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environment only major work needed is ballast water intake/discharge and power line connection. In most cases, work can be completed in approximately two weeks, about seven days less than installation in an engine room. The work does not require cutting of the ship’s side shell, and can be completed at pierside, eliminating the need to drydock. The container-type BWTS is claimed to be ideal for ships that do not have enough space in the engine room for related systems and piping. Hyde Marine says that it already has experience with retrofit installations of its Hyde Guardian BWTS. The compact system has flexibility in module design and the ability to be skid mounted or installed as separate components. In particular, Hyde Marine was the first company to install ballast water treatment systems on cruise ships, and it continues to build compact, customizable, and modular systems to meet the specific needs of retrofit and newbuilds for cruise ships and ships of every class. Hyde’s typical solution uses a component system with filters and UV reactors located in the vessel’s engine room near the ballast pumps. Power panels are installed in the ship’s engine room or machinery spaces, and a control panel is installed in the control room with additional remote panels either installed in the engine room or directly tied into the ship’s automation system to allow operation of the system from numerous locations convenient to the crew. For space-constrained situations in larger vessels like tankers, a typical Hyde Marine solution uses ATEX-approved filters and UV reactors located in the vessel’s pump room or in a deck house above the main deck with power panels installed in the ship’s engine room or machinery spaces. The control panel can be installed in the cargo control room with additional remote panels either installed in the

engine room or directly tied into the ship’s automation system to allow operation of the system from numerous locations convenient to the crew. Fred Loomis, Director of Technical Projects for W&O Supply, which was recently named as Hyde Marine’s exclusive distributor in the U.S. and Canada for the Hyde GUARDIAN Ballast Water Treatment System, sees a potential log jam ahead as the deadline for the regulations gets closer. As deadlines come into play, the number of qualified systems, experienced installers and just getting through the approval process will be tight. Companies should really spend time now planning ahead of the curve. Loomis advises that one of the main concerns customers should have in choosing a retrofit installer is their experience in the field of ballast water treatment.

CRUNCHING THE NUMBERS Probably the question of least practical interest to shipowners at this stage is how the various systems do the job. IMO Type Approval should provide a reasonable guarantee that the treated ballast will meet the required discharge standards. If a system is also on the U.S. Coast Guard list, shipowners have the added assurance of knowing that all the tests done to gain the IMO approval have been very closely scrutinized by the Coast Guard. Whether the systems work by filtration, UV radiation or dosing with chlorine or some other “active substance,” it is only of interest to the extent that they affect maintenance costs and complexity of operation. The remaining questions come down to “will it fit, what will the installed cost be, what will it cost to operate, and, finally, can I get one in time to meet the required installation date?” ■

Filtration – Efficient stacked-disk technology. Modular design. Reliable automatic backwashing. UV Treatment – High-intensity, medium pressure UV Treatment. No Chemicals – Safe and environmentally friendly. No increased corrosion risk. Easy Service – Simple, automatic operation. Low operating cost.

A CALGON CARBON COMPANY

IMO Type ApprOved

+1.724.218.7001 I sales@hydemarine.com I www.hydemarine.com

36 MARINE LOG June 2013

A CALGON CARBON COMPANY


June 2013 Marine Log Magazine