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Nurse

A new era — and new arena — for nursing education Also in this issue: Simulation-enhanced curriculum Alumnae on nursing’s front lines Strengthening nursing’s research impact

2012

F RO M T H E D E A N

Dawning of a new era Reimagined curriculum and new simulation center elevate nursing education at Marquette

John Nienhuis

As I reflect on what the College of Nursing has accomplished during the past year, one word keeps coming to mind — journey. During the past year, more than any other during my four-year tenure as dean, we took very meaningful steps forward on our college’s journey toward reimagining and achieving new excellence in nursing education. I was delighted to welcome 120 new freshman College of Nursing students to campus this fall as the largest freshman nursing class Marquette has ever had, made possible in part by our brand-new $4 million Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for Clinical Simulation in Emory T. Clark Hall (see page 12). With this new facility and our reimagined pre-licensure curriculum (see page 16) — which incorporates increased simulation experiences and a deeper focus on nursing in the Jesuit tradition — I am confident we are positioning our students for success as care providers and leaders in a variety of health care settings. We also took encouraging strides forward this year in re-engaging our alumni through the formation of the College of Nursing Alumni Engagement Committee. This group of distinguished alumni has already begun convening via phone to determine its role in guiding the college and will come together in person during Family Weekend, October 5–7, to discuss issues of importance to current students, alumni and friends of the College of Nursing (see page 3). I’m also proud to share that during the past year, we’ve again increased the amount of scholarly research and publications by faculty members. You can read about the research our faculty are conducting related to the effects of sudden deportation on Latina women (see page 7), chemotherapy’s effect on the brain (see page 6), the use of assistive communication devices on mechanically ventilated patients (see page 6), reductions in violent crime in Milwaukee through the Milwaukee Homicide Review Commission (see page 7), and a promising link between probiotics and reduced infection risk during pregnancy (see page 5). These steps forward have not happened in a vacuum. As part of the process that is laying the groundwork for a university-wide strategic planning initiative, our College of Nursing faculty and staff met with President Scott R. Pilarz, S.J., last spring to discuss Marquette’s strengths, successes, challenges and areas of distinction and how the college will fit into the university’s vision for the future. Once the university’s strategic plan is completed, we will begin development of a strategic plan specific to the College of Nursing, which will align with the university’s overall planning efforts. I’ll be sure to keep you updated as we discuss our goals and vision for the future. I hope you enjoy reading this second issue of Marquette Nurse and learning about accomplishments of our students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends. I’m proud of the steps we’ve taken toward reimagining nursing education for the 21st century, and I look forward to leading the college as we take many more steps forward during the year ahead. Marquette blessings! Margaret Faut Callahan, Ph.D., C.R.N.A., F.N.A.P., F.A.A.N. Dean and Professor Marquette University College of Nursing

Dan Johnson

TA BL E OF C ON T E N T S 2 NEWS Nursing abroad Contributing writers: Jessica Bazan, Kurt Chandler, Stephen Filmanowicz, Danielle Orchard, Lynn Sheka, Paula Wheeler and Carol Winkel

Engaging with nursing alumni

Editorial team: Margaret Faut Callahan, Stephen Filmanowicz and Lynn Sheka

Reducing infant mortality one baby at a time

Graphic design: Joan Holcomb

5 RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

Contact: Share comments or ideas for future issues with Bridget O’Meara at bridget.omeara@marquette.edu.

Probiotics and pregnancy

College mission

Health effects of sudden deportation

New nursing scholarship honors alumna

Strengthening nursing’s research impact

Through a transformational Catholic, Jesuit education, the mission of the Marquette University College of Nursing is to prepare nurse leaders to promote health, healing and social justice for all people through clinical practice and development of nursing knowledge.

8 ON NURSING’S FRONT LINES Three alumnae show what it means to be a “Marquette nurse”

The faculty, students and staff of the college are committed to: • Providing high-quality, compassionate care focused on individuals, families and communities. • Advocating for social justice to eliminate health inequities. • Engaging community partners to promote health care for all. • Generating, evaluating and applying knowledge to improve health and education outcomes. • Creating a dynamic, innovative learning community. • Leading change to improve the health care environment.

12 A NEW ARENA FOR NURSING EDUCATION Center for Clinical Simulation opens its doors Reimagined pre-licensure curriculum debuts

19 ALUMNI PERSPECTIVE Distinguished alumna climbs Mount Kilimanjaro

20 NOTABLE SCHOLARLY ACCOMPLISHMENTS

On the cover: Assistant Professor Jill Guttormson teaches nursing students in the College of Nursing’s new Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for Clinical Simulation. Photograph by John Nienhus

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N EW S

Nursing abroad Dublin program gives students a global perspective on health care

By Lynn Sheka Lisa Philbin and Gretchen Smithy, College of Nursing seniors, spent the spring 2012 semester experiencing the luck and health of the Irish as the first participants in a new nursingcentric study abroad program at University College Dublin. The program, which is receiving strong student interest for the 2012–13 academic year, builds upon the existing relationship between the Irish university and Marquette’s Office of International Education. It encompasses preapproved courses and observation time at hospitals, pediatric clinics, and even Ireland’s National Drug Advisory and Treatment Centre. This makes it possible for nursing students to study abroad without falling an entire semester behind in Marquette’s rigorous curriculum, which requires 240 hours of clinical practice each semester during students’ junior year. Philbin and Smithy were able to combine their observation experience in Ireland with six weeks of clinical rotations supervised by a College of Nursing faculty member when they returned to the United States to fulfill their junior year program requirements. “Studying nursing in Ireland opened my eyes,” says Philbin. “Health care is needed everywhere, and it’s different everywhere.

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MARQUETT E UNIV ERSITY

Lisa Philbin (right photo, far right) and Gretchen Smithy (right photo, middle) spent the spring 2012 semester in Dublin as part of a nursing-centric study abroad program blending academic courses with observation experiences at health care sites in Ireland. Philbin (left photo) and Smithy spent a day shadowing a midwife at Ireland’s National Maternity Hospital, in addition to observing at hospitals and pediatric clinics.

Seeing these different environments made me want to learn as much as I can about health care around the world so I’m able to care for my patients in a variety of settings.” The people Smithy met and the connections she made prompted her to consider nursing abroad after graduation. “I hope to apply what I’ve learned here to my studies in the United States, to compare the two and gain a more well-rounded view of health care,” she says. For Dr. Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, associate dean of undergraduate programs in the College of Nursing, the benefits for her students include “experiencing the differences that exist in nursing care, patient expectations and health outcomes from a global perspective. They also tend to find that being immersed in another culture helps them better understand their own.” ✤

Closer engagement with nursing alumni By Carol Winkel In April, Dean Margaret Faut Callahan announced the formation of the College of Nursing’s Alumni Engagement Committee, which will help ensure the active role of alumni in guiding, impacting, shaping and celebrating the college’s success. “I’m excited to see the willingness and dedication of Marquette’s nursing alumni nationwide in helping the college achieve greatness,” she says. “As we help prepare our students to lead lives of faith and professional excellence in service to others, our alumni will continue to serve as role models for what it means to be professionally successful.” The committee will convene in the coming year by conference call and participate in various campus and regional events. The group’s first in-person gathering will be held during Family Weekend, October 5–7. Agenda items include a tour of the new Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for Clinical Simulation, a spiritual retreat and participation in the Commitment to the Profession Ceremony, which many alumni remember as the Capping Ceremony. ✤

New scholarship honors a compassionate Marquette nurse By Danielle Orchard Known for showing concern for others and bringing out the best in those around her, Mary Severino Meyer, Nurs ’86, surprised no one in her family when she pursued a nursing degree at Marquette and went on to work as a staff nurse, a nurse educator and, later, as an advanced practice nurse. When Severino Meyer passed away in 2010 after battling an aggressive cancer, her family honored her by establishing an endowed scholarship in the College of Nursing. Funded by ongoing contributions, the Mary Severino Meyer Nursing Scholarship — a partial tuition scholarship — will be awarded annually to a nursing student who exhibits the same compassion and commitment as a nurse that she did. “My mom had a positive impact on everyone she took care of,” says Ron Meyer, Severino Meyer’s oldest son. “If there is a student selected for this scholarship every year with as much spirit as my mom, imagine the collective impact those students can have on the people they care for.” During her nursing career in the Chicago area, Severino Meyer never lost sight of the privilege it was to serve others in such a personal way. Capable, calm and extraordinarily compassionate, she touched innumerable lives and epitomized what it means to be a Marquette nurse. Severino Meyer cherished her experience as a Marquette student and appreciated how it helped shape her pursuit of

Mary Severino Meyer, Nurs ’86, is pictured with fellow nursing students as part of the 1985–86 Marquette University Nursing Council. After Severino Meyer passed away in 2010 from an aggressive cancer, her family established an endowed scholarship in the College of Nursing to honor her memory and the compassion she displayed as a nurse.

excellence, leadership and service, guided by faith. As president of Marquette’s Student Nurse Association, she addressed her classmates during their capping ceremony in September 1983, saying: “Nursing is more than just a job. It is a vocation. It is a way of life.” ✤ 2 012 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

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Kat Schleicher

N EW S

Certified nurse-midwife Nichole Virgo interacts with a couple during a midwifery appointment. According to 2008 data from the Wisconsin Public Health and Policy Institute, the infant mortality rate for women who do not receive prenatal care is approximately seven times higher than for women who receive adequate prenatal care.

Reducing infant mortality one baby at a time By Lynn Sheka According to the Wisconsin Public Health and Policy Institute, the infant mortality rate for Milwaukee African-American infants is equal to or worse than that of many developing countries. Kathlyn Albert, Grad ’07, LuVerda Martin, Grad ’00, and Nichole Virgo, Grad ’06, certified nurse-midwives at the nursemanaged Marquette Neighborhood Health Center, have made it their mission to develop targeted care models to change that. Albert, Martin and Virgo were hired to develop a nursemidwife practice and breastfeeding support program, both for underserved, at-risk African-American women in the communities surrounding Marquette’s campus, as part of a five-year, $1.5 million grant the MNHC received last fall from the federal Health Resources and Services Administration. Located at 1834 W. Wisconsin Ave., the MNHC resides in one of the nine ZIP codes with the highest poverty levels in Milwaukee and draws 79 percent of its patients from one of them. The MNHC’s new midwives began seeing pregnant patients at the MNHC on June 1. As part of the nurse-midwifery practice, they lead group prenatal care in a format known as Centering Pregnancy, which brings together eight to 12 women for 10 two-hour educational sessions during pregnancy. Women

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MARQUETT E UNIV ERSITY

receive individual prenatal checkups and learn about breastfeeding, nutrition and appropriate weight gain through group discussions in an atmosphere that encourages peer support and sharing of personal stories. “Nurse-led clinics tend to have a different philosophy of care that’s more holistic in approach,” says Albert. “Instead of just looking at one issue, we examine other aspects of patients’ lives that can affect their health.” Research has shown that breastfeeding carries a negative stigma in the local African-American community, so the MNHC also offers postnatal breastfeeding classes, early postpartum lactation home visitation services and a “breastfeeding café” on the terrace level, where mothers and their families can go to learn more and share their personal stories. By this time next year, the MNHC hopes to have researchbased evidence to prove that midwife care leads to better health outcomes for both mother and child. “By educating our female patients about prenatal care and breastfeeding, we’re empowering them to see that they’re capable of making choices about the way they lead their lives and the way they raise their families,” says Virgo. ✤

RESE A RC H A N D IN N OVAT IO N

Enhancing Mother Nature Faculty nurse-midwives explore probiotics as proactive defense against Group B strep By Stephen Filmanowicz Thanks to routine screening of pregnant women, dangerous Group B streptococcal bacterial infections in newborns are now quite rare. But the 80 percent decline in these cases since the mid-1990s has come with tradeoffs for the approximately 25 percent of pregnant American women found to be at risk of passing the pathogen to their babies during labor and birth. Administered two doses of intravenous antibiotics after labor begins, these women may remain tethered to an IV tube through their babies’ births. Although this prophylaxis protects their babies from the GBS infection that can cause deafness, developmental disabilities or even death, “it adds tension to the whole experience for the mother,” says Dr. Leona VandeVusse, associate professor in the College of Nursing. As certified nurse-midwives and nurse-midwifery faculty members

lactobacillus acidophilus: Could this probiotic lead to more comfortable births for more mothers?

dedicated to making labor and birth as natural and mother-affirming as possible, VandeVusse and her research colleague Dr. Lisa Hanson feel fortunate to be investigating a natural way to lessen

threshold for a positive test. Among 10 pregnant women who

levels of Group B strep in mothers-to-be. Ultimately, they hope, it

did not take the probiotic pill, eight also tested negative for strep

could help them avoid positive GBS test results and the resulting

but two others had significantly higher levels of the bacteria in

intravenous treatments.

their samples — between four and 100,000 times higher than the

At the center of this research are familiar ingestible probiotic supplements — similar to those found in yogurt — that may help minimize levels of Group B strep on the mucosal surfaces babies

threshold level. In vitro testing by Dr. Nasia Safdar, their Madison partner, confirmed that the probiotics inhibited Group B strep formation at the cellular level.

encounter on their way out of the womb. The pair partnered

Although research of this type is scant, probiotics are known to

with a microbiologist-infectious disease specialist from the

be present naturally in the gut and on vaginal mucosal surfaces.

University of Wisconsin–Madison and submitted an application

“They are known to acidfy those mucosal surfaces, and that

to the National Institute of Nursing Research for a grant to fund a

keeps pathogens away. It’s like Lysol for your linings,” observes

randomized, double-blind study of the strep-countering properties

Hanson, associate professor and associate director of the college’s

of probiotics in a sample population of 115 pregnant women.

nurse-midwifery graduate program (VandeVusse is the director).

Already, Hanson and VandeVusse have promising results from a

After helping co-found that program in 1993 and working indepen-

pilot experiment they conducted not to obtain conclusive findings

dently on a number of research projects, Hanson and VandeVusse

but instead to determine the safety and practicality of a larger

are relishing the opportunity to tackle the rigors of experimental

study. Among a group of 10 pregnant women who ingested one

research together. “The more we learned about probiotics,” says

pill each day containing lactobacillus acidophilus and two strains

Hanson, “the more we got excited about their potential to help

of bifidobacteria, eight tested negative for Group B strep late

solve this very common colonization that can cause harmful

in their pregnancies and two others just barely exceeded the

infections in newborns.” ✤

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R ESE A RC H A ND IN N OVAT IO N

Strengthening nursing’s research impact Three junior faculty members seek solutions to patient, community problems By Jessie Bazan Junior faculty members are vital contributors to research and scholarship in the College of Nursing. From studying the effects of chemotherapy on the brain to working to reduce homicides in Milwaukee, these researchers are making their mark on the field and helping usher in a new era of health care.

Dr. Linda Piacentine

Dr. Jill Guttormson

Dr. Linda Piacentine knows the fight against cancer is challenging

Good communication is key in all facets of life. According to

enough without added chemotherapy complications, which is

Dr. Jill Guttormson, perhaps nowhere is it more vital than in the

why she is dedicated to studying the frightening and frustrating

intensive care unit. Guttormson’s research is focused on improving

phenomenon known as “chemo brain.” Occurring in some people

communication for mechanically ventilated patients in the ICU,

undergoing chemotherapy treatment, this condition most commonly

work she thinks can positively impact management of patients’

results in cognitive changes affecting memory and concentration,

pain and anxiety. The goals of her current research are to evaluate

such as forgetting people’s names, being unusually disorganized

assistive communication devices, specifically iPads; identify

and finding it difficult to multitask. Through her research, Piacentine

barriers to their use; and develop interventions aimed at increasing

sees how exasperating these changes are, specifically for breast

their use with mechanically ventilated patients. Guttormson

cancer patients, and has made it her goal to find ways to help

explains how devices like the iPad help lessen communication

people adapt. Specifically, she has used questionnaires about

barriers: “The patient on the ventilator can’t talk, (but) the iPad

quality-of-life issues to analyze patient concerns about fatigue,

has an app that allows text to voice. They touch a picture, and

cognitive changes and general well-being. In collaboration with

the iPad will speak it.” Guttormson’s favorite aspects of the study

the Medical College of Wisconsin, Piacentine also works to bring

are communicating with patients and their families about their

an understanding of the patient experience to basic science

experiences and memories and helping find a solution to a problem

researchers, something she says “enriches our understanding of

identified by patients themselves.

Ben Smidt

the changes occurring in women undergoing chemotherapy.”

(Left to right) Assistant professors of nursing Drs. Mallory O’Brien, Jill Guttormson and Linda Piacentine balance their teaching commitments with cutting-edge health care research.

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MARQUETT E UNIV ERSITY

Dr. Mallory O’Brien Despite recent improvements in Milwaukee’s violent crimes rate,

the commission identified the need for funds to protect witnesses

Dr. Mallory O’Brien thinks America is suffering from an epidemic

and victims, and it worked with the attorney general and District

of violence. An epidemiologist with two decades of experience,

Attorney’s Office to re-establish a witness protection program.

she is working tirelessly to combat this problem through violent

Fully funded by Milwaukee County since 2009, the program has

injury prevention and community health improvements. Drawing

helped increase the safety of individuals willing to testify in

on diverse experience that includes her term as associate director

criminal trials. Going forward, O’Brien and the MHRC are working

of the National Violent Injury Statistics System at Harvard University,

to create a data repository to more efficiently gather information

O’Brien focuses her work with the Milwaukee Homicide Review

from partnering organizations and better identify issues that need

Commission, a group she has helped develop, implement and

to be addressed. Though it may not be the type of research

evaluate since 2004. The commission strives to reduce homicides

expected from a nursing professor, O’Brien believes MHRC’s

and non-fatal shootings through a multilevel, multidisciplinary and

commitment to social justice advocacy and creating a collabora-

multiagency homicide review process. O’Brien says, “One thing

tive learning community coincide with the College of Nursing’s

that’s so exciting about my work is that we find new opportunities

mission to care for vulnerable populations. ✤

for prevention every time we look at a case.” Early on, for example,

Crossing borders Researcher explores toll of sudden deportation on health of Latina women By Lynn Sheka While traveling to the U.S.-Mexico border three times during the

depression, border patrol

past academic year, Associate Professor Dr. Ruth Ann Belknap

violence and drug cartels, and

became very familiar with sudden deportation stories of Latina

other health issues stemming

women. “Many of the women I met had lived in the United

from sudden deportation and

States for years before being deported, typically during a recent

undocumented border cross-

border crossing. In most cases, they had gone back to Mexico

ings, not to mention the

to take care of an ailing family member or attend the funeral of a

reluctance the women felt about

parent,” she says.

sharing their symptoms and circumstances with health

It’s an enormously stressful time for these women, filled with

care professionals.

apprehension about their inability to reunite with children, husbands

“It’s generally known that the more stressful events you have

and the comforts of home. How much cumulative stress do these

in your life, the worse health outcomes you have,” Belknap

women typically experience? That’s a question Belknap is actively

says. “Social support can help mediate those negative health

studying with the help of a grant from the Society for the Psycho-

outcomes, but women who have been deported have long-term

logical Study of Social Issues and support from Marquette’s Office

disruptions in social support. This, along with the stress of migra-

of International Education.

tion, increases their vulnerability to a variety of illnesses, such as

During her three trips to the Kino Border, south of Tucson, Ariz.,

cardiovascular disease and depression.”

Belknap met with and interviewed 18 recently deported women

Belknap plans to publish her findings in a nursing journal with

staying at the Casa Nazaret shelter in Nogales, Mexico. She used

the goal of raising awareness among health care practitioners

a 30-question life stressor checklist to guide conversations and

about the need to evaluate each woman’s history for stressors

help determine which traumatic experiences in the women’s lives

associated with border crossings and sudden deportation. Only

were most difficult to overcome, what gave them strength and

by knowing and understanding those stressors can they fully

where they sought help. She heard firsthand about anxiety and

address the health care needs of women in migration. ✤

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Marquette alumna Janis Snyder at Methodist Hospital DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center in Houston.

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MARQUETT E UNIVERSITY

ON NURSING’S FRONT LINES Alumnae in three unique nursing settings show what it means to be a “Marquette nurse” By Kurt Chandler

Three women from different backgrounds, each followed a different path to the College of Nursing. Today, they share matching values instilled by their Marquette experience — a commitment to care for those who are most in need. One battles daily on the front line against HIV and AIDS. Another cares for transplant patients after working for years with a world-famous heart surgeon. One has practiced for 40 years, first as a public health nurse and now as a clinical specialist. Looking back, after decades in the field, all three agree that Marquette couldn’t have been a better fit for what they had hoped to achieve in their professional lives. orn and raised in Jamaica, Dr. Winsome Panton, Nurs ’99, Grad ’01, ’10, moved to the United States when she was 25. She soon realized that her first college degree, in finance, was unfulfilling. A decision to study nursing at Marquette, first at the undergraduate and then at the graduate level, brought her closer to her true goal — to help the underserved. “Growing up in a Third World country, you see people all around you who don’t get the health care they deserve because of the poverty,” she says. “So I wanted to do my part.” As she pursued a master’s in nursing at Marquette after earning an undergraduate nursing degree here, her decision to take an elective course on HIV and AIDS made her goal even more real. After earning her master’s degree, she found a nursing position at the AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin and was on her way to finding her niche. “HIV is a dynamic field. Now I’m constantly learning,” she says. Though the virus was discovered in the 1980s, its transmission is still misunderstood, as she discovered firsthand. “I live in Hartland, and when I first told my neighbors I was working with HIV… they were scared for me,” she says. People with AIDS are living longer because of efffective antiretroviral medications, but the virus poses a unique set of obstacles, particularly for people living

Denny Angelle, The Methodist Hospital

B

in poverty. “Prevention is an integral part of what I do,” Panton says, explaining that in her practice that often means helping already-infected individuals manage their lives to prevent HIV from getting an upper hand on their immune systems. “If a patient has nowhere to live, taking HIV medication is no longer a No. 1 priority. If there is no food at home, the most important thing for that patient is getting food,” she says. Most frustrating, according to Panton, are struggles to get clients to take their meds. Some will hide the fact that they are HIV-positive from their partners. Some get psychologically weary from the endless regimen of medications, daily reminders that they have an incurable disease. “It’s hard seeing patients not wanting to take medication and seeing them dying before your own eyes,” she says. In a field fraught with uncertainty, gratification comes in small doses. “A good day is when my patient tells me she swallows her saliva after not being able to do so for weeks,” Panton says. “Or when my patient comes in smiling because she just received the final HIV test for the baby she delivered and it is negative. Or when my patient tells me he is able to take his HIV medications because he disclosed his HIV status to his family and he no longer has to hide his medications. My day is made when my patient’s HIV viral load cannot be detected in the blood.” In 2008, Panton received the Service to Nursing Award from the college. Two years later, she completed her doctor of nursing practice degree, also at Marquette. “Maybe I chose Marquette because of my own philosophy. I wasn’t even thinking about it then, but it was a very good match,” she says. 2 012 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

9

Dr. Winsome Panton

Janis Snyder

Nurse practitioner AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin

Chief nurse anesthetist The Methodist Hospital, Houston

Ben Smidt

A

s a self-proclaimed math and science nerd headed to Marquette, Janis Snyder, Nurs ’69, was fascinated with cardiac surgery. “I had read about Dr. Michael DeBakey,” she says, referencing the pioneer heart surgeon who performed the first successful coronary artery bypass and pioneered the use of Dacron grafts to repair large blood vessels in aneurysm surgery. But she was also a huge fan of Ben Casey, a popular TV show about doctors, saying, “One of the nurses on the show was a nurse anesthetist, and she was the character I really admired.” In the end, Snyder went on to work as a certified registered nurse anesthetist for 15 years with none other than DeBakey in Houston. Today, she is chief nurse anesthetist at Methodist Hospital DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, one of the top transplant centers in the country. Snyder credits Marquette for supplying her with the core values of what it means to be a nurse. “Many of our instructors were nuns, who exhibited this caring, this interaction, with patients,” she says. “You couldn’t help but feel it and be a part of it.” Recalling her undergraduate clinical rotations, Snyder says, “I loved spending time with patients — which is funny because I ended up in anesthesia, where most of my patients are actually asleep.” Many of her patients today are transplant patients. “We’re not just doing anesthesia. It’s more like nonstop resuscitation,” Snyder says. “We are taking critically ill patients in need of organ transplants and trying to optimize the function of their failing organs until we can replace them. This applies especially to our heart and lung transplant patients. We are often optimizing an organ that has realistically been without an oxygen and

10 MARQUETT E UNIV ERSITY

Denny Angelle, The Methodist Hospital

blood supply for a period of time and still trying to improve the function of other organs that may have been weakened due to a failing heart or failing lungs. It seems like ‘keeping the patient asleep’ is the easiest part of my job. We try to head off disaster.” It’s not uncommon for Snyder to work a 60-hour week. “It’s a — Janis Snyder difficult job. It really is. But if you’re challenged and enjoy the intensity, you fall in love with it,” she says. She has known that love for most of her life. “During the surgical period, I look at myself as the patient’s guardian and protector,” she says. “I am there not only to see that they are unaware of the surgery and that they don’t experience any pain, but also to see that all their organs remain undamaged and at optimal function. Should they lose blood, I am there to replace it. If their potassium is low, I make sure it is corrected. From treating high blood sugar to a failing heart, this is what I do for my sleeping patient.” But her biggest interaction with patients is in the preoperative period, when her patients are wide awake. She gathers medical information, describing the anesthetic process and inserting intravenous and arterial lines. “That is part of what I enjoy the most,” she says. “It is when I get to hold their hand — make eye contact — which I think is extremely important. I really watch body language to see how stressed a patient is and then try to find something to talk about that will ease the stress. This may mean talking about their hometown, children, pets, whatever. It is always about communication and empathy.” And that goes back to the philosophy at Marquette: ensuring patients are receiving what they need and want. “Those values have always been there,” she says.

“During the surgical period, I look at myself as the patient’s guardian and protector.”

W

 hen Teresa Fadden, Grad ’80, was a first-year nursing student in South Dakota, one of her professors said, “I’d rather pick my nurse than my physician.” The comment puzzled her at the time. But after 40 years in the profession, she understands it completely. “Nurses spend the most time with patients and make decisions that will impact their health. Most nurses are ethical, moral people who want to do the right thing,” Fadden says, not surprised in the least that year after year nursing tops the list as the nation’s most trusted profession. A concern for pursuing social justice through nursing runs through her career, as does an involvement with Catholic institutions including Marquette, Mount Marty College in South Dakota and St. Joseph Hospital, the Wheaton Franciscan facility where she has worked for the past 32 years. After moving to Milwaukee from South Dakota in the early 1970s as a newly minted R.N., Fadden spent a year caring for indigent patients at the former Milwaukee County General Hospital. The experience inspired her to join the city of Milwaukee’s then-100-member-strong corps of public health nurses working in public schools and central city neighborhoods and clinics. At the time, these nurses were also responsible for delivering birth certificates to young mothers. “We would see every newborn and then check on the babies periodically and help teach the new mothers,” she says. Today, at least 40 percent fewer public health nurses work in Milwaukee, and Fadden wonders if we devote sufficient resources to health education and prevention. “So many of the

problems I see now could be prevented — such as obesity, the effects of tobacco, high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke,” she says. In 1978, Fadden saw an opportunity to pursue a master’s degree in nursing at Marquette, which opened the door to a position at St. Joseph’s as a clinical nurse specialist in chronic illnesses. That led to her position as a clinical instructor at Marquette and involvement with the St. Joseph Nursing Research Council. Fadden today continues the three-pronged track. “It’s very stimulating — providing direct patient care, teaching the next generation of nurses the value of service to others and professional research,” she says. “It’s the best of all worlds.” But it’s still the interaction with patients that is exceptionally rewarding. As a staff nurse in a large cardiac, pulmonary and thoracic surgery clinic at St. Joseph’s, she usually is assigned to four or five patients each shift. Responsibilities run the gamut, from administering medications and reviewing lab and diagnostic test reports to prepping patients for tests and surgery and coordinating patient care with other disciplines such as physical therapists, clinical dieticians and physicians. “Advocating for the patient and family is something I am called on to do almost every time I work,” she says. The professional and personal payback comes in the form of the statements of appreciation she hears daily from patients: You made me feel better. I’m having less pain now. You made a difference for me. “That commitment to service for others is so apparent where I work, and it’s very much in line with the Jesuit tradition,” she says. ✤

Teresa Fadden

Dan Johnson

(right) Staff nurse Wheaton Franciscan St. Joseph Hospital, Milwaukee

A NEW ARENA FOR NURSING EDUCATION The College of Nursing’s new $4 million simulation center is a game-changer in preparing nurses for a dynamic health care landscape

By Lynn Sheka Nurses move from room to room, assessing vitals, monitoring IV pumps, evaluating heart rates. A long, tiled hallway echoes with the faint sounds of beeping monitors and nurses updating each other about the status of their patients.

Although the scene is as realistic as any hospital patient care scenario, this is not a hospital, and those are not nurses. At least not yet. They’re College of Nursing students putting their clinical reasoning to the test in realistic, simulated scenarios meant to replicate patient care situations. And the patients aren’t human — they’re computer-programmable mannequins that cost between $50,000 and $100,000 each. Known as high-fidelity human patient simulators, they are “Noelle” and “Hal” to the nursing students who regularly interact with them, and they function in many of the same ways humans do — breathing, perspiring, bleeding, going into cardiac arrest and even giving birth. The human patient simulators can also talk — either by being programmed with phrases that relate to the simulation scenario or by having an instructor talk through the simulators’ mouths — adding an additional interactive dimension to the scenarios. Instructors also tap the skills of trained actors to serve as patients in simulation scenarios focused on teaching students how to use therapeutic communication, an essential part of the patient-nurse relationship. “We could have our students in a clinical environment 24 hours a day, seven days a week for their entire undergraduate career, and they still may not see some of these high-risk scenarios that they need to be educated for,” says Dean Margaret Faut Callahan. “That’s the benefit of simulation.” Providing increased clinical reasoning education through a rigorous simulation curriculum has been paramount to the College of Nursing’s vision for reimagining nursing education

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Photography by John Nienhuis

“I need to start a central line on Mr. Robbins.” “Have you checked the wound dressing on Mrs. Lancaster in room three?” “I’m going to update Dr. Henderson on Miss Smith’s urine output during the past hour.”

In the intensive care unit of the new Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for Clinical Simulation, Erin Fitzgerald, Nurs ’13, and Nikki Katschnig, Nurs ’13 (at bedside), respond to the changing vital signs of a mannequin patient during a simulation exercise. Carolyn Keffer, Nurs ’13, and Katelyn Radler, Nurs ’13 (background), assist. 2 012 | MA R Q U ET T E N U RSE

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(Top): Two four-bed patient-care rooms are the center’s largest clinical spaces, allowing Melissa Romanelli, Nurs ’15 (bedside), to lead a team in assessing a patient who has presented with respiratory complications; (Bottom left): Faculty members and actors are able to speak through the mouths of the center’s simulated patients, creating a truly dynamic clinical experience for students such as Katelyn Radler, Nurs ’13; (Bottom right): In one of the center’s medical-surgical rooms, three graduate students — (left to right) Sarah Battani, Grad ’14, Lisa Maas, Grad ’15, and Lee David Klemens, Grad ’16 — work to resuscitate a patient experiencing a “Code Blue” cardiac arrest.

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“If, when our students first set foot in a clinical environment, they are more confident and prepared because of simulation, then we can say our vision for reimagining nursing education has been successful.” — Dean Margaret Faut Callahan

in the 21st century. But simulation was highly limited in the previous simulation room — a cramped space with multiple hospital beds and mannequins that made for not-so-convincing scenarios. To roll out a new pre-licensure curriculum emphasizing simulation (see sidebar on pages 16 and 17), the college first needed to update its outdated Simulation Technology and Learning Resource Center. Enter the new $4 million Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Center for Clinical Simulation at Marquette University, made possible by a $1 million gift over five years from Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare and generous college alumni and friends. Visitors approach the new 10,000-square-foot facility, located on the terrace level of the College of Nursing’s Emory T. Clark Hall, via a lobby that looks exactly like a health care reception area. A six-bed hospital suite extends along the left side of the main corridor, complete with two intensive care rooms, two medical-surgical rooms, one pediatric room, and one labor and delivery suite with a mannequin simulator that actually gives birth. Visitors who wander the hallways, decorated with warm earth tones and soothing paintings, will also find two health clinic examination rooms, a home health/assisted care apartment, a clinical skills laboratory, two four-bed patient care rooms and four debrief rooms, where professors and clinical educators review video recordings of simulation exercises with students. “Most of the equipment you’d find in a state-of-the-art hospital is in our simulation center, from monitors to oximeters to incubators,” says Callahan. “Our goal is to be as realistic as possible to dispel students’ disbelief.” In fact, GE Healthcare, a leading provider of health care technologies to hospitals, clinics and health care networks

worldwide, provided a $440,000 educational grant of monitors, a central station, telemetry technology and infant incubators, which allows Marquette nursing students and care providers from Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare to practice on the same equipment that they might encounter in clinical situations. For Mary Paquette, director of the Center for Clinical Simulation in the College of Nursing, one of the most crucial parts of each simulation scenario is the debriefing segment, which ties closely to the Jesuit practices of reflection and discernment. After each simulation scenario, the entire class — the students watching and those who participated in the simulation exercise — gather to discuss what went well, what could have gone better and why students made the decisions they did. “Debriefing allows students the opportunity to ask themselves: ‘Did I give the best possible care to my patient? If not, what do I need to do to make that happen?’” she says.

THE FUTURE OF NURSING EDUCATION IS NOW. Join us for an open house Friday, October 19 3:30 p.m. – 6 p.m. Emory T. Clark Hall 530 N. 16th St.

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After each simulation scenario, instructors, such as Dr. Linda Piacentine (above) and students gather in one of the center’s four debriefing suites to review video recordings. Director of the Center for Clinical Simulation Mary Paquette says these debriefings draw on the Jesuit practices of reflection and discernment and provide students an opportunity to ask: “Did I give the best possible care to my patient? If not, what do I need to do to make that happen?”

EDUCATION FOR 21ST-CENTURY NURSING A simulation-enhanced curriculum addresses the health care demands of tomorrow By Paula Wheeler Providing the best possible care for an aging and more acutely ill population in the midst of a nursing shortage of historic proportions is one of the more daunting challenges in health care today. It’s something College of Nursing leaders considered while they retooled the school’s pre-licensure curriculum to better prepare nursing students for demanding nursing environments. The new curriculum debuted this fall for entering freshmen and coincides with the opening of the college’s state-of-the-science Center for Clinical Simulation (see main story), developed in partnership with Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare. While shaping the curricular revision, a team from the college reviewed industry best practices and insights shared by chief health

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care system nursing executives. One of the key takeaways? Nursing students need enhanced clinical reasoning skills to deal with the increasing acuity of patient conditions. Dr. Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, associate dean for undergraduate studies, explains that clinical reasoning is the ability to think critically, draw on knowledge from experience and evidence, and make sound decisions that lead to better patient outcomes. Kosmoski-Goepfert and her faculty colleagues — many of them with expertise in adult, pediatric, maternal-child, mental health, community nursing and health care systems leadership — worked to ensure the new curriculum accounted for the ever-changing nursing landscape. A prime example: As health care once reserved for acute-care hospitals migrates to outpatient settings (think tonsillectomies or chemotherapy),

Debriefing can also help increase patient safety because it teaches students to analyze why a mistake happened, rather than try to hide it. “In its best form, debriefing can lead to root-cause analysis of issues for students and practicing nurses,” says Paquette. “Let’s say a patient is administered the wrong drug because two drugs with similar names are stored next to each other. That’s a system problem that can easily lead to human error. It takes the systematic review process inherent in debriefing to analyze why that mistake was made and how we can ensure it doesn’t happen again.” “I’m recording 15 mls of urine output in the past three hours. I think she could be experiencing acute renal failure.” Monitors beep and the two nursing students participating in the simulation scenario move quickly to check the patient’s heart rate. “She’s crashing. We need to call a code!” “Get the defibrillator!” Haley Meinholz, Nurs ’14, is just beginning to encounter this sort of complex, high-fidelity simulation scenario. “When I was looking at schools, I chose Marquette because you’re accepted into the nursing program as a freshman,” she says. “With the new simulation center, this year’s incoming freshmen will have even more exposure to nursing their first year in the program than I did.” She vividly remembers her first encounter with simulation during an environmental scanning exercise, more commonly referred to as a “safety scavenger hunt.” Meinholz and her freshman classmates had to correctly identify potential risks —

clinical skills associated with them no longer need to be taught in hospital settings. With a finite number of clinical practice sites, and ever-growing demand for more as nursing enrollment ticks upward, “finding good, creative, scientifically based ways to teach has become paramount,” Kosmoski-Goepfert says. Enter clinical simulation as a major cornerstone of the new pre-licensure curriculum. “It’s putting the skills in context,” Kosmoski-Goepfert explains. “We embed everything into clinical scenarios, and it forces students to do that broader clinical thinking.” Other key revisions to the curriculum include: • A reframing of introductory-level classes to “give students a better understanding of our rich Jesuit tradition as it relates to health care and to how St. Ignatius has called us to serve the poor and vulnerable,” says Dean Margaret Faut Callahan. • A two-semester sophomore course integrating health assessment and nursing fundamentals, including a new four-week practicum to help students begin developing

anything from the wrong chart to disconnected oxygen tubing — within a patient room. The College of Nursing’s new pre-licensure curriculum requires clinical instructors teaching junior- and senior-level courses to incorporate numerous different simulation exercises into each class, with the goal of increasing students’ clinical reasoning abilities in health care scenarios with multiple mental health, community health, socioeconomic and multicultural components. These increasingly complex scenarios vary based on the course — sometimes it’s a pregnant woman experiencing hypertension or sometimes it’s a traumatic brain injury. In one scenario, a man identified as a Jehovah’s Witness has a decreasing blood count but refuses blood based on his religious beliefs. Callahan still remembers her first real-life nursing crisis while training to be a nurse anesthetist. A pregnant patient experienced malignant hyperthermia, a potentially lethal reaction to anesthesia. “Today, we could simulate that same reaction so that students can learn what symptoms to watch for and how to treat them rapidly,” she says. Heather Cottini, Nurs ’13, recalls acting as the lead nurse during a newborn simulation exercise in which she had to assess and manage a newborn’s circumcision that had excessive bleeding. “I was trying to be calm and patient while explaining what was happening to the parents while also working to control the mannequin’s bleeding,” she says. “I felt nervous and worried, and my mind was racing as I thought ahead about the next steps I needed to take.” A week later, Cottini encountered the same situation during her clinical rotation at the Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare St. Joseph Campus. “I was extremely calm because I knew I had

therapeutic-communication and patient-care skills earlier in their academic career. • The introduction of an evidence-based research course during the junior year. • More real-life application assignments, an ehanced emphasis on quality and safety across all four years, and a new course aimed at improving systematic safety and quality. Together, the changes in curriculum and simulation will do their share to address the severe nursing shortage brought on by an aging nurse population, allowing the college to increase its freshman class size to 120 students. Callahan thinks the impact will be significant, both for the college and the nurses who graduate each year. “Our hope is that this new curriculum will translate into our students being much more satisfied with their decision to enter nursing and that, long term, we will retain more nurses in the workforce.” ✤

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In the Center for Clinical Simulation’s labor and delivery room, a team of students supervised by Dr. Lisa Hanson, associate professor and co-founder of Marquette’s Nurse-midwifery Program (right), participates in a simulated delivery scenario with the center’s birthing mannequin, Noelle. Tamiah McCoy, Nurs ’13 (left), and Tanya Belanger, Grad ’13 (middle), attend individually to mother and child.

done this before. I did exactly what I did during the simulation exercise, and I even taught the parents how to take care of the wound at home,” she says. The partnership that helped make the simulation center possible is a win for all parties. Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare is guaranteed 200 hours of use of the new simulation center each year for ongoing training of its nurses and other clinical care providers, providing considerable cost savings compared with buildng its own facility. Wheaton’s health care providers will receive interdisciplinary team training and state-of-the-science education in key clinical priorities, with the goal of reducing clinical errors and increasing patient safety. “More than 75 years ago, Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare and Marquette collaborated on a nursing program that ushered in the era of modern nursing in Milwaukee. This new Center for Clinical Simulation builds on this partnership and allows us to better prepare future nurses and our own staff to provide the highest-quality and safest care to patients,” explains Dr. Brenda Bowers, R.N., senior vice president of organizational change and leadership performance for Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare.  For Cottini, the value of simulation now and for the future of the college is summed up in a single word: confidence.

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“Through simulation and a focus on being patient-centered, Marquette nurses are taught the confidence to do whatever needs to be done to give our patients the best possible care,” she says. The faculty responsible for the instruction of Cottini and her fellow classmates are more confident, too, about the future nurses they are training. “Simulation helps give context to the skills students are learning in their courses. First they learn about the skill, and then they practice it in a safe simulated environment before being expected to perform that skill on patients in a clinical environment,” Paquette says. In Callahan’s opinion, today’s nursing graduates enter environments in which patients are sicker than ever, often in busy, complex health care settings. She and Marquette’s nursing faculty have made it their mission to ensure that the college is preparing students to handle these changing trends and challenges within the health care system. “If, when our students first set foot in a clinical environment, they are more confident and prepared because of simulation, then we can say our vision for reimagining nursing education has been successful,” she says. ✤

A L U M N I P E RS P E C T IV E

TOP OF THE FIELD By Jessie Bazan Not many 73-year-olds take up mountain climbing, much less tackle Africa’s highest mountain. But Dr. Shannon Perry, Nurs ’69, is not like most people. Last winter, the decorated College of Nursing alumna climbed more than 15,000 feet up Mount Kilimanjaro to raise awareness and funds to combat human trafficking. Perry’s active lifestyle also includes teaching, traveling and authoring some of the most important textbooks in the field of

Leading nursing educator Dr. Shannon Perry, Nurs ’69, climbed Mount Kilimanjaro to raise awareness about human trafficking.

maternal-child nursing. A leader in nursing education, Perry spent 16 years as a professor and five years as director of the School of Nursing at San Francisco State University, one of the many universities at which she has taught. She is also a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, won the Global Caring Nurses Foundation President’s Award and 2012 Excellence in Education Award from the Beta Upsilon Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International, and co-authored the 2011 American Journal of Nursing’s Book of the Year, Maternity and Women’s Health Care. A 1999 College of Nursing Alumna of the Year, Perry still makes time to support her alma mater in many ways, including as a visiting lecturer and member of the 75th Anniversary Alumni Committee. Dean Margaret Faut Callahan describes Perry as a highly respected innovator in nursing education. “She hasn’t been a nurse educator sitting in an ivory tower somewhere,” she says. “She’s really taken her nursing knowledge around the world, and it’s helped change the lives of people globally.” Recently, Perry sat down to discuss her prolific career and more with Marquette Nurse. What aspect of the nursing profession are you most passionate about and why? I really enjoy student and patient contact and have spent much of my career in the formation of caring individuals who are excellent nurses. I also believe that having knowledge of nursing only in the United States is a very narrow point of view. To that end, I created courses on international nursing perspectives and accompanied students to a number of international settings, including the United Kingdom, Ireland, Ghana, Italy, Thailand, Kenya, Honduras and China. A comment I often hear from students is, “I will never look at nursing and health care the same again,” which is the whole point of those types of experiences. Explain your personal philosophy on service. Nursing is a service profession. We are there to provide the best care and comfort that we are capable of to all persons who seek our assistance. This requires nurses to be knowledgeable, dedicated and caring. We treat patients and co-workers with the kind of service and care that we would like for ourselves and our families, which encompasses physical, emotional and spiritual care. Do you have any advice for undergraduates going into the nursing field today? Study hard to be the best you can be. Continue to read, study and learn so your knowledge is continually updated. Advance your education to the highest level that you desire. And, finally, enjoy yourself! Nursing is a wonderful vocation, career and occupation. What’s next for you? I continue to be involved in professional associations and am on national task forces and committees. I travel extensively for business and pleasure, and my fun writing these days focuses on reports of my travels for local newspapers. For example, in 2007, I visited all seven continents. I want to write an article describing that experience because not too many people have done that. It ties to my passion for educating nursing students to have a global view of health care. ✤

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N O TA B L E A C C O M P L I S H M E N T S

Prominent honors, grants, publications and presentations from the 2011–12 academic year AWARDS/MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS Stacy Barnes, director of the Wisconsin Geriatric Education Center Elected treasurer of the National Association for Geriatric Education and the National Association of Geriatric Education Centers, November 2011. Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., assistant professor Awarded Way Klingler Young Scholar Award, March 2012. Awarded New Investigator Award, Stress and Coping Research, Midwest Nursing Research Society, April 2012.

Awarded 2011 Award for Excellence, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University Alumni Association, Oct. 15, 2011. Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor Inducted as a charter fellow, North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International, May 2012. Awarded third place for Best Review Section, Catholic Press Association of the United States and Canada, 2011.

Norah L. Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., assistant professor Awarded Outstanding Dissertation Award, Family Research Section, Midwest Nursing Research Society, April 2012. Awarded Excellence in Nursing Research Award, Greater Wisconsin Chapter of the Society of Pediatric Nurses, Oct. 5, 2011. Kathryn Schroeter, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.O.R., clinical assistant professor Awarded Outstanding Medical Student Teacher Award, Medical College of Wisconsin, October 2011. Norah L. Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P.

GRANTS Stacy Barnes, director of the Wisconsin Geriatric Education Center Grant: $412,043, “Wisconsin Geriatric Education Center,” Bureau of Health Professions, with Jadwiga Hjertstedt, School of Dentistry.

Margaret Berner, M.S.N., C.N.M., A.P.N.P., program director $510,577, “Marquette University — Nurses Supporting Families to Improve Maternal and Infant Outcomes,” Health Resources and Services Administration.

$361,873, “Wisconsin Geriatric Education Center,” Bureau of Health Professions, with Jadwiga Hjertstedt, School of Dentistry.

Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.–B.C., associate professor $5,000, “Validation of an Instrument for Nurses’ Assessment of Readiness for Hospital Discharge,” Council for Graduate Education in Nursing Administration, with Ronda Hughes, College of Nursing, Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing, and Olga Yakusheva, College of Business Administration.

$42,222, “Alzheimer’s and Dementia Education in Wisconsin,” Health Resources and Services Administration. Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., assistant professor $5,000, “Effects of Positive Cognitions and Resourcefulness on Autism Spectrum Disorder Caregiver’s Burden,” American Psychiatric Nursing Foundation, with Norah Johnson, College of Nursing. Ruth Ann Belknap, Ph.D., R.N., P.M.H.C.N.S.–B.C., associate professor $1,944, “Sudden Deportation: Intersections of Immigration Status, Migration History and Life History of Violence in Women Who Have Been Deported from the U.S. to Mexico,” Society for Psychological Study of Social Issues. Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor $314,122, “SOAR–RN Rural Nurse Residency Program,” Bureau of Health Professions.

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$4,904, “Development of a Unit Level Nurse Surveillance Capacity Profile,” Sigma Theta Tau. “Discharge Preparedness Instruments and Post-Discharge Outcomes in Two Inpatient Rehabilitation Units,” funded by Rehabilitation Nurses Foundation, with Lisa Salamon. “Development of a Unit Level Nurse Surveillance Capacity Profile,” funded by Sigma Theta Tau, with Becky Pogacar. Margaret Faut Callahan, Ph.D., C.R.N.A., F.N.A.P., F.A.A.N., dean and professor $37,500, “Curricular Enhancements in Geriatric Nursing Education,” Helen Bader Foundation, Inc.

$10,000, “Graduate Scholarship in Cancer Nursing Practice: Nursing Education of the Needs of Children with Cancer at the End of Life,” American Cancer Society. $10,000, “Jonas Nurse Leaders Scholars Program,” Jonas Center for Nursing Excellence. $9,000, “Marquette Neighborhood Health Center,” Catholic Community Foundation. Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., associate professor $54,039, “Family Health Through Worksite Wellness: A Planning Grant,” Northwestern Mutual Life, with Astrida Kaugars, Klingler College of Arts and Sciences. Mallory O’Brien, Ph.D., clinical assistant professor $217,800, “National Homicide Review Training and Technical Assistance Project,” U.S. Department of Justice. $32,125, “Violence Prevention Initiative (VIP Program),” Medical College of Wisconsin. Ronda Hughes, Ph.D., R.N., M.H.S., F.A.A.N., associate professor See entry for Kathleen Bobay.

Norah L. Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., assistant professor “Effect of a Social iPad Application for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Undergoing Medical Imaging Procedures,” Funded by the Autism Society of Southeastern Wisconsin. See entry for Abir Bekhet. Mary Ann Lough, Ph.D., R.N. assistant professor $44,441, “Professional Nurse Traineeships,” Health Resources and Services Administration. Maureen O’Brien, Ph.D., R.N., P.C.N.S.–B.C., associate dean for graduate programs and clinical associate professor $50,000, “Increasing Workforce Diversity through New Careers in Nursing at Marquette University,” Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. $5,200, “Increasing Workforce Diversity through New Careers in Nursing at Marquette University,” Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Robert Topp, Ph.D., R.N., associate dean for research and professor “A Comparison of Two Formulations of Biofreeze on Blood Flow, Perceptions,” funded by TheraBand Academy, with Paula Papanek, College of Health Sciences.

GRANTS continued Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor $269,504, “Marquette University: Promoting Minority BSN Student Success,” Bureau of Health Professions.

Marianne Weiss, D.N.Sc., R.N., associate professor $5,000, “Patient Perceptions of PatientEmpowering Nurse Behaviors and Patient Activation after Surgery,” Sigma Theta Tau.

Aimee Woda, M.S.N., R.N.B.C., clinical instructor $4,966, “Motivation in African Americans with Heart Failure: A Photovoice Intervention,” Sigma Theta Tau.

See entry for Kathleen Bobay.

PUBLICATIONS Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., assistant professor “Depression in Older Adults,” Encyclopedia of Nursing Research, Third Edition, (November 2011), Joyce J. Fitzpatrick and Meredith Kazer (editors), Springer Publishing Company, with Jaclene Zauszniewski and M. Wykle. “Measuring Use of Resourcefulness Skills: Psychometric Testing of a New Scale,” International Scholarly Research Network Journal, doi: 10.5402/2011/787363 (2011), with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Mental Health of Elders in Retirement Communities: Is Loneliness a Key Factor?” Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, Vol. 26, No. 3 (June 2012) pp 214–24, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Measurement of Acceptance of LongStanding Health Problems: Psychometrics of an Adapted Scale,” Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2011), pp 416–23, with Patricia McDonald and Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Psychometric Properties of the Pressure to Move Scale in Relocated American Older Adults: Further Psychometric Evaluation,” Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 32, No. 10 (September 2011), pp 711–16, with Jaclene Zauszniewski and Wagdy Nakhla. “The Effect of Acceptance Training on Psychological and Physical Health Outcomes in Elders with Chronic Conditions,” Journal of National Black Nurses Association, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Fall/ Winter 2011), pp 11–19, with Patricia McDonald, Jaclene Zauszniewski, Laura DeHelian and Diana Morris. “Developing a Screening Measure for Early Detection of Depressive Symptoms: The Depressive Cognition Scale,” Western Journal of Nursing Research, Vol. 34, No. 2 (January 2012), pp 228–42, with Jaclene Zauszniewski.

“Psychometric Properties of the Index of Relocation Adjustment,” Journal of Applied Gerontology, doi: 10.1177/0733464812450072 (June 2012), with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Theoretical Substruction Illustrated by the Theory of Resourcefulness,” Perspectives in Nursing Theory, (2012), Pamela Reed and Nelma Shearer (editors), Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. Ronald Benner, M.B.H.A., R.N., L.H.N.A., clinical instructor “Creating a Quality of Life Assessment Measure for Residents in Long Term Care,” JAMDA, Vol. 13, No. 5 (June 2012), pp 438–47, with Madelyn Iris, Noel DeBacker, Joe Hammerman and John Ridings. Ruth Ann Belknap, Ph.D., R.N., P.M.H.C.N.S.–B.C., associate professor “Translation and Adaptation of the Life Stressor Checklist–Revised with Columbian Women,” Health Care for Women International, Vol. 32, pp 599–612, with J. Humphries, P. DePheils, R. Slaughter, T. Uribe, D. Jaramillo, A. Tiwara, G. Canaval, P. Amaya and M. Flores. Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.–B.C., associate professor “Identification of Patients at Risk for Falls in an Inpatient Rehabilitation Program,” Rehabilitation Nursing, doi: 10.1002/ rnj.35 (June 2012), with L. Salamon. “Effectiveness of Multimodal Pain Management Protocol in Total Knee Replacement Patients,” Orthopedic Nursing, Vol. 31, No. 3 (June 2012), pp 153–59, with C. Lewis, K. Gunta and K. Mitchell. See entry for Marianne Weiss. Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Perceptions of Professional Practice and Work Environment of New Graduates in a Nurse Residency Program,” Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, Vol. 42, No. 12 (December 2011), pp 559–68.

Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I.

“Predictors of New Graduate Nurses’ Organizational Commitment During a Nurse Residency Program,” Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, Vol. 28, No. 3 (May/June 2012), pp 108–19, with Holly M. Felzer.

Margaret Faut Callahan, Ph.D., C.R.N.A. F.A.A.N., F.N.A.P., dean and professor A Professional Study and Resource Guide for CRNA, Second Edition (2012), AANA Publishing, with S. Foster.

Susan Breakwell, D.N.P., A.P.H.N.– B.C., clinical associate professor “End-of-Life,” Case Studies in Nursing: Clinical Case Studies in Home Health Care, (2011), Leslie Neal-Boylan (editor), Section 15, Wiley-Blackwell, with D. Riendeau.

“Nurse Anesthesia Student Knowledge of Palliative and End of Life Care,” American Association of Nurse Anesthetists Journal, Vol. 79, No. 4 (August 2011), S15–S20, with Susan Breakwell, College of Nursing, and R. Suhayada.

“Clinical Observation of Reflections From Students in an Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Course,” Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing, Vol. 14, No. 4 (June 2012), pp 274–82, with Margaret Faut Callahan, College of Nursing, M. Phillips and M. Kim.

Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor Science, Faith, and Human Fertility: The Third Conference, (June 2012), Marquette University Press, with Theresa Notare.

See entry for Margaret Faut Callahan. Margaret Bull, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor “Delirium in Older Adults Attending Adult Day Care and Family Caregiver Distress,” International Journal of Older People Nursing, Vol. 6, No. 2 (June 2011), pp 85–92. “Use of Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation in Analysis of Familial Caregiver Reaction Among Families of Older People with Congestive Heart Failure,” International Journal of Older People Nursing, Vol. 7, No. 2 (June 2012), pp 117–26, with P.M. Yeh.

See entry for Susan Breakwell.

“Current Medical Research,” The Linacre Quarterly, Vol. 78, No. 4 (November 2011), pp 455–72. “Mandates and Morals,” The Linacre Quarterly, Vol. 79, No. 1 (February 2012), pp 9–13, with H. Klaus and W. Williams. “Family Planning, NFP, and Abortion Use Among U.S. Hispanic Women,” The Linacre Quarterly, Vol. 79, No. 2 (May 2012), with D. Rodriguez. Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., associate professor “What Can Parents Do to Reduce Youth Obesity? An Initial Study With a Diverse Sample,” Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 26, No. 5 (October 2011), pp 428–34, with A. Heinrich, C. Schimdt and J. Pruszynski.

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N O TA B L E A C C O M P L I S H M E N T S PUBLICATIONS continued “Parenting Behaviors of African American and Caucasian Families: Parent and Child Perceptions, Associations with Child Weight and Ability to Identify Abnormal Weight Status,” Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 27, No. 3 (June 2012), pp 195–205, with M. Polfuss. See entry for Stacee Lerret. See entry for Norah Johnson. Jill Guttormson, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Tailoring a Treatment Fidelity Framework for an Intensive Care Unit Clinical Trial,” Nursing Research, Vol. 60, No. 5 (September/October 2011), pp 348–53, with L. Chlan and K. Savik. Lisa Hanson, Ph.D., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor “Directive Versus Supportive Approaches Used By Midwives When Providing Care During Second Stage Labor,” Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health, Vol. 57, No. 1 (March 2012), pp 3–11, with K. Osborne. Ronda Hughes, Ph.D., R.N., M.H.S., F.A.A.N., associate professor “Evaluation of Patient Care Based on Standards, Guidelines and Protocols,” Evaluation of Health Care Quality in Advanced Practice Nursing, (2012), Joanne V. Hickey and Christine A. Brosnan (editors), Chapter 7, Springer Publishing. “Medication Safety: Considerations for Pediatrics,” The Nurse’s Role in Medication Safety, Second Edition, (January 2012), Laura Cima and Sean Clarke (editors), Chapter 5, Joint Commission Resources. Norah L. Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., assistant professor “Autism Spectrum Disorder: Parenting Stress, Family Functioning and Health Related Quality of Life,” Family, Systems, and Health, Vol. 29, No. 3 (September 2011), pp 232–52, with Marilyn Frenn, College of Nursing, S. Feetham and P. Simpson. “Children With Developmental Disabilities at a Pediatric Hospital: Staff Education to Prevent and Manage Challenging Behaviors,” Journal of Pediatric Nursing, doi:10.1016/j. pedn.2012.02.009 (March 2012), with J. Lashley, V. Stonek and A. Bonjour.

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Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, Ph.D., R.N., associate dean for undergraduate programs and clinical associate professor Integrating Adult Acute Care Skills and Procedures into Nurse Practitioner Curricula (2011), National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. Stacee Lerret, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P.– A.C./P.C., clinical instructor “How Ready Are They? Parents of Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Recipients and the Transition from Hospital to Home,” Pediatric Transplantation, Vol. 15, No. 6 (September 2011), pp 606–16, with Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing. “Challenge With Care: Reflections on Teaching Excellence,” Journal of Professional Nursing, Vol. 27, No. 6 (November 2011), pp 378–84, with Marilyn Frenn, College of Nursing. “Predictors of Non–Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Overweight Children,” Gastroenterology Nursing, Vol. 34, No. 6 (November 2011), pp 434–37, with L. Garcia-Rodriguez, J. Skelton, V. Biank, D. Kilway and G. Telega. “Working Together as a Team: Adolescent Transplant Recipients and the Advanced Practice Nurse,” Progress in Transplantation, Vol. 21, No. 4 (December 2011), pp 288–93, 298, with G. Stendahl. See entry for Marilyn Frenn. Mallory O’Brien, Ph.D., clinical assistant professor Evaluation of the Milwaukee Homicide Review Commission (2011), U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, with D. Azrael and A. Braga. Karen Robinson, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., assistant professor “African American Women’s Infant Feeding Choices: Prenatal Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy and Narratives From a Black Feminist Perspective,” Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing, Vol. 25, No. 4 (October/December 2011), pp 320–30, with Leona VandeVusse, College of Nursing. Margaret Sebern, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Shared Care Dyadic Intervention: Outcome Patterns for Heart Failure Care Partners,” Western Journal of Nursing Research, Vol. 34, No. 3 (April 2012), pp 289–316, with Aimee Woda, College of Nursing.

Kelli Jones, M.S.N., R.N. (center)

Mary Stauber, D.N.P., R.N., A.C.N.P.– B.C., clinical instructor and ACNP option coordinator “Not All Spinal Cord Injuries Involve a Fracture,” Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal, Vol. 33, No. 3 (July/September 2011), pp 226–31. “Spirometry and Peak Flow Assessment,” Integrating Adult Acute Care Skills and Procedures into Nurse Practitioner Curricula, (2011), Kerry Kosmiski-Goepfert (editor), pp 104–23, National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. “Interpretation of a Chest Radiograph,” Integrating Adult Acute Care Skills and Procedures into Nurse Practitioner Curricula (2011), Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert (editor), pp 71–75, National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties. Robert Topp, Ph.D., R.N., associate dean for research and professor “Implementation of a Virtual Journal Club in a Clinical Nursing Setting,” Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, Vol. 27, No. 3 (May/June 2011), pp 116–20, with J. Berger and H. Hardin. “Effect of Topical Menthol on Ipsilateral and Contralateral Superficial Blood Flow Following a Bout of Maximum Voluntary Muscle Contraction,” International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, Vol. 6, No. 2 (June 2011), pp 1–9, with L. Winchester, J. Schilero and D. Jacks. “A Comparison of Ice with 3.5% Menthol Gel on Blood Flow and Muscle Strength of the Lower Arm,” Journal of Sport Rehabilitation, Vol. 20 (August 2011), pp 355–366, with L.J. Winchester, S.H. Sannes, A.M. Mink, J.S. Kaufman and D.E. Jacks.

“Abstract: The Effect of 3.5% Menthol Gel on Knee Pain and Functioning Among Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis,” Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Vol. 42, No. 1 (January 2012). “Stress Among Operating Room Nurses and Operating Room Technologists,” Kentucky Nurse, Vol. 60, No. 2 (March/ June 2012), pp 5–7, with A. Vowels and J. Berger. “Abstract: Effects of Pre-Habilitation on Self-Efficacy for Exercise and Outcome Expectations for Exercise Among Patients Before and After Total Knee Arthroplasty,” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 44, No. 5 (2012). “A Comparison of Topical Menthol to Ice on Pain, Evoked Tetanic and Voluntary Force During Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness,” International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, Vol. 7, No. 3 (June 2012), pp 314–22, with A. Vowels and J. Berger. Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor “Affirming Motherhood: Validation and Invalidation in Women’s Perinatal Hospice Narratives,” Birth, Vol. 38, No. 3 (September 2011), pp 256–65, with A. Lathrop. See entry for Karen Robinson. Marianne Weiss, R.N., D.N.Sc., associate professor “Nursing Staffing, Readiness for Hospital Discharge and Post-Discharge Utilization,” Health Services Research, Vol. 46, No. 5 (August 2011), pp 1473–94, with Kathleen Bobay, College of Nursing, and Olga Yakusheva, College of Business Administration.

“Women’s Perceptions of and Responses to Cesarean Birth: A Roy Adaptation Model-Based Multisite International Study,” Nursing Science Quarterly, Vol. 24, No. 4 (October 2011), pp 352–62, with J. Fawcett, C. Aber, S. Haussler, S.

Meyers, J. Hall, L. Waters, C. King, M. Tarkka, A. Rantanen, P. Astedt-Kurki, J. Newston and V. Silva.

37, No. 1 (January/February 2012), pp 56–63, with J. Ohlendorf and P. Ryan.

“Weight Management Information Needs of Postpartum Women,” The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing, Vol.

Aimee Woda, M.S.N., R.N.–B.C., clinical instructor See entry for Margaret Sebern.

“Measuring the Use of Resourcefulness Skills: Development and Testing of A New Measure,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012, with Jaclene Zauszniewski.

“Nursing Services Research: Examples From Nurse Staffing and Discharge Studies,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee, May 2012, with Ronda Hughes, College of Nursing.

See entry for Stacee Lerret.

PRESENTATIONS Abir Bekhet, Ph.D., R.N., H.S.M.I., assistant professor “Mental Health of Elders in Retirement Communities: Is Loneliness a Key Factor?” Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Research Congress, Cancun, Mexico, July 11–14, 2011, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Cultural Comparison of Individual Characteristics and Relocation Factors Affecting Adjustment in American and Egyptian Older Adults,” American Psychiatric Nurses Association Annual Conference, Anaheim, Calif., Oct. 19–22, 2011, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Measuring Use of Resourcefulness Skills: Psychometric Testing of a New Scale,” American Psychiatric Nurses Association Annual Conference, Anaheim, Calif., Oct. 19–22, 2011, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “The Best Practices of Integrating Teaching and Research in Undergraduate Classrooms: How Can You Keep A Large Class Engaged in a Three Hour Class?” Manresa for Faculty Spotlight Series, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Nov. 18, 2011. “Factors Affecting Relocation Adjustment in Older Adults: Is There a Cultural Difference?” International Society of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses Annual Conference, Atlanta, March 2012, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Effects of Positive Cognitions and Resourcefulness on Autism Spectrum Disorder Caregivers’ Burden,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012, with Norah Johnson, College of Nursing, Jaclene Zauszniewski and research assistant Jiannan Zhang. “Stress and Coping in Vulnerable Populations,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012.

“Resourcefulness, Positive Cognitions and Relocation Adjustment Among Relocated Older Adults: Is There a Cultural Difference?” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012, with Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Stress and Coping: Relocation Adjustment in Older Adults,” All Saints Hospital, Milwaukee, May 7, 2012. “Cultural Comparison of Chronic Conditions, Functional Status, and Acceptance in Older African-American and White Adults,” University Hospitals Case Medical Center Nursing Research Council Poster Day and Continuing Education Conference, Cleveland, May 9, 2012, with Patricia McDonald and Jaclene Zauszniewski. “Let’s Celebrate Diversity; Do We Use Active Learning as a Strategy to Prepare Our Students for the Contemporary Workplace?” Manresa for Faculty: A Celebration of Teaching and Learning, Marquette University, Milwaukee, May 16, 2012. Lesley Boaz, Ph.D., A.P.N.P., clinical assistant professor “Using Technology to Enhance Teaching and Learning,” Manresa for Faculty: A Celebration of Teaching and Learning, Marquette University, Milwaukee, April 2012, with Tracy Schweitzer, College of Nursing, Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, College of Nursing, and Heidi Paquette, College of Nursing. Kathleen Bobay, Ph.D., R.N., N.E.A.–B.C., associate professor “A Program of Research on Nursing Staffing, Discharge Preparation and Patient Outcomes,” Marquette University College of Nursing 75th Anniversary Conference, Milwaukee, July 29, 2011, with Marianne Weiss, College of Nursing.

Marilyn Bratt, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Rural vs. Urban Nurses: Are They Different?” Rural Nurse Organization Annual Rural Nurse Conference, Binghamton, N.Y., October 2011. “Differences Between Rural and Urban Newly Licensed Nurses’ Perception of Practice and Commitment,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012. “Predictors of New Graduate Nurses’ Organizational Commitment During a Nurse Residency Program,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012, with Holly Felzer and Heather Felzer. Susan Breakwell, D.N.P., A.P.H.N.– B.C., clinical associate professor “An Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Education Program Evaluation,” Marquette University College of Nursing 75th Anniversary Conference, Milwaukee, July 27, 2011, with Margaret Faut Callahan, College of Nursing, Judith Paice and Beth Nachtsheim Bolick. “Outcomes of an Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Education Program,” National Institute of Nursing Research and Partners, Bethesda, Md., Aug. 10, 2011, with Margaret Faut Callahan, College of Nursing, Judith Paice, Rosemarie Suhayda, Steven Rothschild, Marcia Phillips, Rita Wickham and Clayton Thomason. “Outcomes of an Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Education Program,” National Academies of Practice, Arlington, Va., March 23, 2012, with Margaret Faut Callahan, College of Nursing, Judith Paice, Rosemarie Suhayda, Steven Rothschild, Stan

Lapidos, Marcia Phillips, Rita Wickham and Clayton Thomason. “Ethical Dilemmas in Pediatric End of Life Care,” Interdisciplinary Pediatric Behavioral Health Research, Milwaukee, Feb. 24, 2012, with Margaret Faut Callahan, College of Nursing, and Cheryl Petersen. “Evaluation of an Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Education Program,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012, with Margaret Faut Callahan, College of Nursing, Rosemarie Suhayda and Judith Paice. Margaret Faut Callahan, Ph.D., C.R.N.A., F.A.A.N., F.N.A.P., dean and professor “Development of a Competitive Research Proposal,” Assembly of School Faculty, American Association of Nurse Anesthetists, San Diego, February 2012. “Leading the Way in Unprecedented Times,” Nurses Week Celebration, Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare St. Joseph Hospital, Milwaukee, May 7, 2012. “Leading the Way in Unprecedented Times,” Nurses Week Celebration, Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare Elmbrook Memorial Hospital, Brookfield, Wis., May 9, 2012. “Leading the Way in Unprecedented Times,” Nurses Week Celebration, Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare All Saints Hospital, Racine, Wis., May 10, 2012. See entries for Susan Breakwell. Kelly Campbell, M.S.N., A.N.P.–B.C., C.C.M., nurse manager of the Marquette Neighborhood Health Center See entry for Norah Johnson. Diane Dressler, M.S.N., R.N., C.C.R.N., clinical assistant professor “Success with Heart Failure,” Marquette University College of Nursing 75th Anniversary Conference, Milwaukee, July 29, 2011.

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N O TA B L E A C C O M P L I S H M E N T S PRESENTATIONS continued Richard Fehring, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., professor “The Menstrual Cycle as a Vital Sign for Women’s Health,” Annual Meeting and Conference of the American Academy of Nursing, Washington, D.C., November 2011. “Efficacy of Fertility Awareness Based Methods Among Older Women” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012. Marilyn Frenn, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.E., A.N.E.F., associate professor “NLN Research Proposals: Fostering Success!” National League for Nursing, Orlando, Fla., September 2011. “NLN Nursing Education Research Priorities Think Tank and Proposal Review Rubric,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012. “Reducing Child BMI Through an Online Intervention: Is a Parent and/or Child Focus More Effective?” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012. “Youth and Parent Perspectives of Feeding Practices: What Matters Most?” International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Houston, May 2012, with Michelle Polfuss.

“Effects of Probiotic Use During Pregnancy on Lactobacillus and Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization: Pilot Results,” American College of Nurse Midwives, Long Beach, Calif., May 2012, with Leona VandeVusse, College of Nursing, and Nasia Safdar. Ronda Hughes, Ph.D., R.N., M.H.S., F.A.A.N., associate professor “Overlooking the Little Things,” CRICO Patient Safety Conference, Boston, Sept. 18, 2011. “Advanced Research,” American Nurses Credentialing Center Research Conference, Baltimore, Oct. 2, 2011. “The Association Between RN Staffing and Scheduling and UnitLevel Outcomes,” American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Magnet Conference, Baltimore, Oct. 5, 2011. See entry for Kathleen Bobay.

“Authoritative Feeding Behaviors to Reduce Child BMI through Online Interventions,” International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Austin, Texas, May 2012.

Norah L. Johnson, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P., assistant professor “Challenging Behaviors: Parent and Hospital Staff Experience of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Sigma Theta Tau International, Cancun, Mexico, July 11, 2011.

Jill Guttormson, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Patients’ Recall and Evaluation of Mechanical Ventilation,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012.

“Challenging Behaviors: Parent and Hospital Staff Experience of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Marquette University College of Nursing 75th Anniversary Conference, Milwaukee, July 29, 2011.

Kristin Haglund, Ph.D., P.N.P., F.N.P., A.P.R.N., associate professor See entry for Norah Johnson.

“Understanding Relationships in HRQL for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Marquette University College of Nursing 75th Anniversary Conference, Milwaukee, July 29, 2011.

Lisa Hanson, Ph.D., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor “A Feminist Perspective on Listening to Women: Birth Stories of Vaginal Following Previous Cesarean Delivery,” Jump Start Research Conference, Milwaukee, October 2011, with Elizabeth Hill Karbowski. “The Relationship of Nurse Attributes and Selected Organizational Characteristics to Labor Support Attitudes and Behaviors: A Mixed Methods Approach,” Jump Start Research Conference, Milwaukee, October 2011.

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“Effects of Probiotic Use During Pregnancy on Lactobacillus and Group B Streptococcus Vaginal Colonization: Pilot Results,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012, with Leona VandeVusse, College of Nursing, and Nasia Safdar.

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“Challenging Behaviors: Parent and Hospital Staff Experience of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Pediatric Nursing Conference, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Brookfield, Wis., Nov. 3, 2011. “Autism Spectrum Disorder: Parent and Hospital Staff Experiences During Acute Care Hospital Visits,” Pediatric Behavioral Health Research Conference: Exploring New Research Directions, Milwaukee, Feb. 24, 2012.

Heidi Paquette, R.N., M.S., C.N.N.P. (right)

“Supportive Family Functioning and WellBeing for Parents of Children with ASD: What Helps the Most and What Helps the Least,” Community of Practice on Autism Spectrum Disorder Developmental Disabilities Meeting, Pewaukee, Wis., March 12, 2012. “Autism Spectrum Disorder: Parent and Hospital Staff Experiences During Acute Care Hospital Visits,” National Association of Pediatric Nurses and Nurse Practitioners, San Antonio, Texas, March 28, 2012. “Dyadic Measures of the Parents’ Stress, Family Functioning and Health Related Quality of Life for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012, with graduate students Erin Lalley and Imran Amranata and Sheik Iqbal Ahamed, Klingler College of Arts and Sciences. “Effect of A Social Script iPad Application for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Undergoing Medical Imaging Procedures,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012, with graduate students Erin Lalley and Imran Amranata and Sheik Iqbal Ahamed, Klingler College of Arts and Sciences. “Autism and DSM-5: A Panel Discussion,” Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, May 2, 2012. “Transitioning New Nurses into Practice: Evaluation of A Year-Long Nursing Professional Development Program,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee, May 10, 2012.

“Challenging Behaviors: Parent and Hospital Staff Experience of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee, May 10, 2012. “Marquette Neighborhood Health Center and Marquette University: An Academic Practice Linkage for Sustainable, Accessible, High Quality Primary Care,” Wisconsin Public Health Association and the Wisconsin Association of Local Health Departments and Boards Conference, Wisconsin Dells, Wis., May 22, 2012, with Kelly Campbell, College of Nursing, and Kristin Haglund, College of Nursing. See entry for Dr. Abir Bekhet. Kelli Jones, M.S.N., R.N., clinical instructor “Infant Mortality in the African American Community: A Continuing Challenge,” Marquette University College of Nursing 75th Anniversary Conference, Milwaukee, July 29, 2011. Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert, Ph.D., R.N., associate dean for undergraduate programs and clinical associate professor “Enhancing Clinical Reasoning and Improving Patient Safety Through a Hybrid Course,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee, May 2012, with Tracy Schweitzer, College of Nursing. See entry for Lesley Boaz. Stacee Lerret, Ph.D., R.N., C.P.N.P.– A.C./P.C., clinical instructor “The Transition from Hospital to Home: Parents of Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Recipients,” American Society of Transplantation Annual Meeting, San Francisco, August 2011.

“The Transition from Hospital to Home: Parents of Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Recipients,” Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation Annual Meeting, Atlanta, September 2011. “Going Home From the Hospital: Parents of Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Recipients,” Nursing Grand Rounds, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, September 2011. “D.N.P. and Ph.D. Nursing Degrees” panel discussion, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin Annual APN Retreat, Milwaukee, September 2011. “Ready or Not, Here We Go: Transition from Hospital to Home for Parents of Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant Recipients,” Annual Wisconsin Chapter Transplant Symposium, Milwaukee, October 2011. “Evidence Based Information: How to Get It,” Annual Wisconsin Chapter Transplant Symposium, Milwaukee, October 2011, with G. Stendahl. “In My Own Words: Taking My Child Home From the Hospital After Transplant,” Annual Interdisciplinary Pediatric Behavioral Health Research Foundation, Milwaukee, February 2012. “In My Own Words: Taking My Child Home From the Hospital After Transplant,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012. “Let the Patient Grow Up! Pediatric Transition to Adult Care,” American Transplant Congress Annual Meeting, Boston, June 2012.

Josephine Mancuso, Ph.D., A.N.P.–B.C., clinical instructor “Health Literacy — What Do We Know? How Can We Improve?” Clement J. Zablocki VA Medical Center Nursing Grand Rounds, Milwaukee, Nov. 16, 2011. “D.N.P. Programs Across the United States: A Benchmark of D.N.P. Program Information,” American Association of Colleges of Nursing Doctoral Education Conference, Naples, Fla., Jan. 27, 2012. “An Exemplar to Assist States in Community Health Improvement Planning: The Estimated Health Literacy of Wisconsin Counties,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012. “Veteran Satisfaction with RN Voicemail Greeting,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee, May 10, 2012. “Assessment and Measurement of Health Literacy: A Look at the Evidence,” Building Bridges to Research Based Nursing Practice Conference, Milwaukee, May 10, 2012. Mallory O’Brien, Ph.D., clinical assistant professor “Partnering with Your Public Health Department: The Epidemiology of Violence,” COPS Annual Conference, Washington, D.C., Aug. 2, 2011. “Broad Based Partnerships: Milwaukee Homicide Review Commission,” Innovations in Criminal Justice Summit, Chicago, Sept. 29, 2011. “Violence as a Disease: Prevention through Public Health Partnerships,” International Association of Chiefs of Police Annual Conference, Chicago, Oct. 22, 2011.

“Getting the Most Out of Homicide Investigations: Spreading Milwaukee’s Success in Holistic, Partnership-based Strategies to Reduce Homicides, Nonfatal Shootings and Domestic Violence,” International Association of Chiefs of Police Annual Conference, Chicago, Oct. 23, 2011. “Law Enforcement and Public Health: Sharing Resources and Strategies to Make Communities Safer,” Public Health and Public Safety: Milwaukee Homicide Review Commission, Washington, D.C., Jan. 29, 2012. Heidi Paquette, R.N., M.S., C.N.N.P., clinical instructor See entry for Lesley Boaz. Linda Piacentine, Ph.D., A.C.N.P.– B.C., C.N.R.N., assistant professor “Spirituality, Religiosity, Depression and Anxiety in Opioid Addiction,” Sigma Theta Tau Biennial Convention, Grapevine, Texas, Nov. 1, 2011. Kathryn Schroeter, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.O.R., clinical assistant professor “Ethics in the Workplace: How to Deal with Bullying,” Northwest Wisconsin Area Health Education Center’s Second Annual Nurses Professional Development Day, Hayward, Wis., April 2012. “Staying on the Same Page: Ethical Communication Among Doctors, Nurses, and Patients,” University of Alberta Medical Bioethics Seminar, University of Alberta, Calgary, Canada, February 2012. “Ethics of Empowerment: Strategies for Nurses — Staying on the Same Page: Ethical Communication Among Doctors, Nurses, and Patients,” Midwest Ethics Committee Network, Center for Bioethics and Medical Humanities, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, January 2012. Tracy Schweitzer, Ph.D., R.N., clinical assistant professor See entry for Lesley Boaz. See entry for Kerry Kosmoski-Goepfert. Margaret Sebern, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor “Characteristics of Cardiac Patients’ and Family Caregivers’ Relationships Associated with Patients’ Self-Care and Health,” Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference, Dearborn, Mich., April 2012.

“Contribution of Satisfactory Support to Self-Care in Persons with Cardiac Disease,” Gerontological Society of America Annual Meeting, Boston, Nov. 21, 2011. Christine Shaw, Ph.D., A.N.P.–B.C., F.N.P.–B.C., associate clinical professor “Marquette Clinic for Women and Children: Nursing Practice,” Marquette University College of Nursing 75th Anniversary Conference, Milwaukee, July 29, 2011. Mary Stauber, D.N.P., R.N., A.C.N.P.– B.C., clinical instructor and ACNP option coordinator “Ortho Evaluation of the Lower Extremity,” Annual Pharmacology and Clinical Update, Lake Geneva, Wis., May 2012. Robert Topp, Ph.D., R.N., associate dean for research and professor “Effects of Prehabilitation on Quality of Life Three Months Following Total Knee Arthroplasty,” National Strength and Conditioning Association, Las Vegas, July 2011, with K. Brown, A. LaJoie, J.A. Brosk, D. Pariser, J.A. Myers and A. Swank. “The Effect of 3.5% Menthol Gel on Knee Pain and Functioning Among Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis,” TheraBand Research Advisory Council, San Francisco, July 2011, with J.A. Brosky and D. Pieschel. Leona VandeVusse, Ph.D., R.N., C.N.M., F.A.C.N.M., associate professor See entries for Lisa Hanson. Marianne Weiss, R.N., D.N.Sc., associate professor “Readiness for Hospital Discharge: A Program of Research,” Froedtert Hospital Annual Research Day, Nov. 15, 2011. See entry for Kathleen Bobay. “Youth and Parent Perspectives of Feeding Practices: What Matters Most?” International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Houston, May 2012, with Michelle Polfuss. “Authoritative Feeding Behaviors to Reduce Child BMI through Online Interventions,” International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Austin, Texas, May 2012.

Marianne Weiss, R.N., D.N.Sc. (left)

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Pre-sorted College of Nursing

Non-profit Org.

P.O. Box 1881

U.S. Postage

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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Marquette University, Office of Marketing and Communication, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881, USA.

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lessing the healing hands of tomorrow’s nurses

During Family Weekend each October, the Commitment to the Profession Ceremony invites sophomore and direct-entry nursing students to dedicate themselves to nursing in the Marquette tradition through high-quality compassionate care and nursing leadership that promotes health, healing and social justice. The centerpiece of the ceremony, which is held at Milwaukee’s landmark Church of the Gesu, features the blessing of students’ hands, celebrating their dedication to healing others.


Marquette Nurse 2012