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Marquette University

Diederich College of Communication

REBOOTING THE COLLEGE FOR THE DIGITAL AGE

2014

No. 03

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In search of solutions Finding mindfulness Rebooting the college

Marquette University

COMM

Diederich College of Communication

2014

No. 03

Comm is published for alumni, colleagues and friends of the college. We’d love to hear your feedback and story ideas for future issues. Email timothy.cigelske@marquette.edu.

NEWS 04 05 05 06 07 08 09

Honoring Phylis Ravel 20 years for Axthelm College hosts Insight Summit Series Johnston Hall, through a lens Momentous changes for Student Media Ugland awarded Fulbright to the Czech Republic Students win Midwest college Emmy

DEAN OF THE DIEDERICH COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATION Lori Bergen, Ph.D.

FEATURES

EDITORS Lori Bergen, Ph.D. Tim Cigelske, Comm ’04

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In search of solutions: The Diederich College’s fellowship in public service journalism and other innovative programs are training journalists to change the world.

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Finding mindfulness: Communication students and professionals are known for, well, communicating. But can shutting it off make their work better?

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Rebooting the future: Dean Lori Bergen, Ph.D., on changes in the college.

THE GRAPEVINE 20 22 24 26 27

Barbara Weeks Thompson, Jour ’74 Leif Brostrom, Comm ’10, and Jeff Kamin, Comm ’93 Marissa Evans, Comm ’13 Dr. Michael Havice and Dr. Lawrence Soley Nick Ashooh, Jour ’76

END NOTE 28

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Rethinking the audience’s role. By Dr. Pamela Hill Nettleton

contents

ART DIRECTOR Patrick Castro, LP/w Design Studios

Photography/Illustrations Jen Janviere, M.F.A.; Dan Johnson; Ben Smidt, Grad ’13; University Archives; CBS; NBCUniversal; Shutterstock.

CONTRIBUTORS Monique Collins, Comm ’15; Becky Dubin Jenkins; Dr. Gee Ekachai; Dr. Sarah Bonewits Feldner; Dr. Pamela Hill Nettleton; Stephen Hudson-Mairet; Chris Jenkins; Daria Kempka, Grad ’12; Debra Krajec; Herbert Lowe, Jour ’84, Grad ’14; Julie Rosene; Nicole Sweeney Etter; Liz Thorson, H Sci ’07 Grad ’11; Dr. Joyce Wolburg.

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I teach a course in writing about the arts. I bring students to galleries, the ballet, the symphony, the theatre and the opera. Even if their early education has been excellent, this is often their first Vivaldi and Shepard and Balanchine and Pollock. First, we read good critical writing about the art form of the week. Then, we go backstage, to rehearsal or to the studio to learn that art is made with effort and deliberation, that a ballerina’s feet are covered in calluses, and that a good cello costs as much as a small house. Finally, they dress in carefully pressed dresses and badly chosen ties, attend the performance, and write a critical review, à la Roger Ebert. They learn that “I didn’t like it” does not constitute insight. They learn that claims should be backed up with logic. They learn to look up rather than guess how to spell Tchaikovsky, to actually read the program notes and to stop dangling their participles. They learn that “good” is not a precise adjective and that the word “relatable” sets my teeth on edge. And, as valuable as it is to learn how to write a coherent sentence that communicates a clear idea, they learn a life lesson that is not at all about writing. They tell me about it in their final essay of the course. “Art takes us out of our comfort zones into a world we didn’t even know existed.” “While the media is telling us what to think, artists guide us to think in a different way.”

them. I believe that I not only survived, but learned to thrive and embrace a world, once thought to be another dimension by me, as my own.” The formation of the mind and heart of students is one of five themes that shaped the university’s strategic plan — a plan that envisions Marquette as a place where students examine the purpose of their lives in the context of a world larger than their own backyard. Yet how can students come to understand what is beyond their own experience? A student can’t be lectured into becoming a socially conscious and humane professional. A compassionate heart and soul can’t be formed on command. But students can make and witness art. They can stand on the stage and sit in the audience. Even if they don’t speak the language, they can see the canvas and hear the music, and, there, souls and hearts speak to each other without boundaries. It can be a brave thing to sit in an audience. It requires nothing less than being fully human. We already know how to understand each other. From the audience, we can clearly see it.

Dr. Pamela Hill Nettleton is an assistant professor in the Diederich College, where she teaches journalism, media studies and writing about the arts. She has researched gender and the media and writes books, plays and libretti.

“This was my first symphony. It will not be my last.” “Covering art is not just letting people know when some art gallery opens, but letting people know that gallery is a glimpse into the world around us, as well as our own identities.” “Here I was, a sports writer in the land of violas and pirouettes. … It was my growth mentally as a person that was tested here, wrapping my brain around the arts, beautiful creations that I had never been exposed to, and making my own sense out of

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end note

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What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others. Pericles

That quote from the Greek statesman and champion of the arts and literature, born nearly 500 years before Christ, resonates for us in the J. William and Mary Diederich College of Communication. Indeed, it resonates in a most profound way this year, when the idea of legacy is front and center. I think first of the newest legacy in the college, the tremendous gift we announced in 2013: $8.3 million from Peter and Patricia Frechette to honor Patricia’s parents, Perry and Alicia O’Brien, to establish fellowships for working journalists in public service journalism. When I first met Pete and Pat nearly three years ago, I was struck by their deep commitment to education and their sophisticated understanding of the power to “learn by doing” as a way to educate. Their philanthropy has consistently supported experiential learning, and their vision to create a legacy for Pat’s parents — one that champions new ways to support journalism and journalism education — is a game-changer for the college, our students and journalism. The story of their gift and the O’Brien Fellowship program is featured (page 10) in this issue of Comm, where you’ll see a range of other stories that reflect the power of legacy. Legacy like the commitment made in 2005, when Bill and Mary Diederich provided the transformational $28 million gift to establish the college as one of the nation’s premier communication schools. Bill’s vision to create the Weather Channel was not just a game-changer in the media world, but for us as well.

children in tow, and whose faith was central — would look to our commitment to the arts, social justice, and our students’ intellectual, emotional and spiritual transformation and say, this is good. And I hope that Mary and Bill would both be proud of the way we bring their legacy to bear for our students and colleagues in the Diederich College. Our commitment to give students the knowledge and skills to master careers in the digital age would resonate with Bill. He was an early media innovator, and we carry on his legacy of preparing students for jobs that we can’t even yet imagine. The range of stories on these pages reflects our commitment to the university’s strategic plan — to embrace new ways of teaching, learning, research and service. From Tim Cigelske’s piece on the role of mindfulness in teaching to Dr. Pamela Hill Nettleton’s essay on teaching students to be critical writers about culture, you’ll see some of these ways that we support our students to reach their full potential. There is one last legacy that’s front of mind, our dear friend and colleague Phylis Ravel, who passed away in 2012. Digital Media and Performing Arts Department Chair Stephen Hudson-Mairet writes eloquently about Ravel in this issue, and I know her commitment to theatre for social justice will continue to resonate. Her legacy is carved not on marble, but on the hearts of her colleagues and students. I doubt that any of these folks ever thought much about a legacy. But in the way they lived, they leave us with the inspiration to continue their work, to champion their causes and to find our own mindful ways to focus on what matters.

And yet it is the quiet legacy of his wife that has been on our minds so much in this year. Mary passed away in September 2012, and as the Diederich family — 65-plus strong — gathered with us to celebrate her legacy, I was reminded of how that wonderful partnership of Bill and Mary is a reflection of all that we as a college have become. Mary’s faith, her love of music, her gentle touch of graciousness, and care with family and strangers remind us that the formation of mind and heart reveals our true selves and highest purpose. I hope that Mary — who played viola in two orchestras, raised 13 children, made each of them feel special by taking them to concerts and plays, found time to visit nursing homes with

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Lori Bergen, Ph.D., Dean of the Diederich College of Communication and William R. Burleigh and E.W. Scripps Professor

letter from the dean

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Honoring Phylis Ravel Phylis Ravel, artistic associate professor in the Department of Theatre Arts, passed away in 2012 after a long and influential Marquette career. Today, her legacy lives on. Theatre arts faculty, staff and alumni created the Phylis Ravel Theatre and Social Justice Fund to honor the woman who was the driving force behind the department’s social justice programming. “It’s fitting that the fund established in her honor supports social awareness activities and the pursuit of justice through theatre,” says Stephen Hudson-Mairet, chair of digital media and performing arts. “The impact of Phylis Ravel on this program is immeasurable. She was a dear friend, mentor and teacher for all of us.” The fund has raised more than half of its $50,000 endowment goal. Once fully endowed, it will be used to sustain programs such as student and faculty projects and research, departmental programming and initiatives, educational forums, speakers, faculty and student development, and community outreach programs. Many credit Ravel, who arrived at Marquette in 1997, with reviving the university’s theatre program. As department chair, artistic director, professor and director of numerous productions, she excelled in exploring social justice issues. “I look forward to upholding her legacy by continuing the socially relevant work that she brought to campus,” Hudson-Mairet says.

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Axthelm Scholarship, Lecture celebrate 20 years Christopher Chavez was struck with one thought when he and Ben Greene were named recipients of this year’s Axthelm Memorial Scholarships. “Wow. I’ve got some big shoes to fill,” the junior journalism major says. “Marquette has produced some great journalism talent, and I hope to continue that by building my own legacy.” He and Greene are well on their way. Last summer, Chavez traveled to Europe and interviewed Olympians such as Usain Bolt while covering track and field for flotrack.org. This summer, he will be joining the prestigious Sports Journalism Institute. Greene, also a junior, helped pioneer the college’s new digital-first student media model as executive sports editor of Marquette Wire (marquettewire.org). He also covered the men’s lacrosse team’s inaugural season as The Marquette Tribune’s assistant news editor. The winners joined journalism students for private and public events with Sports Illustrated writer and CBS college basketball analyst Seth Davis, the speaker at this year’s Axthelm Memorial Lecture, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary as part of the Pete and Bonnie Axthelm Memorial program. Established in 1994, the program celebrates the lives of Pete Axthelm, a well-known sports journalist, and his sister, Bonnie. Davis shared insider tips, career advice and how he reported for his new book about legendary men’s college basketball coach

John Wooden. He hung out with students — and took countless photos — and tweeted that he had fulfilled his campus bucket list. Davis also shared stories about his father’s friendship with Pete Axthelm, whose family made the 20 years of scholarship and speakers possible. Pete’s sister, Nancy, joined Davis and shared how her brother’s friendship with Al McGuire drew them into a long relationship with Marquette. Many notable journalists have visited campus as Axthelm Lecture speakers, including ESPN’s NFL insider Adam Schefter (2013), CBS sportscaster Dick Enberg (2012), USA Today columnist Christine Brennan (2009), and alumnus and Sports Illustrated writer Steven Rushin (2003), among many others. The Axthelm Scholarship has been awarded to more than 20 outstanding students interested in sports journalism careers.

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NEW INSIGHT After a few years of successfully hosting annual conferences in strategic communication, the Diederich College branded the events as the Insight Summit Series. The events’ goal? To offer leadership to those in various communication careers. The Insight Summit Series is a collection of three annual events — the PR + Social Media Summit, Corporate Communication Summit, and Digital Advertising Summit — and reflects three majors in the Department of Strategic Communication. • The PR + Social Media Summit, sponsored by 7Summits, is a one-day conference each October with a focus on the convergence of public relations and social media. The event is designed for agency executives, marketing and PR professionals, brand managers, students, and corporate communication professionals. • The Corporate Communication Commons, held each spring, provides an opportunity for corporate communication thought leaders and scholars to share knowledge and discuss the relationship between corporations and society and issues that affect and influence corporate identity, shared values and stakeholder trust. The 2014 sponsors were Northwestern Mutual, Rockwell Automation, Charleston Orwig and APCO Worldwide.

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• The Digital Advertising Summit, held each spring, focuses on the future of digital advertising and marketing, featuring thought leaders from the industry sharing their digital marketing experience and insights. Nearly 500 professionals and students attended the one-day event in 2013, co-sponsored by Laughlin Constable. Proceeds from the events benefit a scholarship fund for students in the Department of Strategic Communication. For more information, visit insightsummitseries.com.

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Johnston Hall, through a lens Johnston Hall’s hallways became part art gallery when they housed unique photo exhibits from alumni who are professional photographers. The Boyz are back in Town featured photographers Kevin Pauly and Matt Dixon, both Comm ’10. Pauly interned for three years as a photographer in Marquette’s Instructional Media Center, where he learned to tell a story in just a single frame. “Instead of overposing and controlling every little detail of a shot, I like to provide general suggestions and let the moments happen,” Pauly says. After graduating in communication studies, Dixon worked as a staff photographer at The Grand Island Independent in Nebraska. “I’ve learned to talk to anyone or try anything when I have a camera – or two or three – in my hand,” he says. “I’m always looking to learn about the world around me.”

Students were seen crowded around the images of acclaimed photojournalist Allan Tannenbaum. His work showcased the 1970s New York rock ’n’ roll scene, the tragedies of the 9/11 disasters and conflict zones around the world. Tannenbaum shared his stories, then a group of students traveled to see him at his New York studio. This led to the production Diederich Ideas: Life Through a Lens — go.mu.edu/diederich-ideas — a program focusing on Tannenbaum’s experiences as a photojournalist and fine art photographer. Johnston Hall also became home to the works of photographer Rev. Don Doll, S.J. His images of Jesuits helping tsunami victims in Southern India and Sri Lanka, along with captivating photographs of children from conflict zones around the world, brought Marquette’s mission of social justice into focus. “Jesuits have a mission — faith doing justice,” Father Doll says. “I photograph to tell the stories of people who have no voice. Hopefully I can help others understand and work to change unjust social structures.”

Photographs of rock stars, celebrities and historical images from around the world were on exhibit during the spring semester.

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Momentous changes for Student Media

The 24 students gathered in a Johnston Hall conference room in May 2013 — including three Skyped in from overseas — knew they were embarking on something momentous. “We all know it’s going to be a challenge for next year,” Erin Caughey, Comm ’14, said at the time. “But also it’s going to be an opportunity.” The meeting of student media leaders followed months of restructuring to enhance greater collaboration among The Marquette Tribune, The Marquette Journal, MUTV, WMUR, and interactive and advertising branches. It also ushered in a digital-first mindset aimed at better matching the realities expected of professional journalists. For decades, the student newspaper, magazine, television and radio staffs operated separately. Now, a group of executive editors coordinates newsgathering and opinion and integrates reporters, photographers and copy editors. Caughey led the operation as general manager. But not everyone welcomed the changes approved by the university’s student media board. The Tribune’s final editorial of the year criticized

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See the difference

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them as, among other things, jeopardizing journalism students’ abilities to become specialists. At that May 2013 meeting, student leaders noted opportunities, including expanding skill sets, learning to decide which medium is best to cover a story and creating more expansive coverage. The challenges included communicating, coordinating, defining the roles of reporters, ensuring quality amid change and adapting to new learning curves. All eyes were glued to Greg Borowski, Jour ’89, the student media board’s alumni representative who encouraged the leaders. Borowski, assistant managing editor for projects and investigations at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, noted that his and other newsrooms went through such changes and urged the students to be patient and keep an open mind. He also encouraged them to collaborate, share successes and learn from their mistakes. “I’m not all that nervous about it,” he told them at the time. “All the challenges you listed can be anticipated and be resolved.”

Do you know a fellow alumnus/a who, through personal or professional achievements, embodies the mission of Marquette? Please nominate him or her for an Alumni National Award. View the awards criteria at go.mu.edu/awardscriteria, visit the online nomination form at go.mu.edu/munominate and save the date. The event is held every April.

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Ugland awarded Fulbright to the Czech Republic Throughout its history, the United States has grappled with tension between free press rights and national security. Today, the debate over technology surveillance is a political hot-button issue. But it’s not just occurring in America. As a Fulbright scholar for spring 2014, Dr. Erik Ugland saw firsthand how relatively young democracies like the Czech Republic struggle with reconciling the rights of the press with interests of the state. “Central Europe is a fascinating part of the world, “ Ugland says. “It is also an ideal place to study how countries with relatively young constitutional histories are dealing with the social and legal pressures created by new technology.” Ugland, a Diederich College associate professor, was awarded a dual faculty appointment at Masaryk University in Brno. He taught a course in media law at the Institute of Law and Technology, along with a course on the political economy of mass media. During his time in Brno, he also spent time researching European law and policy, particularly the rights of citizens and journalists to

gather news. This builds upon his current research, which focuses on interpretations of the free press provisions of the European Convention on Human Rights. Ugland was thrilled to have the opportunity to experience another culture and noted that living in Brno was a great location for travel in Europe because it’s within four hours of several major cities, including Vienna; Prague; Bratislava, Slovakia; Krakow, Poland; and Budapest, Hungary. Ugland’s Fulbright in the Czech Republic also offered an opportunity for adventure for his family. His children, Gus and Ella, attended an international school in Brno, and his wife, Missy, continued to operate her consulting business, which focuses on grant writing and special projects. After the semester ended, they began traveling to other countries, including Norway, where they planned to meet some distant relatives and visit their ancestors’ family farm. To accommodate his research and travel, Ugland stepped down from a three-year appointment as associate dean for graduate studies and research to resume the role of faculty member in the Diederich College.

Dr. Erik Ugland

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STUDENTS WIN MIDWEST COLLEGE EMMY

A student production of Diederich Ideas: Reporting from the Front Line received a 2012 college Emmy from the Chicago/Midwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. The program featured combat journalist James Foley, Arts ’96, who was first taken captive in Libya in 2011 and released more than 40 days later. He spoke candidly about his passion for reporting from the front lines. Shortly after visiting campus in late 2011, Foley traveled to report on conflict in Syria. He disappeared in the northwest part of the country in November 2012. Other student productions took home awards. What’s So Funny? received a first-place award from the Broadcasting Education Association. The half-hour program was a behind-the-scenes view of the inner workings of what makes people laugh and brought together comedians Danny Pudi, Comm ’01; Pat Finn, Sp ’87; Chris Marrs, Comm ’98; Kevin Farley, Bus Ad ’98; and John Farley, the brother of Kevin and the late Chris Farley, Sp ’86. 37 Days and Counting won a 2013 First-place Student Award for Excellence from the Wisconsin Broadcasters Association. A student crew produced a documentary that followed two undecided first-time voters during the final 37 days before the 2012 presidential election. The crew interviewed Washington, D.C., media and political experts to glean insights about what the media was doing to attract young voters in the changing media landscape. Diederich Ideas students are working on sports.edu — go.mu.edu/diederich-sports — which features exclusive interviews with high-profile athletes, including the Milwaukee Brewers’ Ryan Braun; former Green Bay Packers Charles Woodson and Dr. George Koonce, Grad ’12; and ESPN’s Jay Bilas and Adam Schefter.

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The Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service is an awardwinning online source for objective, professional multimedia reporting on urban issues in 17 Milwaukee communities. NNS covers stories that are important to the people who live, work and serve in city neighborhoods, on topics such as education, public safety, economic development, health and wellness, the environment, recreation, employment, youth development, and housing. The news service has won several awards for excellence since its launch in 2011, including a regional Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association (2012) and two silver awards from the Milwaukee Press Club (2013 and 2014). A project of the United Neighborhood Centers of Milwaukee and the Diederich College of Communication at Marquette University, the NNS traces its origins to the Zilber Neighborhood Initiative.

SEE MORE AT MILWAUKEENNS.ORG.

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IN SEARCH OF SOLUTIONS

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THE O’BRIEN FELLOWSHIP IN PUBLIC SERVICE JOURNALISM AND OTHER INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS IN THE DIEDERICH COLLEGE ARE TRAINING JOURNALISTS TO CHANGE THE WORLD. By Nicole Sweeney Etter

In January 2013, Kayla Parker, Grad ’14, set out in a tiny Belgian town, armed with recording equipment, a notebook and a mission.

Now, Marquette’s challenge is to teach today’s student journalists to ethically tackle those same issues with their writing and multimedia in a time- and budget-crunched media landscape.

She wasn’t there to sightsee. Parker traveled more than 4,000 miles with a Marquette team determined to uncover the secret of the town’s 700-year-old success in treating the mentally ill.

Fortunately, today’s students have experienced guides to help them. Helping to begin the fellowship program during the 2012–13 academic year, a group of Diederich College students delved into the complex issues of mental health with an expert guide: Meg Kissinger, an award-winning investigative reporter for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

“The whole motto behind Marquette is ‘Be The Difference,’ and they really instill it,” Parker says. “One thinks, ‘How can my project help the world?’ That’s just the culture of Marquette.” Parker’s trip is just one example of how the Diederich College is training the next generation of journalists to live out Marquette’s mission. The college is already making a mark in the growing field of solutions journalism, defined as rigorous and compelling reporting about responses to social problems. This includes the Perry and Alicia O’Brien Fellowship in Public Service Journalism, made possible by an $8.3 million gift from Peter and Patricia Frechette in honor of Patricia’s alumni parents. Patricia’s father, Perry O’Brien, Jour ’36, was a longtime reporter and photographer for the Janesville Daily Gazette in Wisconsin. “I think it’s a thrilling opportunity to even have the possibility of affording something like this to students,” says Dr. Karen Slattery, an associate professor of journalism and media studies. “They get to work with people doing incredibly powerful journalism.” A thirst for social justice has always run strong in journalism. It inspires people to commit to a career that entails long hours and relentless deadlines for modest pay. From muckraking pioneers to today’s watchdog reporters, journalists have always played a critical role in highlighting important social issues.

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Kissinger’s work as the inaugural O’Brien Fellow based in the college resulted in “Chronic Crisis: A System That Doesn’t Heal,” a heralded series of Journal Sentinel stories about Milwaukee County’s mental health failures — as well as possible solutions from elsewhere.

“It really opens up the university’s resources to a reporter,” Slattery says. The series was recognized in 2014 with the prestigious George Polk Award for her investigative reporting. Judges said “Chronic Crisis” stories were “so revelatory, analytical and conclusive that they amount to a definitive study of a system that barely functions.” “My mission was to produce a project that would reflect public service journalism,” Kissinger says, “playing into Marquette’s credo of being men and women for others and the mission of all reporters to shine a light on a problem and really focus on powering past just what the problem is — but what are the solutions?” Kissinger says.

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Kissinger, whose reporting took her to California, Texas, Ohio, Tennessee and Pennsylvania, in addition to Belgium, says she was especially inspired by the talk New York Times reporter David Bornstein gave about solutions journalism at Marquette during her time on campus. “I had that very much in mind as I was working on this yearlong project,” she says. Diederich College Dean Lori Bergen, Ph.D., and members of the journalism faculty embraced the opportunity to partner with the Journal Sentinel to host a public service journalism fellow as a way to free up a reporter to work in depth on a project. It’s a rare opportunity for journalists and students because only a handful of similar journalism fellowships exist nationwide, including at Harvard University, Stanford University and the University of Michigan. “It really opens up the university’s resources to a reporter,” Slattery says. That includes student journalists eager to sign on as research assistants and contribute pieces of the story. Once a week, a group of students met with Kissinger and, occasionally, Greg Borowski, Comm ’89, the Journal Sentinel’s assistant managing editor for projects and investigations. “The students really impressed me with how open-minded they were and how fair,” Kissinger says. “It was not this ‘gotcha’ approach. They were appropriately skeptical but very open to telling a complete story and looking for ways to help.” Case in point: Early on, the team identified a compelling story about a homeless man with mental illness and his relationship with his sister. But it eventually became clear that the man

THE 2013–14 O’BRIEN FELLOWS O’Brien Fellows are fully funded and return to their newsrooms with a world-class journalism project and a paid intern for the next summer. In addition, each Fellow’s reporting and projects are presented at an annual conference held the next fall at the university. For more information about becoming an O’Brien Fellow, visit marquette.edu/ comm/obrien-fellowship.

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wasn’t comfortable being identified as having a mental illness and that the story would do more harm than help. Students understood and respected that, and the team decided not to pursue the story, Kissinger says. Kyle Hill, Grad ’13, who helped collect and analyze data on Milwaukee County’s mental health system, appreciated the chance to work with Kissinger. “It was so much more involved than I ever thought it would be,” says Hill, who has since started freelancing for Scientific American, Popular Science, Wired and slate.com. “Getting that experience and getting more confidence to work with numbers helped propel me into doing more professional science writing.” Parker helped scrutinize the budget of Milwaukee County’s Behavioral Health Division. Then she traveled to Geel, Belgium, with a team that included other students and was led by Kissinger and Danielle Beverly, the college’s professional in residence in digital media. The cobblestone-lined Belgian town has an unusual claim to fame. For the past 700 years, it has had a fostering program for the mentally ill and disabled. Families take in patients and help them find work. The Diederich College team followed a family for a day, and the Journal Sentinel included the seven-minute documentary as part of “Chronic Crisis.” (go.mu.edu/belgium). Now, Parker is so hooked on the topic that she’s working on her own documentary project about mental health. This fellowship program also opened her eyes to what she hopes will be a career concentrating on public service journalism. The profession, she discovered, is more than just facts and figures. “Journalism,” she says, “can make a change in the world.”

HAL BERNTON The Seattle Times

Hal Bernton has been a reporter with The Seattle Times since 2000. He received the Gerald R. Ford Prize for national defense reporting in 2013 and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2003 for his work with other Times reporters on “The Terrorist Within.” In 1989, he was part of a reporting team that won a Pulitzer for an Anchorage Daily News series about Alaska’s native peoples.

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STUDENTS LEARN FROM PROFESSIONALS — AND DOING By Herbert Lowe, Jour ’84, Grad ’14

Marquette students contributed to world-class reporting projects produced by the three journalists — Hal Bernton, Dan Egan and Lillian Thomas — who spent the 2013–14 academic year as O’Brien Fellows in the Diederich College. In January, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel twice published reports by Egan stemming from a 10,000-page, U.S. government study about the Great Lakes. His fellowship focused on investigating threats to the lakes and the government’s efforts to protect them. The Journal Sentinel also published as part of Egan’s reporting an interactive timeline produced by three students featuring their research pertaining to Asian carp and their influence on the Chicago River and Great Lakes Basin. One of the students, senior Erin Caughey, also created additional interactive work focusing on the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Bernton’s three-part “Losing Ground: The Struggle to Reduce CO2” series, published in May by The Seattle Times, kicked off his reporting on the challenges of reducing carbon emissions. In December, graduate student Zhu Ye, a native of China, accompanied Bernton to Inner Mongolia, where she served as translator, photographer and videographer during two weeks of reporting amid brutal weather. Ye even narrates two videos she produced as part of “Losing Ground.” The Times also intends to publish stories evolving in part from a reporting trip Bernton took with two undergraduate journalism students last fall to Texas and the efforts of additional students to look at attempts to convince young people in Wisconsin that climate change is real. Four journalism students helped Thomas produce a series of stories for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. She focused on challenges associated with health care in low-income neighborhoods and initiatives that seek to improve care for underserved patients. The students helped with the research and created two infographics; one student even wrote a short piece the Post-Gazette published. Thomas also teamed with 12 students in an online news design course taught by adjunct instructor Daria Kempka, Grad ‘12, and the staff of the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service, to create an interactive special report looking at how low-income patients manage chronic diabetes. Both the news service and the Journal Sentinel published the collaboration on their websites.

DAN EGAN

LILLIAN THOMAS

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Dan Egan has covered the Great Lakes for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel since 2003. His 2012 series “Deep Trouble,” which explored the effort to prevent Asian carp from reaching the lakes, was a Pulitzer Prize finalist and earned an AAAS Kavil Science Journalism Award in 2013. Also a Pulitzer finalist in 2010, Egan earned the Oakes Award for environmental journalism in 2006 and has received four National Headliner Awards.

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Lillian Thomas is assistant managing editor of special projects at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Since late 2012, the investigative team she leads has broken dozens of stories about a federal investigation of the city of Pittsburgh that led to charges against the police chief, who resigned, and went on to focus on the city’s mayor. Thomas has also been a reporter, city editor and Sunday editor for the Post-Gazette.

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Fiction nissinc tatiam ipsunturiae volorum fuga. Itatem fuga. Aborehe ntiusam volut que volorio. Itas explites nos dolorrum num ipsae quias minim quis eatisto et vollaut prae. .Ro voleceprem. Nam sinvenist quuntum enimus, omniti omnit hit, volluptatem facesed mossimo volupta corendi psapiduciam et as ea quature icius, et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur. Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Officia nam eratus ratiation nulpa que expliquia volum que volorendam fugia sus, im faccus volupta qui iusdam sedi doloratio ea si quae voluptur. Us eni doloria cum re cum eicae cus, cumquo molorum res exerspit excea niae es aut il mi, nonsequae nam de velibus eos res plit et eum re evel ipsus reped quid eum hici aut remosa verum et ulluptas expedicae niminuste plita net qui arum accus maion pedi quias molectur moleniendi con re finding veliquamus et rempell ignienima num fuga. Nemque latur, optatem volentur, cuptatio et quibera consecuptas modigent dem cuscidi am eatur magnim rero ipsum fugita dolore voluptatium nos et inum, ut am ium rectia nihitiu ntorem suntior runtiati ut landae. Udae nossum, secaborro volupta non re pra ipsam quo ipsam voloriat. , et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur? Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Fiction nissinc tatiam ipsunturiae volorum fuga. Itatem fuga. Aborehe ntiusam volut que volorio. Itas explites nos dolorrum num ipsae quias finding minim quis eatisto et vollaut prae. .Ro voleceprem. Nam sinvenist quuntum enimus, omniti omnit hit, volluptatem facesed mossimo volupta corendi psapiduciam et as ea quature icius, et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur. Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Officia nam eratus ratiation nulpa que expliquia volum que volorendam fugia sus, im faccus volupta qui iusdam sedi doloratio ea si quae voluptur. Us eni doloria cum re cum eicae cus, cumquo molorum res exerspit excea niae es aut il mi, nonsequae nam de velibus eos res plit et eum re evel ipsus reped quid eum hici aut remosa verum et ulluptas expedicae niminuste plita net qui arum accus maion pedi quias molectur moleniendi con re finding veliquamus et rempell ignienima num fuga. Nemque latur, optatem volentur, cuptatio et quibera consecuptas modigent nos mindfulness et inum, ut am ium rectia nihitiu ntorem suntior runtiati ut landae. Udae nossum, secaborro volupta non re pra ipsam quo ipsam voloriat.et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur? Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Fiction nissinc tatiam ipsunturiae volorum fuga. Itatem fuga. Aborehe ntiusam volut que volorio. Itas explites nos dolorrum num ipsae quias minim quis eatisto et vollaut prae. .Ro voleceprem. Nam sinvenist quuntum enimus, omniti omnit hit, volluptatem facesed mossimo volupta corendi psapiduciam et as ea quature icius, et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur. Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Officia nam eratus ratiation nulpa que expliquia volum que volorendam fugia sus, im faccus volupta qui iusdam sedi doloratio ea si quae voluptur. Us eni doloria cum re cum eicae cus, cumquo molorum res exerspit excea niae es aut il mi, nonsequae nam de velibus eos res plit et eum re evel ipsus reped quid eum hici aut remosa verum et ulluptas expedicae niminuste plita net qui arum accus maion pedi quias molectur moleniendi con re finding veliquamus et rempell ignienima num fuga. Nemque latur, optatem volentur, cuptatio et quibera consecuptas modigent dem cuscidi am eatur magnim rero ipsum fugita dolore voluptatium nos et inum, ut am ium rectia nihitiu ntorem suntior runtiati ut landae. Udae nossum, secaborro volupta non re pra ipsam quo ipsam voloriat. , et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur? Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Fiction nissinc tatiam ipsunturiae volorum fuga. Itatem fuga. Aborehe ntiusam volut que volorio. Itas explites nos dolorrum num ipsae quias minim quis eatisto et vollaut prae. .Ro voleceprem. Nam sinvenist quuntum enimus, omniti omnit hit, volluptatem facesed mossimo volupta corendi psapiduciam et as ea quature icius, et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur. Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Officia nam eratus ratiation nulpa que expliquia volum que volorendam fugia sus, im faccus volupta qui iusdam sedi doloratio ea si quae voluptur. Us eni doloria cum re cum eicae cus, cumquo molorum res exerspit excea niae es aut il mi, nonsequae nam de velibus eos res plit et eum re evel ipsus reped quid eum hici aut remosa verum et ulluptas expedicae niminuste plita net qui arum accus maion pedi quias molectur moleniendi con re finding veliquamus et rempell ignienima num fuga. Nemque latur, optatem volentur, cuptatio et quibera consecuptas modigent dem cuscidi am eatur magnim rero ipsum fugita dolore voluptatium nos et inum, ut am ium rectia nihitiu ntorem suntior runtiati ut landae. Udae nossum, secaborro volupta non re pra ipsam quo ipsam voloriat. , et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur? Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Fiction nissinc tatiam ipsunturiae volorum fuga. Itatem fuga. Aborehe ntiusam volut que volorio. Itas explites nos dolorrum num ipsae quias minim quis eatisto et vollaut prae. .Ro voleceprem. Nam sinvenist quuntum enimus, omniti omnit hit, volluptatem facesed mossimo volupta corendi psapiduciam et as ea quature icius, et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur. Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Officia nam eratus ratiation nulpa que expliquia volum que volorendam fugia sus, im faccus volupta qui iusdam sedi doloratio ea si quae voluptur. Us eni doloria cum re cum eicae cus, cumquo molorum res exerspit excea niae es aut il mi, nonsequae nam de velibus eos res plit et eum re evel ipsus reped quid eum hici aut remosa verum et ulluptas expedicae niminuste plita net qui arum accus maion pedi quias molectur moleniendi con re finding veliquamus et rempell ignienima num fuga. Nemque latur, optatem volentur, cuptatio et quibera consecuptas modigent dem cuscidi am eatur magnim rero ipsum fugita dolore voluptatium nos et inum, ut am ium rectia nihitiu ntorem suntior runtiati ut landae. Udae nossum, secaborro volupta non re pra ipsam quo ipsam voloriat. , et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur? Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Fiction nissinc tatiam ipsunturiae volorum fuga. Itatem fuga. Aborehe ntiusam volut que volorio. Itas explites nos dolorrum num ipsae quias minim quis eatisto et vollaut prae. .Ro voleceprem. Nam sinvenist quuntum enimus, omniti omnit hit, volluptatem facesed mossimo volupta corendi psapiduciam et as ea quature icius, et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur. Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Officia nam eratus ratiation nulpa que expliquia volum que volorendam fugia sus, im faccus volupta qui iusdam sedi doloratio ea si quae voluptur. Us eni doloria cum re cum eicae cus, cumquo molorum res exerspit excea niae es aut il mi, nonsequae nam de velibus eos res plit et eum re evel ipsus reped quid eum hici aut remosa verum et ulluptas expedicae niminuste plita net qui arum accus maion pedi quias molectur moleniendi con re finding veliquamus et rempell ignienima num fuga. Nemque latur, optatem volentur, cuptatio et quibera consecuptas modigent dem cuscidi am eatur magnim rero ipsum fugita dolore voluptatium nos et inum, ut am ium rectia nihitiu ntorem suntior runtiati ut landae. Udae nossum, secaborro volupta non re pra ipsam quo ipsam voloriat. , et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur? Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Fiction nissinc tatiam ipsunturiae volorum fuga. Itatem fuga. Aborehe ntiusam volut que volorio. Itas explites nos dolorrum num ipsae quias minim quis eatisto et vollaut prae. .Ro voleceprem. Nam sinvenist quuntum enimus, omniti omnit hit, volluptatem facesed mossimo volupta corendi psapiduciam et as ea quature icius, et quam faccaborro quis seque nim volorem re volore, quo dolut estem diora in peditios mo dit is pe es sequi dolum doluptis veni iur. Ur, sequiassitem faceatibea consend ipsandanis everio et ommossequo et ut omnit doluptatia simodis eatquas ad essi acea cullupt iorporrum sequi volupta turibus ea delestiur reiure as et aut harumquibus enisitate comnit ipsum re cum is excea denis verum rem fugiatia quo comniet renimus aut qui cum aliqui quaturiasi inim anis accat elessum est, net accaborae cuscium eaque volor apitio il exerit anihit perro coratiossunt et, officie nditia quiae nobit, as audantio esse poribus, sanda quam, to eat dolorro raturita dolo blabore strunte optate sim aut atureruptis exerspiet officimodit lam aut harias alit officiendae dia conseditium faccusapit, et velescides reniet quam eturio. Officia nam eratus ratiation nulpa que expliquia volum que volorendam fugia sus, im faccus volupta qui iusdam sedi doloratio ea si quae voluptur. Us eni doloria cum re cum eicae cus, cumquo molorum res exerspit excea niae es aut il mi, nonsequae nam de velibus eos res plit et eum re evel ipsus reped quid eum hici aut remosa verum et ulluptas expedicae niminuste plita net qui arum accus maion pedi quias molectur moleniendi con re finding veliquamus et rempell ignienima num fuga. Nemque latur, optatem volentur, cuptatio et quibera consecuptas modigent dem cuscidi am eatur magnim rero ipsum fugita dolore voluptatium nos et inum, ut am ium rectia nihitiu ntorem suntior runtiati ut landae. Udae nossum, secaborro volupta non re pra ipsam quo ipsam

14

finding mindfulness

diederich.marquette.edu

By Tim Cigelske, Comm ’04

COMMUNICATION STUDENTS AND PROFESSIONALS ARE KNOWN FOR, WELL, COMMUNICATING. BUT CAN SHUTTING IT OFF MAKE THEIR WORK BETTER? Admit it. There are stereotypes — flattering and unflattering — for those in the communication field. There’s the confident and assertive news anchor. The exuberant theatre major. The aggressive print reporter asking tough questions. The PR pro constantly attending events and pitching for his client. The extroverted CEO. Whether these stereotypes are true, they all share a commonality: They assume those in the communication field thrive in a world of endless commotion. In other words, the world thinks communication professionals don’t know how to shut up or shut it off.

diederich.marquette.edu

But, increasingly, business is getting in touch with its inner introvert. Silence is gaining value, being bolstered with new research and attention like Susan Cain’s best-selling book Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. With its Jesuit foundations, Marquette is suited to nurture the quieter side of communication. It was St. Ignatius, after all, who created the Examen to review the day’s events, harness emotions, identify patterns and channel energy. Mindfulness is part of the DNA of the university — and the Diederich College.

finding mindfulness

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Walk into Dr. Jean Grow’s Communications Ethics classroom, for example, and you’ll see contemplation in action. That’s because Grow has her students meditate at the beginning of each class. Last fall, she also led 20-minute meditation sessions open to the university community. “At first blush, this might sound unrelated to media ethics,” she says. “But Harvard Medical School is using it. If the practice of mindful meditation can be used to enhance healing, then I have to believe it will enhance decision-making.” Grow refers to studies that show that mediation and its related state of “mindfulness” can result in better memory, creativeness and communication. Research has found that undergraduates who participated in mindfulness training had decreased mindwandering and increased memory capacity and performed better on a reading comprehension test, according to the journal Psychological Science. Grow puts those findings into practice in her class by starting with a reading from one of the world’s seven spiritual traditions followed by a minute of silence. She also gives her students a weeklong, once-daily assignment: Set a timer, and set aside some quiet time to observe and reflect. “I want to set the tone right away that mindfulness really matters,” she says. “It’s about opening their minds but also slowing them down so they can learn.”

“In order to be open to creativity, one must have the capacity for constructive use of solitude. One must overcome the fear of being alone.” Rollo May

At first, some students were skeptical. But when they debriefed at the end of the semester, many reported that their quiet reflections became an oasis they looked forward to and a resource to help them make decisions. “When I was first introduced to the concept, I was puzzled. How did mindfulness relate to media ethics?” one student wrote on Grow’s class blog, ethicalaction.wordpress.com. “But as I dissected the idea more, it made some sense. Instead of just contributing to the media hype and the typicality of the news cycle, practitioners need to be aware of the content they distribute to the masses, especially today.” At the end of the semester, students reported that they continued with Grow’s assignments — even after it was over and they weren’t graded on it. Being contemplative may help communicators in the long term beyond the ability to learn, according to Dr. Jeremy Fyke, who teaches communication studies and strategic communication. Fyke’s dissertation and ongoing research focus on leadership development, managing conflict and providing feedback. His findings show that leaders aren’t created simply by accumulating skills like public speaking. Becoming a leader entails developing a higher level of thinking. And that requires personal reflection, he says.

16

finding mindfulness

diederich.marquette.edu

“Everybody always talks about the importance of speed, speed, speed, speed,” Fyke says. “But when everyone is moving too fast, slowing down becomes a competitive advantage. Quiet and reflection can be the new way of communicating.” Of course, it can be easier said than done to develop mindfulness in a competitive business world, a communication industry with pressure to be first and consumers who crave fresh content. Which is why Marquette offers insight into communication strategies that have stood the test of time. Some of the techniques Grow and Fyke use in the classroom are founded in sessions led by Dr. Susan Mountin, Jour ’71, Grad ’94, director of Manresa for Faculty in the Center for Teaching and Learning. Mountin’s role includes training faculty about the principles of Jesuit pedagogy, which places a high importance on contemplative practices. “There is so much noise in our society,” she says. “Helping people focus, go deeper and create an element of quiet in the classroom is important in every discipline.” To demonstrate the power of senses without speaking, Mountin adapted an exercise from St. Ignatius and had professors take five minutes to peel and eat a tangerine. She encouraged them to take in the colors and textures, tart smells, sweet tastes, and what they were feeling. “This is how we learn to pay attention,” she says. This lesson was so important to Fyke that he used the exercise to kick off his consulting class. This helped him demonstrate that it’s first necessary to be quiet and take in one’s surroundings to be an effective communicator. “A communication consultant needs to be a curious and enquiring observer,” he says. “When you spend five minutes peeling and eating a clementine, you learn to notice what’s around you.”

diederich.marquette.edu

This wasn’t a one-time practice for Fyke. For the rest of the course, he frequently held up a clementine during class to bring students back to the basics. At the end of the semester, several students remarked that the exercises helped them build a framework for learning to be a consultant. Fyke also thinks contemplative practices — he tries to engage in centering prayer for 20 minutes twice a day — help him be a more effective classroom instructor. He says he can be more comfortable with silence when asking questions and more focused on material when lecturing.

“When people are centered, they are much more resourceful. It really does help from decision-making to how you explain material.” “When people are centered, they are much more resourceful,” he says. “It really does help from decision-making to how you explain material.” When the business of the semester ended, Fyke used the time for further reflection at a three-day retreat at a Kentucky monastery. He brought a copy of Quiet and read about the power of silence. While preparing for his trip, he told Mountin of his intentions. She responded with some sage advice. “She reminded me to make sure you spend time actually being quiet, not just reading about being quiet,” he says.

finding mindfulness

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REBOOTING THE COLLEGE  FOR THE DIGITAL AGE A Q&A with Dean Lori Bergen, Ph.D.

Standing outside Johnston Hall, you can’t help but be struck by the contradiction. One of Marquette’s oldest buildings looks exactly the way it did for decades when it served as training ground to generations of aspiring journalists, PR pros and future Mad Men (and Women). From 12th and Wisconsin, everything looks like business as usual. Inside, however, another story unfolds. Johnston Hall is undergoing an extreme school makeover, the Marquette edition. Everything from the curriculum to the classrooms is rebooting to meet the needs of the next generation of communication majors. Major changes to the curriculum are under way, and, at the beginning of summer 2014, the entire building began being retrofitted to ensure Marquette’s communication students have what they need to meet the challenges that are streaming through their industry. We sat down with Dean Lori Bergen, Ph.D., to talk about these changes for the Diederich College and get an update about the vision for the college’s future. Q. “Rebooting” is an interesting word to describe what’s happening for the College of Communication. What’s that about? Bergen: I like the metaphor of “rebooting” the college for the digital age. It’s a digital 2.0 term for restarting the operating system of a computer. Boot references the idiom “pulling yourself up by your own bootstraps” — overcoming a challenge through your own force of will.

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Q&A

In 2013, we completed a strategic plan process at Marquette that compels us to reach beyond traditional academic boundaries to address challenges, to become agents for change in a complex world, to reimagine who we are and what we do, to innovate and solve problems, and to set the world on fire. These are powerful words from the plan — aspiring to be recognized among the most innovative and accomplished Catholic and Jesuit universities in the world. With that vision from the strategic plan, we’re challenged to put everything on the table, to “reboot.” And that’s essentially what we’re doing: making change possible from the inside out. Q. What are some of the ways that technology has influenced curricular changes and other innovations in the college? What’s the rationale for changes you’ve been making? Bergen: First and foremost, we know that everything today is driven by digital capability. When I say “digital,” I mean it as shorthand for a cultural shift — how we think and live and work and teach, redefined for a knowledge-based society. As a college, that means we’ve had to shift away from preparing students for a world that doesn’t exist anymore and to integrate skills for a digital future in new ways. As we’ve made important additions in our course offerings, we’ve kept the foundations that transcend time. We’ve started focusing more on experience and doing — collaborations among students and students working with faculty. Students come to us with a passion for communication, and they expect to find jobs when they graduate. They need global awareness, technical skill, a certain self-confidence and as much real-world experience as they can get. They have to be problem-solvers. We’ve updated our curriculum, and our faculty are committed to ensuring students take courses that reflect continuing developments in the communication industries and the world.

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New courses in the Department of Strategic Communication, for example, include Mobile Communication, Emerging and Social Media, Sports Promotion, Crisis Communication, and Public Relations Strategies. The Digital Communication Toolbox course is also new, so our students are equipped with design and software competences when they enter the job world. Faculty in the Department of Communication Studies created two new courses — Dr. Bob Shuter teaches Communicating in Multinational Corporations and Dr. Tracey Sturgel teaches Generational Communication. The Department of Journalism and Media Studies faculty continue to update their curriculum to emphasize reporting and writing content across media, rather than focusing primarily on print. Our O’Brien Fellowship and the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service show how we’re leading in a national trend to remake journalism education along the teaching hospital model, with a focus on public service and social justice that’s unique to Marquette. Finally, in our Department of Digital Media and Performing Arts, we’ve invested heavily in technology that is increasingly sophisticated and gives students who pursue degrees in digital media, the major formerly known as BREC, a true state-of-the-art experience. Q. The college has been making renovations to the building since 2006 with funds from the $28 million Diederich gift and other sources — updated classrooms, the jPad student lounge, a new elevator, windows, even a new roof and tuck-pointed exterior brick façade. What’s left to do? Bergen: It’s really what you don’t see in the building that will benefit from this major overhaul of our infrastructure, things that have aged or never been updated as the result of deferred maintenance. The university assumed $50 million in bond debt to fund the Historic Core Project and address problems in Johnston, Marquette and Sensenbrenner halls. Our portion of that — about $7.5 million — will replace our HVAC system, upgrade plumbing and bathroom facilities, stairwells, corridors, and, most important to us, the data and technology infrastructure that will allow us to be truly wired — and wireless — for the digital future. It’s a challenge to provide appropriate data services in a building with 16-inch brick walls that was first wired in the 1990s. Sometimes students can’t get online with their laptops, and faculty struggle to show a YouTube clip in a class when the page won’t load.

All the work in the building is scheduled to conclude by fall 2014, and that means we’ll be moved out completely during summer 2014 to allow for the construction and disruption. That’s a challenge that will be well worth the inconvenience. Q. So with all the changes you’ve outlined for the college, what is the most important change that needs to happen? Bergen: The biggest change we need to embrace is a change of mindset. That’s probably the most difficult change of all. All of us here in the college and across Marquette have been very successful for a long time by doing things a certain way. The issues were fairly constant, the functional rules were very clear and it was a pretty safe bet that if we did things the way we always did them, then we would continue to be successful. Unfortunately, I don’t believe we have that luxury anymore. Our world and the college’s specific place in that world are moving too fast to stand still or to keep doing things the same old way. It’s also sometimes tough to head off into uncharted territory. Ralph Waldo Emerson once said that no matter what course you decide on, somebody’s going to tell you that you’re wrong. The trick is not to let the trouble you find along the way tempt you into believing that the critics are right — mapping a course and following through to the end require courage. Our university colleagues have developed a very ambitious agenda for Marquette to drive forward to ensure we remain and become more successful in the years ahead. To accomplish this, we have to think differently, act differently, and demand more of ourselves as administrators, educators and students. I would venture to say that if we fall back on the adage “we’ve always done it this way” when trying to solve a problem, chances are we’ll find out the old way probably isn’t the best way anymore. Certain values and Marquette’s core principles of excellence, faith, leadership and service will never change, but everything else should be up for discussion. Wayne Gretzky once remarked that his team needed to “skate to where the puck is going to be, not to where it’s been.” In my opinion, this is the most difficult challenge we face. Change is scary, and finding your way through change is difficult, but it’s something we have to do if we intend to remain successful.

Imagine helping a visitor find the restrooms in Johnston Hall — women on the first floor and men on the third! It’s a great conversation starter with prospective students and their parents, but I won’t miss explaining that the early occupants at an all-male university didn’t need more than one bathroom in 1904.

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Q&A

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By Liz Thorson, H Sci ’07, Grad ’11

BARBARA WEEKS THOMPSON Jour ’74

Search Barbara Weeks Thompson’s profile photo on her company’s website. She’s tossing a Marquette basketball — signed by former coach Hank Raymonds — in the air. She’s smiling and proudly wearing her Marquette athletics zip-up jacket. And she’s standing in front of a “We are Marquette” sign from when the men’s basketball team went to the 2003 Final Four. Thompson, president and CEO of the Roberts Group, is strategic — in her work and in the promotion of her beloved alma mater. Originally from Aurora, Ill., Thompson, Jour ’74, chose Marquette because of the distinguished reputation of the journalism school. She was involved with a variety of campus organizations, working as a resident assistant for two years and collaborating with other departments such as Campus Ministry. She recalls the significant social issues present in the early 1970s, especially women’s rights. So she and a group of classmates started the Marquette Organization of Women, taking advantage of the 1966 establishment of the National Organization for Women. The group even brought writer and activist Betty Friedan, author of The Feminine Mystique, to campus. After graduating from Marquette, Thompson spent five years as the director of marketing and communications for Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, then ventured out on her own in 1981 to start the Roberts Group. It was one of the first advertising companies in the country to focus exclusively on health care. And she hasn’t looked back since.

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“I think health care is the greatest industry in the world, and I love problem-solving for my clients,” she says. “Inside my agency, I consider mentoring junior staff members the most gratifying part of my job.” Since 1985, Thompson and the Roberts Group have earned more than 700 professional awards, something she says that comes from “working hard and smart.” Most recently, in 2012, she received the Professional Excellence Award from the Wisconsin Healthcare Public Relations & Marketing Society and the company was recognized by The Milwaukee Business Journal for being one of the state’s largest women-owned businesses. When reflecting back on her time as a student, Thompson recalls wondering then why she had to take some of the courses considered foundational to a Jesuit education. “I questioned how courses like philosophy and theology would be of value to me in my career,” she admits. “But once I was in the working world, I understood how incredibly valuable they were.”

It was that experience that prompted her to encourage her daughters, Jen and Kate, to consider a Jesuit university. Jen, who works for the Roberts Group, earned her bachelor’s degree from St. Louis University and master’s degree from Boston University. Kate, who works for the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., earned her bachelor’s degree in performing arts from Marquette. So what’s next for this already-busy woman? Citing the fact that her most influential Marquette teachers were also working professionals, Thompson says: “I would love to teach. I would love to do more classroom work, especially at Marquette. To teach is to learn.” She also plans to continue volunteering in the community, something she learned to value during her time at Marquette, with organizations like the Food Pantry of Waukesha County and the Women and Children’s Fund.

In fact, years ago, while helping a Catholic hospital and nonCatholic hospital merge, Thompson recalls a particularly poignant moment. “There were four of us arguing in the same direction about what services would be appropriate for the particular community — how the patients and employees ought to be cared for,” she says. “I discovered after one meeting that all four of us were Jesuiteducated: two of us from Marquette, one from Georgetown and another from Loyola.”

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ALUMNI Q+A: JEFF KAMIN, COMM ’93, AND LEIF BROSTROM, COMM ’10

By Tim Cigelske, Comm ’04

Jeff Kamin and Leif Brostrom took the trek up I–94 to Minneapolis after graduating, and both found themselves working for public media. Today, they’re connected by neighboring buildings and shared experiences. “Leif and I first met on social media and realized we had a lot of common favorite bands and then that we were both Marquette alums,” Kamin explains. “Later, we met in person, and now I can’t go anywhere without Leif showing up and tweeting about me.” Brostrom is the social media and web specialist for Twin Cities Public Television, and Kamin is the senior producer of performance programs for Minnesota Public Radio. Together, they discussed how Marquette prepared them for their careers, the future of media and their campus connections.

Jeff Kamin, Comm ’93

What do you see as the future of media? Kamin: I think we’ll keep seeing more digital, mobile and globalization. Media is going to be consumed wherever and whenever people want it. We are all going to be our own programmers and broadcasters. If I can continue to create content that connects with any audience, we’ll find the right ways to get it from each other. Marquette prepared me with a well-rounded base for this. Even if the rules are changing the methods of delivery, you still need a solid knowledge of the how we got here and an ethical value system to help maintain your sense of self. Brostrom: I see the future of media as an amalgamation of talents. We all have multiple talents out of necessity, and they become passions when we figure out how to make them relate and intersect. Marquette gave me a shot at success because of

Leif Brostrom, Comm ’10

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the massive amount of on-campus opportunities. There were so many activities related to a major — just like life, a balance of passions and interests. Most folks would be hard-pressed to find a place where they can manage a TV station, formulate a social media presence, submit ideas to faculty and contribute to new websites. My time at Marquette was a microcosm of the real world.

What led you to your current job? Kamin: My job at MPR came from producing and performing in my own shows around the Twin Cities and then being called in to discuss what I might be able to do with MPR. I wasn’t really looking for it, but it was the right position at the right time, and I was able to turn it from a freelance gig to a full-time position. Marquette lessons about working hard and being ethical helped. Brostrom: I’ve always looked to get involved in things that were unconventional. After three and a half years working in the music industry, I applied on a whim — and here we are! I was intrigued because of my interest in NOVA, cooking shows and Frontline. My broadcast and electronic communication degree helped, but it also helped to have glowing recommendations from former professors, supervisors and professionals at Marquette. I learned in earning my degree that not everyone is cut out for media. You really have to care to make the content stick.

What have you been most proud of so far in your current roles? Kamin: I am probably most proud of what I built with my show Books & Bars. It combines my knowledge of communication

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and performing with advertising, marketing and business to make the biggest and best book club show in Minnesota. In 10 years, it’s grown to three shows a month and occasional road shows. It’s the most enriching live performance I’ve had since leaving L.A.’s improv scene. Brostrom: I’ve been able to reinvigorate my excitement of being in a TV station. There’s nothing like walking in to one of the most viewed public TV stations in the world every day. I’m given the privilege to be their most public-facing voice. I also work in concert advising and directing our in-house brands on social media strategy content, as well as collaborating with partners. It’s absolutely fulfilling to be a part of a service provider that really produces and communicates the mission using the power of media to support others.

Any final Marquette-related stories you’d like to share? Kamin: Chris Farley spoke at my graduation from the College of Communication. When I moved to L.A. and did improv comedy at iOWest, I worked with his brothers, Kevin and John, and got know another iOWest performer, Farley’s roommate and Marquette alum Pat Finn. I actually got called back for a job at a film production company because the chairman knew Marquette’s reputation. Going to Marquette meant writing skills, in his experience. I never dreamed that my advertising and psychology degree would lead to working for Danny DeVito, but it did. Brostrom: I joined Twitter in the old MUTV office and started a Facebook page for rapper Atmosphere in 2007 from my room in Straz Tower. Today, that Facebook page has more than 1.1 million likes.

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By Monique Collins, Comm ’14

MARISSA EVANS Comm ’13

Marissa Evans, Comm ’13, is a health policy Web reporter for Kaiser Health News in Washington, D.C. In May 2013, the National Association of Black Journalists’ 2013 student journalist of the year launched an online news venture, InHue Magazine. Today, the website is overflowing with recipes, beauty tips and health news for women of color. In an industry in which health news sheds little light on issues for women of color, the publication is pioneering a new path.

Q: What initially inspired you to launch InHue?

A: I took a magazine design class with Dr. Ana Garner my junior year, and since then I haven’t been able to look at magazines the same way. I had two project ideas for that class: a humanitarian awareness magazine and, before I had a name for it, the idea of InHue. I didn’t use InHue for the class, but I never stopped thinking about it.

Q: Why are you interested in targeting minority women?

A: I was trying to find ways to be healthier and looking to health magazines on the market. I didn’t see many women that looked like me or my mother or my aunts, and they were not really covering racial health disparities. I was complaining about this to my mom one day, and she said, “Well, Marissa, why don’t you start a magazine like that?” It was one of those questions that kept me up at night for several months until I finally decided to just do it. I had some knowledge from the class about how to develop a magazine and, then, with my internship experience, the journalism part was just second nature.

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Q: What sets your publication apart from other women’s health publications?

A: Some think InHue needs to “broaden its demographics,” but if I were to do so, there would be nothing to make it stand out from the other women’s health magazines on the market. I didn’t really want a magazine for all women. Not because health isn’t important for everyone, but magazines like Women’s Health, Shape, Self, Prevention and Health already focus on a more general overview of women’s health. This is reflected in the content they write about, as well as little things like skin and beauty products for skin tones that they suggest.

Q: When concerns you most about the difference between these magazines and yours?

A: These magazines don’t talk about racial health disparities. As our nation becomes more and more racially intermixed and diverse, I think it’s more important than ever that women of color are aware of what kinds of health issues they face.

Q: How has launching InHue been for you?

A: It was a little bit stressful trying to manage a staff, troubleshoot the website on my own, and, in the middle of all that, have a social life and graduate. But it’s been very rewarding. We’ve received some great feedback from readers about the kind of content we produce, and I want to keep that momentum going.

Q: Where do you see InHue two years from now?

A: I’d love to be running the magazine full time and paying the staff, too. Ideally, in the next two years, we’ll continue to build our social media presence and recognition among readers. We have a really talented group of food writers, and I’d like to see InHue develop a cookbook of some form. The most ideal thing, though, would be for an angel investment of redesigning our website, inhuemag.com, to provide more functionality for our readers.

Q: What about five years from now? Q: What health concerns are most prevalent to women of color?

A: There are too many health concerns for women of color to allow me to choose just one. There are lots of statistics about racial health disparities but not enough solution-based ideas, programs and platforms to inform this demographic about how to be proactive about living healthy lifestyles.

A: In five years, I’d like to see InHue be in an office space somewhere so we could connect with a local community and do outreach beyond a magazine with community fitness classes, a garden and other social entrepreneurial activities. There’s really no minority health magazine on newsstands right now, which can be seen if anyone were to go onto the Barnes & Noble website or into its brick-and-mortar store. There’s a real chance for InHue to be a leader, and I’m hopeful we can do that.

Q: Did you worry at all about attracting an audience and support for InHue?

Monique Collins, Comm ’14, is a past president of the National Association of Black Journalists at Marquette University.

A: I knew as soon as I put the idea of InHue out on Facebook and Twitter that it would gain lots of interest. Almost every woman of color I spoke with about the idea of InHue believed it was time for a magazine specifically focused on minority women health.

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By Dr. Gee Ekachai

SOLEY AND HAVICE RETIRE

of teaching and learning in mediated and virtual training environments. Recent studies included research relative to teaching confidence in media writing, as well as teaching in online and virtual environments. Recently, Havice explored the world through his camera lens, winning awards for his photographic artwork in several Milwaukee-area exhibitions. He has been active in competition and exhibitions with the Coalition of Photographic Artists and their Midwest Juried Photo Exhibition. Soley, an expert in propaganda and visual research methods, authored seven books and more than 90 published research articles and book chapters. During his career, he was one of the most published researchers in the field, according to the Journal of Advertising and Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly. More than 1,200 researchers have cited his works, and his articles and books have won several awards. Soley’s book, Clandestine Radio Broadcasting, was named an “outstanding book” by Choice magazine, and his study on advertising pressures in newspapers received the Journal of Advertising’s “Best Article Award.” Soley also served as a reviewer for many journals and was on the editorial board of the Journal of Advertising for two decades.

Dr. Lawrence Soley

Dr. Michael Havice

Drs. Lawrence Soley and Michael Havice wrapped up their Marquette careers with 60 years of combined experience in the college. In his nearly 29 years at Marquette, Havice taught almost every class offered in the curriculum, from introduction production techniques to advanced TV production, corporate media and multimedia design course work. He helped the department develop and implement the senior capstone course that included several service learning opportunities for students. In his classes, Havice worked to bring the professional community to the classroom whenever appropriate, and he continues to maintain relationships with professionals and alumni in the industry. With a doctorate of education, Havice spent much of his time exploring the acquisition of knowledge and learning through media application. He extensively studied the exploration

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During his career, Soley also wrote for many publications, including Mother Jones, In These Times, the Utne Reader, Dollars & Sense, and City Pages, for which he was a contributing writer. An article he wrote for Mother Jones received the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Award, and one he wrote for Dollars & Sense was named one of the most important stories of 1996 by Project Censored. Near the end of his career, Soley received a Fulbright Fellowship to teach at Bilgi University in Istanbul, Turkey. While there, he taught Qualitative Research Methods and Film as Communication, as well as conducted research for his latest book, Understanding Visual Communication. Soley had never before taken an extended or overseas sabbatical because of his three young children, but the Fulbright gave him the opportunity to travel abroad with his youngest son. Soley remains in touch with many former students and enjoys watching their careers blossom. He is looking forward to finishing his book and seeing what new scholars bring to the field. “I think all journals can use a new perspective,” he says. “The media are changing, and the faculty at Marquette should be changing, too.”

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By Dr. Sarah Bonewits Feldner

NICK ASHOOH Jour ’76

Ashooh has seen the corporate communication field evolve, with executives beginning to understand the value of advance planning to address issues. “Communication now is at the table,” he says. “It is much more part of the planning process rather than the damage control process.” Ashooh credits Marquette’s program with giving him the skills he needed to be successful and strategic. After all, he came to the university with an interest in sports journalism.

Nick Ashooh was going to Milwaukee. He might as well have been going to the moon. Ashooh’s first time on an airplane was a trip to begin his undergraduate career at Marquette. When he landed, he found a place where the streets were laid out in a grid and just about everybody — even store cashiers — smiled and said hello. He wasn’t in New Hampshire any more, but he quickly came to regard Marquette as his home — and the place that laid the groundwork for a successful career in corporate communication. “It was exactly the right place because I got all the attention I needed,” he says. Ashooh, Jour ’76, is senior director of corporate and executive communication for APCO Worldwide, a global communication, stakeholder engagement and business strategy firm. Previously, he was in senior-level communication roles at Alcoa and the American International Group and managed communication for utility, public service and publishing companies.

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“No matter what you do, no matter what situation you get in, you need to think critically and observe the highest standards — and not just when someone is watching,” he says. In recent years, Ashooh has shared his expertise and experience with Diederich College students and faculty, serving on the advisory committee that helps plan the college’s annual Corporate Communications Summit, which draws to campus industry professionals and academics. “I am so excited about the college today,” he says. “To me, it is so much more. Its perspective is much broader. When we were there, you were going to work for a newspaper, a TV station or a magazine. That was pretty much it back then. Now, with the explosion of social media and digital media and how everything is integrated, I think Marquette is in a great position to be able to prepare people to do all those fields. And it’s a place that has values and cares about individuals.”

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Art: revealing the us in the other

By Dr. Pamela Hill Nettleton

It is not a passive thing to sit in the audience. It is also not a safe thing. We file in, avoiding eye contact and clutching tickets. We sort ourselves into aisles that are lettered and numbered in illogical fashion, we search for but can’t spell mezzanine, and we politely share the armrests as though nothing transformative is about to happen and as if we will emerge in two hours utterly unchanged. But we are wrong.

It would be rude to look a stranger in the eye and ask to see his soul. But, from the audience, we can clearly see it.

When the curtain rises or the dancer enters or the baton drops or the singer exhales — if it is good art, and, heck, sometimes even if it is bad art — the cacophony of the disparate lives of 200 or 400 or 1,200 people in the audience is stilled. Some common human ground is found and tilled and made fertile, and our hearts are laid bare to each other and to ourselves.

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We can know nothing about people, yet when we listen to the rise and fall of their music, some visceral place in them touches a visceral place in us. Without living another life, we come to know another life. We believe that we are unique, that we are the first generation to be outraged by injustice or feel true passion, but art reveals the artifice in that sort of thinking. We learn that we share the ages, we share the planet and we are not the only ones who have suffered great loss or love to tap dance.

end note

Art engenders empathy. In its beauty and its ugliness, art reveals what it is to be humane. Art bypasses small talk and inserts us into the hearts and minds of those whom we might otherwise overlook. Art reveals the us in the other. Art has the profound power to show us we are not alone.

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NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION US POSTAGE PAID Milwaukee, WI Permit No. 628

Diederich College of Communication

M

P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1881 USA

Journalism that reveals solutions as it uncovers problems.

That’s a guiding principle behind the Perry and Alicia O’Brien Fellowship in Public Service Journalism. O’Brien Fellows are fully funded as they spend an academic year at Marquette University — reporting on stories they care deeply about — and then return to their newsrooms with a world-class project and a paid summer intern. In addition, each Fellow’s reporting and projects are presented at an annual conference held the next fall at the university. The 2014–15 O’Brien Fellows are: n

 randon Loomis B The Arizona Republic

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Raquel Rutledge Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

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 arjorie Valbrun M Independent journalist and contributor to The Washington Post

For more information about the fellowship, visit marquette.edu/obrien-fellowship.

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Comm Magazine July 2014