax entities are discussed. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. ACCT221 Cost Accounting

ACCT306 Peachtree Accounting III

3 Credits

3 Credits

ACCT400 Tax Assistance Internship

This course is designed to introduce students to business applications that are commonly computerized in a business environment. It examines accounting information systems (AIS) within the context of the total management information system (MIS). Topics such as a general ledger package, spreadsheet applications, and various managerial and financial decision models are included. This course provides students with the opportunity to experience the actual implementation of software packages using the facilities of the computer lab. Prerequisite: Principles of Accounting I (ACCT105) or departmental approval. ACCT303 Peachtree Accounting

3 Credits

This course is designed to train students to provide a community service of free tax assistance with a basic return to elderly, low-income, disabled, and others within the student population. Students will establish and operate a VITA program in the college community. This involves securing community sites, scheduling volunteers, arranging publicity, securing necessary tax forms and supplies, coordinating the efforts with the local IRS VITA coordinator, and providing tax assistance. These responsibilities will be delegated among those participating in the course. Students are required to pass an IRS exam, volunteer 40 hours. during the semester for tax preparation, and complete papers summarizing their experience in the course. Prerequisite: Taxation (ACCT211) or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

This course is designed to give students a realistic exposure to Peachtree Accounting, a commercial general ledger software package. A real business environment will be simulated through the use of source documents to illustrate actual business transactions. Topics such as a company ledger setup for both retail and service organizations, general journal entries, invoicing, customer statements, and receiving payments are included. Purchasing and vendor payments along with the entire payroll cycle will be covered. Advanced topics of inventory control, job costing, and budgeting may also be included. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. ACCT304 Peachtree Accounting I

1 Credit

This module is designed to demonstrate the application of a commercial general ledger software package to a job order business. A good example of this type of business is a plumbing company in which each individual job is open to bid, the proposal is accepted, the work is completed, and the customer is billed. Peachtree will be used in the computer lab to open individual job sheets, accumulate the cost of material and labor for each job, and calculate the profit margin on each job. Payroll will be covered using time sheets, hourly labor rates,and pay schedules for salaried employees. Peachtree will be used to prepare income statements, statements of owner equity, and balance sheets on a monthly and annual basis. Prerequisite: Peachtree Accounting II (ACCT305).

This course is an introduction to basic cost theory and practice. Cost systems and analytical uses of cost data by management are surveyed. Job order process and operation cost systems and standard cost approaches to such systems are completed. Cost-volume-profit relationships, cost-behavior patterns, and comprehensive and flexible budgeting are also introduced. Cost applications cover manufacturing as well as merchandising and service applications for both profit and non-profit entities. Prerequisite: Managerial Accounting (ACCT107). ACCT302 Computerized Business Applications

1 Credit

ANTHROPOLOGY ANTH101 Introduction to Anthropology

3 Credits

This course offers a study of human life in different societies with emphasis upon the physical, social, cultural, and archaeological aspects. The concept of culture, with its transmission and change, will be analyzed within societies and on a cross-cultural basis. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

1 Credit

ANTH202 Cultural Anthropology

This module is designed to demonstrate the application of a commercial general ledger software package to a service firm. Peachtree will be used in the computer lab to open a chart of accounts, record cash payments from customers,and invoice clients who will pay in the future. Supplies and utilities used in the service business will be purchased using cash (Write Checks command) and purchased on account, where the vendor is paid at a later date. Peachtree will be used to prepare income statements, statement of owner equity, and balance sheets on a monthly and annually basis. Prerequisite:

3 Credits

This course is the study of cultures of non-literate societies on a comparative and holistic basis. Topics include marriage and kinship, government, economics, religion, and magic. Selected cultures studied will include hunter-gatherers, pastoralists, and farmers from Africa, Asia, Pacific Islands, and the New World. Ethnographic methods will be focused on contemporary societies. Prerequisite: Introduction to Anthropology (ANTH101) or departmental approval. 88

Course Descriptions ANTH400 Special Study in Anthropology

1 Credit

used. Field trips, reports, and class projects are used to build skill in applying reference material. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisites: Survey of Physics (PHYS 131), Technical Physics I (PHYS141), College Physics I (PHYS151), or General Physics I (PHYS161); and Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher, waiver by placement testing results or permission of instructor.

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Anthropology faculty. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: Approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

ARCHITECTURE ARCH106 Graphic Communications with CAD

ARCH207 Building Codes and Construction Management 3 Credits

Contract documents (drawings and specifications) are analyzed for code requirements as they apply to the design and construction of buildings in Massachusetts. Various classifications of construction types are considered for fire safety and other code requirements. Elements of design, project scheduling, and construction supervision are also studied. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Methods and Materials of Construction (ARCH107) or permission of instructor.

Effective use of color, symbols, compositions, and basic features of current computer programs are introduced. The art of sketching is practiced, emphasizing proportion and perspective. Scaled study models are made for analysis of spatial relationships. Examples and projects progress from concrete to abstract subjects selected by both teacher and student. Presentation and organization skills are developed considering process, arrangement, identity, priorities, and scale. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 4 hours. ARCH107 Methods and Materials of Construction

ARCH214 Lighting and Acoustics

3 Credits

This is a basic course to enable a student to utilize a site considering natural amenities, topography, and site codes. Lectures include development of recreational, commercial, and residential sites. Included is the study of topography, site planning, and grading. Environmental considerations of wind, sun, view, and buffer zones are included for development of site plans. Street contours, parking areas, surface drainage, and landscaping are discussed in lectures and implemented in drafting labs that will help in the student’s use of 3D modeling. Prerequisite: Work Drawings I (ARCH121) or permission of instructor. ARCH121 Working Drawings I

ARCH217 Applied Structural Design

3 Credits

ARCH226 Architectural Design

3 Credits

Basic design elements of buildings are analyzed. The student applies the code requirements to bubble and function diagrams. Upon completion of data, students prepare their own designs. Individual instruction is given to students in the development of sketches to express their concepts. The first two projects emphasize the planning, design, and materials. The last project includes emphasis on design pertaining to structural and mechanical systems. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisites: Construction Planning (ARCH230) and Working Drawings II w/CAD (ARCH 122) or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

This course develops elements of a complete set of construction documents. Plans, elevations, sections, details, and schedules are provided with the use of CAD. The practice of scanned images from approved construction documents is implemented to provide changes in the work as practiced in the industry. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Working Drawings I (ARCH121) and Methods and Materials of Construction (ARCH107), or permission of instructor. ARCH204 Plumbing and Heating Systems

4 Credits

Properties of wood, steel, and concrete under typical construction conditions are studied. Stresses are analyzed under common loading conditions, and allowable stresses compared. Building codes and manufacturer’s data in tables and charts are analyzed and applied, using basic engineering formulas, to basic building designs. Demonstrations and laboratory and team projects are used to introduce professional practice. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Concepts of Technical Physics II (PHYS133), Technical Physics II (PHYS142), College Physics II (PHYS152), General Physics II (PHYS162), or permission of instructor.

Freehand sketching of plans and elevations is introduced to explain orthographic projection and to provide the use of scale and proportion. Further lecture and labs provide the student symbols, conventions, and wall and building sections that are implemented in Working Drawings II (ARCH122). Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Computer-Aided Drafting (ENGT107) or permission of instructor. ARCH122 Working Drawings II with CAD

4 Credits

Electrical power, distribution, control systems, lighting, and measurement are studied. Control of noise in buildings, health and safety aspects of noise control, specialized acoustic spaces (such as performance halls and auditoria), and electronic modifications to acoustics are among the topics covered. Interrelation of building design and environmental control systems is the theme. Related physics topics are developed and extended to architectural/engineering applications. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Co-Prerequisites: Concepts of Technical Physics II (PHYS133), Technical Physics II (PHY142), College Physics II (PHYS152), or General Physics II (PHYS162); Construction Planning (ARCH230); and Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher, waiver by placement testing results or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

The fundamental aspects of building materials and systems are taught in this course. Student projects are required, demonstrating knowledge of basic building construction systems. Fields trips, labs and lectures, combined with student use of building product CDs, Sweet’s Source and the Internet, are used to retrieve data and technical information. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARCH115 Site Development

4 Credits

ARCH230 Construction Planning

3 Credits

Four aspects of building construction are studied. This includes the use of building materials, the development of structural systems, and the development of environmental systems as they relate to architectural concepts and functions. Field sketching of building construction and graphic clarity of representation are stressed to develop design presentation skills. Internet research, computer graphics, and field trips are used by students for projects and presentation. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 4 hours. Co-Prerequisite: English Composition I (ENGL101), waiver by placement testing results,

4 Credits

Energy loss and gain in buildings is evaluated. Heating, ventilating systems, and energy conservation are analyzed. The interrelation of building design and building environmental control systems is considered. Domestic water supply, piping, and waste disposal systems are studied. Charts and tables from professional-level references are 89

Course Descriptions a forklift operator. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

or permission of instructor. ARCH241 Environmental Health and Safety

3 Credits

ARCH266 Ornamental Ironwork I

Students learn a variety of material based on OSHA and EPA health and safety regulations. They are made familiar with the physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of hazardous materials and waste. Participants in the course are also presented with methods of evaluating and controlling hazardous materials and are taught the use of personal protective equipment such as self-contained breathing apparatus and fully-encapsulated suits. Students are presented with sampling and monitoring techniques as well as site entrance and decontamination procedures. This course includes the required minimum 40 hours. of training for OSHA Certification. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARCH251 Architectural Detail Drawings

This course familiarizes the student with the proper use of the hand tools commonly used by ironworkers for ornamental work. It also provides the essential knowledge and skills required for fabrication of several types of window wall and curtain wall systems. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARCH267 Pre-Cast Concrete

3 Credits

ARCH268 Blueprint Reading

ARCH269 Occupational Health and Safety

3 Credits

ARCH270 Structural Ironwork II

2 Credits

ARCH271 Rigging II

2 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge of how various equipment and material must be rigged. It is a continuation of Rigging I (ARCH262). Topics covered include slings, rigging safety, cranes, equipment, and rigging jobs. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

2 Credits

ARCH272 Ornamental Ironwork II

4 Credits

This course is a continuation of Ornamental Ironwork I (ARCH266). It familiarizes the student with sealant applications and glazing systems, curtain wall system testing and the erection and/or installation of a wide variety of door, stairs, railings, and other systems. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

4 Credits

ARCH273 Lead Training

This course covers the standards and corresponding guidelines for the erection of plantproduced pre-cast and pre-stressed concrete products and describes a set of quality control procedures for a general pre-cast concrete erection operation. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARCH264 Forklift Safety Training

2 Credits

This course, in conjunction with on-the-job training, is designed to analyze the operations connected with structural steel erection. It is a continuation of Structural Ironwork I (ARCH261). Topics covered include plumbing, aligning, and bolting up structural steel, bridge erection, detailing, and proper use of cranes. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

This course, in conjunction with on-job training, is designed to equip the student with the knowledge, skill, and ability to become a competent rigger. Topics covered include history of rigging, use of wire and rope, and reeving. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARCH263 Reinforcing and Post Tension

2 Credits

This course consists of three units each designed to equip the student with the knowledge and skills to recognize, prevent, and/or respond to accidents, illnesses, and deaths on the job. Emphasis is placed on OSHA topics. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

This course, in conjunction with on-job training, is designed to analyze the operations connected with structural steel erection. Topics covered include historical use of iron and steel, planning, and the processes of structural steel, column and beam erection. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARCH262 Rigging I

4 Credits

In this course the student learns to read the basic and more complex drawings required to erect steel and to set reinforcing steel and pre-cast room slabs. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

This course considers cost per square foot, assemblies, and unit cost methods for estimating construction projects. Sample projects representing commercial and residential construction are used in computer labs for complete estimates. Working drawings and specifications are used for estimating quantities. Reference manuals, CDs, and estimating software complement the specifications and drawings. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Working Drawings II w/CAD (ARCH122) or permission of instructor. ARCH261 Structural Ironwork I

2 Credits

This course provides the student with the standards and corresponding guidelines for the safe and successful erection of plant-produced, pre-cast concrete. It familiarizes the student with the quality procedures associated with the erection process. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

This course complements Working Drawings II w/CAD (ARCH122). The student is taught the basics of detailing and drawing required for the construction of a building. Instruction is given in the use of selecting components to detail an assembly for such details as expansion joints and wall jambs. Technical information is assembled from manufacturer’s catalogs, the Internet, and Sweet’s Source to provide data for freehand sketches of detailed assemblies. These details are discussed and modified. The final details are done in CAD in a full drawing format. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Working Drawings II w/CAD (ARCH122). ARCH252 Estimating

3 Credits

2 Credits

This course is designed to equip ironworkers engaged in construction work on bridges, steel structures, and demolition with the knowledge and skills to recognize and understand lead health hazards and to prevent the effects of lead exposure in the workplace. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

2 Credits

ARCH274 Welding Theory and Practice

This course prepares the student to operate a forklift safely and to obtain certification as

3 Credits

Through a combination of classroom instruction and supervised shop practice, this course

90

Course Descriptions ARCH310 Rigging and Hoisting for Glaziers

provides students with a foundation in welding theory, principles, and applications and prepares them to obtain industry-recognized SMAW welding certifications. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARCH301 Apprenticeship, Work, and Society

Students learn the basics of safe rigging and hoisting as it applies to the glazier’s trade. The basics of transits and leveling instruments used by glaziers are studied and applied as they relate to job layout and measurement of mirror systems.

3 Credits

ARCH311 Apprenticeship: Painter and Trade

This survey course in labor history provides a topical overview of the economic, social, and political events that gave rise to the development of trade and industrial unions. ARCH302 Glazier Safety and Safe Work Practices

2 Credits

ARCH312 Occupational Health and Safety—Painters

4 Credits

ARCH313 Lead Abatement

Students learn how to use drawings, plans, and diagrams used to design, build, and install simple to complex storefronts. Estimating materials and installation are also covered.

ARCH314 Painting Methods and Materials

ARCH315 Drywall Finishing Techniques

ARCH316 Exterior Insulation and Finish

1 Credit

This course covers the history of EIFS and how these building systems work. Students learn successful installation procedures and proper methods of surface preparation.

2 Credits

This course familiarizes the student with the basic terminology, requirements, methods, and procedures related to aluminum entrance installations. The cleaning and safe handling of anodized and painted aluminum are also covered.

ARCH317 Wallcovering

4 Credits

The various materials used in wallcovering and their skillful application procedures are the main objectives of this course. Topics include accurate layout and measurement, proper selection of adhesives, preparation of surfaces, selection and maintenance of tools, safety, and proficiency on the job.

3 Credits

This course provides the student with the fundamentals of locks and bolts and their proper installation and operation. Students become familiar with the American National Standard for Exit Devices and the terminology of security and panic hardware exit devices, including revolving doors. ARCH309 Wall and Window Systems

3 Credits

Students are introduced to the types, function, and proper use of the tools and materials of the drywall finishing trade. Filling procedures, taping and wiping techniques, and spray and hand application of hard and soft textures are studied and applied.

4 Credits

In this course students survey and use five sets of blueprints to determine glazing requirements, make sketches, and calculate dimensions for a variety of commercial building applications.

ARCH308 Locks, Bolts, and Panic Hardware

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic materials, tools, and application methods of the painter. Surface preparation and paint remedies are also covered.

4 Credits

This course introduces students to the three types of pictorial drawings with emphasis on generating oblique views. Students learn how to read and use multiple sets of increasingly more complex blueprints.

ARCH307 Anodize and Paint Finishes: Aluminum Entrance

3 Credits

This course trains students to remove lead paint safely in accordance with state law and federal guidelines. It complies with the Massachusetts State Regulation which sets forth training requirements for deleading certification.

ARCH304 Storefronts: Draw and Architecture Metal Applications 4 Credits

ARCH306 Blueprints and Plans for Glaziers

3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to equip students with the knowledge and skills to recognize, prevent, and respond to accidents, illness, and deaths on the job. The course includes CPR training and pulmonary function test, OSHA hazardous awareness training, and safe working practices with materials and equipment.

Students learn the terminology of the glass trade, general glazing techniques, and safe use of hand and power tools. Topics covered in this class are insulated and highperformance glass, cutting and fabrication, and stained glass.

ARCH305 Sketching and Blueprints for Glaziers

3 Credits

This survey course provides an in-depth study of the significant economic, social, and political events that shaped the development of the craft and building-trades unions. The history of painting from the medieval emergence of the painters’ guild to the development of today’s modern painting industry is reviewed.

This course teaches students how to protect themselves from work-related injury, accident, and illness through an understanding of trade-specific rules and regulations. Students learn how to select and use ladders, swing stages, and man-lifting devices safely. ARCH303 Methods and Materials for Glaziers

3 Credits

ARCH318 Industrial Painting

3 Credits

Topics covered in this comprehensive studio course include surface preparation,coatings application technologies, and use of equipment associated with the trade. Students are also instructed in personal, workplace, and environmental health and safety procedures.

3 Credits

In this course students become familiar with pressure wall installation, curtain wall construction, architectural panel systems, and ribbon window systems. They will learn how to use tools used in laying out curtain wall structures such as transits, lasers, and plumb bobs. Safety factors associated with structural glazing and safety equipment that should be used when handling hazardous materials and MSDs for primers, solvents, and sealants will be reviewed.

ARCH319 Color Theory and Application—Painters

1 Credit

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the basics of color theory and its application to the painting trade.

91

Course Descriptions ARCH320 Blueprint Reading for Painters

3 Credits

ARTG105 Graphic Design I

In this course students acquire the technical skills required to read blueprints for application to site management.

3 Credits

This course provides students with the technical knowledge and basic skills in various spray painting methods for interior and exterior environments.

The course emphasizes the development of graphic design concepts from preliminary phases through comprehensive stages utilizing traditional studio techniques interactively with basic computer applications. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Introduction to Graphic Design and Production (ARTG115), ComputerAided Graphic Design (ARTG281), and Typography (ARTG112), or permission of instructor.

ARCH322 Special Coatings and Finishes

ARTG106 Graphic Design II

ARCH321 Spray Painting

2 Credits

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Graphic Design I (ARTG105). The emphasis is on the development of more advanced graphic design concepts as produced in professional comprehensive presentations. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I (ARTG105), Typography (ARTG112), Introduction to Graphic Design and Production (ARTG115), and Computer-Aided Graphic Design (ARTG281), or permission of instructor.

This course introduces the student to the areas of protective and architectural coatings. It provides knowledge of their uses, chemical properties, limitations, and safety in handling. Techniques in the preparation and finishes of wood surfaces are also covered in this course. ARCH401 Architectural Technology Internship

3 Credits

This course provides the student with practical hands-on experience in an architectural or related engineering environment. The tasks required by students will vary depending on the office environment into which they are placed; however, students will be required to document their duties and responsibilities. Typical duties include generating CAD drawings, revising existing drawings, estimating and processing change orders, researching and specifying products,and performing related functions pertinent to the construction or architectural industry. Shadowing project managers, architects, and engineers and taking notes at office meetings are also considered part of the internship experience. Students require prior approval. Interested students should contact the department chair prior to enrolling for a complete outline and requirements for this course.

ARTG107 Drawing I

ARTG108 Drawing II

3 Credits

ARTG112 Typography

3 Credits

This course is a study of the design history and use of letter forms. Topics include characteristics of the major typeface families, typographic contrasts, legibility through design, and the nomenclature of type. Computer-assisted assignments are an integral part of this course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Computer-Aided Graphic Design (ARTG281) or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

ARTG113 Color and Design I

This course surveys the visual arts comprehensively from the Paleolithic through the Late Renaissance periods. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical attitudes that inspired the artist’s work. Analysis of each art object focuses on the methods and materials (i.e., composition, line, value, and color) and how the technology of the time influenced the creation of the work. Prerequisite: Preparation for College Reading II (ENGL092), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. ARTG102 History of Art II

3 Credits

This course focuses on the human form as the primary source for observation. It examines basic human anatomy as a basis for understanding the human form. Students explore the depiction of the figure using a variety of techniques, including contour and tonal drawing. Assignments include gesture drawing as well as sustained studies. Individual and group critiques form an integral part of the course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Drawing I (ARTG107) or permission of instructor.

This course surveys the visual arts proceeding chronologically from the ancient era to modern times. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical and social attitudes that inspired the artist’s work. Analysis of each art object focuses on the methods and materials (i.e., composition, line, value, and color) and how the technology of the time influenced the creation of the work. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. ARTG101 History of Art I

3 Credits

Through the act of drawing, the student learns to process visual information. Emphasis is placed on the geometric forms that compose all compositions as well as the study of perspective systems relevant to the visual artist. Lectures are provided on the use of varied materials and surfaces and on the use of line and/or tone to portray the image at hand. Individual and group critiques form an integral part of this course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

ART ARTG100 Art History of the Western World

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course is an introductory course to two-dimensional design theory. Design is the foundation discipline of all forms of visual expression. This course introduces the student to the formal elements of form, shape, line, value, and texture. Exercises in these areas will also include the basics of color theory as they relate to these elements. Through a variety of assignments students use these elements to solve problems of visual organization. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

ARTG114 Color and Design II

This course surveys the visual arts proceeding chronologically from the ancient era to modern times. Emphasis is placed on the philosophical and social attitudes that inspired the artist’s work. Analysis of each art object focuses on the methods and materials (i.e., composition, line, value, and color) and how the technology of the time influenced the creation of the work. Prerequisites: Preparation for College Reading II (ENGL092), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Color and Design I (ARTG113) with an in-depth investigation of color theory. In addition, students will explore scale, spatial depth, balance, and rhythm. Color studies will demonstrate the specific application of color to advertising, illustration, and design. Space, the art of the third dimension, and topics of late 19th and early 20th century content and style are studied as well. Lecture: 2 92

Course Descriptions ARTG143 Adobe Photoshop for Web Design

hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Color and Design I (ARTG113) or permission of instructor. ARTG115 Introduction to Graphic Design and Production

This course will use Mac-based Adobe Photoshop, a standard image-editing tool to process and manipulate images for print, multimedia, and the Web. Students will learn basic skills using the Photoshop toolbox to create layers, retouch images, reformat images, create composite images, manipulate and change color, and choose appropriate file formats. Instruction will include using Fireworks to create rollover and slice images. Students will be able to design and create Web-ready pages at the completion of the course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to graphic design elements and principles and their application to page layout. Assignments will emphasize the development of advertising graphics from concept and design phases through basic computer production applications. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: ComputerAided Graphic Design (ARTG281) or permission of instructor. ARTG121 Introduction to Photography

ARTG144 Multimedia on the Mac

3 Credits

ARTG145 Final Project: Develop a Website

3 Credits

ARTG152 Museum Methods/Collections Care and Management

3 Credits

ARTG153 Gallery Exhibition Skills I

3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of exhibition design. Students will receive instruction in the basics of organization, layout, and installation of art exhibitions from concept to completion. Under the guidance of the instructor, students participate in the mounting of one major exhibition at the college. Field trips to area museums will afford students the opportunity to view behind-the-scenes preparation for a variety of exhibition types. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

In this course students will use writing and visual skills to understand better the art, culture, and history of times and places other than their own. Topics will vary each semester and may include but are not limited to Introduction to Asian Art, Art and Archaeology of the Ancient World, African Art, Art of Renaissance Italy, Art of the 19th Century, History of Photography, and Art since 1945. ARTG142 Information Design for the Web—Mac

3 Credits

This course will focus on current museum practices through lectures, readings, guest presentations, and demonstrations. In addition, this course examines the basic principles and techniques involved in acquiring and caring for collections, including access, records management, conservation and storage.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to videography, including camera operation and controls, video formats, lighting techniques, sound, and nonlinear editing for weddings, meeting and event coverage, and corporate and fine art production. Hands-on demonstrations, in-class exercises, and follow-up assignments prepare students to produce a special piece ready for production. Final Cut Pro will be used for editing. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARTG134 Topics in Art History

3 Credits

This course brings together all the skills learned in the previous certificate courses in the goal of creating two final, professional-grade products. Students will use HTML enhanced with film, animation, and images and scripting to develop a multimedia Website and a multimedia CD-ROM. This is a great opportunity to round off a portfolio or prepare for the discipline of real-world deadlines and requirements, as students can continue preexisting projects or work to specification. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Adobe Photoshop for Web Design (ARTG143), Information Design for the Web—Mac (ARTG142), Dreamweaver on the Mac (ARTG216), and Macromedia Flash Animation on the Mac (ARTG210), or permission of instructor.

Students refine traditional camera and darkroom techniques by mastering low light and difficult-to-meter situations, controlled lighting, and advanced processing and printing controls. Assignments include photo illustration of art director concepts, applied graphic techniques, and the photo essay. Photographic seeing and the use of aperture and shutter as creative controls to heighten the communicative power of photographs are covered in depth. Photography as fine art and practical applications of photography in modern society are included as important adjuncts to the development of individual technique through extended individual projects. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography (ARTG121) or permission of instructor. ARTG123 Introduction Video Techniques

3 Credits

The course is a full exploration of the capabilities of digital video for Webcasting and HTML-based CD-ROM delivery. This course covers capturing, editing, and delivering digital video. Editing is done using the professional standard, Final Cut Pro. The QuickTime wrapper format (MPED-4) is used to demonstrate live-broadcast and ondemand streaming. Students will learn how to deliver video for broadcast-ready, Webready, and CD/DVD-ROM targets. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Information Design for the Web—Mac (ARTG142) and Macromedia Flash Animation on the Mac (ARTG210), or permission of instructor.

Students learn how to operate a 35mm camera while exploring the fundamentals of photography. Shutter and aperture controls, light meter calculations, adjustable focus, and depth of field will be covered. This course stresses photographic composition as a vehicle for artistic expression. Lectures and demonstrations will be combined with developing and printing black-and-white film using an enlarger in a traditional darkroom. Students are required to have a fully manual camera and tripod. Students supply film, photo paper, developing tanks, and reels. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARTG122 Intermediate Photography

3 Credits

ARTG154 Gallery Exhibition Skills II

3 Credits

This is a continuation of Gallery Exhibition Skills I (ARTG153). This course provides advanced theory, instruction, and practical experience in all aspects of design and installation of art exhibitions. Under the guidance of the instructor, students participate in the installation of three to four exhibitions per semester. Prerequisites: Introduction to Museums (ARTG156) and Gallery Exhibition Skills I (ARTG153), or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

This course teaches the design skills (including typography) needed to break out from the cookie-cutter presentation of most Web pages. To do this, the student will look under the hood of standard Web creation tools and view the underlying structure of HTML, DHTML, XHTML, and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). JavaScript and browser cookies will be explored with an eye toward customizing Web presentations to nonstandard viewers. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

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Course Descriptions ARTG155 Museum/Gallery Field Experience

3 Credits

using reduction, key block, and line methods of registration. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

A field experience provides students with the opportunity for hands-on experience in a professional museum. Placement will be designed to meet each student’s interest in the museum field. Museum projects will be documented with a journal, written report, or photographic report. Because experience is highly valued in museum work, students are strongly encouraged to pursue additional opportunities such as a second field experience or volunteer work in a museum. Prerequisites: Introductions to Museums (ARTG156) and Gallery Exhibition Skills I (ARTG153), or permission of instructor. ARTG156 Introduction to Museums

ARTG214 3D Animation I

This course is an introduction to 3D animation and modeling using Maya on the Macintosh platform. Students will learn the history and theory behind computer animation through lectures and discussion of classic animation examples viewed in class. Rendering, modeling, sequential editing, and integration of image sequences will be explored in a series of short projects. Weekly critiques will be an integral part of this course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

This survey course provides an overview of the history, philosophy, and structures of a broad spectrum of museums through lectures, readings, quest presentations, demonstrations, and field trips. The following cultural organizations will be included: art museums, children’s museums, science museums, natural history museums, historic properties, anthropology museums, and topical museums. ARTG205 Three-Dimensional Design

ARTG215 Pastel

3 Credits

ARTG216 Dreamweaver on the Mac

3 Credits

ARTG217 Introduction Video Techniques

ARTG218 3D Animation II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of 3D Animation I (ARTG214). Students will learn to incorporate advanced 3D features and effects, such as NURBS and Inverse Kinematics (bones) into their work. Modern computer animation theory and production practices will be introduced. A final project involves teamwork to produce a short piece suitable for inclusion in a demo reel. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: 3D Animation I (ARTG214) or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of the conceptual and technical skills of pictorial communication introduced in Illustration I (ARTG211). This course will emphasize the styles used by contemporary illustrators to answer assignments in the various areas of illustration. The student will have the opportunity to develop a personal style and apply these skills to answer assignments with actual or simulated commercial applications. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Illustration I (ARTG211) or permission of instructor. ARTG213 Relief Printing: Woodcut and Linocut

3 Credits

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to videography, including camera operation and controls, video formats, lighting, sound, and nonlinear editing for weddings, meeting and event coverage, and corporate and fine art production. Handson demonstrations, in-class exercises and follow-up assignments prepare students to produce a short piece for presentation. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

This course provides an opportunity to explore a variety of media used in commercial illustration, as well as the different types of illustration, including children’s book, newspaper, and periodical illustration. The student will investigate a range of techniques which can be used to enhance the expressive potential of illustration. Through lectures the student will examine the basic design, composition, and thought processes used by illustrators. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Drawing II (ARTG108) or permission of instructor. ARTG212 Illustration II

3 Credits

This course will cover basic Website construction and design using Dreamweaver on a Mac platform. Topics to be covered include introduction to concept development, storyboarding, and color theory, as well as technical skills for navigation, file management, file compression, and HTML programming. Emphasis will be on the effective use of design principles in the selection and integration of text and image to create a site that is both elegant and functional in design. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

This is an introductory course in using Macromedia Flash to produce multimedia animations for the Web. This course includes lessons from animation history, storyboarding, character animation, interactivity, and soundtrack synchronization. Basic drawing skills and Macintosh literacy are required for this course. ARTG211 Illustration I

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the art of pastel. The student will become familiar with various chalk pastels and color systems distinct to this medium. Students will be taught a range of mark-making techniques: hatching, feathering, stippling, overlaying, and some innovative experimental methods. Individual and group critiques form an integral part of the course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

Design elements and principles will be explored through student fabrication of a variety of three-dimensional design projects. Assignments will include plan drawing, proportional enlargement and reduction of designs, and space sketch and model building. A variety of media are introduced, including construction board, plasticine, aluminum, and plaster. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARTG210 Macromedia Flash Animation on the Mac

3 Credits

ARTG221 Painting I

3 Credits

This course presents an introduction to painting media, basic techniques, picture composition, and color systems. Project assignments emphasize the development of technical skills and familiarity with the medium necessary for students to record their visual observations in paint. Individual and group critiques form an integral part of the course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

Woodcut, the oldest method of creating prints, is a direct and simple process. From strong textural illustrations of the 14th century in the Western world to the subtle transparent colors of the traditional Japanese print, woodcut has demonstrated its malleability to the images of artists over the centuries. A variety of relief printmaking techniques using traditional wood blocks, linoleum, and vinyl plates will be explored

ARTG222 Painting II

3 Credits

This course presents an intermediate-level easel-painting experience. Projects are assigned with an emphasis on continued development of technical skills through a variety of perceptual approaches (i.e., working from life) as well as conceptual 94

Course Descriptions ARTG244 Color Photography

experimentation (i.e., working from imagination). Individual and group critiques form an integral part of this course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Painting I (ARTG221) or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

This course presents an introduction to transparent water-based media. Painting from observation will be emphasized. Students will be exposed to indirect color mixing methods specific to the media. Students will be taught a variety of watercolor techniques including: wet-into-wet, wet-into-dry, flat and graduated washes, as well as experimental approaches. Individual and group critiques form an integral part of the course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

This course will explore the aesthetics and psychology of color photography, color theory, the preoccupation with the literal, and the development of a personal approach to color. The control and manipulation of color, from film exposure to processing and printing, will be examined. Digital control of color photographic images will be discussed, but this is not a course in digital photography. Presentation, preservation, and applications of color photography will be considered in depth. An overview of the various color processes that produce both positives and negatives will include color prints, duotones, color transparencies, and infrared images. Students must supply their own cameras and have their own film developed by outside labs. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

ARTG224 Advanced Painting

ARTG245 Major Photo Influences of 20th Century

ARTG223 Watercolor

3 Credits

3 Credits

In this course students will explore technical and conceptual boundaries that concentrate on each individual student’s personal vision and goals. The properties of paint and grounds will be examined. The production of specific supports and ground surfaces will be explored. Traditional and contemporary methods will be studied and used. There will be an emphasis on an independent pursuit of individual approaches to the discipline. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Painting II (ARTG222) or permission of instructor. ARTG225 Drawing into Print

This course is a survey of the major trends of photography as art, communication, and commerce. Students look at the evolution of the medium’s rich pictorial history, with an emphasis on the 20th century to the present. Students develop an appreciation for the relationship of photography to the other fine arts, the graphic arts, and industry. In examining the influence of personalities, aesthetic movements, innovations of technique and process, and the social impact of photography within the context of art and culture, students are encouraged to gain perspective in developing their own artistic techniques. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

ARTG246 Studio Photography

This beginning-to-intermediate course will focus on translating a variety of drawing techniques into prints using traditional relief, intaglio, and other printmaking mediums. Students will learn how to transfer their imagery to a print matrix, use the appropriate tools for each medium, and print limited editions. Drawing excursions to area museums and sites will provide an exciting source for students to develop a personal repertoire of images to translate into print. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARTG235 Clay Work

3 Credits

ARTG247 Advanced Photography Portfolio Seminar

3 Credits

This course prepares students for a career in photography, a related field, or for transfer to a baccalaureate or graduate program. Students concentrate on the development of professional or personal portfolios through individualized long-term projects. A discussion of contemporary issues in photography including career opportunities, professional business practices, aesthetics, and criticism guide each student in producing a tightly edited body of work. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Introduction to Photography (ARTG121) and Digital Photography I with Photoshop (ARTG242), or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

Students explore the fundamentals of the digital darkroom using industry-standard image-editing computer applications. Image capture, scanning, storage, image editing, adjustments for color and contrast, photo retouching, monitor calibration, and output options are introduced. Students will scan conventional film or prints, use digital cameras, and import images from CDs. Students are not required to own a digital camera. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARTG243 Photo Restoration

3 Credits

This course provides a practical introduction to the special concerns of the studio photographer. Students master studio lighting principles using tungsten light sources, strobe, and grip equipment. Techniques of modifying natural and artificial light for portraiture, still life, and product illustration are covered. Students learn about camera movements, perspective control, processing, and printing large-format negatives by operating medium-format cameras and large-format view cameras. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Introduction to Photography (ARTG121) or permission of instructor.

This course teaches basic and advanced wheel-throwing skills for the beginning to advanced student. Hand-building techniques such as slab and coil construction and surface-decorating techniques such as scraffito, incising, paper resist, carving, and glaze formulation will also be investigated. Advanced students will explore more complicated pieces involving altering and combining clay-forming methods. ARTG242 Digital Photography I with Photoshop

3 Credits

ARTG254 Intaglio Printing: The Art of Etching

3 Credits

Students will learn the basics of preparing the plate surface with hard and soft grounds as well as manipulating the image with resists and varnishes during the etching process. Sugar lift, white ground, and aquatint methods will also be explored along with the more direct methods of dry point and engraving techniques. Copper plates will be used with the Edinburgh etch, a safer ferric chloride-based mordant. Non-toxic soy-based intaglio inks will be used. Emphasis will be on discovering the unique transformation of line, value, and form through the art of etching. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

Learn to remove wrinkles, unwanted backgrounds or color casts, image flaws or 10 extra pounds so images look better than reality. This course will take you through numerous step-by-step examples that highlight the tools and techniques used by professional digital artists to restore valuable antique images, retouch portraits, and enhance glamour photography. This course will feature dozens of tutorials that will show users of all skill levels how to transform faded, damaged photographs into beautiful images that are as clear and crisp as the day they were taken. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

ARTG255 Monoprint and Monotype Printmaking

3 Credits

This course investigates the art of the unique print. With monoprint, the most

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Course Descriptions immediate form of printmaking, drawings can be quickly translated in a painterly manner using additive and subtractive methods. Using a plate matrix, students will create any number of print variations with monotype. Chine colle, multiple plate, and offset techniques will be explored with oil-and water-based inks. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

ARTG282 Basic Design for Desktop Publishing

ARTG256 Screen Printing

ARTG291 Digital Photography II with Photoshop

This course will provide guidelines for creating effective, well-designed desktop publications. Lecture and discussion topics with related assignments will be used to develop an understanding of basic typography in relation to the elements and principles of design. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

This course in silkscreen will introduce a variety of stencil-making procedures. Beginning with direct drawing, cut paper, and film methods, students will learn the basics of multiple color registration. Photo processes will be explored using handdrawn acetate positives and the computer. A range of projects on a variety of supports will explore the versatility of this popular commercial and fine art medium. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARTG257 Printmaking Seminar

3 Credits

ARTG292 3D Animation II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of 3D Animation I (ARTG214). Students will learn to incorporate advanced 3D features and effects, such as NURBS and Inverse Kinematics (bones), into their work. Modern computer animation theory and production practices will be introduced. A final project will involve teamwork to produce a short piece suitable for inclusion in a demo reel. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: 3D Animation I (ARTG214) or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

ARTG331 Ceramics I

This course examines drawing as an independent discipline and focuses on the development of landscapes and figurative drawing. Classes include multiple drawing sessions in the field and figure drawing, in the studio, from the model. The course emphasizes the importance of accurately drawing form in all areas of art study as well as the importance of figure drawing in the portfolio. Individual critiques form an integral part of this course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Drawing II (ARTG108) or permission of instructor. ARTG263 Sculpture I

3 Credits

In this second-level class, students expand their knowledge of digital imaging by using a range of image acquisition, editing, and presentation procedures with applications. Advanced image adjustments with curves and channel mixing for color correction and contrast control, advanced compositing, grayscale, black-and-white conversions, line art, color management, work flow, and real-world production techniques are covered. Students learn more about the various methods of output and the aesthetics of digital printing. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Digital Photography I with Photoshop (ARTG242) or permission of instructor.

This intensive course allows the printmaking student to explore in depth a particular theme within a chosen print medium. Series editions, artists’ books, and narrative illustrations are explored and discussed as directives for individual projects. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Relief Printing: Woodcut and Linocut (ARTG213), Drawing into Print (ARTG225), Intaglio Printing: The Art of Etching (ARTG254), Monoprint and Monotype Printmaking (ARTG255), Screen Printing (ARTG256), or permission of instructor. ARTG261 Advanced Drawing

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course explores basic clay techniques, including wheel-throwing and handbuilding methods such as slab construction and pinch and coil. Surface decoration and glazing techniques are introduced in conjunction with firing methods. The history of the medium, including traditional and contemporary forms, is discussed through slide review and demonstrations. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ARTG332 Ceramics II

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the basic techniques and practices of sculpture. It will examine how three-dimensional form is organized and created. Students will experiment with the processes of modeling and casting with a variety of materials including plasticine, wax, clay, and plaster. Group critiques and slide lectures will complement studio work. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

This course continues hand-building and wheel assignments, concentrating on both construction and conceptual approaches. Different clay bodies are introduced along with kiln firing, loading, and building. Surface decorations such as subtractive and additive methods are further examined. Historical and contemporary review is continued, and guest clay artists are introduced. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Ceramics I (ARTG331) or permission of instructor.

ARTG264 Sculpture II

ARTG400 Visual Arts Internship

3 Credits

This is an intermediate-level course utilizing stone and wood sculpture techniques and practices. It will examine how three-dimensional form is created utilizing the subtractive methods of sculpture. Students will learn about stone and wood carving history and how to use stone and wood carving tools. Group critiques and slide lectures will complement studio work. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Sculpture I (ARTG263) or permission of instructor. ARTG281 Computer-Aided Graphic Design

3 Credits

This internship opportunity exemplifies the principles of cooperation between business and academia. The internship coordinates marketplace art experience with that of the College. Students who are strongly motivated to advance their knowledge of specific job opportunities in the art and graphic design and the fine arts fields are encouraged to seek and complete this 160-hour elective at a work site approved by the department. After meeting the demands of the professional marketplace, students return to the classroom with a more focused view as they complete their studies.

3 Credits

ARTG441 Independent Study I

Relevant to the contemporary graphic designer, this course emphasizes computer layout, type, and color as they integrate into publication design. Laboratory experience in page design and relevant skill building is emphasized. Students generate original graphics and develop a graphics portfolio component. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Art and is limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

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Course Descriptions BIOLOGY BIOL091 Fundamentals of Science

BIOL118 Introduction to Human Disease

3 Credits

This introductory-level course is a systematic approach to the understanding of a range of specific human diseases. Topics include mechanisms of disease, incidence and prevalence of diseases, disease descriptions, etiology, signs and symptoms, and diagnosis as well as treatment, prognosis, and prevention. This course is designed for the non-science major and reinforces cross-curriculum competencies: critical thinking, technology skills, oral communications, quantitative skills, reading, and writing. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

3 Credits

This course emphasizes the way scientists think and the evolution of scientific thought throughout history. It stresses the basic information and skills needed by students entering any college science course. Topics include the scientific method, science vs. nonscience, a brief history of science, and selected topics in physics, chemistry, geology, and biology. The course will work on developing students’ strengths in the core competencies of critical thinking, computer skills, oral communication, quantitative skills, reading, and writing and includes several assessments toward those ends. This course is not offered for graduation credit and is recommended for those students who have not had any recent science courses and/or are currently taking Preparing for College Reading I or II (ENGL091 or ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and/or Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010). Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

BIOL119 Introduction to Evolutionary Biology

3 Credits

The contents of this course deal with basic biological concepts and their implications in human affairs. Emphasis is placed on the principles common to all living things. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENG 092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

This course is an introduction to biological evolution and to the concept of evolution as the unifying theme of biology. It will include such topics as evolutionary theories, fossils, phylogeny, biodiversity, mutations, drift, selection, adaptations, and extinctions. The course will also address the evolution of sex, family, and behavior. Emphasis will be placed on the biology of evolution with emphasis on DNA, mutations, and the process of natural selection. This course is designed for the non-science major. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

BIOL114 The Evolution of Evolution

BIOL121 Biological Principles I

BIOL103 Survey of Biology

3 Credits

3 Credits

4 Credits

Central and fundamental to the science of biology is the theory of evolution proposed by Charles Darwin in the mid-19th century and expanded (or challenged) by many since then. This course begins with the question of origins, surveys selected pre-Darwinian evolutionary ideas, and explores the genetic basis for evolution by natural selection. The course concludes with a brief examination of the impact of evolutionary thought on the study of populations, ecosystems, and the biosphere. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

This course introduces basic principles of biology. Topics include scientific method, evolution, cellular and subcellular structure, basic cell chemistry, transport across cell membranes, mitosis, meiosis, metabolism, photosynthesis, DNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, and patterns of inheritance. This course is required as a prerequisite for most other four-credit Biology courses. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: One unit of high school science, (preferably biology), Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

BIOL115 Survey of Human Form and Function

BIOL122 Biological Principles II

3 Credits

This course is a study of the domains, kingdoms, and major phyla composing the living world. The evolution of the diverse forms of life on the earth today, from the earliest life forms to the present, serves as a unifying theme throughout the course. Topics include classification, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. Observation and dissection skills will be developed while studying selected organisms, both plant and animal, in the laboratory portion of the course. The dissection component of the laboratory work is required for successful completion of the course. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: C- or higher in Biological Principles I (BIOL121) or successful performance on departmental challenge exam, Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

This course is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body. Topics covered include the cell, tissues, levels of organization, and a survey of the major organ systems of the body. The course is designed to be a combination lecture-laboratory experience, emphasizing a hands-on approach to learning. A dissection component of the laboratory work is required for successful completion of the course. Recommended for Dental Assisting and Visual Arts students. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BIOL116 Evolution Seminar

4 Credits

1 Credit

This seminar is intended for students who have completed or have enrolled in the Evolution of Evolution (BIOL114). During the January semester break the class travels to England and visits a number of sites that were significant in the development of Darwin’s theory of evolution. Included will be Darwin’s birthplace in Shrewsbury, his home in Kent (Down House), Cambridge University (where he completed his undergraduate work), Oxford University (the site of the Huxley-Wilberforce debate), the Museum of Natural History, and Darwin’s grave in Westminister Abbey. To receive the credit for this seminar, the student must submit an acceptable seminar journal.

BIOL124 General Zoology

4 Credits

This course will present an overview of the animal-like protists and select members of the animal kingdom. Students will explore the characteristics of the animal phyla through lecture discussions, lab exercises, Internet explorations, and student presentations. Included will be an examination of the ecological and evolutionary relationships of various animals. The course will endeavor to build students’ strengths in the core competencies of critical thinking, computer skills, oral communication, quantitative skills, reading, and writing, and therefore includes several assessments 97

Course Descriptions toward those ends. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: C- or higher in Biological Principles I (BIOL121), Preparing for College Reading II (ENG092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

writing. Lecture: 3 hours. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

BIOL131 Animal Behavior

This is an introduction to the study of animal behavior from a biological viewpoint. The course begins with a brief history of the development of animal behavior as a science and emphasizes the influence of evolutionary principles and the interaction of physiological and ecological factors on animal behaviors. Specific topics will include the principles of learning, communication, social behaviors, reproductive behaviors, biological clocks, and migrational patterns. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

This course is an introduction to biological aspects of major marine environments. Local habitats are used as examples for a survey of common marine organisms and to study interactions between organisms and their surroundings. Emphasis is placed on human relationships to the ocean environment. Communities to be investigated are primarily rocky coast, marsh-estuary, and sandy beach. The course also includes a discussion of marine mammals. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

BIOL136 Human Genetics

BIOL142 Laboratory for Introductory Biology

BIOL141 Introduction to Marine Biology

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course deals with biological aspects of human reproduction and genetics. It will include such topics as cellular division, anatomy and physiology of the human reproductive systems, prenatal development, reproductive technologies, human sexuality, transmission genetics, DNA and chromosomes, and genetic technology. This course is designed for the non-science major. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BIOL137 Human Genetics Laboratory

BIOL143 Issues in Environmental Science

3 Credits

BIOL201 Anatomy and Physiology I

4 Credits

This is the first part of a two-semester course that presents in a comprehensive manner the structure and function of the human body. Topics include tissues and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. A dissection component of the laboratory work is required for successful completion of the course. This course is designed for students in the health programs and must be taken before Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL202). Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: C- or higher in Biological Principles I (BIOL121) or successful performance on departmental challenge exam, Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

1 Credit

This course will include activities related to human nutrition, such as food sources, digestion, absorption and metabolism, and the role of nutrition in health. An emphasis will be placed on understanding and using the scientific process. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Introduction to Human Nutrition (BIOL138). BIOL140 Introductory Biology

4 Credits

This course will introduce students to important environmental issues including fisheries conservation and management, coastal pollution, ecology and conservation of wetlands (including salt water marshes, rivers, streams, and vernal pools), groundwater issues (including depletion and pollution of aquifers), introduced species, and endangered species, energy use, land conservation, and examples of historic use of land in a region. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

1 Credit

This course is an introduction to the science of human nutrition and its role in health. It will include such topics as types of nutrients, nutrient digestion, absorption and metabolism, food sources, recommended nutrient intakes, food safety, and food technology. The course may also address other topics related to health and nutrition. Emphasis will be placed on application of these concepts to promote health and fitness. This course is designed for the non-science major. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BIOL139 Introduction to Human Nutrition Laboratory

1 Credit

This is an introductory laboratory course intended to supplement Introductory Biology (BIOL140). This course is recommended for students who need a 4-credit laboratory science for transfer purposes but do not intend to continue in the biological sciences. Laboratory topics will be closely integrated with lecture topics and so will include human biology, biotechnology, ecology, and other topics. Laboratory: 2 hours. CoPrerequisite: Introductory Biology (BIOL140).

This course will include activities related to human reproductive anatomy, transmission genetics, and molecular genetics. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the scientific process. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Human Genetics (BIO 136). BIOL138 Introduction to Human Nutrition

4 Credits

BIOL202 Anatomy and Physiology II

3 Credits

4 Credits

This is the second part of a two-semester course that presents in a comprehensive manner the structure and function of the human body. Topics include the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems. A dissection component of the laboratory work is required for successful completion of the course. This course is designed for students in the health programs. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: C- or higher in Biological Principles I (BIOL121) or successful performance on departmental challenge exam, C- or higher

This course is not intended for students planning to major in science or allied health. It is an issues-based course including topics of current interest in today’s society. It will include aspects of human biology, biotechnology, ecology, and other topics. This course is intended to further develop student abilities in the core competencies: critical thinking, oral communications, quantitative skills, reading, technology skills, and

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Course Descriptions in Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL201), Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

encountered in the field of hospitality. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

BIOL205 Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology I

BUSN105 Hospitality Marketing and Sales

4 Credits

This is the first part of an introductory course sequence in the comparative anatomy and physiology of vertebrates, with a focus on domestic animals. Students will use anatomical models and preserved specimens of a variety of species to study gross and microscopic anatomy of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Emphasis is placed upon the normal anatomy and physiology to provide sufficient knowledge of normal physiological processes to understand the responses to drugs and disease processes discussed later in the veterinary science curriculum. Note: Dissection is required. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: C- or higher in Biological Principles I (BIOL121) or successful performance on departmental challenge exam, Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BIOL231 Microbiology

Students study client counseling, marketing, sales techniques, travel documents, booking procedures, record keeping, business ethics, and customer service. Simulations introduce students to the various aspects of hospitality operations and management, sales, and marketing. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results or departmental approval BUSN106 Conference and Event Planning

4 Credits

BUSN107 Hospitality Law

BUSN110 Introduction to Business

3 Credits

This is an introductory course that surveys business organizations as they operate within our free-enterprise system. The functional areas of accounting, finance, production, and marketing are explored from a management perspective with an emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

1 Credit

BUSN111 Personal Finance

3 Credits

This course provides for the planning and management of personal assets by individuals over both short-term and long-term periods. Topics include household budgeting, savings and financial institutions, consumer credit and other borrowing, insurance investments, pensions and annuities, and the implications of taxes in decisions. An overview of relevant topics for planning, maintenance, and protection of personal estates is also discussed. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

BUSINESS 3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the students to food and beverage service. Students learn about storeroom procedures and the preservation of foods, wines, and liquors. They are also taught the proper service of food and beverages to customers. Guest lecturers may be used from time to time, and students may take field trips. Because restaurants depend on keeping costs at a minimum, special emphasis is placed on techniques of cost comparisons, ingredient costing, and cost reduction. Prerequisite: Introduction to Hospitality Management (BUSN103). BUSN103 Introduction to Hospitality Management

3 Credits

This course includes a study of the legal principles governing hospitality operations including common law; contracts; laws of tort and negligence; hotel-guest relationship; laws regarding food, food service, and alcoholic beverages; and employment laws. Legal issues in travel and tourism, including those associated with transportation, travel agents, tour operators, and gaming will also be covered. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Biology. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chairperson and Division Dean.

BUSN101 Food and Beverage Service Management

3 Credits

This course introduces students to a comprehensive overview of the conference and event planning profession with a focus on marketing and promotional strategies for conventions and special events. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), or waiver by placement testing results.

This is a course in general microbiology with emphasis placed on the practical applications for medical, food, dairy, water, and environmental microbiology. Part of the laboratory experience includes an introduction to techniques in molecular biology and the identification of one or more bacterial unknowns to demonstrate adequate knowledge of the proper laboratory technique. Organisms of discussion include bacteria, viruses, fungi, and some of the primitive algae and protozoa. Topics covered include classification, procaryotic cell structure, microbial genetics, biotechnology, microbial metabolism, microbial growth, and control of microbial growth. Chemistry is recommended, but not required, before taking this course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisites: C- or higher in Biological Principles I (BIOL121) or successful performance on departmental challenge exam, Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BIOL400 Special Study in Biology

3 Credits

BUSN112 Principles of Management

3 Credits

This is an initial course in management with emphasis upon the principles and techniques of the managerial process in business. The basic concepts of management planning, organizing, directing, staffing, and controlling are related to the operations of businesses. Recent implications of social theory, communications theory, and group functions are considered. Case studies are used as a vehicle to enable students to apply theory to practice. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the complex field of hospitality management. These fundamentals of hotel and restaurant management are discussed: techniques of personnel management, methods of operation, and problems encountered in the industry. Case studies and problem-solving exercises are used to illustrate problems 99

Course Descriptions by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN113 Managerial Communications

3 Credits

This course focuses on the skills students will need to communicate effectively as managers: gathering, analyzing, and evaluating information; constructing arguments; presenting ideas clearly and concisely. Class time will be devoted to group discussions and exercises, individual writing exercises, and peer editing. Class participation is central to student learning in this course. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). BUSN120 Principles of Marketing

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the role of marketing in the organization. Major emphasis is placed on the concept of marketing strategy as a comprehensive, integrated plan designed to meet the needs of the consumer and thus facilitate exchange. Techniques and practices commonly utilized by marketers in the areas of research, product planning, pricing, distribution, and promotion are presented. A problem-solving approach utilizing the case-study method and lecture is used. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099) and Fundamentals of Math (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN122 Sales

3 Credits

This course is a study of the functional aspects of personal selling and career opportunities in the field of sales and focuses on the development of the skills necessary for effective selling. Emphasis is placed on effective communication, motivation theory and practice, gaining interviews, handling objections, and closing the sale. Topics included are the sales framework (retail, wholesale, industrial), sales management, and legal and ethical considerations of sales. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN123 Advertising

3 Credits

This course is a survey of the social and economic role of advertising in our society. Students have an opportunity to study the components of effective advertising and to observe the use of advertising by the various forms of mass media. Topics include the role of advertising, planning, media creation, and management of the advertising campaign. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN124 Principles of Retailing

3 Credits

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the role and responsibilities of the retail manager. Emphasis is on planning, controlling, and organizing the retail environment from the perspective of the entrepreneur and the corporate manager. Topics include institutions, strategy, consumer behavior, marketing research, location, organization, merchandising, planning, image, promotional strategy, and pricing. Lecture and case-study methods are utilized. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN125 Small-Business Organization and Management

3 Credits

This course considers the status, problems, and requirements of launching and profitably operating a small business enterprise. Management and marketing functions

are stressed with emphasis on the relevance of personal factors. Topics include selecting a business, financing the venture, forms of ownership, buying an existing business, operation, accounting, financial statements, location, purchasing and inventory control, pricing, marketing, and taxes. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN126 Financial Management

3 Credits

This course is a survey of the scope and nature of the field of corporate finance dealing with a firm’s acquisition of funds to carry on its activities and with the determination of optimum methods of employing the funds. In addition, the functions, goals, and tools needed in the financial decision-making framework are examined. Topics include capital policies and the management of current assets, major sources of short- and long-term financing, interest factors, capital budget techniques, investment decisions, financial structures, leverage valuation, rates of return, cost of capital, dividend policies, and timing of financial decisions. Prerequisite: Principles of Financial Accounting II (ACCT106). BUSN127 Human Resources Management

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide fundamental principles and practices of personnel and human resource management. An in-depth review of job design and analysis, job evaluation procedures, wage and salary administration programs, and progressive discipline procedures are discussed. Protection and representation studied through EEO/Affirmative Action and other current legislation affecting employment are also discussed. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN129 Sports and Entertainment Marketing

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the role of marketing in the sports and entertainment industry. There is an emphasis on employing basic marketing concepts and strategies to these two specific areas of study. Particular attention is focused on the marketing of products and services through sports. Other areas covered include careers in sports marketing, marketing music and theater, marketing recreational sports, and legal issues for sports and entertainment. The course utilizes a problem-solving approach through the use of case study and lecture. Prerequisites: Introductory Writing (ENGL099), Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN131 Hotel Operations

3 Credits

This course covers the two basic phases of hotel management. The “Back of the House” is the first phase and covers such problems as licensing, real estate considerations, engineering, sanitation, and housekeeping. The “Front of the House” phase covers such problems as dealing with the needs of the guest, managing the front desk, and understanding the reservations procedures. Students taking this course are exposed to both phases and may utilize field trips and guest lecturers to enhance their knowledge. Prerequisite: Introduction to Hospitality Management (BUSN103). BUSN133 Introduction to Tourism

3 Credits

This introductory course surveys the major components of travel and tourism, providing an overview of the tourism industry—its origins, background, organizations, and career opportunities. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), or waiver by placement testing results.

100

Course Descriptions BUSN134 Hospitality Marketing

3 Credits

Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the role of marketing within a hospitality organization. Major emphasis is placed on the concept of restaurant marketing strategy as a comprehensive, integrated plan designed to meet the needs of the consumer and thus facilitate exchange. Techniques and practices commonly utilized by hospitality marketers in the areas of product, menu layout and design, pricing, place, promotion, strategy, and tactics will be covered. A problem-solving approach utilizing the case-study method and lecture is used. BUSN135 Hospitality Human Resources

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide fundamental principles and practices within the hospitality industry of personnel and human resource management. An in-depth examination of areas including work environment, job description, recruitment, screening, hiring, supervision, training, terminations, employee benefits, and a lawful workplace are discussed. BUSN136 ServSafe Certification

1 Credit

3 Credits

This course is a study of the operations functions within formal organizations. It is concerned with the interaction of the various resources (people, money, machinery, facilities, information, or materials) that are used in some combination to provide the product or service for which the enterprise is established. Production and operations management is also concerned with the job of the operations manager whose primary responsibility is to find the best combination or allocation of the resources and see that it results in the desired product or service in the proper amount, at the proper time, and at the desired quality level. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), or waiver by placement testing results. BUSN201 Business Law I

This course introduces the student to the origins of the law, its nature, and its classification. This course covers the federal and state court systems with emphasis on Massachusetts civil procedures. Contract law is studied in detail with comprehensive emphasis on problems dealing with consumer laws in relation to deceptive and false advertising and the legal effects of warranties as they relate to the commercial world of business. Legal remedies (including the new method of arbitration in the settlement of disputes) are examined. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN202 Business Law II

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to current legal problems in specific areas of the law. The law of torts and personal liability is discussed in depth. Sales contract law is comprehensively examined through the use of the Uniform Commercial Code and the Massachusetts Consumer Protection Act. Other areas of the law covered are bailments and personal property, agency and real estate law, and wills and the administration of estates. An overview of various kinds of business organizations, which includes corporations, sole ownership, partnership, and the growing field of franchising, is presented. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory

3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to study human behavior in organizations at the individual and group levels. Lectures and discussions include the effect of organization structure on behavior. Specific attention is given to using concepts for developing and improving interpersonal skills. The course concentrates on motivation, communication, influence, power, group decision processes, leadership, conflict, change, cultural systems, and perception. Management techniques such as team development are also explored in order to improve the management of people. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN331 Seminar in Hospitality Management

3 Credits

This seminar gives the students an opportunity to discuss their internship experiences and to undertake individual study projects with the guidance of the instructor. Students are also able to pursue research in special areas of hotel and restaurant management that may service to equip them with special skills. Prerequisite: Hotel Operations (BUSN131). BUSN401 Coop Work Experience in Business Administration I

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the basic principles and terminology of real estate. It is designed to benefit those students preparing for a business career and those students seeking a clear understanding of commercial and financial transactions involved in the ownership and transfer of real estate. Although invaluable to those studying for the real estate licensing exam, it is not intended as a preparatory course for such examinations. Topics include property description and characteristics, ownership interests, liens, easements, encumbrances, contracts, title closing, the investor-broker relationship, brokerage, mortgage financing, real estate markets, appraisal, management, leases, zoning, and real estate trends. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. BUSN301 Organizational Behavior

In this course students learn regulations governing sanitation and methods for eliminating food and health hazards within the food service industry. Testing for the NRAEF Sanitation Certificate is required. BUSN137 Production and Operations Management

BUSN203 Principles of Real Estate

3 Credits

This course offers students an opportunity for a structured, supervised paid work experience in the business world. The co-op experience allows the student to apply the theory of the classroom to a business setting. In addition, a weekly seminar gives the students the opportunity to discuss their jobs, employers’ evaluation of their work performance, and their weekly academic assignments. This course is open to qualified sophomore students in Business Administration programs. Prerequisite: department approval. BUSN402 Coop Work Experience in Business Administration II

3 Credits

This course offers students an opportunity for a structured, supervised paid work experience in the business world. The co-op experience allows the student to apply the theory of the classroom to a business setting. In addition, a weekly seminar gives the students the opportunity to discuss their jobs, employers’ evaluation of their work performance, and their weekly academic assignments. This course is open to qualified sophomore students in Business Administration programs. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

101

Course Descriptions CHEMISTRY CHEM131 Survey of Chemistry

or permission of instructor. CHEM400 Special Study in Chemistry

3 Credits

This is a survey course for non-science transfer students and involves lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory experiments relating to the basic facts and principles of chemistry. Discussions of atomic theory, bonding, states of matter, chemical equilibrium, and applied chemistry are included. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. CHEM151 General Chemistry I

4 Credits

This course is designed for students who plan to continue in a science or related area. The major topics covered include atomic structure, stoichiometry, modern chemical bonding, and the gaseous state of matter. The laboratory is both preparative and analytical, using classical and spectroscopic techniques. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher, Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. CHEM152 General Chemistry II

4 Credits

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I (CHEM151). Major topics covered include thermochemistry, thermodynamics, the states of matter, solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, and an introduction to organic chemistry. The laboratory includes classical and spectroscopic techniques. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: C- or higher in General Chemistry I (CHEM151) or departmental approval. Co-Prerequisite: College Algebra (MATH203) or higher. CHEM153 Criminal Justice Forensic Chemistry

4 Credits

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Chemistry faculty. Limited to 2 courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

CHILD CARE EDUCATION CCED101 Behavior Management in Child Care

3 Credits

This course provides the student with an introduction to principles involved in child care behavior management. Behavior management topics are approached as they relate to child care settings. Positive interactions between adults and children are emphasized as effective learning environments for young children. The influence of family, peers, community, and culture on children’s behavior is explored. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. CCED102 Development in Early Childhood

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to a child’s developmental growth from prenatal stages to seven years of age. Developmental landmarks are studied as they relate to a preschool setting. The importance of recognizing individual as well as cultural differences and various rates and patterns of growth is emphasized. A grade of C or better is required for graduation. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or department approval.

This course will introduce students to the principles and techniques in the field of forensic chemistry. Topics will include organic analysis, inorganic analysis, DNA, glass and soil samples, drugs, fire, and blood. Students will learn the techniques for the analysis of compounds, including microscopy, electrophoresis, chromatography, and spectroscopy. Students should gain a basic understanding of the capabilities and limitations of the forensic sciences as they are presently practiced. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Investigative and Forensic Services (CJUS223) and Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher. Effective Spring 2012 prerequisites: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101) and Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher.

CCED105 Introduction to Early Childhood Education

CHEM201 Organic Chemistry I

The course explores the development and implementation of curriculum in an early childhood setting. It facilitates ways of integrating differing languages, customs, and traditions into the curriculum so children develop greater self-esteem and a broader understanding and appreciation of their own ethnic heritages, and the ethnic heritages of others. The instructor and students design activities to reflect this multicultural perspective. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in Development in Early Childhood (CCED102) or departmental approval.

5 Credits

This is a study of the main classes of organic compounds, including an introduction to natural products. The nomenclature, reaction mechanisms, synthesis, and general properties of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, and haloalkanes are discussed. The topics of stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, and radical chain reactions are discussed. The laboratory is both preparative and analytical, using classical and instrumental experimental techniques. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: General Chemistry II (CHEM152) or permission of instructor. CHEM202 Organic Chemistry II

5 Credits

This is a continuation of the study of the main classes of organic compounds, including aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, amines, and aromatics. The nomenclature, reaction mechanisms, synthesis, and general properties of these compounds will be discussed. The techniques of MS, NMR, and IR spectroscopy will be introduced. IR and NMR spectra will be run and interrupted where appropriate in the laboratory. The laboratory is both preparative and analytical, using classical and instrumental experimental techniques. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I (CHEM201)

3 Credits

This course is designed to give the beginning student in child care an overview of early childhood education from a philosophical, historical, multicultural, and economic point of view. The student gains an understanding of how early childhood education has influenced the child care profession. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. CCED111 Early Childhood Curriculum: Multicultural Perspectives 3 Credits

CCED112 Health, Nutrition, and Safety Needs of Young Children 3 Credits The dynamics of health, nutrition, and safety as they relate to the child’s development and environment is explored. The student identifies problems that may occur in a day care setting: poor nutrition, safety dangers, or child abuse. Advocacy for young children is encouraged. As advocates, students develop methods of assessment, reporting, and referral. The student is introduced to first-aid techniques by the completion of the course. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

102

Course Descriptions CCED201 Admininstration, Supervision, and Management of Child Care Programs

3 Credits

This course emphasizes the importance of thoughtful planning and administration for the success of child care programs. Special attention is given to understanding organizational structure; budgeting; and personnel recruitment, selection, and supervision. Ways to develop and implement philosophical goals and their relationship to the children, families, staff, and the community are discussed. Prerequisites: Introduction to Early Childhood Education (CCED105) or Child Psychology (PSYC102) or a grade of C or better in Development in Early Childhood (CCED102) or departmental approval. CCED211 Child Care Policies and Issues

3 Credits

This course is designed to give the participant an overview of the growing field of child care. Topics focus on a variety of issues such as administration, child abuse, laws and regulations, and historical and social issues as they relate to child care today. Prerequisites: Development in Early Childhood (CCED102) passed with a C or better, Introduction to Early Childhood Education (CCED105), Child Psychology (PSYC202), or departmental approval. CCED212 School-Age Child Care

aspects of development in school-age children and the application of that knowledge in and out of the school setting. The importance of recognizing individual and cultural differences and various rates and patterns of growth is emphasized. Participants will also learn how to conduct health assessments, guide children in developing healthy food habits, and examine how children can be actively involved in their own nutrition, safety, and health education. CCED242 School-Age Program Planning

This course will focus on planning and organizing programs that are developmentally appropriate for school-age child care. Emphasis will be on a variety of content areas, including creative and recreational activities, study skills development, and socialization. Students will be able to apply developmentally appropriate principles to the design of the physical and social environment as well as create and implement activity plans. Prerequisite: School-Age Childcare (CCED212) CCED243 Adminstration, Supervision, and Management Child

1 Credit

This five-week course is designed to introduce the new Massachusetts Early Childhood Program Standards and Guidelines for Preschool Learning Experiences. CCED400 Special Studies-Child Care

3 Credits

3 Credits

1 Credit

This course is designed to prepare students to work in a school-age child care program. It will include school-age child development; health, safety, and nutrition; curriculum development and relationship building; and professional development.

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Child Care Education. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

CCED217 The Young Child with Special Needs

CCED401 Practicum I: Child Care

3 Credits

This course acquaints teachers with ways of integrating the young child with special needs into the regular preschool program. It examines ways of assessing and identifying characteristics of the young child with special needs or the child at risk. Topics include planning and program development, modifying the classroom environment, and working with parents and community resources. Prerequisites: Introduction to Early Childhood Education (CCED105) or Development in Early Childhood (CCED102) passed with a C or better, Child Psychology (PSYC202) or departmental approval. CCED221 Educational Designs of the Child Care Classroom

3 Credits

The child care environment needs not only to be visually pleasing but also to be designed to enhance a child’s inner discipline and to be a warm, creative environment in which to grow. This course investigates the relationship between curriculum and design by addressing issues related to how, what, why, and where children learn. CCED231 Infant and Toddler Care

3 Credits

This course explores how the development stages relating to the first three years should impact the care of infants and toddlers. The student examines physical, psychological, linguistic and cognitive development from birth to three. Emphasis is placed on designing developmentally appropriate activities; understanding the importance of health, nutrition, and feeding practices; equipping space; and nurturing self-esteem in the child care setting. Prerequisites: Development in Early Childhood (CCED102) passed with a C or better, Child Psychology (PSYC202) or departmental approval. CCED241 Development of School-Age Children

3 Credits

This course introduces students to children’s developmental growth from ages seven through fourteen. Information presented in this course corresponds with the Core Competencies for Massachusetts School-Age Practitioners in the competency areas of Child Development and Safety, Health, and Nutrition. Participants will learn about all

3 Credits

The student is placed at an on-site training center for 150 hours. per semester. A minimum of 12 hours. per week is required. The student keeps a journal and makes written observations. Interns participate in a variety of experiences reflective of the community. Field experiences begin with observation and increase to planning activities for individuals or small groups as well as management of the whole group for a portion of the placement. A grade of C or better is required for graduation. A grade of B- or better is required to proceed to Practicum II. Prerequisite: Development in Early Childhood (CCED102) passed with a C or better. Co-Prerequisite: Early Childhood Curriculum: Multicultural Perspectives (CCED111). Corequisite: Seminar I: Child Care Education (CCED407) or departmental approval. Makeup policy: Hours in this practicum may be completed at the discretion of the instructor providing all course work is completed. CCED405 Practicum II: Child Care Management

3 Credits

The student is placed at an on-site training center under the supervision of a director or lead teacher for 150 hours/per semester. A minimum of 12 hours/per week is required. Management skills such as personnel hiring, supervision, and evaluation as well as understanding the regulations that govern group care are developed. The student also understands the importance of addressing multicultural issues when initiating community support and interaction and assumes the responsibilities for the full range of teaching and caregiving. A grade of C or better is required for graduation. Prerequisites: Practicum I: Child Care (CCED401) or School-Age Practicum (CCED409) passed with a grade of B- or better and Early Childhood Curriculum: Multicultural Perspectives (CCED111), or departmental approval. Co-Prerequisites: Administration, Supervision, and Management of Child Care Programs (CCED201) or departmental approval. Corequisite: Seminar II: Child Care Management (CCED408) or departmental approval.

103

Course Descriptions CCED407 Seminar I: Child Care Education

2 Credits

CTIM102 Beginning Word

1 Credit

The students meet twice a week to discuss the practicum experience, exchange ideas, and share concerns. Conference sessions will be included during the seminar. Members of our diverse cultural community are invited to share their knowledge with students. A grade of C or better is required for graduation. A grade of B- or better is required to proceed to Seminar II. Corequisite: Practicum I: Child Care (CCED401) or departmental approval.

This course provides basic training in Microsoft Word for Windows. Students will learn the essentials of document creation, including text entry and editing, text and paragraph formatting, printing, and saving and retrieving documents. Other topics include using features such as spell-checker and thesaurus, headers and footers, and AutoCorrect to enhance the appearance of documents.

CCED408 Seminar II: Child Care Management

This course provides basic training in Microsoft Excel for Windows. Students will learn the essentials of spreadsheet creation, including data entry and editing, formatting, printing, saving, and retrieving worksheets. Other topics include creating and using simple formulas and functions, moving and copying data, AutoFill, and Fill Right/Down features.

2 Credits

The students meet twice a week to discuss the practicum experience, exchange ideas, and share concerns. Conference sessions will be included during the seminar. Members of our diverse cultural community are invited to share their knowledge with students. The focus includes administration and management topics. A grade of C or better is required for graduation. Prerequisites: Seminar I: Child Care Education (CCED407) or School-Age Seminar (CCED410) passed with a grade of B- or better. Corequisite: Practicum II: Child Care Management (CCED405) or departmental approval. CCED409 School-Age Practicum

3 Credits

This course is the on-site training in school-age child care. The student must complete one semester, which includes a minimum of 150 hours distributed over no less than 12 weeks. Practicum experiences include keeping a journal, writing observations, and planning activities in a variety of areas for individuals and groups. Students are encouraged to participate in additional activities within the program to enhance their experience. A grade of C or better is required for graduation. Co-Prerequisite: SchoolAge Program Planning (CCED242). Corequisite: School-Age Seminar (CCED410). CCED410 School-Age Seminar

2 Credits

CTIM103 Beginning Excel

CTIM104 Intermediate Windows

1 Credit

1 Credit

This course is a continuation of Beginning Windows (CTIM101). It covers in depth the use of the Windows features My Computer and Windows Explorer for disk and file management, including disk formatting and labeling; creating, viewing, moving, copying, and sorting folders; searching for files, and printing screens and lists. CTIM105 Intermediate Word

1 Credit

This course is a continuation of Beginning Word (CTIM102). Basic skills are reinforced and additional skills developed, including working with multiple documents; Find, Replace, and Go To; graphic elements; tabs; tables and columns; bulleted and numbered lists; and footnotes. CTIM106 Intermediate Excel

1 Credit

The students will meet on a scheduled basis to discuss the practicum experience, exchange ideas, and share concerns. Conference sessions will be included during the seminar. Members of our diverse cultural community are invited to share their knowledge with students. A grade of C or better is required for graduation. CoPrerequisite: School-Age Program Planning (CCED242). Corequisite: School-Age Practicum (CCED409).

This course is a continuation of Beginning Excel (CTIM103). Topics covered include using statistical, financial, and miscellaneous functions; controlling absolute and relative cell addressing; creating basic charts; AutoFormat and Format Painter; working with multiple workbooks; and consolidating workbooks. Students increase their efficiency as they develop problem-solving spreadsheet skills for various business applications.

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

CTIM108 Advanced Word

CTIM100 Computer Keyboarding

3 Credits

In this introductory course, the student obtains a thorough knowledge of the computer keyboard and the basic principles of touch keyboarding. The course will include the basic features of word processing software and an introduction to letter styles, tables, and manuscripts. The student should progress to a speed of 25–45 words per minute with no more than three errors on three-minute timed writings. The course is adaptable for business and personal use. CTIM101 Beginning Windows

1 Credit

This course is designed as a practical, step-by-step introduction to beginning concepts of the Microsoft Windows operating system. Students learn how to use the mouse and special keys; control window size and display; and use the Start Menu, dialog boxes, and other features of Windows. The Windows accessories Notepad, Wordpad, and Paint are used to learn elementary features of Windows, including editing, copying, and moving text, selecting from menus, and using the Clipboard. Students will learn to save and retrieve files from floppy disks and the basics of the Windows Help feature.

1 Credit

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Word (CTIM105). Topics covered include mail merge; advanced features of tables; recording and running macros; working with wizards, styles, and templates; integrating applications; and object linking and embedding. CTIM109 Advanced Excel

1 Credit

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Excel (CTIM106). Topics covered include advanced functions, creating and running macros, using templates, linking worksheets, embedding objects, charts and graphs, Pivot tables, Goal Seek and forecasting and modeling scenarios. CTIM114 Beginning PowerPoint

1 Credit

This course provides basic training in Microsoft PowerPoint for Windows presentation graphics software. Students learn to plan, create, modify, and enhance presentations with graphics and to produce an on-screen slide show. CTIM115 Intermediate PowerPoint

1 Credit

This course is designed to familiarize the student with more advanced features of Microsoft PowerPoint for Windows presentation graphics software. Basic skills are

104

Course Descriptions reinforced and the following skills are developed in this course: modifying slides and adding graphs, tables, transitions, WordArt, sound/animation, and object linking and embedding. Students increase their efficiency in developing effective presentations as they create electronic slide shows, transparencies, and other visuals. CTIM117 Beginning Access

1 Credit

This course provides basic training in Microsoft Access for Windows database software. Students will learn to create and modify files, add and edit records, and produce reports and labels for a variety of business applications. CTIM118 Intermediate Access

1 Credit

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the more advanced features of Microsoft Access for Windows database software. Basic skills are reinforced and the following skills are developed in this course: creating macros, querying database tables, designing forms, creating reports, use of multiple and interrelated files, and the advanced use of custom screen displays and formatted reports. Students increase their proficiency as they develop problem-solving database skills for various business applications. CTIM119 Voice-Recognition Software

1 Credit

This course will present the features of voice-recognition software to assist students and professionals in increasing their productivity at computer tasks while improving their oral and written communications skills. Each participant will create an individual speech profile, adjust the microphone, use speech commands and software features effectively, correct and train for unique words, and produce voice-typed documents. CTIM121 Business English

3 Credits

This course presents a comprehensive study of punctuation, grammar, spelling, and related language arts skills for effective production of various types of communications for business. Editing and proofreading skills are developed. CTIM122 Business Communication

3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to develop effective writing skills for business and professional use. After a study of sentence and paragraph construction, specialized writing skills are developed, including the production of memoranda, business letters, reports, and resumes. Prerequisite: English Composition I (ENGL101), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. CTIM127 Beginning QuickBooks

1 Credit

This course introduces the students to QuickBooks accounting software, which enables the business owner or worker to manage business finances by using computers. Students will learn how to prepare tax forms, create and monitor budgets, control inventories, work with bank and checking accounts, process payrolls, enter and pay bills, and keep track of cash flow and other assets. CTIM130 Editing

1 Credit

This course develops proficiency in editing and proof-reading skills. Students learn universal proofreading symbols and apply their skills in detecting and correcting formatting and grammatical errors through the use of business documents. CTIM141 Introduction to a Web Editor: Dreamweaver

1 Credit

to Web pages; and learn hyperlinks, lists, and a basic table structure. CTIM142 Introduction to the Internet and the World Wide Web

1 Credit

Students will acquire the necessary information and online skills to become Internet literate. The basic Internet services of email, listserv, newsgroups, chat, blogs, FTP, and the World Wide Web will be explored. Students will learn to use the Web and its resources for educational, professional, and personal use. CTIM147 Internet: Creating a Home Page

1 Credit

This course introduces students to Web page development. Students will evaluate a variety of Web sites and then produce one of their own. Students will use HTML and JavaScript to create a Web site. Students will learn the basic HTML tags as well as how to use tables and add links, graphics, animated gifs, and sound to a Web page. After creating a Web site, students will consider how to obtain a domain name and presence on the Web. CTIM148 Computer Keyboarding Workshop

1 Credit

This course provides a thorough knowledge of the computer keyboard and the opportunity for students to acquire the basic techniques of touch typing. Students who can demonstrate basic keyboard proficiency will have the opportunity to improve their speed and accuracy through the use of specialized keyboarding software. A minimum typing speed of 20 words per minute is required to pass this course. Grading: Pass/Fail. CTIM151 Computer Ethics

1 Credit

This course is designed to educate existing and future information technology (IT) professionals on the impact ethical issues have on the use of computers in the business world. After an overview of ethics is presented, topics covered will include ethical issues related to systems design, privacy, freedom of expression, intellectual property, software development, employer-employee issues, the Internet, and related social issues concerning computing. The course will give future IT professionals the foundation they need to make appropriate decisions when faced with difficult situations and help them to make a positive impact on the field. CTIM155 Introduction to JavaScript

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the uses of JavaScript to make their Web pages active and functional by adding multimedia elements, creating pages dramatically, and interacting with a user. JavaScript can be embedded in HTML documents, thus providing interactivity to what would be static documents. Some of the topics included are displaying messages on the status bar, adding sound to a Web Page, rollovers, working with arrays, writing scripts for frames, and implementing cookies. Prerequisite: Introduction to HTML (CTIM277) or permission of instructor. CTIM156 Creating Web Pages with HTML

4 Credits

This course combines theory and practice in introducing the student to the fundamental elements that make up a Web page. The student will understand how a Web page is structured, organized, and presented in a browser. The student will learn how to use HTML (the language of the Web) to create a range of Web pages. Using sample pages, the student will learn how HTML is used for text formatting, page layout, creating hyperlinks and lists, and displaying images and how FTP is used to upload Web pages to a Web server. The student will also learn how to create more advanced layouts using tables, cascading style sheets, frames, and forms.

Students will learn how to construct, edit, and publish Web pages using Dreamweaver. In addition, they will learn how to import and format text and paragraphs; add images 105

Course Descriptions CTIM157 Introduction to Java Programming

3 Credits

CTIM196 Digital Publishing

Java is a platform-independent object-oriented programming language used to create applets for the World Wide Web and stand-alone applications. This course will give the student a basic understanding of the Java language and its role in the object-oriented world. The student will create simple applets and applications and be introduced to the new HTML tag and parameters required in Web construction. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Introduction to Software Design and Development (CTIM 281) or departmental approval. Prior experience in C or C++ would be helpful but is not required. CTIM164 Internet Law

1 Credit

Cyberlaw, the legal doctrines and principles that apply to the operation and development of computer technology and the Internet, will be examined in this course. Through an analysis of case studies, students will examine various Web-related concerns such as jurisdiction and constitutional issues, e-business, property rights, and cybercrime. CTIM168 Advanced Java Programming

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Java Programming (CTIM157). It develops advanced Java programming skills that are required to fully utilize the capabilities of this object-oriented, general-purpose programming language. Topics covered include exception handling, streams and file input/output, dynamic data structures, recursion, swing objects, applets and HTML, and graphics objects. The student will create sophisticated applets and applications. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Introduction to Java Programming (CTIM157) or departmental approval. CTIM171 Computer Configuration and Hardware

3 Credits

This course will cover personal computer components and configuration. This handson hardware approach is intended to provide the student with real-world exposure to computer repair and maintenance. The student will use system diagnostics to analyze and repair personal computer system faults. The emphasis will be on troubleshooting and replacing individual system components such as memory, hard drives, floppy drives, video cards, modems, and other components. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. CTIM178 Help Desk Concepts

3 Credits

This course introduces the students to the help desk field and to the concepts needed to run a successful help desk. The major components of a help desk (people, process, technology, and information) are examined in detail. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of help desks, career trends and certification, performance measures, and issues related to minimizing stress and avoiding burnout are also considered. Students develop customer service skills, including listening skills, written and verbal communications, handling difficult customers, and solving and preventing problems. CTIM180 Computer and Information Security

3 Credits

This course is designed to give those in the computer and security professions an understanding of the challenges of protecting information assets and the resources available to meet those challenges. An introduction to information and computer security is followed by an examination of the need for security and the legal, ethical, and professional issues faced by professionals in this field. Students will then examine the methodologies within the five stages (Security Analysis, Logical Design, Physical Design, Implementation, and Maintenance and Change) of the development, implementation, and maintenance of a new security system within an organization or the improvement of an existing security system.

3 Credits

Students will learn to use the publishing program InDesign to produce various business publications. Students will progress from learning the basic palettes, tools, and navigation features of InDesign to creating flyers, brochures, and multipage color publications. CTIM197 Adobe Acrobat

1 Credit

Students will learn to use the various features of Adobe Acrobat to publish documents on the World Wide Web that can be viewed, printed, and accessed in their original format. These documents can be electronically shared with anyone regardless of hardware and software platforms. CTIM201 Computer Literacy

3 Credits

This course presents basic computer literacy concepts in the areas of the Windows operating system and the Word, Excel, and PowerPoint features of Microsoft Office. Students who complete this course should be able to use email efficiently, file and retrieve documents, format and edit business-related documents, prepare spreadsheets containing basic formulas and charts, and create electronic presentations. CTIM213 Administrative Management

3 Credits

This course will provide students with the tools for supervising people and technology in the rapidly changing information systems environment through a study of management theories, supervisory styles, and personnel procedures. Problemsolving and critical thinking skills will be developed and applied to business situations. Topics covered include facilities layout and design, work standards and job analyses, work measurement and simplification, budgetary considerations, and the effective utilization of human resources. CTIM221 Operating Systems Concepts

3 Credits

This course is designed for second-year Computer Information Systems students. It examines operating systems from an application programmer’s viewpoint. It shows why operating systems are needed and how they are used to increase operating efficiency while minimizing the need for technical programming. Standard functions of commonly used operating systems are examined. CTIM267 Computer Applications for Telecommunications

3 Credits

This is an introductory course in basic computer orientation to hardware and implementation of software applications in telecommunications. Students will use various software packages to create documents, spreadsheets, graphs, databases, and presentations. The student will utilize this knowledge to solve problems and transfer information via an electronic medium. Lectures, interactive learning, and demonstrations will be employed. Laboratory exercises and presentations will be require. Prerequisite: Telecommunications Technical Mathematics I (MATH143). CTIM271 Database Concepts and Practices

3 Credits

Database software is used to show how data can be logically organized and retrieved for information purposes, overcoming the problem of data redundancy and program dependency on data. The student will do a series of exercises to create, store, sort, and retrieve data. Maintenance will be done on database files to make additions, deletions, and changes. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Beginning Excel (CTIM103), Intermediate Excel (CTIM106), or departmental approval.

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Course Descriptions CTIM274 Information Management

1 Credit

approval.

This course examines paper and non-paper records from creation to destruction. The growth of computer-assisted retrieval of records and information and the use of media and imaging technology for both active records systems and information technologies for records processing and control are also included. CTIM278 Data Communications

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the broad area of business data communications. The fundamental concepts of communications in the computer and telecommunications field are covered. Specific equipment and hardware, such as multiplexers, concentrators, and front-end processors are studied. Various types of transmission will be discussed such as modulation, duplex transmission, and errors. Basic network concepts like topologies, architecture, protocols, and media are discussed in detail.

CTIM292 Software Management and Maintenance

3 Credits

This course will cover personal computer software and maintenance. The course will examine the subject area through classroom and laboratory work, presenting the student with real-world exposure to software management and maintenance. The emphasis will be on installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting software such as operating systems and applications. Prerequisite: Computer Configuration and Hardware (CTIM171) or departmental approval. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. CTIM293 Advanced Game Programming

3 Credits

This is an introductory course in the logical design and development of computer software. Flow charts and algorithms are used as the tools for analysis, design, and development of computer programs. Topics covered include the steps in the logical development of a program, structure programming logic, and the three basic control structures. A practical application of the sequence of the precise instruction of the control structures of simple sequence, If Then Else, and loops will be applied using a simple programming language. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

In this course students will expand their knowledge of programming online games using the programming language ActionScript. Specific topics include the advanced concepts of ActionScript: exceptions, exception handling, garbage collection, dynamic ActionScript, scope, namespaces, XML, E4X, Flash Player security restrictions, the display API, the display list, events, display hierarchies, interactivity, screen updates, programmatic animation, drawing with vectors, bitmap programming, text display, and input and loading external display assets. Students will explore the creation of different types of complex games including action games, adventure games, role-playing games, strategy games, simulation games, vehicle games, puzzle games, and sports games using ActionScript and will leave this class with an advanced understanding of online games and with the ability to program complex online games using ActionScript.

CTIM285 Introduction to Python

CTIM294 Game Production

CTIM281 Introduction to Software Design and Development

3 Credits

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course will give the student a basic understanding of the Python, an object-oriented scripting language, and the role of Python in the object-oriented and scripting worlds. The student will create simple programs using sequence, selection, repetition, and functions. Prerequisite: Introduction to Software Design and Development (CTIM281) or departmental approval.

This course examines the development of one of the most sophisticated forms of software: games and the complex, collaborative efforts required for game development and publishing. The technical challenges of software development, issues of design documentation, content creation, team roles, group dynamics, risk analysis, people management, and process management are also examined.

CTIM286 Advanced Python

CTIM321 Creating Web Sites in Dreamweaver

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Python (CTIM286). It develops advanced Python programming skills that are required to fully utilize the capabilities of this object-oriented scripting language that includes modules, classes, and exceptions. The student will create sophisticated programs. Prerequisites: Introduction to Software Design and Development (CTIM281) and Introduction to Python (CTIM285), or departmental approval.

Students will learn how to construct, produce, edit, and manage Web sites for business using Dreamweaver. Students will learn how to import and format text using character styles, paragraph formats, add images to Web pages, create image maps, create hyperlinks and lists, create layouts using tables and frames, create interactive forms and PDF files, and upload pages to a Web server.

CTIM290 Game Design

Students will learn the basic concepts and skills required to develop effective graphics for the Web and various business publications, the basic tools used in Adobe Photoshop to create and edit images, how to optimize images and save images in proper file formats, and color selection and conversion as it relates to both Web and business publications. Techniques of digital image capture and photo retouching will also be explored.

3 Credits

This course examines the ideas fundamental to the design of electronic and nonelectronic games: gameplay, storytelling, challenges, and basic interactive design (interface design, information design, and world interaction). It provides a detailed study of how games function to construct experiences; including rule design; play mechanics; game balancing; social game interaction; and the integration of visual, audio, tactile, and textural elements into a total game experience. Practical aspects of game design, such as game design documentation and play testing, are also examined. CTIM291 Introduction to Game Programming

3 Credits

This course introduces students to programming games using the object-oriented programming language Java. Threads, 2D graphics and animation, interactivity and interfaces, sound, and multi-player games will be examined. The student will create simple games using Java. Prerequisites: Introduction to Java Programming (CTIM157) and Introduction to Software Design and Development (CTIM281) or departmental

CTIM322 Photoshop for the Web and Print Media

CTIM331 Introduction to Networking

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course is designed to establish a working knowledge of concepts for users who are new to the networking environment. It will introduce students to terminology used in the field and expand students’ technical expertise. The course will define a network, the different types of networks, and the reasons they are used. Explanations of the OSI Reference Model, protocols, transmission media, topologies, and access methods will be discussed.

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Course Descriptions CTIM341 Current Topics in Computer Information Systems

1 Credit

Open only to Computer Information Systems majors in their last semester of study, this course will cover areas of current importance in the information technologies field. Topics covered will include a variety of contemporary, technology-related issues that students entering the IT field may encounter. The class is conducted in seminar format and requires extensive class discussion utilizing timely articles and Internet searches. A project or paper on a relevant topic is required. Prerequisites: Computer Ethics (CTIM151) and Internet Law (CTIM164), or department approval. CTIM361 Introduction to Visual BASIC

3 Credits

This course provides the skills and knowledge required to use essential features and capabilities of Visual BASIC, a programming system used to produce Graphical User Interfaces and applications in a Windows environment. It includes basic programming concepts, problem solving, programming logic, and the design of event-driven programming. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Introduction to Software Design and Development (CTIM281) or departmental approval. CTIM362 Advanced Visual BASIC

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Visual BASIC (CTIM361). It provides advanced programming skills and knowledge of Visual BASIC required to produce Graphical User Interfaces and applications in a Windows environment. It includes advanced programming logic, file and database processing, and methods for allowing the sharing of data between Windows applications. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Introduction to Visual BASIC (CTIM361) or departmental approval. CTIM371 Programming in C++

3 Credits

This is the first course in the C++ programming language. The course will cover general program structures, functions, variable naming rules, iteration statements (for, while, do/while), arithmetic and relational operators, arrays, an introduction to pointers, and an introduction to objects. Hands-on programming exercises will be completed using the College’s IBM-compatible computers and the Turbo C++ compiler. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Introduction to Software Design and Development (CTIM281) or departmental approval. CTIM372 Advanced Programming in C++

3 Credits

This course provides the skills and knowledge required to use essential features and capabilities of Visual C++, a programming system used to produce Graphical User Interfaces and applications in a Windows environment. It includes basic programming concepts, problem solving, programming logic, and the design of event-driven programming. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Introduction to Software Design and Development (CTIM281) and Programming in C++ (CTIM371), or Introduction to Visual Basic (CTIM361), or departmental approval. CTIM400 Special Studies-Computer

CRIMINAL JUSTICE CJUS101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 Credits

This course provides a history, development, and philosophy of criminal justice in a democratic society. It also covers an introduction to agencies in the administration of criminal justice and career introduction. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. CJUS111 Drugs and Behavior in Criminal Justice

CJUS201 Evidence and Court Procedures

3 Credits

This course covers the rules of evidence, the principles of exclusion, evaluation, and the examination of evidence as proof, competency, and consideration of the witnesses. Additional areas covered in this study are the laws of search and seizure and court procedures. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101). CJUS202 Police-Community Relations

3 Credits

This course describes the role of the individual officer in achieving and maintaining public support. It also covers the principles of human relations, public information, relationships with violators, and complaints. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101).

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of

3 Credits

This course acquaints the student with the administrative and physical aspects of private security in such areas as retail, industrial, banking, transportation, medical, and government enterprises. Emphasis is placed on such special problems as private security, education, and training. Other areas covered are the investigation of whitecollar crimes, theft, document control, subversion and sabotage, labor problems, civil disturbances, and disaster preparedness. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101). CJUS213 Security Devices Utilization

3 Credits

This course introduces the students to specific security devices, installation procedures, and methods of utilization. Access control, visitor management, and video and voice activation systems will be emphasized. The infrastructure and integration of security devices to provide warnings against terrorism threat and intrusion (burglary, robbery, theft, or vandalism) will be developed. Design application will include Delay, Detect, Alert, and Respond (DDAR). Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101). CJUS215 Terrorism and the Criminal Justice System

1 Credit

3 Credits

This course will examine the use of psychoactive drugs, emphasizing the social, psychological, and legal context of drug abuse and how drug use and abuse relate to and impact the criminal justice system and society. Federal and state drug laws, drug definitions, drug effects, and drug-related behavior will be discussed. The drug experience throughout history will be examined. Prevention and treatment of drug abuse as well as social control of drug use will also be a focus. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101) or departmental approval.

CJUS211 Introduction to Private Security

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Programming in C++ (CTIM371). The course covers Object Oriented Programming concepts: classes, member functions, stream I/O, inheritance, pointers, arrays, linked lists. Hands-on programming assignments will be completed using the College’s IBM-compatible computers and the Turbo C++ compiler. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Programming in C++ (CTIM371) or departmental approval. CTIM373 Introduction to Visual C++

members of the Department of Computer Technology and Information Management. Limited to two courses per student Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the study of domestic and transnational terrorism.

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Course Descriptions It will focus on this unique form of organizational crime and its implications for the American criminal justice system. The course will pay special attention to the shift in emphasis of the American criminal justice system as well as the new hierarchy of priorities assigned to the various federal, state, and local agencies. Prerequisites: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101).

with management. Contemporary personnel issues and the impact of internal and external influences within agencies are also addressed. Prerequisites: Criminal Law I (CJUS305), Criminal Procedures (CJUS306), English Composition II (ENGL102), American National Governmental (GOVT105) or State and Local Government (GOVT301), General Psychology (PSCY101), and Principles of Sociology (SOCI104).

CJUS221 Domestic Violence

CJUS302 Correction I

3 Credits

This course will deal with the theories of victimology and how domestic violence affects the family structure and society in general. Current trends and statistics will be discussed and law enforcement’s role and legal responsibility in domestic abuse cases will be analyzed. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101). CJUS222 Negotiating

3 Credits

This course surveys the relationship between the courts and the various levels of correctional facilities. Covered in this course are the functions of prisons, jails, halfway houses, and treatment centers as well as the current theory and practice of rehabilitation. The related activities of probation and parole are also covered. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101).

Negotiating is a key process in dispute and conflict resolution as well as a necessary skill for our personal and professional lives. This course is designed to improve students’ abilities to analyze, prepare for, and practice negotiating. Techniques will include roleplaying and the case-study method. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor.

CJUS305 Criminal Law I

CJUS223 Introduction to Investigative and Forensic Services

CJUS306 Criminal Procedures

3 Credits

This course covers crime scene procedures, collection and preservation of evidence, recording of the crime scene, surveillance, and investigative techniques. Also covered are the history of forensic science, crime laboratories’ capabilities and limitations, and the examination of physical evidence. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101). CJUS231 Juvenile Justice

3 Credits

This course will explore national, state, and local efforts to develop and implement effective juvenile delinquency prevention programs. Studies will focus on the methods of prevention, intervention, treatment, detention, and rehabilitation of the youthful offender. Students will also review model case studies of nationally recognized programs. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101). CJUS232 Supervising Police Personnel

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the indispensable role the first-line supervisor plays in the administration of the criminal justice system. It covers important supervisory principles of leadership, training, evaluations, communications, motivating employees, discipline and grievances, and a host of other human resources issues. Prerequisites: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101), Introduction to Investigative and Forensic Services (CJUS223), Criminal Law I (CJUS305), Criminal Procedures (CJUS306), English Composition II (ENGL102), American National Government (GOVT105), General Psychology (PSYC101), Criminology (SOCI203), Speech Communication (SPCH105), Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher, and any one Criminal Justice elective, or departmental approval. Effective Spring 2012 Prerequisites: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101), English Composition I (ENGL101), and General Psychology (PSYCH101), or departmental approval. CJUS234 Management of a Criminal Justice Organization

3 Credits

This course explores management principles and organizational structures of criminal justice agencies. The basic tenets of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, coordinating, motivating, communicating, and budgeting are explored within the unique context of public safety organizations. Emphasis will be placed on the important functions of line supervision and the symbiotic relationship it shares

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course offers a study of the powers and duties of the police, the elements of a crime, and what misdemeanor and felony crimes entail. The course also covers the study of common law and statutory law, the motor vehicle code, and the powers of arrest of the enforcement officer. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101). 3 Credits

This is a study of search and seizure, stop and frisk, threshold inquiry, search warrants, constitutional issues, and recent court decisions. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101). CJUS307 Criminal Investigation

3 Credits

This course covers crime scene procedures, the collection and preservation of evidence, recording of the crime scene, surveillance, investigative techniques, and the methods of preparing a case for court presentation. CJUS308 Introduction to Criminalistics

3 Credits

This course covers the collection, identification, preservation, and transportation of physical evidence. Additional areas covered are the history of forensic science, crime laboratories’ capabilities and limitations, and the examination of physical evidence within the resources of the laboratory. CJUS309 Probation and Parole

3 Credits

This course will provide an overview of the history and philosophical foundations of probation and parole. It will examine the structure and operations of probation and parole agencies as particular segments of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101) or departmental approval. CJUS313 Mediation I

3 Credits

Mediation has proved to be a successful method of resolving a wide variety of interpersonal conflicts in the community, ranging from neighborhood disputes to civil and criminal matters. This course will offer students comprehensive hands-on training that will explore all aspects of the mediation process. Students will be involved in presentations, interactive skill-building exercises, group discussions, and role-playing. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. CJUS314 Mediation II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Mediation I (CJUS313) and examines the resolution of conflict in different contexts. Students will demonstrate mastery of essential

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Course Descriptions mediation skills including facilitating communication, identifying and clarifying issues, rephrasing, questioning techniques, and writing agreements. A variety of problemsolving strategies in conflict situations will be utilized. It is expected that students will spend a minimum of five hours observing civil and mediation cases in Brocktonarea courts under the supervision of program faculty. Students will keep a journal of experiences and have knowledge of the District Courts and how they function. Prerequisite: Mediation I (CJUS313). CJUS321 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice

3 Credits

This course will examine critical issues related to crime and justice. The focus of the course will vary from semester to semester, but it will enable students to synthesize their knowledge and skills in analyzing issues including ethics and criminal justice, racial inequality in the criminal justice system, the efficacy of increasing incarceration rates, and societal responses to crime. The course will require students to demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the field of criminal justice, critical thinking skills applied to criminal justice, effectiveness in oral and written communication, awareness of ethical issues in criminal justice, and knowledge of data sources in criminal justice and the ability to apply criminal justice–related information and research. Prerequisites: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101) and Criminology (SOCI103), or departmental approval. CJUS331 Victimology

3 Credits

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding of crime victims and the criminal justice response. Specifically, the course will be examining the rediscovery of the crime victim, the role of the victim, victim participation, and the concept of a victim-centered justice system. Discussion will include victim-oriented legislation, victim assistance programs, victimization theories, and the key social and demographic characteristics associated with victimization. Prerequisites: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101) and Criminology (SOCI203). CJUS400 Special Study in Criminal Justice

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Criminal Justice. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean. CJUS401 Coop Work Experience in Criminal Justice

3 Credits

This course offers students an opportunity for a structured, supervised paid work experience in criminal justice. The co-op experience allows the student to apply the theory of the classroom experience to the practical application in a criminal justice setting. In addition, a weekly seminar gives the students the opportunity to discuss their jobs, their employers’ evaluations of their work performance, and their weekly academic assignments. This course is open to all qualified sophomore students in the Criminal Justice Programs. Prerequisite: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101). CJUS411 Field Placement in Criminal Justice

3 Credits

For information regarding this course, please check with the Department Chairperson and Division Dean. This course requires independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Criminal Justice Department. There is a limit of two courses per student. Prerequisites: Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJUS101), Introduction to Investigative and Forensic Services (CJUS223),Criminal Law I (CJUS305), Criminal Procedures (CJUS306), English Composition II (ENGL102), American National Government (GOVT105), General Psychology (PSYC101), Criminology (SOCI203), Speech Communication (SPCH105), Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher, and any one Criminal Justice elective, or departmental approval.

CULINARY ARTS CULA123 Table Service

3 Credits

This course will prepare students to set a table according to various styles: American, English, French, and banquet service. They will develop interpersonal skills to interact effectively with customers and coworkers. Emphasis will be placed on setting attractive tables: creating centerpieces, various napkin folds, and table applications with a focus on design and comfort. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 4 hours.. Students should have successfully tested out of or completed Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010) before enrolling in this course. CULA128 Yeast Doughs

3 Credits

In this course students will be taught the skills to prepare a variety of breads and rolls. Emphasis will be placed on accuracy in scaling and measurement of formulas and the proper mixing of dough. The fermentation and baking process will be discussed in detail. Skill development will be introduced through the rolling and shaping of many different styles of breads and rolls. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Students should have successfully tested out of or completed Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010) before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Introduction to Baking (CULA143). CULA135 Garde Manger and Menu Design

3 Credits

Garde manger is the production of food that is not only flavorful but pleasing to the eye. This course familiarizes the students with several aspects of banquet and catering production, including the various design components related to banquets, special occasions, and buffet menus. Students will also cover the planning and application of food garnishes, decorations, centerpiece displays, and other culinary art forms. Canapes, hors d’oeuvres, salads, and galantines will be produced and served by the students. This course requires 15 hours. of college-function participation in addition to lecture and lab components. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Culinary Concepts (CULA140). CULA140 Culinary Concepts

3 Credits

In the first half of this course, students acquire an understanding of basic sanitation and safety skills, leading up to taking the ServSafe exam for national certification in sanitation. In the second part of this course, students acquire an understanding of the preparation of various types of foods and how foods interact with each other. Students learn the fundamental concepts and skills involved in correct measurements, procedures, and knife skills. CULA142 Storeroom and Inventory Procedures

3 Credits

In this course, students learn how to staff and operate a storeroom. Emphasis focuses on proper control and reporting procedures. Preparation of daily, weekly, and monthly reports is required. Lectures include discussion of grading specifications, foodpurchasing regulations, federal and trade grades, yields, and quality controls. CULA143 Introduction to Baking

3 Credits

Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts, skills, and techniques of basic baking. Special emphasis is placed on the study of baking equipment, trade terminology, ingredient identification, and analysis. Lectures and demonstrations cover yeast-raised dough mixing methods, pie crust varieties, pate choux and pastry cream, buttercream, and cake decorating techniques. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Students should have successfully tested out of or completed Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092)

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Course Descriptions involved in the preparation of foods utilizing current nutritional trends and dietary practices. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Culinary Concepts (CULA140).

and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010) before enrolling in this course. CULA144 Soups, Sauces, and Thickening Agents

3 Credits

In this course, special attention is paid to the five grand or mother sauces and the small or compound derivatives. Students prepare basic stocks and learn the various binding or thickening agents. The three categories of soups are also explained. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Culinary Concepts (CULA140). CULA145 Pastry Skills

3 Credits

This course offers the student an exposure to a variety of creative mediums that are found in professional establishments, focusing on advanced skills required for classical and contemporary decorative pieces and pastries. The student will have the opportunity to work with such products as chocolate, sugar, various forms of display mediums, and advanced pastry works. Emphasis will be on techniques, terminology, piping, decorating, presentation, and display pieces. Because the focus of this class is to advance the student’s technical skills, the student must show competencies obtained in the prior bakeshops. Further introduction to the various mediums may come from guest lecturers, field trips, videos, and demonstrations. CULA146 American Regional Cuisine

3 Credits

4 Credits

This course is designed to give the student an overview of foods produced in different regions of the world. Each week the student will prepare different styles of food based on the historical and current food trends of that region. The student will explore foreign cuisines, cultures, and cooking styles in different geographical regions through lectures, handouts, and the preparation of a luncheon buffet from that region. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: American Regional Cuisine (CULA146). CULA152 Classical Cuisine

4 Credits

This course concentrates on various classical foods and recipes. Students will be required to prepare classical French menus following the principles and techniques recommended by Auguste Escoffier and other French masters. Dining concepts from around the world will be emphasized and the preparation of gourmet foods and specialty dishes will also be studied. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: American Regional Cuisine (CULA146). CULA155 Sanitation for Certification and Facilities Planning

3 Credits

This course studies the layout and design of food service operations, with emphasis on designs that allow for efficient production, service, and control. Students will plan a facility of their own and will be required to include a blueprint of their project. Students learn regulations governing sanitation and methods for eliminating hazards. Testing for the NRAEF Sanitation Certificate is required. HACCP and ServSafe procedures will be thoroughly covered. CULA156 Nutrition and Food Trends

3 Credits

This course is designed to acquaint students with basic nutritional concepts and their relationships to promotion of good health, consumer food choices, and appropriate means to ensure pleasurable and healthy dining experiences. The student will be

3 Credits

Students learn to identify meat structure and composition and are taught proper cutting techniques. Also, students study meat grading methods, storage procedures, and methods of preparation and cooking. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Culinary Concepts (CULA140). CULA159 Cake Decorating and Finishing

3 Credits

The students are instructed in the fundamentals of cake, cookie, and dessert preparation. Decorating techniques that will be covered include icing preparation, masking cakes, formation of inscriptions and borders, basic floral designs, basic chocolate and candy decorations, holiday and theme designs, and the proper utilization of decorating tools. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Current prerequisite: Introduction to Baking (CULA143) or departmental approval. Effective Spring 2012 co-prerequisite: Introduction to Baking (CULA143) or departmental approval. CULA160 Chocolate and Sugar Artistry

This course is designed to give students an overview of the regional cuisine of America. Each week the student will prepare different styles of food consistent with the historical and current food trends in that region of America. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Culinary Concepts (CULA140). CULA151 International Cuisine

CULA157 Butchery and Meat Cutting

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to advanced chocolate and sugar techniques. Demonstrated competence with these display media is desirable in many professional establishments. The student will also have the opportunity to work with various other forms of display media. Emphasis will be on techniques, terminology, and the creative process as the student designs, creates, and presents finished display pieces. In addition to providing lectures, this class may feature field trips, videos, and demonstrations designed to promote skill building. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. CULA161 Advanced Pastries

4 Credits

In this baking course, students will be taught the art of preparing a variety of buffetstyle pastries and desserts. Pate choux and puff pastry will be emphasized, centerpiece projects for buffet displays will be included, and some chocolate and marzipan projects will be introduced. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: Introduction to Baking (CULA143). CULA162 Classical Desserts

4 Credits

The focus of this course will be to study the techniques of producing classical style desserts such as baked goods with hot and cold sauces, frozen desserts, bavarois, mousses, chiffons, chocolate ganache, meringues, genoise, cheesecakes, and chocolate and marzipan garnishing. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: Introduction to Baking (CULA143). CULA407 Field Work Experience in Culinary Arts

4 Credits

This course enables students to participate in a supervised (paid or unpaid) learning experience of at least 240 hours. for the semester. Students will be required to work in a food service establishment that will enhance the students’ skills and learning objectives established by the faculty coordinator. Students are also required to keep journals of their daily work activities and the relevance of these activities to their learning objectives. All field work experience sites must meet departmental guidelines and standards. Any student who finds it to his/her advantage to do his/her field work during the summer prior to the fall semester of his/her sophomore year may do so with departmental approval. This process must begin before the seventh week of the Spring semester of the freshman year. Prerequisites: Introduction to Baking (CULA143) and

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Course Descriptions American Regional Cuisine (CULA146).

course is a study of communication as it relates to patient-doctor-auxiliary relations as well as employer-employee situations. The course covers telephone techniques, appointment control, record and filing procedures, banking, billing, third-party payments, inventory control, and supplies. Resume and interviewing techniques are also covered.

DANCE DANC301 Introduction to African Dance

3 Credits

This course is a dance and cultural experience on and about the African Diaspora. It is a course designed to teach the student about African dance and culture. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to African geography and history. Students will also learn how traditional movements and rhythms have influenced dance in America. DANC303 Introduction to Irish Dance

3 Credits

This course is a dance and cultural experience on and about the Irish Diaspora. It is a course designed to teach the student about Irish dance and culture. Students will learn various dance steps and Irish Ceili dances. DANC305 Contemporary Dance

3 Credits

This is a studio-based class including the study of classic, contemporary, and modern forms to help students develop their flexibility, rhythm, strength, and self-awareness. The class will be a combination of the study of famous and founding dancers, learning routines or dance phrases, and improvisation. Weekly dance combinations will be taught. Students will conclude the course with an appreciation for contemporary dance. All levels are welcome, but some dancing experience is recommended. DANC306 Latin Dance

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide a cultural dance experience. The classes will introduce the basics of the following Latin dances: Salsa, Merengue, Cha Cha, Rumba, and Samba. Partner work will be required, but students do not need to bring their own partners. DANC400 Special Study Dance

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Dance faculty. Limited to 2 courses per student Prerequisite: Approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

3 Credits

This course includes the theory and practical use of dental materials, including uses, composition, properties, and proper manipulation. Gypsum products, impression materials, waxes, and cements are covered. Basic restorative materials are introduced. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DENT103 Dental Radiography I

3 Credits

This course provides instruction in the nature of ionizing radiation; the production, properties, dosage, and hazards of radiation; and appropriate protection techniques for patient and operator. Instruction in the function and correct use of the dental X-ray machine and techniques of film exposure, processing, and mounting are presented through lectures, demonstrations, and clinical practice. Patient exposures include bite wing X-rays and full mouth X-rays. Co-Prerequisite: Dental Science I (DENT106). Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DENT105 Dental Office Management

3 Credits

This course is designed to train the Dental Assistant in business procedures for a dental setting. Emphasis is placed on this role as part of the team concept. Included in this

5 Credits

This course provides instruction in head and neck anatomy and emphasizes oral anatomy as it relates to the growth and development of the teeth and adjacent structures. The course will include the relationship of dental structures to body systems and to health. The course will also cover oral history, oral embryology, and microbiology as they apply to oral disease and the prevention and methods of infection control. Oral pathology and identification of common oral conditions and lesions will be a component of this course. Nutrition will be included as it relates to oral health and dental caries. Home care instruction and plaque control will also be emphasized. Lecture: 4 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DENT107 Chairside Assisting

6 Credits

This course prepares the student for clinical externship, utilizing the concepts of four-handed dentistry. Instruction is provided in instrumentation, tray set-ups, and sterilization. Also included is instruction in chairside positioning, preparation of the dental unit, and maintenance of equipment. Basic intra-oral functions such as mirror placement and retraction, use of oral evacuation, and rubber dam technique are also covered. CPR training is included as part of this course. Lecture: 4 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. DENT111 Dental Science II

3 Credits

A continuation of Dental Science I (DENT106), this course includes dental pharmacology, emphasizing the nature and property of the drugs and anesthetics used frequently in dentistry. Also included is an introduction to dental specialties: orthodontics, periodontics, oral surgery, endodontics, pediatric dentistry, and prosthodontics. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Science I (DENT106) DENT112 Clinical Externship in Dental Assistance

DENTAL DENT102 Dental Materials I

DENT106 Dental Science I

6 Credits

This component of the program provides the student with practical experience in four-handed dentistry, general office procedures, and basic laboratory skills. To expose students to a broad spectrum of patients and settings, the students rotate through several types of dental settings, including private practice and a hospital or dental clinic. To integrate experiences, students must maintain a daily log of dental procedures and duties performed and must attend a seminar with the dental assistant faculty member. This course involves 300 hours. of clinical experience. Current prerequisites: Dental Materials I (DENT102), Dental Radiography I (DENT103), and Chairside Assisting (DENT107). Effective Spring 2012 prerequisites: Grade of C+ or higher in the following courses: Dental Materials I (DENT102), Dental Radiography I (DENT103), and Chairside Assisting (DENT107). DENT113 Dental Materials II

2 Credits

This course includes restorative materials but in more depth than first semester. Students also learn to perform laboratory procedures associated with chairside assisting: pouring, trimming, and polishing study models and casts; fabricating custom impression trays from preliminary impressions; cleaning and polishing removable appliances; and fabricating temporary crowns and restorations. In addition, demonstrations of fabrication of dies, wax patterns, investment, and casting procedures are provided. Sealants are taught to clinical proficiency. Polishing agents are introduced. Laboratory:

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Course Descriptions 4 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Materials I (DENT102). DENT114 Dental Radiography II

3 Credits

Students learn both the bisecting-angle technique and the long cone or paralleling technique. In this semester, emphasis is placed on the latter. Evaluation of dental radiographs for diagnostic value and application of readings to clinical practice is also stressed. Methods of instruction are lecture, demonstration, and clinical practice. Exposures continue with additional full-mouth X-ray. Duplication of films is included. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Radiography I (DENT103).

DIESEL DIES107 Engine Principles I

3 Credits

This course is designed to familiarize the students with the fundamental physical principles and relationships that apply to reciprocating internal combustion engines. Topics include the operational theory of internal combustion engines, combustion and heat, fuel consumption and power, scavenging and supercharging. The handson servicing of complete engines involves disassembly, precision measuring, and reassembly of an engine in the laboratory. Lecture: 1 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. DIES108 Electrical Systems

3 Credits

The student develops an understanding of electrical knowledge as a foundation for future level advancement. The course gives the student the background and working knowledge of the electrical theory required to test and service the electrical system of a diesel-powered piece of equipment. Repair and troubleshooting procedures consisting of removal, disassembly, inspection, repair, and reassembly of electrical components are designed to prepare students for entering the job market equipped with both the knowledge and skills needed for satisfactory performance on the job. Safety in all areas is constantly stressed, as well as the development of correct work habits, attitudes, and interest for each student. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES118 Engine Machining

3 Credits

This course covers the principles of basic engine machining with an emphasis on the development of basic engine machining skills. Engine machining will cover cylinder block repairs including counterbore cutting, water passage inserts, thread repairs, boring and honing cylinders, and welding repairs. Cylinder head repairs will include pressure testing, valve and valve guide replacement, and proper procedures for valve seat refinishing. Nondestructive metal inspection will be covered including Magnafluxing and dye penetrant procedures. Special emphasis will be placed on developing precision measuring skills that are necessary to complete any machining process. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES122 Fuel Systems

3 Credits

This course is designed to give the student the background and working knowledge of modern diesel fuel injection systems and their components, which are a necessary part of the diesel internal combustion engine. Topics include the operation of instruments, computer diagnostic and calibration programs, and special tools required to test current production fuel systems on modern diesel engines. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engine Principles I (DIES107) or permission of instructor DIES123 Truck Components I

3 Credits

This course will introduce the student to a number of specialized areas that a diesel technician will encounter. Through classroom lecture and lab application the student

will learn maintenance and repair procedures for heavy-duty truck components. Specialized areas of study will include braking, steering, suspension, and basic drivelines. The lab will provide practical experience in troubleshooting and maintenance of these components. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Engine Principles I (DIES107) or permission of instructor. DIES124 Truck Components II

3 Credits

This course will introduce the student to a number of specialized areas that a diesel technician will encounter. The students will build on the knowledge that they received in Truck Components I (DIES123). The more complex components discussed include ABS brakes, on-board computer systems, hydraulics, and transportation refrigeration. The lab will provide practical experience in troubleshooting and maintenance of these components. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Truck Components I (DIES123) or permission of instructor. DIES130 Introduction to Engine Principles

2 Credits

This course is designed to familiarize the students with the fundamental physical principles and relationships that apply to reciprocating internal combustion engines. Topics include the operational theory of internal combustion engines, combustion and heat, fuel consumption and power, scavenging, and supercharging. The hands-on servicing of engines involving disassembly, precision measuring, and reassembly of engine components will be covered in this course. DIES133 Governing and Computer Control Systems

3 Credits

This course is a study in the theory and operating characteristics of various types of governing and computer control systems as applied to the diesel engine. The study of the governing system includes functions of the system and detailed analysis of the mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic, and electrical governors. The second major focus of this course is on the computer control system and its role in engine governing, emission control, and diagnostics. Through lab application, this course will give students the necessary skills used in solving problems in governing and computer control systems. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engine Principles I (DIES107) or permission of instructor. DIES134 Multi-Cylinder Overhaul

4 Credits

This course develops the student’s understanding of various diesel engines by working with one manufacturer at a time, enabling the student to gain a clear understanding of a diesel engine’s construction, operation, maintenance, and repair. Also covered are the troubleshooting and engineering designs that are integrated in the diesel engines of various manufacturers. The course provides a sound procedure in understanding the importance of the serial number of the engine, so the technician can obtain the information needed to correct any deficiency with a diesel engine. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. DIES140 Marine Diesel Engines

3 Credits

This course will introduce the student to the most common Marine Diesel engines used in the marine industry. Basic engine design, diesel fuel systems, engine electrical and electronics, engine mechanical troubleshooting, cooling systems and maintenance will be covered. This course will provide valuable experience for both boat owners and mechanics involved in the maintenance of diesel-powered vessels. DIES141 Fund of Standby Power Generation

4 Credits

This course covers the fundamental operating principles of stationary and portable

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Course Descriptions electric power generation equipment. Generator construction, operating principles, troubleshooting and proper installation procedures are covered in detail. Students work with current production automatic transfer switches and GENSETS from 2.8 kW to 25kW developing an understanding of generator operation and proper testing procedures. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES150 Crane Safety

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of craning. It is divided into three units: site, load charts, and operations. Crane safety is emphasized throughout the course. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES151 Grades and Plans

2 Credits

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of grade checking and to selected methods and techniques used by grade checkers. It is designed to provide a foundation upon which to build the skill of grade checking. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES152 Health and Safety

3 Credits

This course consists of two units, each designed to equip the student with the knowledge and skills to recognize, prevent, and/or respond to accidents, illnesses, and deaths on the job. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES153 Rigging and Reeving

3 Credits

This course provides the student with a basic knowledge of rigging equipment, materials, procedures, and safety precautions used in the construction industry. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES154 Electricity I

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to electricity and electronics as they are commonly used in mobile machines. It covers theory, components, batteries, and circuitry. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES155 Electricity II

3 Credits

This course is designed to teach the basic and generic elements that a student should know about nearly all types of construction equipment. The student will acquire a basic understanding of mechanical systems for purposes of pre-operational checking and inspection. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES157 Hydraulics

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with the basics required to understand and service hydraulic systems. Theory of operation, failure analysis, repair, and troubleshooting procedures will be covered in detail. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES158 Earth Moving Equipment Operation

DIES159 Welding

3 Credits

This course introduces the student operator to the basics of bulldozers, graders, rubber tire loaders, and rubber tire loader backhoes in terms of their elementary, intermediate,

3 Credits

This is a fundamentals course designed to introduce the student to gas and arc welding processes through classroom study and hands-on shop practice. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 4 hours. DIES222 Electronic Engine Diagnostics

3 Credits

This course covers the introduction and uses of computer- based diagnostic applications. Students will learn basic Windows and then learn engine-specific diagnostic applications that are used in the calibration and repair of today’s electronic diesel engines. They will learn to open and create new job orders using engine software applications and will learn how to diagnose engine faults using diagnostic programs and follow appropriate troubleshooting procedures. Electronic engine control module calibrations and customer-controlled parameters will be covered in depth. The primary focus in this class will be on the Cummins Insite and the Caterpillar ET diagnostic programs, although others will be discussed. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engine Principles I (DIES107) or permission of instructor. DIES223 Compressed Natural Gas Engines

3 Credits

This course covers the characteristics of compressed natural gas (CNG) and propane and how they are used as alternative power sources in internal combustion engines. The student will learn the characteristics of alternative fuels, evaluate the storage and handling components of the alternative fuel system, and the safety procedures involved in working with these fuels. Students will learn the theory behind the operation of gaseous fuel engines and be able to identify, service, and troubleshoot components unique to these engines. The primary focus in this class will be on the Cummins 5.9 BG and the L10 G engines, although other manufacturers will be discussed. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engine Principles I (DIES107) or permission of instructor. DIES224 Electronic Mid-Range Diesel Engines

3 Credits

This course is designed to build upon the knowledge and skills obtained in Electricity I (DIES154). It focuses on switches and controls, monitors and controllers, and diagnosis and testing of the electrical systems commonly used in heavy equipment operations. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. DIES156 Heavy Equipment Pre-Operation Inspection

and advanced operations. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

4 Credits

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the Cummins ISB and ISC Electronic Mid-Range Automotive Diesel Engines. Emphasis is placed on understanding the Interact System (computer controls), air, lube, cooling and fuel systems as they apply to troubleshooting. Topics include Diesel Engine Theory, maintenance practices, manual utilization, proper troubleshooting and tune-up procedures. Emphasis is also placed on understanding both the Bosch VP-44 Electronic Distributor Fuel System and the Cummins Accumulator Fuel Systems. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. DIES225 Mid-Range Diesel Engines

4 Credits

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the Cummins B and C Mid-Range Automotive Diesel Engines. Emphasis is placed on understanding the air, lube, cooling, and fuel systems as they apply to troubleshooting. Topics include Diesel Engine Theory, maintenance practices, manual utilization, proper troubleshooting, and tune-up procedures. Emphasis is also placed on understanding both distributor and inline fuel systems. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. DIES241 Environmental Health and Safety (Hazwoper)

3 Credits

This course trains the student to become Hazwoper certified to work in a variety of hazardous waste construction and demolition settings. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

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Course Descriptions EARTH SCIENCE ESCI121 Geology I

ECON400 Special Study Economics 4 Credits

This course is intended to acquaint students with the physical structure of the earth, the nature of the materials constituting it, and the major processes responsible for continual change. Students learn how geologists go about interpreting the earth and deciphering its history. In the laboratory portion of the course, emphasis is placed on becoming familiar with crystal rocks and minerals and the effects of geological processes as interpreted from topographic maps and aerial photographs. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in Introductory Algebra (MATH101), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. ESCI123 Meteorology

4 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the dynamic processes at play within the earth’s fluid atmosphere and with an appreciation of the role of these processes in producing weather. Topics covered in the course include the origin and evolution of the earth’s atmosphere, structure and characteristics of the atmosphere, earth-sun relationships and their influence on seasons, solar and terrestrial radiation, the hydrologic cycle, gas laws, global circulation, weather systems and fronts, storms, and analysis of weather maps. Weekly laboratory exercises complement the topics covered in lecture. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: C- or better in Introductory Algebra (MATH 101), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. ESCI124 Physical Ocean Environment

4 Credits

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Economics faculty. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

EDUCATION EDUC101 Classroom Management

3 Credits

This course will cover the principles of classroom management in elementary through high school settings. The development of classroom and individual behavior plans will be emphasized. The influence of positive communication, structured learning environments, cultural sensitivity, reinforcement techniques, individual disabilities, and social skills and communication will be examined. Also addressed will be the influence of family involvement and staff cooperation on classroom and student behavior. EDUC102 Strategies in Teaching Literacy

3 Credits

This course will present issues and strategies in literacy for classroom paraprofessionals so that they can provide instructional support services based on the standards and competencies recommended by the International Reading Association. The learner will receive instruction in the methods and materials associated with reading literacy for students ages 4 to 14 based on the general standards of the Massachusetts English Language Arts Curriculum Framework. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. EDUC103 Methods of Teaching Mathematics

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the physical aspects of the marine environment. Topics include the origin of the earth and oceans, physical properties of water, properties of the ocean basins, economic wealth of the oceans, atmospheric-oceanic circulation, waves, tides, and shoreline processes. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Cor better in Introductory Algebra (MATH101), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

This course will present methods of and materials for instruction for classroom paraprofessionals so that they can provide mathematical experiences confidently and knowledgeably. The learner will also receive instruction in the areas of cognitive development most closely associated with mathematics for students ages 4 to 14. Prerequisites: Introduction to Algebra (MATH101), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

ECONOMICS

EDUC104 Classroom Technology in Education

ECON201 Principles of Economics I (Macro)

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the study of the capitalist economy and supply and demand. The major emphasis is devoted to an analysis of the components of the national product. Also, consideration is given to how the economy operates at full employment. Fiscal and monetary policies are examined. Understanding economics as a discipline is stressed throughout the course. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. ECON202 Principles of Economics II (Micro)

3 Credits

This course includes a continuation of market analysis and the choices individuals and firms make when they buy and sell. Emphasis is on the pricing of the factors of production. Some attention to allocation by non-market methods will be given. Market structures are also examined. Policy problems include income distribution, competition, and regulation. Trade and comparative economic systems are also studied. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

3 Credits

This course will offer students and practicing education professionals an opportunity to develop skills that will enable them to facilitate current federal, state, and local requirements and standards. Topics will include an assessment of traditional and contemporary media, learning technologies, and integration of computers into classrooms and curriculum. Learners will also develop skill in identifying equipment uses, set-up, and maintenance. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading ll (ENGL092), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. EDUC105 ELL and Diversity in the Classroom

3 Credits

This course is designed for paraprofessionals to provide them with the knowledge and skills necessary to address communication and cultural barriers in increasingly diverse classrooms. Issues and topics will include intercultural communication skills, cross-cultural awareness, linguistic diversity, and appreciation for cultural diversity. Special focus will be given in assisting the English language learner to integrate into the classroom culture. EDUC106 Introduction to Special Education

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of special needs education. It examines ways of identifying the characteristics of the behavioral, social, and learning needs of children from birth to 14 years of age so that effective interventions

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Course Descriptions and services may be utilized. Topics will include planning and program development in inclusive settings, working with the Individual Education Plan (IEP), modifying the environment, examining relevant state and federal laws, and working with families and community resources. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. EDUC111 Introduction to Elementary Education

3 Credits

In this course students will be introduced to elementary education from philosophical, theoretical, social, and historical perspectives. Emergent theories and philosophies will also be examined. Students will begin to explore the development of young children and legal issues related to education in grades one through six. Students are required to participate in a 40-hour pre-practicum experience during this course. Students will assimilate classroom learning about the educational process with observational experiences in grades one through six classroom settings. One month (or as early as possible) prior to the pre-practicum placement, students must submit to CORI and SORI checks. Inability to fulfill the course requirement of 40 hours. of pre-practicum observation due to CORI or SORI restrictions will result in course failure. It will also result in the inability to successfully fulfill the program and degree requirements. Prerequisites: Principles of Mathematics I (MATH123) or Principles of Mathematics II (MATH124) and Biological Principles I (BIOL121), Introductory to Biology (BIOL140) and Laboratory for Introductory Biology (BIOL142), General Chemistry I (CHEM151), College Physics I (PHYS151), Physical Ocean Environment (ESCI124), or departmental approval.

ENGINEERING ENGT049 Verizon Orientation

1 Credit

The purpose of this course is to help students succeed in their academic degree program in telecommunications. Basic study skills, umbrella competencies, and test-taking strategies are reviewed. Students are shown how to use the library, conduct Web searches on the computer, and use the assigned calculator. Emphasis is placed on team building using group exercises and assignments. ENGT104 Electrical Circuits

4 Credits

In this course students learn to analyze DC and AC passive circuits using Ohm’s Law, Kirchhoff’s laws, and Superposition. RC and RL circuits are analyzed for impedance and phase angles. Troubleshooting, analysis by computer simulation using simulation software, and telecommunication applications are stressed throughout. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Telecommunications Technical Mathematics II (MATH144) and Computer Applications for Telecommunications (CTIM267). ENGT107 Computer-Aided Drafting

3 Credits

Using a microcomputer-based CAD system, the student will learn basic drawing tools, modifications, layers, dimensioning, text, blocks, and hatch parameters. Students will create drawings and learn how to plot, file, retrieve, and modify them. Projects include drawings from architectural, civil, mechanical, and electronic career fields. The course includes a review of basic drawing concepts, including orthographic, isometric, and line weights. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT109 Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting

3 Credits

Topics covered include use of blocks and block attributes in parts libraries, creating Bills of Material and reports using block attributes and a programming language, drawing isometric drawings on the computer, using 3-D surface modeling routines, 3-D drawing, writing and using macros, and customizing the CAD program. Prerequisites: ComputerAided Drafting (ENGT107) or departmental approval.

ENGT111 Electrical Circuits I

4 Credits

This is the first of two courses that investigate the operation of electrical circuits. It contains the following material: electron theory; conductors and insulators; current and voltage; the properties of resistance; work and power; the principles of series, parallel, and series- parallel circuits; the concepts of capacitance, and RC time constants. Kirchoff’s Laws, Thevenin’s Theorem, Superposition Theorem, loop equations, and network theorems are also covered. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher, waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. ENGT112 Electrical Circuits II

4 Credits

This course is a continuation of Electrical Circuits I (ENGT111). The topics include magnetic theory, inductance, RL time constants; the theory of alternating current and voltage; inductive and capacitive reactance; phasors; impedance characteristics of series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits; power in AC circuits; power factor and its correction; series and parallel resonance; filter circuits; transformer characteristics; and the application of DC circuit theorems to the AC circuit. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Electrical Circuits I (ENGT111) and Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher, waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. ENGT114 Digital Circuits

3 Credits

This course covers numbering systems, Boolean algebra, combination logic gate circuits, flip-flops, counters, shift registers, adders, and timing diagrams. Throughout the course, practical application of logic gating systems is emphasized. The specification sheet and loading requirements of the various families of logic gates such as TTL and CMOS are studied. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical Circuits I (ENGT111) or permission of instructor. ENGT117 Digital Electronics I

4 Credits

This course will prepare students in digital electronics with topics related to number systems and codes, logic functions, and Boolean algebra. IC building blocks are used in applications ranging from logic gates to flip-flops, counters, registers, and arithmetic circuits. Algebraic reduction and mapping are used to minimize Boolean expressions and combinational logic circuits. Computer simulation of digital circuits will be used to verify actual hardware setups. Prerequisite: Linear Electronics I (ENGT115) Corequisite: Telecommunications I (ENGT301). ENGT118 Digital Electronics II

4 Credits

This course is designed to train students in the organization, architecture, and hardware aspects of digital computer systems. Topics include an introduction to microprocessors, types and characteristics of different chips, microprocessor architecture, introduction to programming, PC system organization, operating systems, motherboards, bus structures, memory, I/O interface devices, disk drives, video displays, and printers. Serial and parallel buses are discussed. Applications include the interfacing of peripherals, data communications between computers, and a team project. Prerequisites: Digital Electronics I (ENGT117) and Linear Electronics II (ENGT116). Corequisite: Telecommunications II (ENGT302). ENGT121 Digital System Telecommunications I

4 Credits

Students practice the analysis and application of advanced electronic circuits as applied to the telecommunications industry. Topics include frequency response of filters, opamps, oscillators, amplitude modulation, noise, and LC circuits. Troubleshooting and

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Course Descriptions analysis by computer simulation software is stressed throughout. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Telecommunications Technical Mathematics I (MATH143) and Computer Applications for Telecommunications (CTIM267). ENGT122 Digital System Telecommunications II

4 Credits

In this course students will be working with hardware and software installation with an introduction to personal computer fundamentals. This course will cover management and support of the Windows operating system, configuration of user-related issues, and customization. Computer maintenance and troubleshooting fundamentals will also be covered. Students will connect a personal computer to a network and install and set up a printer. Home technology integration including surveillance, home automation, and cabling is an optional topic. The course is composed of lecture and inclass demonstration. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Digital System Telecommunications I (ENGT121).

Certification and introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. It uses the OSI and TCP layered models to examine the nature and roles of protocols and services at the application, network, data link, and physical layers. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. Labs use a model Internet to allow students to analyze real data without affecting production networks. Packet Tracer (PT) activities help students analyze protocol and network operation and build small networks in a simulated environment. At the end of the course, students build simple LAN topologies by applying basic principles of cabling, performing basic configurations of network devices such as routers and switches, and implementing IP addressing schemes. ENGT131 Routing Protocols and Concepts

4 Credits

Students practice the analysis and application of advanced electronic circuits as applied to the telecommunications industry. Topics include frequency response of filters, opamps, oscillators, amplitude modulation, noise and LC circuits. Troubleshooting and analysis by computer simulation software is stressed throughout. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Telecommunications Technical Mathematics I (MATH 143) and Computer Applications for Telecommunications (CTIM267).

This course is the second of four modules that will prepare students for the Cisco CCNA Certification. The course describes the architecture, components, and operation of routers and explains the principles of routing and routing protocols on the Network Layer of the OSI Model and the TCP/IP Model. Students analyze, configure, verify, and troubleshoot the primary routing protocols RIPv1, RIPv2, EIGRP, and OSPF. Students complete a basic procedural lab, followed by basic configuration, implementation, and troubleshooting labs in each chapter. Packet Tracer activities reinforce new concepts and allow students to model and analyze routing processes that may be difficult to visualize or understand. Prerequisite: Network Fundamentals (ENGT130).

ENGT124 Electronic Systems for Telecommunications II

ENGT204 Microprocessors and Digital Systems

ENGT123 Electronic Systems for Telecommunications I

4 Credits

4 Credits

Students practice the analysis and application of advanced electronic circuits as applied to the telecommunications industry. Topics include frequency modulation, communication techniques, digital wired, and wireless transmission lines, antennas, and fiber optics. Troubleshooting and analysis by computer simulation software is stressed throughout. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electronic Systems for Telecommunications I (ENGT123). ENGT126 Green Energy Design and Building

4 Credits

This 12-module online course is designed to update construction industry professionals, high school and vocational educators, and consumers about the status of emerging energy systems and the recent evolution of building and infrastructure design. Both the practical applications and the underlying theories will be addressed. Applications will be covered at a level appropriate for discussions among contractor, architect, and consumer. Typical targeted consumers might be municipal officials, homeowners, or physical plant managers. The underlying theory of each system will be discussed at the level of high school physics with references to more advanced science for those requiring it. ENGT127 Energy Systems Module I

This course emphasizes the uses and design of microprocessors and interfacing especially as they relate to the Personal Computer. Binary numbering systems are discussed as applied to digital systems. The course will cover managing and supporting Windows operating systems. Computer hardware will also be studied, including the motherboard, Central Processing Unit (CPU), hard drives, memory, and optical drives. Students will connect a personal computer to a network and install and set up a printer. Through hands-on experiments, the student will learn how to troubleshoot, maintain, and update their own personal computers. This course will include an introduction to networking and protocols using the Cisco database. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Digital Circuits (ENGT114). ENGT209 Electronic Devices

4 Credits

Semiconductor physics is studied as an aid to understanding the operation of electronic devices. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of device parameters and characteristic curves. Devices studied include the diode, transistor, the SCR, and power supplies. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical Circuits II (ENGT112) or permission of instructor. ENGT221 Electronic Circuit Applications

3 Credits

4 Credits

4 Credits

This course involves a comprehensive study of energy, energy sources, and energy systems in our technological society. Specifically, the topics will include energy, energy sources, comparative analyses of energy systems, energy efficiency, and cost analysis, energy by-products, waste, pollutants, pollution, and its environmental impact, corrective action to environmental pollution, solar energy technology, analysis of solar energy systems, and improvements and alternatives for energy systems. Prerequisite: Concepts of Technical Physics II (PHYS133) or higher.

This course is a continuation of Electronic Devices (ENGT209). New active devices to be covered include Field Effect Transistors, Differential Amplifiers, Operational Amplifiers, Triacs, and unijunction devices. These devices will be used in amplifier circuits, oscillators, power control circuits, digital and analog circuits, and various industrial applications. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electronic Devices (ENGT209) or permission of instructor.

ENGT130 Network Fundamentals

This course covers the principles of basic electronic test equipment and their applications. The equipment is first analyzed and then utilized in active circuits. The equipment to be covered includes power supplies, VOM and digital voltmeters, function

4 Credits

This course is the first of four modules that will prepare students for the Cisco CCNA

ENGT227 Instrumentation and Measurements

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3 Credits

Course Descriptions generators, oscilloscopes, frequency counters, and specialized equipment. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT228 Electronic Communications Technology

4 Credits

Analog and digital communications systems are covered with an emphasis on fiber optic cable as a transmission media. Topics include modulation, demodulation, multiplexing, de-multiplexing, and the advantages and disadvantages of various transmission media. Topics related to the telephone network will be emphasized. This will include an introduction to networking and protocols using the Cisco database. Approximately half of the laboratory sessions will use computer software to simulate circuits and systems. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: Electronic Devices (ENGT209) or permission of instructor. Corequisite: Electronic Circuit Applications (ENGT221) or permission of instructor. ENGT241 Code I

1 Credit

In this course the National Electrical Code is examined in detail. Students develop a working knowledge of the NEC and the ability to apply its requirements to electrical processes. Laboratory: 2 hours.

ENGT251 Data I

2 Credits

This introductory course examines the evolution of data communications and the technical aspects of data communications equipment and facilities. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT252 Data II

2 Credits

This course is a continuation of Data I (ENGT251). Students become familiar with Local Area Network systems, management, connectivity of wires and cables, along with the testing of cabling, wiring, and jacks. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT253 Data III

2 Credits

This theory and shop course is an introduction to Local Area Networks (LANs). It covers the history of networking, different kinds of network architecture, standards and protocols (OSI model), and the future of networking. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT254 Data IV

2 Credits

This course focuses on the use and application of the National Electrical Code in the design and installation of lightning protection systems. Laboratory: 2 hours.

This combination theory and shop course is a continuation of Data III. Students learn basic LAN tenets and media, telecommunication standards, fiber optic guidelines, a complete premise wire system, basic topologies, optical fiber transmissions, network and local exchange carrier, TCP/IP, and NT networking. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

ENGT243 Theory

ENGT255 Telephone I

ENGT242 Code II

1 Credit

1 Credit

2 Credits

This course begins with a review of AC theory, then covers series and parallel resonances, filters, power factors, quality and harmonics. Students learn to correct problems associated with power factors and harmonics and to demonstrate their ability to apply electrical theory learned in preceding years. Laboratory: 2 hours.

This foundation course provides a basic introduction to telephone technology and its fundamental principles of operation. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

ENGT244 Digital Electronics

This course is a continuation of Telephone I. It provides a general introduction to cable installation and maintenance. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

2 Credits

This course introduces the student to Boolean algebra, characteristics of logic circuits with buffer and inverter amplifiers, digital, switch circuits, principles of motor speed control, opto electronics, and fiber optics. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

ENGT256 Telephone II

ENGT257 Telephone III

2 Credits

2 Credits

This shop course prepares the student to take electrical examinations for the Massachusetts Journeyman and Master’s Licenses. Students undertake a thorough review of both national and state electrical codes and complete a comprehensive series of sample questions and examinations. Laboratory: 2 hours.

This course is designed to prepare the student entering the industry to install, program, and maintain small electronic hybrid key systems (NorstarCICS). It provides key system history, theory, standards, and product knowledge competencies on the Norstar key system product line. Students participate in classroom and laboratory exercises in installing, administering, and maintaining analog trunking. This course includes handson product training and orientation of the Norstar installation guide and handbook. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

ENGT246 Computer Literacy Shop I

ENGT258 Telephone IV

ENGT245 Code Shop

1 Credit

1 Credit

This course is an introductory computer literacy shop for students with no computer experience. The course covers the history of the computer, systems hardware, operating systems, hands-on practice in word processing and spreadsheets, and an introduction to the Internet. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT247 Welding Shop

3 Credits

This course prepares students to complete a fillet weld test coupon successfully and safely using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process, after a combination of classroom study, review, and hands-on application and practice in the welding shop. Students also learn the proper techniques required to set up and safely operate an oxyacetylene cutting torch and associated equipment. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

2 Credits

This course is a continuation of Telephone III (ENGT257) and is designed to prepare the student to install, program, and maintain large hybrid key systems (Norstar MICS). It provides key system history, theory, standards, and product knowledge competencies on the Norstar key system product line. Students receive classroom and laboratory exercises in installing, administering, and maintaining analog trunking (loop and ground start), Digital Trunk Interface (DTI), Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), Primary (PRI) and Basic Rate Interface (BRI), and drop-in services (voice and data integration). The course includes hands-on product training and orientation to the Norstar installation guide handbook. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

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Course Descriptions ENGT259 Electronics I

2 Credits

ENGT268 Fiber Optics Shop

2 Credits

Through a combination of lecture, demonstration, and practical application in the laboratory, students acquire a working knowledge of the fundamentals of electricity and electronics as they apply to the telecommunications industry. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

In this shop course, students focus on the practical aspects of installing fiber optic cable plants and networks. Students receive an overview of the basics of fiber optics and hands-on training in how to prepare, pull, splice, terminate, and test cables. Precision and accuracy are emphasized. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours.

ENGT260 Electronics II

ENGT301 Telecommunications I

2 Credits

This course is a continuation of Electronics I (ENGT259). Through classroom instruction and practical application in the laboratory, students acquire a working knowledge of the application of alternating current circuits to the telecommunications industry. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT261 Electronics III

2 Credits

This course is a continuation of Electronics II (ENGT260) and completes the electronics technology program designed to prepare students for successful employment in the telecommunications industry. In this combination classroom-laboratory course, students acquire a working knowledge of integrated circuits and basic electronic circuits. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT262 Computer Literacy Shop II

1 Credit

This is a basic computer literacy shop for beginners with no computer knowledge or experience. Students learn how to create documents using Word 97 and spreadsheets using Excel 97. ENGT263 Telecommunications Code

2 Credits

This course is an introduction to the National Electrical Code (NEC) as it applies to the telecommunications industry. Emphasis is on provisions of the code that cover grounding, health care facilities, fire alarm systems, fiber optics, and teledata installations. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT264 Security Alarms

1 Credit

This combined classroom theory and hands-on shop course is a basic introduction to the installation and service of security systems in residential and light commercial settings. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT265 Blueprint Shop

2 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the principles and techniques of reading telecommunication industry wire specifications, drawings, and blueprints as found in actual contractual specifications for both municipal and private projects. EIA/TIA standards and their effect on specifications are also reviewed. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT266 Alarm Systems Theory

1 Credit

This course familiarizes the student with access systems and CCTV. The student learns to install and do basic troubleshooting of access and CCTV installations. Code issues are covered to ensure safe installations. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT267 Fire Alarms

This course is designed to instruct students in the organization, architecture, set-up, maintenance, hardware, and software aspects of local area networks. Topics include introduction to networks; types and characteristics of different network architectures and network topologies; intra- and inter-network devices; network operating systems; peer-to-peer and client-server environments; LAN setup and maintenance, network printing, and internal Web server. A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout. Lectures and interactive learning demonstrations will be employed. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Electrical Circuits (ENGT104) and Telecommunications Technical Physics (PHYS107). ENGT302 Telecommunications II

This course is an introduction to the installation and service of fire alarm systems in residential settings. Students learn how systems are wired, installed, and operated in order to effectively repair and service them. Emphasis is on troubleshooting techniques. Laboratory: 2 hours.

4 Credits

This course will cover the basics of voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) systems. Topics include: an overview of TCP/IP networks with a focus on VoIP; an introduction to VoIP; Quality of Service (QoS); VoIP system components; VoIP protocols and VoIP protocol analysis; VoIP architecture and VoIP codecs. A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Electronic Systems for Telecommunications I (ENGT123) and Telecommunications I (ENGT301). Corequisite: Electronic Systems for Telecommunications II (ENGT124). ENGT303 Telecommunications III

4 Credits

This course covers the organization, architecture, set-up, and hardware and software aspects of network video delivery systems. Topics include video transport, compression, packet transport, multicasting, content ownership and security, transport security, IPTV-IP video to the home, video file transfer, VPNs, and home-office video links. A hands-on approach will be taken, with team projects throughout. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Telecommunications II (ENGT302). ENGT304 Telecommunications IV

4 Credits

A survey of current and emerging technologies in telecommunications will be presented. Lectures, interactive learning, demonstrations, and hands-on work will be employed. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Telecommunications III (ENGT303). ENGT305 Engineering Graphics

3 Credits

This course gives the student training in the fundamentals of communicating technical information graphically. Concepts include geometrical constructions, sketching, orthographic projection, auxiliary views, sectional views, developments, assembly drawing and isometric drawing. Portions of the course are done using a computeraided drafting program. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT331 Electrical Machines

1 Credit

4 Credits

4 Credits

This course studies the theory of operation and characteristics of the various common types of DC and AC generators and motors. The different types of transformers will also be covered as well as single-phase and three-phase distribution networks. The laboratory provides practical experience in construction and testing of circuits utilizing these devices and includes the interpretation of wiring diagrams and schematic

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Course Descriptions diagrams. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical Circuits II (ENGT112) or permission of instructor. ENGT332 Fluid Power

3 Credits

This course studies components and circuits that depend on the movement and manipulation of confined fluids, either liquids or gases, when used to drive and control automated industrial equipment. The student moves from basic theory and the simple hydraulic and pneumatic circuits to the more complex systems including electrical and mechanical activation of control devices. Industrial controls are set up on the laboratory table, tested, and evaluated. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. ENGT341 Industrial Process Control

4 Credits

Electromechanical devices and circuits are studied as they are applied to the activation and control of modern industrial systems. The course includes the principles of electrical, electronic, and pneumatic controls, including associated transducers for monitoring temperature, level, flow, and pressure. Programmable controllers, electronic and pneumatic controllers, and recorders are also studied. The laboratory provides experience in the actual operation of an industrial type process control system with emphasis on discrete digital and analog controls as well as computer control. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical Circuits II (ENGT112) or permission of instructor. ENGT401 Co-op Work Experience in Applied Technology

3 Credits

ENGLISH 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to improve their reading comprehension, to increase their vocabulary, and to expand their general knowledge. An additional one-hour laboratory in the Academic Resource Center may be a required part of the course. Credit earned in this course cannot be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: Reading for ESL Students (ENSL111), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. ENGL092 Preparing for College Reading II

3 Credits

This course is designed to afford students an opportunity to increase the accuracy of their comprehension and to further develop their general knowledge, vocabulary, study skills, and critical reading skills. An additional one-hour laboratory in the Academic Resource Center may be a required part of the course. Credit earned in this course cannot be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading I (ENGL091), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. ENGL099 Introductory Writing

ENGL101 English Composition I

3 Credits

This course is designed to strengthen basic student writing. It includes the study of usage, mechanics, and sentence development. It involves intensive practice in writing

3 Credits

This is a course designed to help students develop and organize extended pieces of writing. Students will focus on the correct and appropriate use of language and the organization and development of paragraphs and essays. Research techniques, documentation of sources, and a short research paper will be included. Constant reading and frequent writing will be required. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading I (ENGL091) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. ENGL102 English Composition II

3 Credits

This is a course designed to strengthen students’ skills as writers and to focus on analysis and argument. Assignments include critical examination of literature and an essay using research and documentation utilizing the MLA style sheet. Emphasis is on writing as part of the processes of thinking and learning. Prerequisites: English Composition I (ENGL101) and Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. ENGL106 Introduction to Critical Thinking

This course offers students an opportunity for structured, supervised, paid work experience in their applied technology areas. This co-op experience allows students to apply the theory of classroom experience to practical applications in their technical fields of concentration. In addition, a biweekly seminar gives students the opportunity to discuss their jobs and their employers’ evaluations of their work performance in their weekly academic assignments. The course is open to qualified sophomore students in any of the departments within the Applied Technology Division. Prerequisite: approval of Department Chair.

ENGL091 Preparing for College Reading I

clear, unified paragraphs and includes practice in writing essays that indicate readiness to succeed in English Composition I (ENGL101). Credit earned in this course cannot be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: College ESL II (ENSL102), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to critical thinking and effective problem-solving techniques. The course develops critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they apply to the analysis of a variety of media from diverse cultural sources and perspectives. Students learn to evaluate and to construct arguments by applying principles of sound informal logic. A project is required. ENGL107 Technical Writing

3 Credits

This is a course for students in engineering, the sciences, or business, and for others wishing to deal with the demands of technical material and the audiences who read it. The course covers research, audience analysis, technical exposition, narration, description, argumentation, mechanical and graphical elements, proposals, progress reports, physical research reports, and feasibility studies. Production of a report is the final project. Prerequisite: English Composition I (ENGL101), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. ENGL119 Creative Writing

3 Credits

This is a course designed for those students who have mastered grammatical skills and who have a desire to express themselves creatively in fiction (short story or novel), drama (plays or screenplays), and/or poetry. This course is conducted as a workshop, with readings of the students’ works followed by creative criticism. The objective of the course is to write for publication, so the course includes a realistic appraisal of the possibilities in the publishing market. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102) or permission of instructor. ENGL121 Children’s Literature

3 Credits

This course examines the reading interests of children from pre-school years through the elementary grades with emphasis on the contribution that reading can make toward the process of growth. Topics include the history of literature for children, illustrators, folk tales, myths, modern fanciful tales, fiction, poetry, and books in special fields. This course requires extensive reading and writing.

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Course Descriptions ENGL123 Children’s Literature with a Modern Language Component 4 Credits This course examines the reading interests of children from pre-school years through elementary grades with an emphasis on the contribution that reading can make toward the process of growth. Topics include the history of literature for children, illustrators, folk tales, fiction, poetry, and books in special fields. This course requires extensive reading and writing and will be taught with a language component. Students will do approximately one-third of the assignments in a modern language and will meet with a language instructor for an additional class hour. The language may change each semester and reflect the languages taught at the college: Spanish, French, Portuguese, or Chinese. Prerequisites: Beginning I and Beginning II of the featured language or its equivalent. ENGL125 Introduction to Science Fiction

3 Credits

This course introduces students to science fiction through the examination of the major themes found in the genre. The course traces the origins and evolution of science fiction and examines the relationship between the story and the era in which it was written. Students will read a wide selection of science fiction and related fantasy fiction, discuss stories and themes, write several analytical papers, and complete a research project. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). ENGL141 Women in Literature

3 Credits

ENGL172 The Poet in the Modern World

3 Credits

ENGL201 English Literature I

ENGL202 English Literature II

ENGL206 Irish-American Literature II

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course examines plays from Shakespeare’s early, middle, and late periods, using representative comedies, tragedies, and histories. It focuses on dramatic development and principal themes. The sonnets are examined briefly. The course is usually offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: B or better in English Composition II (ENGL102), or recommendation of an English Composition II Instructor, or permission of instructor.

ENGL145 Irish Life and Literature

ENGL152 Cross-Cultural Communication

3 Credits

This course is designed to explore the English literary tradition through selected readings in major writers from the beginnings of Romanticism to the present. English Literature I (ENGL201) is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102).

ENGL205 Irish-American Literature I

This is an interdisciplinary course of interest to students of literature, history, folklore, cultural studies, and liberal arts. It has three strands: History of Modern Ireland; Irish Literature in English; Irish Folklore and Folk Life. The course includes accommodations and meals at the University of Limerick along with three one-day excursions to sites of cultural and historical importance in various parts of Ireland.

3 Credits

This course course is designed to explore the English literary tradition through selected readings in major writers from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 18th Century. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102).

This survey course is designed to introduce the student to the rich store of literature written by Americans of Irish descent in the 20th century. This course, which consists of readings of fiction, drama, and poetry, involves a study of the works of Irish-American writers as they respond to the challenging adventure of the United States. IrishAmerican Literature I (ENGL142) is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). 3 Credits

3 Credits

This course is an introductory study of the various forms, styles, and techniques of poetry as exemplified by the work of established modern and post-modern poets as well as the work of some of the popular poets and songwriters of our own time. This course requires extensive reading and writing.

ENGL203 Shakespeare

This course involves a thematic approach to literature, dealing primarily with various aspects of the feminine psyche. Women as writers as well as women as the subjects of literature are studied, and the changing role of women is examined in poetry, story, and drama. This course requires extensive reading and writing. ENGL143 Irish-American Literature II

that have served as models for contemporary writers. This course requires extensive reading and writing.

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the rich and abundant store of literature written during the 19th century by Americans of Irish descent. The course, which consists of readings of fiction, poetry, and drama, involves a study of IrishAmerican writers as they respond enthusiastically to the challenging adventure of the United States. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). 3 Credits

This survey course is designed to introduce the student to the rich store of literature written by Americans of Irish descent in the 20th century. This course,which consists of readings of fiction, drama, and poetry, involves a study of the works of Irish-American writers as they respond to the challenging adventure of the United States. IrishAmerican Literature I (ENGL205) is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102).

This course examines the verbal and nonverbal means of communication among members of defined cultural groups. The focus is on developing an understanding and awareness of the reasons for ineffective cross-cultural communication and on developing vehicles to promote effective crosscultural communication. Literary selections from diverse cultures will serve to give voice to varied expressions. This threecredit course will transfer as a liberal arts or humanities elective. Prerequisite: English Composition I (ENGL101) waiver by placement testing results.

ENGL211 Masterpieces of World Literature I

ENGL171 Introduction to Fiction

This course is a study of selected masterpieces from the Renaissance to the 20th century. The course traces literary and philosophical influences in selected European writers as they are revealed in varied forms. Emphasis is on comprehension and appreciation of human values in literature. Masterpieces of World Literature I (ENGL211) is not a

3 Credits

This course examines the short story and the novel; the emphasis falls on contemporary works, but always in reference to the traditions of prose fiction and the forms and styles

3 Credits

This course begins with a study of selected masterpieces from Hebrew, Greek, and Roman writers. It continues with a study of selected continental and British writers up to and including the Middle Ages. Emphasis is on comprehension and appreciation of human values in literature. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). ENGL212 Masterpieces of World Literature II

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3 Credits

Course Descriptions prerequisite. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). ENGL213 American Literature to 1860

approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

3 Credits

This introductory course examines the major contributors to the development of American literature, culture, and ideals from the colonial period to the era of American Romanticism. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). ENGL214 American Literature Since 1860

3 Credits

This introductory course examines the major contributors to American literature, culture, and ideals from the Civil War to the present. American Literature to 1860 (ENGL213) is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). ENGL215 African-American Literature I

3 Credits

This course examines the works of African-American writers and performers from the periods of colonization and slavery through the Harlem Renaissance. Works will be studied in political, historical, and cultural contexts, with a particular focus on contributions and challenges to Euro-American culture and to simultaneous developments internationally among peoples of African descent. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). ENGL216 African-American Literature II

3 Credits

This course examines the works of African-American writers and performers after the Harlem Renaissance to the present, including the periods of Realism, Naturalism, and the development of the Black Arts movements of the 1960s. Works will be studied in political, historical, and cultural contexts, with a particular focus on contributions and challenges to Euro-American culture and to simultaneous developments internationally among peoples of African descent. African-American Literature I (ENGL215) is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). ENGL217 Dramatic Literature I

3 Credits

This course begins with an overview of theatrical literature and an understanding of the play as a form. Following this, selected plays from the Greek, Roman, Medieval, and Renaissance periods will be read and explicated. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). ENGL218 Dramatic Literature II

3 Credits

This course begins with an overview of theatrical literature and an understanding of the play as a form. Following this, selected plays from the late 17th and 18th centuries,19th century, Early and Mid-20th century, and contemporary periods will be read and explicated. Dramatic Literature I (ENGL217) is not a prerequisite. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102). ENGL251 Honors Seminar: Ethics

3 Credits

This course will develop the skills of critical thinking in ethical issues of contemporary life. Using a multi-disciplinary base, students will learn to think clearly, logically, critically, and effectively. Methods will include cross-disciplinary lectures, class discussion, readings, written assignments, and problem-solving activities, such as reaching reasoned judgment through seminar-style learning. Prerequisite: Honors English Composition II ( ENGL102) or permission of Honors Program Director. ENGL400 Special Study in English

ENSL101 College ESL I

This course is designed for non-native English speakers to develop a command of correct English in the four areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with special attention to reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on grammar, sentence structure, idiomatic expression, reading comprehension, and recognizing and developing correct English patterns in sentences and paragraphs. ENSL102 College ESL II

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of English. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite:

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of College ESL I (ENSL101), with emphasis on developing a facility to read and discuss standard college English work, the ability to recognize and produce correct patterns in sentences and paragraphs, and the ability to combine paragraphs into correct and coherent compositions. Prerequisite: College ESL I (ENSL101) or departmental approval. ENSL111 Reading for ESL Students

3 Credits

This course is designed for ESL students to gain a facility in reading college texts and various printed materials with which they come in contact. Emphasis is placed on developing reading comprehension, vocabulary (including idiomatic expressions and figurative language), and study skills (including following directions, listening skills, and note-taking skills). ENSL112 Conversation and Pronunciation in ESL

3 Credits

This course is designed to help ESL students develop an oral facility in English. Oral presentations are required. The ability to participate in discussion and debate on a variety of subjects is emphasized. The unique sounds and intonation patterns of English are analyzed and practiced. Students may be required to work on pronunciation exercises in a laboratory setting.

FILM FILM122 Film and Society

3 Credits

This course provides an analysis of contemporary and classic films as a reflection of societal values and as a socialization agent shaping societal values. Emphasis will be on films as instruments for cultural analysis. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

FIRE SCIENCE FIRE101 Introduction to Fire Science Technology

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to fire science technology’s role in the protection of life and property. Study includes the history and philosophy of fire protection, fire loss analysis, public and private fire protection services, introduction to the chemistry of fire, scientific methods and technology applied to fire protection, equipment usage, and discussion of future fire protection problems. FIRE103 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention

1 Credit

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course discusses fire department inspections and the recognition of fire hazards. The development of a systematic and deliberate inspection program stressing public

122

Course Descriptions cooperation and image is promoted. Local, state, and national codes pertaining to fire prevention and related technology are surveyed. FIRE105 Fire Department Organization and Administration

3 Credits

This course explores the organizational principles and structural components of a fire department. History, types, methods, and principles of fire department organization (both formal and informal line), and staff are studied. Emphasis is placed on supervisory responsibilities and functions. FIRE107 Massachusetts Fire Laws and Regulations

3 Credits

This course covers an in-depth study of Chapter 148 of the Massachusetts Laws concerning fire prevention and protection. In addition, the Life Safety Code NFPA 101 (National Fire Protection Association) and Chapter 266 of the Arson Code will be examined. Also covered is the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Regulations (CMRs) on fire works, oil burner equipment, gasoline service station, LPG appliances, transportation of flammable liquids, use of explosives, and flammable decorations and other relevant materials. Prerequisites: Introduction to Fire Science Technology (FIRE101) and Fundamentals of Fire Prevention (FIRE103), or departmental approval. FIRE111 Fire Cause Detection

3 Credits

This course is designed to assist firefighters and fire officers in learning to properly determine the cause and origin of fires. The instructor also discusses and reviews various areas of inquiry associated with the preliminary investigation of a fire incident. FIRE112 Arson Investigation

3 Credits

This course attempts to help the student to understand the motivation of arsonists and the methods they use to set fires. The proper approach to arson investigation, the correct procedure for fire scene examination, the proper methods to secure and preserve evidence, and the proper methods for court presentation are also studied. The laws and regulations dealing with arson are discussed. Prerequisite: Fire Cause Detection (FIRE111) or departmental approval. FIRE206 Fire Protection Systems and Equipment

3 Credits

This course concentrates on fire protection systems. Covered in this course are an analysis of water supply and extinguishing agent requirements, various automatic signaling and detection systems, and special extinguishing systems. Demonstrations and field trips are used to supplement the classroom discussion. Prerequisite: Introduction to Fire Science Technology (FIRE101) or departmental approval. FIRE208 Fire Hydraulics and Water Distribution Systems

3 Credits

This course addresses the mechanics of the flow of fluids through fire hoses, nozzles, appliances, pumps, standpipes, water mains, and other devices. Design, testing, and use of nozzles and appliances, pumps, and water distribution systems are introduced. Measurements of fluid flow and methods of determining quantities of water available from a distribution system are also studied. Prerequisites: Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher waiver by placement testing results, and Survey of Physics (PHYS131) or Technical Physics I (PHYS141), College Physics I (PHYS151) or General Physics I (PHYS161), or departmental approval. FIRE211 Hazardous Material Incident Response

3 Credits

This course concerns itself with hazardous materials and hazardous waste incident response. Emphasis is placed on first responder awareness and operational level response as covered in National Fire Protection Association Standard 472, Competence

of Responders to Hazardous Materials Incidents, and OSHA 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response. Initial procedures to be taken during fires and spills of hazardous chemicals encountered during their transportation and in fixed facilities are discussed. Prerequisites: Any Chemistry course, Introduction to Fire Science Technology (FIRE101), and Fundamentals of Fire Prevention (FIRE103), or departmental approval. FIRE213 Building Construction and Blueprint or Plan Review

3 Credits

This course is an overview of construction designs and methods and materials utilized in building construction and emphasizes fire protection concerns. Included in this course of study is an introduction to structural blueprint reading for the purpose of recognizing conditions that may affect the prevention of fire within the building and/or firefighting efforts should a fire occur. Field trips are included. Prerequisite: Introduction to Fire Science Technology (FIRE101) or departmental approval. FIRE215 Terrorism and Domestic Response

3 Credits

This course concerns itself with terrorism and the domestic response. Emphasis will be placed on understanding terrorism, the associated risks, and the potential outcomes of a terrorist incident. Discussion will center on recognizing and identifying the presence of terrorist criminal activity. Actions to initiate an emergency response sequence by notifying the proper authorities will be covered. FIRE301 Fire Company Officership

3 Credits

The scope and functions of the fire company officer within the fire department are covered in this course. Topics discussed include the role of the fire service, departmental organization, administrative and management procedures, training, public relations, tactics and strategy, and fire prevention. FIRE400 Special Study in Fire Science

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Fire Science. Limited to two courses per student Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

GEOGRAPHY GEOG201 Human Geography

3 Credits

This course provides an investigation of the relationship between human beings and their environment on a global scale. The course will consider how geographic patterns are influenced by distributions of population, ethnicity, economic systems, religious systems, political forms, and landscape development. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

GOVERNMENT GOVT105 American National Government

3 Credits

This course examines the government and politics of the United States. Major attention is given to the Constitution of the United States and the Amendments and the historical development of the national government. The powers and the actions of Congress, the President, and the Courts are covered. Consideration is given to federalism, political parties and elections, and the influence of special interest groups and the media on American political culture. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and critical

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Course Descriptions thinking. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. GOVT111 The American Judicial System and Civil Litigation

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the federal and state courts as well as key legal terms and introduces the student to civil litigations. Topics to be discussed are contract law, torts, sales (Uniform Commercial Code), labor law, consumer law, and landlordtenant law. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), or waiver by placement testing results. GOVT112 Theory of Conflict Resolution

3 Credits

HVAC114 Heat Principles and Application

4 Credits

This course is an in-depth study of heat principles, gaseous and liquid heating fuels, heating equipment, and distribution systems. Also discussed is the removal of combustion by-products through ventilation and venting requirements as prescribed in the state and national codes. High-efficiency heating units and their special venting requirements are covered. In a laboratory setting, the student is exposed to instrumentation, methods of metering and proper fuel delivery, and adjusting heating equipment to achieve maximum performance. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. HVAC116 Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

3 Credits

The theory of conflict resolution will present students with specific methods in which to begin the development of the skills necessary to mediate and negotiate successfully. Among the topics presented are the win-lose, win-win, and dialogic methods. The obstacles, both individual and organizational, which are often present when attempting to mediate or negotiate will be examined. This course will focus on the more commonly used conflict resolution theories and will place particular emphasis on practical application and skill development.

This course utilizes the most current theories and principles in thermodynamic heat transfer in buildings as required to calculate their heat loss and gain. This analysis and the calculations are the first vital steps in the design of all heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems. This course includes the selection of design conditions, heat transfer coefficients, and ventilation requirements used to calculate the design loads for residential, commercial, and industrial HVAC systems. Co-Prerequisite: Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher, waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor.

GOVT300 Introduction to Political Science

HVAC121 Drafting for HVAC Technicians

3 Credits

Political science is a discipline that investigates the nature of politics and political systems. Topics studied include the development of society and the state, contemporary political doctrine, and governmental institutions and policies.Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. GOVT301 State and Local Government

3 Credits

This course investigates the structure and politics of American government at the state and local level. Types of legislatures, city councils, governors, mayors, city managers, county government, the development and operation of town meetings, and constitutional, judicial, and financial problems are discussed. This course is intended to follow American National Government (GOVT105). Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. GOVT400 Special Studies in Government

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of History and Government. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

HEATING, VENTILATING, & AIR CONDITIONING HVAC111 Basic Electricity and Control Theory

4 Credits

This course is the first in a series of electrical courses for the HVAC student. It provides students with a general knowledge of electricity and how it is applied to control circuits found in the HVAC industry. After an introduction to electron theory, students explore magnetism, electric meters, direct and alternating current, and power generation, distribution, and utilization. Once they gain the knowledge of what electricity is, they then proceed to schematic symbols, wiring diagrams, electric code, and motor control fundamentals. In the laboratory, students explore these principles and components through test and analysis. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours.

3 Credits

This course includes components by which the student will generate several types of drawings used in the HVAC industry by employing multiple drawing techniques. The types of drawings generated will include pipe and duct layouts, mechanical room plans, equipment layouts, schematics, flow diagrams, schedules, and electrical diagrams. Drawing techniques used will include sketching and instrument drafting. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. HVAC201 Refrigeration Principles and Application

4 Credits

This course is a concentrated study of the fundamentals of mechanical refrigeration systems, its components, and cycles used in cooling and heat pump applications. Utilizing thermodynamic principles, the students explore methods of heat transfer, nature and effect of heat energy in refrigeration, the physical characteristics of the common refrigerants, and refrigerant piping design. In the laboratory, through demonstration and experimentation, students validate these principles. Students are exposed to instrumentation and procedures utilized for testing and evaluating purposes. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Any physics course or permission of instructor. HVAC204 HVAC Principles

4 Credits

This course examines the properties of air and water as applied to heat transfer in HVAC systems. The concepts of fluid flow as applied to water and air systems are covered. This includes the interpretation of air conditioning processes on the psychometric chart, pumps, blowers, piping, duct systems, volume control, and system performance. Laboratory experience includes piping and duct systems layout. Trainers are utilized by the student in measurements of system performance. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisites: Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher, waiver by placement testing results, and any physics course, or permission of instructor. HVAC205 HVAC Systems Design

4 Credits

This course is designed to advance a student’s knowledge of HVAC principles into the area of system design. Topics covered include high and low velocity duct systems, variable air volume (VAV) systems, and hot water and steam systems. Students are exposed to equipment selection of items such as fans, pumps, coils, valves, air handlers,

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Course Descriptions exhaust fans, and packaged heating and cooling units. To complete this course, students are required to submit a commercial project. This project includes design, calculation, and computer-generated drawing components. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Computer-Aided Drafting (ENGT107), Heating and Cooling Load Calculations (HVAC116), and HVAC Principles (HVAC204), or permission of instructor. HVAC206 Hydronics and Piping Design

4 Credits

electrical, and heating and cooling systems components. Emphasis is placed on the diagnosis of operational failure and the appropriate corrective action required. Refrigerant leak detection, recovery, and recycling procedures are covered in detail. Laboratory: 6 hours. Prerequisites: Heat Principles and Application (HVAC114), Refrigeration Principles and Application (HVAC201), and HVAC Equipment Controls (HVAC213), or permission of instructor.

This course covers the study of concepts for hot water, steam heating, and chilled water systems, including pumps, fluid flow, piping, valves, boilers, air venting, and condensate handling. Weekly labs will provide related practical experiences including the layout of basic one- and two-pipe systems, calculation of pressure drops through the system, and proper pipe-sizing methods. Trainers will be used by the student in the measurement of fluid flow, supply, and return temperatures and the performance of hot water systems. Projects include the design of residential and commercial piping systems, developing specifications, and equipment selection. Prerequisites: Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher, Survey of Physics (PHYS131), Heat Principles and Application (HVAC114), Heating and Cooling Load Calculations (HVAC116), and Computer-Aided Drafting (ENGT107).

HVAC224 HVAC Systems Control

HVAC207 Psychrometrics and Duct System Design

HIST101 History of Western Civilization I

4 Credits

This course examines the properties of air and the interpretation of the properties of air and air conditioning processes on the psychrometric chart. Requirements for good air distribution, outlet performance, volume control, noise limitations, selection, and location of air outlets are studied. Discussions of centrifugal fans and fan laws as well as air balancing and system commissioning are part of this course. Design of ducted systems, ventilation and exhaust requirements, and equipment selection are also covered. Prerequisites: Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher, Survey of Physics (PHYS131), Heating and Cooling Load Calculations (HVAC116), and Computer-Aided Drafting (ENGT107). HVAC211 Cost Estimating

3 Credits

This course is designed to acquaint students with the installation practices, pricing, and sales concepts used within the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning industry. Discussed are codes and standards and their effect upon the cost of construction. Students take a basic installation and price the job, breaking down all of the component parts. Students are exposed to cost-volume-profit relationships and the use of cost data in decision making. Customer needs and work habits are discussed to develop the understanding and the skills needed in professional sales. Skills necessary to interpret blueprints will be developed. Students are required to complete many assignments utilizing computer applications. Prerequisites: Heat Principles and Application (HVAC114), Refrigeration Principles and Application (HVAC201), HVAC Principles (HVAC204), and Beginning Windows (CTIM101) or higher, or permission of instructor. HVAC213 HVAC Equipment Controls

4 Credits

This course is a detailed study of circuitry found in HVAC equipment. Topics covered are controlling factors, system control components, and heating and cooling equipment control circuitry. Utilizing the theories learned, students develop equipment control circuitry. In the laboratory, students investigate the application and troubleshooting techniques of these circuits. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Basic Electricity and Control Theory (HVAC111) or permission of instructor. HVAC223 HVAC Service Procedures

3 Credits

This course introduces students to the basic service, troubleshooting, repair, and startup procedures found within the HVAC industry. Areas covered include refrigeration,

4 Credits

This course explores the principles of electric, electronic, and pneumatic systems control. An examination of current practices regarding application and design of commercial systems is studied. Discussions include energy savings through computer application in building automation systems. In the laboratory, students investigate the principles, application, and troubleshooting techniques of these circuits. Students will also develop computer-generated control drawings. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: Basic Electricity and Control Theory (HVAC111), HVAC Principles (HVAC204), and Computer-Aided Drafting (ENGT107), or permission of instructor.

HISTORY 3 Credits

This course is a study of the foundations and development of the history, ideas, and institutions of the Western world from ancient to early modern times. The Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian heritages and the Renaissance and Reformation receive special attention. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and critical thinking. (HIST101 and HIST102 may be taken in either order.) Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST102 History of Western Civilization II

3 Credits

This course deals with the development and problems of the Western world in early modern times. Emphasis is given to the development of nation-states; the impact of wars, revolutions, and ideas; industrialization and modern science; and the development of political systems such as democracy and totalitarianism. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and critical thinking. (HIST101 and HIST102 may be taken in either order.) Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENG092) and Introductory Writing (ENG099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST103 United States History I

3 Credits

This course traces the political, economic, social, and cultural development of what became the United States from its beginnings to the end of the Civil War. Particular attention is paid to the nature of Puritanism, the complex background of the American Revolution, the creation of the Federal and State Constitutions and their implementation, the growth of sectionalism, westward expansion, the nature of slavery, and the breakdown of the American political system resulting in the Civil War. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and critical thinking. (HIST103 and HIST104 may be taken in either order.) Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST104 United States History II

3 Credits

This course traces the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the United States since the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on the discord of the Reconstruction Era; the rise of industrialization, urbanization, and immigration; the development of American

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Course Descriptions foreign policy; American reform movements as seen in Populism, Progressivism, and the New Deal; the course of the Cold War; the Civil Rights Movement; the contemporary women’s movement; the influence of technology on American life, and recent developments. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and critical thinking. (HIST103 and HIST104 may be taken in either order.) Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST107 The Origins of Civilization

3 Credits

This course focuses on the study of the origins and development of early civilizations in the Near East, Egypt, Europe, and the Americas. The period from the domestication of plants and animals to the establishment of large states and empires is covered. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099) waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST111 History of Massachusetts

3 Credits

The history of Massachusetts from its earliest settlements to the present is the focus of this course. Topics include the Commonwealth’s role in the struggle for independence and in the formation of a Federal Union, leadership in the abolitionist movement, the impact of industry and immigration in the late 19th century, and an overview of contemporary issues and problems. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST121 The American Presidency

3 Credits

The development of the office of the President from the tenure of George Washington to the present serves as the focus of this course. A major emphasis is placed on the period from the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt through the current presidency. Among topics to be considered are the way domestic problems (such as the economy) and international involvement have changed the Presidency and the emergence of new relationships between and among the President, the Congress, and the Courts. Prerequisites: Preparing for College II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST131 The United States Since 1945

3 Credits

This course surveys the political, economic, social, and cultural changes experienced by the United States from the end of the Second World War to the present. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST133 The Civil War

3 Credits

This course will explore the state of affairs existing in the United States leading to the American Civil War. We will focus on the political, cultural, social, economic, military, leadership, and other issues that played a part in starting and conducting the Civil War, and address the causes of the war, how our nation addressed the struggle, and the conflict’s aftermath. This course will also emphasize the operational contributions and the leadership styles of the key military leaders, along with the evolution of command and control, the experiences of the soldiers, and the civilian reaction to the war. Analysis of selected battles of the war will be addressed as examples of the strategies and tactics involved. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and critical thinking. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

HIST211 History of Modern Ireland

3 Credits

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the main currents of Irish history since 1800. It covers such topics as Ireland’s union with England, the impact of the Famine, and the movement of Irish Independence. Continuing political development in both Northern and Southern Ireland since 1923 is highlighted. The current conflict in Northern Ireland receives special attention. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST212 Irish-American History

3 Credits

This course traces the Irish-Americans from immigration to integration. Extensive coverage is given to the following topics: conditions in Ireland leading to emigration to America; conditions in America at the time of arrival; development of an economic and social life; participation in politics; and the overall position of Irish-Americans in the United States. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and critical thinking. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST251 American Labor History

3 Credits

This course traces the changes in the nature of work and the experiences of workers in America from the colonial era to the present. This course reviews all types of American work and labor but concentrates on labor organizations. Extensive coverage is given to the following topics: work in pre-industrial society, conditions of labor in early industries, growth of labor associations and organizations in the 19th and 20th centuries, labor-management relations, and recent changes in the post-industrial economy. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and critical thinking. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST265 Regional Studies of the Non-Western World

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to a specific region of the world. Each semester, the course focuses on one of the following areas: the Middle East, Africa, Asia, or Latin America. Using insights garnered from the fields of economics, geography, history, sociology, and political science, this course focuses its attention on the recent past and current circumstances of a particular region. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HIST400 Special Study in History

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of History and Government. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: departmental approval.

HUMAN SERVICES HSRV101 Introduction to Social Welfare

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the U.S. Social Welfare system by examining its history, systems, laws, programs, policies, services, worker roles, and client populations and their problems. Student learning will focus on two key areas: professional development and career planning and the acquisition of knowledge of the U.S. Social Welfare system. Students will work in groups to develop a case plan and presentation. This course emphasizes reading, writing, and communication and critical thinking skills. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing

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Course Descriptions (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HSRV102 Interviewing Techniques

3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the principles and techniques of the helping interview. Topics will include self as professional, appropriate attitudes, values and ethics, client needs, intake interviewing, observation, listening and responding skills, verbal and non-verbal communication, and recording or reporting skills. Classroom simulations, demonstrations, and practice sessions will be extensively used. Emphasis will be placed on the core competencies of reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HSRV103 Group Dynamics

3 Credits

This course provides a structured environment within which students can increase awareness of their own and others’ attitudes, emotions, and behaviors and how these support or detract from meeting individual and group needs. Students will begin to build knowledge and skills that facilitate effective group process. Topics will include group formation, types of groups, effective communication, problem solving and decision making, guiding discussions, managing conflict, leadership, and teamwork. Student learning will focus on four key areas: self- assessment, personal development, professional development and career planning, and skill development for effective group process. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading I (ENGL091), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HSRV104 Advanced Group Dynamics

3 Credits

This experientially based course is designed to further build the students’ knowledge of the dynamics of group process, with major focus on leadership skills. Emphasis is placed on continued self-exploration, leadership styles and theories, group structures and processes, and application of theory to practice. Extensive reading is required. Prerequisites: Introduction to Group Dynamics (HSRV103), Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. HSRV105 Human Services Practice

3 Credits

This course provides a theoretical and practical overview of entry-level generalist human service practice with all client systems. Special emphasis is given to the continued development of helping skills, including relationship building, assessment, goal setting, problem solving, decision making, and evaluation. Particular attention is placed on working effectively with clients from diverse social backgrounds and classes and within a variety of provider systems. Core competencies of reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking are emphasized in this course. Prerequisite: Interviewing Techniques (HSRV102) or departmental approval. HSRV107 Fostering Equality and Diversity

3 Credits

This course utilizes the concepts of diversity and oppression to build the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to human service workers serving women, minority, and low-income clients. Examples of how social welfare laws, programs, benefits, and services have promoted, limited, or denied social equity to diverse client groups will be explored. Topics will include systems of privilege and disadvantage, power, cultural systems for managing diversity, social identity, and social justice. Discrimination based on race, gender, age, ethnicity, national origins, sexual variance or orientation, ability

or disability, and other factors will be examined. Professional and personal ethics and values that foster equality will be promoted. The core competencies of reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking will be emphasized. This course was formerly titled Women, Minorities and the Poor. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. HSRV121 Death and Dying

3 Credits

This course introduces students to various theoretical models for understanding the dying, grieving, and loss process. An in-depth exploration of the grieving process helps students begin to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to work effectively with dying persons, their families, and others who are experiencing significant losses. Students survey the types of agencies, services, programs, benefits, and worker roles that relate to serving dying and grieving clients and their significant others. Particular emphasis is placed on information related to persons with AIDS or cancer-related diagnoses. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. HSRV122 Introduction to Family Theory and Treatment

3 Credits

This introductory course provides students with an overview of family theory and treatment, knowledge of the family as a system, knowledge of functional and dysfunctional family patterns, and knowledge of roles and games played in families. Students become able to differentiate between functional and dysfunctional family systems on a beginning-level. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding dysfunctional dynamics and roles (including codependency) in families in which there is substance abuse. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. HSRV123 Introduction to Addiction Studies

3 Credits

This course provides a rigorous examination of substance abuse and abusers and of theories of addiction and methods of substance abuse treatment. Students are expected to develop and defend their theoretical perspectives on addiction. This course offers an overview of problems generated by substance abuse (including research and discussion concerning AIDS); an overview of the pharmacology of alcohol and drugs and the medical aspects of substance abuse (including symptomology); and an in-depth examination of worker roles, types of service delivery systems, and their programs, methods, and philosophies. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. HSRV124 Introduction to Mental Health

3 Credits

This course offers a historical perspective on the treatment of the mentally ill, an overview of current clinical diagnoses and treatment methodologies, and an introduction to crisis intervention and behavior management in residential and rehabilitative settings. Students develop knowledge of the behavioral model and of the use of drugs as a behavioral management tool and acquire skill in writing behavioral objectives and developing task analysis. Avoidance of labeling is emphasized. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor.

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Course Descriptions HSRV131 Substance Abuse Treatment in Criminal Justice Settings 3 Credits

testing results, or permission of instructor.

This course will provide criminal justice and substance abuse treatment personnel with knowledge, experiences, and skills that will assist them in working more effectively together. It begins with an overview of the criminal justice and substance abuse systems; explores their missions, goals, purposes, commonalities, and differences; and encourages team building across the two systems. Students will examine the benefits of corrections-based treatment, profiles of substance abusing offenders, and ways to assess and manage abusing offenders in the criminal justice institution and in the community. Elements of effective substance abuse treatment for offenders will be explored. These include integrating criminal justice sanctions with substance abuse treatment, examining ethical issues regarding confidentiality, utilizing drug testing, managing infectious diseases and violence, understanding theories of criminality, and working with dual-diagnosis clients. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. HSRV133 Child Welfare

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the primary laws, policies, programs, benefits, and services within child welfare. Topics will include a historical overview, current trends, worker roles and interventions, foster care and adoption, child abuse and neglect, and the impact of domestic violence and addictions on children and families. Students will assess their own values and reactions to at-risk children and families and to the child welfare system and will explore possibilities for working within child welfare. Reading, writing, speaking, computer skills, and critical thinking will be emphasized in this course. HSRV141 Community-Based Services

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the fundamental knowledge and skills needed for working effectively with people with mental retardation. The course has two components: students will work with developmentally challenged individuals in Department of Mental Retardation sites and attend a weekly on-campus seminar. The Community Support Skill Standards (national standards for Human Service workers) will be extensively reviewed, and students will be expected to develop a beginning-level of skill in four of them. Students will keep journals and time logs to report on and enhance their performance and learning at their work sites. Regular reading and writing assignments will be included as part of the seminar. Learning methods will include guest lectures, videos, group discussions, and small-group simulations. This course is limited to Urban Youth Program students selected for participation by Road to Responsibility. Work-site placements will be determined by representatives from Road to Responsibility in conjunction with the Massasoit Coordinator. HSRV201 Addiction and Society

3 Credits

This course uses a psychosocial approach to examine addiction and explore its causes and impact on individuals and groups in American society. Emphasis is placed on understanding prevailing attitudes about addiction, exploring varied definitions and types of addiction, and examining the impact of addiction on business, family systems, the judicial system, and society as a whole. The concepts of prevention and treatment will be explored and a variety of prevention and treatment methodologies will be reviewed. Addictive behaviors such as alcoholism, drug abuse, workaholism, eating disorders, runner’s high, and gambling will be explored. Additionally, domestic violence, especially as it relates to addiction and substance abuse, will be examined. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement

HSRV221 Special Topics in Human Services

3 Credits

This course offers specialized knowledge and skills in various contemporary topics of importance in the Human Services field. A small-group seminar format and individualized projects are used. Limited to two courses on different topics per student Prerequisite: permission of instructor. HSRV222 Developmental Disabilities

3 Credits

This course will cover the physiological, sociological, and psychological development of the individual with developmental disabilities from birth through senescence and death. The three main causes of developmental disabilities (genetics, prenatal, and postnatal) will be examined. An overview of syndromes such as Down’s, spectrum disorders such as autism, physical disorders such as spina bifida and head injury, will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on how the disabled person copes with changes and challenges across varied life stages such as during maturation, puberty, adolescence, and adulthood. The role of family and other social support systems will be examined. Students will be exposed to methods for promoting effective communication with clients, families, colleagues, and other caregivers. Legal and ethical issues such as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the American with Disabilities Act (ADT), court decisions, litigation, ethics, and guardianship issues will be examined and discussed. HSRV231 Addiction Treatment

3 Credits

This course will provide an overview of the knowledge and skills needed by workers in the field of addiction treatment. Students will develop an understanding of the treatment process. They will explore varied counseling skills such as evaluation, screening, assessment, treatment planning, documentation, and interviewing. Students will gain a basic level of competency in documentation, assessment, and interviewing skills. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. HSRV232 Topics in Addiction Treatment

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to an array of topics within the field of addiction treatment. Topics will include relapse and relapse prevention, crisis intervention, suicide prevention, and dual addictions. Additionally, students will explore the effects of addiction on the family, the mentally ill, clients with AIDS or HIV, clients with sexually transmitted diseases, and clients with special needs. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. HSRV241 Principles of Ethical Practice

3 Credits

This course explores the counselor’s professional and ethical responsibilities and behaviors. Varied ethical standards regarding issues such as privacy and confidentiality, respecting individual and multicultural differences, accountability, record keeping, and reporting will be examined. Students will utilize an ethical decision-making model to understand how to solve ethical problems common to professional practice. Class participants will examine several published professional codes. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor.

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Course Descriptions HSRV302 Introduction to Gerontology

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the basic physiological, psychological, and sociological (primary focus) factors in human aging. Major emphasis is placed on normal successful aging patterns and the myths that have contributed to prejudice against the elderly. Sociological dimensions include adult socialization, relations to others, social policy, and social programs. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. HSRV321 Leadership Training

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the basic skills of governance. It covers such areas as parliamentary procedure, the committee structure, and principles of the planning process. Through the use of case-study techniques and role-playing, students establish goals for their organization. Leadership styles, communication skills, and individual and group assessment procedures are also stressed. This course is limited to but not required of Student Government members. HSRV400 Special Study in Human Services

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Human Services. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean. HSRV405 Field Experience and Seminar in Human Services I

4 Credits

This course provides students with an in-depth, supervised learning experience (of at least 135 hours. per semester) in area social service agencies. Field Experience students also attend a weekly one-hour on-campus seminar in which they share knowledge concerning the practices, policies, procedures, and client populations of their field experience settings, consider key social service practice issues, and relate classroom learning to the field experience. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in Introduction to Social Welfare (HSRV101), Interviewing Techniques (HSRV102), and Introduction to Group Dynamics (HSRV103), or departmental approval. HSRV406 Field Experience and Seminar in Human Services II

4 Credits

This course provides students with an in-depth, supervised learning experience (of at least 135 hours. per semester) in area social service agencies. Field Experience students also attend a weekly one-hour on-campus seminar in which they share knowledge concerning the practices, policies, procedures, and client populations of their field experience settings, consider key social service practice issues, and relate classroom learning to the field experience. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in Introduction to Social Welfare (HSRV101), Interviewing Techniques (HSRV102), and Introduction to Group Dynamics (HSRV103), or departmental approval.

INTERDISCIPLINARY INTR101 When Science Meets Religion

issues of the 21st century. It is recommended that prospective students have had a science course at either the high school or college level and possess strong reading and writing skills in order to complete course assignments. INTR102 Liberal Arts Seminar

This is an interdisciplinary seminar taught by a team of two professors from different disciplines, assisted by several guest lecturers. Students will explore developments in science, technology, art, and society that impact modern culture. Students will be required to participate in research and classroom presentations. Prerequisite: English Composition II (ENGL102).

JOURNALISM JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism

Since the birth of the scientific revolution in the 16th century, scientists, theologians, and the general public have shared many questions about the implications of scientific discoveries on religious faith. When they interact, are religion and science enemies, strangers, or partners? We will use a historical approach to reveal the subtlety, complexity, and diversity of the science-religion interaction. This approach requires sensitivity to the shifting boundaries that impact both of these disciplines. Topics will include the Copernican revolution, Newton’s mechanical universe, science-religion during the Enlightenment, the evolution-creationism controversy, and science-religion

3 Credits

This course is designed to give students instruction and practice in gathering, writing, and evaluating the news. Students learn the conventions of news writing, focus on writing and editing factual news stories, and study the basis for news judgments and editorial decisions. Prerequisite: C or better in English Composition I (ENGL101) or permission of instructor. JOUR400 Special Study Journalism

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Journalism faculty. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

LIBRARY LBSC114 Introduction to Information Literacy

1 Credit

This course provides opportunities for students to develop the search strategies and critical thinking skills needed for the selection and evaluation of information for academic projects and for lifelong learning. Students investigate print materials, online databases, and the Web, using evaluative techniques to determine the best source for research. Students will be expected to complete online assignments and projects, participate in online discussions with cyber “mates,” and make a visit to a local library. LBSC400 Special Study Library Science

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of a member of the Library Science faculty. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

MATHEMATICS MATH010 Fundamentals of Mathematics

3 Credits

3 Credits

3 Credits

The aim of this course is to provide for the person with slight mathematical background an opportunity to acquire an understanding and appreciation of the basic structure of elementary operations on whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. In addition, percent, measurement, ratio and proportion, signed numbers, simple linear equations, and exponential notation will be covered. Problem solving will be integrated throughout the course. Credits earned in this course cannot be applied toward graduation. Students must earn a grade of C- or higher to take Introductory Algebra (MATH101). Placement testing is required.

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Course Descriptions MATH101 Introductory Algebra

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the fundamental concepts of algebra and examine some simple applications of these concepts, i.e., word problems. Topics include signed numbers, algebraic expressions, linear equations and inequalities in one variable, the Cartesian coordinate system, linear equations and inequalities in two variables, systems of equations, and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, median, mode, and reading graphs). Credits earned in this course cannot be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: C- or higher in Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. MATH112 Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Introductory Algebra (MATH101). Topics include properties of exponents, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, radicals and rational exponents, quadratic equations, and right triangle trigonometry. Credits earned in this course cannot be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: C- or higher in Introductory Algebra (MATH101), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. MATH115 Contemporary Mathematics

3 Credits

but who do not wish to be mathematicians. Possible topics to be included are number systems, mathematical systems, number theory, voting coalitions, geometry, the mathematics of finance, topology, linear programming, game theory and cryptography. A selection of three or more such topics will be offered each semester. Prerequisite: D- or higher in Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or a score of 72 or higher on mathematics placement testing results, or departmental approval. MATH127 Math for Elementary Teachers I

3 Credits

This course provides a conceptually based, comprehensive study of the mathematical content of numbers and their operations at the deep level required for successful elementary school teaching. Topics will be examined in ways that are meaningful to preservice elementary teachers. Topics include place value and arithmetic models, mental math, algorithms, pre-algebra factors and prime numbers, fractions and decimals, ratio, percentage and rates, integers, and elementary number theory. Prerequisites: Dor higher in Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. MATH128 Math for Elementary Teachers II

3 Credits

Students will develop problem-solving skills while covering topics that include number sense and estimation, proportions, unit conversions, the metric system, statistics and probability, percents, the mathematics of finance, and mathematical modeling of contemporary problems. Additional topics will be tailored to meet the needs of students in specific programs. Prerequisite: Introductory Algebra (MATH101), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

This course provides a conceptually based, comprehensive study of the mathematical content of geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics at the deep level required for successful elementary school teaching. Topics will be examined in ways that are meaningful to pre-service elementary teachers. Topics include: two- and three-dimensional geometry, measurement, data analysis, single variable statistics, and probability. Prerequisites: D- or higher in Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

MATH116 Math Experiences for Early Childhood Education

MATH131 Introduction to Statistics

3 Credits

This course will present methods and materials of instruction for the caregivers and teachers of preschool children so that they can provide mathematical experiences confidently and knowledgeably. The content will focus on the influences of Piaget, Bruner, Gagne, and the psycho-educational aspects of how children learn (especially mathematics) and progress through the stages of development put forth by Piaget. The student will also receive instruction in the areas of cognitive development most closely associated with mathematics— classification, one-to-one correspondence, seriation, and counting—and have the opportunity to observe and participate in model lessons and experiences. Prerequisite: Introductory Algebra (MATH101), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

3 Credits

This course provides a basic introduction to statistics. It is recommended for students in business, social science, human resources, allied health, and criminal justice and provides an excellent preparation for any career. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, the normal distribution, hypothesis testing, estimates and sample sizes, the chi square distribution, correlation, and regression. Prerequisite: D- or higher in Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112), a score of 72 or higher on mathematics placement testing results, or departmental approval. MATH141 Technical Mathematics I

3 Credits

This course covers the algebra and statistics needed to analyze various real-world applications of mathematics. Emphasis will be on the study of problems relating to environmental issues. Topics include descriptive statistics and linear and exponential models. The use of technology (graphing calculator or computer) will be required.

This course provides the mathematics skills necessary for success in the technology programs. A review of introductory and intermediate algebra concepts and the geometry of area and volume are included. Other topics include algebraic operations with units, the arithmetic of approximate numbers, interpolation, systems of three or more linear equations, determinants and Cramer’s Rule, variation, and trigonometry of the right triangle. Applications drawn from various technical areas are stressed. The hand-held calculator is used throughout. Prerequisite: C- or higher in Introductory Algebra (MATH101), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

MATH121 Topics in Mathematics I

MATH142 Technical Mathematics II

MATH120 Mathematic Modeling

3 Credits

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course is provided for students who wish to know what mathematics is about but who do not wish to be mathematicians. Topics included are elementary logic, set theory, probability, and statistics. Prerequisite: D- or higher in Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112), or a score of 72 or higher on mathematics placement testing results, or departmental approval.

This course is a continuation of Technical Mathematics I (MATH141). Topics include extensive use of trigonometric relationships, radian measure, vectors, Laws of Sines and Cosines, complex numbers and exponential and logarithmic relationships. Prerequisite: C- or higher in Technical Mathematics I (MATH141), waiver by placement testing results or departmental approval.

MATH122 Topics in Mathematics II

MATH143 Telecommunicatons Technical Mathematics I

3 Credits

This course is provided for students who wish to know what mathematics is all about

4 Credits

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence of intermediate algebra and

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Course Descriptions trigonometry with technical applications. Topics include operations in the real number system, functions and graphs, first-degree equations, lines and linear functions, systems of linear equations, right triangle trigonometry, geometry (perimeters, areas, and volumes of common figures), rules of exponents, polynomial operations, factoring, operations on rational expressions, quadratic equations, and binary and hexadecimal notation. A calculator and a laptop computer will be used throughout. Umbrella competencies will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Placement examination. Corequisite: enrollment in Verizon Next Step Program.

parametric equations, sequences and series, vectors, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Prerequisite: C- or higher in Calculus II (MATH222), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval.

MATH144 Telecom Technical Mathematics II

MEDIA

4 Credits

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence of intermediate algebra and trigonometry with technical applications. Topics include operations on exponents and radicals, exponential and logarithmic functions and equations, radians, trigonometric functions of any angle, sinusoidal functions and graphing, oblique triangles, vectors, complex numbers and their applications, inequalities, ratio and proportion, variation, and an (optional) introduction to statistics. If time permits, a brief intuitive approach to calculus will be covered. A calculator and a laptop computer will be used throughout. Umbrella competencies will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: Telecommunicatons Technical Mathematics I (MATH143). Corequisite: enrollment in Verizon Next Step Program. MATH203 College Algebra

3 Credits

This course covers the algebra necessary for successful completion of the Precalculus and Calculus sequence while introducing functions, graphing, and graphing utilities. Topics include the operation and use of graphing utilities, polynomial operations and functions, absolute value equations and functions, radical and rational exponent functions, piecewise functions, composite functions, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: C- or higher in Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. MATH217 Precalculus

4 Credits

This course continues the mathematics preparation for successful completion of Calculus. Topics include the operation and use of graphing utilities, the properties and graphs of rational functions, one-to-one and inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: C- or higher in College Algebra (MATH203), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. MATH221 Calculus I

4 Credits

This standard course includes limits, continuity, differentiation and applications of algebraic and trigonometric functions, antiderivatives, approximation of area, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: C- or higher in Precalculus (MATH217), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. MATH222 Calculus II

4 Credits

This course is a continuation of Calculus I (MATH221). Topics include the Second Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, methods of integration, differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, logarithmic differentiation, differential equations, indeterminate forms, L’Hopital’s Rule, improper integrals, and applications. Prerequisite: C- or higher in Calculus I (MATH221), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. MATH223 Calculus III

4 Credits

This course is a continuation of Calculus II (MATH222). Topics include polar coordinates,

MATH400 Special Study in Mathematics

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Mathematics. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

MDIA111 Introduction to Mass Communication

3 Credits

This course surveys the history and growth of newspapers, radio, television, film, and the telecommunications industries. The course offers the student an awareness of how mass media influence social and personal environment. Contemporary media issues, policies, and ethics are discussed. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) or waiver by placement testing results. MDIA112 Television Studio Production

3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to television production theory and practice. The course combines hands-on experience with background lectures. The student’s experiences include television terminology, camera operation, switching, audio, floor plans, shot planning, picture composition, studio broadcasting procedures, floor direction, graphics, scenery, videotape, and master control. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) or waiver by placement testing results. MDIA113 Radio Production: Theory and Practice

3 Credits

This course covers the planning, writing, producing, directing, and performance of radio programs. The theory of sound production is also explored. The student will produce commercials, newscasts, and drama presentations as well as participate in the business side of broadcasting by developing promotions and programming schedules. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. MDIA114 Advanced Television Production

3 Credits

This course concerns producing, directing, writing, and performing for television. It emphasizes the creative nature of the final program product, operation of the television facilities, studio and control room production, script writing, and directing various television formats. The student is required to develop all phases of an independent television program. Prerequisite: Television Studio Production (MDIA112) or departmental approval. MDIA116 Digital Video Editing

3 Credits

Students taking this course will learn about digital technology, use the skills and techniques of video production, and practice them in a wholly digital environment. Using programs like Avid Liquid and Apple Final Cut Pro, students will complete projects by building and editing timelines that will then be rendered and output to digital videotape (DV), digital video disc (DVD), and digital Web files. MDIA121 Digital Audio Production

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to creating, managing and displaying digital audio productions, including creating, editing, and converting digital audio files, displaying streaming digital audio files on the Internet, creating MIDI files, adding digital audio to digital video, and applying digital audio in multimedia productions. It will be a hands-

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Course Descriptions on course that will have the students primarily involved in developing actual audio production skills. MDIA122 Introduction to Multimedia Production

3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the various tools and systems necessary to produce electronic media, with an emphasis on the integration of multimedia formats on the Internet, including Web site development, media production, multimedia integration, electronic hardware, and multimedia delivery systems. It will be a hands-on course that will have the students primarily involved in developing actual multimedia production skills. MDIA123 Digital Music Production

3 Credits

This is a course for musicians who wish to learn how to digitally produce their music. The course will cover music theory, orchestration, arranging, digital audio production techniques, including MIDI, sequencing, multi-track recording, and wave form synthesis. MDIA311 Film Analysis

3 Credits

Students examine an introduction to the basic issues involved in the serious enjoyment (appreciation) of film. The nature of the medium, its early history and development, the elements of film criticism, and basic issues in film theory are explored. Using concepts developed in the course, students view, study, and analyze selected film masterpieces. Field trips to area movie houses are arranged when possible. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) waiver by placement testing results. MDIA400 Special Study Media

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Media faculty. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean. MDIA401 Practicum in Television or Radio

3 Credits

This course offers a work-learning experience in television or radio. The student performs tasks commensurate with actual production entities. The student will be closely supervised by a college instructor, will attend one group meeting per week, and will work closely with television or radio professionals. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 4 hours. Prerequisite: Television Studio Production (MDIA112) or Radio Production: Theory and Practice (MDIA113), and departmental approval.

MEDICAL ASSISTANT MEDA104 Basic Laboratory Procedures I

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide medical assistant students with the basic clinical laboratory principles and skills used in a physician’s office. Topics include specimen identification and collection, laboratory safety, microscopy, routine urinalysis, fecal analysis, clinical bacteriology, and blood-grouping procedures. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. MEDA107 Medical Assisting Techniques I

2 Credits

This course is designed to teach students the fundamental clinical procedures medical assistants are allowed to perform with a minimum of supervision. Lecture and laboratory topics include taking medical histories, vital signs, and administration of treatments. Assistance at minor surgical procedures and maintenance of an aseptic environment are also stressed. Laboratory: 4 hours.

MEDA108 Anatomy, Physiology, and Terminology I

3 Credits

Medical terms are taught in a systematic manner in tandem with anatomy and physiology. This enables students to comprehend the terminology used in health care facilities. Anatomy and physiology begins with the cell and progresses to the body cavities, planes, and systems through the digestive system. This is designed to strengthen the students’ understanding of the clinical sciences and to increase the technical skills they need in administering patient care. MEDA109 Pharmacology

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to medical office pharmacology. Types and forms of drugs, their effects on body systems, and legal aspects of medication are emphasized. Abbreviations, systems of measurement, and dosage preparations are also included. MEDA116 Clinical Externship in Medical Assisting

6 Credits

Students participate in a clinical affiliation at a selected health care facility for the final eight weeks of the spring semester. Students gain more practice in both clinical and administrative aspects of medical assisting and learn new techniques that are performed at their individual facilities. Clinical facilities include physicians’ offices, hospitals, and health maintenance organizations. Each student is evaluated by the supervisor at the facility and the program instructor. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in all Medical Assistant courses MEDA119 Anatomy, Physiology, and Terminology II

2 Credits

This is a continuation of Anatomy, Physiology and Terminology I (MEDA108). Additional body systems and their functions are covered. New medical terms are added at appropriate intervals throughout the course. Prerequisite: Anatomy, Physiology and Terminology I (MEDA108). MEDA120 Medical Assisting Techniques II

2 Credits

Students perform more complicated clinical procedures and utilize skills learned in Medical Assisting Techniques I (MEDA107). Topics include electrocardiography, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and administration of medications. Clinical skills are increased, and students gain a comprehension of the disease process and its relationship to clinical situations. Prerequisite: Medical Assisting Techniques I (MEDA107). MEDA121 Basic Laboratory Procedures II

2 Credits

The basic principles and skills of hematology are covered. Lecture and laboratory topics include blood collection, hematocrit, hemoglobin, white blood cell counts, and differential evaluations. A brief introduction to blood chemistry may also be included. Lecture: 1 hour. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Basic Laboratory Procedures I (MEDA104). MEDA229 Medical Office Management I

5 Credits

The course introduces medical assisting students to medical office skills that are required for employment in a health care facility. The skills necessary for the medical assisting student will include understanding the operations of the medical facility, telephone techniques, understanding confidentiality (HIPPA regulations), documenting medical records, filing, billing, and medical correspondence. The students are instructed to complete tasks for an electronic medical environment, including patient registration, appointment scheduling, and posting patient accounts with computer software.

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Course Descriptions MEDA230 Medical Office Management II

2 Credits

This is a continuation of Medical Office Management I (MEDA224). Managing medical finances (patient accounts receivables, banking activities, posting charges, encounter forms, posting payments and/or adjustments, recording patient visits on a day sheet, balancing the day sheet, online payments, and patient aging accounts) with medical software is a primary focus of this course. Medical coding is introduced (CPT, ICD, HCPCS). Health insurance (history, obtaining, paying, Medicare, Medicaid, Workers’ Compensation); billing (types, credit agreements, collection agencies); and professionalism (externship, certification, professional organization, resume writing, successful job hunting) will be covered. Prerequisite: Medical Office Management I (MEDA229). MEDA231 Introduction to Health Insurance Billing and Coding

3 Credits

This course will enable medical coding students, through lecture and computer laboratory, to acquire the necessary knowledge of the health insurance industry. Health insurance programs, including Health Maintenance Organizations, Medicare, Medicaid, PPOs, and private insurance companies will be discussed. Students will be introduced to medical coding and its application to health insurance billing and reimbursement. Third-party terminology will be discussed. Students will learn to complete insurance claim forms both manually and electronically through the use of medical coding software in order to receive prompt and accurate reimbursement. Follow-up to claim submission and rejections from insurance carriers will be discussed. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. MEDA232 Anatomy and Terminology for Medical Coding

2 Credits

This course is designed to enable medical coding students to learn the physical structures of the human body and the function and pathology of the major body systems. The students will learn medical terminology, emphasizing the meaning of medical terms and their parts: word roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Medical terminology abbreviations as utilized for medical coding will be taught. MEDA233 Introduction to Medical Records and Health Information Management 2 Credits This course is designed to educate students in health information and medical records management. The purpose and management of medical records will be discussed. Regulations, ethics, and standards of documentation will be taught. tudents will learn the basic guidelines of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and the importance of compliance as it applies to Medical Coding. MEDA234 Advanced Medical Coding

3 Credits

This course will provide medical coding students advanced education in Medical ICD and CPT coding through lecture and computer laboratory. This course will include interpretation of medical and surgical procedures retrieved from medical records. Students will learn to appropriately code information for medical and surgical procedures, diseases of the various body systems, pregnancy, childbirth, injuries, and burns. Students will learn to accurately code using coding manuals, textbook, and medical coding software. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Introduction to Health Insurance Billing and Coding (MEDA231) or permission of instructor. MEDA301 Principles and Methods of Phlebotomy

a hospital or private laboratory. Lecture topics include an introduction to the health care setting, anatomy and physiology of body systems, blood collection supplies and procedures, safety, and quality assurance. A brief introduction to an EKG is given. The laboratory component includes venipuncture and microcollection demonstration and practice. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Students must be accepted into the Certificate in Phlebotomy Program, meeting all requirements. MEDA302 Phlebotomy Techniques

This course provides students with basic instruction in venipuncture and microcollection procedures. Special collection techniques such as blood cultures, bleeding times, and winged infusion procedures are included. Laboratory sessions will include demonstration and practice in all venipuncture and skin puncture techniques. Laboratory: 2 hours. MEDA401 Phlebotomy Clinical Practicum

This course presents the history of phlebotomy, giving an overview of blood collection equipment and techniques, preparing the student for a clinical training experience at

2 Credits

Students are placed in a hospital or private laboratory for training in all procedures of blood collection. Students are trained in the areas of venipuncture, skin puncture, and special procedures such as bleeding time test and blood culture techniques. Students observe arterial puncture techniques and specimen processing. Prerequisite: C or better in Principles and Methods of Phlebotomy (MEDA301).

MODERN LANGUAGE—ARABIC MLAR101 Beginning Arabic I

3 Credits

This course initiates the development of the ability to speak, understand, read and write Arabic. Students learn the fundamentals of grammar, basic vocabulary, and correct pronunciation. Various aspects of Arab cultures are discussed. This is a beginning-level course designed for students with no previous experience or with no more than one year of study of Arabic at the high school level. MLAR102 Beginning Arabic II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Beginning Arabic I (MLAR101). Emphasis is on communication through the continued development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the language. Students will continue to acquire grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and correct pronunciation, which will enhance their ability to initiate and sustain conversations, read basic Arabic passages, and write basic Arabic sentences and dialogues. Various aspects of Arab cultures will be explored. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with one to two years of previous study of Arabic at the high school level or one semester at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Arabic I (MLAR101) or departmental approval. MLAR201 Intermediate Arabic I

3 Credits

Grammar and syntax are reviewed and expanded upon with greater emphasis on oral work. Students engage in class discussion and conversation as well as reading assignments and compositions. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with two to three years of previous study of Arabic at the high school level or two semesters at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Arabic II (MLAR102) or departmental approval.

MODERN LANGUAGE—CAPE VERDEAN MLCV101 Beginning Cape Verdean Creole I

3 Credits

1 Credit

3 Credits

This course initiates the development of the ability to speak, understand, read, and write Cape Verdean. Students learn the fundamentals of grammar, basic vocabulary,

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Course Descriptions and correct pronunciation. Various aspects of Cape Verdean cultures are discussed. This is a beginning-level course designed for students with no previous experience or with no more than one year of study of Cape Verdean at the high school level. MLCV102 Beginning Cape Verdean Creole II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Beginning Cape Verdean Creole I (MLCV101). Emphasis is on communication through the continued development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the language. Students will continue to acquire grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and correct pronunciation, which will enhance their ability to initiate and sustain conversations, read basic Cape Verdean passages, and write basic Cape Verdean sentences and dialogues. Various aspects of Cape Verdean cultures will be explored. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with one to two years of previous study of Cape Verdean at the high school level or one semester at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Cape Verdean I (MLCV101) or departmental approval. MLCV400 Special Studies in Cape Verdean

1 Credit

MODERN LANGUAGE—CHINESE 3 Credits

This course initiates the development of the ability to speak, understand, read, and write Chinese. Students learn the fundamentals of grammar, basic vocabulary, and correct pronunciation. Various aspects of Chinese culture are discussed. This is a beginning-level course designed for students with no previous experience or with no more than one year of study in Chinese at the high school level. MLCH102 Beginning Chinese II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Beginning Chinese I (MLCH101). Emphasis is on communication through the continued development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the language. Students will continue to acquire grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and correct pronunciation, which will enhance their ability to initiate and sustain conversations, read basic Chinese passages, and write basic Chinese sentences and dialogues. Various aspects of Chinese culture will be explored. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with one to two years of previous study of Chinese at the high school level or one semester at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Chinese I (MLCH101) or departmental approval. MLCH211 Intermediate Chinese I

3 Credits

MODERN LANGUAGE—FRENCH MLFR101 Beginning French I

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Chinese I (MLCH211). The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with three to four years of previous study of Chinese at the high school level or three semesters at the college level.

3 Credits

This course initiates the development of the ability to speak, understand, read, and write French. Students learn the fundamentals of grammar, basic vocabulary, and correct pronunciation. Various aspects of French culture are discussed. This is a beginning-level course designed for students with no previous experience or with no more than one year of study of French at the high school level. 3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Beginning French I (MLFR101). Emphasis is on communication through the continued development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the language. Students will continue to acquire grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and correct pronunciation, which will enhance their ability to initiate and sustain conversations, read basic French passages, and write basic French sentences and dialogues. Various aspects of French culture will be explored. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with one to two years of previous study of French at the high school level or one semester at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning French I (MLFR101) or departmental approval. MLFR201 Intermediate French I

3 Credits

Grammar and syntax are reviewed and expanded upon with greater emphasis on oral work. Students engage in class discussion and conversation as well as reading assignments and compositions. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with two to three years of previous study of French at the high school level or two semesters at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning French II (MLFR102) or departmental approval. MLFR202 Intermediate French II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Intermediate French I (MLFR201). The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with three to four years of previous study of French at the high school level or three semesters at the college level. Prerequisite: Intermediate French I (MLFRC201) or departmental approval. 1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Modern Languages. Limited to two courses per student Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

MODERN LANGUAGE—HEBREW MLHB101 Beginning Hebrew

3 Credits

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Modern Languages. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

MLFR400 Special Studies in French

Grammar and syntax are reviewed and expanded upon with greater emphasis on oral work. Students engage in class discussion and conversation as well as reading assignments and compositions. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with two to three years of previous study of Chinese at the high school level or two semesters at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Chinese II (MLCH102) or departmental approval. MLCH212 Intermediate Chinese II

MLCH400 Special Studies in Chinese

MLFR102 Beginning French II

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Modern Languages. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

MLCH101 Beginning Chinese I

Prerequisite: Intermediate Chinese I (MLCH211) or departmental approval.

3 Credits

This course initiates the development of the ability to read, write, and communicate in Hebrew, the language of modern Israel. Students learn the fundamentals of grammar, basic vocabulary, and pronunciation. Emphasis will be placed on the Hebrew characters and alphabet, their sounds, and correct pronunciation. Students will be exposed to

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Course Descriptions appropriate cultural materials and aspects of the culture of modern Israel.

approval.

MODERN LANGUAGE—ITALIAN

MLPO201 Intermediate Portuguese I

MLIT400 Special Studies in Italian

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Modern Languages. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

MODERN LANGUAGE—LATIN MLLT101 Beginning Latin I

This course initiates the development of the ability to speak, understand, read, and write Latin. Students learn the fundamentals of grammar, basic vocabulary, and correct pronunciation. Various aspects of Latin cultures are discussed. This is a beginning-level course designed for students with no previous experience or with no more than one year of study of Latin at the high school level. MLLT102 Beginning Latin II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Beginning Latin I (MLLT101). Emphasis is on communication through the continued development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the language. Students will continue to acquire grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and correct pronunciation, which will enhance their ability to initiate and sustain conversations, read basic Latin passages, and write basic Latin sentences and dialogues. Various aspects of Latin cultures will be explored. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with one to two years of previous study of Latin at the high school level or one semester at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Latin I (MLLT101) or departmental approval. MLLT400 Special Studies in Latin

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Modern Languages. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

MODERN LANGUAGE—PORTUGUESE MLPO101 Beginning Portuguese I

3 Credits

This course initiates the development of the ability to speak, understand, read, and write Portuguese. Students learn the fundamentals of grammar, basic vocabulary, and correct pronunciation. Various aspects of Portuguese culture are discussed. This is a beginning-level course designed for students with no previous experience or with no more than one year of study of Portuguese at the high school level. MLPO102 Beginning Portuguese II

Grammar and syntax are reviewed and expanded upon with greater emphasis on oral work. Students engage in class discussion and conversation as well as reading assignments and compositions. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with two to three years of previous study of Portuguese at the high school level or two semesters at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Portuguese II (MLPO102) or departmental approval. MLPO202 Intermediate Portuguese II

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Beginning Portuguese I (MLPO101). Emphasis is on communication through the continued development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the language. Students will continue to acquire grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and correct pronunciation, which will enhance their ability to initiate and sustain conversations, read basic Portuguese passages, and write basic Portuguese sentences and dialogues. Various aspects of Portuguese culture will be explored. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with one to two years of previous study of Portuguese at the high school level or one semester at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Portuguese I (MLPO101) or departmental

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Portuguese I (MLPO201). The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with three to four years of previous study of Portuguese at the high school level or three semesters at the college level. Prerequisite: Intermediate Portuguese I (MLPO201) or departmental approval. MLPO400 Special Studies in Portuguese

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Modern Languages. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

MODERN LANGUAGE—SIGN LANGUAGE MLSL101 Beginning American Sign Language I

3 Credits

This course initiates the development of the ability to sign and understand American Sign Language. Students learn the fundamentals of grammar, basic vocabulary, and correct signing. Cultural aspects of the Deaf community are discussed. This is a beginning-level course designed for students with no previous experience or with no more than one year of study of Sign Language at the high school level. MLSL102 Beginning American Sign Language II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Beginning American Sign Language I (MLSL101). Emphasis is on the continued development of communication skills and face and body expressions. Students will continue to acquire grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, which will enhance their ability to initiate and sustain conversations using American Sign Language. Cultural aspects of the Deaf Community will be explored. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with one to two years of previous study of ASL at the high school level or one semester at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Sign Language I (MLSL101) or departmental approval. MLSL400 Special Studies in Sign Language

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Modern Languages. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

MODERN LANGUAGE—SPANISH MLSP100 Conversational Spanish

3 Credits

This is an introductory course to help students develop the ability to converse in Spanish and to acquire the basic skills necessary for communication in and beyond the workplace. Special emphasis on law enforcement, business, teaching, health, or social services is determined by the needs of the students.

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Course Descriptions MLSP101 Beginning Spanish I

3 Credits

MUSC131 Music Theory I

This course initiates the development of the ability to speak, understand, read, and write Spanish. Students learn the fundamentals of grammar, basic vocabulary, and correct pronunciation. Various aspects of Spanish cultures are discussed. This is a beginning-level course designed for students with no previous experience or with no more than one year of study of Spanish at the high school level. MLSP102 Beginning Spanish II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Beginning Spanish I (MLSP101). Emphasis is on communication through the continued development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the language. Students will continue to acquire grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and correct pronunciation, which will enhance their ability to initiate and sustain conversations, read basic Spanish passages, and write basic Spanish sentences and dialogues. Various aspects of Spanish cultures will be explored. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with one to two years of previous study of Spanish at the high school level or one semester at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Spanish I (MLSP101) or departmental approval. MLSP201 Intermediate Spanish I

3 Credits

Grammar and syntax are reviewed and expanded upon with greater emphasis on oral work. Students engage in class discussion and conversation as well as reading assignments and compositions. The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with two to three years of previous study of Spanish at the high school level or two semesters at the college level. Prerequisite: Beginning Spanish II (MLSP102) or departmental approval. MLSP202 Intermediate Spanish II

3 Credits

3 Credits

This course presents fundamental music theory: an introduction to reading music, scales, intervals, chords, and basic harmonic progressions. Harmonic analysis is integrated with written exercises. MUSC141 Irish-American Music

3 Credits

A study of Irish-American musical life, this course will examine folk songs, popular songs, dance tunes, and/or liturgical music in the context of the Irish-American experience. Students will consider the origins of Celtic music in Ireland (and Scotland) and the two-way traffic in traditional music between Irish and Irish-American musicians. Students will also examine the way that Irish-American musical tradition illuminates major historical themes like the famine, emigration, work, war, religion, politics, and nationalism. Frequent listening but no knowledge of musical theory will be required. MUSC205 Introduction to Piano

3 Credits

This beginning course in piano instruction offers students an opportunity to learn the basics of the piano and music theory, including rhythm, harmony, structure, chords, and lead sheets. Students will experience playing in an ensemble, learn how different instruments fit in with the whole ensemble, and learn how orchestration works. MUSC206 Intermediate Piano

3 Credits

A continuation of Introduction to Piano I (MUSC205). Students will continue to work on technique, sight-reading, theory, and repertoire. In addition, students will be introduced to the concept of improvisation, building chords, and reading from lead sheets. Prerequisite: Introduction to Piano I (MUSC205) or permission of instructor. MUSC207 Elementary Guitar

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Spanish I (MLSP201). The Modern Language Department recommends this course to students with three to four years of previous study of Spanish at the high school level or three semesters at the college level. Prerequisite: Intermediate Spanish I (MLSP201) or departmental approval.

This course introduces the elementary principles of guitar playing. The student learns simple tunes and melodic patterns. The student also strums basic chord patterns and explores music reading and musical notation. Students must furnish their own instruments.

MLSP400 Special Studies in Spanish

MUSC400 Special Studies in Music

1 Credit

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Modern Languages. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Music faculty. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

MUSIC

NURSING

MUSC101 History and Development of Music

3 Credits

NURS101 Nursing I

This course offers a greater understanding and enjoyment of music. A wide range of music is presented, with an emphasis on the musical style and historical background evident in the works of the great composers. Study includes compositions from the Renaissance to the present. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) or waiver by placement testing results. MUSC113 History of Jazz

3 Credits

This course offers an understanding of the history of jazz in America. Multiple styles of jazz will be presented, with the intent to enrich and enhance the enjoyment of music. Listening comprehension will cover jazz from its earliest recordings to today’s jazz recordings.

8 Credits

This course is designed to provide a foundation for nursing practice. The focus is on the nursing process, the patients, and their families as community members and the adaptations in their patterns of daily living necessary during illness. Emphasis is placed on health and hygienic practices for the nurse and patient. Content includes interpersonal relations, observations, communications, nutrition, basic pharmacology, and therapeutic measures, with an introduction to critical thinking, evidence-based practice, and patient teaching. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Co-Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL201) and General Psychology (PSYC101). NURS203 Nursing II

4 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the role of the nurse in the comprehensive health care of mothers and newborn infants during the childbearing 136

Course Descriptions phase of the lifecycle. A family-centered approach applying the nursing process is the framework for health care delivery to families from diverse populations. The student is guided to integrate previously learned knowledge and skills. Content includes social and biological sciences, nutrition, pharmacology, growth and development, patientfamily teaching, critical thinking, and evidence-based practice. Emphasis is placed on the study of relationships and responsibilities as the family expands. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Prerequisites: Nursing I (NURS101), Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL201), and General Psychology (PSYC101). Co-Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL202). NURS204 Nursing III

4 Credits

This course is designed to build upon the content of Nursing I (NURS101) and focuses on basic human needs when altered by common health problems. The content includes pathophysiology, pharmacology, nutrition, social sciences, nursing theory, patient teaching, and evidence-based practice. The student continues to apply the nursing process in the care of patients with medical and surgical problems. The student is guided to integrate previous learning. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Prerequisites: Nursing I (NURS101), Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL201), and General Psychology (PSYC101). Co-Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL202). NURS212 Nursing I-E

6 Credits

This course is designed as the foundation for nursing practice, stressing critical thinking and the nursing process. Emphasis is on health, hygienic practices, and the necessary adaptations during illness. The content includes the study of interpersonal relations, safety, basic pharmacology, asepsis, and the psychomotor skills and concepts necessary for therapeutic interventions. Evidence-based practice is introduced. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. CoPrerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL201) and General Psychology (PSYC101). NURS213 Nursing II-E

5 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the role of the nurse in meeting the health needs of the growing family. The focus is the maternity cycle, care of the neonate, related pharmacology, and the family’s expanding role. Cultural diversity and developmental needs are explored. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills, therapeutic interventions, and the application of the nursing process to support optimal wellness. The content includes nursing theory, related pharmacology, nutrition, family teaching, and evidence-based practice. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL201), Nursing I-E (NURS212), and General Psychology (PSYC101). Co-Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL202). NURS214 Nursing III-E

5 Credits

This course is designed to focus on the application of critical thinking and the nursing process in caring for patients whose basic needs are threatened by common health problems. Integration of previous learning is expected. Nursing constructs as they apply to acutely ill patients are introduced. The content includes nursing theory, pathophysiology, pharmacology, evidence-based practice, and the social sciences. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL201), General Psychology (PSYC101), and Nursing I-E (NURS212). Co-Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL202).

NURS301 Nursing IV

9 Credits

This course is designed to present the principles of comprehensive nursing care related to the major mental and physical health problems across the life span. The content includes pathophysiology, pharmacology, nutrition, social sciences, and nursing theory. Emphasis on patient teaching, evidence-based practice, and critical thinking continues. The nursing process is further implemented as the student learns to recognize and meet more complex nursing problems. Clinical experiences are planned in medical, surgical, psychiatric, and/or pediatric community settings. The student is expected to integrate previously learned knowledge and skills. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL202), Nursing II (NURS203), and Nursing III (NURS204). Co-Prerequisites: Human Growth and Development (PSYC205) and Microbiology (BIOL231). NURS302 Nursing V

9 Credits

This course is designed to continue to present the principles of comprehensive nursing care related to major complex mental and physical health problems across the life span. The content includes pathophysiology, pharmacology, nutrition, social sciences, and nursing theory. The nursing process is further implemented as the student learns to recognize and meet more complicated health problems. Emphasis on patient teaching, evidence-based practice, and critical thinking continues. Community resources are included as a focus for continuity of care. Clinical experiences are planned in medical, surgical, psychiatric, and/or pediatric community settings. The student is expected to integrate previously learned knowledge and skills. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Prerequisite: Nursing IV (NURS301). NURS303 Nursing Seminar

1 Credit

This course is designed to present the evolution of nursing practice as it interfaces with contemporary nursing issues and problems that influence health care delivery. Contemporary issues relating to leadership and management, health care costs, nursing theory, legal and ethical concerns, cultural disparity of disease, emergency preparedness, world health problems, and health care policy are discussed. Lectures and discussion integrating previous knowledge and skills are utilized. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Prerequisite: Nursing IV (NURS301). Corequisite: Nursing V (NURS302). NURS304 Nursing A

6 Credits

This course is designed to present the role of the nurse utilizing the nursing process in providing comprehensive nursing care. Major mental and physical health problems across the life span are presented. The content includes nursing theory, pathophysiology, pharmacology, nutrition, and the social sciences. Critical thinking, evidence-based practice, and teaching and learning are stressed. Clinical experiences are planned in medical, surgical, psychiatric, and/or pediatric settings. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL202), Nursing II-E (NURS213), and Nursing III-E (NURS214) are required for part-time generic students. Advanced placement students must have a current license to practice Practical Nursing in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Co-Prerequisite: Human Growth and Development (PSYC205). NURS305 Nursing B

6 Credits

This course is designed to present the principles of comprehensive nursing care related to the major mental and physical health problems across the life span. Students are expected to integrate previously learned knowledge and skills. The nursing process is

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Course Descriptions further implemented as the student intervenes therapeutically. The course content includes nursing theory, pathophysiology, pharmacology, nutrition, and the social sciences. Emphasis on critical thinking, evidence-based practice, and teaching and learning continues. Clinical experiences are planned in medical, surgical, psychiatric, and/or pediatric settings. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Prerequisite: Nursing A (NURS304). NURS306 Nursing C

6 Credits

This course is designed to build on the knowledge and skills of the previous nursing curriculum. The nursing process is further implemented to provide a framework for comprehensive nursing care for diverse populations across their life spans. The content includes nursing theory, pathophysiology, pharmacology, nutrition, and the social sciences. Critical thinking, evidence-based practice, and teaching and learning continue to be stressed. Clinical experiences are planned in medical, surgical, psychiatric, and/or pediatric settings. This course has a lecture, lab, and clinical component. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Prerequisite: Nursing B (NURS305). Co-Prerequisite: Microbiology (BIOL231). NURS307 Nursing Trends

1 Credit

This course is designed to provide a survey of the challenges, issues, and problems influencing contemporary health care delivery. Nursing history and the growth of leadership and management in nursing practice are reviewed. Legal and ethical responsibilities, cultural disparity of disease, emergency preparedness, and global health problems are discussed. Lectures and discussion enhance the integration and application of previous nursing knowledge. A minimum grade of C (78%) is required. Corequisite: Nursing C (NURS 306).

PHILOSOPHY PHIL101 Introduction to Philosophy

3 Credits

2 Credits

This course provides an analysis and understanding of laws as they relate to the medical profession and the responsibilities and ethical considerations that must be considered and applied while executing these laws. Topics covered include codes of medical ethics, techniques and methods used in making ethical decisions, structure of the law as it relates to medical health, and the various laws as they pertain to specific situations. Case studies are utilized as much as possible. PHIL400 Special Studies in Philosophy

PHED112 Personal Fitness

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Philosophy faculty. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

1 Credit

This is an exercise and activity course that emphasizes personal fitness. Techniques and theories on how to maintain physical fitness are covered. Active participation by the student is expected throughout the course. PHED118 Volleyball

1 Credit

Volleyball covers the game’s fundamental skills, techniques, rules, and strategies. Rules interpretation and match play strategies are also discussed. PHED122 Weight Lifting

1 Credit

Weight lifting techniques and program are stressed. Also, the theories on weight lifting are covered, and actual programs are worked on during the course. PHED128 Aerobics

1 Credit

This course is designed to teach students the principles and benefits of cardiovascular fitness through participation in aerobic exercise. Students will gain endurance and strength by participating in a regular exercise program. PHED140 Yoga

1 Credit

This course is designed to help students find their mind-body-spirit connection and reduce their stress levels. Through the practice of traditional yoga postures, breathing exercises, and guided meditation, students will gain strength, flexibility, peace of mind, and a basic understanding of yoga philosophies. PHED203 Principles of Coaching

An introductory examination of the problems and scope of philosophical inquiry, this course introduces the student to major issues in philosophy, including theories of being, theories of knowledge, and theories of value, with attention to the historical development of philosophical thought. Prerequisites: English Composition I (ENGL101) and Preparing for College Reading ll (ENGL092), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. PHIL111 Medical Law and Ethics

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

3 Credits

This course will concentrate on the principles and techniques of coaching children and young adults in competitive athletics. It will focus on the philosophy and psychology of coaching, as well as coaching, organizational, and evaluative techniques. PHED204 History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education 3 Credits This course is designed to introduce students to the historical and philosophical study of sport and physical education. This course will trace the evolution of physical education and sport in ancient society, Europe, and the United States. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the philosophies of past and present leaders in sport and physical education. PHED205 Lifeguard Training

3 Credits

This course will include the skills and knowledge needed to prevent and respond to aquatic emergencies. Requirements and responsibilities of lifeguarding, rescue techniques, facilities operation, CPR, and First Aid, as well as the comprehension of the physiology of drowning, will be emphasized. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be eligible to take the American Red Cross exams in Lifeguard, Community First Aid, and CPR for the Professional Rescuer to become certified as lifeguards. Students must be competent swimmers and able to pass a water pre-test given at the beginning of the course consisting of a continuous swim, treading water, and retrieving a submerged object. PHED400 Special Studies in Physical Education

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Physical Education and Athletics. Limited to two courses

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Course Descriptions per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

PHYSICS PHYS107 Telecommunications Technical Physics

4 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the physical laws and principles inherent in the study of the core topics of mechanics, vibrations and waves, light and optics, and electricity and magnetism. The topics of thermodynamics, heat, and modern physics will be treated as time permits. Fiber optics, wave mechanics, and wave propagation will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Telecommunications Technical Mathematics II (MATH144).

of technical physics. This course is specifically designed to satisfy the minimum physics requirement for the Architectural Technology, Diesel Technology,and HVAC programs. Emphasis is placed on understanding through problem solving and applications. Topics include vectors, force systems, kinematics, dynamics and Newton’s laws, work, conservation of energy and momentum, and rotational motion. This course can be substituted for Survey of Physics (PHYS131) in the Architectural Technology, Diesel Technology, and HVAC programs and options. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher, or departmental approval. PHYS133 Concepts of Technical Physics II

3 Credits

This course will include activities related to vibrations, sound waves and other waves, musical instruments, and room acoustics. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Science of Music (PHYS113).

This course is a continuation of Concepts of Technical Physics I (PHYS 132). Topics include properties of solids and fluids, heat and thermodynamics, wave motion, sound, electrostatics, electric current, electromagnetism, light, and optics. This course can be substituted for Survey of Physics in the Architectural Technology, Diesel Technology, and HVAC programs and options. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Concepts of Technical Physics I (PHYS132) or departmental approval.

PHYS113 Science of Music

PHYS141 Technical Physics I

PHYS112 Science of Music Laboratory

1 Credit

3 Credits

This course explains aspects of music in terms of physical laws and principles. It begins with an introduction to musical terminology and an overview of basic physics, including vibrations, resonance, and wave motion. It continues with a description of sound waves, and uses standing waves, to analyze string, wind, and percussion instruments. The timbre of complex sounds, harmony, and temperaments are also discussed, as well as the ear and musical perception and concert hall acoustics. Electronic music and sound recording are optional topics. No background in science or music is necessary. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher, or permission of instructor. PHYS114 Survey of Astronomy

3 Credits

This is an introductory astronomy course that is designed to acquaint students with a basic understanding and appreciation of our universe, but with emphasis on the solar system and the nature of the celestial bodies inhabiting it and the mechanics of their orbits. Emphasis is placed upon understanding scientific concepts as opposed to rote memorization. Topics included in the course are the nature and scale of the universe, observing the night sky from Earth, seasonal changes in the night sky, and the Sun’s place on the celestial sphere, the celestial coordinate system, highlights from the historical development of astronomy, the force of gravity and the motion of planets and other celestial bodies, origin of the solar system, the Earth and the Moon, the planets of the solar system, and the Sun. Students are expected to do some observing on their own and to become familiar with the night sky with the help of star charts, which the instructor will provide to them. Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. PHYS131 Survey of Physics

3 Credits

This course is designed for non-science transfer students. It is a survey of the central ideas of physics and their applications to everyday situations. Emphasis is on qualitative understanding of concepts and theories. Weekly laboratory experiments demonstrate and reinforce the class topics. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Introductory Algebra (MATH101) or higher, or waiver by placement testing results. Survey of Chemistry (CHEM131) is not a prerequisite. PHYS132 Concepts of Technical Physics I

3 Credits

This is the first semester of a one-year introduction to the principles and applications

4 Credits

This course is an introductory course in physics and technical applications. Topics are vectors, statics, equations of motion, Newton’s Laws, energy, simple machines, impulse, momentum, and rotation motion. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher or waiver by placement testing results. PHYS142 Technical Physics II

4 Credits

This course is a continuation of Technical Physics I (PHYS141). Topics are hydrostatics, simple harmonic motion, waves, sound, heat, thermodynamics, light, optics, electricity and magnetism. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Technical Physics I (PHYS141) or permission of instructor. PHYS151 College Physics I

4 Credits

This is the first semester of a one-year introduction to the principles and applications of physics. Emphasis is placed on understanding through problem solving. Topics are vectors, force systems, kinematics, dynamics and Newton’s Laws, work, conservation of energy and momentum, and rotational kinematics and dynamics. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher, waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor. PHYS152 College Physics II

4 Credits

This is a continuation of College Physics I (PHYS151). Problem-solving ability is further developed. Topics include properties of solids and fluids, heat and thermodynamics, wave motion, sound, electrostatics, electric current, electromagnetism, light, and optics. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: College Physics I (PHYS151), or permission of instructor PHYS161 General Physics I

4 Credits

This course is an introduction to classical physics using calculus. Topics are vectors and scalars, kinematics and dynamics, work, energy, momentum, the conservation laws, and rotational kinematics and dynamics. The basic concepts of calculus are introduced within the context of the course material. This course is usually offered in the fall. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisite: Calculus I (MATH 221), waiver by placement testing results, or permission of instructor.

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Course Descriptions PHYS162 General Physics II

4 Credits

A continuation of General Physics I (PHYS161), topics in this course include heat and thermodynamics, oscillatory and wave motion electrostatics, electric current, electromagnetism, Maxwell’s Equations, light, and optics. This course is usually offered in the spring. Lecture: 3 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: General Physics I (PHYS161) or permission of instructor.

PSYCHOLOGY PSYC101 General Psychology

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to psychology as the science of human behavior. Major topics include scientific method, history of psychology, learning, motivation, emotion, social psychology, and perception. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. PSYC201 Abnormal Psychology

PSYC301 Social Psychology

This course studies the analysis of the individual’s behavior in social contexts. Topics considered include the historical background of social psychology, methods of social psychology, acquiring motives and attitudes, social factors in perception, human personality, groups, leadership, and social movements. Prerequisite: General Psychology (PSYC101) or departmental approval. PSYC400 Special Study in Psychology

3 Credits

RADT101 Radiologic Technology I

PSYC203 Adolescent Psychology

RADT105 Radiologic Technology III

3 Credits

A critical and educational review of research and theories pertaining to the emotional, intellectual, physical, and social development of adolescents is given in this course. Emphasis will be placed on the role of peers, family, and experiences in the formation of personalities and the intelligence and emotional behavior of the adolescent. The course is recommended for Secondary Education majors. Prerequisite: General Psychology (PSYC101) or departmental approval. 3 Credits

This course includes an exploration of the physiological and psychological development of the human organism throughout the life span, including childhood, adolescence, adulthood, old age, and death. Emphasis will be placed on identifying the factors that are most influential in changes that occur during each of our life stages as well as some of the problems associated with such changes. Prerequisite: General Psychology (PSYC101) or departmental approval. 3 Credits

This course is concerned with the various aspects of the grief process and factors that influence it. This will include discussions of the nature of normal grief, forms of maladaptive grief, and theoretical perspectives on grief. The course will also include discussions of life cycle issues, mode of death, and family dynamics, among other factors that influence the grief process. Further, there will be discussions of the role

3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of Radiologic Technology. Topics covered include basic radiation protection, orientation to allied health professions, medical ethics and legalities, patient care, medical terminology, and image production. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into Radiologic Technology program. Corequisite: Radiographic Anatomy and Positioning Lab I (RADT111). RADT102 Radiologic Technology II

PSYC231 The Psychology of Grief

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Social Science. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

An introduction to the field of child psychology, with an emphasis on the influence of society and culture in normal development. This course stresses the role of family, heredity, environment, and development of cognitive functioning. Salient research will be summarized and presented. Prerequisite: General Psychology (PSYC101) or departmental approval.

PSYC205 Human Growth and Development

3 Credits

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY

3 Credits

A systematic study of behavior, psychology, symptoms, patterns, ideology, prognosis, and therapy is offered in this course. Attention will be given to the wide range of ways in which the personality may be disordered. Emphasis is on normal behavioral development, highlighted by psychopathology. Evidence and theories concerning problems of treatment will also be considered. Prerequisite: General Psychology (PSYC101) or departmental approval. PSYC202 Child Psychology

of the funeral service and burial process, empathy and the grieving process, and referrals to mental health professionals. Prerequisite: General Psychology (PSYC101) or departmental approval.

3 Credits

This course develops an understanding of the production and processing of medical images. Included are components of radiographic quality, principles of radiographic exposure, and radiographic film processing. Prerequisite: Radiologic Technology I (RADT101). Corequisites: RADT Principles of Digital Imaging (RADT120). 2 Credits

This course will continue to explore the methods of medical image production, including the study of radiographic equipment and techniques. Prerequisite: Radiologic Technology II (RADT102). Corequisite: Radiation Science I (RADT131). RADT106 Radiologic Technology IV

2 Credits

This course is a continuation of Radiologic Technology III (RADT105), with an emphasis on quality assurance and film critique. Prerequisite: Radiologic Technology III (RADT105). Corequisite: Radiation Science II (RADT132). RADT111 RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lab I

1 Credit

This is the first in a series of related courses that provide students with the skills necessary to begin positioning patients for radiographic examinations. Positioning and related anatomy and pathology of the chest, abdomen, and upper and lower extremities are stressed. This course is coordinated with Radiographic Clinical Experience I (RADT121). Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Radiologic Technology program. Corequisite: Radiographic Anatomy and Positioning Lecture I (RADT133). RADT112 RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lab II

1 Credit

This course continues the ongoing study of radiographic positioning, procedures, and related anatomy. Content includes the pelvic and shoulder girdles, axial skeleton, and abdominal organ systems. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisite: RADT Anatomy and

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Course Descriptions Positioning Lab I (RADT111). Corequisite: RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lecture II (RADT134). RADT113 RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lab III

1 Credit

This course includes advanced positioning and procedures of areas previously studied as well as specialized procedures used to demonstrate specific anatomical and physiological conditions. Laboratory: 2 hours. Prerequisites: RADT Anatomy and Positioning Laboratory II (RADT112). Corequisites: RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lecture III (RADT137). RADT120 RADT Principles of Digital Imaging

2 Credits

This course is an introduction to the development of computer-assisted diagnosis methods for radiology and includes the principles of computers and their uses, as well as a description of important functional components. Radiologic applications of digital imaging in radiology are reviewed and include digital imaging operations, archiving, management networks (PACS, IMACS), and radiology information systems (RIS). Prerequisite: Radiologic Technology I (RADT101). Corequisite: RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lab II (RADT112). RADT121 RADT Clinical Experience I

4 Credits

This course provides the freshman Radiologic Technology student with the opportunity to apply skills in a clinical setting. Clinical experience is gained at affiliated hospitals approximately two days per week. Students are introduced to the operation of the hospital and radiology department and begin positioning patients for radiographic examinations of the chest, abdomen, and extremities. Competency evaluations are given in these areas. Clinical: two days per week in the fall, four days per week during intersession. Approximately 15 hours plus winter intersession-64 hours. Prerequisite: acceptance to Radiologic Technology program. Corequisite: Radiologic Technology I (RADT101). RADT126 RADT Clinical Experience II A and B

8 Credits

This course provides a continuation of practical skills application. Emphasis is given to positioning of the pelvic and shoulder girdles, the axial skeleton, and the genitourinary and digestive systems. Competency is determined by evaluation in these areas. In addition, a 32-hour a week, 12-week summer clinical experience provides an opportunity for the student to integrate the didactic and practical aspects of the program and to fully implement all of the skills learned in preparation for the second year of the Radiologic Technology program. Competency is determined by a standard evaluation process. Clinical: two days per week in the spring, four days per week in the summer. Rotation to second clinical site is scheduled during this time. 15 hours in spring and 32 hours in summer. Prerequisite: RADT Clinical Experience I (RADT121). Corequisite: Radiologic Technology II (RADT102). RADT127 RADT Clinical Experience III

RADT131 Radiation Science I

4 Credits

This is the last in the series of clinical courses. Students complete clinical competency

3 Credits

This course addresses the physics of X-ray production, interactions with matter, and the X-ray circuit. Prerequisite: Radiologic Technology II (RADT102). Corequisite: Radiographic Anatomy and Positioning Lab III (RADT113). RADT132 Radiation Science II

3 Credits

This course is a continuation of the physics of image production. Heavy emphasis is given to radiation protection and the effects of ionizing radiation on living matter. Prerequisite: Radiation Science I (RADT131). Corequisite: RADT Advanced Imaging Procedures (RADT140). RADT133 RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lecture I

2 Credits

This is the first in a series of lecture courses that provide the Radiology Technology student with the skills necessary to begin positioning patients for radiographic examinations. Specific topics include terminology of positioning, positioning and regional anatomy of the chest, abdomen, and upper and lower extremities. This course correlates with RADT Clinical Experience I (RADT121) and RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lab I (RADT111). Prerequisite: acceptance into the Radiology Technology program. Corequisite: RADT Clinical Experience I (RADT121). RADT134 RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lecture II

2 Credits

This is the second in a series of lecture courses that provide the Radiologic Technology student with the skills necessary to position patients for radiographic examinations. Specific topics will include anatomy and positioning of the spine, skull, thoracic cage, gastrointestinal system, and genitourinary system. Prerequisite: RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lecture I (RADT133). Corequisite: RADT Clinical Experience II A and B (RADT126). RADT137 RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lecture III

1 Credit

This is the third in a series of lecture courses that provide the Radiologic Technology student with the skills that are necessary to position patients for radiographic examinations. The student will study the anatomy and advance positioning examinations of the appendicular and axial skeletal systems. Prerequisite: RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lecture II (RADT134). Corequisite: RADT Clinical Experience III (RADT127). RADT138 RADT Pathology and Sectional Anatomy

5 Credits

Third in a series of clinical courses, this segment includes advanced application of skills in positioning and performance of fluoroscopic and radiographic examinations of the digestive, urinary, and biliary systems and the axial and appendicular skeleton. Second year, semester 1: three days per week in the fall, 4 days per week during intersession. Clinical: Approximately 22 hours, plus 64 hours in winter intersession. Prerequisite: RADT Clinical Experience II A and B (RADT126). Corequisite: Radiologic Technology III (RADT105). RADT128 RADT Clinical Experience IV

evaluations and are able to function in all entry-level aspects with indirect supervision. Special rotations may be arranged with permission of the Program Director. Students are also introduced to specialized modalities. Clinical: Approximately 22 hours, three days per week. Prerequisite: RADT Clinical Experience III (RADT127). Corequisite: Radiologic Technology IV (RADT106).

3 Credits

This course uses a systems approach to introduce the student to the common pathological findings on radiographic examinations and the fundamental concepts of body structure in cross-section imaging. Prerequisite: RADT Anatomy and Positioning Lecture III (RADT137). Corequisite: RADT Clinical Experience IV (RADT128). RADT140 RADT Advanced Imaging Procedures

2 Credits

This course will introduce students to specialized examinations in diagnostic radiology, which include pediatric, geriatric, advance imaging studies, mobile and trauma radiography, and their modified imaging procedures. The students will be introduced to the various imaging modalities: Computerized Tomography, Ultrasonography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Nuclear Medicine, Positron Emission Tomography,

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Course Descriptions Radiation Therapy, Angiography, Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography, Interventional Radiography, and Bone Densitometry. The study of venipuncture will also be demonstrated. Prerequisite: Radiologic Technology III (RADT105). Corequisite: RADT Pathology and Sectional Anatomy (RADT138).

historical development of computerized tomography, preparation of the examination room, patient assessment and education concerning the procedures, patient positioning, protocol selection, image display, filming and archiving, and contrast media.

RADT305 MRI Clinical Experience I

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of body structure in crosssectional imaging. Using a regional approach, the student will be provided with the means to identify anatomical structures in cross-section, utilizing standard (axial, coronal, and sagittal) and customized imaging planes with models, photographs, drawings, and computer-generated medical images.

1 Credit

This course provides MRI Certificate students with the opportunity to apply skills in a clinical setting. Clinical experience is gained at affiliated MRI facilities approximately four hours per week. Students are introduced to the operation of the MRI department and gain experience in patient screen and safety, coil selection, patient positioning, protocol selection, and filming. Competency evaluations are given in these areas. RADT306 MRI Clinical Experience II

1 Credit

RADT323 CT Cross-Sectional Anatomy

RADT325 CT Clinical Experience I

3 Credits

1 Credit

This course provides a continuation of practical skills application for MRI Certificate students. Clinical experience is further developed at affiliated MRI facilities, approximately four hours per week. Students refine technical proficiency in patient preparation and safety, coil selection, patient positioning, protocol selection, and filming. Competency evaluations are given in these areas.

This course provides Computerized Tomography Certificate students with the opportunity to apply skills in a clinical setting. Clinical experience is gained at affiliated hospitals. Students are introduced to the operation of the computerized tomography department and are instructed in patient screening and safety, contrast administration, patient positioning, protocol selection, and filming for anatomical examinations. First semester: four hours per week.

RADT308 Magnetic Resonance Imaging

RADT326 CT Clinical Experience II

2 Credits

This course continues to explore the methods of MRI production, including the study of MRI equipment and techniques. Image acquisition and reconstruction selection, with an emphasis on advanced imaging techniques, including MR Angiography, Cardiac Imaging, and Spectroscopy, will be discussed. Also included in discussion will be imaging characteristics, artifacts, and quality assurance. RADT309 Multi-Planar Sectional Pathology

2 Credits

This course is designed to expose the MRI student to the common pathological findings on MRI examinations. This program is designed to equip the student with the basic knowledge required to select proper choices for scan protocols based on patient history and physical condition. Lectures will consist of slide and film presentations and explanations of pulse sequences based on an anatomical regional approach with the guidance of expert guest lecturers. RADT312 Introduction to MRI

2 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of magnetic resonance imaging and the various techniques associated with MRI, along with all necessary safety guidelines required to work in the MRI environment or department. Topics covered include the basic principles of MRI, understanding acquisition protocols and how to acquire them, and imaging components and their necessity. Emphasis is placed on patient concerns and anxiety-related issues, understanding the magnetic environment, and safety. RADT313 Multi-Planar Sectional Anatomy

2 Credits

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of body structure in crosssectional imaging. Using a regional approach, the student will be provided with the means to identify anatomical structures in cross-section, utilizing standard (axial, coronal, and sagittal) and customized imaging planes with models, photographs, drawings, and computer-generated medical images. RADT321 Introduction to Computerized Tomography

1 Credit

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles and the various techniques associated with computerized tomography. Topics covered include the

1 Credit

This course provides a continuation of practical skills application for Computerized Tomography Certificate students. Clinical experience is further developed at affiliated computerized tomography facilities. Students refine technical proficiency in patient preparation and safety, coil selection, patient positioning, protocol selection, and filming. Competency evaluations are given in these areas. Second semester: four hours per week. RADT327 Computerized Tomography

2 Credits

This course continues to explore the methods of computerized tomography image production, including the study of computerized tomography equipment and techniques. Topics to be covered include image acquisition and reconstruction, image quality as it pertains to resolution, noise properties in computerized tomography, linearity, image artifacts, and image quality control. Measuring patient dose from computerized tomography scanners, advanced computerized tomography techniques, imaging moving organs, ultrafast CT scanning, and the dynamic spatial reconstructor will also be introduced. RADT328 Computerized Tomography Pathology

2 Credits

This course is designed to expose the computerized tomography student to the common pathological findings on computerized tomography examinations. This program is designed to equip the student with the basic knowledge required to select proper choices for scan protocols based on patient history and physical condition. Lectures will consist of slide and film presentations under the guidance of expert guest lecturers.

RELIGION RELG101 Introduction to World Religions

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the principal beliefs and practices of the world’s major religious traditions. Emphasis will be on their historical development, sacred literature, and impact on human thought and action. The course does not investigate the existence of a supernatural reality but does develop an objective view of humanity’s struggle with this question. Instruction will include guest lectures, reading, media presentations, and discussions. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory

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Course Descriptions Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. RELG400 Special Study in Religion

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Religion faculty. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

RESPIRATORY CARE RESP101 Fundamentals of Respiratory Care I

7 Credits

This course consists of an examination of the basic concepts of medical care and the role of the respiratory care practitioner in the total medical realm. Emphasis is placed on career identity, professional responsibilities, and qualifications of a respiratory care practitioner. Students study the metric system, some relevant nursing care procedures, gas laws, anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system, medical gases, oxygenation, aerosol and oxygen therapy, hand resuscitators, lung volumes, chronic lung disease, and sterilization. The laboratory and the clinical components permit equipment study and the development of pertinent nursing skills and reinforce what is learned in class. Lecture: 4 hours. Laboratory: 1 hour. Clinical: 16 hours. A grade of 75 (C) or better is required for graduation. Students must attain a theory grade of 75 or better and pass in clinical in order to continue in the program. RESP102 Fundamentals of Respiratory Care II

7 Credits

This course introduces topics that include oxygenation, hypoxia, shunting, the deadspace unit, V/Q, airway management, methods of hyperinflation therapy, IPPB, I.S., chest physical therapy, patient assessment, complete pulmonary function technology, electrolytes, and arterial blood gas interpretation. The laboratory and the clinical components offer the practical training to the topic areas. Lecture: 4 hours. Laboratory: 1 hour. Clinical: 16 hours. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Respiratory Care I (RESP101) completed with a grade of 75 or better in the lecture component and a grade of pass in the clinical component. RESP103 Fundamentals of Respiratory Care III

7 Credits

This course includes topics on neonatology, pediatrics, pulmonary rehabilitation, and home care, ACLS, diagnostic tests, and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Students also become familiar with the NBRC exam format by preparing for and taking selfassessment exams prepared and scored by the NBRC and by successfully completing five software Clinical Stimulation exams. Clinical experiences are provided to enhance the learning of these topics. Lecture: 4 hours. Laboratory: 1 hour. Clinical: 16 hours. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Respiratory Care III (RESP103) completed with a grade of 75 or better in the lecture component and a grade of pass in the clinical component.

2 Credits

Lectures and discussions focus on the basic principles of disease processes and their effect on the normal form and functions of the body. This course is intended for respiratory therapy students. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Respiratory Care II (RESP102). Corequisite: Fundamentals of Respiratory Care III (RESP103). RESP112 Introduction to Pharmacology

2 Credits

Lectures and discussions focus on the study of drugs, especially those relating to respiratory therapy. Indication, contraindication, side effects, and dosages of drugs are studied. This course is intended for respiratory therapy students. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Respiratory Care I (RESP101). Corequisite: Fundamentals of Respiratory Care II (RESP102). RESP113 Respiratory Care Seminar I

2 Credits

This seminar course will provide the student with the ability to select, review, obtain, and interpret data relevant to respiratory care cases. The student will review existing clinical data and collect and recommend therapy. The student will develop a respiratory care plan that is appropriate for the data collected. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. RESP115 Respiratory Care Equipment

2 Credits

This course explores the theoretical and practical application of respiratory care equipment. The student will develop an understanding of the various pieces of equipment used in respiratory care. The equipment discussed will be limited to oxygen equipment, aerosol equipment, pulmonary function equipment, and emergency resuscitating equipment. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. RESP116 Seminar II in Respiratory Care

3 Credits

This course focuses on the initiation and modification of respiratory care in the emergency setting. Specific topics include: Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), and Neonatal Resuscitation (NR). Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Respiratory Care III (RESP103). RESP117 Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics and Evaluation

7 Credits

In this course, the students learn to assess degrees of respiratory failure, mechanical ventilatory care, PEEP, CPAP, and weaning from the ventilator. Attempts are made to put the complications and benefits of ventilator therapy into proper perspective. Analysis of ventilators is studied. The students acquire an understanding of basic electrocardiogram interpretation and of non-invasive and invasive hemodynamic monitoring. The laboratory and the clinical components offer practical application of the topic areas in the hospital intensive care units. Lecture: 4 hours. Laboratory: 1 hour. Clinical: 16 hours. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Respiratory Care II (RESP102) completed with a grade of 75 or better in the lecture component and a grade of pass in the clinical component. RESP104 Fundamentals of Respiratory Care IV

RESP111 Introduction to Pathology

1 Credit

This course, which is intended for Respiratory Care students, will focus on diagnostic testing with an emphasis on critical care medicine. The integration of this assessment data into medical decision making will be evaluated through the use of clinical simulations in a laboratory setting. Lecture: .5 hours. Lab: 1 hour. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Respiratory Care III (RESP 103). RESP121 Topics in Respiratory Care: Clinical Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology

3 Credits

This course examines the cardiopulmonary system of the human body and its relationship to other organ systems. Topics of study include basic anatomy and physiology of the heart-lung systems, hemodynamic monitoring, and application of cardiopulmonary diagnostic indicators. An integrated approach will facilitate the examination of other body systems in order to promote the clinical application of respiratory care assessments and interventions. Models of study will span the human developmental cycle to include newborn, pediatric, and adult applications. Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Respiratory Care II (RESP102). RESP203 Polysomnography I

3 Credits

This course continues to explore the methods of polysomnography. The stages of sleep, EKG interpretation, basic sleep physiology, and pharmacological issues will

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Course Descriptions be discussed. EEG arousal scoring, abnormal record interpretation, and periodic limb movement scoring will be emphasized. RESP204 Polysomnography II

3 Credits

This course continues to explore the methods of polysomnography, including the study of polysomnography equipment and technique. CPAP and bi-level pressure titration, auto titrating CPAP systems, MSLT procedures and record interpretation, digital polysomnography, and troubleshooting will be discussed. RESP205 Introduction to Polysomnography

1 Credit

This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of polysomnography. The students will understand the field of sleep medicine and technology. Topics include polysomnography operation, equipment calibration, review of the respiratory anatomy, respiratory monitoring devices, and interfacing ancillary equipment. Emphasis is placed on patient concern and anxiety-related issues, understanding the polysomnography environment, and safety. RESP206 Polysomnography Scoring

1 Credit

This course provides the Polysomnography Certificate student with the opportunity to score various studies. Scoring and interpretation of the abnormal polysomnogram will be discussed. Students will continue to gain experience in recognizing artifacts and becoming familiar with the multiple sleep latency test. RESP301 Polysomnographic Technology I

4 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the students to the basics of polysomnographic technology. The students will understand the field of sleep medicine and technology. The scope of practice of sleep medicine and technology will be covered. Other topics of discussion will be the history of sleep medicine and technology, the nosology of sleep medicine, major categories of sleep disorder, and therapeutic modalities utilized in polysomnographic technology. RESP302 Polysomnographic Technology II

4 Credits

The brain structure and function as it relates to the generation of sleep will be discussed. Other topics to be covered are circadian sleep-wake rhythms, electric brain wave– eye movement activity during sleep, generations of skin-surface muscle potentials, generations of skin-surface heart-muscle potential, sleep stages, normal sleep, sleep deprivation, age-specific sleep patterns, brain-spinal cord control of breathing, hypoxic and hypercapnic mechanisms of ventilatory drive, and the mechanics of breathing. Prerequisite: Polysomnographic Technology I (RESP301). Corequisite: Polysomnographic Clinical Experience II (RESP306). RESP303 Polysomnographic Technology III

4 Credits

This course is a continuation of Polysomnographic Technology II (RESP302), with special emphasis on the knowledge of sleep stages. Topics include recognizing sleep states and EEG wave forms; identifying artifact, arousals, alpha intrusions, hypersynchronous theta, beta spindling, asymmetrical activity, seizure activity, sleep disorder breathing, cheyne-stokes respiration, OSA, central sleep apnea, mixed apnea, obstructive hypopnea, non-event hypoxemia, cardiac arrhythmias, and bruxism; and identifying and denoting periodic limb movement of sleep. Prerequisite: Polysomnographic Technology II (RESP302). RESP304 Polysomnographic Technology IV

4 Credits

will be introduced to periodic limb movement of sleep (PLMS), restless leg syndrome, insomnia, hypersomnia, gastro-esophageal reflex disease (GERD), narcolepsy, parasomnias, MSLT, and MWT. Prerequisite: Polysomnographic Technology III (RESP303). RESP305 Polysomnographic Clinical Experience I

This course will provide the students with practical skills in reviewing patients’ charts. This will include verifying medication requirements, determining appropriateness of protocol, determining special precautions related to infection control, performing patient assessment, performing patient orientation techniques, preparing and organizing necessary electrodes and monitors, and applying electrodes correctly. Corequisite: Polysomnographic Technology I (RESP301). RESP306 Polysomnogrpahic Clinical Experience II

6 Credits

This course provides a continuation of practical skills application. Emphasis is given to calibrating all necessary equipment; implanting biological calibrations; verifying proper electrode impedance; verifying proper signal quality of all channels; monitoring and documenting the polysomnographic procedure; determining heart rate, respiratory rate and respiratory patterns, oximetry values, and patient behaviors; manipulation of amplifier settings and derivations, and recognizing equipment malfunctions. Competency is determined by evaluation in these areas. This clinical component runs during the spring semester and fourteen weeks during the summer. Prerequisite: Polysomnographic Clinical Experience I (RESP305). Corequisite: Polysomnographic Technology II (RESP302). RESP307 Polysomnographic Clinical Experience III

3 Credits

In this third clinical course, students will acquire the skills needed to score sleep studies competently and proficiently, perform MSLT/MWT procedures with appropriate scores, and generate professional and accurate reports with indirect supervision. Prerequisite: Polysomnographic Clinical Experience II (RESP306). Corequisite: Polysomnographic Technology II (RESP303). RESP308 Polysomnographic Clinical Experience IV

3 Credits

This is the last in a series of clinical courses. Students will complete clinical competency evaluations and will be able to perform all entry-level functions with indirect supervision. Prerequisite: Polysomnographic Clinical Experience III (RESP307). Corequisite: Polysomnographic Technology IV (RESP304). RESP311 Polysomnographic Technology Seminar

2 Credits

This course will provide the student with the ability to select, review, obtain, and interpret data relevant to polysomnographic cases. Topics of discussion will include medical terminology, legal issues, ethical issues, cultural diversity, communication with physicians, ACLS, and BLS. RESP312 Polysomnographic Instrumentation

2 Credits

This course will review the basics of electricity and electronics as it relates to polysomnographic technology. Topics of discussion will include frequency and voltage; characteristics of EEG, EOG, EMG, and ECG; impedance measurements and meters; montages; calibrations; artifact; and the effects of different time bases on the PSG signal display. Prerequisite: Polysomnographic Technology I (RESP301). RESP313 Polysomnographic Pharmacology

This course is a continuation of Polysomnographic Technology III (RESP 303). Students

3 Credits

2 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the pharmacological agents that are

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Course Descriptions relevant to the field of polysomnography. Topics include the impact of drugs used to treat sleep disorders and drugs that are in common use that affect the polysomnogram. RESP314 Polysomnographic Therapeutic Intervention

2 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of oxygen therapy and its uses in polysomnographic technology. Topics covered include the use of oxygen equipment, oximeters, capnometers, airflow monitors (RESP302), CPAP, BiPAP, PAP theory and therapy, and correct oxygen titration techniques. Prerequisite: Polysomnographic Technology II (RESP302). RESP315 Pathophysiology Nosology of Sleep Disorder

2 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to human anatomy and physiology as they relate to sleep disorders. Topics covered include identifying the major categories of sleep disorders according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders and describing the signs and symptoms associated with major categories of sleep and arousal disorders. Emphasis is on the major categories of sleep and arousal disorders based on age-specific criteria and the most commonly encountered sleep disorders with infants, children, and the elderly. RESP316 Polysomnographic Technology Scoring

2 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the knowledge and skills required to accurately score sleep stages and the clinical events recorded during the polysomnographic evaluation. Topics covered include sleep-related movements, arousals, cardiac arrhythmias, sleep disorder breathing, oxygen saturation levels, and esophageal PH and carbon dioxide levels. Prerequisite: Polysomnographic Technology III (RESP303). RESP401 Polysomnography Clinical Experience I

1 Credit

This course provides the Polysomnography Certificate student with the opportunity to apply skills in a clinical setting. Clinical experience is gained at affiliated polysomnography facilities. Students are introduced to the operation of sleep study labs and gain experience in head measurement for EEG electrode placement, equipment calibration, patient monitoring, and body sensor and electrode placement. Competency evaluations are given in these areas. RESP402 Polysomnography Clinical Experience II

1 Credit

This course provides a continuation of practical skills application for Polysomnography Certificate students. Clinical experience is further developed at affiliated polysomnography facilities. Students will continue to gain experience in scoring and interpreting polysomnograms, recognizing artifacts, EEG arousal scoring, and the analysis of CPCP and bi-level pressure titration recordings.

SOCIOLOGY SOCI091 Survey of Social Science

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the social sciences. It stresses the basic information and skills needed by students entering any college social science course. Attention will be given to some early contributors in the development of psychology, sociology, and economics. The course will introduce students to important concepts used in these subjects. This course is not offered for graduation credit and is recommended for those students who are currently taking Preparing for College Reading I or II (ENGL091 or ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and/or Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010).

SOCI104 Principles of Sociology

3 Credits

This course involves the study of humans as social animals. The attributes of the individual will be presented, and a study will be made of behavior as influenced and modified by group activity. Social institutions such as the family, the community, and education will be described. Problems that interfere with the successful operation of society will be fully discussed. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. SOCI124 Terrorism in a Democratic Society

3 Credits

This course examines the principal issues associated with modern international and domestic terrorism, efforts to counter them, and the effects of both on a democratic society. This course will use a sociological approach to address the nature, roots, evolution, objectives, tactics, and organization of terrorism and terrorist groups. Focus is placed on the vulnerability of a democratic society to both the reality and perception of danger associated with terrorism. Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology (SOCI104) or departmental approval. SOCI202 Social Problems

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of contemporary American social problems and the application of sociological concepts, methods, and principles to these problems. Analysis is given to areas such as urbanization, race relations, and poverty. Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology (SOCI104) or departmental approval. SOCI203 Criminology

3 Credits

Topics include patterns and evolution of criminal behavior, the social forces involved, and development of the individual criminal; administration of criminal justice, laws, courts, police, and prisons. Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology (SOCI104) or departmental approval. SOCI204 Sociology of Deviance

3 Credits

This course will provide an analysis of deviant behavior through the examination of current theories and research in the field. Attention will also be given to those institutions that most frequently deal with deviancy. A variety of forms of deviant behavior will be analyzed, including drug abuse, alcoholism, juvenile delinquency, sexual deviance, suicide, and mental disorders. Prerequisite: General Psychology (PSYC101), Principles of Sociology (SOCI104), or departmental approval. SOCI208 Family and Community

3 Credits

This course includes a presentation of the structural principles necessary in all kinship systems, with brief treatment of the most important ranges of variations and a survey of marriage and the family in various societies. The main emphasis will be on courtship, marriage, and the family in the United States and their basic structural characteristics, trends of change, and practical problems insofar as sociology can illuminate them. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. SOCI223 Law and Society

3 Credits

Law and Society affords a perspective of law that permeates all aspects of social behavior. Basic principles of sociology and concepts of society are introduced. The course provides a window to the legal culture— a panorama of ideas, ideals, and ideologies characterizing United States legal values and institutions. Primary focus

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Course Descriptions is on specific aspects and concepts of civil and criminal law and their respective functions and procedures of the legal system in regulating behavior and resolving conflict. Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092), Introductory Writing (ENGL099), and Fundamentals of Mathematics (MATH010), waiver by placement testing results, or departmental approval. SOCI232 Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

3 Credits

Because human and cultural diversity are important factors deserving increased sensitivity and awareness, this course is structured to provide a socio-historical account of various groups making up the melting pot of America and a sociological analysis of intergroup processes. An overview of the interaction between dominant and minority groups is presented as well as comparisons and contrasts of various racial and ethnic minority group experiences and concerns that may be similar or dissimilar to the dominant culture. Particular attention is paid to differences in power, race, culture, and social class. Prerequisite: Principles of Sociology (SOCI104) or departmental approval. SOCI303 Juvenile Delinquency

3 Credits

This course will study the problems of youth. It will concentrate on the detection, prevention, control, and processes of rehabilitation of delinquents. The Juvenile Court system, with its substantive rules and procedures as well as area protective services, will be discussed. Also included will be the special problem of drug usage by youths. Prerequisite: Criminology (SOCI203) or departmental approval. SOCI400 Special Study in Sociology

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Social Science. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

SPEECH SPCH105 Speech Communication

3 Credits

This course covers small-group and interpersonal communication, using a variety of exercises. Formal consideration is given to the planning, organization, and delivery of speeches. Students also analyze persuasive and informative techniques as they experience subject, speaker, and audience. SPCH106 Advanced Speech Communication

3 Credits

This course offers continued practice in the development of a personal public speaking style through exercises in group discussion, leadership skills, interpersonal skills, and conference techniques. Prerequisite: Speech Communication (SPCH105). SPCH107 Oral Interpretation

3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the art of oral interpretation of literature, including the techniques of literary and communicative analysis for public performance. Goals of the course include development of methods in handling speech fright, building confidence, and audience adaptation. The course is especially recommended for future teachers. Co-Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092). SPCH400 Special Study in Speech

THEATRE THET101 Introduction to the Theatre

This course covers an introduction to the history, art, craft, and sociopsychological dimensions of the theatre. The course combines assigned play readings with the study of the elements and techniques used in theatre, as well as viewing live theatre performances. The elements of acting, directing, stage settings, and costuming are incorporated. The relationship between theatre and society is explored. Prerequisite: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) or waiver by placement testing results. THET102 Voice Improvement

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Department of Communicative Arts. Limited to two courses per student Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

3 Credits

This course concentrates on developing and improving the student’s voice and speech to meet stage, television, and broadcasting needs and the needs of business and personal communication. Exercises improve the student’s relaxation, breathing, resonance, articulation, diction, pronunciation, and connection of voice to thoughts and emotions. THET200 Introduction to Acting

3 Credits

This course offers hands-on experience in the fundamentals of the craft of acting. Students will have the opportunity to explore text and develop confidence in their performance skills through voice and movement exercises, improvisation, and group exercises designed to free emotional spontaneity and creativity. This course would be useful to those with an interest in the profession and those looking to improve verbal and communication skills. THET201 Acting Techniques I

3 Credits

Students will learn and practice the separate parts of the composite art of acting, which entails the effective communication of the ideas and emotions of a dramatic character to an audience. Students will be required to rehearse, memorize, and perform several short scenes and monologues in order to develop skills. Prerequisite: Movement for Acting (THET204) or permission of instructor. THET204 Movement for Acting

3 Credits

This course is structured to give students an overall understanding of how the actor’s body works and to develop their bodies to meet the needs of acting for the stage and screen. Students will participate in group and individual physical exercises that will enable them to develop expressive bodies that are connected to their thoughts and emotions. Students will also be required to attend live theatrical productions so that they can evaluate how actors use their bodies to express themselves. THET221 Creative Drama

3 Credits

This class is recommended to anyone interested in education and is designed especially for those who want to work with students pre-K through 12. The course reviews the theory and practice of using the medium of drama in education. Various aspects of dramatic expression are examined, including spontaneous dramatic play and such teacher-guided activities for children and adolescents as creative dramatics, sociodramatic play, improvisation, and story dramatization. THET400 Special Study in Theatre

1 Credit

3 Credits

1 Credit

This course involves independent work on a selected topic under the direction of members of the Theatre faculty. Limited to two courses per student. Prerequisite: approval of the Department Chair and Division Dean.

146

Course Descriptions THET402 Performance and Production

3 Credits

This course introduces the basic techniques involved in play production for the stage, stressing the function of technical, artistic, and administrative work. The student studies all areas of play production and participates in at least two of these areas. Students will research and discuss their areas with the instructor, classmates, and professionals in the field. The class also requires that the student acquire hands-on experience working closely with theatre technicians, artists, or administrators. Lecture: 2 hours. Laboratory: 2 hours. Co-Prerequisites: Preparing for College Reading II (ENGL092) and Introductory Writing (ENGL099), or waiver by placement testing results. THET431 Stagecraft I

3 Credits

This course emphasizes the creative process used in developing the physical elements of a theatrical production. Students explore the technical elements of stagecraft in an experiential setting. Emphasis is placed on hands-on experience in the study of the processes of scenery, lighting, sound design, costuming, properties and stage management. Students aid in the construction and technical work required for Massasoit theatre productions.

TRAVEL GEOGRAPHY TRGE101 Destination Geography I

3 Credits

Students examine the major characteristics of geographical locations in North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean. Topics include weather, topography, culture, political structures, and economic situations. This course is usually offered in the fall. TRGE102 Destination Geography II

3 Credits

Students examine the major characteristics of geographical locations in Western and Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. Topics include weather, topography, culture, political structures, and economic situations. This course is usually offered in the spring.

147

Catalog 2011 - 2012

FULL-TIME FACULTY Anania, Kenneth J Humanities & Fine Arts Professor A.A., Massasoit Community College B.A., Stonehill College M.A.T., Fairleigh Dickinson University AuCoin, William Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.S., Bridgewater State College M.Ed., Boston University Ed.D., Boston University

Brown-Sederberg, Janet Business & Technology Associate Professor B.S., Stonehill College M.S., Bridgewater State College

Cortese, Palma Humanities & Fine Arts Associate Professor B.A., Emmanuel College M.Ed., University of Illinois

Brunelle, Juanita H Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., Clark University M.A., University of R.I. M.A., University of Massachusetts

Cotter, Alexander Math & Science Full Time Faculty M.A. Boston College B.A., Stonehill College

Baldwin, John Emergent Technologies Instructor

Burke, Anne-Marie Math & Science Assistant Professor M.S., Duke University

Bermingham, Christina Public Service-Social Science Instructor B.S., Emmanuel College M.S., Suffolk University

Burke, Cheryl Nursing & Allied Health Assistant Professor B.S., Bridgewater State College

Blanchette, Roland Public Service-Social Science Professor B.A., University of Florida M.A., University of Florida Bolduc, Gilles Math & Science Assistant Professor B.S., University of Maine M.A., Boston University Ph.D., Boston University Boudreau, Catherine Business & Technology Professor B.S., American International College M.Ed., American International College Bowers, Robert Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., Boston College M.A., University of Maine Brown, Janet Nursing & Allied Health Associate Professor B.N.Sc., Queen’s University M.Sc., McGill University

Caffrey, Mary Catherine Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., Boston College M.A., Northwestern University Clover, Susan Nursing & Allied Health Professor B.S., Boston College M.S., Regis College Coburn, Peter B Public Service-Social Science Professor B.A., Denison University M.A., Stanford University Colletti, Rosemary Nursing & Allied Health Professor B.S.N., Fitchburg State College M.S.N., California State University Coole, Lisa Public Service-Social Science Associate Professor B.S., Bridgewater State College M.A., Northeastern University

148

Curtis, Jeanne Business & Technology Associate Professor A.S., Newbury College M.Ed., Cambridge College Dacaret, Joia Souza Admissions Academic Counselor M.I. & I.M., School for International Training B.S.W., Ceara State University, Brazil Demers, Kenneth G Math & Science Professor B.A., Boston University M.S., Brown University Dente, Linda Nursing & Allied Health Professor B.S., Fitchburg State College Desikan, Vasumathi Math & Science Associate Professor B.S., University of Madras M.S., Indian Institute of Technology Ph.D., Iowa State University Desilva, Martha Nursing & Allied Health Professor A.S., Laboure Junior College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College DeVoe, Jane Math & Science Associate Professor M.A., University of Massachusetts

Catalog 2011 - 2012 DiCarlo, Henry Public Service-Social Science Instructor B.S., Northeastern University M.M., Cambridge College M.A., University of Massachusetts Dunn, Linda S Emergent Technologies Professor B.F.A., Mass. College of Art M.S.A.E., Mass. College of Art Dunphy, Andrew Humanities & Fine Arts Instructor B.A., Wesleyan University M.A., Hollins University Eisele, Anne R Nursing & Allied Health Professor B.S.N., Catholic University of America M.S.N., Yale University Elliottsmith, T P Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., University of Vermont M.Ed., State College at Salem M.S.F., Boston College England, Bruce E Business & Technology Professor B.A., Rhode Island College M.B.A., Bryant College Ph.D., Washington School of Law Faiella, Patrick J Public Service-Social Science Associate Professor A.S., Massasoit Community College B.S., University of Massachusetts M.A., University of Massachusetts Ferrante, Margaret Nursing & Allied Health Professor B.S., Framingham State College M.A., Anna Maria College Fitzgerald, John P Emergent Technologies Professor A.S., Blue Hills Technical Institute

B.S., Suffolk University Foshey, Clare Nursing & Allied Health Associate Professor A.D.N., Northeastern University B.S.N., University of Massachusetts M.S., University of Massachusetts Frizzell, Thomas F Business & Technology Professor A.A., Massasoit Community College B.A., Westfield State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Galante, Christopher Public Service-Social Science Associate Professor A.S., Massasoit Community College B.A., Bridgewater State College M.Ed., Cambridge College Gullak, Rebecca Humanities & Fine Arts Instructor B.A., Bridgewater State College Hall, Susan Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., University of Maine M.A., University of Massachusetts M.A., Simmons College Han, Liang-Shu Emergent Technologies Associate Professor B.A., Rutgers University M.A., University of Massaschusetts Hanna, William Math & Science Associate Professor B.A., Colby College Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University Hina, Aziza Math & Science Associate Professor B.A., University at Buffalo B.S., University at Buffalo M.A., University at Buffalo Hinds-Manick, Charlotte A Nursing & Allied Health 149

Professor B.S., Boston University M.S., Boston University Ed.S., University of Georgia Hirschy, David C Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., Northeastern University M.A., Dalhousie University Ph.D., Dalhoussie University Holyoke, Rhonda L Nursing & Allied Health Professor B.S., University of Massachusetts M.S., Boston University Hsu, Laura Public Service-Social Science Assistant Professor B.A., University of California–Berkeley M.Ed., Harvard University Ed.D., Harvard University Janey, Gerald L Emergent Technologies Professor B.S., Boston State College M.S., Northeastern University Johnson, Sheila A Math & Science Professor B.A., Albertus Magnus College M.S., Central Connecticut State College Jones-Hyde, Rita Humanities & Fine Arts Assistant Professor B.A., Oklahoma State University M.A., University of New Hampshire Ph.D., University of North Carolina Kay, Marjorie Nursing & Allied Health Instructor M.S., University of Massachusetts B.S., University of Massachusetts A.S., Massasoit Community College Kearns, Thomas Emergent Technologies Professor A.S., Massasoit Community College B.A., Stonehill College

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Keating, John F Math & Science Professor B.A., Bridgewater State College M.A., Boston College Keith, Susan Humanities & Fine Arts Associate Professor B.S., University of New Hampshire M.A.L.S., Wesleyan University Kennedy, Robert Andrew Business & Technology Professor B.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute M.S.E.E., Northeastern University Ketcham, Scott Emergent Technologies Assistant Professor B.A., Williams College Kollett, Linda S Math & Science Professor B.A., Cedar Crest College M.S., Northwestern University Ph.D., Northwestern University Lafontaine, David Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., Brown University M.A., Norhtheastern University Laidler, Patricia Business & Technology Professor B.A., Hofstra University M.B.A., Northeastern University M.A., University of Massachusetts Liles, Robin Nursing & Allied Health Associate Professor B.S.N. George Mason University M.S.N., University of Massachusetts MacWade, Kevin J Public Service-Social Science Professor B.A., Boston University M.A., Assumption College Ph.D., Boston University

Manning, Cheryl A Nursing & Allied Health Assistant Professor A.S., Massasoit Community College Marchionne, Louise A Public Service-Social Science Professor A.S., Massasoit Community College B.S., Bridgewater State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Marconi, Elizabeth Humanities & Fine Arts Professor M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Martelli, Susan J Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., Boston College M.A., Bridgewater State College Mastrangelo, Charles Public Service-Social Science Assistant Professor B.A., Bridgewater State College M.A., University of Massachusetts Matthews, Andrea Nursing & Allied Health Associate Professor B.S.N., Northeastern University M.S.N., Spalding University McDonald, Maureen Nursing & Allied Health Professor B.S., Curry College M.S., University of Massachusetts Meggison, Peter F Business & Technology Professor M.A., Rider University Ed.S., University of Wisconsin Ed.D., University of Massachusetts Miraglia, Susan Nursing & Allied Health Professor B.S.N., Villanova University M.S.N., University of Massachusetts Morrell, Elizabeth Humanities & Fine Arts 150

Professor B.A., Kalamazoo College M.A., Emerson College Nagle, Richard W Public Service-Social Science Professor B.A., Stonehill College M.A., University of Rhode Island Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University Natoli, Richard G Public Service-Social Science Professor B.S., Northeastern University M.S., University of California O’Hara, Paul Emergent Technologies Professor A.S., Blue Hills Technical Institute B.S., Northeastern University M.Ed., Bridgewater State College O’Heir-Coelho, Sheila M Math & Science Professor B.A., Stonehill College M.Ed., Boston College Pacheco, Jeanne Nursing & Allied Health Associate Professor A.S.N., Greenfield Community College B.S., University of Massachusetts M.S.N., University of Massachusetts Pacheco, Robert A Business & Technology Professor A.S., Massasoit Community College B.S.B.A., Suffolk University M.B.A., Suffolk University Pahl, Kathleen Humanities & Fine Arts Instructor B.A., Boston College M.Ed., University of Massachusetts Peery, Robin Humanities & Fine Arts Full Time Faculty, Modern Language B.A., University of Missouri M.A., University of Wisconsin

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Pennel, Lori Business & Technology Assistant Professor B.S.B.A., Suffolk University M.B.A., Suffolk University Perry, Anne Marie Public Service-Social Science Professor A.S., North Shore Community College B.A., Cambridge College M.Ed., Framingham State College

Roy, Subhendu Public Service-Social Science Assistant Professor M.S., University of Wales M.S., University of Delhi Ph.D., Boston University Santini, Laurel Humanities & Fine Arts Assistant Professor B.A., Taylor University M.A., Emerson College

Peterson, Donald Business & Technology Assistant Professor B.S., Bates College M.B.A., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Schaub, Tracey Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., University of Massachusetts M.Ed., University of Massachusetts Ed.D., University of Massachusetts

Philibert, John R Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design M.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design

Semler, Christine LATCH Latch Academic Counselor M.A., Bridgewater State College

Priest, Robert H Emergent Technologies Professor B.F.A., University of Massachusetts M.F.A., School of Museum of Fine Arts Principe, Christine Public Service-Social Science Professor B.S., Boston State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Rich-Shea, Aviva M. Public Service-Social Science Assistant Professor B.S., Boston University M.S., Northeastern University Ph.D., Northeastern University Rosato, Marianne Math & Science Associate Professor B.A., Boston College M.A., Bridgewater State College Rosenthal, Deborah Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., University of Massachusetts M.A., University of Massachusetts

Shannon, Judith Nursing & Allied Health Associate Professor M.Ed., Worcester State College Shave, Ellen H Business & Technology Professor A.S., Blue Hills Technical Institute B.S., Northeastern University Shea, Roger Public Service-Social Science Professor A.A., Mass Bay Community College B.S., Boston State College M.S.P.A., University of Massachusetts Sherry, Marilyn R Business & Technology Professor B.S., Boston University M.S., Oregon State University Shevory, Richard Math & Science Professor B.S., Suffolk University M.A., Suffolk University

151

Shields, Leighton, Jr., Public Service-Social Science Professor B.A., Bates College M.A., Harvard University Shipman, Rebecca M Public Service-Social Science Professor B.A., West Virginia University M.A., West Virginia University C.A.G.S., University of Massachusetts Simmons, Marc Math & Science Professor B.S., The George Washington University M.S., University of New Hampshire Sterlin, Pierre Business & Technology Assistant Professor B.A., Northeastern University M.B.A., Jones International University Stevenson, Margaret M Math & Science Professor B.A., Tufts University M.A.T., Bridgewater State College Sullivan, Mary Math & Science Assistant Professor B.S., University of Massachusetts M.S., Kansas State University Sutcliffe, Nancy J Nursing & Allied Health Professor A.S., Massasoit Community College B.A., Bridgewater State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Torres, Andrea Math & Science Instructor B.S., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute M.S., University of Connecticut Trecek-King, Melanie Math & Science Instructor B.S., University of Nebraska M.A., University of Nebraska

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Tressel, James A Math & Science Professor B.A., Bridgewater State College M.S., Southeastern Mass. University Twomey, Kendra Math & Science Associate Professor B.S., Stonehill College M.S., Tufts University Ph.D., Tufts University Walsh, Kathleen Business & Technology Associate Professor B.S., Framingham State College M.B.A., State University of New York Walsh, Mark Humanities & Fine Arts Associate Professor B.A., Southeastern Massachusetts University M.A., Northeastern University Weeden, Paul Business & Technology Associate Professor A.S., Johnson & Wales University B.S., Johnson & Wales University M.S., Eastern Nazarene College Weiner, Irving Emergent Technologies Professor A.S., Wentworth Institute of Technology B.A., Boston Architectural Center

B.S., Newbury College Zahara, Sawsan Humanities & Fine Arts Professor B.A., Lebanese University, Beirut M.Ed., Boston University Ed.D., Boston University Zaker, Panteha Sanati Humanities & Fine Arts Instructor B.A., San Diego State University M.A., Fitchburg State College

PROFESSIONAL STAFF Agganis, Nicholas Career Placement Administrative Assistant I Aiello, Pauline Library Librarian B.A., Lesley University M.S., Simmons College Akeke, Peter C Human Resources Vice President A.A., Massasoit Community College B.A., University of Massachusetts M.Ed., Bridgewater State College

Beals, Donna Human Resources Benefits Coordinator Bean, Linda J Conference Center Director B.A., Wheaton College M.A., University of Massachusetts Berg, Mary Academic Resource Center Disabilities Counselor Berolini, Linda Human Resources Staff Assistant A.S., Massasoit Community College Boissel, Donna R Human Resources Associate Director A.S., Community College of R.I. Bolduc, Nicole Business Office Payroll Analyst Boutin, Karyn D Public Service-Social Science Dean B.S., University of Massachusetts M.A.T., Bridgewater State College

Alves, Christina Gateway to College Director B.S., University of Massachusetts

Briggs, Donna D Strategic Planning Director B.A., Worcester State College M.A., Goddard College

Winchell, Melissa Humanities & Fine Arts Instructor M.A., Salem State College B.A., Gordan College

Aspinwall, Linda Community Education Director ABE Programs B.A., University of Massachusetts M.A., University of Massachusetts

Brogna, Catherine A PLAN Learning Disabilities Specialist B.S., Bridgewater State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College

Wood, Kathleen Nursing & Allied Health Professor A.S., Northeastern University B.S., Bridgewater State College

Ayers, Albert R Information Technology Chief Information Officer B.A., University of Massachusetts M.B.A., Boston College

Burke, Elizabeth President’s Office Recording Secretary to Board of Trustees A.B., Quincy College

Wright, Donna Business & Technology Assistant Professor A.S., Newbury College

Barrett, John W Information Technology Director B.S., Wentworth Institute of Technology

Burke, Marilyn L Development & Alumni Relations Staff Assistant B.S., Bridgewater State College M.A., Walden University

152

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Burns, Constance M Business Services Business Manager B.A., Emmanuel College M.B.A., Anna Maria College

Courtright, MaryBeth Financial Aid Director B.A., Lake Erie College B.A., Capital University

Dyment, Arlene Ford F Advisement & Counseling Senior Academic Counselor B.A., Boston State College M.Ed., Boston State College

Caffelle, John Administration & Finance Staff Associate to Vice President B.A., Bridgewater State College

Daily, Ryan Advisement & Counseling Academic Counselor

Dyment, Christine Advisement & Counseling Director A.S., Massasoit Community College B.A., Bridgewater State College M.A., Bridgewater State College

Callahan, Sally Faculty & Instruction Assistant to Vice President B.A., University of Massachusetts M.S., Bentley College Cardoso, Balbina Gateway to College Resource Specialist B.S., Springfield College M.S., Springfield College Centrella, Jane Student Services & Enrollment Management Staff Assistant to Vice President B.A., College of the Holy Cross Chambers, Patricia Faculty & Instruction Director of Perkins Program B.A., Stonehill College M.Ed., Lesley University Chappell, Mary Academic Resource Center Academic Coordinator M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Collins, Anne Grants Staff Assistant A.B., Stonehill College Collins, Betty Registrar’s Office Registrar B.A., Stonehill College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Collins, Kathleen Children’s Center Teacher B.S., Boston State College

DeMarco, Jeffrey P Food Services Director A.S., Culinary Institute of America A.S., Fisher Junior College DePina, Laureanne Financial Aid Counselor DePina, Virginia Media Instructional Support Technician A.S., Massasoit Community College B.A., Emerson College Desatnick, Evan Admissions Academic Counselor B.A., Western Maryland College M.A., Emerson College DeVito, Felix Emergent Technologies Dean B.Arch., Boston Architectural College B.S., Clarkson University M.S., University of New Hampshire Dipasqua, Linda M Administration & Finance Budget Analyst B.A., Bridgewater State College M.A., Framingham State College Dominguez, Frank Facilities Assistant Director Driscoll, Susan Children’s Center Director Duguay, James Math & Science Biology Laboratory Technician 153

Finkelstein, Barbara E Faculty & Instruction Senior Vice President and Vice President of Faculty & Instruction B.A., Boston State College M.A., New York University Ph.D., Capella University Fruzzetti, Teresa Business Office Assistant Comptroller A.S., Massasoit Community College Gardell, John Information Technology Manager of User Support Service B.S., Stonehill College M.S., Boston University Giguere, Jillian Math & Science Laboratory Technician Gonzalez, Teresa Media Assistant Director Haidul, Susan Minority Affairs Staff Assistant Harris, Mary F. Grants Grants Specialist B.A., Hartwick College Heitman, Kathleen Health Services Health Care Counselor B.S., University of Vermont

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Helton, Elizabeth Math & Science Biology Lab Technician B.S., University of Massachusetts Amherst M.S., University of Michigan Henry, Andrea Advisement & Counseling Disabilities Counselor B.A., Smith College M.A., Boston University Hickey, Catherine PLAN Counselor Hickey, Maryann Health Services Nurse Hinken, Laurie Advisement & Counseling Counselor Howard, Louise Professional Development Director B.S., University of Lowell M.B.A., River College Huggon-Mauretti, Amanda Academic Resource Center Special Programs Coordinator B.A., University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Hughes, Michelle A Admissions Director B.S., Fitchburg State College M.Ed., Suffolk University Hughes, Todd Financial Aid Coordinator Hutchings, Kelli Student Services & Enrollment Management Junior Web Developer Inferrera, John Marketing Web Developer MWDEC, Clark University

Johnston, Peter Academic Resource Center Dean B.A., University of Pennsylvania M.S., University of Pennsylvania Jones, Joanne E Library Director A.A., Bristol Community College B.S., Boston State College M.L.S., University of Rhode Island

B.S., Bentley College M.B.A., Northeastern University Liston, Kathleen Children’s Center Lead Teacher B.S., Westfield State College Litcoff, Steven Professional Development Center & Work Force Development Director

Kenney, Sandra L President’s Office Staff Assistant Burdett School of Business

Lo, Dia Financial Aid Counselor B.A., Temple University

Krasnow, Edward TV, Radio & Media Services Acting Director A.S., Massasoit Community College B.S., Emerson College

Lynch, James Marketing Director of Web Operations & Advertising Activities B.A., Bridgewater State College

Landers, Paula Athletics Associate Director B.S., Bridgewater State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College

Lynch, Mary Goodhue Institutional Research Director B.A., Emmanuel College M.Ed., Boston College

Larkin, Janet Faculty & Instruction Staff Assistant M. Ed.,Bridgewater State University

Maker, Laurie Marketing Director Public Relations B.A., University of Maine

Lavarnway, Ellen W., R.N., Health Services Director B.S., State University College of N.Y.

Mason, Kathleen Advisement & Counseling Senior Academic Counselor B.S., Ball State University M.A., Ball State University

Learned, Betty Administration & Finance Vice President A.S., Springfield Tech Community College B.A., Worcester State College M.B.A., American International College LeClair, Donna Women’s Center Coordinator

Mauretti, Patrick Information Technology Network Manager May, Jennifer Institutional Research Research Associate B.A., Boston College M.A., Boston College McAlpine, Aimee Business & Technology Coordinator of Instructional Technology

Lee, Sophie Business Office Comptroller 154

Catalog 2011 - 2012 McCaughey, Sharyn Advisement & Counseling Academic Counselor A.S., Massasoit Community College B.S., Bridgewater State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College McCutcheon, Frances H Math & Science Acting Dean B.S., Fitchburg State College M.A.T., Bridgewater State College McDonnell, Marie Academic Resource Center Director J.D., Suffolk University Law School M.A., University of Massachusetts McKechnie, Karyll L Food Services Manager, Cafeteria A.S., Massasoit Community College McKeithen-Franks, Yvonne Advisement & Counseling Senior Academic Counselor B.A., Oberlin College M.S., Auburn University Ph.D., Auburn University Moller, Ellyn Akillian Gallery & Arts Event Coordinator Moran, Christopher J Advisement & Counseling Senior Academic Counselor A.S., Massasoit Community College B.S., Bridgewater State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Morosco, John Faculty & Instruction Director of Middleboro Morrison, William Information Technology Applications Manager

Mulvey, Julie C Athletics Director B.A., University of Massachusetts M.S., Bridgewater State College Naughton, Patricia A Library Coordinator of Library Services B.A., Boston State College M.L.S., Simmons College Nesson, Mary L. Library Coordinator of Library Services B.S., Boston State College M.L. I.S., University of Rhode Island Olsen, Susan Payroll Manager B.A., University of Hawaii at Hilo Paglia, Barbara M Business Office Bursar Palantzas, Nick Canton Campus Vice President A.A. Massasoit Community College B.A., Eckerd College M.A., Framingham State College Paquette, Rozaria Community Education Director B.A., UMass Dartmouth Pittman, Johanna Academic Resource Center Learning Specialist M.A., University of New Hampshire Pitts, David Information Technology Database Administrator

Precourt, Nicole Admissions Morrison, Hannah Senior Counselor Financial Aid B.S., University of Massachusetts Associate Director & Systems Manager M.S., Troy University B.A., University of Massachusetts Pryles, Kathryn A Career Placement 155

Coordinator B.S., Bridgewater State College Reale, Patricia B Choices Director B.A., Stonehill College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Reid, Kathleen Student Life Coordinator A.B., Boston College Richardi, Rocco Facilities Director Riley, Alvin PLAN Director B.S., Bentley College M.R.E., Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary M.D.I.V., Interdenominational Theological Center Rocheteau, Mark TV, Radio & Media Services Academic Counselor B.S., Emerson College Rodio, Lorna Library Reference Librarian M.S., Simmons College Rudolph, Jennifer M Library Coordinator B.A., Marietta College M.S., Simmons College Santos, Michelle Registrar’s Office Associate Registrar A.S., Massasoit Community College B.A., Eastern Nazarene College Sauvignon, Carine Faculty & Instruction Associate Dean B.S., Southern Connecticut State University M.A., Boston University

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Savage, Sheryl Development & Alumni Relations Executive Director of College Advancement A.A., Massasoit Community College B.A., Curry College M.A., University of Massachusetts Scalzo-McNeil, Anne Nursing & Allied Health Dean B.S., Boston College M.S., Syracuse University Ph.D., Syracuse University Shane, Sarah Advisement & Counseling Academic Counselor B.A., James Madison University M.A., Boston College Sharpe-Marmorstein, Susan LATCH Professional Tutor B.A., Bridgewater State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Sheppard, Phillip President’s Office Assistant to the President B.S.B.A., Boston College M.A., Bridgewater State College J.D., University of Oklahoma Smith, Clinton L Student Assessment / GED Director B.S., Suffolk University M.P.A., Suffolk University Smith, Jolene Human Resources Staff Assistant A.S. Florida Metropolitan University Snyder, Kerryn Academic Resource Center Academic Counselor B.S., Bridgewater State College States, Hollyce Grants Associate Dean B.A., St. Lawrence University M.B.A., Boston University

Stearn, Cheryl Gateway to College Staff Assistant A.S., North Shore Community College B.A., Bridgewater State College Stewart, Elaine J Workforce Development & Community Education Dean B.A., State University of New York M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Stigas, Amy Children’s Center Teacher A.S., Quincy College B.S., Curry College Sullivan, Nancy E Student Services & Enrollment Management Dean B.S., Bridgewater State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Thayer, Maureen C Student Services Dean B.S., Boston State College M.Ed., Bridgewater State College Thompson, Lynda J Business & Technology Acting Division Dean B.S., Salem State College M.B.A., Suffolk University Tilden, Kelley Community Education Assistant Director Tracy, David Student Services & Enrollment Management Vice President M.Ed., University of Maine Urbano, Philip O Information Technology Training Specialist, User Support B.A., Stonehill College M.Ed., Fitchburg State College C.A.G.S., University of Massachusetts

156

Wall, Charles C. Jr., President’s Office President A.B., Bates College M.A., University of Virginia Ph.D., University of Virginia Walo, Katherine Registrar’s Office Assistant Registrar Washington-Fortes, Diann Payroll Analyst West, Rebecca Financial Aid Senior Financial Aide Counselor A.S., Massasoit Community College B.S., Bridgewater University M.S., Eastern Nazarene College Wood, Sarah Admissions Associate Director B.S., Springfield College M.S., Springfield College Yameen, Deanna Humanities & Fine Arts Dean A.A., Bradford College B.A., Bradford College M.A., Brandeis University Yarro, Michele T President’s Office Acting Executive Assistant Zielinski, Leah Canton Campus Staff Assistant to Vice President Zymaris, Joyce President’s Office College’s 504/ADA, Title II, and Title IX Coordinator B.A., University of Massachusetts M.Ed., Boston University

Catalog 2011 - 2012

STAFF Ahearn, John Facilities Maintainer II Akeke, Martin Facilities Carpenter I Albertson, Scott Campus Police Dispatcher II Andrew, Bailey Facilities Maintainer II Andrews, Douglas H Information Technology Electronic Technician Araujo, Henrique Campus Police Officer I Azzola, Robert Facilities Utility Plant Operator Baggs, Carole J Financial Aid Administrative Assistant I Bailey, Susan Student Services Administrative Assistant II Baker, Melbourne Facilities Painter II Baptiste, Barbara Media Audiovisual Equipment Technician II Barry, Robert Facilities Maintainer II Bennett, Diane F Community Education Administrative Assistant II Bernavil, Bernadine Library Library Assistant II

Berry, Kathleen Business & Technology Clerk V

Connolly, John Facilities Electrician II

Bester, Hattie M Financial Aid Clerk V

Coppage, Robert L Campus Police Officer I

Bowlen, Christopher Campus Police Officer I

Crawford, Jonathan Facilities Maintainer II

Bullock, Rubin Facilities Maintainer II

Crawford, William T Copy Center Reproduction Service Supervisor

Bunker, Marylou Facilities Maintainer II

Cummings, Carrie M Emergent Technologies Administrative Assistant II

Cahill, Dawn Business Office Receiving Teller II

Cummings, Christopher Campus Police Acting Chief of Police

Cameron, James W Facilities Utility Plant Operator

Cummings, Margaret P Conference Center Technical Assistant II

Cameron, Judith A Advisement & Counseling Administrative Assistant II

Daniels, Pattiann Institutional Research Administrative Assistant I

Canzano, Cory Facilities Maintainer II

Deehan, Nancy A Math & Science Administrative Assistant II

Carbone-Shainis, Adelina Food Services Administrative Assistant II

DePina, Angela Public Service-Social Science Clerk IV

Carrico, Kelly Business Office Accountant III

Derienzo, Rocco Facilities Maintainer II

Clancy, George P, Jr. Facilities Building Maintenance Supervisor II

DiPerna, Kenneth Facilities Maintainer II

Clancy, Nancy L Student Assessment/GED Administrative Assistant II

DiTucci, James Facilities Maintainer I

Condon, Kathleen Information Technology EDP Systems Analyst III

Domings, Elizabeth Copy Center Clerk IV

157

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Donna, Deborah Media Audiovisual Equipment Technician I

Farrell, Michael Facilities Maintainer II

Gernhardt, Kathleen Information Technology EDP Entry Operator II

Donohue, Paul Facilities Maintainer II

Figueiredo, April Facilities Building Maintenance Supervisor I

Getchell, Nicholas Information Technology Electronic Technician I

Doten, Kenneth Facilities Maintainer II

Figueiredo, Nathan Facilities Maintainer II

Giannotti, Richard Facilities Working Foreman

Doyle, Eliza Business Office Accountant I

Fitch, Michele PLAN Administrative Assistant I

Doyle, Sarah Information Technology Administrative Assistant II

Fitzpatrick, Sheila A Marketing Graphic Arts Technician II

Gianunzio, Arthur Facilities Supervisor of Garage and Motor Pool

Duguay, Gertrude M Registrar’s Office Administrative Assistant I

Flaherty, Theresa M Registrar’s Office Administrative Assistant II

Dumas, Kathleen Information Technology EDP Programmer IV

Foret, John Information Technology Electronic Technician II

Dunn, Christina L Academic Resource Center Administrative Assistant II

Forrest, Marie Athletics Clerk V

Eaton, Andrew Information Technology EDP Computer Operator Supervisor

Francillon, Mimose Food Services Cook III

Eaton, William Facilities Maintainer III

Franciosi, Matthew Facilities Utility Plant Operator

Egan, Denise Grants Administrative Assistant II

Franciosi, Rachel Math & Science Administrative Assistant I

Egan, Patricia Public Service-Social Science Administrative Assistant I

Franey, Gayle Switchboard Mail Clerk III

Faherty, Marcia Switchboard Administrative Assistant II

Gallant, Amy Campus Police Officer I

Fahey, Jennifer Advisement & Counseling Clerk III

Gammon, Janet R Information Technology Electronics Technician I

Gomes, Denise A Facilities Clerk V Harris, Stephen M Facilities Maintainer II Hayes-Demulis, Mary Admissions Clerk IV Hoey, Robert Campus Police Officer I Hurlburt, Ronda Purchasing Buyer I Johnson, Lizzetta I Faculty & Instruction Clerk V Julevich, Peter P Facilities Painter I Kavanagh, Janice Faculty & Instruction Clerk V

158

LaFratta, Paul Facilities Electrician II Lim, Frances Conference Center Administrative Assistant I

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Lovell, Philip Facilities Maintainer II

Navin, Laurie A Registrar’s Office Administrative Assistant II

Picket, Aaron Facilities HVAC & Refridgeration Mechanic I

Lowe, Christine Humanities & Fine Arts Administrative Assistant II

Nelson, Carol Registrar’s Office Administrative Assistant II

Piquette, Diane L Purchasing Buyer III

Mahase, Corrine Campus Police Officer II

Nunes, Juventino Facilities Carpenter II

Pransky, Christina Vogel Grants Accountant I

Maw, Annmarie Business Office Receiving Teller I

O’Leary, Jennifer O’Connell Admissions Administrative Assistant II

Pritchard, Victoria Humanities & Fine Arts Administrative Assistant I

McElhinney, Christine Business Office Accountant I

O’Neil, Kathleen Nursing & Allied Health Clerk V

Pylant, George Facilities Storekeeper IV

McGrath, Nola D Admissions Administrative Assistant II

Onujiogu, Obiajunwa Campus Police Officer II

Rose, Madeline Registrar’s Office Administrative Assistant I

Meagher, Steven Campus Police Communication Dispatcher II

O’Sullivan, Christopher Campus Police Officer I

Rosenberg, Douglas Campus Police Officer I

Medairos, Virginia Business Office Accountant II

Ozbilen, Meltem Registrar’s Office Administrative Assistant I

San Soucie, Joanne Choices Administrative Assistant II

Melegian, Teresa Student Assessment / GED Administrative Assistant I

Papaioannou, Evridiki Admissions Clerk III

Saucier, Christopher Campus Police Officer I

Mitchell, Wayne Campus Police Officer I

Patricio Volpe, Jacqueline Registrar’s Office Administrative Assistant I

Seely, Patricia Campus Police Officer I

Morris, Anthony T Facilities Utility Plant Operator

Patterson, William Facilities Maintainer II

Severino, Eudis Facilities Maintainer II

Morris, Mathieu Facilities Head of Grounds

Perry, Ann M Facilities Maintainer II

Singleton, Jeanette Business & Technology Administrative Assistant II

Murphy, Marjorie Registrar’s Office Administrative Assistant II

Perry, Brian K Facilities Maintainer II

Skahan, Robert Campus Police Officer II

159

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Smith, Alison Faculty & Instruction Clerk V

Wetterholm, Jay Facilities Working Foreman

Smith, Deanna M Faculty & Instruction Administrative Assistant II

Willis, Brian TV, Radio & Media Services Technical Assistant III

Smith, Neil K Facilities Maintainer II

Willis, Theresa Nursing & Allied Health Administrative Assistant II

Snell, David Facilities Building Maintenance Supervisor I

Woodford, Paola Student Assessment / GED Clerk II

Soares, Diane Financial Aid EDP Entry Operator III

Zarrella, Joseph Facilities Maintainer II

Strong, Vera Canton Campus and College Operations Clerk V

Zarrella, Michael Facilities Maintainer II

Thomas, Susan Facilities Administrative Assistant I

Zarrella-Burke, Cheryll A Business Office Receiving Teller II

Thorn, Deborah Information Technology Electronic Computer Operator II Tone-Pah-Hote, Donna Academic Resource Center Clerk IV Trucchi, Christopher Campus Police Officer I Vendt, Frederick N Facilities Building Maintenance Supervisor I Vieira, Daniel Information Technology Electronic Technician II Weathers, Rogene Library Assistant III

160

programs of study Brockton Campus Associate Degree Programs

Business Administration Careers with options in: Accounting (D), General Business (D, E)

Respiratory Care (D) - (June 15 deadline) Telecommunications Technology (D)

Hospitality Management (D), Marketing (D, E) Supervisory Management (D, E)

Business Administration Transfer (D, E) Child Care Education & Administration (D) with option in: Transfer (D) Computer Information Systems with options in: Programming (D), User Support (D) Criminal Justice with options in: Career (D, E), Transfer (D, E) Culinary Arts (D) Fire Science Technology (D, E) Human Services with options in: Career (D, E), Transfer (D, E) Liberal Arts Studies (D, E) with options in: Media Communications (D), Theater (D)

In-House Certificate Programs Child Care (D) Computerized Accounting (D, E) Computer Repair and Maintenance (E) Computerized Tomography (E) Department of Developmental Services Direct Support Certificate in Human Services (E) (DDS Employees Only)

Elementary Education (D)

Liberal Arts Transfer (D, E)

with options in: Computer Science (D, E), Science (D, E)

LPN to Associate Degree Advanced Placement Nurse Education (D, E) - (February 1 deadline) Nurse Education (D) - (February 1 deadline) Polysomnographic Technology (E) - (June 15 deadline)

Digital Media Arts (D) Food Production (D) Law Enforcement (D, E) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (E) Microsoft Office Specialist (D, E) Pastry (D)

Certificate Programs Office Technologies (D)

(Sleep Technology)

Radiologic Technology (D) - (February 1 deadline)

Canton campus Associate Degree Programs

In-House Certificate Programs

Architectural Technology (D) Business Administration Careers with option in: General Business (D) Business Administration Transfer (D) Criminal Justice with options in: Career (D) Transfer (D) Diesel Technology (D) Electronic Technology (D) Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning Technology (D) Liberal Arts Studies (D, E) Liberal Arts Transfer (D, E) Telecomunications Technology (D)

Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning Technology (D) Insurance Billing Specialist (E) Law Enforcement (D) Museum Studies (E) Phlebotomy (D)

Certificate Programs Dental Assistant (D) Medical Assistant (D)

Visual Arts with options in: Art & Graphic Design (D), Fine Arts (D)

Middleborough Center Associate Degree Programs

Business Administration Careers with option in: General Business (D) Business Administration Transfer (D) Child Care Education & Administration (D) with option in: Transfer (D)

Criminal Justice with options in: Career (D) Transfer (D) Liberal Arts Studies (D, E) Liberal Arts Transfer (D, E) Note: D = Day only, E = Evening only, D, E = both Day and Evening 161

Catalog 2011 - 2012

Academic Departments

Division of Faculty and Instruction Dr. Barbara Finkelstein, Vice President Business & Technology Lynda Thompson, Acting Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Business Administration Careers / General Business

English Composition I* Principles of Financial Accounting I Mathematics Elective** Introduction to Business Business Law I

The Business Administration Careers (BAC) Program has been designed to allow and encourage the acquisition of specific skills that will enable the student to enter and perform successfully in a variety of career paths within business. The student will attain focus in his or her studies by concentrating in a sequence of courses collectively referred to as an Option. There are currently five Options that exist within the Business Administration Careers Program, four of which follow specific career paths: Accounting, Marketing, Supervisory Management, and Hospitality Management. Students who are uncertain of which specific career path they wish to follow should select a fifth Option: General Business. General Business | Accounting | Hospitality Management | Marketing | Supervisory Management | Transfer The sequencing of specific course requirements within the Business Administration Careers Program allows the student whose career interests change after the first semester to switch Options or to switch into the transfer program (Business Administration Transfer) with no risk of having to make up courses. Students are encouraged to consult with advisors before choosing any Option sequence; such a choice is often not made until the end of the student’s first semester.

ENGL101 ACCT105 BUSN110 BUSN201

3 4 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II ENGL102 Principles of Financial Accounting II ACCT106 or Principles of Managerial Accounting ACCT107 Organizational Behavior BUSN301 Computerized Business Applications ACCT302 Principles of Marketing BUSN120

3 4 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 1

Science Elective Principles of Economics I Managerial Communications Business Elective Liberal Arts Elective

ECON201 BUSN113

3 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Business Elective Business Elective Liberal Arts Elective General Elective General Elective

3 3 3 3 3

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** Topics in Math I (MATH121) or higher, excluding MATH127, MATH128, MATH141, and MATH142. This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 20 courses and a minimum of 62 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation ((see p. 40).).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 162

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Business & Technology Lynda Thompson, Acting Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Business Administration Careers / Accounting Option

English Composition I* Principles of Financial Accounting I Mathematics Elective** Organizational Behavior Business Law I

The Business Administration Careers (BAC) Program has been designed to allow and encourage the acquisition of specific skills that will enable the student to enter and perform successfully in a variety of career paths within business. The student will attain focus in his or her studies by concentrating in a sequence of courses collectively referred to as an Option. There are currently five Options that exist within the Business Administration Careers Program, four of which follow specific career paths: Accounting, Marketing, Supervisory Management, and Hospitality Management. Students who are uncertain of which specific career path they wish to follow should select a fifth Option: General Business. General Business | Accounting | Hospitality Management | Marketing | Supervisory Management | Transfer The sequencing of specific course requirements within the Business Administration Careers Program allows the student whose career interests change after the first semester to switch Options or to switch into the transfer program (Business Administration Transfer) with no risk of having to make up courses. Students are encouraged to consult with advisors before choosing any Option sequence; such a choice is often not made until the end of the student’s first semester.

ENGL101 ACCT105 BUSN301 BUSN201

3 4 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II Principles of Managerial Accounting Principles of Marketing Principles of Financial Accounting II Computerized Business Applications

ENGL102 ACCT107 BUSN120 ACCT106 ACCT302

3 4 3 4 3

Second Year Semester 1

Science Elective Principles of Economics I ECON201 Intermediate Accounting I ACCT201 Taxation ACCT211 Liberal Arts Elective

3 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Financial Statement Analysis ACCT111  or Peachtree Accounting ACCT303  or Tax Assistance Internship ACCT400 Cost Accounting ACCT221 Liberal Arts Elective Managerial Communications BUSN113 General Elective

3 3 3 3 3

*ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** Topics in Math I (MATH121) or higher, excluding MATH127, MATH128, MATH141, and MATH142. This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of a minimum of 20 courses and 63 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 163

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Business & Technology Lynda Thompson, Acting Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Business Administration Careers / Hospitality

English Composition I* Principles of Financial Accounting I Mathematics Elective** Introduction to Hospitality Mgmt. Introduction to Tourism

Management Option

The Business Administration Careers (BAC) Program has been designed to allow and encourage the acquisition of specific skills that will enable the student to enter and perform successfully in a variety of career paths within business. The student will attain focus in his or her studies by concentrating in a sequence of courses collectively referred to as an Option. There are currently five Options that exist within the Business Administration Careers Program, four of which follow specific career paths: Accounting, Marketing, Supervisory Management, and Hospitality Management. Students who are uncertain as to which specific career path they wish to follow should select a fifth Option: General Business.

ENGL101 ACCT105 BUSN103 BUSN133

3 4 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II Principles of Financial Accounting II or Principles of Managerial Accounting Computerized Business Applications Hospitality Marketing Conference and Event Planning

ENGL102 ACCT106

3 4

ACCT107 ACCT302 BUSN134 BUSN106

3 3 3

Second Year Semester 1

General Business | Accounting | Hospitality Management | Marketing | Supervisory Management | Transfer The sequencing of specific course requirements within the Business Administration Careers Program allows the student whose career interests change after the first semester to switch Options or to switch into the transfer program (Business Administration Transfer) with no risk of having to make up courses. Students are encouraged to consult with advisors before choosing any Option sequence; such a choice is often not made until the end of the student’s first semester.

Science Elective Social Science Elective or Principles of Economics I or Principles of Economics II Food and Beverage Service Mgmt. Hospitality Law Liberal Arts Elective or Destination Geography I or Destination Geography II

ECON201 ECON202 BUSN101 BUSN107 TRGE101 TRGE102

3 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Hospitality Human Resources BUSN135 Hotel Operations BUSN131 Managerial Communications BUSN113 Accounting Business Elective or Culinary Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective or Destination Geography I TRGE101 or Destination Geography II TRGE102 ServSafe Certification BUSN136

3 3 3 3 3 1

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** Topics in Math I (MATH121) or higher, excluding MATH127, MATH128, MATH141, and MATH142. # Suggested courses for Culinary Arts Elective or Business Elective: Small-Business Organization and Management (BUSN125), Organizational Behavior (BUSN301), Table Service (CULA123), Sanitation for Certification and Facilities Planning (CULA155). This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 21 courses and a minimum of 63 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 164

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Business & Technology Lynda Thompson, Acting Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Business Administration Careers / Marketing Option

English Composition I* Principles of Financial Accounting I Mathematics Elective** Business Law I Introduction to Business

The Business Administration Careers (BAC) Program has been designed to allow and encourage the acquisition of specific skills that will enable the student to enter and perform successfully in a variety of career paths within business. The student will attain focus in his or her studies by concentrating in a sequence of courses collectively referred to as an Option. There are currently five Options that exist within the Business Administration Careers Program, four of which follow specific career paths: Accounting, Marketing, Supervisory Management, and Hospitality Management. Students who are uncertain of which specific career path they wish to follow should select a fifth Option: General Business.

ENGL101 ACCT105 BUSN201 BUSN110

3 4 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II Principles of Financial Accounting II or Principles of Managerial Accounting Computerized Business Applications Principles of Marketing Liberal Arts Elective

ENGL102 ACCT106

3

ACCT107 ACCT302 BUSN120

4 3 3 3

General Business | Accounting | Hospitality Management | Marketing | Supervisory Management | Transfer The sequencing of specific course requirements within the Business Administration Careers Program allows the student whose career interests change after the first semester to switch Options or to switch into the transfer program (Business Administration Transfer) with no risk of having to make up courses. Students are encouraged to consult with advisors before choosing any Option sequence; such a choice is often not made until the end of the student’s first semester.

Second Year Semester 1

Science Elective Principles of Economics I ECON201 Business Elective Advertising BUSN123 Liberal Arts Elective

3/4 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Sales BUSN122 Principles of Retailing BUSN124 Managerial Communications BUSN113 General Elective Organizational Behavior BUSN301

3 3 3 3 3

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** Topics in Math I (MATH121) or higher, excluding MATH127, MATH128, MATH141, and MATH142. This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 20 courses and a minimum of 62 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 165

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Business & Technology Lynda Thompson, Acting Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Business Administration Careers / Supervisory

English Composition I* Principles of Financial Accounting I Mathematics Elective** Introduction to Business Business Law I

Management Option

The Business Administration Careers (BAC) Program has been designed to allow and encourage the acquisition of specific skills that will enable the student to enter and perform successfully in a variety of career paths within business. The student will attain focus in his or her studies by concentrating in a sequence of courses collectively referred to as an Option. There are currently five Options that exist within the Business Administration Careers Program, four of which follow specific career paths: Accounting, Marketing, Supervisory Management, and Hospitality Management. Students who are uncertain ofwhich specific career path they wish to follow should select a fifth Option: General Business.

ENGL101 ACCT105 BUSN110 BUSN201

3 4 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II Principles of Financial Accounting II or Principles of Managerial Accounting Principles of Marketing Principles of Management Computerized Business Applications

ENGL102 ACCT106

3

ACCT107 BUSN120 BUSN112 ACCT302

4 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 1

General Business | Accounting | Hospitality Management | Marketing | Supervisory Management | Transfer The sequencing of specific course requirements within the Business Administration Careers Program allows the student whose career interests change after the first semester to switch Options or to switch into the transfer program (Business Administration Transfer) with no risk of having to make up courses. Students are encouraged to consult with advisors before choosing any Option sequence; such a choice is often not made until the end of the student’s first semester.

Science Elective Principles of Economics I ECON201 Business Elective Small-Business Organization and Management BUSN125 Liberal Arts Elective

3/4 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Human Resource Management Managerial Communications Liberal Arts Elective Organizational Behavior General Elective

BUSN127 BUSN113 BUSN301

3 3 3 3 3

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** Topics in Math I (MATH121) or higher, excluding MATH127, MATH128, MATH141, and MATH142. The program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of a minimum of 20 courses and a minimum of 62 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 166

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Business & Technology Lynda Thompson, Acting Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Business Administration / Transfer Option

English Composition I* Principles of Financial Accounting I Mathematics Elective** Principles of Management Humanities Elective

The Business Administration Transfer Program emphasizes the preparation of business students whose express intention is transferring to a four-year institution. The curriculum of this program is designed to provide the student with a strong foundation in the principles of business administration and liberal arts.

ENGL101 ACCT105 BUSN112

3 4 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II Principles of Financial Accounting II Lab Science Elective Business Law I Computerized Business Applications

ENGL102 ACCT106 BUSN201 ACCT302

3 4 4 3 3

Second Year Semester 1

Principles of Economics I ECON201 Science Elective Principles of Managerial Accounting ACCT107 Humanities Elective Social Science Elective

3 3/4 4 3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Principles of Economics II ECON202 Principles of Marketing BUSN120 Introduction to Statistics MATH131 Humanities Elective Humanities or Social Science Elective

3 3 3 3 3

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** College Algebra (MATH203) or higher. This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of a minimum of 20 courses and 64 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 167

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Public Service / Social Science Karyn Boutin, Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Child Care Education and Administration

English Composition I* Development in Early Childhood Introduction to Early Childhood Education Speech Communication or Oral Interpretation Behavior Management in Child Care

The Child Care Education and Administration department has designed a comprehensive career program for students interested in working with young children. The program will prepare students for Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) certification as Lead Teacher and, after six months of work experience, as a Director in a child care setting. The program will help students develop the knowledge, skills, and understanding needed to work effectively in a multicultural society. The curriculum is designed to meet the standards of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

ENGL101 CCED102

3 3

CCED105 SPCH105 SPCH107 CCED101

3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

Health, Nutrition, and Safety Needs of the Young Child Early Childhood Curriculum: Multicultural Perspectives General Psychology or Principles of Sociology Practicum I: Child Care Seminar I: Child Care

The Massasoit Children’s Center is an integral part of the program, providing an opportunity to complete specific assignments in all courses. Formal instruction is integrated with fieldwork in the form of a supervised practicum experience. The opportunity to observe and work in early childhood facilities will support course work, as well as fulfill EEC employment requirements. Admission to the Child Care Program, however, does not ensure a practicum placement.

CCED112

3

CCED111 PSYC101 SOCI104 CCED401 CCED407

3 3 3 2

Second Year Semester 1

English Composition II ENGL102 Business Requirement** Administration, Supervision, and Management of Child Care Programs CCED201 Practicum II: Child Care Management CCED405 Seminar II: Child Care Management CCED408 Infant and Toddler Care CCED231

Prior to the students obtaining a practicum assignment, their records may be subject to review pursuant to the Criminal Record Information Act, Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 6, Sections 172-178, and Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 28 A, Section 1 et seq., and regulations promulgated pursuant to such statutes. The emphasis of this A.S. program is to provide the student with sufficient knowledge and skills to obtain employment upon graduation and is not oriented to transfer. However, several courses may transfer to baccalaureate degree–granting institutions. Interested students should seek additional information from the Child Care Education Department.

3 3/4 3 3 2 3

Second Year Semester 2

Science Elective Mathematics Elective*** Family and Community Department Approved Elective# Child Care Policies and Issues

SOCI208 CCED211

3/4 3 3 3 3

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. **Survey of Accounting (ACCT103), Payroll Applications/QuickBooks (ACCT112), Principles of Management (BUSN112), Small-Business Organization and Management (BUSN125), Peachtree Accounting (ACCT303), Principles of Financial Accounting I (ACCT105). *** Math Experiences for Early Childhood Education (MATH116) or MATH115 or higher, excluding MATH 141 and MATH142. # Department-approved electives: Children’s Literature (ENGL121), Creative Drama (THET221), other Child Care or Early Childhood Education courses approved by the department, any Modern Language course except Latin, and ELL and Diversity in the Classroom (EDUC105). This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 21 courses and a minimum of 61 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 168

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Public Service / Social Science Karyn Boutin, Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Child Care Education and Administration / Transfer

English Composition I* Development in Early Childhood Introduction to Early Childhood Education Speech Communication or Oral Interpretation General Psychology Behavior Management in Child Care

Option The Child Care Education and Administration Transfer Option is designed to meet the requirements of the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education Transfer Compact. The intent of the compact is to facilitate transfer from community colleges in Massachusetts to early childhood preparation programs at public four-year institutions in Massachusetts. Graduates of the transfer option will meet EEC requirements for teachers.

ENGL101 CCED102

3 3

CCED105 SPCH105 SPCH107 PSYC101 CCED101

3 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II* Early Childhood Curriculum: Multicultural Perspectives Principles of Sociology Practicum I: Child Care Seminar I: Child Care

ENGL102

3

CCED111 SOCI104 CCED401 CCED407

3 3 3 2

Second Year Semester 1

Introductory Biology & Lab BIOL140, 142 or Biological Principles BIOL121 4 U.S. History I HIST103 3 Social Science Requirement** 3 Humanities Requirement*** 3 Liberal Arts Elective 3 Math for Elementary Teachers I MATH127 3 Second Year Semester 2

Physics Elective**** 4 U.S. History II HIST104 3 Children’s Literature ENGL121 3 Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective Math for Elementary Teachers II MATH128 3 Humanities or Social Science Requirement***** 3 * ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** History of Western Civilization I (HIST101), History of Western Civilization II (HIST102), Principles of Economics I (ECON211), Child Psychology (PSYC202), Family and Community (SOCI108), or Abnormal Psychology (PSYC201). ***

Any Literature course or Modern Language course.

****

Survey (CHEM131), Geology I (ESCI121), Meteorology (ESCI123), Physical Ocean Environment (ESCI124), or Survey of Physics (PHYS131 ).

***** Any Humanities course or one of the following courses: History of Western Civilization I (HIST101), History of Western Civilization II (HIST102), Principles of Economics I (ECON201), Child Psychology (PSYC202), Family and Community (SOCI108), or Abnormal Psychology (PSYC201).

This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 21 courses and 61 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 169

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Business & Technology Lynda Thompson, Acting Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Computer Technology Information Management Programming Option

English Composition I* Principles of Financial Accounting I Mathematics Elective** Introduction to Software Design and Development Computer and Information Security Programming in C++

The Computer Technology and Information Management (CTIM) Department at Massasoit Community College offers a highly successful array of programs to prepare its graduates for career advancement opportunities in the computer and information technologies fields.

ENGL101 ACCT105

3 4 3

CTIM281 CTIM180 CTIM371

3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II Computer Configuration and Hardware Database Concepts and Practices Programming , Humanities, or Socal Science Elective

The Programming Option of the Computer Information Systems program will train students who wish to become computer programmers and show an aptitude for doing so. Students will become proficient in at least two programming languages. Each of these languages will be a two-semester sequence. A third language may be taken as an elective. In addition, students will study in depth the development and design of software, systems design, operating systems, databases, and data communications.

ENGL102

3

CTIM171 CTIM271

3 3

Second Year Semester 1

Operating Systems Concepts CTIM221 Programming Elective*** Programming Elective*** Principles of Financial Accounting. I ACCT105 or CTIM Elective Mathematics Elective **

In addition to taking computer courses, the student will receive a firm grounding in the humanities, science, mathematics, and social science. On completion of a two-year program, an Associate in Science degree is awarded.

3 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Science Elective 3/4 Data Communications CTIM278 3 CTIM Elective 3 Programming Elective*** 3 Current Topics in Computer Information Systems CTIM341 1 Computer Ethics CTIM151 1 Internet Law CTIM164 1 1

*ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. **Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher. ***Students must complete two programming sets. Programming in C++ (CTIM371) is required of all students. The sets include Programming in C++ (CTIM371) and Advanced Programming in C++ (CTIM372), Introduction to Java Programming (CTIM157) and Advanced Java Programming (CTIM168), Introduction to Visual BASIC (CTIM361), and Advanced Visual BASIC (CTIM362). Introduction to Visual C++ (CTIM373), or one of the languages not taken as part of a set can be taken as the fifth programming course. This program awards the A.A.S. Degree upon completion of 24 courses and a minimum of 61 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 170

Catalog 2011 - 2012 COURSE TITLE

Business & Technology Lynda Thompson, Acting Division Dean

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

English Composition I* ENGL101 Mathematics Elective** Introduction to Software Design and Development CTIM281 Beginning Windows CTIM101 or Intermediate Windows CTIM 104 Beginning Word CTIM102 or Intermediate Word CTIM 105 Beginning Excel CTIM103 or Intermediate Excel CTIM106 Help Desk Concepts CTIM178

Computer Technology and Information Management User Support Option The Computer Technology and Information Management (CTIM) Department at Massasoit Community College offers a highly successful array of programs to prepare its graduates for career advancement opportunities in the computer and information technologies fields. During the past two decades, the information-processing industry has expanded so rapidly that all aspects of daily life are affected by the gathering, processing and dissemination of information. At the same time the industry has changed from one in which computers and those who understand and operate them are objects of mystery to one in which everyone living in a technological society has access to computers.

3 3 3 1 1 1 3

First Year Semester 2

Principles of Financial Acctounting I ACCT105 or CTIM Elective English Composition II ENGL102 Business Communication CTIM122 Database Concepts and Practices CTIM271 Intermediate Windows CTIM104 or Introduction to Web Editior: Dreamweaver CTIM141 Intermediate Word CTIM105 or Advanced Word CTIM108 Intermediate Excel CTIM106 or Advanced Excel CTIM109

Because of these changes, career paths in Computer Information Systems have also evolved. Those who wish to work with computers no longer have to choose programming as their only option. The User Support option of the Computer Information Systems program will train students to solve the everyday computing problems of computer users in the workplace. Students will learn a wide variety of applications software, as well as software design, systems design, operating systems, and data communications, but will apply this study to prepackaged software and computer systems rather than to writing original programs. Upon graduation they should be able to support other computer users in business and industry. They will be able to study one or more programming languages as electives if they choose to do so.

3 3 3 3 1 1 1

Second Year Semester 1

Computer Configuration and Hardware CTIM171 Social Science or Humanities Elective Administrative Management CTIM213 Computer and Information Security CTIM180 Beginning PowerPoint CTIM114 or Intermediate PowerPoint CTIM115 Adobe Acrobat I CTIM197 Internet: Creating a Home Page CTIM147

In addition to computer courses, the student will receive a firm grounding in the humanities, science, mathematics, and social science. On completion of a two-year program, an Associate in Science degree is awarded.

3 3 3 3 1 1 1

Second Year Semester 2

Operating Systems Concepts CTIM221 3 Science Elective 3/4 Data Communications CTIM278 3 Programming Elective*** 3 Current Topics in Computer Information Systems CTIM341 1 Computer Ethics CTIM151 1 Internet Law CTIM164 1

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism . ** Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher *** Introduction to Java Programming (CTIM157), Advanced Java Programming (CTIM168), Introduction to Visual BASIC (CTIM361), Advanced Visual BASIC (CTIM362), Programming in C++ (CTIM371), Advanced Programming in C++ (CTIM372), Introduction to Visual C++ (373). This program awards the A.A.S. Degree upon completion of 28 courses and a minimum of 61 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 171

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Public Service / Social Science Karyn Boutin, Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Criminal Justice / Career Option

English Composition I* Speech Communication Principles of Sociology Introduction to Criminal Justice American National Government

The Associate Degree program in Criminal Justice at Massasoit Community College includes both day and evening programs. The day program attracts primarily pre-service students, many of whom are recent high school graduates. Motivations for seeking a degree in Criminal Justice are many. Most wish to prepare for a career in municipal and state policing or attain a position in one of twenty-one federal law enforcement agencies, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms; Drug Enforcement Administration; U.S. Customs Service; or U.S. Marshals Service. This program is Quinn Bill approved.

ENGL101 SPCH105 SOCI104 CJUS101 GOVT105

3 3 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II ENGL102 General Psychology PSYC101 Correction I CJUS302 Criminal Justice Elective** Criminal Procedures CJUS306

Many students in this program exhibit an interest in such related fields as corrections, probation, parole, juvenile justice, and private security. Approximately 15% of our full-time day students are in-service police officers whose working shifts permit them to pursue their education on a full-time basis. Students devote approximately one-half of their time studying Liberal Arts courses such as Psychology, Sociology, and English.

3 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 1

Criminology SOCI203 Psychology Elective Criminal Justice Elective Mathematics Elective*** Criminal Law I CJUS305

The other half of their program is more directly related to the field of Criminal Justice. They study career-oriented courses such as Criminal Investigation, Criminalistics, and PoliceCommunity Relations. Students may also take law courses such as Criminal Law and Evidence and Court Procedures. Interesting and valuable electives such as Negotiating, Domestic Violence, and Introduction to Corrections are also available.

3 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Liberal Arts Elective 3 Sociology Elective 3 Criminal Justice Elective** 3 Science Elective 3/4 Management of a Criminal Justice Organization CJUS234 3

Please note that the articulation agreements with Bridgewater State College are currently under review; therefore, check with the Public Service and Social Science Division for the latest updates. Furthermore, you may review the MassTransfer Program if you are planning to transfer to a Massachusetts four-year college to see which colleges are in partnership with Massasoit Community College.

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** Any Criminal Justice course except Criminal Investigation (CJUS307), or Introduction to Criminalistics (CJUS308). *** Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher. This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 20 courses and a minimum of 60 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 172

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Public Service / Social Science Karyn Boutin, Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Criminal Justice / Transfer Option

English Composition I* Speech Communication Principles of Sociology Introduction to Criminal Justice American National Government or State and Local Government

The Associate Degree program in Criminal Justice at Massasoit Community College includes both day and evening programs. The day program attracts primarily pre-service students, many of whom are recent high school graduates. Motivations for seeking a degree in Criminal Justice are many. Most wish to prepare for a career in municipal and state policing or attain a position in one of twenty-one federal law enforcement agencies, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms; Drug Enforcement Administration; U.S. Customs Service; or U.S. Marshals Service. This program is Quinn Bill approved.

ENGL101 SPCH105 SOCI104 CJUS101 GOVT105 GOVT301

3 3 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II ENGL102 General Psychology PSYC101 Mathematics Elective** Correction I CJUS302

Many students in this program exhibit an interest in such related fields as corrections, probation, parole, juvenile justice, and private security. Approximately 15% of our full-time day students are in-service police officers whose working shifts permit them to pursue their education on a full-time basis. Students devote approximately one-half of their time studying Liberal Arts courses such as Psychology, Sociology, and English.

3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 1

Criminology SOCI203 Criminal Law I CJUS305 Criminal Justice Elective*** Humanities Elective Lab Science Elective

The other half of their program is more directly related to the field of Criminal Justice. They study career-oriented courses such as Criminal Investigation, Criminalistics, and PoliceCommunity Relations. Students may also take law courses such as Criminal Law and Evidence and Court Procedures. Interesting and valuable electives such as Negotiating, Domestic Violence, and Introduction to Corrections are also available.

3 3 3 3 4

Second Year Semester 2

Humanities Elective Social Science Elective Criminal Justice Elective*** Management of a Criminal Justice Organization Lab Science Elective

Please note that the articulation agreements with Bridgewater State College are currently under review therefore, check with the Public Service and Social Science Division for the latest updates. Furthermore, you may also review the MassTransfer Program if you are planning to transfer to a Massachusetts four-year college to see which colleges are in partnership with Massasoit Community College.

3 3 3 CJUS234

3 4

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** Introduction to Statistics (MATH131) or higher. ***Any Criminal Justice course. This program fulfills the Commonwealth Transfer Compact. This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 20 courses and 62 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 173

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Business & Technology Lynda Thompson, Acting Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Culinary Arts

Math Elective* English Composition I** ENGL101 Facilities Planning/Sanitation for Certification CULA155 Introduction to Food Production CULA141 Table Service CULA123 or Beginning Windows, CTIM101 Beginning Word, CTIM102 and Beginning Excel CTIM103 Introduction to Baking CULA143 Culinary Concepts CULA140

The Culinary Arts program prepares students to enter the diverse and exciting field of food service. A fieldwork experience requirement obliges the student to have a minimum of 240 hours of paid or un-paid experience in a food-service establishment, thus giving him or her the practical knowledge necessary to supplement his or her studies. The curriculum for Culinary Arts requires courses in a variety of subject areas as well as at least fifteen Culinary Arts courses. All Culinary Arts students are required to adhere to a dress code and to provide and care for their own uniforms.

3 3 3 3

3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

Storeroom and Inventory Procedures CULA142 Soups, Sauces, and Thickening Agents CULA144 Yeast Doughs CULA128 Table Service CULA123 or Beginning Windows, CTIM101 Beginning Word, CTIM102 and Beginning Excel CTIM103 American Regional Cuisine CULA146

3 3 3

3 3

Second Year Semester 1

English Composition II International Cuisine Advanced Pastries Speech Communication or Oral Interpretation Field Work Experience in Culinary Arts I

ENGL102 CULA151 CULA161 SPCH105 SPCH107

3 4 3

CULA407

4

3

Second Year Semester 2

Garde Manger and Menu Design Classical Cuisine Classical Desserts Science Elective Culinary Arts Elective

*

CULA135 CULA152 CULA162

3 4 3 3/4 3

Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher.

** ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism.

The student is awarded an A.A.S. degree upon completion of 23 courses and a minimum of 66 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 174

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Public Service / Social Science Karyn Boutin, Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Fire Science Technology

English Composition I* Introduction to Fire Science Technology Fundamentals of Fire Prevention Chemistry Elective# Mathematics Elective**

Students completing the requirements of this program receive the Associate in Science Degree in Fire Science. The Fire Science Technology program is designed to provide career fire department personnel in the communities served by the College with a two-year career program whereby they may upgrade their educational levels and improve their effectiveness in the use of modern fire science techniques. Furthermore, the program will prepare students to begin a career in fire service.

ENGL101 FIRE101 FIRE103

3 3 3 3/4 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II General Psychology Physics Elective## Massachusetts Fire Laws and Regulations Fire Science Elective

The curriculum combines career and general education courses. In addition to firefighting, graduates of this program may find employment in private industry, or they may transfer to a college offering a Bachelor of Science Degree in Fire Science or Public Safety.

ENGL102 PSYC101 FIRE107

3 3 3/4 3 3

Second Year Semester 1

State and Local Government Principles of Sociology Hazardous Material Incident Response Building Construction and Blueprint, or Plan Review Fire Company Officership

GOVT301 SOCI104

3 3

FIRE211

3

FIRE213 FIRE301

3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Speech Communication Fire Protection Systems and Equipment Fire Hydraulics & Water Distribution Systems Fire Cause Detection General Elective

SPCH105

3

FIRE206

3

FIRE208 FIRE111

3 3 3

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher. # Survey of Chemistry (CHEM131) or General Chemistry I (CHEM151). ## Survey of Physics (PHYS131), Technical Physics I (PHYS141), or College Physics I (PHYS151). This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 20 courses and a minimum of 60 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 175

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Public Service / Social Science Karyn Boutin, Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Human Services, Career Option

English Composition I* Principles of Sociology Introduction to Social Welfare Group Dynamics Mathematics Elective**

The Human Services Department attracts a diverse student population that shares a desire to work with and help other people. Students are often enrolled directly from high schools. Others are returning to change careers, while still others have raised families and are seeking career opportunities for the first time. The ages of Human Services students vary.

ENGL101 SOCI104 HSRV101 HSRV103

3 3 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II Speech Communication General Psychology Interviewing Techniques Human Services Elective

Most students attend the full-time day program; others earn their degrees on a part-time day or evening basis. Some of these students are currently employed in social service agencies and are pursuing a degree for purposes of advancement.

ENGL102 SPCH105 PSYC101 HSRV102

To better meet the needs of Massasoit students, there are two options in Human Services: Transfer and Career.

Second Year Semester 1

The Career Option maximizes students’ opportunities for job placement directly after graduation by emphasizing skillbuilding course work and practicum experiences. Students in this option should take special care to choose their Human Service electives and other electives to build knowledge and skills that will help them reach their individual career objectives.

HSRV405 HSRV105

Field Experience and Seminar in Human Services I Human Services Practice Psychology or Sociology Elective State and Local Government Human Services Elective

GOVT301

3 3 3 3 3

4 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Fostering Equality and Diversity Human Services Elective Field Experience and Seminar in Human Services II Science Elective General Elective

HSRV107

3 3

HSRV406

4 3/4 3

*ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. **Contemporary Mathematics (MATH115) or higher, excluding Technical Mathematics I (MATH141) and Technical Mathematics II (MATH142). This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 20 courses and a minimum of 62 credits. Keyboarding competency is required for graduation see p. 40

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 176

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Public Service / Social Science Karyn Boutin, Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Human Services / Transfer Option

English Composition I* Principles of Sociology Introduction to Social Welfare Group Dynamics Mathematics Elective**

The Human Services Department attracts a diverse student population that shares a desire to work with and help other people. Students are often enrolled directly from high schools. Others are returning to change careers, while still others have raised families and are seeking career opportunities for the first time. The ages of Human Services students vary.

ENGL101 SOCI104 HSRV101 HSRV103

3 3 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II Speech Communication General Psychology Interviewing Techniques Human Services Elective

Most students attend the full-time day program; others earn their degrees on a part-time day or evening basis. Some of these students are currently employed in social service agencies and are pursuing a degree for purposes of advancement.

ENGL102 SPCH105 PSYC101 HSRV102

3 3 3 3 3

To better meet the needs of Massasoit students, there are two options in Human Services: Transfer and Career.

Second Year Semester 1

Field Experience and Seminar in Human Services I HSRV405 or Field Experience Human Services II HSRV406 Human Services Practice HSRV105 Psychology or Sociology Elective Humanities Elective Lab Science Elective

The Transfer Option allows the Massasoit Human Services graduate to transfer directly into the junior year at other Massachusetts state colleges. Most students transfer into Human Services, Sociology, Psychology, Social Work, or Education programs.

4 3 3 3 4

Second Year Semester 2

Fostering Equality and Diversity Human Services Elective Humanities Elective Lab Science Elective General Elective

HSRV107

3 3 3 4 3

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** Topics in Mathematics I (MATH121) or higher, except Technical Mathematics I (MATH141), and Technical Mathematics II (MATH142). This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 20 courses and a minimum of 63 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 177

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Humanities & Fine Arts Deanna L. Yameen, Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Liberal Arts Studies

English Composition I* U.S. History I or History of Western Civilization I General Psychology Mathematics Elective** Science Elective ##

The Department of Communicative Arts, guided by a faculty of dedicated professionals in the arts, offers a variety of liberal arts and humanities electives in the fields of speech, theater, media, music, and dance, as well as two programs and an inhouse certificate.

ENGL101 HIST103 HIST101 PSYC101

3 3 3 3 3/4

First Year Semester 2

The Liberal Arts Studies program includes a broad range of electives that allows students to tailor the program to meet their individual needs. The student with specific career goals may, through selection of electives, design a program to meet specific vocational objectives. The student who plans to transfer into a program in a four-year college, the prerequisites of which are not adequately met in any other program, may tailor the program to meet these requirements. The program is also offered for those students who do not intend to continue formal studies after the completion of the Associate Degree but who desire the opportunity to explore occupational courses through electives in such areas as Business Administration or another career path.

English Composition II U.S. History II or History of Western Civilization II Principles of Sociology Mathematics Elective** Lab Science Elective ##

ENGL102 HIST104 HIST102 SOCI104

3 3 3 3 3/4

Second Year Semester 1

American National Government English Literature I General Elective General Elective General Elective

GOVT105

3 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 2

Speech Communication or Oral Interpretation English Literature II General Elective General Elective General Elective

SPCH105 SPCH107

3 3 3 3 3

* ENGL101 - A student, based on testing scores, may place out of English Composition I (ENGL101) and substitute any college-level writing course in its place. This is also the case if a student placed into an equivalent to ENGL102 at another school and was not required to take the ENGL101 equivalent. Currently there are only three options for replacement: ENGL107 Technical Writing; ENGL119 Creative Writing; JOUR120 Newspaper Journalism. ** Intermediate Algebra and Trigonometry (MATH112) or higher. ## If a student wishes to take more than one year of foreign language, that course of study should begin in semester one; it must be clear, however, that the required year of science will be taken in semesters three and four. This program awards the A.S. Degree upon completion of 20 courses and a minimum of 60 credits. Keyboarding competency is a requirement for graduation (see p. 40).

PROGRAM CURRICULUM 178

Catalog 2011 - 2012 Humanities & Fine Arts Deanna L. Yameen, Division Dean

COURSE TITLE

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year Semester 1

Liberal Arts Studies / Media Communications Option

English Composition I* ENGL101 U.S. History I HIST103 or History of Western Civilization I HIST101 Mathematics Elective** Speech Communication SPCH105 or Oral Interpretation SPCH107 Introduction to Mass Communication MDIA111

The Department of Communicative Arts, guided by a faculty of dedicated professionals in the arts, offers a variety of liberal arts and humanities electives in the fields of speech, theater, media, music, and dance, as well as two programs and an inhouse certificate. The Liberal Arts Studies program includes a broad range of electives that allows students to tailor the program to meet their individual needs. The student with specific career goals may, through selection of electives, design a program to meet specific vocational objectives. The student who plans to transfer into a program in a four-year college, the prerequisites of which are not adequately met in any other program, may tailor the program to meet these requirements. The program is also offered for those students who do not intend to continue formal studies after the completion of the Associate Degree but who desire the opportunity to explore occupational courses through electives in such areas as Business Administration or another career path.

3 3 3 3 3

First Year Semester 2

English Composition II U.S. History II or History of Western Civilization II Mathematics Elective** American National Government Television Studio Production

ENGL102 HIST104 HIST102 GOVT105 MDIA112

3 3 3 3 3

Second Year Semester 1

Dramatic Literature I General Psychology Science Elective Newspaper Journalism Media Elective***

The Media Communications Option in Liberal Arts Studies is designed to prepare a student for careers in broadcasting, including television, radi