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EDITORIAL: Sexual violence awareness training flawed but promising– Viewpoints, page 6

The Marquette Tribune SPJ’s 2010 Best All-Around Non-Daily Student Newspaper

Women bring the heat against South Florida

Father Pilarz speaks on his past and future

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Since 1916 www.marquettetribune.org

Volume 96, Number 9

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

‘Marquette, baby, we are clearly born to run’

Pilarz officially becomes university’s 23rd president By Katie Doherty kathleen.doherty@marquette.edu

After a week of build-up, campus practically buzzed with excitement Friday as the Rev. Scott Pilarz was formally inaugurated as the 23rd president of Marquette University. In a ceremony at the packed Al McGuire Center, Pilarz outlined his vision for Marquette’s future, using humor to engage the audience and passion to drive home his message, and received congratulations as he embarked on his new journey. “It’s a funny feeling to be a freshman at 52,” Pilarz joked. He arrived on campus in August and lives in the Campus Town apartments among upperclassmen students. He said it was likely no coincidence that the date of the inauguration, Sept. 23, was the birthday of his home state New Jersey’s (unofficial) poet laureate, Bruce Springsteen. “Marquette, baby, we are

clearly born to run,” Pilarz said. The new president’s wit wasn’t the only thing supporting his speech, though. As a former English professor, he chose to “hazard” a metaphor that summed up his intention for the future of Marquette. “Jacques Marquette was obsessed with discovering the Mississippi River. … (to) enhance human experience and open opportunities for the spread of God’s good news,” Pilarz said. “So what is our Mississippi River? What keeps us up at night at Marquette?” Focusing on these questions, Pilarz asked how many students leave Marquette having experienced an “engagement of reality” that transforms them to their very core – an experience that should be the goal of a Jesuit education, he said. Pilarz encouraged the audience to reflect on the Jesuit mission. He said the work of Marquette is grounded in “learned ministry,” and the university must work for justice. “God’s grace is surely at work here, giving us the energy and enthusiasm to go and ‘set the See Inauguration, page 5

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Pilarz calls on the words of Bruce Springsteen and Jacques Marquette on Friday during his speech.

MU gets first ‘Homecoming’

Photo by Elise Krivit/elise.krivit@marquette.edu

Jim Love is the mastermind behind planning ‘Unofficial Homecoming.’

Student spurs idea of bringing a new tradition to campus By Elise Angelopulos elise.angelopulos@marquette.edu

This week, many Marquette students will wear blue and gold game day colors as if they are welcoming the highly anticipated basketball season. But

the season does not begin for another few months — so why exactly is the student body celebrating? Marquette’s first annual Unofficial Homecoming kicked off Monday. The weeklong celebratory event was planned and organized by Jim Love, a junior in the College of Communication. Love said the idea of homecoming on Marquette’s campus

INDEX

DPS REPORTS.....................2 CALENDAR.......................2 VIEWPOINTS........................6 CLOSER LOOK....................8

STUDY BREAK....................10 SPORTS..........................12 CLASSIFIEDS..................14

began in July. “I visited some friends at Southern Illinois (University) and heard all the stories about their good times,” he said. “I felt deprived — like we needed to have something on this campus.” Marquette’s Unofficial Homecoming’s Facebook page has generated more than 1,200 RSVPs. According to the page, students may purchase $10 wristbands that enable participation in all the week’s planned events, as well as food and beverage. The wristbands were sold this past week at on-campus locations like The Brew Bayou, and will be for sale through Wednesday. Planned events for the week include a campus bar crawl Thursday, a semi-formal dance at 15th Street and State Street Friday where a Marquette “King” and “Queen” will be announced and a family cookout Saturday followed by the men’s soccer game at Valley Fields, according to the Facebook page. Love says 35 wristbands have been sold and he hopes 150 to 200 students total will attend See Homecoming, page 5

Troy Davis controversy stirs doubt and debate

assaulted in a nearby parking lot, allegedly by Davis. According to witnesses, Davis shot and killed the officer in retaliation. Davis, 42, was given a lethal injection at 11:08 p.m. on Sept. 21, according to a Georgia Department of Corrections offiBy Andrea Anderson andrea.anderson@marquette.edu cial, after a last minute appeal was heard by the U.S. Supreme All eyes were on Georgia last Court, which ultimately deweek as Troy Davis was put to clined to grant clemency. death for the 1989 murder of an The decision to follow off-duty policeman in Savan- through with the ruling was a nah, Ga. Activists around the battle for 22 years. nation and the world rallied for The most recent appeal conDavis and protested sisted of seven reagainst what they canted testimonies viewed as murky “You can’t look at from trial witnesses circumstances of his the recantations and and the possible conviction and the say they are accuconfession of anuse of capital pun- rate.” other suspect. Seven ishment. of the nine witnessDavis’ execution John McAdams es said police presProfessor of political science sured them in 1989, was stayed four times while on death according to interrow, according to views with the Ascourt documents. Each appeal sociated Press. resulted in failure to prove his John McAdams, an associate innocence in the murder of professor of political science at Mark MacPhail. Marquette and a published auMacPhail was working as a thor on the death penalty, said security guard at a Burger King the defense’s assertion that when he defended a man being

Execution has many wondering if right decision was made

See Davis, page 5

NEWS

VIEWPOINTS

SPORTS

Speed of light

Gamble

Greska

Research finds particles breaking rules of physics. See, PAGE 3

Take some time to relax your body and your mind. See PAGE 3

Madness is around the corner. Let’s make this one extra special. See PAGE 6

NEWS

2 Tribune

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Invisible Children brings ‘Tony’

Group strives to bring awareness about Uganda issues By Simone Smith simone.smith@marquette.edu

For almost 25 years, Uganda has been engulfed in a horrific civil war. Since 2006, the Marquette chapter of Invisible Children has been working to enlighten students and help bring peace to the war-torn nation. Tonight, Invisible Children will showcase the film “Tony” from 7 to 9 p.m. in Emory Clark Hall. Peter King, a pastor in northern Uganda, will also give a firsthand account of the war. King mentors students the organization has given scholarships to. The event is also a fundraiser, with Invisible Children merchandise on sale. All proceeds will go toward rebuilding education, establishing radio networks and funding rescue teams to help children escape and reconnect with their families. Headquartered in San Diego, Invisible Children sends representatives called “roadies” to screen documentaries at different schools each semester. The current film shows the progress of a child named Tony over the last few years, and how Invisible Children has helped him. Since 1987, Uganda has been

engulfed in a fight between the Ugandan government and a group called the Lord’s Resistance Army, led by Joseph Kony. The army, identified as a terrorist organization by the U.S. Patriot Act, fights the government and represents the Acholi people, a group that claims to have been unjustly treated by the Ugandan government. More than 30,000 children have been abducted by the LRA to serve as child soldiers since the beginning of the war, and more than 100,000 civilians have been killed, according to the United Nations website. Christina Fiocchi, president of Invisible Children at Marquette, wants students to learn about the conflict and its effect on children. “To instill fear, the LRA soldiers force the children to kill their families before abducting them,” Fiocchi said. Fiocchi said many of the young girls abducted are forced to be wives of LRA soldiers and some are disowned by their families if they have a child by a rebel soldier. She said the LRA soldiers destroy villages so that if the children escape, they have nothing to go back to. Since the late 1990s, the Ugandan government has sequestered citizens in displaced person camps as a safety measure. It was intended to be temporary, but there are still millions living in the camps,

according to the U.N. website. Fiocchi said Invisible Children at Marquette’s goal is to create awareness. “We just want to get people involved and do what we can to help end the conflict,” Fiocchi said. Dana Leonard, a sophomore in the College of Communication and member of the Invisible Children at Marquette executive board, thinks the event will make the conflict real for students. She said seeing the conflict on television is one thing, but hearing a firsthand account is another. “This war has been going on for 25 years … that’s longer than I have been alive,” Leonard said. Leonard said students do not recognize the impact Invisible Children is having on the world. “History is being made right now,” Leonard said. “I don’t think anyone really knows it.” Chima Korieh, a professor of African history in the College of Arts and Sciences, recognizes the work that Invisible Children has done and thinks it has made progress in raising awareness. But she said the conflict is far from over. “The Ugandan conflict can be looked at as an outcome of ethnic ideology and conflict in post-colonial Africa,” Korieh said. “The LRA’s human rights violations are expanding beyond Ugandan borders to include the Congo and Sudan.”

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DPS Reports Thurs., Sept. 22 Between 3:57 p.m. and 6:05 p.m. on Wed., Sept. 21, a student reported that an unknown person(s) removed his secured, unattended bicycle estimated at $800 from outside Straz Hall. Fri., Sept. 23 An employee was observed on video at 5:45 a.m. removing university property estimated at $8 from Eckstein Hall. The subject’s employment with Marquette was terminated. A student reported that between 4:20 p.m. and 4:35 p.m. an unknown person(s) removed her unsecured, unattended property estimated at $600 from outside the Raynor Memorial Library. MPD is being contacted. At 9:19 p.m., an employee reported that two students attempted to purchase alcohol in the Union Sports Annex using another person’s ID. Sat., Sept. 24

An alumnus reported that between 9 p.m. Sat., Sept. 24 and 11 a.m. Sun., Sept. 25 an unknown person(s) removed his secured, unattended vehicle estimated at $7,500 from the 900 block of North Renee Street. MPD was contacted. Between 9:39 p.m. Sat., Sept. 24 and 4:57 a.m. Sun., Sept. 25 an unknown person(s) vandalized university property in Campus Town West, causing an estimated $30 in damage. Facilities Services was contacted. Sun., Sept. 25 Between 2:53 a.m. and 2:57 a.m. a student reported being involved in a physical altercation with two unidentified subjects in Campus Town Lot 2. DPS transported the student to Aurora Sinai Medical Center. MPD was contacted. At 10:16 a.m. a person not affiliated with Marquette trespassed outside Olin Engineering and was cited by MPD.

Events Calendar September 2011 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Tuesday 27 Post Graduate Service Fair, Alumni Memorial Ballrooms, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Dar Williams and Joan Osborne, Turner Hall Ballroom, 7 p.m. Milwaukee Brewers vs. Pittsburgh Pirates, Miller Park, 7:10 p.m.

Delights from Kasana, Ray’s Wine and Spirits, 8930 W. North Ave., 6:30 p.m. to 8:15 p.m.

Wednesday 28 STRFKR, Turner Hall Ballroom, 7 p.m. Soup with Substance, AMU 157, 12 p.m. Milwaukee Ballet Artist Series: Dracula – Creating a Seductive Thriller, Charro, 729 N. Milwaukee St., 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Screening of “Fish Fry Night Milwaukee,” Von Trier 2235 N. Farwell Ave., 8 p.m.

endless possibilMPD investigates learn something Interchange death Milwaukee Contact Us and Corrections Person jumped off nearby freeway over weekend By Allison Kruschke allison.kruschke@marquette.edu

The Milwaukee Police Department is investigating the death of a person who apparently jumped off an overpass on the Marquette Interchange. The person appeared to have jumped from the area where eastbound Interstate 94

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connects with the ramp to southbound I-94 at the beginning of the High Rise Bridge. According to MPD, a call was received about a disabled vehicle on the interchange Saturday morning. A deputy responded and found the vehicle unoccupied with the engine running. The deputy then discovered the body in a parking lot near North 13th Street and St. Paul Avenue below the ramp. The fire department responded and pronounced the victim dead at the scene.

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The Marquette Tribune welcomes questions, comments, suggestions and notification of errors that appear in the newspaper. Contact us at (414) 288-5610 or editor@marquettetribune.org.

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Editor-in-Chief Matthew Reddin (414) 288-7246 Managing Editor Tori Dykes (414) 288-6969

Editor Zach Hubbard Closer Look Designer Katherine Lau Viewpoints Designer Zach Hubbard Sports Designers Monica Lawton,Martina Ibanez-Baldor News Designers Kaitlin Moon, Haley Fry Marquee Designer Rob Gebelhoff

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NEWS (414) 288-5610 Editor Brooke Goodman Assistant Editors Dominic Tortorice, Andrew Phillips Closer Look Editor Caroline Campbell Investigative Reporters Zach Buchheit, Leah Todd Administration Tony Manno Campus Community Simone Smith College Life Sarah Hauer Consumer Patrick Simonaitis Crime/DPS Benjamin Stanley Metro Olivia Morrissey MUSG/Online Katie Doherty Religion & Social Justice Andrea Anderson General Assignment Allison Kruschke, Elise Angelopulos

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COPY DESK (414) 288-5198 Copy Chief Marissa Evans Copy Editors Alec Brooks, Sarah Butler VIEWPOINTS (414) 288-6969 Editor Kara Chiuchiarelli Editorial Writer Maria Tsikalas Columnists Bridget Gamble, Kelly White, Ian Yakob MARQUEE (414) 288-3976 Editor Sarah Elms Assistant Editor Jennifer Jorgensen Reporters Matthew Mueller, Liz McGovern, Vanessa Harris SPORTS (414) 288-6964 Editor Mike Nelson Assistant Editor Andrei Greska Copy Editor Michael LoCicero, Erin Caughey Reporters Trey Killian, Mark Strotman, Michael LoCicero, A. Wesley Herndon Sports Columnists Andrei Greska, Erik Schmidt

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The Marquette Tribune is a wholly owned property of Marquette University, the publisher. The Tribune serves as a student voice for the university and gives students publishing experience and practice in journalism, advertising, and management and allied disciplines. The Tribune is written, edited, produced and operated solely by students with the encouragement and advice of the advisor and business manager, who are university employees. The banner typeface, Ingleby, is designed by David Engelby and is available at dafont.com. David Engelby has the creative, intellectual ownership of the original design of Ingleby. The Tribune is normally published Tuesdays and Thursdays, except holidays, during the academic year by Marquette Student Media, P.O. Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881. First copy of paper is free; additional copies are $1 each. Subscription rate: $50 annually. Phone: (414) 288-7246. Fax: (414) 288-3998. E-mail: editor@marquettetribune.org

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Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Speed of light comes to a halt

Facebook changes: dislike

Antonio Ereditato of the University of Bern said in the press release. “After many months of studies and cross-checks we have not found any instrumental effect that could explain the result of the measurement. While OPERA researchers will continue their studBy Pat Simonaitis patrick.simonaitis@marquette.edu ies, we are also looking forward to independent measurements to Forget everything you know fully assess the nature of this observation.” about the theory of relativity. Ereditato, who is stationed in Well, maybe not everything. But if new findings reported last Switzerland, did not respond to a Thursday of particles surpass- request for comment as of press ing the speed of light are proven time. Marquette physics professor true, Albert Einstein’s 1905 theory could be due for a re-examination. Andrew Kunz said he is not willParticles shot from European ing to jump to any conclusions reOrganization for Nuclear Re- garding the fate of Einstein’s spesearch (CERN) labs near Geneva, cial relativity theory. He said that Switzerland to Gran Sasso, Italy, until now, special relativity has reportedly surpassed the speed held up perfectly and works where of light by 60 billionths of a sec- it has been applied. Kunz alluded to preond. The experiment vious scientific breakwas part of OPERA, “It is analogous to throughs and said the a project designed to test the oscillation of climbing up the tow- new information may not completely dissmall particles called er of Pisa, dropping neutrinos. a rock and watching credit the former understanding. CERN, one of the (the) rock fly ...” “Maybe there is world’s leading scientific research orgaBaha Balantekin something that special UW-Madison Professor relativity can’t do and nizations, is based in we need a new theory specializations with to explain that area,” physics and using advanced technology. More than Kunz said in an e-mail. “That new 20 European states have citizens theory will ultimately have to incorporate special relativity and working in the organization. Objects moving at the speed therefore Newtonian physics as of light, traditionally viewed as well.” Balantekin said the theory of the ultimate, unsurpassable speed limit, would travel the 730 km in special relativity likely has a se2.4 thousandths of a second. The cure place in physics and science neutrinos took 60 nanoseconds and provides the framework for shorter than that. A nanosecond is many modern devices, such as global positioning systems and one one-billionth of a second. Special relativity deals with, electronic equipment. Sergio Bertolucci, CERN reamong other things, the relation between velocity, light and time. search director, said in the press It has long been the framework release he welcomed other scienfor modern physics and crucial tists to challenge CERN’s results. “If this measurement is conto understanding the nature of the firmed, it might change our view universe. Baha Balantekin, an expert in of physics, but we need to be neutrino physics at the Univer- sure that there are no other, more sity of Wisconsin-Madison, said mundane, explanations. That will he and the physics community require independent measureare very skeptical of the results, ments,” Bertolucci said. Kunz, skeptical of the breakwhich could have far-reaching imthrough, questioned why this had plications. “This is an extraordinary claim,” not been discovered sooner by other research faciliBalantekin said in an ties, like the northe-mail. “It is analoern Illinois laboragous to climbing up “Maybe there is the tower of Pisa, something that special tory Fermilab, where similar research has dropping a rock and relativity can’t do and been conducted. The watching (the) rock we need a new laboratory features fly instead of droptheory ...” ping.” Andrew Kunz particle accelerators comparable to those Balantekin, a felMarquette University Professor at CERN. low of both the AmerKunz said if the ican Physical Society and the United Kingdom’s Insti- findings are proven by repeated tute of Physics, said he suspects an experimentation, he still does not error will come to light when other see any practical applications for physicists attempt the experiment. the discovery, at least not for the According to the highly pub- average person. “CERN is a $5 billion dollar falicized CERN press release, the researchers are confident in their cility, and if that is what it takes methods, but are open to others to create this effect, then it seems unlikely to me that this will trickle testing their findings. “This result comes as a com- down into everyday life,” Kunz plete surprise,” spokesperson said.

European group says Einstein theory may be incomplete

Tribune 3

Users speak out against new look; Google+ debuts By Sarah Hauer sarah.hauer@marquette.edu

It happened again. Facebook users logged in to catch up on their friends’ activity, only to find the social networking site completely different than when they left. Immediately, users updated their statuses and vowed they would leave Facebook forever in favor of another social networking site, in protest of the ever-changing website. But most users probably did not leave. Facebook is the most popular social media platform in the world, boasting over 800 million active users, according to Facebook statistics, and plans to remain that way. At Facebook’s annual developers conference last week, F8, CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced new changes to the site, “to make the world more open and connected.” The changes will allow you to, “connect to anything you want in any way you want,” Zuckerberg said. The site partnered with multimedia services Spotify, Rhapsody, Hulu and Netflix to make Facebook a one-stop online media hub. Now, users can listen to music and watch videos without ever leaving Facebook. After using the new applications to watch videos or listen to music, users are able to tell their friends about different media interactions with the addition of “listen”, “watch”, “read” and “want” buttons. But the new applications aren’t the source of user frustration. Rather, it’s the changes in layout. The news feed is no longer entirely chronological — Facebook now tries to feature stories it deems most interesting to users by

facebook vs. Google+ Newsfeed: No longer chronological, provides what Facebook decides is each user’s Top New Story. “Read, ”watched” and “listened” buttons allow users to tell friends what they read, watched or listened to with the new media apps.

News Feed: Simple and chronological.

Music and video: Partnered with Spotify, Rhapsody, Hulu and Netflix to allow users to listen +1 button allows users to music and watch video to note things around the without leaving the site. web they like, agree with or Profile: The timeline allows you to see life on Facebook graphically.

want to recommend to others.

Music and video: None. Incorporates Gmail and Google docs.

Graphic by Zach Hubbard/zachary.hubbard@marquette.edu placing them in a “top story” feed. Also, the newly added ticker provides a continuous, chronological and lightweight stream of friends’ activity. The ticker is placed to the right of birthday and event notifications, with the chat box below it. Facebook users are not enthusiastic about the changes, and many feel they are unnecessary. Anna Hill, a freshman in the College of Communication, sees the changes as annoying and feels the site was fine the way it was. She said she logs into Facebook less often because she does not want to deal with the changes. “I don’t like knowing what everyone is doing every second,” Hill said. Hill said she now uses the micro-blogging site Tumblr more than Facebook because the product stays consistent. Caroline Collins, a sophomore in the College of Education, said she feels less like using Facebook since the changes made the site more confusing to use. Collins said she considered deleting her Facebook account but decided not to because she was unsure how she would communicate with many of her friends

and classmates. She said after the changes she has used the site less to “stalk” and more to communicate. Emily Isaksson, a first-year graduate student in speech pathology, said she is not panicking about the changes but does not like them either. Isaksson said “the changes were overwhelming,” especially those made on the homepage. The changes to Facebook coincide with the new public availability of the latest social networking site, Google+. Google+ is a social networking site with more than 43 million users. It provides a simple chronological news feed, a +1 button to indicate things around the web users like and does not contain video or music applications. Alec Gryen, a freshman in the College of Business Administration, said he plans on making a Google+ account very soon because of the site’s simple layout. Despite his plans to migrate to Google+, Gryen is not quite ready to abandon Facebook altogether. “I need (my Facebook account) to connect with friends because everyone is on (Facebook),” Gryen said.

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Panel discusses city crime

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

U.S. Bank to cut 35 jobs in MKE Downtown location scales back on I.T., data processing

Photo by Elise Krivit/elise.krivit@marquette.edu

On Monday, panelists from varied backgrounds discussed the problem of youth crime in Milwaukee.

Volunteers, former gang members debate solutions By Olivia Morrissey olivia.morrissey@marquette.edu

“Milwaukee youth.” Two words that Milwaukee Judge Joe Donald said extend beyond young people in Milwaukee. They refer to the crimes occurring in neighborhoods citywide, a problem Donald and the other panelists at Monday’s “On the Issues with Mike Gousha” discussed. “The city of Milwaukee is very good at trailing, nailing and jailing,” Donald said. “But at some point these people will get out of jail, and if we don’t do more to change the thought process and behavior, all we will be doing is spending money on (separation).” Intervention, prevention and rebuilding a sense of community in these troubled neighborhoods dominated this “On the Issues” discussion, which was presented in conjunction with the Milwaukee Film Festival. One of the movies featured at the festival is “The Interrupters,” a documentary focusing on three former gang members who now work with CeaseFire, a program in Chicago aimed at stopping crime and violence. Donald, along with restorative justice advocate Ron Johnson, Milwaukee Police Chief Ed Flynn, Safe & Sound Milwaukee executive director Barbara Notestein and United Community Center volunteer and Marquette sophomore Pedro Hernandez, sat before community members during the discussion. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett and one of the

volunteers featured in the film, Ameena Matthews, were in the audience. Flynn said the problem of violent crime must be tackled at its core, in the neighborhoods themselves. He said the challenge for the police department is to disrupt the environments where these crimes occur, so as to alter the norms of people responding with violence. “At the neighborhood level, crime causes poverty,” Flynn said. “We need these people to realize that they are not just killing each other, they are killing their neighborhoods.” Restoring the social fabric of impoverished and crime-ridden communities is a central element of Safe & Sound Milwaukee, Notestein said. Violence is a learned behavior, she added, and the organization tries to prevent youths from receiving an education in committing violent crime. Johnson also works with at-risk youth, but more as an interventionist. He often goes to racially diverse high schools in the area that suffer from violent gang wars. His approach to diffusing the situations is to sit the offenders in a circle and allow each person to voice their feelings. Although the method is effective, Johnson said he notices the generation gap between himself and the children. “Sometimes, adults can preach or talk at kids rather than talk with them,” Johnson said. “The kids won’t listen to you if you don’t talk with them.” Hernandez, who works with children primarily from the south side of Milwaukee, said the influence of someone his age is more powerful than that of an adult to children in these situations. “I know what they’ve gone through. I’ve seen what they’ve

seen,” said Hernandez, a student in the College of Arts & Sciences. “I try to uplift them by showing them not only the instrumental value of education, but also the intrinsic value as well.” The panelists agreed that recognizing education in all its forms is necessary in reducing violent crime in the city. We live in a violent society, Johnson said, and children see violence on television, on the Internet and in the behavior of the adults around them. But Notestein said it is important to combat the prevalence of violence by teaching the children to think of the consequences of their actions. “We need to help them understand that their crimes harm others, their communities and ultimately themselves,” Notestein said. “Instead of, ‘I’m going to jail,’ we need to change the mentality to ‘I’m going to miss out on all these positive opportunities in life,’” Hernandez added. The violent crimes that occurred in the Riverwest neighborhood and at State Fair Park over the summer were discussed, and Flynn said the media is to blame for the contribution these bad situations have made to the reputation of Milwaukee as an unsafe city. “During the time those incidents were happening, we had 18,000 kids in the Safe & Sound Milwaukee program, but there’s no film on them,” he said. But there is the film on the CeaseFire program in Chicago, and Matthews hopes “The Interrupters” and the panel discussion will change the way people look at at-risk youths. These children aren’t simply lost causes, Matthews said. “They are thinking human beings who need to be given better opportunities and hope,” she said.

“The cuts made were only at this location,” he said. “We are growing and adding jobs nationwide. We are not in a reduction mode at all. We are just automating some processes in these positions.” By Allison Kruschke Joyce said jobs are being cut allison.kruschke@marquette.edu at the downtown Milwaukee location and not at others only beThe U.S. Bank in downtown cause of changes being made to Milwaukee will be cutting 35 jobs the information technology deby November as part of a restruc- partment at that location. turing of the branch, the bank told Workers who were displaced state officials. Job separations are will work with human resources scheduled to begin Nov. 16. in order to be placed in other arThe jobs to be cut are in infor- eas within the bank if positions mation technology and data pro- are available. cessing, according to “Because we are Tom Joyce, a spokes- “The cuts made adding and growing, person for U.S. Bank. we are hoping we can were only at this U.S. Bancorp, the place some of these parent company of location.We are individuals in posiU.S. Bank, notified growing and adding tions that make sense state officials ear- jobs nationwide.” for them,” Joyce lier this year about 64 Tom Joyce said. “We would like U. S. Bank Spokesperson to make the net loss other job cuts made in the downtown loto be something less cation. These jobs than 35.” were in fraud and dispute manLisa Clark, U.S. Bank media agement. representative for Wisconsin, U.S. Bank employs about 5,000 said cuts will only affect the people statewide. downtown branch and will not afJoyce said the cuts made to the fect employees of the Marquette downtown location are not reflec- branch. tive of U.S. Bank’s other branches in Wisconsin.

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NEWS

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Tribune 5

Continued from page 1:

Continued from page 1:

seven out of nine testimonies were recanted is nonsense. “You can’t look at the recantations and say they are accurate,” McAdams said. “The people told authorities they ‘didn’t remember saying that,’ not ‘I didn’t say that.’” A number of politicians, celebrities and public voices called for the delay of the execution because there was “too much doubt” present in the case after the recanted testimonies. Davis supporters included Pope Benedict XVI, former President Jimmy Carter, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, former FBI Chief William S. Sessions, Sean “P. Diddy” Combs and Amnesty International. Thousands of Davis supporters worldwide took up the antideath penalty cause during Davis’ final days. Vigils were held in the U.S. and Europe, where people chanted, “I am Troy Davis” and wrote the phrase on signs and T-shirts. More than 500 people stood outside the Jackson, Ga. prison where Davis was held, as well as the White House last Thursday, while approximately 150 demonstrators carried signs with Davis’ face on them at a rally in Paris. “Everyone who looks a little bit at the case knows that there is too much doubt to execute him,” Nicolas Krameyer of Amnesty International said at the protest in Paris.

world on fire,’” Pilarz said. In the ceremonial installation of the president, the Rev. Robert A. Wild, Marquette’s previous president, and Mary Ellen Stanek, vice chair of the Board of Trustees and chair of the presidential search committee, presented Pilarz with two symbols of presidency – the chain of office and a mace. Other speakers at the inauguration echoed Pilarz’s call for excellence. Sue Cooper, a staff member at Student Health Services, spoke in representation of Marquette administrators and staff. She quoted an Ignatian prayer: “Teach us to give and not to count the cost.” Alex Johnson, a senior in the College of Communication, was selected to speak at the inauguration as a student representative. Johnson said the university’s genuine care for others and the world attracted him to

Davis: All sides doubtful Inauguration: Pilarz begins presidency McAdams claimed very few of these activists read enough of the transcript and case to understand it in its entirety. “One in 1,000 activists read the transcript,” McAdams said. “They also get superficial media coverage with only one side getting attention. No one is asking what the real facts of the case are.” McAdams didn’t discount the people who are passionate about the case and signed petitions. “Those who signed petitions are sincere and want to see a change,” McAdams said. “It’s people like the Pope and Jimmy Carter who have not looked at the evidence and want to have a say.” Davis’ execution also elicited reaction from campus. Colleen Ross, a sophomore in the College of Arts & Science and member of JUSTICE, a social justice organization on campus that strictly opposes the death penalty, said what Davis went through was unjust and hailed the support he received from high places. “The work continuously done by people such as Pope Benedict XVI, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Jimmy Carter contributes tremendously to the campaign for social justice,” Ross said. “Lending their voices against the Troy Davis execution is a positive step that helps reach beyond the usual audience to spread awareness of this injustice.”

Continued from page 1:

Homecoming: Unofficial Facebook page said the event the Unofficial Homecoming. The buzz surrounding this is “not intended to encourage new event is exciting many stu- heavy drinking or blacking out,” but it will focus on students. “I think it is exactly what dents enjoying themselves by Marquette needs,” said Claire “celebrating the school they Mullen, sophomore in the Col- love.” Although one scheduled camlege of Communication. “There is never a point where the whole pus-wide event involves alcohol, Love insisted such events campus is together.” Mullen said that although are intended for upperclassmen basketball games can gather the only. Some Marquette students, student body and campus community, there is not the same like Jim Deroche, a sophomore in the College of united feeling or Business Adminisplanned social events tration, didn’t see that a homecoming “The whole campus a problem with stuassociated with foot- seems genuinely dents organizing ball games would excited about this. I this event without generate. feel it is a celebration consulting the uniStudents interested in attending the event that is well overdue.” versity. Jim Love “I don’t think evcan sign up for email Homecoming planner erything that hapalerts by following a pens on this campus link on the Facebook page. Love says these alerts re- must go through administraveal themed days like “Spirit tion,” Deroche said. Deroche said Unofficial Day” for Monday. The themes will continue through Wednes- Homecoming is a good idea, but if the students are irresponday. Marquette’s Unofficial sible throughout the week, their Homecoming is neither spon- poor behavior would make it sored nor endorsed by the Of- more difficult for these events fice of Student Development or to occur in the future. Love said thus far, there has Marquette University Student been “unwavering support” for Government. “I don’t think administration Unofficial Homecoming. Many knows about the event,” Love Marquette students have volunsaid. “I really would love to talk teered space and time to make to the Office of Student Devel- the event a reality. “The whole campus seems opment, though, and possibly make this a yearly celebration genuinely excited about this,” Love said. “I feel it is a celebrawith the university.” A disclaimer on the event’s tion that is well overdue.”

Marquette. degrees as part of the ceremony. “The main focus of this uni- The first was given to the Rev. versity has always been the stu- Dean Brackley, a retired profesdents,” Johnson said. “I have sor of theology and ethics at the never felt such a strong connec- University of Central America tion to a place as I have to Mar- in San Salvador, who received quette. This is my home away his degree in absentia due to sefrom home.” rious illness. Inas Murrar, a Carolyn Forché, graduate of the Col- “This is our moment. director of the Lanlege of Health Sci- You have fortunately nen Center for Poetences and a second chosen Father Pilarz ics and Social Pracyear student in the to lead you at this tice at Georgetown School of Dentistry, time.” University, also realso spoke at the Carolyn Forché ceived an honorary inauguration. MurKeynote speaker degree. Forché was rar presented Pilarz the inauguration’s with a white lab coat keynote speaker. on behalf of graduate students. “This is our moment. You The presentation was met with have fortunately chosen Father loud applause from the audi- Pilarz to lead you at this time,” ence. Forché said in closing. Rabbi Ronald Shapiro of The celebration concludCongregation Shalom Milwau- ed with a lunch reception in kee gave the benediction. Sha- Westowne Square, featuring a piro congratulated Pilarz as the Bruce Springsteen cover band new president of “this revered in honor of Pilarz. university.” Pilarz conferred two honorary

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Viewpoints

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 6

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

The Marquette Tribune Editorial Board:

Kara Chiuchiarelli, Viewpoints Editor Maria Tsikalas, Editorial Writer Matthew Reddin, Editor-in-Chief Tori Dykes, Managing Editor Brooke Goodman, News Editor Caroline Campbell, Closer Look Editor

Mike Nelson, Sports Editor Sarah Elms, Marquee Editor Marissa Evans, Copy Chief Zachary Hubbard, Visual Content Editor

STAFF EDITORIAL

Sexual violence videos make mistakes, but don’t give up on them

TRIBUNE ROll call Thumbs Up:

Thumbs Down:

- #BringWadetoMadness

-This week’s forecast

-Rainless Mondays

-Being sick

-The Marquette Mace

- O.P. robbery

-Food after inauguration

-Classes not cancelled all day Friday

Column

VIOLENCE

—You are a rapist! Photo Illustration by Haley Fry/haley.fry@marquette.edu

In light of last week’s Sexual Violence seriously. Who is going to view these vidAwareness Week, the recent allegation of eos as authoritative and useful when they sexual assault in Schroeder Hall and the are being told to defecate themselves? Are high-profile case last semester involv- there no other viable solutions for students ing student athletes, it is ever-relevant to to escape such a situation? Furthermore, we have to ask how many continue to discuss and evaluate the new training procedures Marquette has insti- hours of training videos incoming students tuted in an effort to make positive changes will be expected to watch before arriving on campus. It seems inevitable that these on campus. One of the methods is training student videos will be perceived to be a drag in the leaders and next fall’s incoming students same way that AlcoholEdu is, the online with a series of online training videos. alcohol education program incoming freshThese online videos are narrated and led men are required to take. We are worried by two pseudo-college students who dis- they will be viewed in the same context, as cuss information surrounding sexual assault more or less a joke. If students trivialize these videos, we run interspersed with testimony from people who have experienced sexual assault in the risk of actually inflating the stigma of sexual assault and having fewer students different forms. While the videos provide a lot of good report the crimes and seek help when information addressing what sexual assault they happen. We applaud the university for its recent actually is and how to recognize and prevent it, the valuable parts are juxtaposed efforts to be transparent, thorough and with off-putting moments and absurd ideas. sensitive when dealing with these issues. The “typical male college student” played Marquette is taking an important first step by an actor is offensive and completely un- in acknowledging the problem of sexual assault on a college campus aware of the issues and seeking to reduce it and why they are important, which seems The intention behind these on ours. The intention behind unfair to males in videos — and the other forms these videos — and the othgeneral. One has to of training faculty and student er forms of training faculty wonder why the videos could not have leaders are undertaking — is to and student leaders are unportrayed the char- be commended. However, we have dertaking — is to be commended. However, we have acter as a normal a long way to go. a long way to go. college student lookWe implore that students ing to learn more do not disregard these vidabout sexual assault eos. If we are to collecinstead of a crass and willfully ignorant male needing to be tively acknowledge the serious nature of the problem and expect the university to set straight. Do we need such an overtly negative im- address it, we must allow them some room age of college guys? The clips describing for trial and error. After all, the university different ways men try to pressure college was not directly responsible for the content women into potential assault situations, in the videos. While recognizing the effort the universiwhile fair and comprehensive, seem to do ty is making, we can offer critical feedback. the job. If we want college men to take these vid- During this pivotal time of determining eos seriously and realize the immensity of the best course to discuss these issues, we the issues, it is questionable whether this can urge the university to continue trying to find a module that best fits our student caricature is the best way to depict them. The videos also offer suggestions on last- body. We can also remind the administraditch measures to prevent a potential rape by tion to include us in the process. After all, only students will know if other advising students to claim to be HIV positive (to which the male character laughably students will take the training seriously. responds, “Me too!”) and to remember the And when discussing sexual assault, we three “-ates”: urinate, defecate, and regur- simply need to find a way. gitate. These ideas are simply hard to take

Got Zen, Marquette? arrived five minutes late to class. By the time I found the room, I was winded and flustered. I followed my classmates’ lead and laid on the mat, staring up at the ceiling. I noticed the brick wall behind me seemed to lean forward and that my earrings felt too heavy. I was hot, nervous about riding my bike home in the dark and thinking about the bar I was to meet Bridget Gamble my friends at afterwards. The stretches proved to be simple; it Last week, I knew I was in trouble. was my brain that couldn’t keep up. I was driving to Target when it hit. I Or was it keeping up too well? had to fight the urge to skip my exit and Stress is a side effect of age. In high broaden the trip to venture out into no school, we went home at 3 p.m. and left man’s land. our books in our lockers; in college, as It’s a common occurrence, that rest- much as we love it, there is no escape less feeling. Snacking without hunger, during those times when we don’t. lazing without sleep. An excess of cafHence the urge to forge a road trip out feinated energy and an absence of moti- of a Tuesday night Target run. vation. It’s too early in the year to feel Cluttered minds may be natural, but that tense. they’re curable, too. Yoga and meditaOnce home from my excursion, I tion are fantastic, but be under no illubrainstormed a list of things to take the sions: it takes a boatload of effort to sit edge off. I’ve already exhausted most on a mat without thinking. methods: lighting canStill, it’s an effort dles, deep-cleaning my worth making. apartment, taking off At our age, and at If we don’t clear some room for a weekend. Marquette especialin our heads, everything we But there was one I ly, we’re constantly held out hope for: yoga. store upstairs will turn yellow urged to reflect evThe benefits of yoga with age and lose meaning. ery move we make and other styles of and every relationmeditation have been ship we build. We’re plugged for centuries. taught that everyThirty minutes of moderated breath- thing requires thought and planning, ing and stretching has been proven to and I fully believe that. lengthen attention spans, reduce blood The question is: Do we ever stop? pressure and alter the gray matter in the I’d argue that we don’t as much as we brain to boost memory, sense of self should. That’s why the first 10 seconds, and empathy. 10 minutes or even 10 rounds of meditaWhy? Because yoga reverses your tion are so overwhelming. Our thoughts stress response. Your heart beats slow- are uncontrollable. It’s a process just to er, your lungs breathe deeper and your quiet one or two. blood flow evens out. But it’s a process we can’t skip. If we I did yoga regularly in high school don’t clear some room in our heads, evand saw these benefits materialize. But erything we store upstairs will turn yelthat was high school. My stress levels low with age and lose meaning. were already practically underground. So maybe I was mistaken in going Regardless, I signed up for a Wednes- to yoga class, looking to emerge afterday night class at Yama Yoga in the wards with rosy cheeks and a Zen atThird Ward. Students are entitled to titude. This isn’t about staying relaxed, a great deal: ten days of unlimited it’s about staying sane. That takes more classes for $10. effort than holding a pose — but it pays I rode my bike to the studio, and de- more, too. spite having left a half hour early, I bridget.gamble@marquette.edu

Statement of Opinion Policy The opinions expressed on the Viewpoints page reflect the opinions of the Viewpoints staff. The editorials do not represent the opinions of Marquette University nor its administrators, but those of the editorial board. The Marquette Tribune prints guest submissions at its discretion. The Tribune strives to give all sides of an issue an equal voice over the course of a reasonable time period. An author’s contribution will not be published more than once in a four-week period. Submissions with obvious relevance to the Marquette community will be given priority consideration. Full Viewpoint submissions should be limited to 500 words. Letters to the editor should be between 50 to 150 words. The Tribune reserves the right to edit submissions for length and content. Please e-mail submissions to: viewpoints@marquettetribune.org. If you are a current student, include the college in which you are enrolled and your year in school. If not, please note any affliations to Marquette or your current city of residence.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

VIEWPOINTS

Letter to the editor

Consider priorities for pages To the editors of The Marquette Tribune: Marquette’s campus was buzzing with so many good vibes last week due to all the events, including the events of Sexual Violence Awareness Week. When I picked up my copy of the Tribune on Tuesday, I was unpleasantly surprised to find that the Trib considered a story about a supposed drug bust in Schroeder paramount to these events. Furthermore, the name-dropping of the Schroeder Hall residents who have not yet been convicted may have been inappropriate. Even if it is decided in court that their charges should be dropped, the negative social stigma of having their name appear on the front page of the university newspaper for “suspected drug house” can never be dropped. That being said, I really would have liked to see a different focus this week. I do understand that Marquette takes its drug policy seriously (and rightly so), but considering the efforts that the Rev. Pilarz has already made towards campus awareness of sexual violence so early in his presidency, that may have been a more appropriate front page topic during this special week devoted to awareness. Thank you, Emily May College of Arts and Sciences, 2012 emily.may@marquette.edu

Tribune 7

#Tr ibTwee ts @alexrydin

First you rob us, now you go after our convenience stores? You’ve gone too far.

@CurtisMcCormac

My social media goal of the semester is to get mentioned in @mutribune Trib Tweets section #tribtweets

@ArtMilwaukee

Thanks to the 6,500 friends that participated in this years Das Oktoberfest MKE. Looking forward to 3 days of Oktoberfest next year.

@MarquetteU

It’s been a proud day. Marquette University, please welcome Father Scott Pilarz to the family!

@Brewers

BREAKING: Brewers clinch NL Central with 4-1 win over Marlins and Cardinals’ 5-1 loss to Cubs.

@brewtownandy

Have you tweeted #BringWadeToMadness yet today? #mubb

You or your friends tweet something worth our printers’ ink? Retweet it to @MUTribune with the hashtag #TribTweets and your Twitter handle might be the latest to grace our Viewpoints section.

Life is short it!

Stay awake for

Closer Look

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 8

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

York (CUNY) in 1996. While president of the University of Scranton, and as a professor at Georgetown, Pilarz taught English. He said he hopes to do the same next semester at Marquette, perhaps 16th and 17th century British literature.

Photo by: Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Pilarz said part of the Jesuit lifestyle is to move and make an impact elsewhere; he hopes to do so at Marquette.

New president tells his life and hopes for MU By Caroline Campbell

caroline.campbell@marquette.edu

The Rev. Scott Pilarz stood outside St. Joan of Arc chapel in late August 2011, observing his new home. “This is a really beautiful part of campus,” he said. “I think this is a surprise to people, too, because they assume that this is an urban campus. … It is a great setting.” The flowerbeds around the chapel were in full bloom — bright purples, yellows and reds. The sky was clear and the weather was warm for the beginning of another school year at Marquette. Pilarz, not a stranger to harsh climates, claimed he was ready for his first winter in Milwaukee. “The weather has been really perfect since I have been here,” Pilarz said. “I am coming from Scranton (Pa.), which is not exactly the tropics.”

Pilarz was raised Catholic. He attended a Catholic grade school and high school in New Jersey and went to Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. for undergraduate studies. Although Pilarz’s resident assistant his freshman year of college later became a Jesuit and the president of Georgetown University, Pilarz himself did not decide to pursue Jesuit formation until his senior year. “I went to Georgetown as an undergrad, but I did not know what a Jesuit was, really,” Pilarz

said. “It was really just getting to know Jesuits at Georgetown as teachers and as people who lived in residence halls (that encouraged me to pursue Jesuit priesthood). I was really fascinated, too, because I had this experience of Jesuits doing a lot of different things.” Pilarz met Jesuits who were lawyers, physicians and politicians. At the time, the Rev. Robert Drinan, a Jesuit, was a congressional representative for Massachusetts. “I did not know priests could do all those different kinds of things, and that was really intriguing,” Pilarz said. “I just got the sense that these men seem really happy and enthusiastic and excited about what they are doing.” One could describe Pilarz himself in exactly those words.

Pilarz admits he did not consider entering the education profession while he was at Georgetown. “I was not a real serious undergraduate, academically,” he said. “I did OK, but I would never have imagined that I would grow up to be a professor when I was in college.” It was when he was teaching British Literature at Loyola High School in Baltimore from 1985 to 1988 as a Jesuit novitiate that he fell in love with the profession. His religious superior at the time, who was guiding him through the process of becoming a priest, suggested he return to school and pursue higher education as a career. Pilarz said he would have considered teaching high school for the rest of his life if he had not received the encouragement to go to graduate school.

“So I did it, and it’s been great ever since,” he said. Pilarz earned his masters in philosophy from Fordham University in New York in 1985, as well as additional degrees in theology and divinity from Weston Jesuit School of Theology in 1991 and 1992, and in English from City University of New

Pilarz is excited to get to know Marquette, and has already taken many steps to do so. He has had dinner with students and faculty and plans to do this often throughout the year. Pilarz lives in Campus Town East. He likes living in student housing and has been doing so for almost all of the past 20 years. “I think I can sleep through anything,” he said. This is not the first time Pilarz has had to adjust to a new place, though he did say he is not familiar with the Midwest at all. “I’m not nervous. There’s a lot of excitement about being in a new place and learning a new culture and getting to know a lot of people,” he said. Pilarz will definitely miss the friends he made at the University of Scranton but said he plans to keep in close contact with them. He also said he has “a real love for the Jersey Shore,” as the place where he was born and raised and has spent much of his life. “Jesuits move. That’s part of who we are,” Pilarz said. “One of the earliest Jesuits said, ‘Our

home is the road.’ So it’s good for us to pick up stakes and move and start fresh. There’s a lot of energy and excitement that comes with that.” Many people have noticed the energy Pilarz mentioned. Steve Frieder, assistant to the president and corporate secretary, said he is excited to work with the new president. “His high level of energy and enthusiasm for Marquette is really infectious. It’s fun,” Frieder said. Frieder said he respects that Pilarz “takes his job seriously, but doesn’t take himself too seriously.” He said the president has a great sense of humor and is a “vibrant and effective leader.” Abigail Searfoss, a junior in the College of Arts & Sciences, volunteered at the inauguration last week. She received an email asking for student volunteers and was excited at the opportunity. “I had really wanted to meet the president,” Searfoss said. “I felt I really liked the guy.” Searfoss is impressed with Pilarz’s efforts to get to know students. She likes the many emails he has sent to students already, and that he lives in campus housing. Searfoss also lives in Campus Town East. “I’ve been tempted to find his room,” she said, laughing. “But that might be awkward.” “You should ask him for an egg!” said her roommate from down the hall. “Or a muffin pan. We need one of those,” Searfoss joked. Though Searfoss was not able to attend the inauguration because

Photo by: Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Pilarz is excited to start his presidency and get to know the Marquette campus and culture.

CLOSER LOOK

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Tribune 9

Photo b

y: A

.edu

a/aaron.ledesma@marquette

Photo by: Aaron Ledesm

Pilarz sa aron Ledesma /a id Milwauk he has been aron.ledesma@ marque enjoying ee but th tte.e th at he is ready to e weather sinc du e take on winter. moving to

n of Arc Chapel, Pilarz Standing in front of St. Joa during an interview rs enjoys the campus outdoo with the Tribune.

There are many things Pilarz hopes to do in his first few months at Marquette. One of his main goals is learning what daily student, faculty and staff life is like at Marquette. “I’m looking forward to getting to know people and doing a lot of listening and learning,” Pilarz said. “There is no substitute for actually being here on the ground and establishing relationships and getting a better feel for the place. … This is a really thoughtful community, and people are engaged and aware of what is going on. One of the great things about Marquette is that everybody has a sense of ownership about it. I have not met anybody who is disinterested or disengaged.” He is also excited for basketball season. Though he has been taking hits from some of his Georgetown friends, he laughed when asked which team he will support when the Hoyas and the Golden Eagles face off on the basketball court. “I know where I live now,” he said.

Pi pre larz wa side s nt o officia fM arq lly inau uett e U gurate d nive rsity on Fri day .

as t he 2 3rd

Graphic by Katherine Lau/katherine.lau@marquette.edu

she was volunteering to set up the picnic that was held afterward, she said all the student volunteers will have a pizza party with the president next month. She is excited to use that opportunity to speak with Pilarz and get to know him.

Study Break

The Marquette Tribune Tuesday, September 27, 2011

PAGE 10

CROSSWORD

Edited by Timothy E. Parker August 23, 2011 DO THE SHA-SHA-SHA By Nick Coolidge DOWN ACROSS 1 They turn at 33 1/3 rpm 1 A no-win situation? 2 “___ la la!” 5 Uppermost stories 3 Minor scrap 11 Go there for “60 Minutes” 4 Antique photo tone 14 Jab in the ribs 5 “The African Queen” scriptwriter 15 South American cowboy James 16 Grp. overseeing early reactors 6 Abe’s babe 17 Put steers on a truck? 7 Rubber ducky’s milieu 19 ___ tai 8 Pleistocene Epoch, e.g. 20 Bailiff’s command 9 Singer with a Best Actress Oscar 21 The Chrysler Building’s style 10 It’s delivered underhandedly? 23 Half of a ‘60s rock foursome 11 Surveillance item 25 Ryan of “Courage Under Fire” 12 Guiding light 27 Element with the symbol B 13 Heirs 28 Clay, today 18 “Hey, buddy!” 29 An instant 22 Bit of whipped cream 31 Rickman and others 23 Like a wet hen 32 Inexact recipe amount 24 Wistful word 34 Musician Yoko 25 Kind of blinds or skirt 35 100 percent 26 President’s concern 36 The stores on Main Street? 30 It’s fit to be tied 41 Country-club prop 33 ___ balloon 42 Dig this, and mine your business 35 Criminally assist 43 Chess piece 37 Doesn’t give up 45 Obscure, as vision 38 Graph paper pattern 48 Common alias 39 Got money for chips 50 ___ Paulo, Brazil 40 “The Bridge on the River ___” 51 Berra and Bear 44 Friend of Wynken and Blynken 52 Dancer Charisse 45 Side roads 53 Pest for a rose 46 Drunk or wealthy, in slang 55 Jedi knight, e.g. 47 Birds with showy plumes 57 What Washington couldn’t tell 48 Movie star’s milieu 58 “Lemon” or “lime” ender 49 “Gilligan’s Island” skipper portrayer 59 Best-selling window treatment? 54 Site of dozens of keys 64 “The best is ___ to come!” 56 Buckeye State 65 Part of a car’s steering system 57 Pierce portrayer on classic TV 66 Victoria and Albert’s river 60 Memorable time in history 67 ‘60s radical sit-in grp. 61 Undergo decomposition 68 Beethoven’s “Moonlight ___” 62 Pipe elbow 69 Kind of child 63 “The Bridge of San Luis ___”

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Little Shop of Horrors Book and lyrics by Howard Ashman Music by Alan Menken Based on the film by Roger Corman Screenplay by Charles Griffith

Don’t miss this out-of-this-world musical experience. Charming, tuneful and hilarious, this spoof of 1950s sci-fi movies will have you screaming with laughter! Sept. 29 — Oct. 9, 2011 Originally produced by WPA Theatre (Kyle Renick, Producing Director) | Originally produced at the Orpheum Theatre, New York City by the WPA Theatre, David Geffen, Cameron Mackintosh and the Shubert Organization | Originally Directed by Howard Ashman with Musical Staging by Edie Cowan | Is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI) | All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 | Phone: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 | www.MTIShows.com

Students: $10 $6 student tickets on Wednesday, Oct. 5 Bring a friend on Oct. 6, and get two for $12. Evan P. and Marion Helfaer Theatre Order tickets by phone or online: 414.288.7504 | theatretickets.marquette.edu

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Sports

The Marquette Tribune

PAGE 12

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Women’s Volleyball

Carlson ‘bull’ies South Florida for Big East win

Middle hitter named to honor roll for first time By Mark Strotman mark.strotman@marquette.edu

A week ago, senior outside hitter Ciara Jones dominated the left side in a five-set loss (3-2) to Minnesota, tallying 24 kills and finishing with a .432 hitting percentage. Sunday afternoon at the Al McGuire Center, Danielle Carlson took her turn in the spotlight. The junior middle hitter tied a career-high with 15 kills and added four blocks in Marquette’s four-set win over South Florida (5-9, 1-1 Big East) to open Big East play, en route to a nomination to the Big East Honor Roll. Senior outside hitter Ashley Beyer had a double-double with a team-high 16 kills and 18 digs while freshman setter Chelsea Heier added 53 assists. But it was Carlson who led the Golden Eagles (10-4, 1-0 Big East) with an array of well-placed kills and booming spikes off South Florida miscues. “It doesn’t look real flashy at times, but she’s really just skilled at shot making, placing the ball correctly and, at times,

just thundering it,” coach Bond Shymansky said. “So it’s nice to have her in full rhythm as we get into conference play.” Carlson shook off a slow start by tallying nine of her 15 kills in the third and fourth sets. The junior put together a crucial stretch in the third set with a kill, a block and a kill on successive possessions to give the Golden Eagles a three-point advantage. South Florida defenders made life difficult for Jones and Beyer, who combined to hit just .182, but Carlson’s play helped counter-act that outside pressure from the Bulls. “I think that what’s really good about our team is if the outside swing isn’t working as well we have the right side and our middles that can take care of business,” Carlson said. “Our attack is so dynamic that it’s alright if one position isn’t totally on. We can get the other two positions going.” Beyer said Carlson’s presence was a key factor in the win. “It’s a relief to us outside when somebody else can handle you and help you out,” Beyer said. “When Danie gets on a roll, then they go on her, and we’re oneon-one. So it’s a relief to us and we can keep playing the way we know we can play.” The co-captain made the transition from outside hitter to

middle hitter in the offseason, filling the enormous shoes left by All-American Rabbecka Gonyo, who was third in the nation in hitting percentage a year ago. Carlson welcomed the position change and has made the transition in stride. For those who were quick to write off the middle hitter position following Gonyo’s gradua-

tion, Carlson has turned doubters into believers. She leads the Big East in hit percentage (.394) and is second on the team with 39 blocks, including a teamhigh nine solo blocks. Marquette exacted a bit of revenge with the win, as the Bulls had defeated the Golden Eagles in their last two Big East openers. Carlson said that motivation

pushed her and the team to begin conference play with a tally in the win column. “We wanted to beat USF,” she said. “We remember the last two years where we lost to them in our first Big East match, and that wasn’t going to happen again. We were determined to just get it done.”

Column

It’s time for a new trending topic Andrei Greska This is not another “why doesn’t Marquette have a football team” column. There have been enough of those. As awesome as it would be to have someone to root for on Saturday afternoons without having to betray the essence of being a Golden Eagle fan — I’m talking to you, Bucky fans — it ain’t happening. Yet, not having a pigskin-throwing team doesn’t have to bar us from enjoying some of the benefits of football season. I want the pageantry. I want the passion. I want the school spirit. I’m talking about a homecoming game. Obviously it’s difficult to have a homecoming football game without a football team — sorry club football, you don’t count. We do have a women’s volleyball team though. And both men’s and women’s soccer teams. Most importantly, we have basketball. Really good basketball. I propose we make Marquette Madness, Oct. 14, our “homecoming game.” This is something we need. Our student body is pathetic at supporting our teams. Whether it’s volleyball at the Al McGuire Center, soccer at Valley Fields or basketball at the Bradley Center, we are consistently underwhelming. We

fail to provide a proper home court advantage to our teams. Just this past weekend, the women’s soccer team played No. 20/24 Notre Dame, the defending national champions, and only 395 people were in attendance. How many of those were students? Probably about 50, given how well Notre Dame fans travel. It wasn’t any better at the Al either. As the women’s volleyball team devastated the South Florida Bulls, all of 240 people were in attendance. Of those people, I could count on my hands the number of students there and four of them were covering the game for this newspaper. It’s almost embarrassing seeing the apathetic nature of our fans. Both teams are very good this year and have a chance of winning Big East titles. Yet, less than 100 combined students bothered to go watch. Marquette needs an event to bring the student body out of its doldrums. Marquette Madness is packed year after year, so why not add a little excitement to that whole week? At Western Illinois, student groups and organizations compete against each other during the homecoming week in a variety of events, including attendance at games, dance-offs and boat races. During the fill-the-gym event for a women’s volleyball game, Western Illinois packed 826 people for the game, a whopping 639 more than its average attendance before then. We could do that. Easily. See Topic, page 13

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Sophomore Courtney Mrotek (15) and junior Danielle Carlson (8) go up for a block Sunday against South Florida.

men’s Soccer

Freshman finds a home

Nortey taken in by family from Chicago area By Mike Nelson michael.e.nelson@marquette.edu

Editor’s note: This is the second part of a two-part profile on freshman James C. Nortey. For the first part, check the Tribune’s website. Hotchkiss School was supposed to be C. Nortey’s only home. He traveled from the Right to Dream Academy in Accra, Ghana, to study and play soccer at the Connecticut boarding school. Nortey was destined to live in the isolation of dorm life on a new continent. But Jack Dickinson had other ideas. Dickinson was Nortey’s nextdoor neighbor and best friend when the two were freshmen in 2007. Thanksgiving break of that year, Dickinson — now a freshman at Duke — invited Nortey to Chicago to spend Thanksgiving with his family after hearing that Nortey would otherwise spend the break at Hotchkiss. English was still a struggle for Nortey at the time and he

couldn’t speak fluently. He couldn’t express himself. But Dickinson said everything Nortey needed said. He served as Nortey’s translator until Nortey, who spoke Ga, the local language in Accra, and Twi, the regional language, became comfortable enough with English, by the end of sophomore year. Nortey made an instant impact on members of the Dickinson family. They liked him. He liked them. And they gave Nortey an open invitation to come back to their home whenever he wanted. Dan Dickinson, Jack’s father, said the family didn’t know where the relationship would go or what it would turn into. But what it turned into was a relationship that would alter the lives of all involved. Nortey proceeded to spend every break he could with the Dickinson family. “When you cut through it all, he is a great person to be with,” Dan Dickinson said. “We have four kids and every one of our kids embraced him. We talked about it as a family about how lucky we are to have him as part of our family.” On a scale of one to 10, with 10 being most important, Nortey ranked the Dickinson

family as a 10, because upon his arrival at Hotchkiss, he “had nobody.” “Right now, they get me. They get everything that I’m about,” Nortey said. “They’re trying their best to let my dreams come true for me. And I’m not relying on them to do everything for me. But I know they are there for me. If I hit the wall, and I cannot go anymore, they are there to help me out.” While Nortey was not provided an actual host family through either the Right to Dream Academy or Hotchkiss, he said the See Home, page 16

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Freshman James C. Nortey

SPORTS

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Tribune 13 TRIBUNE Game of the Week

Sports Calendar

Tuesday 29

Wednesday 28

Women’s Volleyball at Sacred Heart – 6 p.m.

Wed.

28 Men’s Soccer vs. Wisconsin - 7 p.m.

Fri.

Men’s Soccer at Wisconsin– 7 p.m.

Thur.

29

Fri.

Women’s Volleyball vs. Sacred Heart - 6 p.m.

30

Men’s Tennis at Ball State Invitational - All Day

Sat.

30 Women’s Soccer vs. Louisville - 6 p.m.

1

Men’s Soccer vs. Rutgers at Valley Fields - 7:05 p.m.

Sat.

Men’s Soccer at Wisconsin 7 p.m. - Madison, Wis.

Marquette Badgers 8..................Second Half Goals...............8 1.5..................Goals Per Game..............1.62 60....................Corner Kicks....................33 the facts Coming off back to back road victories, the Marquette men’s soccer team will look to make it a turkey when it faces the Badgers in an in-state Showdown on Wednesday. Wisconsin comes in with a 4-3-1 record, having gone unbeaten in its previous three matches. All bets are off when these two meet, though, and you can be sure to expect a thriller in the state capital.

1

Cross Country at Greater Louisville Classic - 8:30 a.m.

Women’s soccer

They still believe: MU takes out Irish once again

Women extend winning streak at the Valley to 16 By Michael LoCicero michael.locicero@marquette.edu

Take care of business at home. That seems to be the mantra for the Marquette women’s soccer team (10-2-0, 3-1-0 Big East) this year. The Golden Eagles beat DePaul 2-1 Thursday and defending national champion Notre Dame 3-2 Sunday, both in overtime, to vault into sole possession of second place in the American Division of the Big East conference. Sunday’s win was particularly impressive considering the treacherous conditions from overnight rain that pervaded throughout the match. The game began under threatening skies and opened up about halfway through the first half, leading to many slippages from both teams, making even the most mundane tasks like dribbling and passing difficult. “I think we got used to it, but there were a bunch of slips and misplays,” sophomore midfielder Taylor Madigan said. “But the conditions were the same for both teams.” Madigan ripped a shot off the outstretched hand of junior goalkeeper Maddie Fox into the net just 18 seconds into the first overtime period to beat Notre Dame (4-5-1, 1-2-1 Big East) for just the second time in program history. The win gave the Golden Eagles their fourth overtime victory in as many opportunities this season and pushed its unbeaten home winning streak to 16 games. “It keeps our spirit up. We definitely needed this game and this win,” sophomore forward Maegan Kelly said. “It’s just a push going forward in the season.” Thursday, Marquette found itself in a closer game than expected entering the night, having to get a few lucky breaks from the crossbar before freshman forward Mady Vicker took a perfect pass from sophomore midfielder Brittney Scott and finished low past the Blue Demons goalkeeper. DePaul (2-7-2, 0-2-2 Big East) came into the game 2-1-1 in its last four games after dropping its first five and put a big scare into Marquette. Kelly scored her 10th goal of the season just six minutes into the match, but DePaul got the equalizer from Morgan Celaya

in the 71st minute and had a few opportunities to get a potential game-winner before Vicker’s goal. “We really dominated the first half but didn’t necessarily have a lot of chances in the second half,” coach Markus Roeders said following Thursday’s game. “The tying goal was a little unfortunate, but in the last eight or so minutes of regulation, we really stepped up and continued it into overtime.” After Kelly’s goal in the 66th minute of the Notre Dame match, Marquette improved to 15-0-0 alltime. The final outcome was in doubt after the Fighting Irish’s Jessica Schuveiller blasted a perfect shot from 35 yards out that the outstretched arms of senior goalkeeper Natalie Kulla had no chance of saving. Schuveiller’s goal tied the game at 2-2 and set up Madigan’s goal in overtime. Even with key injuries to sophomore defender Megan Jaskowiak and senior forward Lindsey Page, Marquette’s depth proved insurmountable when Madigan’s golden goal improved Marquette’s record to 21-10-5 when playing National Division foes. “We’ve had some injuries but have a lot of great depth, and it’s good for some of the younger players to get some experience,” Roeders said.

Photo by Aaron Ledesma/aaron.ledesma@marquette.edu

Freshaman Vanessa Legault-Cordisco played 31 minutes against Depaul.

Continued from page 12:

Topic: Get Wade to MU Madness

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Sophomore Taylor Madigan scored the game-winner against Notre Dame.

There are three games the week of Madness beginning with women’s volleyball and soccer on Sunday, Oct. 9, and followed by men’s soccer that Wednesday. Create incentives for these groups to attend, and I guarantee increased attendance figures. On top of that, let’s get a common theme running through the school. During the Sweet 16 run last spring, the three-goggles became a Marquette symbol. Students, athletes and alumni all embraced it. His Majesty Dwyane Wade was asked to come to Madness by senior guard Darius Johnson-Odom on Twitter, and we’re running with it. I propose a hashtag that our basketball blog “Paint Touches” origi-

nated as our theme: #bringwadetomadness. Anyone with a Twitter or Facebook account, which should cover 99.9 percent of the student population, must use the hashtag at least once a day starting now. Once we get enough people in on it, we will begin to coordinate tweet times with the ultimate goal of getting it to trend nationally and having Wade come to Madness. Homecoming will only be considered a success if we can get Flash to show up. The gauntlet has been thrown. You truly want the “football experience,” then put your Tweets where your mouth is. We are Marquette, and we can make this happen. #bringwadetomadness andrei.greska@marquette.edu

14 Tribune

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women’s tennis brief

SPORTS

Tribune 15

Men’s golf

Sophomore three strokes behind lead

Senior Olga Fischer amassed a 3-1 singles record over the weekend to lead the Marquette women’s tennis team during its weekend competing at the Spartan Invitational in East Lansing, Mich. Senior Gillian Hush also notched a Sunday victory over By Trey Killian IPFW’s senior Raquel Vescovi, robert.killian@marquette.edu 6-1, 6-4, in Draw B. The Marquette men’s golf Earlier on Saturday, Fischer team finished up first round recorded a hard-fought victory over senior Anna Dushkina of play at the Cardinal Collegiate Purdue, 1-6, 6-1, 10-3. Fresh- yesterday, and despite currently man Ali Dawson, senior Kris- sitting in 13th place, the Golden tina Radan, and sophomore Ro- Eagles are only seven strokes cio Diaz all went 1-1 on the first off third place. The team shot a 297 overall, day of play. In doubles action, the duo of and sophomore Corey KoniecFischer and Diaz won the first zki is only three strokes off the match of play to move into the individual lead after firing a 70. winner’s bracket. But they fell Konieczki said he’s feeling conto senior Mariya Kovaleva and fident about his game and looks freshman Haley Craig of Illi- to continue to lead Marquette in nois-Chicago 8-4 in round two. the next round. “I had a few putting errors On day three, two Marquette doubles teams were victorious. The duo of freshman Ana Pimenta and Dawson beat IPFW’s senior Alex Forsyth and freshman Marcy Huck, 8-5, while Radan and Hush defeated redshirt junior Dana Guentert and sophomore Olga Chernova, of Michigan State, 8-5. The team now has three weeks off before heading to the ITA Midwest Regional Championship tournament in Columbus, Ohio.

Team sitting in bottom half after one round of play

in the first round which got me down a little bit, but I only missed one green on the first hole,” Konieczki said. “I feel like I just have to know I can win (today) and go out and shoot the lowest score possible.” Coach Steve Bailey said he was proud of the way Konieczki played and is confident that his team can make a run at a high tournament finish today. “If we can get our one and two guys to post good scores (today) and get those other three guys to show up then I think we have a good shot of making our way up the leaderboard,” Bailey said. A top-ten finish in the 18team field would be a welcomed boost to the young Golden Eagles after a disappointing 10th place finish out of 11 teams in last weekend’s season-opening tournament.

The tournament was shortened to 36 holes due to weather issues, but Bailey said that it didn’t affect his game plan or preparation for the second and final round of the tournament. “Typically in the final round a lot of the hole locations are a lot more difficult, and we don’t need to press or be too aggressive,” he said. “We just need to play smart golf, and I think if we do that the rest will take care of itself.” Freshman C.J. Swift shot a 73, Marquette’s second best score of the round, to finish in a 10-player tie for 22nd on the individual leaderboard. Swift said that he had faith in senior Matt Haase and sophomore Michael Motz to come through in the final round after what he described as uncharacteristically bad starts.

“Matt Haase and Michael Motz are usually the backbone of our team, so it was really surprising to see them both shoot 77s,” Swift said. “I know they both have really good game and they can easily turn it around tomorrow, finish a couple under par and get us right back in it.” Bailey said last weekend Marquette’s short game needed much improvement, and the team took some steps towards improvement in the first round. “I think our iron play was a lot better today, but we didn’t get as many opportunities short game-wise,” Bailey said. “Matt Haase converted on two out of three opportunities and I think most of the guys putted well. I think if we can keep that going it will bode well for tomorrow and will really continue to serve us all season.”

Men’s Tennis brief The Marquette men’s tennis team competed in the Tom Fallon Invitational this past weekend at Notre Dame, with most of the team’s success in doubles matches. Although the tandem of freshman Cameron Tehrani and sophomore Thibault Troude was the only one to win on Sunday, three out of four teams earned victories on both Friday and Saturday. On both days the tandems of junior Otavio Perim and freshman James Stark, senior Drake Kakar and freshman David Packowitz and senior Jonathan Schwerin and freshman Vukasin Teofanovic defeated teams from Notre Dame, Western Michigan and Illinois State respectively. Freshmen shined in singles with Stark, Tehrani and Teofanovic leading the team with straight set victories on Sunday. Perim also joined them, collecting a win over Western Michigan. Perim experienced his first match loss this season after posting a perfect 3-0 record at the Milwaukee Classic (Sept. 16-18). Schwerin, the team’s only competing senior, posted two singles victories before falling short on Sunday. The tournament featured Illinois State, Western Michigan, Notre Dame, Marquette and Cleveland State.

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Photos courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Sophomore Corey Konieczki (left) leads Marquette after one round of the Cardinal Collegiate. Senior Matt Haase (right) is seven strokes behind Konieczki.

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16 Tribune

comes the sun. heerenjoy.

SPORTS

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

here comes the sun, here comes the sun, and i say itʼs all right. little darling, itʼs been a long cold lonely winter. little darling, it feel like years since itʼs been here. here comes the sun, here comes the sun and i say itʼs all right. little darling, the smiles returning to the faces. little darling, it seems like years since itʼs been here. here comes the sun, here comes the sun and i say itʼs all right. sun, sun, sun, here it comes...sun, sun, sun, here it comes...little darling, i feel that ice is slowly melting. little darling, it seems like years since itʼs been clear. here comes the sun, friends theallmarquette here sincerely, comes the your sun, and i sayatitʼs right. itʼs tribune. all right

October 8th 11am-2pm

Sept. 29 2006 He was the greatest player to ever don the blue and gold. And this was the day he was immortalized. It was announced that Dwyane Wade, the current Miami Heat superstar who led the Golden Eagles to the the Final Four in 2003 and won an NBA championship in 2006, would have his No. 3 jersey retired by the university. It seemed fitting that the retiring of Wade’s number would break some of the rules. It had been Marquette precedent that only players who actually graduated would be eligible to have their number retired, but obviously

Wade was a special circumstance. He had just come off, arguably, one of the greatest NBA Finals performance of all-time, averaging 34.7 points and 7.8 rebounds a game, while earning the Finals MVP award. His dominance since coming into the league thrust Marquette into the national spotlight and helped push the basketball program into elite territory. So if history was to be rewritten for any player, it was going to be Wade. His jersey was retired on Feb. 3, during a home game against Providence. And now his legendary No. 3 dangles from the rafters for all the world to see.

Continued from page 12:

Home: Dickinsons embraced Nortey as one of their own

natural bond that was formed with the Dickensons earns them that title. In return, the Dickinsons have embraced him as one of their own. “We’re fortunate to have him as part of our family,” Dan

Dickinson said. “Through all his challenges, this kid has incredible optimism, incredible fortitude and character and ability and perseverance. It’s really inspirational.”

Photo courtesy of Marquette Athletics

Freshman forward C. Nortey was named Big East freshman of the week after scoring two goals against Syracuse in the Big East opener.


Sept. 27th 2011 : The Marquette Tribune