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COVERING BOGALUSA, FRANKLINTON, ANGIE, VARNADO, CLIFTON, ENON, MT. HERMON, PINE, SHERIDAN, STATE LINE, THOMAS, WARNERTON AND ALL OF WASHINGTON PARISH.

Recreation · Medical · Things To Do · Education · History Shopping/Fashion · Restaurants · Important Numbers

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Highly trained and certified medics are ready 24/7 to provide high level non-emergency and emergency care across communities in Washington Parish.

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Here’s Washington Parish! 1

Table Of Contents Washington Parish Courthouse

Table of Contents ...................................... 2-3 Washington Parish ..................................... 4-9 City of Bogalusa .................................... 10-11 Town of Franklinton ............................... 12-13

Bogalusa Chamber of Commerce ..... 14-15 Franklinton Chamber of Commerce ... 16-17

Washington Parish History .................... 18-23 Bogalusa Driving Tour........................... 24-30 Franklinton Driving Tour ......................... 31-37 Fashion/Shopping ................................. 38-51 Genco Home Here’s Washington Parish!™ magazine is wholly owned by M & M Publishing. No part or whole of Here’s Washington Parish!™ may be reproduced by any means or in any media, including, but not limited to, print, electronic media, video or audio. All images, illustrations, copy, design and maps, unless otherwise specified, are intellectual property of M & M Publishing. Reproduction of any images, illustrations, copy, design, or maps is expressly prohibited in any media, in any form, without the express written consent of M & M Publishing. ©2012, All Rights Reserved, M & M Publishing, 601-264-7574 2 Here’s Washington Parish!

Recreation ................... 52-58 Things To Do ...................... 68 Medical ........................ 69-74 Retirement ........................ 75 Education .................... 76-79 Restaurants .................. 80-85 Important Numbers .... 86-87

Aulton Cryer selling veggies at Franklinton Farmer’s Market Farmer’s Mkt. Info 839-3569

Washington Parish Memorial by Pearl River

Advertiser’s Index ............. 88 Photography: Front cover photos: Mile Branch Settlement photo, Marsha Olderr; Mardis Gras reveler photo, courtesy of Doctor Who, all rights reserved. Driving Tour Photos: Mark Olderr, Marsha Olderr, Mary Sergeant. Historical Postcards courtesy of the Larry Hunt Collection. Contributing Photographers: Mary Sergeant, Linda Crain, Washington Board of Tourism, Mark Olderr, Marsha Olderr. Maps: M & M Staff Writers: Mark Olderr, Mary Sergeant Graphic Artists: Monica Reinfeld (Lead Graphic Artist), Missy Ketterling, Lacey Wilkens A Special Thanks to the Bogalusa Chamber of Commerce & Marilyn Bateman, Franklinton Chamber of Commerce & Linda Crain, Washington Parish Tourism Commission & Kathi Mayor, Greg Genco and Patti Lucchesi. Also, a Special Thanks to Larry Hunt for providing historical information and photos. Finally, a Special Thanks to Michael Godwin for his assistance in putting this magazine together. Night night. Here’s Washington Parish! 3

Dear Readers, I am Richard N. Thomas, Jr., Washington Parish President. As President of Washington Parish, I would like to take this opportunity to welcome you to our parish and hope that your visit whether vacationing or business, is all that you expected and that you will return again with family and friends to visit. Washington Parish is home to over 47,000 residents. My goal is to better ensure and preserve the quality of life in Washington Parish. Located in the southeast corner, “toe of the boot” of the State of Louisiana we are known for agriculture, timber and paper industry, watermelons and our annual Washington Parish Free Fair. Washington Parish has an abundance of communities that are the makeup of this wonderful parish. A “Sportsman’s Paradise” Washington Parish situated in the rolling hills, with two major rivers is a playground for the outdoor enthusiast. Offering boating, hunting, fishing, tubing, canoeing and kayaking to just name a few of the activities enjoyed. South of Franklinton on Highway 25 is Bogue Chitto State Park, a state of the art park on 1,786 acres, with amenities for families who will enjoy camping, hiking and water activities on the beautiful Bogue Chitto River. Ben’s Creek Wildlife Management Area located West of Bogalusa with 13,044 acres, offers for the avid hunter, game such as deer, wild turkey, rabbits, quail, woodcock and squirrel in the vast terrain of rolling hills and Loblolly Pines. If golfing is your sport, we have 3 courses in Washington Parish, Bogalusa Country Club is a 9-hole course, while Franklinton Country Club and Gemstone offer 18 holes and open daily for your convenience. We hope you would consider making Washington Parish your new home; we have two schools systems Washington Parish Schools and Bogalusa City Schools along with Bowling Green Schook, Ben’s Ford Christian School and Annunciation Catholic School. Washington Parish is also home to Northshore Technical Community College. Washington Parish has two major hospitals, LSU-Bogalusa Medical Center and Riverside Medical Center offering doctors and medical facilities for our surrounding communities. Industry in our parish is growing daily; restaurants, small and large businesses alike are making Washington Parish their home. We are thankful for the investments that they are making in our parish and the opportunity for growth and employment for our residents. As Parish President and a lifelong resident of Washington Parish, I am proud of our parish and the people who reside here. Community leaders and organizations are working together to move our parish forward. I hope that you have a great experience while visiting our parish and that you will come back to visit us again.

Richard N. Thomas Jr., President Washington Parish 4 Here’s Washington Parish!

Here’s Washington Parish! 5

Tyl To er MStown

WASHINGTON WASHINGTON 438

Mount Hermon

25

Silver Creek Campground

38

BOGUE

od To Kentwo

Warnerton

38

438

38 430

Clifton

436

Recreational Facility* To Tangipahoa

440 450

10

To Wilmer

16

ATV Trail Bike Route**

m

To A

Blueberries Camping

Golf Horse Trail Hunting RV’s Skeet Tubing

*The Recreational Facility just north of Franklinton will be officially named later in 2012.

10

BEN’S CREEK WILDLIFE MGMT. AREA

16

437

1072

Enon

VE

To Folsom

Fishing

Franklinton Airport

RI

450

Canoeing

439

FRANKLINTON

Bogue Chitto State Park

ite

Lee Mem Forest

Sheridan

10

25

Pine 62

D.B.Varnado Store Museum

Washington Parish Fairgrounds

CHI TTO

The Washington Parish Free Fair is believed to be the largest fair in the country that still has free admission!

State Line Thomas 62

R

16

60

60 Plainview

d orl g W bin e’s o Tu t yn t i a h W ue C Bog Isabel

**The Adventure Cyclying Association Southern Tier Route runs through the middle of Washington Parish. FOR MORE INFORMATION FOR MORE INFORMATION LOOK ININTHE TODO DO SECTION I LOOK THETHINGS THINGS TO THIS MAGAZINE SECTION OF THIS MAGAZINE. .

6 Here’s Washington Parish!

To Sandy Hook MS

PARISH PARISH Pus

Angie

hep

438

Angie is the home of two Bluegrass Festivals, one in the Spring and one in the Fall.

Great Southern RV Park

ata p

a

21

L

EA R

P

eek Cr Varnado

m. t

436 rr Ca t R. por ge ir or . A Ge em M

E

The Museums Cassidy Pk.

BOGALU SA

0

Hwy. 10 is part of the Zachary Taylor Pkwy. which will extend 210 miles from Alexandria, LA to Poplarville, MS and will eventually be four-laned all the way.

Pick Your Own Blueberries

To Poplarville, MS

Bogalusa Mardi Gras Parade

Rio

Pearl Canal

1074

To Sun

g

River

1075

Inc. City

RIVER

21

The MCCA Mardi Gras Parade is the largest Mardi Gras Parade The MCCA Mardi Gras Parade for cities under 15,000 is the largest Mardi Gras Parade people in the world! for cities under 15,000 IN people in the world!

Parish Seat Town State Hwy.

Fox Squirrel

4-Lane Hwy. 10

Hwy. Number Airport Rivers/Creek Zachary Taylor Parkway Here’s Washington Parish! 7

Washington Parish Statistics 2010 Population 47,168

OCCUPATIONS** Service Occupations

Production, transportation, and material moving occupations

(an increase of 7.4% from 2000)

20.0 13.8

Land Area 669.53 square miles Persons per square mile 70.4 Micropolitan Statistical Area: Bogalusa, LA Micropolitan Area Building Permits issued 2010: 68 Retail Sales $326,287,000.00 Per Capita Retail Sales $7,241.00

Natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations

15.5 25.3 25.4

Management, business, science, and arts occupations

Statistics taken from 2010 U.S. General Census unless otherwise noted. ** These statistics taken from 2006-2010 Census' American Community Survey Estimates

Sales and office occupations

INCOME AND BENEFITS** MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (DOLLARS) - $30,363 MEAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (DOLLARS) - $43,635 16.7%

10.3%

16.0%

Less than $10,000

$10,000$14,999

$15,000$24,999

8 Here’s Washington Parish!

12.2%

14.3%

14.9%

7.3%

6.0%

.8%

1.4%

$25,000- $35,000- $50,000- $75,000- $100,000- $150,000- $200,000 $34,999 $49,999 $74,999 $99,999 $149,000 $199,999 or more

Washington Parish Statistics INDUSTRIES** 5.1%

9.8%

8.2%

Agriculture, Construction Manufacturing Forestry, Fishing and Hunting, Mining

2.8% Wholesale Trade

15.5%

5.3%

0.6%

3.7%

Retail Transportation Information Finance, Trade and Warehousing, Insurance, Utilities Real Estate, Rental & Leasing

6.1%

24.6%

6.1%

5.8%

6.5%

Professional, Educational, Arts, Entertainment, Other Services Public admin. Scientific, Healthcare, Recreation, Except Public Management, Social Assistance Accommodation, Administration Administrative, Food Services Waste Management Services

EDUCATION Bachelor’s Degree +

11.8

77.3 21%

MEAN COMMUTE TIME

High School Grads 25+

31.3 min.

RACE White 66.7%

Statistics taken from 2010 U.S. General Census unless otherwise noted. ** These statistics taken from 2006-2010 Census' American Community Survey Estimates

Black 31.0% American Indian 0.3% Two or More Races 1.1% Hispanic 1.9%

AGE

Persons under 18 Persons under 5

6.8 Persons 65 +

25.2 51.1 14.5

Here’s Washington Parish! 9

Dear Readers, The City of Bogalusa sits at a crossroads. Not only are we at the crossroads of Louisiana Highways 10 and 21, we are also at a crossroads from our storied past, to our bright future. Ever since our virgin pine forests caught the attention of the Goodyear family of New York, we have been a city whose economy was driven by forest products. Today we are proud that International Paper operates a paper mill and converting plant in Bogalusa. While forest products are still a major driver of our economy, we have become a regional center for healthcare. The LSU Bogalusa Medical Center offers a variety of healthcare specialties and we are tremendously proud of the Rural Family Practice residency program that trains competent and dedicated family physicians to serve in rural and often under-served populations. We look to this combination of programs to establish Bogalusa as a premier health-care center for southeast Louisiana. I am proud to be the mayor of this city where family, friendships and faith are our cornerstones. Our faith community is strong and diverse, our people are friendly and our community is like a family. We are proud of our Northshore Technical and Community College, Sullivan Campus, which is one of the fastest growing schools of its size in the nation. We are educating our community today for the jobs that will drive our city’s economy tomorrow. You will find a variety of shopping experiences from the nationwide concerns such as WalMart to small locally owned shops and restaurants. Just the names will make you smile, “The Green Goat” and the “Cuckoo’s Nest” are two of our shops with intriguing names and you will find wonderful eateries like Vicki’s Café and Chit Chat Parlor. Every door you enter, will lead you into a friendly place that will make you feel at home. We are bordered on the east by the Pearl River which offers many recreational opportunities. Many parks and playgrounds are present in our City. Cassidy Park is undergoing a transformation with the building of a new performance pavilion and the implementation of an exciting, forward looking master plan. The park is home to some of our most revered festival events such as Festival in the Park, Wild Game and Barbeque CookOff, Christmas in the Park and our newest festival, the Bogalusa Blues and Heritage Festival. Add to that the festivity of a Mardi Gras parade that is the culmination of the Carnival season and a Fourth of July Celebration with a pageant, parade and fireworks, and you have got small town living at its best. We have much to be thankful for in our City. We are working hard to protect our investments, create new opportunities for our citizens and investors and make progress in providing economic opportunities and improving our quality of life. As Mayor, I pledge to always work to promote our City and to Build a Better Bogalusa. Sincerely,

Charles E. Mizell Mayor

10 Here’s Washington Parish!

Here’s Washington Parish! 11

Dear Readers, The Town of Franklinton, located on the banks of the scenic Bogue Chitto River, is home to about four thousand people. The settlement dates from the year 1819 when its founder, John Bickham, donated thirty acres of land on which to create a permanent parish seat for the newly created Washington Parish. It was not until March 7, 1861, however, that Franklinton was officially chartered by the signing of the Louisiana Legislative Act 96, incorporating Franklinton as a town. Franklinton has retained its unique small-town, authentic Southern atmosphere while welcoming new citizens, new industry and improved infrastructure. Our citizens, because of their churches, schools, businesses and neighborliness, along with the dedication and forethought of our former and present leaders and citizens, take pride in calling Franklinton their hometown. Franklinton is a diverse community with an ever-widening economic base. From local entrepreneurs to mid-size industry, modern public and private schools, and a medical community which includes family and specialty practitioners, clinics, home health agencies, providers for the care of both our elderly and mentally challenged citizens and a modern, fullservice inpatient hospital, Franklinton offers a quaint, but vibrant community for its citizens. The opportunity for worship is very evident in our community with a wide variety of denominations offering services for the spiritual growth of our children, youth, adults and senior citizens. The people of Franklinton are very proud of the influence their town has had on the history of Southeast Louisiana, and rightly so. By acknowledging and preserving our past we take an important step in solidifying our future. Franklinton boasts of seven structures that have been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. These structures include Franklinton High/Jr. High School, the Greenlaw House, the Knight Cabin, the Robert H. Babington House, the Sylvest House, the Thomas M. Babington House and the D.A. Varnado and Son Store/Museum. A very active art, cultural and recreational area, Franklinton is the home of the nation's largest free fair, the Washington Parish Free Fair. Thousands of residents and visitors are welcomed to "The Fair City" each October for four days of entertainment, food, crafts, rodeos, carnival rides, an authentic pioneer village and just plain fun! The beautiful, pine treeladen grounds along Mile Branch are used throughout the year for other cultural activities, such as the Mile Branch Pioneer Christmas Celebration, and as walking and running paths. The Varnado Store Museum in the downtown area, offers rotating exhibits along with permanent historical artifacts of interest to local residents and visitors. Children and adults have access to a modern library at the Franklinton Branch of the Washington Parish Library. The library, is expanding its computer availability and genealogical information, and is drawing patrons from near and far. The Washington Parish Art Association, the Franklinton Community Theater, and various, social and service clubs and organizations enhance community involvement and social opportunities for Franklinton's citizens. The recently completed Bogue Chitto State Park, located six miles south of Franklinton, is one of the state's "Premier Parks". Camping and meeting facilities, picnic areas, a children's water park, fishing areas and canoe and tubing services bring locals and tourists to the park and to our town for fun and relaxation. As you see, we have much to be thankful for in our community. As our forefathers did, we must continue to be diligent and wise in regard to the growth of our town and the opportunities afforded our present and future citizens. As your mayor, it is a privilege and honor to serve the citizens of Franklinton. Let us continue to "Make Franklinton Better Together". Sincerely,

M. Wayne Fleming Mayor of the Town of Franklinton 12 Here’s Washington Parish!

Here’s Washington Parish! 13

Bogalusa Chamber of Commerce Members 2011/2012 Aaron’s Sales & Lease Adams, Jim –Inc. All Care Eye Center Allied Materials AmeraCare Hospice/Home Health American Legion Post 24 Animal Clinic of Bogalusa Annunciation Catholic School AT&T Augustine, Ramona B & B Petroleum Bass Concrete LLC Ben’s Ford Christian School Better Business Bureau Bill McGehee Insurance Bino’s Seafood Black, Robert-Attorney/Judge Body Parts, LLC Bogalusa Country Club Bogalusa Credit Bogalusa Indemnity Brannan/Moorman, LLC-Attorneys Burger King of Bogalusa Burris, Mike-CPA C & F Pharmacy Camellia Home Health/Hospice Capital One Bank Care Physical Therapy Cassidy Park Museums Citizens Savings Bank City of Bogalusa Coastal Orthotics/Prosthetics Coca-Cola, McComb Div. Cook-Richmond Funeral Home Crain, Johnny-Clerk of Court Daily News, The Davis Products Delta Printing Co. Discount Tire & Auto Double D Meat EdwardJones Investments Egan Healthcare Entergy Enterprise-Rent-A-Car Esma’s Antiques & Collectibles Eye-$ave Optical Farm Bureau-Washington Parish Feliciana Hospice/Palliative Care First Pentecostal Church Florida Parishes Juvenile Detention Ctr. Food Depot Gayle’s Jewelers Genco’s Amusements Gilscot-Guidroz International Graham, Oneita-City Council Golden Pear Restaurant Hancock Bank 14 Here’s Washington Parish!

HL Brownstone Hope House Children’s Advocacy Image Works/Signs & Graphics International Paper (was Temple-Inland) Lamb, Robert Jr.-CPA Lee Finance Co. LeMaire, Mitou-DDS Lewis, R. Bradley- Attorney Louisiana Dental Center LSU-BMC Health Sciences Ctr. M & M Publishing MacKenzie Co. Magee Financial Magic City Ice Magic Touch of Health Maria’s Restaurant McDonald’s of Bogalusa McKenzie RV Sales Mehle, Charles-DDS Miles, Joe N. & Sons Milltown Cabinets Modern Finance Moore & Jenkins Insurance Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church NAPA Auto NECO Neighborhood Housing Services Nellie Byers Training Center Nielsen’s City Drug Store Nielsen’s Pharmacy/Medical Equipment NorthShoreLinks.com Northshore Technical Community College-Sullivan Campus Ochsner Health Center O’Reilly Auto Parts Painted Elephant, The Parish Computer Solutions Parker, Gary-DDS Patton’s Sausage Co. Inc. Poole-Ritchie Funeral Home RCC-Rayburn Correctional Center Real Records, Inc. Regional Healthcare Center-Dr. Casama Reed, Walter-District Attorney Resource Bank Resthaven Living Center Rotary Club of Bogalusa Schilling Greenhouses Snap Fitness Sonic of Bogalusa Southeast LA Home Health, Inc. State Farm Insurance-Ross Chaisson Surgical Eye Associates Tchefuncte Cardiovascular Temple-Inland (now International Paper) Therapeutic Concepts, Ltd. Thomas, Richard Ned Washington Parish President Timberlands Time & Temperature of Washington Parish

Tractor Supply Co. Travelers’ Rest Motel/Mobile Home Park Travis’ Grocery United Way of SE LA Serving Washington Parish Vital Link, A Home Care Co. Walmart of Bogalusa Washington Parish Sheriff’s Office Washington Parish Tax Assessor Washington Parish Tourism Commission Washington Television-Ch. 17 WBOX-AM/FM WEDF-Washington Economic Development Foundation Western Sizzlin Whitney National Bank YMCA YoYo’s Bar & Grill Restaurants Youth Service Bureau/CASA YWCA Zellco Federal Credit Union Zesto of Bogalusa

2011 Board of Directors:

Officers: President: Jerry Bailey 1st Vice-President: Regina Runfalo 2nd Vice-President: Ramona Augustine Secretary: Marsha Hunt Adams Treasurer: Adrian Case Board Members: Greg Castorena, Robin Day, Phyllis Freeman, Marcelle Hanemann, Monica Moses, Haley Nobles, Billy Potter and Stephanie Spikes.

Thanks from the Board of Directors to these businesses, professionals, organizations and individuals for maintaining their membership in the Bogalusa Chamber of Commerce. 2012 Board of Directors:

Officers: President: Regina Runfalo 1st Vice-President: Robin Day 2nd Vice-President: Greg Castorena Secretary: Ramona Augustine Treasurer: Monica Moses Board Members: Marsha Hunt Adams, Jerry Bailey, Adrian Case, Phyllis Freeman, Haley Nobles, Billy Potter, Stephanie Spikes, Chris Workman Here’s Washington Parish! 15

Adveon Solutions AGA Shoe Boutique Allen and Frederick - Attorneys Allstate – Chauppetta Ins. Agency Andre, Irvin and Kathy Andrew’s Computer Repair & Service ARB - Blossman Petroleum Associated Hearing Bickham, Inc. Bill McGehee Insurance Inc. Bogue Chitto Canoeing and Tubing

Booty, Loretta Brannan & Moorman – Law Offices Brian E. Taylor Tax & Accounting Services Brooks, Karen Brumfield, Ronald J. Burger King - Dunaway Food Service Burris, William H. - Attorney Café Bouchee’ Capital One Bank Care Physical Therapy Cargill Animal Nutrition Children’s International Medical Group Circle T Farm Supply Inc.

Citizens Savings Bank Corkern, Ginger Crain and Sons Funeral Home Crain Funeral Home, Inc. Creel Insurance Crown Auto Sales, Inc. Dairy Farmers of America Darwin Sharp Construction Davis Products Co. Decorating Showroom Direct Wireless Egan Healthcare of Northshore Eleventh Ave. (11th) Garage Enterprise Rent-A-Car

Knight Law Offices Knight, Judge William J. (Rusty) Kuhn, G. Wayne – Attorney Lacox, Inc. Lamb, Hal Leader Printing and Office Supplies Inc Lee Finance of Franklinton Inc Louisiana Castle Magee Autoplex Magee Financial Margie’s Florist Market Max Maurice Magee Furniture

McDaniel, Bobby McDonald’s – Thomas Mgmt. Group McGuire, Lawrence and Claire McNeal Investment Group Mike’s BBQ Restaurant Mike’s Flooring Minda B. Raybourn CPA Monograms Plus Moore and Jenkins Insurance Moseley’s Jewelers Murphy Bateman Building Supplies Northshore Links.com Orman and Bickham Real Estate

Our Renthouse Equipment Parish Credit Parish Disposal, Inc. Pizza Inn - Southern Pizza Company Popeyes - Premium Food Concepts, Inc. Posey, Aubrey Remedies Resource Bank Riverside Medical Center Riverview Apartments Rotary Club of Franklinton Rural Franklinton Water Corporation Salvage Store #2

Franklinton Chamber of Commerce Members 2012

16 Here’s Washington Parish!

Era Leader – Franklinton Publishing Erwin, Charlotte Excel Home Health Fair City RV Sales & Service Family Medical Clinic Farm Bureau Felder, Joe First Finance Co. of Franklinton Foret, Dr. Gerald Forshag’s Drug Store Franklinton Area Economic Development Foundation Franklinton Association for Challenged Citizens

Franklinton Country Club Franklinton Title Bureau & Ins. Agency Franklinton’s Grill Fred’s #1665 Gallaspy, Dixie Garden Spot of Franklinton Gardner Realtors/Folsom Office Glen’s Electric and Security Glendale Properties LLC Good Samaritan Living Center Graham’s Quality Auto Grand Isle Shipyard Graves Plumbing H & R Block

Hall’s Hardware Hancock Bank Heritage Manor Hillcrest Baptist Church Home and Garden Club Hunt Brothers of Louisiana Jackie’s Corner Jeanna Wheat’s Pools & Spa JMO Lawn Services John Burris Web Design Jones Ready Mix Kaylor’s Accounting Service Inc Ken Knight Creative Photography King’s Unique Beauty Salon & Boutique

Shedd, Tom Silver Creek Camp Grounds Smith, Phillip – CPA Southeast LA Home Health Spencer, Charlotte State Farm Insurance Subway Sunshine Equipment Co. Surgical Eye Associates Tate’s Tax Service Temple-Inland Thigpen Concrete Materials, Inc. Town of Franklinton

Truxillo, Terrence H., D.D.S. Twice As Nice Consignment Ultra Care Unified Recovery Group – I.E.D. United Way of Washington Area Varnado Store Museum Walker Company (The) Washington Educational Assoc. Fed Credit Union Washington Parish AssessorWashington Parish Clerk of Court Washington Parish Council on Aging

Washington Parish Government Washington Parish Master Gardeners Washington Parish School Board Washington Parish Sheriff’s Office Washington-St. Tammany Electric Coop Waverley Club Wendy’s WFCG 107.3 - Southwest Broadcasting Whitney National Bank Winbury Club Wyble, John Zellco Federal Credit Union Here’s Washington Parish! 17

Washington Parish History T

he Spanish explorer Ferdinand de Soto’s was the first European to discover the Mississippi River in 1541, but his actual route did not take him through the area now known as Louisiana according to most accounts. After de Soto died in 1542 on the banks of the Mississippi, close to the place that is now McArthur, AR (some claim he died in Louisiana), the remainder of the de Soto expedition floated down the Mississippi River through Louisiana past New Orleans and then headed to Mexico.

Sieur Pierre Le Moyne d’Iberville, Canadian by birth, sailed from France in 1698 and reached the Gulf of Mexico in the spring of 1699. D’Iberville cast anchor close to the mouth of the Perdido River, about 60 miles east of New Orleans. Soon, there were French colonies at Biloxi, Bay St. Louis, Ship Island and Cat Island. The French built a fort in Louisiana called Fort de la Boulaye in 1700, located in what is now Plaquemines Parish about one mile north of Phoenix. The fort was abandoned in 1707 though, because of relentless attacks by the aggressive local Native American tribes.

“Discovery of the Mississippi by DeSoto, A.D. 1541,” William H. Powell (1853)

In 1683, M. de La Salle (Rene-Robert de La Salle), during his first expedition, sailed to the mouth of the Mississippi River and claimed the entire middle part of North American in an area he named Louisiana for King Louis IV of France. During La Salle’s second doomed, perilous expedition, his own crew murdered him. Only 7 people, out of the 300 who had started out with La Salle, finally made their way back to Canada! The French explorer Rene-Robert de La Salle. La Salle claimed all land from the Appalachians to the Rockies for France.

18 Here’s Washington Parish!

Pierre Le Moyne, Sieur d’Iberville, French soldier and explorer.

Mobile, protected by the imposing Fort Louis, was made the capital of the territory the French called Louisiana, and remained the capital even after the founding of the city of New Orleans. Mobile was strategically important because it countered the Spanish fortified settlement located at Pensacola. Although over 2500 French settlers immigrated to the colony, only 400 French settlers remained along with about 20 Africans after 13 years. France’s strategy in the New World was to surround the English colonies on the American seaboard. So, from Canada (New France) down to Louisiana, the French attempted to expand their Continued Next Page

influence and undercut further English encroachment into North America. Diplomatic attempts were made on both sides, although you wonder how genuine either side was, to settle their differences, but encroachments into the Ohio Valley by both the French and the English led to numerous skirmishes. The conflict was finally declared a war in 1756--the French and Indian War. Early in the war, the French captured Fort Ticonderoga, Fort Oswego and Fort William Henry (”The Last of the Mohicans” includes, somewhat inaccurately, the battle for Fort William Henry), and the war was going entirely in France’s favor. In 1758, under the leadership of Britain’s Lord William Pitt, the British changed their strategy in North America. The new tactics reversed the French tide and turned the conflict in favor of the British and they never let up after they seized the initiative. The conflict had pretty much concluded with the victorious British siege of Quebec and British takeover of that French stronghold in 1759. By 1760, the British had de facto control of Canada and all of American territory east of the Mississippi River. The Treaty of Paris of 1763 finalized the results of the war. The Native American tribes, who had been allies of the French, continued to battle the British until 1764 but, finally, the Native Americans and their Pontiac Rebellion were put down and peace ensued.

Flags of Washington Parish before the U.S.: Upper left: Royal Standard of Spain,Upper Right: French Fleur de Lis flag, Lower Left: British Red Ensign & Lower Right: the Republic of West Florida.

In 1782, the Spanish retook control of the Florida parishes by defeating the British garrison at Baton Rouge. The Spanish encouraged settlers from the United States to settle in the territory. Large groups of American settlers (mostly from Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina) took advantage of the Spanish offers and they were content with the Spanish government. However, agitations by proBritish factions as well as pro-French and pro-Spanish factions made the ultimate control of the colony uncertain. The American settlers decided their future would be brighter if the United States took over the territory, but they had no success in enlisting active support of the U.S. government in taking control of the Florida parishes. A significant development occurred when France regained control of Louisiana from Spain (the Treaty of San Ildefonso) in 1800. The U.S. had Robert Livingston negotiate the purchase of the French territory in the Americas. In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson authorized the purchase of this huge territory, which doubled the size of the country at that time, for $15,000,000—less than 3 cents an acre. With the purchase of the vast Louisiana Territory, the Florida parishes probably looked attractive to the United States, but the U.S. was busy absorbing its new territory. The U.S. didn’t need the risk or the cost of taking on the Spanish Empire. However, the proAmerican West Florida colonists did not want the British or French to retake control so, after one failed attempt in 1805, they overthrew the Spanish garrison in Baton Rouge in September 1810. The Republic of West Florida, which had their own flag, constitution and President, was now in control of the Florida parishes and was an independent country from September 23, 1810 to December 6, 1810. The United States sent troops and gunboats to Baton Rouge in December and took control of the short-lived republic. Continued Next Page

Here’s Washington Parish! 19

Photograph of the Great Southern Lumber Company. The smokestacks are part of the power generation system that not only supplied power to the plant but also to the whole town of Bogalusa. In the center background there is a building that looks almost like a bullet. The refuse burner consumed 560 cords of refuse, each and every day for a total of 2,688,000 cords of wood during its lifetime of use from October 1, 1908 to July 4, 1928. This plant was the largest lumber mill in the world and was a model of efficiency.

F.H. Goodyear

C.W. Goodyear

In the area that is now Washington Parish, unlike the rich alluvial bottomland along the Mississippi, and unlike the gold and silver mines of Latin America, there were no easy riches in this area. This land had to be worked hard just to get it ready for subsistence farming. The economic and physical hardships and dangers faced by settlers in this area were the primary reasons the French and Spanish had such trouble getting settlers to come and stay in this area. Toppling the vast forests of huge longleaf pine trees, although the timber resources became the eventual “gold mine” for the area, presented a daunting task for settlers interested in farming the land. Clearing enough land for farming with the rudimentary tools they possessed was a huge task, and for many who left, insurmountable. Washington Parish, named for President George Washington, was formed out of St. Tammany Parish; it was established by an act of the Louisiana State Legislature on March 6, 1819. Mr. John Bickham, in 1819, had donated thirty acres of land to be used as the parish seat. In 1821, “Franklin” was designated as the seat of justice. Right after the creation of Washington Parish, the seat of government of the parish was located about five miles south of the current location of Franklinton on the Enon Highway. However, in an election held in July of 1826, Franklin was designated as the parish seat. Citizens from the new parish had approached the state legislature in 1826 and asked their new parish seat be named Franklin, in accordance with name 20 Here’s Washington Parish!

stated in the 1821 legislation creating the seat of justice for the new parish. At the same time as the Washington Parish application, another group of citizens from a town also called Franklin located in St. Mary Parish asked the legislature to name their town Franklin. In a compromise, the citizens from the new parish graciously added “ton” to Franklin so their parish seat would be called Franklinton. According to the Honorable Prentiss B. Carter, Judge of the 22nd Judicial District, Parishes of St. Tammany and Washington, in his History of Washington Parish, some of the names of the early families in the area that became Washington Parish were Bickham (Franklinton), Brumfield, Richardson, Magee, Bankston, Burch, Pierce, Mizell, Simmons, Hays, McGehee, Adams (Adamstown by the Pearl River), Mitchell, Stafford, Toney, Ellis (close to Franklinton) Warner (between Franklinton and Enon), Fussell & Bickham (Mt. Vernon) Thomas & Richardson (Sheridan) Gorman & York (Gorman), Irwin spelled Erwin, Alford, Godf, Graves, Byrd, Hayes, Ginn, Chappel, Percy & Edwards (Rio). There were some family names that are prominent today that are not included in this list but they may have moved in at a later time. When General Jackson traveled through what is now Washington Parish on his way to New Orleans, he had to build bridges (including the bridge over the Bogue Lusa Creek which the General named Ben’s Ford) over many of the rivers in order to get his Continued Next Page

army through. According to Judge Carter, there were citizens that provided arms to Jackson’s army. Mr. C. W. Goodyear in the “Bogalusa Story” said that many of the more vigilant citizens kept their “guns loaded” as the army passed through. Looking at Louisiana maps made at the time right after the creation of the parish, Franklinton was the big city. If you had to do shopping or you had to have any government work done, you went to Franklinton. It would take a good part of a day bumping over rough trails and crossing multiple obstacles to reach the town. Franklinton’s commercial establishments were important not only to the town, but to the parish as a whole. The life of many settlers in the area we now know as Washington Parish consisted of subsistence living based on farming and hunting and life pretty much stayed that way throughout the rest of the 19th Century. Frank H. and Charles W. Goodyear changed the direction of the parish forever as they introduced large scale lumbering to the area. Their company, the Great Southern Lumber Company, impacted the whole parish and bordering Louisiana parishes as well as bordering counties in Mississippi. The Goodyears’ plan called for building a city of 15,000

These tents held the original sawmill in Bogalusa. The paper mill is located kitty corner across Willis Ave.

complete with houses, public buildings and parks and the largest sawmill in the world in the middle of a huge piney wilderness. When considering locations to build this massive mill, the Goodyears did consider Mississippi, however because of some Mississippi laws restricting real property holdings, it was decided that Louisiana would be the place they would build. It was amazing that such a wilderness frontier could still exist in a region that was only a stone’s throw from New Orleans. The Great Southern Lumber plan had many doubters, but the Goodyears, along with their partners, plunged ahead. It took over one third of a billion in today’s dollars with sixty percent coming from the Goodyears ($9,000,000 in their day, but worth over one-quarter billion dollars today) and the other forty percent coming from a small group of investors. (“Bogalusa Story”, by C. W. Goodyear, 1950, Pg 43) “When Frank Goodyear responded to a question by LeRoy Pearce about what they planned to do with the land the company had bought, he replied that Continued Next Page

Photo of exhibit located in the Museums at Cassidy Park, Bogalusa.

First Passenger Train Arrives in Bogalusa.

Here’s Washington Parish! 21

“the land we bought from you and from the Richardsons, the Adams farm, the Hunt headright, and one or two smaller parcels of land” would be suitable for a “large lumber operation.” William Sullivan, impatient with Mr. Goodyear’s modest description, told Mr. Pearce this: “’We’re going to build the biggest sawmill in the world right here. It’ll have a capacity of a million feet of lumber every twenty-four hours. It’ll run day and night for twenty-five maybe thirty years. The logs will be skidded by machinery and then hauled by the trainload to the sawmill. This means we’ll be building a mile of railroad track every day. We won’t be using any oxen to do the logging, except perhaps where there are small scattered tracts of timber. “The town we build will be one of the largest in Louisiana. There’ll be modern homes and schools. There’ll be a hospital and banks. There’ll be jobs for everyone in Washington Parish. Why, this wilderness will be turned into one of the most prosperous parts of Louisiana before you know it. That’s what we’re going to do here, Mr. Pearce.’” They were able to do exactly as Mr. Sullivan had told Mr. Pearce. The Great Southern Lumber Company’s (GSL) officers were Frank Goodyear, president, Charles Goodyear, vice-president, Charles I. James, second vice-president, F. A. Lehr, secretary/treasurer, A. Conger Goodyear, Charles’s son, purchasing agent and William Sullivan was general manager of lumber operations. William Sullivan was the mover and shaker in Washington Parish and he was just the bulldog to put that ambitious plan into operation. Using sand and stone from the Bogue Lusa River and lumber from their forests, GSL built the mill, the houses, the public buildings, and the roads from scratch. They even built the parks. That’s why people call Bogalusa the Magic City. When GSL built the town and the largest lumber mill in the world in the middle of a wilderness from scratch, it was like magic. 22 Here’s Washington Parish!

When they couldn’t get things, they improvised. GSL tried to attract retailers from New Orleans to build stores in Bogalusa but they were unable to get any stores to commit so they built their own store in Bogalusa called the Commissary. Workers could simply show their badge and it acted similar to a credit card. The amount that was purchased was simply charged against the income of the holder of the badge number. Sales were slow to begin with but they went over $1,000,000 ($26,000,000 in today’s dollars) with $150,000 ($4,000,000) in profit. GSL built their railroad, the New Orleans Great Northern Railroad, starting at Slidell and working north to Bogalusa. The line eventually ran all the way up to Jackson MS and down to New Orleans. The company needed the railroad to get their wood to American markets but also to overseas markets such as Britain, Japan and even Africa. By 1906, the town had experienced numerous changes and had grown to 8,000 people. To accommodate the large amount of mail moving through the city, a U.S. Post Office was built. The first passenger train came to Bogalusa. A hospital had been built and the Colonial Hotel was built for unmarried employees. Everything was on course to saw the first log in 1907, but then tragedy struck. Much like today, the national economy was going through financial crisis and Mr. Sullivan was told by the head office to hold off. GSL allowed the workers to stay in company housing at no charge, and they decided to begin building offices, homes and public buildings to give people work while the lumber mill was still on hold. Then to make a difficult situation worse, in 1908 a depression hit the country. However in the face of huge financial uncertainties nationally, the Goodyears decided to go ahead and start the mill. The Goodyears’ idea was to stockpile the lumber to be ready to sell when the economy did turn around. So, on October 17, 1908, Mr. Ben Sellers had the honor of cutting the first log in the mill. This Continued Next Page

What is the Redwood connectioN to Bogalusa? Living in what used to be an ocean of virgin pine, it’s interesting to note the many references to redwood in Bogalusa, when most people would associate the redwoods with California. In 1928, the forward thinking Mr. William H. Sullivan announced the creation of the Southern Redwood Company after taking over a company that owned two million board feet of redwood lumber, which would keep the mill running. The Great Southern Lumber Company started processing the redwood from that acquisition and the names started popping up after that including the Redwood Bowl, the Redwood Hotel and the Redwood Theatre. massive operation was finally a working reality. While attending the opening of the mill, dignitaries, officials, reporters had stayed at the Pine Tree Inn, which had been completed a few weeks before the opening of the mill. The guests were treated to sumptuous meals and 5-star service. Although the Pine Tree operated at a loss, the directors of the GSL figured it was good advertisement for the Bogalusa brand (a registered trademark) of lumber. When purchasing agents needed to buy large quantities of lumber for railroads, industrial companies or lumber companies, they stayed at the Pine Tree Inn. There is Bogalusa brand lumber made of virgin pine that can still be found in buildings all over the world. Although stamped with the Bogalusa brand, that timber may have come from around Bogalusa or Franklinton or even from Mississippi. If the timber was cut and planed in the mill though, the Bogalusa brand went on. The plant continued for nearly thirty years just like Mr. Sullivan said it would. Mr. Sullivan’s commitment to the community has paid dividends to this day. Not only did every major institution in Bogalusa, from churches to schools to government, benefit from the Great Southern Lumber Company, there was an attempt as the lumber started to run out of lumber to seek out other opportunities for work. Vegetables, tung trees, bringing in lumber from other areas of the country (such as the redwood lumber from California) and even from other countries, attempts were made to keep the community alive and make sure that it didn’t end up as a ghost town, like hundreds of lumber/mining communities all over the country ended up after the resource was mined out or cut down. A cigar factory, wood product manufacturers, a canning plant, food processors, and textile manufacturers--all sorts of businesses were encouraged to come to the community. What really had a lasting impact was the start of paper production by the Bogalusa Paper Company on January 4, 1918. From

Bogalusa Paper to Gaylord to Crown Zellerbach to Temple-Inland to International Paper Company, the paper mill has continued producing. When the lumber companies started to harvest the virgin timber, taxes had to be paid on the standing timber that the lumber companies owned so cutting it down as fast as you could was the object of every lumber company to avoid taxes. They used trains and steam-driven skidders to totally take everything down in any area they worked. If you replanted, the taxes started again, so the cutover land was left barren. However, Great Southern Lumber, by lobbying the legislature, worked out a deal so that the taxes were deferred until harvest with a minimal fee as the trees were growing. Armed with the new law of the land, a massive replanting operation was begun in 1920. This would allow future generations to reap economic benefits from practicing sustainable forestry. The trees that were used in making pulp and then paper could be much smaller than the ones needed for commercial timber. The reforestation began and has continued to this day. The production of pulp and paper has also continued as a result of having continued access to the lumber. The legacy of the lumber industry is certainly evident today as “the mill,” as the International Paper mill is known, is still the major private employer in the parish. International Paper recently bought out Temple-Inland but has continued to make improvements to keep the mill producing kraft paper for use around the world. The strong people who initially settled the parish as well as the people who came later are the heroes who carved this great parish out of an ocean of gigantic pine trees. The people of the parish are still closely tied to the land through hunting, fishing, gardening, farming and yes, lumbering. These pioneers have created a good place to live, work and raise a family. Here’s Washington Parish! 23

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BOGALUSA POINTS OF INTEREST 1. Bogalusa City Hall 2. Bogalusa Chamber of Commerce 3. Bogalusa High School 4. Lumberjack Stadium 5. LSU Bogalusa Med Ctr. 6. Goodyear Park 7. Pleasant Hill Elementary 8. Ave“B”Baseball Park 9. Denhamtown Elem. School

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DRIVING TOUR Driving Tour locations are marked with a D and the number of the Tour location that it corresponds with. Some locations are on the Points of Interest and the Driving Tour. Example: City Hall is listed as D1 for the driving tour, but is also listed as 1. on the Points of Interest.

Bateman Lake Crystal Lake

Bogalusa Driving Tour D1. 202 Arkansas Ave., Bogalusa City Hall, Built in 1914, this dignified building serves a beautiful reminder of an age where the virgin pine seemed to be limitless. Designed by architect Rathbone Debuys, this Classical Revival building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

D2. 208 Georgia Ave., St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church. The church was built as a gift from Orlo J. Hamlin, a Director of the Goodyear Lumber Company and one of the original investors in the Goodyear Lumber Co.

Take a right onto Austin St. and you will come to D3. Bogalusa Depot, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is not currently in use. The railroad made the lumber industry possible. Without the railroad there would be no way to get the lumber to market. The New Orleans Great Northern Railroad was incorporated on Jan. 27, 1905 in Louisiana and the Crescent City Construction Company, owned by owners of the Great Southern Lumber Company, had the contract to start construction from Slidell north to Bogalusa.The rail yard was much larger than what is seen now. It took in all the area of Shopyard Square (the shopping center where Wal-Mart is) and more. Take a right onto Louisiana Ave. (before the D4. Freight Office).

Take a right on Memphis, go one block and take a left on Mississippi, go one block and take a right onto Masonic Dr. where you’ll see the D5. Masonic Temple. The Masonic Temple was originally used as the Bogalusa High School before 1920. The lodge’s interior was finished off with Bogalusa heart pine, which makes for an amazing place to have lodge meetings.

Take a left on Alabama Ave and then take the next left, on Lexington Ave, the next street is Mississippi Ave. (Because of limited space, there are no specific homes on Mississippi Ave. on this driving tour. There are wonderful examples of 1920’s stucco homes from 309 – 329 Mississippi Ave. as well as many fine examples of bungalow style houses further up the street.) Drive one block to Louisiana Ave. and on your left before Louisiana Ave. is D6. 328 Louisiana Ave., W. Gibb Dorsey Home, this was the home of a former Mayor of Bogalusa before the city’s incorporation in 1914 and was built in the “aughts,” early 1900’s. Gorgeous woodwork inside as well a nicely landscaped lot are attributes of this fine home. Here’s Washington Parish! 25

Take a right on Louisiana Ave. drive five blocks and veer right onto Virginia D7. 1218 Founder’s Dr. Built in the 1940’s. This was the former home of Charles Goodyear, Jr. Prior to the house being built, the property was also the location of Charles Goodyear Sr.’s cabin.

D9. 1646 Piney Branch. This striking Tudor home was originally built for managers of the Gaylord Company.

D8. 1336 Founder’s Dr., Another mayor, Ivan Magnitzky, built this home in the 1940’s. Magnitzky was the resident manager of the New Orleans Corrugated Box Co. and Gaylord Bags.

D10. 1500 Young’s Rd. Now the Smoky Creek Bed & Breakfast, this restful location is located behind Bogalusa Country Club. Originally, it was the home of Mr. V. Young, a Gaylord Mgr. and was built in the 1940’s.

D11. The Ponemah Cemetery was so named in 1914 by the Bogalusa Cemetery Association. William Henry Sullivan and Elizabeth Sullivan, the “Father and Mother” of Bogalusa, are buried here. Built in the days when segregation was the norm, the Ponemah Cemetery served only white people when it was first built and the Bogalusa Cemetery served only black people. Segregation started at birth and continued in the great beyond. Strangely enough, people of Italian descent were also buried in the Bogalusa Cemetery for many years after they had immigrated to the United States and come to this area to work. From the Ponemah Cemetery take a right onto Louisiana Ave. (Hwy. 10) and take a left at N. Columbia St (Hwy. 21). On your left will be The Bogalusa Country Club.

D12. The Bogalusa Country Club, 1003 Mississippi Ave., The nine-hole, semi-private course was part of the original plan for the Magic City. Everyone was treated equally on the course so if there was a group of managers, or even the Goodyears would have their turn along with everyone else. Continue down N. Columbia St., and then take a right on Fiorenza Dr. Take a left on Richmond St. This turns into S. Columbia. Follow S. Columbia St. and on the right side of the street right before E. 4th St. is The Redwood Theater building. 26 Here’s Washington Parish!

D13. The Redwood Theater, S. Columbia was the location of the Bogalusa “theater district.” Meyer Berenson arrived in Bogalusa in 1906. A couple years later, after Meyer’s first store failed, his brother Elias moved to Bogalusa and together they built the Berenson Department Store on S. Columbia St. This store was a big success. In 1929, they put up two theaters, The State Theater first and then The Redwood Theater. There was another theater that was a big competitor of the State Theater, called The Ritz Theater, which was also located on S. Columbia. The Redwood is the only building of the three still standing. Larry Hunt pointed out the window on the second floor (see photo) as a means of ventilation for the projector operator. The old projector produced massive amounts of heat and the window was kept open to encourage airflow through the projector room.

Go one block beyond The Redwood Theater and take a right on E. 5th St., then take a right on Ave. U. Follow Ave U until it deadends on S. Columbia. Take a left on S. Columbia St. and then take a left on Willis Ave. At the intersection of Willis Ave., Cumberland and Ave. B is the interesting Diamond Jubilee Mural. Take a right onto Hwy. 60 (Cumberland) and left on Okechobee. On your left will be a grassy field that looks like there could have been a football field, well it was. At the time it was used, it was billed as one of the top football stadiums in the state of Louisiana. D14. Site of the Redwood Bowl. This area was also the site of White’s Wood Products, which made broom handles, washboards and furniture. The Bogalusa Cannery was also located in this general area as well.

Go back onto Cumberland and take a right onto Willis, on your right, you will see: D15. Site of the First Sawmill, City’s Founding—the first sawmill was operated out of tents and primarily milled lumber used in construction of the new town and the newcompany buildings.

Go a little further on Willis and on your right you will see: D16. Cassidy Park and the Museums of Cassidy Park, the Museum of Native American Culture and Pioneer Museum. These museums have extensive, sophisticated exhibits, which give visitors a good sampling of what Pioneers may have seen and a snapshot of Native American life. Here’s Washington Parish! 27

Go back to Willis and take a left, pass the Bogalusa Chamber of Commerce (which has an extensive array of brochures and information on the area,) take a right on Ave. F and a sharp veer to the left on S. Border (the next street on the left). Go up the hill and on the left you will see: D17. Former Mayor William Sullivan’s home, The Sullivan Home, built in 1907, is set on a large wooded lot. The house is a symmetric, two-and-a-half-story frame edifice, which combines elements from the Colonial Revival and Queen Anne styles. The Colonial Revival characteristics may primarily be viewed from the house's exterior; these characteristics include its three-bay colossal order gallery, the front door, the ballroom, Palladian window motif, and dormers. The most architecturally significant Queen Anne feature of the house is its rigid, mannered style. The workers in the town came to refer to the home as "Official Quarters." It is located in a section of town called "Little Buffalo" or "Buffalotown" since it was the residential district where many of the company officials who had come from Buffalo, New York, had their homes.

Also part of Little Buffalo are D18. The former house of D.J. Wade and further down S. Border on the right hand side is another impressive home, D19. this one was Dr. E.E. Lafferty’s home.

28 Here’s Washington Parish!

Continue down S. Border and take a left on W. 3rd St., take a left on Plaza St. and on your left you’ll see D20. the YWCA, completed 1918, was a gift from Florence Goodyear Daniels in memory of Florence’s mother, Josephine Looney Goodyear, and D21. YMCA, which was a gift from Frank Goodyear, on behalf of his father.

If you take a left on Ave B, immediately on your left is the D22. U.S. Post Office. James A. Wetmore designed this impressive Colonial Revival building. Construction on the building began in 1930, in the heart of the Depression, and originally served as the Bogalusa Federal Building.

Take a right on Ave. B and on the right is D23. Goodyear Park. The “Magic City” plan, created by Harvey Murdock, and modified by the Goodyears, included plans for several parks, the largest of which was the Goodyear Park. Here’s Washington Parish! 29

Right across from the park are two churches: D24. The Elizabeth Sullivan United Methodist Church. Named for the “Mother of Bogalusa,” Elizabeth Sullivan, the Elizabeth Sullivan United Methodist Church was built in 1907

D25. The Annunciation Roman Catholic Church’s original building was built in 1907. The present building was constructed in 1927. The copper-clad dome atop the bell tower gives the church an historic Gothic look. One of the building’s distinctive features is the set of stained glass windows.

If you take a right on W. 5th St. and drive two blocks to Ave. D, you will see D26. First Presbyterian Church. Built in 1907 and dedicated in 1910, the church has gone through many modifications and enlargements. One of the building's most defining features is its impressive bell tower.

Take a left on Ave. D and drive down to W. 6th St. and take a right, drive two blocks and you’ll see D27. First Baptist Church. The current church building was completed in the 1950’s. The light sandstone colored brick and limestone along with the Norman Gothic arch really make this handsome building stand out. Families from the church donated the pretty stained glass windows, which are another distinctive feature of the church. 30 Here’s Washington Parish!

FRANKLINTON POINTS OF INTEREST 1. Washington Parish Council 2. Washington Clerk/Court 3. Washington Parish Sheriff 4. Washington Parish Tourism 5. Franklinton Chamber of Commerce 6. Franklinton Town Hall 7. Franklinton Police Dept. 8. Franklinton Junior High School 9. Washington Parish Library 10. Franklinton Elementary School 11. Franklinton Primary School

12. Franklinton Resource Center 13. Franklinton High School 14. LSU Ag Center 15. Washington Parish Fairgrounds 16. Washington Parish Industrial Park #1 17. Washington Parish Industrial Park #2 18. Franklinton Country Club G.C. 19. Franklinton Airport 20. Town of Franklinton Boat Ramp

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FRANKLINTON Driving Tour Franklinton has been a center of commerce and government almost since the establishment of Washington Parish. In 1819, Washington Parish was formed and the county seat was located in the former St. Tammany Courthouse which was actually five miles south of Franklin, close to Enon. That same year John W. Bickham donated 30 acres of land to the parish government in the area of what would become Franklinton. In 1820, the Louisiana legislature named this location as the temporary county seat and in 1821 the legislature named the town Franklinton. It wasn’t until 1826 election that chose the town as the permanent county seat that the courthouse was actually located in Franklinton. A post office was established in 1829 and the brick courthouse was complete in 1830. Franklinton received a town charter in 1861 but the town ran without any active town government. In 1888, the town received a second charter and from that time on, Franklinton was actively governed. 1. The Varnado Store Museum (Pearl & Cleveland) is housed in an historic building in downtown Franklinton, LA, parish seat of Washington Parish. The two-story, century-old structure was a hub of activity in the early days of Washington Parish as farmers would come to town, sell their produce and purchase needed supplies. Daniel E. Sheridan, a timber dealer, real estate agent, Franklinton alderman, and director of the Bank of Franklinton and the First State Bank of Bogalusa built the store prior to 1910. A 1910 map of Franklinton shows that W. C. Lonnergan, formerly of Carriere, MS, owned the business, which had on hand a very large general stock comprised of fancy and staple groceries, dry goods, notions, shoes, hats and clothing along with a big line of feed stuffs, harness and saddlery, and farming implements. The store drew trade from a fifteen-mile radius of town and shipped to points along the N.O. and Great Northern Railroad. Second owner S.F. Burris, third owner, D.A. Varnado. The store operated from being built to the 1980’s. Marie Moore House

2. Marie Moore House, Ca. 1900, Original owner McFadden.

Burris House

6. Burris House, Ca. 1909, Built by Burrises. Served as a popular boarding house for years, left to nephew Joe E. Magee. Square head nails were used in its construction. Hallie Love House

Stella Magee House

9. Stella Magee, named the Mile Branch Settlement (located at the Washington Parish Fairgrounds). Bateman-Ellis House

3. Mary Burris House, Ca. 1935.

4. Smith House, Ca. 1930, Built by prominent dentist.

Breland House

7. Hallie Love House, Ca. 1910, First Girl Scout Leader. Expression teacher (Speech) in public schools in 30’s, 40’s and 50’s. Williams House

5. Breland House, Ca. 1919, Original owner E.Y. Breland.

10. Bateman-Ellis, Ca. 1900, First owner A. Magee, Annie Gatlin owned and operated a tavern on the Bogue Chitto River for many years.

11. Franklinton High School, Ca. 1938, on the National Historic Register. First Franklinton High School burned in 1937. This building, which now serves as the 8. Williams House, Ca. 1930, Lumber Company owner and Franklinton Junior High School, was built in 1938. sawmill operator. Here’s Washington Parish! 33

Thomas M. Babington House

13. William James Burris, Ca. 1930, descendants own Burris Mill. 14. Magee House, Ca. 1940, Original owners Willie Eugene and Clara Magee.

12. Robert H. Babington House, The Robert H. Babington House is on the National Register of Historic Places. The house now houses a bank.

17. Halls Hardware & Building Inc., Ca. 1939, Formerly St. Charles Creamery, current owner is cousin of D.A. Varnado, Willie Mae Varnado Smith. Her husband Hall Smith, served on the Police Jury for many years.

15. Thomas M. Babington, Jr., 18. Hammon Richardson House, Ca. 1930, Earl Brown, former Mayor of Site of the first fair 1911, this was also the Franklinton lived in the house for 50 years. location of a slave graveyard and the old hanging tree. 16. Thomas Babington Sr., Ca.1900, Formerly the McGehee Clinic for over 50 years., sold to Dr. McGehee in 19. M. M. Moore House, 1945. The Babinton family was very much Ca. 1930, Grandfather of the owners of involved in the commercial development Moore-Jenkins Insurance Company. of Franklinton. 20. M. M. “Bud” Magee House, Ca. 1914. 21. Wood House, Ca. 1900. 22. Pierce House, Ca. 1900. 23. A. G. Johnson, Ca. 1940, Prominent Insurance Company owner; his wife, Bobbie, was a promoter and organizer of the Mile Branch Settlement. Johnson House

24. Johnson-Lucchesi House, Ca. 1907. 34 Here’s Washington Parish!

Carter House

25. Carter House, Ca. 1908, Home of Judge Carter for many years, owned by Haley Carter. 26. Cecil Addison Burris House, Ca. 1915. Addison Burris House

Varnado House

27. John Addison Burris House, Ca. 1904, home of the First Mayor of Franklinton. 28. Varnado House, Ca. 1900, still used by the relatives of D.O. Varnado for family gatherings. 29. Rock House, Ca. 1938, Owned by the Waverly Club, the oldest women’s club in Franklinton. Served for many years as the home of the Franklinton Library. 30. Masonic Lodge No. II. 31. Masonic Lodge No. I, Ca. 1906. 32. Robert Babington House, Ca. 1901. 33. Sylvest House, Ca. 1925, Murphy Sylvest was principal of the Franklinton High School.

Welch House

34. Welch House, Ca. 1932, Owner and operator of shoe repair store in the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s. 35. Stringfield House, Ca. 1908 D.H. Stringfield, Superintendent of Education. Here’s Washington Parish! 35

Greenlaw House

36. Greenlaw House, Ca. 1906, on the National Register of Historical Places. 37. Denman House, Ca. 1906, Built by Greenlaw but owned by Dr. James Denman. Denman House

Ott House

38. Ott House, First owned by Magee Ott, attorney. 39. Magee House, Ca. 1909, Natalee Magee’s parents built the house, Natalee was a 3rd grade teacher in Franklinton for years until her retirement. Claude Brumfield House

Marie Moore House

Maurice Magee House

40. C. Brumfield House, Ca. 1920. 41. Cone House, Ca. 1915. Cone House

42. Maurice Magee House, Ca. 1907, Founder of Maurice Magee, which is still in operation today. 43. Smith House, Ca. 1912. 36 Here’s Washington Parish!

HISTORICAL TIDBITS Bogalusa City Bus Service and Parking Tokens Bogalusa had its own bus service at one time. The city even coined its own tokens. The city also had its own parking tokens struck, which were used by motorists at Bogalusa parking meters. Both of these tokens were provided courtesy of the Larry Hunt collection.

Bus Token Parking Token Coke Plant

Coca-Cola Bottling Plant - this fine old building was built in 1927 on the same site as the original 1910 building. A sample of a “Bogalusa” bottle is shown in the inset. Currently, this piece of historical architecture of the Parish is in danger of being lost. A buyer is currently being sought to purchase and refurbish the grand old structure. “Bogalusa” bottle provided courtesy of the Larry Hunt Collection.

ONE OF THE favorite pastimes of grammar school boys is shooting marbles. Larry Hunt, third grade student at Columbia Street School, and son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hunt of Third Avenue "knuckles down" for a difficult shot.

Great Southern Lumber Company Badge People had to wear the badge to get in and out of the mill. The badge was also used in the commissary (which used to be located where Sears is now) almost like a credit card. You would pick up the items you wanted and then you would give your badge number to “charge” them to your account. Badge photo courtesy of the Larry Hunt Collection. Here’s Washington Parish! 37

Fashion & Shopping W

ith a new year comes a new set of fashion trends to take over stores across the nation and across the world. Throwbacks from past decades revisit us and new styles are made. Fashion allows everyone to break out of the old and into a whole new spectrum of clothing options. If the recent past is any indication, the colors are always brighter, the textures are always lighter and the designers always get a little funkier. Fashion makes every season of the year a season to look forward to and enjoy. A large realm of colors, styles and textures are being covered this season for women. Everything from pants, blouses, sun-

by Mary Sergeant

dresses and even shoes are decked out in various arrangements of floral prints. Bolder florals are popular right now. These loud, bright prints are taking over just. Blocky prints of black and white paired with an array of greens, blues, reds and other bright colors have dominated the new lines for 2012. This style can be found on straight-lined dresses and the sportswear collections also popular. Sportswear has been transformed into everything from skirts to suits; covering the styles of women at the country club and the modern, businesswoman. Fashion is taking us from the gym all the way to

Africa with tribal prints, desert hues such as beige and white and, of course, animal print. Swim suits and flowing dresses can be found in many of the collections with tribal embellishments and different varieties of animal prints. Fashion has also jumped to another continent: Spain. Designers covered both masculine and feminine styles for this trend. The stiff, bullfighter apparel made of intricate boleros and matador hats wasseen on the runways along with ruffled, loud dresses and flower hair clips much like the flamenco dancers of Spain. As with every season, an old style is brought back--the 1920s are here for a comeback. The runways have been lined with feathers and silks along with the signature flapper dresses of the twenties. These airy dresses and silky suit-sets are found in light pastel colors. With this girly, airy look comes the popularity of floor-length skirts that can be worn with everything from heels to boots. On the runway, these have been paired with tube-tops, stiff dressy tank tops and even lace. Everyone can pursue their ultra-feminine side with this new look. Every woman loves her accessories and this spring a whole new world of accessorizing is taking over. Elaborate, bolder and bigger are words that will jump to your mind when you look at the new lines. Purses, necklaces, bracelets and rings alike match the new styles coming out. EgyptianContinued Page 40

38 Here’s Washington Parish!

Keep up the good fight and make sure you come out a winner in your own version of the Hunger Games. Model Meggie Merritt is a definite winner with her Sequin Heart dress and Very Volatile boots furnished by Apple's Ltd. of Poplarville, MS. Movie Page Design by Corey Barker.

Here’s Washington Parish! 39

styled jewelry goes with everything tribal this season. Gold, large necklaces with the head of a sphinx will be spotted accompanying many outfits this year. Handbags with expressive designs and bold tribal prints are also very popular. Purses and handbags in sorbet colors are a signature style right now. These light colors can accompany any outfit from

a white t-shirt and shorts to a floral dress and heels. By day you can sport the sorbet colors but by night metallic colors take over. Shoes and purses alike are futuristic-styled and give any outfit a strong, galactic feel. Pairing these metallic silvers and gold accessories with black dresses and the long, elaborate earrings that are also going to be seen in many

If events are Titanic and you feel like you’re going down with the ship, just make sure you’re dressed like the Queen of the World! Model Meggie Merritt will never sink in her My Michelle blouse and Silver jeans.

40 Here’s Washington Parish!

stores, anyone is sure to have a good time out on the town. Decorative earrings are back and ready to rock every outfit this year. Long earrings in various colors and in various designs were a signature feature in the fashion shows this year. Accessories are a work of art and if done right they can turn a plain outfit into a masterpiece. Continued Next Page

With these earrings, anyone can work a simple dress but loo utterly fabulous in it. Men’s fashion has taken a more masculine turn with fitted slacks, rugged t-shirts, the classic white tee and loafers. In the past years, tight pants of various colors have been all the rage. Suit pants, trousers and jeans alike will all take a dramatic step towards wider legs with both baggy legs and the classic, loose yet straight pant. Men’s fashion is going back to the classics. Plaids and stripes are coming back. There will be a combination of wild color hues of different assortments but sticking to the classic beiges and whites will also be prevalent. A white tshirt or white button-down paired with denim jeans creates an extremely masculine look that can be both professional when paired with a nice jacket and casual when worn plain. Unlike women’s fashion, men’s fashion does not vary as drastically from year to year but these simple changes are going to transform menswear for the year to come. New seasons are all about revitalization and change. Let's start looking at putting our best foot forward it's always fun to look at shoe styles. Women and men alike have many new styles of shoes to choose from. Shoes can change any outfit from casual to dressy in a matter of minutes. They are a crucial aspect to any wardrobe.

Model Brittyn Miller is making people see the Star that she is in an Esley dress and bracelet and earrings furnished by Apples, Ltd. of Poplarville, MS.

SHOES

Cute flats, sassy heels, and boots are all the rage this year. Wedges are a trend that have been around for quite a while but designers never cease to change them each year, makContinued Page 42

Here’s Washington Parish! 41

Above Photo: These ladies look comfortably stylish. (L to R) Vonetta Jordan is wearing a Veronica M blouse and Silver Jeans. Meggie Merritt is dressed in My Michelle blouse and Silver jeans. Brittyn Miller is sporting a Lulumari blouse with Big Star Jeans. All clothing and jewelry furnished by Apples, Ltd. of Poplarville, MS.

ing them better and better. Every girl needs a pair of wedged heels. They are comfortable but still add major height and can dress up just about any dress or even a pair of dressy linenshorts. One of the hottest pair of wedges for this season is the Marc by Marc Jacob’s Wedge Heels. This pair of shoes is done in block style much like many of the dresses. The base, or “wedge”, of the shoe is done in white and red while the top is black and the straps are red. Continued Next Page

42 Here’s Washington Parish!

The way the colors are separated adds for a lot of versatility to the shoe. Riding boots were the musthave item from last year; the spring shows have brought us booties in bright colors with intricate designs taking the stage. The runway has showcased everything from purple opentoed leather boots to black boots with cut-out designs to tall yellow rubber boots. Boots can be paired with almost any outfit. They look good with straight-legged jeans and even better with a black dress and embellished tights. Floral is not just seen on dresses, shorts and shirts but also shoes. The runways have been lined with floral wedges, floral heels and even floral tennis shoes. These shoes add a wave of color to just about any outfit. Mules make an outfit look very mature. Designers such as Louis Vuitton have transformed the mule and made it a work of art by adding metal studs and metallic heels. The pointy shaped toes make them perfect for everyday office wear and shopping trips in the city. During the nighttime, every lady this season wants to be slipping into black, strappy heels. Heels are a must-have for all women. For young women, the added height adds maturity and confidence to any outfit when worn right. Not only are strappy heels in this season but thick, colorful heels are also going to be popular. Polka-dotted shoes with thick heels much like the ones seen in the ‘90s have been on the Continued Page 44

Here’s Washington Parish! 43

Above Left Photo: Models (L to R) Meggie Merritt and Vonetta Jordan are shopping with relaxed confidence. Meggie is wearing a Palazzo Jumpsuit accented with a Sequin Heart Pearl Necklace and MSN Rings and Bracelet. Vonetta is also wearing a Palazzo Jumpsuit. All clothing and jewelry furnished by Apple's Ltd. of Poplarville, MS. Above Right Photo: Model Vonetta Jordan is ready for a starry, starry night in her London Times dress and jewelry furnished by Apple's Ltd. of Poplarville, MS.

runway a lot. Much like this season’s women’s clothing, the shoes are also changing and becoming more fun and more intricate. For men, shoes styles do not change much from year to year. Leather dress shoes in black and dark brown are something every man needs in their wardrobe. Boat shoes Continued Page 47

44 Here’s Washington Parish!

Charley's Models are ready for anything coming their way. (L to R) Brittyn Miller is chopping bad guys in her My Michelle dress accented with Very Volatile boots. Meggie Merritt is shooting a stylish Sequin Heart dress and Very Volatile boots. Vonetta Jordan is staying cool even as things are exploding around her in a Modern Love dress and Very Volatile boots. All Earrings, Necklaces & Bracelets and clothes have been furnished by Apple's Ltd. Movie Page Design by Corey Barker.

Here’s Washington Parish! 45

Model Brittyn Miller is definitely going Up with her Roxy dress. Dress, hat, necklace & bracelet furnished by Apple's Ltd. of Poplarville, MS. Movie Page Design by Corey Barker.

46 Here’s Washington Parish!

and sandals are a necessity for men of every age. Living in the Gulf South area means being outside for social events, recreation and just enjoying our wonderful climate. Having shoes that can be used in water and then be dry the next day to wear again make being outside and enjoying yourself that much more enjoyable. Many designers have men sporting loafers with fringe on them. Very comfortable useful for a lot of settings, loafers are shoes that never go out of style. They can be paired with khakis and a button-down or with a pair of shorts and a polo. Just as men’s clothing is keeping it classic so are the shoe styles. Style is all about being yourself and loving what you are wearing. Every season there are new clothes, new jewelry, new shoes, and new purses; but what really matters is how you use all of these new things to fit your own style. Branch out, try something new and make it all your own. As the seasons change to summer and fall, you’ll be seeing an accentuation of some earlier trends. Deep, rich colors will be everywhere, like purples and deep reds. In the South, the land of steel magnolias, women still enjoy more feminine wear and there is good news along those lines. Skirts are surging back into fashion. It used to be you couldn’t find a skirt to buy but there are some new lines and you’ll start seeing more skirt styleson the shelves. Dress lengths will be going longer Continued Page 49

Here’s Washington Parish! 47

Model Meggie Merritt is lighting up the night sky in her Tulle dress with jewelry furnished by Apple's Ltd. of Poplarville, MS.

48 Here’s Washington Parish!

so the micros and minis will be heading south not north. As always we wear lighter clothes longer here because of beautiful climate. Put your boots on because boots will be around from summer right into winter. From cowboy boots to stilettos, if you want to kick back or kick your boyfriend, there will be boots you will want to have in your wardrobe.

Looking at accessories, you’ll see that larger is better right now. Stack rings and bracelets and get watches with bigger faces. Large necklaces and clunky necklaces will be the order of the day. One item that has graced amazing women throughout the ages that is making a strong comeback--pearls. Yes, pearls, classic white milky pearls. Get a

nice pearl necklace with your favorite little black dress and it’s time for a party!!! As always, your sense of style, your likes and dislikes are indispensable in making your clothing, shoe and accessory purchases. Shop ‘til you drop or make a list and do beeline shopping. Either way, put together styles that make you feel great and look great!!!

These beautiful women look like the sky is the limit as they are Up for any dressy occasion. Models (L to R) Meggie Merritt is dressed in a Tulle design, Brittyn Miller is ready for a party in her Esley dress and Vonetta Jordan is making a fashionable statement in her London Times dress. All clothes and jewelry furnished by Apples, Ltd., Poplarville, MS. Here’s Washington Parish! 49

Everything Starts With

by Hannah Rachal

W

hat is the one thing every woman should have in her closet to complete her wardrobe? A little black dress, commonly called the LBD. This classic look is always in style, no matter the occasion or season. Coco Chanel made the LBD a staple by introducing it in the 1920’s as a piece in a woman’s wardrobe that could transcend fashion. As opposed to changing every season, the LBD is made to be long-lasting and versatile. If you are on a budget and need something to get you through many different occasions, find the perfect LBD and accessorize it differently according to the occasion. For example, it can easily be a part of your work wardrobe by pairing it with a professional jacket, classy jewelry, and modest heels. However, you can transform this look into an evening outfit by throwing on some stilettos, bright jewelry and even some colored tights. Just be creative and you’ll find many ways to wear your LBD. The essential thing to remember when buying your own LBD is to keep it simple and find the dress silhouette that flatters your body type. Keeping the dress simple allows you to wear it to many more events over many seasons. When looking to buy for your body type, follow these guidelines: Petite Frame: Women who are petite should look for dresses that are not very long (try just above the knee) to elongate the frame. Also, it helps to avoid any detailing that might make you look younger, such as puffy sleeves or ruffles. Try a simple just above the knee (or maybe a little higher) strapless fitted dress. Hourglass Shape: Because this shape is already well-proportioned, you can try almost any look. Be cautious though not to wear something that will take away from your curves, however, like a baby-doll dress. Always try on before you buy! Continued Next Page 50 Here’s Washington Parish!

A Little Black Dress! Pear Shape: The easy way to de-emphasize a bottom heavy figure is to play up other areas to create a balanced effect. Instead of looking for something that will hug your bottom half, find a skirt that flows away from it. An A-line dress will do this nicely by accentuating the waist but disguising the heavier bottom half with a flowy skirt. It is also helpful to play up the curves on top with interesting necklines or detail around the bustline. Apple Shape: This shape tends to be more top-heavy with wider shoulders and/or a heavier bust. Since the idea is to create a balanced look, find a dress that accentuates the waistline and also gives a little more volume in the bottom, perhaps with a fuller skirt. This will make the entire body look more proportioned. Stay away from large sleeves and necklines that make the shoulders and bust look larger. Instead, try an asymmetrical neckline for wide shoulders and a v-neck wrap for a heavier bust. Rectangular Shape: Women with rectangular or athletic builds usually are looking to add curves. To do this, look for a dress that adds volume in all the right places, like the bustline and the bottom, while nipping in at the waist. Create the illusion that you have curves by finding a dress with v-neck or voluminous ruffles at the neckline that comes in at the waist with a full skirt. Wide Waistline: If you have a wide waistline, the easiest way to feel the most comfortable in a dress is to draw attention away from that area. The dress silhouette that best does this is the empire waist. Since it nips in just below the bustline and then flows away from the waist, it disguises any problem areas! Overall, find a dress that you feel most comfortable in. When you feel that you have created a beautiful hourglass shape, it is probably the right dress for you! Then, all you have to do is find the right accessories and you’re ready for any occasion you attend. Here’s Washington Parish! 51

Fishing At Cassidy Park

RECREATION W ashington Parish is truly a sportsman’s paradise (as Louisiana Tourism claims,) but women and children are very much included so it’s more of a

sportsperson’s paradise. The claim certainly holds true for hunting and fishing, but also for many recreational activities and sports. This area boasts amazing sports programs for kids in a variety of sports including baseball, soccer, football, and more. The area’s softball leagues are full of participating teams of men, women and coed.

Cassidy Park

For this area, sports becomes a family affair with parents driving kids with younger siblings in tow to weekend tournaments. Football borders on a religion. You can fish all year long, and I’m not talking about sitting on a slab of ice in a little shack in the winter either. The hunting manias here are deer hunting and turkey hunting. There are parks located around the parish and in towns. There is an amazing state park, which recently opened—the Bogue Chitto State Park. A new recreational facility is being set up north of Franklinton. Boating on the Pearl River and the locks has become extremely popular. A national bike route, set up by the Adventure Cycling Association, goes right through Washington Parish. For more detailed information about this route, go to www.adventurecycling.org. There are three golf courses in Washington Parish so if you’re into hitting the heck out of unoffending little white orbs, you’re in good shape. Tennis courts are also available.

Tangipahoa

55 12

52 Here’s Washington Parish!

Poplarville

BOGALUSA

MISSISSIPPI ALABAMA 65 MOBILE

LOUISIANA

Vancleave

10 Fairhope

10

10 NEW ORLEANS

FLORIDA

Perkinston

BIKE ROUTE

Gulf Shores

Pensacola

Goodyear Park

FRANKLINTON

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Ave B Ballfield

Sonja Wideman (L) and Phyllis Warren (R) enjoying their lunch in the park.

Opal Breland and Dorothy Sharp getting artesian well water at a well located at the Franklinton Fairgrounds.

Fairgrounds Park

Washington Parish Recreation District #1 Recreation Park PRESSBOX PAVILION MAINTENANCE BARN COMMUNITY CENTER RV CAMPING PLAYGROUND OUTDOOR BASKETBALL PAVILION

R300'

CONCESSION PAVILION

SPRAYGROUND Pony (Ages 13 & 14)

R250'

CONCESSION/BATHROOM PAVILION

R300'

R300'

PRESSBOX PAVILION R250'

R200'

R250' R225'

R225'

tang Mus 9 & 10) s (Age

co Bron & 12) s 11 (Age

200'

R200'

SOFTBALL

OUTDOOR BASKETBALL PAVILION

Spray Ground tang Mus 9 & 10) s (Age

co Bron & 12) s 11 (Age

R225' R225'

R200'

R150'

Pond

R150'

R150'

FISHING PIER

TENNIS

)

ALT

PH

(AS

The proposed Washington Parish Recreation District #1 project includes: soccer/football fields, youth boys baseball fields, youth girls softball fields, adult softball fields, concession stands, restrooms, playgrounds, a water spray pad, pavilions, walking/bike trails, RV spaces, an amphitheater and outdoor basketball. There are also plans to eventually build a gymnasium.

SOCCER

Here’s Washington Parish! 53

Bogue Chitto State Park

A t Bogue Chitto State Park, visitors will experience a diversity of natural habitats on one of the most dynamic and scenic river systems in Louisiana. The 1,786-acre site includes small streams, cypress tupelo swamps, a hardwood forest, upland forests and a rolling landscape.

Overnight visitors will find accommodations from tent camping to RV camping to cabins overlooking the bluffs. For larger groups and family reunions, the park offers a group camp and a conference room.

Hours of Operation: Site is open daily. Gates open at 7 am and close at 9 pm, Sunday through Thursday, and at 10 pm on Friday, Saturday and days preceding holidays. April-September, entrance station is open 8 am to 7 pm; October-March, entrance station is open 8 am to 5 pm

Frickes Cave, which -- despite its name -- resembles more of a gorge, possesses delicate sandstone spires created when water erodes the surface underneath pebbles. The pebbles remain perched atop the spires, while over time water splashes on the sandstone surface, forming the two-foot tall fingers of sandstone that shoot up from the now-lowered surface. Boardwalks have been built, so that visitors can admire the sandstone creations from afar, as the formations are too delicate to allow visitors to walk amongst them. Fourteen miles of equestrian trails wind through some of the most interesting topography of southern Louisiana, with the trailhead located near Fricke's Cave. A day trip to Bogue Chitto State Park will be a full one, with a river perfect for canoeing or kayaking, 11 lakes stocked with a variety of freshwater fish, a water playground, numerous picnic pavilions and an outdoor classroom. Directions: From I-12, take US 190 north to Hwy. 25. Travel approximately 20 miles, then turn right onto State Park Blvd. Entrance to the park is 1 mile on the left. GPS Coordinates:N 30.767527983, W -90.1573070.

54 Here’s Washington Parish!

Entrance Fees: $1 per person; Free for Seniors (62 and older) and children age 3 and under.

17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, LA 70438 (985) 839-5707 or toll free (888) 677-7312. For reservations, call 1-877-CAMP-N-LA (877-226-7652) toll free. Email: boguechitto@crt.la.gov

LEAGUE PLAY (depending on sport, age 4 to 12th Grade) Bogalusa Bogalusa Sports Association, President Bill Adams 985-516-1708 Franklinton Baseball 985-515-2335 Aubrey Posey Softball 985-839-9416 Sarah Soccer 985-795-9288 Charlie Ackerman

Tubing Bogue Chitto Canoeing & Tubing, 10237 Choctaw Rd, Bogalusa, LA. Tubing: Two and four trips available. Canoeing & Kayaking: Over night, 1 hour, 4 hour, & 8 hour trips available. Camping and tent camping available. (985) 735-1173. Wayne’s World, 12413 Camp Circle Rd, Franklinton, LA 70438. Tube the Bogue Chitto! Coolers available. (985) 795-2004.

Camping

Ben’s Creek Wildlife Management Area T

his area, comprised of 13,044 acres, is located west of Bogalusa in Washington Parish. This property was leased by the Department in1987 from Cavenham Forest Industries and is currently leased from Weyerhaeuser Co,. Inc. Access to the area is gained from LA 10. Some roads within the WMA have been closed to vehicular traffic and are so marked. The terrain is rolling hills managed primarily for pine timber. Loblolly Pine is the dominant overstory species. To a much lesser extent, longleaf pine, red maple, black cherry, persimmon and red oak are also found in the overstory. Weyerhaeuser Company actively manages this area for pine production. Extensive clear cutting and thinnings result in thick underbrush. Species such as yaupon, broomsedge, French mulberry, blackberry, and wax myrtle are found in the understory. Several small creeks are found on the area. In these areas blackgum, yellow poplar, and sweetbay magnolia are the dominant overstory species. Wax myrtle, titi, green briar, gallberry, and switchcane are commonly found in the understory. Deer, wild turkey, and rabbits are the primary species sought by hunters. Hunting for these species is considered good at this time but could fluctuate with changes in timber management practices. Quail, woodcock and squirrel are also hunted. An extensive system of wildlife food plots has been established, benefiting deer, turkey, quail, and rabbits as well as other non-game species. - Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries

Great Southern RV Park 30397 Louisiana 21, Angie, LA. RV hookups. Home of two Bluegrass Festivals, one in the Spring and one in the Fall. (985) 986-8411. Silver Creek Campground, 37323 Highway 1055, Mount Hermon, LA 70450. For reservations, call (985) 877-4256. ATV Trail System & Mud Bogging, Dirt Track, Fishing, Pavilion, Bath House, Laundromat, Game Room, Playground & Sand Pile, Deer & Dove Hunting. Pets Welcome.

Here’s Washington Parish! 55

Franklinton Country Club

Golf Courses Washington Parish

Bogalusa Country Club Bogalusa Country Club facility in Bogalusa, LA is a 9-hole regulation course; the course offers 2,783 yards of golf for a par of 36. Bogalusa is a private equity facility golf course with a 'Accompanied By Member' guest policy. The golf course was part of the original “Magic City” plan created by the Goodyears for the city of Bogalusa.

Franklinton Country Club The 18-hole course at the Franklinton Country Club features 6,470 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 72. The course rating is 70.7 and it has a slope rating of 116.  The course’s new management are refurbishing the course step by step from the interior of its clubhouse as well as maintaining and upgrading holes.

Franklinton Country Club

Gemstone Plantation Country Club The 18-hole Gemstone Plantation Country Club course south of Franklinton is a 6,657-yard course. This beautiful public course rating is 72.5 and it has a slope rating of 128.  This is the newest course in Washington Parish and was opened in the late 1990’s.

Bogalusa Country Club

L. Glen Smith, R. William Reeves 56 Here’s Washington Parish!

Fishing License

State of Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries

P ersons taking fish, whether recreationally or commercially, and persons involved in the fish industry, including wholesale/retail dealers and transporters, and vessels involved in the fish industry must be licensed.

All recreational licenses are valid from the date of purchase and expire on June 30 each year. In addition to other bona fide residency requirements, a Louisiana Driver's License or Louisiana ID Card issued by the Department of Public Safety is required to purchase resident recreational hunting and fishing licenses. Title 56, Section 302.1.C.(1) requires that all recreational anglers fishing south of the "saltwater line" for saltwater species have in their possession a Louisiana saltwater angler's license IN ADDITION TO a basic Louisiana fishing license EXCEPT those persons otherwise exempted. All regulations apply regardless of where the fish is taken. A recreational fisherman must purchase and have in possession a valid basic recreational fishing license to possess fish in Louisiana waters or to use the following: 1.Bow and arrow 2.A barbed or barbless spear 3.Frog gig/catcher 4.Scuba Gear 5.Hook & line (trot line) 6.Cast net with a radius not to exceed 8 ft. 6 in. 7.Rod and reel Persons who obtain resident licenses when not complying with the bona fide residency requirements as stated in the definition section will be subject to criminal and/or civil sanctions. Bona Fide Resident: 1. Any person who has resided in this state continuously during the 12 months immediately prior to the date on which he applies for any license and who has manifested his intent to remain in this state by establishing Louisiana as his legal domicile, as demonstrated by compliance with all of the following, as applicable: • If registered to vote, he is registered to vote in Louisiana • If licensed to drive a motor vehicle, he is in possession of a valid Louisiana drivers license • If owning a motor vehicle located within Louisiana, he is in possession of a valid Louisiana registration for that vehicle • If earning an income, he has filed a Louisiana state income tax return and has complied with state income tax laws and regulations.

RESIDENT FISHING LICENSE FEE (Subject to Change by the State at Any Time)

Hook & Line (cane pole) Basic Fishing Saltwater License (Basic Fishing Required) *Senior Fish/Hunt ***Charter Passenger License (3 day) **La. Disabled Fishing

$ 2.50 $ 9.50 $ 5.50 $ 5.00 $ 5.00 $ 2.50

La. Sportsman's Paradise License

(Includes basic and saltwater fishing; basic and big game hunting; bow, primitive weapon, turkey and La. waterfowl license; WMA hunting permit, and all recreational gear licenses EXCEPT recreational trawls greater than 16 feet in length.) $100.00

military LICENSE FEE Res/Non-Resident Active Military Fishing

$ 9.50

Res/Non-Resident Active Military Saltwater $ 5.50 Here’s Washington Parish! 57

Hunting License

State of Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Annual hunting and fishing licenses go on sale June 1 each year and expire June 30 of the following year. Bona Fide Resident: 1. Any person who has resided in this state continuously during the 12 months immediately prior to the date on which he applies for any license and who has manifested his intent to remain in this state by establishing Louisiana as his legal domicile, as demonstrated by compliance with all of the following, as applicable: • If registered to vote, he is registered to vote in Louisiana • If licensed to drive a motor vehicle, he is in possession of a valid Louisiana drivers license • If owning a motor vehicle located within Louisiana, he is in possession of a valid Louisiana registration for that vehicle • If earning an income, he has filed a Louisiana state income tax return and has complied with state income tax laws and regulations. 2. Any person, who possesses a resident license from any state or country other than Louisiana shall not qualify for a resident hunting license in Louisiana. HUNTER CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS All persons born on or after September 1, 1969, must show proof of satisfactorily completing a Hunter Safety course approved by LDWF to purchase a Basic Hunting License. EXCEPT any active or veteran member of the United States armed services or any POST-certified law enforcement officer, application for the exemption shall be filed in person at the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries main office building in the city of Baton Rouge. However, a person younger than 16 years of age may hunt without such certificate if he is accompanied by and is under the direct supervision of a person 18 years of age or older EXCEPT during a statewide youth deer hunt, Youths must possess a hunter safety certification or proof of successful completion of a hunter safety course. Each youth must be accompanied by one adult 18 years of age or older. If the accompanying adult is in possession of hunter safety certification, a valid hunting license or proof of successful completion of a hunter safety course, this requirement is waived for youths younger than 16 years of age. For course information, call (225)765-2932 or any Regional Office.

(Prices Subject to Change by the State at Any Time)

Resident Hunting Fees Basic Season (excluding Big Game) $15.00 Big Game1 $14.00 Bow  $10.50 Primitive Firearm  $10.50 LA Duck  $5.50 LA Sportsman's Paradise License2 $100.00 Wild Louisiana Stamp  $9.50 Wild Louisiana Stamp (1 day)  $2.00 Wild Turkey3 $5.50 Harvest Information Program (HIP)4 FREE  Senior Hunt/Fish License5 $5.00 WMA Hunting Permit (age 18-59)6 $15.00

non-Resident (NR) Hunting Fees

Basic Season (excluding Big Game)  $150.00 Big Game1  $150.00 Bow  $26.00 Small Game/ Migratory Bird (1 day)7 $29.00 Deer (1 day)7 $36.00 Turkey (1 day)7 $36.00 Primitive Firearm  $26.00 LA Duck  $25.00 Louisiana Wild Turkey3 $20.50 Harvest Information Program (HIP)4 FREE  Hunting Preserve (Oct. 1 - April 30)  $15.00 NR La. native Basic Trip (5 days, excluding Big Game)  $15.00 NR La. native Big Game Trip (5 days)1 $14.00 NR La. native Bow Trip (5 days)  $10.50 NR La. native Primitive Firearm Trip (5 days)  $10.50 NR La. native Turkey Trip (5 days)  $5.50 NR La. native Duck (5 days)  $5.50

military hunting fees

58 Here’s Washington Parish!

Resident/NR Active Military Basic Season  $15.00 Resident/NR Active Military Big Game1  $14.00 Resident/NR Active Military Bow  $10.50 Resident/NR Active Military Primitive Firearm  $10.50 Resident/NR Active Military LA Duck  $5.50 Resident/NR Active Military Wild Turkey3 $5.50

THINGS TO DO KREWE OF MCCA MARDI GRAS PARADE

Presenting a Carnival parade in Bogalusa and Washington Parish, Louisiana, was initially the idea of two local businessmen who hoped that a parade through downtown Bogalusa would help to revive the faltering business district.  In a period of less than one month, a krewe of 80 men was recruited, six primitive Carnival floats were rented, three local area high school bands were signed, and the first Washington Parish Carnival parade in history was presented in February, 1981.    To enlarge and make the parade more spectacular, the community was invited to participate. So decorated trucks, cars, motorcycles, and bicycles followed the krewe floats and that is still done today.   The Mardi Gras parade is held in Bogalusa the Saturday before Fat Tuesday. Today’s MCCA parade bears little resem-

blance to the original procession, but it definitely mushroomed from the original concept.  The MCCA parade now includes 38 authentic Carnival floats pulled by tractors, with nearly 20 high school marching bands, and is introduced by a column of more than 100 roaring motorcycles.  Today’s parade is considered the largest Carnival celebration held in any city of 13,000 people in the world!  Here’s Washington Parish! 59

THE MUSEUMS IN CASSIDY PARK The Museums in Cassidy Park; The Pioneer Museum and the Museum of Native American Culture, exhibit artifacts and interpretive materials and programs relevant to the history of the City of Bogalusa, Louisiana and its surrounding communities. The museums are set in Cassidy Park, which offers a beautiful and tranquil wooded area almost completely surrounded by a clear, fast flowing creek. The Park also includes walking paths, a scenic drive, picnic shelters and a protected area for animals such as peacocks, donkeys, geese, semi-“wild” where children can enjoy watching them wander freely. The two Museums are great places to visit, admission free, to be entertained and educated about this unusual city. Bogalusa is located in great pine forests beside the Pearl River. Heavily settled by indigenous “Indian” tribes, chiefly Choctaw, and by European peoples migrating after the Revolutionary War, many of whom were British “Tory” sympathizers. The area has a history of determined self-reliance - once having been the independent nation of West Florida. Around the turn of the 20th Century it was the location of the largest sawmill in the world, serving customers worldwide, and has been home of a paper mill of international importance since the 1920’s. Come to the museums with friends and family in the everyday activities of the park, make visits in conjunction with family reunions, club meetings, school outings, birthday parties and don’t miss our special exhibits during events such as “Christmas in the Park”.

Museum of Native American Culture

JOIN THE MUSEUM (Admission to View Museum is FREE) The Museums of Cassidy Park are admission-free and supported by their Annual Memberships. Further, volunteers are encouraged to apply. Membership privileges include tuition-free classes, lectures and many special members-only events as well as special event alerts via postal service, email, or phone.  All members are invited to the Annual Meeting in late spring of each year. Membership Rates subject to change Contact: 985.735.9188 REGULAR MEMBERSHIP Individual $25.00 Family $35.00 Student $5.00 SPONSORSHIPS Gold $1000.00; Corporate $100.00; Bronze $300.00; Silver $500.00; Individual $100.00 Willis Ave. at Pocohontas St.

Museum of Native American Culture 60 Here’s Washington Parish!

Pioneer Museum

STUDIO IN THE COUNTRY

Classic recording studio circa 1973 still in operation with ProTools, Studer analog and a recently acquired Neve 8068 recording console circa 1975. The studio rents out a top notch recording experience and can provide anything the artist needs to produce a world-class sound. On 26 wooded acres. Housing available.

Washington Parish 2012 Calendar January-February

Annual Quilt exhibit Varnado Museum, Franklinton (Exhibits change every 1-2 months)

Feb or Mar Krewe of MCCA Mardi Gras parade, Bogalusa (Saturday prior to Fat Tuesday) March or April: March 30-Apr 1

Festival in the Park, Bogalusa

April 14 April 19-21

Cassidy Park Cook-Off & BBQ, Bogalusa Great Southern Spring Bluegrass Event, Angie

May 4-5 Annual IHC Louisiana Chapter #31 Antique Tractor, Engine and Truck State Show, Franklinton May 5 May Muse, Varnado Museum area, Franklinton May 5 Founders Day picnic, Franklinton May 5 City Run, Bogalusa May 26 Rotary Club Run, Bogalusa (used to be held before MCCA parade) May 26-27 Bogalusa Boat Club Outboard Races, Riverside Landing, on the Pearl River June 30-July 1 Bogalusa Boat Club Outboard Races, Riverside Landing, on the Pearl River

Kansas, the Neville Brothers, the Wild Magnolias. Stevie Wonder, Jimmy Buffet, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, the Dirty Dancing soundtrack, Willie Nelson, Blues Traveler, Pete Townsend, Clarence Gatemouth Brown and Clifton Chenier are just a few of the performers who have recorded there. 21443 Louisiana 436, Bogalusa, LA 70427 (985) 735-8224 studiointhecountry.com

July 4

Old-Fashioned Independence Day festivities, Bogalusa

September 1-2 Bogalusa Boat Club Outboard Races, Riverside Landing, on the Pearl River September 20-22 Great Southern Fall Bluegrass Event, Angie September 29 (1st year) Bogalusa Blues & Heritage Festival, Cassidy Park October 17-20

Washington Parish Fair

Nov 22- Dec 25

Christmas in the Park, Bogalusa

December 1-2

Mile Branch Pioneer Christmas, Franklinton

Calendar of Events provided by the Washington Parish Tourism • Date & Time Subject to change

Great Southern Bluegrass Event

Bogalusa Boat Races

Here’s Washington Parish! 61

WASHINGTON PARISH ART ASSOCIATION

Kaye Williams

Anne Howell Crawford

The Washington Parish Art Association showcases the work of local Washington Parish artists in their annual Art Show. For the last two years the show has been staged at the studio of artist Anne Crawford, located just across the Mississippi state line in the Warnerton community. Crawford said the location draws art lovers from both Louisiana and Mississippi. She encourages everyone to come enjoy an interesting day talking and visiting with local artists while enjoying refreshments. Art work is available for all price ranges. Artist members of the association who have had artwork on display and for sale include: Ann Warner,  Sylvia Warren, Kaye Williams, Terry Seal, Louise Barber, Bob Ann Breland, Cathy Robbins, Christine Beatty, Willard Harrell, Katie J. Lee, Janis Fisher, Jamie Burkhalter, Barbara Carter, Frances Miller,   Reba Sanspree, Lora Lyn Fendlason, Angel Moseley, Anne Crawford, Sara Nelson, Lenora Frazier, Gwen Thompson, Sherry Brown, Vickie Scallan, Ellen Barrett, Violeta Thomas, Nena Passman, Judith Smith, Amy Dickinson, Hallene Magee, Jeanne Green, Charlyn Harvey, Susie Sanders, Kathye Ryan, Malinda White and possibly others who have yet to sign on. Contact: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Washington-Parish-Art Association/300246406704163

FRANKLINTON COMMUNITY THEATER The Franklinton Community Theater, currently under the leadership of Mr. Rodney D. Sabiston, have been providing quality theatrical entertainment for Franklinton and Washington Parish since the 70’s. This ambitious theater group has performed in a variety of venues including the Franklinton Junior High School, but has found a great theater home in the 1010 Club located on Bene St. in Franklinton.  This building was a former cannery that used to can everything from okra to butter beans.  This completely remodeled air-conditioned building has been transformed into a state of the art theater facility with moveable stage, a lighting system and surround sound.   The meal provided by the dinner theater is catered by a local restaurant and includes a meat such as pork chops, fried chicken or possibly pork tenderloin, a potato, such as au gratin potatoes, a salad, a dessert and iced tea. Not only do you get a great meal but you will be able to enjoy your meal and the performance in a cushioned seat. The meal is served on a black linen tablecloth with nice china and silverware; you may feel like you’re in an upscale restaurant. This theater group has put on large-scale productions such as The Wiz, (a huge success), in the substantial facility available in the Franklinton Junior High School.  However when the wonderful 1010 Club became available as a permanent home, the group jumped on the chance.  Although smaller, the venue was first class in every way as well as being air-conditioned. Since their facility is smaller the troupe has specialized in producing dinner theater and they’ve been a big hit.  In their production of the Nunsense last season, there was such demand, the Franklinton Town Players had to put on additional shows beyond their normal two weekend performance schedule.   Besides Nunsense and The Wiz, which were mentioned above, the troupe has also performed very popular shows such as Noah’s Animals, Tuna and God’s Favorite. The show being planned for this year is the fast moving musical Smoke on the Mountain, a hilarious, yet thoughtful, comedy set in the 1930’s centered on the comings and goings of the Sanders family at the Mount Pleasant, North Carolina Baptist Church. Enjoy the meal and the fun and old timey hymns of Smoke on the Mountain! Y’all come! Contact: 985-848-5845 62 Here’s Washington Parish!

WASHINGTON PARISH FREE FAIR Since its humble beginning in 1911 in a local livery stable, this county/parish fair has steadily grown bigger and better each successive year. Today, based upon attendance records, it is believed to be the largest county/parish free fair in the USA. It is the second oldest Parish Fair in Louisiana. It is a family fair. They come from all over the country to enjoy the wholesome virtues characterized by Wiley Wit and imagination cemented with a strong enthusiasm, cooperation and genuine concern for the cultural, educational and economic advancement of the parish. They come to enjoy the excellent exhibits of cut flowers, homemaking, livestock and agricultural products. Then there is Old McDonald’s Farm, and the activities that never seem to cease on the stage. They come to experience the magic of the Midway and the excitement of the PRO Rodeo, and even to just sit a spell under one of the tall pine trees and enjoy the good food. In addition to all these attractions there is the Authentic Historical Pioneer Village, the Mile Branch Settlement. Here the visitors will be heartily welcomed by the many costumed hosts and experience a trip into our past as they visit the various log cabins and buildings filled with antiques and hospitality. One will feel free to sit a while on one of the broad porches or tap one's feet to the music. It’s our opportunity to experience many pioneer activities typical of the Louisiana piney woods in the 1800’s. It is a visit one will not soon forget.

This fair is organized, designed and produced by hundreds of local volunteers who have given freely of their time and talents for generations. At a glance one wonders what makes this fair so special or different from the hundreds of other fairs throughout our land. This intangible quality, recognized by all, yet curiously unexplained, has given our fair its national reputation. The indisputable fact that this county/parish fair is different and is truly special is the reason our visitors come back year after year. It is an experience one will not want to miss. www.freefair.com Here’s Washington Parish! 63

The Mile Branch Historical Settlement Located on the Washington Parish Fairgrounds on the banks of the Mile Branch sits a collection of pioneer cabins built in the mid- to late 1800s and early 1900s. The Settlement began in 1976 as a tribute to the pioneering spirit of Washington Parish. During the annual Parish Fair you will see volunteers dressed in period costumes performing many daily chores such as cooking, quilting, weaving, and spinning. These cabins and other buildings were originally located throughout the piney woods of Washington Parish. Mile Branch Settlement is open only twice each year during the Washington Parish Fair in the third week of October and Thanksgiving weekend for the Pioneer Christmas celebration. Group tours are available throughout the year. Please call in advance to arrange any visit. There are no charges for school tours if scheduled in advance. Donations are accepted. Contact: http://www.facebook.com/pages/MileBranch-Settlement/193692970660466

Knight Cabin (left) Cracklins (right) Knight Cabin George and Martha Knight built their cabin in 1857. This cabin models notch and pin construction with hand-hewn sills measuring 18 X 22 feet. The cabin was in place to celebrate our country’s bicentennial in 1976. The Knight cabin is listed in the National Historical Register and the Louisiana Division of Historical Preservation. This simple, single room, frontier log cabin with window shutters was probably built in 1857and may regarded as typical for a pioneer family in rural LA. Apart from the area beneath the sleeping loft, the cabin is completely open to the rafters providing more light to this usually dark environment. Kemp Fence The split rail fence, built by Andrew Kemp in 1902, was donated by the Emerson Kemp family in 1976 and is located west of the Grandpa King House on Dry Creek. Sylvest-Magee Cabin This cabin is actually a combination of two homes, donated in 1977 by the Sylvest and Magee families of Washington parish. The Sylvest cabin built by Nehemiah Sylvest was built circa 1880-81 while the family of five children lived in the dirt-floored smokehouse. As the family grew, the house was expanded from a single 64 Here’s Washington Parish!

pen to a double pen by the addition of a hall and front porch. The fear of fire led pioneer families to built detached kitchens. The Magee cabin ca 1909-1910 by Marcus Magee is a board and batton building of longleaf pine with exposed wide boards on the inside of the cabin and covered on the outside with narrow strips of lumber. Saddie and Ethel Magee donated the cabin in memory of their brother Jacob Nathaniel Magee. Mount Hermon School

Mount Hermon School Due to the large number of children in the Mt. Hermon area and the long distance they were required to travel to school in Silver Springs, MS, the residents of the community built the school shortly after the Civil War. The Denman Ott estate and David Jackson Ott donated the school in 1978. The one-roomed log structure was replaced in 1885 by a one-room frame building, furnished with wood desks and benches. The students were seated with the girls on one side and the boys on the other side. Half Moon Bluff Baptist Church Half Moon Bluff Baptist Church was the first Baptist church in LA and the first of two Protestant churches of any denomination organized in the state. It was located on the Bogue Chitto River about 4 ½ miles north of Franklinton at Half Moon Bluff. On October 12, 1812, the church was granted Constitution and gained admission into the MS Baptist Association. Nearly all of the Baptist churches in this area have their roots dating back to the original Half Moon Bluff Baptist Church. The church in MBS is a replica of the original church. The church was built in 1978 with aid and support of the Southeast LA Baptist District, LA Baptist Convention, and the Washington Parish Baptist Association. The Half Moon Bluff Baptist Church is of outstanding significance and while it is a Baptist church, under the regulations of the MBS, all displays, activities, and programs are of interdenominational faith. Visitors of all faiths are welcomed by cordial invitation of the Baptist Association and the MBS. Bankston General Store A very welcome addition to MBS, the Bankston Store was built in the late 1890’s by Claudia Bankston and Continued Next Page

was located about 10 miles northeast of Franklinton. Will Wilkes repaired saddles and harnesses in the Bankston General Store prior to the selling of food items. Chickens and eggs were also sold in the store. Today, lemonade, cookies, pickles, hoop cheese slices, multi-flavored jellies, and post cards are sold in the Bankston General Store. A bigger than life white cotton bale beckons visitors from the front porch. Warnerton Post Office Located within the Bankston General Store, the post office dates back to 1900 around the time the K & E Railroad began its service through Warnerton. Isaiah Pigott served as the first Postmaster, followed by John Warner. At his death, Mrs. Stella Bickham Warner was appointed the first Postmistress. The post office remained open until August 31, 1954. The J. J. Warner family donated the post office in 1978. In 1993, under the sponsorship of the Quality, Work, Life-Employees, International (QWL-EL), the post office was officially opened during the Fair to sell envelopes and stamps. Mail could actually be deposited for processing. Marilyn Bateman designed a MBS postmark. Harvey Shoemake, Bogalusa Postmaster, and Margaret Hill of QWL-EL, assisted with the implementation of the project. The post office was staffed by volunteer postal mail carriers from Franklinton and Bogalusa. Burrel Jones Cabin A one-room structure built shortly after 1885, this log cabin measures approximately 19 X 20 feet. The chimneys are made of mud with three doors to the outside and porches across the front and back. Split shingles comprise the room and sills are made of heart pine. The foundation rests on huge split wood blocks. Mrs. Freeda Jones Kaylor and Earl Jones donated the cabin to MBS in 1979.

Stafford Syrup Mill and Iron Kettle In 1979, Mrs. Collins Pope donated the syrup mill and iron kettle. The kettle dates back to 1900 and is typical of implements used in syrup making prior to the use of rectangular tin pans. The kettle measures 4 feet in diameter by 2 feet deep and weighs approximately 250 pounds when empty.

Bankston Blacksmith Shop Bankston Blacksmith Shop This blacksmith shop built by Claudia Bankston is typical of an 1890’s country farm shop. The shop was used by Mr. Bankston to repair items from guns to plows, wagons to buggies, as well as for shoeing horses. This was also a viable source of income for the Bankston family. Some of the original implements are on display: plows, wagons, bellows, forge, anvil, block, grinding stone, benches, and various smaller tools of the trade. The heirs of Mrs. Kate Bankston Burch donated this superb example of a workable blacksmith shop in 1980.

Richardson Building

Pigott Cabin

Richardson Building Constructed of logs circa 1879 from a building donated by the J. Alton Richardson family in 1979, the cabin was located originally in Sunny Hill, LA. The building was used since its inception as a workshop, storage area or tool shed.

Pigott Cabin The cabin, originally located on the Old River Road in the Pearl River Swamp about 5 ½ miles north of Bogalusa, was not far from the area known as Pigott’s Crossing. The two-room structure was hand-hewn on all sides from virgin pine logs and put together with pegs and square nails. The Pigott cabin has a partition wall one plank thick between two rooms providing insufficient acoustical privacy.10 The 33-foot “lighter” pine sills rest on large sandstones and wooden blocks or pillars. Including the front and back porches, the Continued Next Page

Here’s Washington Parish! 65

building measures 38 x 40 feet. Original and somewhat unusual features include the original frames of two clay chimneys. Other members of the Pigott family occupied the cabin until about 1923-24. In July of 1982, Thomas Hamilton Pigott, joined by his children William Thomas Pigott and Betty Rose Pigott Hunt, donated this log house to the Settlement in memory of Mr. Pigott’s parents and grandparents. Johnson Cabin

Johnson Cabin The cabin was built in the mid-1800’s. About 1882, the cabin, with the exception of the rear portion, was dismantled and moved. The cabin was later dismantled and moved again, this time west of the Bogue Chitto River Road, where it remained and was used for many years by various families as a home. Names of those who at one time lived in the home included Johnson, Jones, Knight, Lee, Hunt,Varnado, and Watson. Mrs. Wanda Jones Watson, wife of the late George Watson, Jr., donated the cabin to the Settlement in 1981. Grist Mill Donated in 1980 by Mr. and Mrs. Leon Knight, the mill was placed next to the Branch corncrib. One of three mills previously used by Murphy Bateman Building Supply, the mill was ordered from Meadows Mill Co. of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, in the early 1940’s. During the celebration of the 70th Anniversary of the Washington Parish Fair in 1983, the mill was in operation, grinding corn into fresh corn meal, the demand for which was greater than supply. Fresh ground corn meal is available along with a country cornbread recipe. Ben’s Ford Kitchen This tiny kitchen, was constructed by Morgan Adams, was found nestled between several tall pines trees in the Ben’s Ford Community, near Bogalusa, La. The building, which serves as the kitchen to the Jones Cabin, was donated by Mr. And Mrs. Elmer Rogers III and moved to the settlement in 1983. The kitchen was complete with all the furnishings, including the old chicken coup fastened to the outside of the house up off the ground. 66 Here’s Washington Parish!

Fleming Barn Fleming Barn The old barn, approximately 30-feet square, was constructed of cypress logs, and donated to the Settlement in 1985 by Mr. And Mrs. Wyatt A. Fleming, Jr. in memory of Mr. Fleming’s father, Dr. Wyatt A. Fleming. Mr. Fleming feels that the barn was constructed between 1870 and 1890. Varnado Corn Crib In 1987, the log crib, donated by Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Morgan, was moved into the Settlement. James Oliver “Barlow” Varnado probably built the crib, 12’x 14’, in the early 1900’s. The structure, constructed of “heart” pine logs, was previously located in the Stoney Point Community. "Grandpa" King House

“Grandpa” King House The house was probably built in 1830 by Thomas Iverson King (TIK), one of the early settlers of Washington Parish. In 1991, the house, known among the members of the King family as “The Grandpa King House”, was moved from an area often referred to as the Benny King Place, five miles northeast of Clifton, LA to the Settlement. This house is referred to as “probably the finest dogtrot cabin remaining in LA.” Tree length logs were cut and used as floor joists. The flooring was notched on the bottom at contact points with joists to reduce floor thickness, yet maintained a smooth surface on top. Also distinguishing the King Cabin as a “fine home” are its early glass sash windows, which appear to be original.12 Large native sandstone rocks were used to raise sills off the ground and for leveling. The front and back Chamfered post porches were tied the room structure with full-length one-half notched logs that traversed the full width of the house. Continued Next Page

The ceiling joists were hand-hewn down from round logs to 5” x 5” square beams used over the exposed ceilings of the porches. The original roof was constructed of hand-split shingles. Each room had intricately worked Federal style fireplace mantles. In one of the rooms, on the mantle-piece, the initials T.I.K. were carved from wood strips. The attic and the dogtrot were floored and used as sleeping lofts. The area could be accessed from both rooms and the dogtrot. The kitchen was separate from the house with a raised walkway between the two buildings. The house has never been connected to electricity or had running water. Two dug wells – one near the kitchen and the other near the barn – supplied water. Beaded ceilings and siding were installed on the interior walls and the dogtrot area was enclosed. Six-inch drop siding covered the exterior walls and split shingled roof was replaces with tin sheeting. Brick chimneys replaced with original clay. One side of the back porch was also enclosed to make a bedroom, dining room, and kitchen. Glass windows were installed throughout the house in the late 1800’s. In 1996, William Roy King and Ellis Bateman added a functional pitcher water pump near the King House. In 1997, an additional pitcher water pump was drilled in front of the King Barn. A watering trough was also added for the farm animals. The house was donated to the Settlement in 1991 by Bessie Warren King, her children William Roy King, and Dorothy King Tickler in memory of James Samuel (J.S.) King Jr. Related families Magee, Richardson, Smith, Brumfield, Warren, Wilson, Dillon, Branch, Bateman, Haley, and Bickham.

oxen, ten milk cows and 15 other cows, one sheep, 50 swine, livestock, valued at $481; 250 bushels of Indian corn, 100 bushels of sweet potatoes; and farm equipment valued at $20. The barn was donated to the Settlement in 1991 by Bessie Warren King, William Roy King, and Dorothy King Tickler in memory of James Samuel (J.S.) King, Jr.

Pine Stump Pine Stump The 14-foot virgin long-leaf pine stump was found on the property of Judge A.J. Jones in the vicinity of Pigott’s Crossing. The stump was moved from a swampy area to Mile Branch in 1993. The stump, probably much larger when alive, perhaps came from a tree which could have been as tall as 300 feet. Apparently broken or twisted off in a storm years before logging operaKing Barn tions began in Washington Parish, the stump was moved to the Settlement through the cooperative King Barn efforts of Frank Prisk and the Washington-St. Tammany Probably built circa 1835 by Thomas Iverson King Electric Cooperative. after he built the “Grandpa House” in 1830, the barn is 64-feet long and 30-feet wide. This is the largest Mile Branch Historical Settlement, Washington Parish barn known to have survived in Washington parish Fairgrounds, Franklinton, LA (985)-986-8411. measuring 64’ X 30’.13 The 1850 census indicates For more information, that Mr. King possesses 40 acres of improved land, visit the Washington Parish Free Fair web site. Web Site: http://www.freefair.com 100 acres of unimproved land, three horses, four Here’s Washington Parish! 67

D. A. VARNADO STORE MUSEUM The D. A. Varnado Museum is housed in a historic building in downtown Franklinton, LA, the parish seat for Washington Parish. The two-story, century old structure was a hub for activity in the early days of Washington Parish as farmers came to town selling their produce and purchasing their needed supplies.

The D. A. Varnado Museum is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The Varnado Store Museum is housed in an historic building in downtown Franklinton, LA, parish seat of Washington Parish. The twostory, century-old structure was a hub of activity in the early days of Washington Parish as farmers would come to town, sell their produce and purchase needed supplies. Early records show that the building was built prior to 1910 and was owned by Daniel E. Sheridan, a timber dealer, real estate agent, Franklinton alderman, and director of the Bank of Franklinton and the First State Bank of Bogalusa. A 1910 map of Franklinton shows that W. C. Lonnergan, formerly of Carriere, MS, owned the business, which had on hand a very large general stock comprising fancy and staple groceries, dry goods, notions, shoes, hats and clothing along with a big line of feed stuffs, harness and sad68 Here’s Washington Parish!

dlery, and farming implements. He drew trade from a fifteen mile radius of town and shipped to points along the N.O. and Great Northern Railroad. He was a member of Woodmen of the World and took a keen interest in the development and advancement of his town. Other previous owners include S. H. Burris, who owned the store in 1913. In 1920 the David A. Varnado family purchased the store, and they worked the store until it closed in the mid 1980’s. Some of the people who worked at the store over the years were Mrs. Delos (Mildred) Magee, Olan Varnado, Mrs. Lillie Varnado, Lena Varnado, Theodore Alford, Mary Jones Burkhalter, Doris Erwin’s father, and countless others. About seven years ago a handful of volunteers began diligently working to purchase the historic D. A. Varnado and Sons Dry Goods Store and building in order to establish a museum. The Washington Area Museum Foundation was formed, consisting of a board of fifteen members that represented the entire parish. Memberships and donations were solicited for the purpose of raising funds to purchase the property. Generous individuals, businesses and institutions within the parish made donations, but the Foundation finally had to contract a loan for the remaining money needed to purchase the building. Then the work began! The building had been closed for many years and needed lots of

attention. Volunteers still continued to dream their dream which, as stated in the Foundation’s by-laws, is: The Varnado Store Museum has made much progress, and is now open every weekend, Saturdays 10 - 4 and Sundays 1 - 4, weekdays by appointment only. The contantly changing exhibits are a window into the past, featuring a glimpse of early life in the parish. It is the goal of the Foundation to eventually be open full time with a paid director, to develop the second floor, and to provide many more educational programs and exhibits. The new building behind the museum houses the museum office. It replicates the old shipping/loading dock and warehouse from which wagons and trucks loaded their supplies. It houses the recordkeeping office and provides a meeting room and hands-on educational facility, etc. Inside the museum there is a fun gift shop where visitors can purchase memorabilia, locally handcrafted items and homemade jellies, jams and lots of other homegrown, home-canned goodies! Tourist information about various other area attractions is also available at the museum. The museum and its many volunteers continue to work hard to preserve local history and local heritage in many different ways. Admission is free; donations welcomed.

LSU Health Bogalusa Medical Center LSU Bogalusa Medical Center is a general medical and surgical hospital in Bogalusa, LA, with 74 beds and is accredited by the Joint Commission (JC). Survey data (2011) shows that 28,444 patients visited the hospital’s emergency room and the hospital had a total of 2,899 admissions. Its physicians performed 464 inpatient and 3,053 outpatient surgeries. The LSU Bogalusa Medical Center provides a wide array of medical service including emergency room, cardiology, family medicine, gastroenterology, ophthalmology/retina clinic, pediatrics/KID MED, podiatry, pulmonology, surgical, urology and women’s health services. The LSU Bogalusa Medical Center also provides special services in its Birthing Room and Infection Isolation Room. The Medical Center provides the latest technologically advanced diagnostic services through its CT scanner, Continued Next Page

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Diagnostic Radioisotope, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), MultiSlice Spiral CT and Ultrasound equipment. The Bogalusa Medical Center also provides outpatient services that include Breast Cancer Screening/Mammogram, Geriatric, HIV-AIDS, Kidney Dialysis, Physical Rehab, Psychiatric, StopSmoking, Women’s Health Center and Wound Management services. The medical center has active community outreach programs including informative health fairs and health screenings. With over 14 full-time and part-time doctors and dentists along with 142 full-time and part-time registered nurses along with 71 licensed practical nurses, the LSU Bogalusa Medical Center has a well-trained staff that can

provide the best possible medical care. The medical center also sponsors the Rural Family Medicine Residence training program accredited through the LSU School of Medicine. The LSU hospital has an illustrious history dating back to its first hospital, Charity Hospital in New Orleans, which started in 1735. The system has seen many changes since those early years. Early on in the development of Washington Parish, health services were set up by the Great Southern Lumber Company in 1906 in Bogalusa to serve the workers and residents of Bogalusa. In 1918, the hospital was named the Elizabeth Sullivan Memorial Hospital in honor of Mayor William Sullivan’s wife. On January 11, 1951 the Washington-

St. Tammany Parish Charity Hospital (Bogalusa Medical Center) opened in Bogalusa, Louisiana. In 1997, Act 3, enacted by the Louisiana Legislature allowed LSU Hospitals to operate the charity hospitals in the state. On June 24, 2002, Washington-St. Tammany Parish Charity Hospital merged with the Bogalusa Community Medical Center to form the Bogalusa Medical Center. The LSU Bogalusa Medical Center provides a complete range of modern medical services and procedures comparable to medical centers in much larger communities. It has a history of caring for the people of Bogalusa and all of Washington Parish in years gone by and will continue to serve for many more years in the future.

AMG Specialty Hospital The only long term acute care hospital in Bogalusa, AMG Specialty Hospital, provides care for patients with medically complex needs that require hospitalization for an extended period of time. Through their multidisciplinary approach, each patient receives individual specialty care designed to return them to an optimal level of wellness in the least restrictive medical environment. This is achieved through their highly qualified staff, including three fulltime internal medicine physicians as well as a specialized wound care staff, in-house dialysis, 24-hour respiratory therapy, a successful ventilator weaning program and a low patient to nurse ratio. 70 Here’s Washington Parish!

Northshore EMS Northshore EMS wants you to know that you do have a choice in requesting emergency transport for a medical emergency or non-emergency. Their highly trained and certified medics are ready 24/7 to provide highlevel non-emergency and emergency care for all locations within Washington Parish. They have been proudly serving Washington Parish since 2004.

Premier Heart Centers of Louisiana, LLC Dr. Victor E. Mejia offers cardiology care at his office at Premier Heart Centers of Louisiana, LLC. Whether you require diagnosis, treatment, or management of your cardiovascular disease you will be able to find it at Premier Heart Center. Most insurances are accepted including Medicare and Medicaid.

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Resthaven Living Center Resthaven has around the clock skilled care, individualized treatment plans, rehab services, IV therapy, dementia care, wound care, respite stays and colostomy care. Further, Resthaven provides medication management and education, pain management, hospice care, psychological services, audiology, a registered dietician, lab testing and X-rays. Medicare, Medicaid, private, HMO insurances are accepted as is private pay. Taking trips to shopping and doctor visits is easy in Resthaven’s shuttle bus equipped with television. If you’re in need of any of our services, please come see us and take a look at our lovely facilities.

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AmeraCare Family Hospice & Home Health Home Health . . . It is about caring! If you have difficulty climbing stairs or walking or taking a bath, you may benefit from Home Health Services. Have you fallen been hospitalized, changed meds or have wounds that won’t heal, then you may benefit from AmeraCare Home Health Services. AmeraCare Home Health offers skilled nursing services such as diabetic management, psychiatric certified nursing, cardiac disease management, medication teaching, pain management, nutritional Instruction, respiratory care, orthopedic care, geriatric psych, wound care and foot care. Our occupational therapist can help restore function for daily living. Our physical therapists can create an exercise or rehab program in conjunction with the doctor for achievement of optimum progress. Our licensed therapists work to improve speech and swallowing for those with nerve, muscle or cognitive disorders. Our medical social services can assist the client and/or caregiver to adjust to lifestyle changes brought on by injury or illness.

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Good Samaritan Living Center

Good Samaritan Living Center offers quality 24-hour nursing care to its guests. A registered dietician supervises all diets. There is in-house physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy available. Good Samaritan has an innovative restorative nursing program to assist residents in becoming more independent. There are organized activities offered twice a day. Transportation to doctor’s appointments, shopping and other activities is available. The home-like atmosphere of its bright, cheerful in all of its rooms including its private and semi-private rooms, make the Good Samaritan a wonderful place to live. Good Samaritan also offers in-house beauty shop, barber and chapel. Visit us for a tour at our Franklinton location.

Mitou A. LeMaire Whether you are a nervous Ned or a steady Sam at the dentist, the office of Mitou A. LeMaire can make your visit to the dentist as painless as possible. Dr. LeMaire provides general dental care and can handle a wide variety of dental problems. Most insurance plans are accepted. If you need dental care come see us at Dr. Mitou A. LeMarie’s office. And remember, new patients are always welcome.

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Retirement & Assisted Living Assisted Living facilities are set up for people who have no way of providing care for themselves either personally or through the efforts of family and/or friends. The assisted living resident is aided with medical assistance and/or personal needs assistance. About a million people now live in assisted care facilities in this country and they’re not necessarily retired. Families who have younger family members with significant disabilities oftentimes take advantage of living in an assisted care facility. There are a variety of assisted living facilities ranging from houses to dedicated buildings. Buildings that have been constructed specifically for assisted living residents can be more efficient in dealing with all the care needs of the residents but there

have been converted homes and buildings that are used for assisted living as well. Some of the services provided by assisted care facilities are:

• Transportation • Housekeeping services • Eating, bathing, dressing, toileting and walking assistance • Access to medical services • Three meals a day served in a dining area • Medication management • 24-hour security/staff availability • Emergency systems for each resident • Health promotion programs • Laundry services • Social activities

The living quarters provided in assisted living facilities can be anything from basic to luxurious. Being able to transition into an environment that has a homelike atmosphere can be helpful to potential assisted living residents. As with any residential living quarters it is essential to look over the facilities which the assisted livingcare organization provides. Go to the facility and look around at the common areas, medical areas, and the rooms. Talk with the administrator and get a feeling for the organization’s philosophy on providing care. For many families, assisted living is an option which actually can give greater care to the resident, while at the same time providing relief to the burden being carried by family and/or friends.

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Northshore Tech Community College Sullivan Campus

In a global market, anyone looking for work must possess top-notch skills and training and that is where Northshore Technical Community College comes in. Find your future in one of the following fields: air conditioning/refrigeration, automotive technology, business technology, building technology, care and development of young children, criminal justice, culinary or diesel powered equipment technology. Additional careers are also available in: drafting & design technology, emergency medical technician, computer/networking support, machine tool technology, nurse assistant, patient care technician, practical nursing and welding. Financial assistance is available to qualified applicants. Let the Northshore Technical College Sullivan Campus assist you with obtaining career skills that will place you on the cutting edge of today’s workforce!

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Annunciation Catholic School (ACS) Welcome to Annunciation Catholic School (ACS) - the Little School with a Big Heart!  For over 70 years, ACS has fostered academic excellence and character development in a God-centered CatholicChristian environment.  Graduates of Annunciation are equipped with life skills that enable them to be successful in their future endeavors. The school serves children in grades Pre-K 3 through eight. Students are taught to think, love, act, and speak as Jesus did so that their lives may reflect Jesus to others. Annunciation Catholic School seeks to educate and form the whole person by promoting the spiritual, intellectual, emotional, social, and physical development of each student in light of the Gospel message of Jesus and the tradition of the Catholic Church. Students and staff recognize that each person is created in God’s own image. Annunciation Catholic School welcomes all races, creeds, and cultures. Annunciation Catholic School provides a strong academic curriculum and challenging, competent instruction to its students. In a spirit of love, each student is helped to attain his/her fullest potential and develop a true sense of positive self-worth. ACS fosters a love of life and learning in students that enables them to become responsible American citizens.

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Washington School District

Public Schools

Enon Elementary School 14058 HWY 16
Franklinton, LA 70438 Phone:  985-839-3976 Fax:  985-839-3402 www.ees.wpsb.org Enon Elementary School, located in Franklinton, LA Grades PK - 6 Principal: Jackie Boone (jboone@wpsb.org) Franklinton Elementary School 345 Jaguar Dr.,
Franklinton, LA 70438 Phone:  985-839-3580 Fax:  985-839-5149 www.fes.wpsb.org Grades 3 – 5 Principal: Polly Thigpen (pthigpen@wpsb.org) Franklinton High School 1 Demon Cir., Franklinton, LA 70438 Phone:  985-839-6781 Fax: 985-839-9830 www.franklintonhigh.com Grades 9 - 12 Principal: Lisa Tanner (ltanner@wpsb.org) Franklinton Junior High School 617 Main St., Franklinton, LA 70438 Phone:  985-839-3501 Fax:  985-839-6912 www.fjhs.wpsb.org Grades 6 - 8 Principal: Pauline Bankston (pbankston@wpsb. org) Franklinton Primary School 610 T.W. Barker Dr., Franklinton, LA 70438 Phone:  985-839-5674 Fax: 985-839-9546 www.fps.wpsb.org Grades PK - 2. Principal: Aylene Crain (acrain@wpsb.org)

Pine Junior / Senior High School 1 Raider Dr., Franklinton, LA 70438 Phone:  985-848-5243 Fax:  985-848-9433 www.phs.wpsb.org Grades 6 - 12 Principal: Jennifer Thomas (jthomas@wpsb.org) Mount Hermon School 36119 HWY 38, Mount Hermon, LA 70450 Phone:  985-877-5813 Fax:  985-877-4710 www.mhs.wpsb.org Grades PK - 12 Principal: Renee Carpenter (rcarpenter@wpsb.org) Thomas Elementary School 30341 HWY 424, Franklinton, LA 70438 Phone:  985-848-2881 Fax:  985-848-5497 www.tjhs.wpsb.org Grades PK - 5 Principal: Steve Knight (sknight@wpsb.org) Varnado High School 25543 Washington St., Angie, LA 70426 Phone:  985-732-2025 Fax:  985-732-5198 www.vhs.wpsb.org Grades 6 – 12 Principal: Randy Branch (rbranch@wpsb.org) Wesley Ray Elementary School 30523 Wesley Ray Rd., Angie, LA 70426 Phone:  985-985-3131 Fax:  985-986-2228 www.wre.wpsb.org Grades PK - 5 Principal: Ginger Champagne (gchampagne@wpsb.org)   

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City of Bogalusa School District Bogalusa High School 100 MJ Israel Drive, Bogalusa, LA 70427 Phone: 985-281-2180 Fax: 985-735-9768 www.bogalusahigh.com Principal: Bryan Stewart Bogalusa New Tech High 100 M. J. Israel Dr., Bogalusa, LA 70427 Phone: 985-281-2220 Fax: 985-545-1016 sites.google.com/site/bogalusanewtechhigh1 Principal: Don McDaniel Bogalusa Middle School 1403 North Ave., Bogalusa, LA 70427 Phone: 985-281-2232 sites.google.com/site/bogalusamiddleschool/ Principal Tonja Seal Assistant Principal: Linda Moore

CollegesHigher Education Northshore Technical College 1710 Sullivan Drive
Bogalusa, LA 70427 Phone: 985 732-6640 www.northshorecollege.edu/ Campus Dean/NTCC Chancellor: William S. Wainwright, M.Ed.

Northside Technology Middle School 517 Mississippi Ave., Bogalusa LA 70427 Phone: 985-281-2202 www.northsidetech.org Principal: April King Byrd Avenue Elementary School 1600 Byrd Ave., Bogalusa LA 70427 Phone: 985-281-2190 sites.google.com/site/byrdave Principal: Pam Ard Pleasant Hill Elementary School 725 Avenue C, Bogalusa LA 70427 Phone: 985-281-2202 sites.google.com/site/pleasanthillhoneybees Co-Principal: Sheila Lawrence Co-Principal: Barbara Greely

Private Schools

Superior Avenue Elementary School 625 Superior Ave., Bogalusa LA 70427 Phone: 985-281-2170 sites.google.com/site/superioravenue10 Principal: Melessa Walker

Annunciation Catholic School 511 Ave. C, Bogalusa, LA 70427 Phone: 985-735-6643 Pre K-8, Principal: Veda Matthews

Denhamtown Elementary School 1101 Avenue M, Bogalusa LA 70427 Phone: 985-281-2194 denhamtown.org Preschool Coordinator: Phlesher Mingo

Bens Ford Christian School 59253 Mt Pleasant Road 2, Bogalusa, LA 70427 Phone: 985-735-0387 Co-ed, Pre K-12 Head Master: Sharon McGehee Bowling Green 700 Varnado Street, Franklinton, LA, 70438 Phone: 985-839-5317 Co-ed, Pre K-12 Principal: Beverly Young Here’s Washington Parish! 79

RESTAURANTS 450 Quickstop & Deli 16423 Hwy. 450 Franklinton.............................. 985-839-2500 Bennie’s Wings & Things 524 Martin Luther King Jr. Dr. Bogalusa................................. 985-735-8664 Big Easy Grill 100 Cumberland St. #E Bogalusa................................. 985-735-6695

Bino’s Seafood Restaurant 1101 N Columbia St Bogalusa............................ 985-735-7132 Birdie’s Roadhouse 26646 Hwy. 21 Angie...................................... 985-732-4032 Bo’s Steak House 30184 Louisiana 25 Franklinton.............................. 985-839-3330 Burger King 101 Cumberland St. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-9014 Burger King 735 Washington St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-3080 80 Here’s Washington Parish!

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Cafe Bouchee (Open for lunch) 103 Cleveland St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-8983 Chicken to Go 1327 S Columbia St. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-4001 China Star 113 Cumberland St. Bogalusa................................. 985-735-8886 Chrissy’s 215 Louisiana Ave. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-9067 Crawfish Shack 27024 Louisiana 25 Franklinton................................... 985-839-0039 Domino’s Pizza 201 Superior Ave. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-5551 Don Juan 137 Washington St. Franklinton.............................. 985-795-9013 Don Juan Mexican Restaurant 209 Louisiana Ave. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-3434 Donut Palace 213 Superior Ave. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-7399 Continued Next Page

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Dragon Place Restaurant 220 Louisiana Ave. Bogalusa................................. 985-735-1531 Franklinton’s Grill 1012 Washington St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-4903 Gerald’s Steak House 30184 Hwy. 25 Franklinton.............................. 985-839-3330

Glynn’s Drive-In Restaurant 945 Ave. F Bogalusa............................ 985-735-1212 Grand Chinese Buffet 1601 Washington St. Franklinton...............................985-839-1166 Hardee’s 300 Cumberland St. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-2900 House of Catfish & Seafood 1228 S Columbia St. Bogalusa................................. 985-735-7755 House of Seafood Express 143 Shenandoah St. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-0233

K & J Golden Pear 225 Louisiana Ave. Bogalusa............................ 985-735-1199 La Iguana Mexican Restaurant & Cantina 913 Washington St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-2646 Lady E’s 930 Bene St. Franklinton.............................. 985-795-0909 Lane’s Chicken & Seafood 1750 Washington St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-8937 Long Branch Cafe 847 Ave. F Bogalusa..................................985-735-8711 Continued Next Page

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Louise’s 805 Main St. Franklinton.............................. 985-795-2070 Main St. Restaurant 1102 Main St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-9700 Maria’s Mexican Restaurant 200 Austin St. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-3013 McDonald’s 250 Cumberland St. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-3973 McDonald’s 702 Washington St. Franklinton.............................. 985-795-9556 Ole Hickory Barbeque (Th-Sat) 30163 Railroad St. Angie...................................... 985-986-0039 Ole South Buffet & Seafood 15273 Hwy. 21 S Bogalusa................................. 985-732-2444 Palace Drive Inn Restaurant 207 Main St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-2230 Pine Seafood Restaurant (Th-Sat) 26450 Choctaw Rd. Franklinton.............................. 985-848-2233 Continued Next Page

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Pines Malt Stand 28001 Hwy. 424 Franklinton.............................. 985-848-2150 Pizza Inn 1611 Washington St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-6305 Pizza Pete’s 945 Cleveland St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-0170 Popeye’s Chicken & Biscuits 206 Superior Ave. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-4200 Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen 1420 Washington St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-9234 Redwood Grill 1417 Gobbler Head Dr. Bogalusa................................. 985-735-8888 Sonic Drive-In 1018 N. Columbia St. Bogalusa................................. 985-735-1515 Sonic Drive-In

1621 Washington St.

Franklinton.............................. 985-839-3012 Stewart Seafood 16424 Hwy. 450 Franklinton.............................. 985-839-9616 Stuart’s Café 30222 Hwy. 21 Angie...................................... 985-986-2990 Subway 218 Cumberland, Wal-Mart Bogalusa................................. 985-735-9622 Subway 935 Washington St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-5902 Sonny’s Pizza 1203 S Columbia St. Bogalusa................................. 985-735-5623 Continued Next Page 84 Here’s Washington Parish!

Taco Bell Western Sizzlin Steak House 205 Superior Ave., #B 1523 S Columbia St. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-7882 Bogalusa................................. 985-735-9533 Thomas Downtown Diner Yoyo’s Mexican Restaurant 31044 Hwy. 424 701 Superior Ave. Franklinton.............................. 985-848-5444 Bogalusa ................................ 985-735-7374 Union Square Yoyo’s Bar & Grille 224 Louisiana Ave. 210 Louisiana Ave. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-9090 Bogalusa................................. 985-735-7374 Warner’s Fish House Zesto’s Drive-In 2221 Ave. F 100 Richmond St. Bogalusa................................. 985-732-5353 Bogalusa................................. 985-735-5761 Wendy’s OLD Fashioned Hamburgers 129 Cumberland St. Bogalusa................................. 985-735-6185 Wendy’s OLD Fashioned Hamburgers 709 Washington St. Franklinton.............................. 985-839-3730

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IMPORTANT NUMBERS Washington Parish

Parish Council Richard “Ned” Thomas (President)..............839-7825 District 1.................................................... Ken Wheat District 2.........................................Michael A. Fussell District 3........................... Charles “Chuck” Nassauer District 4..............................................Andre Johnson District 5.................................................Pete Thomas District 6..............................................Greg Route, Sr District 7........................................... Aubrey L. Posey Clerk of Council: Sharon Lyons.....................839-0105 Clerk of Court: Johnny D. Crain.....................839-4663 District Attorney............................................. 839-6711 Washington Parish Sheriff: Robert J. Crowe Non-emergency..............................................839-3434 Emergency.............................................................. 911 Washington Parish Tax Assessor.................839-7815 Washington Parish Tourism Commission...839-5228

BOGALUSA, CITY OF

Mayor: Charles E. Mizell..................................732-6200 Bogalusa City Hall, 214 Arkansas Ave Bogalusa City Council...................................732-6202 Councilman At Large.............................. Doug Ritchie Councilwoman at Large..........Wendy O’Quin-Perrette Councilwoman District “A”.................. Penny Williams Councilman District “B”........................ Michael O’Ree Councilman District “C”...................... Oneita Graham Councilman District “D”.............Theodore Drummond Councilman District “E”........................ Randy Hodges Bogalusa Fire Dept. Fire Chief: Richard Moody Non-emergency........................................732-6219 Emergency......................................................... 911 Bogalusa Police Dept, 202 Arkansas Ave. Police Chief: Joe Culpepper Non-emergency........................................ 732-3611 Emergency......................................................... 911 Airport..............................................................732-4521 Bogalusa Licensing/Bldg. Permits...............732-6211 Bogalusa Public Works.................................732-6213 Bogalusa Water/Sewer Billing....................... 732-6211 City Prosecutor: David Merlin Duke ..............732-6292

CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE

Bogalusa Chamber of Commerce 608 Willis Avenue Bogalusa, LA 70427....735-5731 Fax............................................................735-6707 e-mail: bogalusachamber@bellsouth.net Franklinton Chamber of Commerce 1051 Main Street, Franklinton, LA 70438... 839-5822 . e-mail: franklintonchamber@franklinton.net

DRIVER’S LICENSE See State listings 86 Here’s Washington Parish!

FEDERAL AGENCIES

Social Security Administration 205 Arkansas Ave............................... (888) 748-7678 U.S. Post Offices Angie, LA 70426 29891 Hwy. 21..........................................986-7486 Bogalusa, LA 70427, 305 Ave. B................735-1356 .. (PO boxes have zip code 70429) Bush, LA 70431.................................. 81880 Hwy. 41 Franklinton, LA 70438 805 Lee St................................................839-5124 Mt. Hermon, 36043 Louisiana 438...........................................877-5772 Sandy Hook, LA 39478 480 John Ford Home Rd..........................736-9670 Sun, LA 70463 30034, Hwy. 16.........................................886-3136

FRANKLINTON, TOWN OF

Mayor: Wayne Fleming....................................839-3569 Franklinton Town Hall 301 11th Ave Franklinton Alderman....................................839-3569 Alderman T. J. Butler Alderman John L. Daniel, Alderman Alderman Richard Dillon, Alderman Alderman Florence Manning, Alderman Alderman Brad Orman, Alderman Franklinton Fire Dept. Fire Chief: Chad Manning Non-emergency........................................839-3515 Emergency......................................................... 911 Franklinton Police Dept. Police Chief: Donald Folse Non-emergency........................................839-2977 .. Emergency......................................................... 911 Franklinton Building Inspector.....................839-3569

GARBAGE COLLECTION

Parish Disposal, 21164 Hwy. 16 Franklinton, LA.............................................839-0066

HOSPITALS

LSU Hospitals/ Bogalusa Medical Center 433 Plaza St., Bogalusa, LA 70427.............730-6700 Riverside Medical Center 1900 Main Street, Franklinton, LA................839-4431

LIBRARIES

Washington Parish Library System Bogalusa Library 304 Avenue F, Bogalusa, LA 70427..............735-1961 Enon Library, 14073 Highway 16, Franklinton, LA 70438...839-9385 Franklinton Library 825 Free Street, Franklinton, LA, 70438.......839-7805 Thomas Library 26513 Highway 62, Franklinton, LA 70438...848-7061

Media

Magazines Here’s Washington Parish! Magazine M & M Publishing...............................601-264-7574 Newspapers The Daily News 525 Avenue V, Bogalusa, LA....................732-2565 Era-Leader 1137 Main Street, Franklinton, LA............839-9077 Timberlands Advertiser 607 Rio Grande St, Bogalusa...................735-8053 Radio WBOX, AM & FM radio, WKIX 22037 Highway 436, Bogalusa.................732-4254

PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Washington Parish School District 800 Main St., Franklinton, LA 70438............839-3436 Franklinton High School 1 Demon Circle, Franklinton, LA 70438......839-6781 Franklinton Junior High School 617 Main Street, Franklinton, LA 70438......839-3501 Franklinton Elementary School 345 Jaguar Drive, Franklinton, LA 70438....839-3580 Franklinton Primary School 610 T.W. Barker Drive Franklinton, LA 70438.................................839-5674 Enon Elementary School 14058 Hwy. 16, Franklinton, LA 70438.......839-3976 Thomas Elementary School 30341 Hwy. 424, Franklinton, LA 70438.....848-2881 Varnado High School 25543 Washington Street Angie, LA 70426..........................................732-2025 Wesley Ray Elementary School 30523 Wesley Ray Road, Angie, LA 70426, 3131 Pine Junior / Senior High School 1 Raider Drive, Franklinton, LA 70438........848-5243 Mount Hermon School 36119 Hwy. 38 Mount Hermon, LA 70450...........................877-5813 Bogalusa City School District 1705 Sullivan Dr., Bogalusa, LA 70427........281-2100 Bogalusa High School 100 M. J. Israel Dr........................................281-2180 Bogalusa New Tech High 100 M. J. Israel Dr........................................281-2220 Bogalusa Middle School 1403 North Ave.................................................281-2232 Northside Technology Middle School 517 Mississippi Avenue................................281-2200 Byrd Avenue Elementary School 1600 Byrd Avenue........................................281-2190 Denhamtown Elementary School 1101 Avenue M.............................................281-2194 Pleasant Hill Elementary School 725 Avenue C...............................................732-9771 Superior Avenue Elementary School 625 Superior Ave..........................................281-2170

Private Schools

ANNUNCIATION CATHOLIC SCHOOL 511 Ave C, Bogalusa, LA 70427................735-6643 Bens Ford Christian School 59253 Mt. Pleasant Rd. Bogalusa, LA 70427.....................................735-0387 Bowling Green School 700 Varnado St, Franklinton, LA 70438.......839-5317

COLLEGES

Northshore Technical Community College, Sullivan Campus 1710 Sullivan Dr., Bogalusa, LA 70427...732-6640

State of Louisiana Agencies

LSU AgCenter Extension Service 1104 Bene St., Franklinton, LSU Forestry Camp 21139 Lee Memorial Dr. Pine.......................848-5709 Louisiana Motor Vehicle Division, 62041 Benjamin Rd., Bogalusa....................732-6628 301 11th Ave., Franklinton............................795-1015 Louisiana Rayburn Correctional Inst, Control Ctr., Hwy 21.........................................................986-5008 Louisiana State Legislators State Senator Ben Nevers...........................732-6863 or ...........................................................800-881-2749 State Rep. Harold Ritchie............................730-2147 Louisiana Thomas Community Health Ct. 51704 Hwy 438, Pine...................................848-9955 Louisiana Workforce Development Job Ctr. Hwy 438 Ave B.............................................732-6630

UTILITIES

Cable Charter Communications................... 1-888-438-2427 Electric Entergy.............................................. 1-800-368-3749 Washington- St. Tammany Electric Cooperative, Inc. 950 Pearl St., Franklinton, LA 70438..... 839.3562 Gas: CenterPoint Energy/Entex............................735-1307 Water/Sewer/Garbage Service Public Works Dept., City Hall.......................732-6213 Electrical Inspection Public Works Dept., City Hall.......................732-6213 Tele: BellSouth........................................... 1-800-557-6500

ZIP CODES

Angie......................................................... 70426, 70427 Bogalusa................................................... 70427, 70429 Bush...................................................................... 70431 Franklinton............................................................. 70438 Mt. Hermon............................................................ 70450 Sun ....................................................................... 70463 Varnado................................................................. 70467 Here’s Washington Parish! 87

ADVERTISERS INDEX AmeraCare Family Hospice & Home Health........................................................................................................73 AMG Specialty Hospital...........................................................................................................................................70 Annunciation Catholic School................................................................................................................................77 Apple’s LTD.................................................................................................................................................................38 Arata Law Office...........................................................................................................................Inside Back Cover Bill McGehee Insurance..........................................................................................................................................27 Bino’s Seafood Restaurant.......................................................................................................................................81 Bogalusa Chamber of Commerce...................................................................................................................14-15 Bogalusa, City of.......................................................................................................................................................11 Circle T Farm Supply.................................................................................................................................................30 Citizen’s Savings Bank..............................................................................................................................................44 City Rexall Drug Store...............................................................................................................................................47 Crain & Sons..............................................................................................................................................................29 Crain Funeral Home.................................................................................................................................................34 Delta Printing.............................................................................................................................................................47 Direct Wireless...........................................................................................................................................................35 Franklinton Chamber of Commerce................................................................................................................16-17 Franklinton, Town of..................................................................................................................................................13 Gayle’s Jewelers.......................................................................................................................................................42 Glynn’s Drive-In.........................................................................................................................................................83 Good Samaritan Living Center...............................................................................................................................74 H.L. Brownstone’s (Tanning).....................................................................................................................................41 Hattiesburg Visitor’s Ctr.............................................................................................................................................49 International Paper....................................................................................................................Outside Back Cover K & J Golden Pear....................................................................................................................................................85 Lacox Inc. (Propane, Natural Gas).........................................................................................................................32 LeMaire, Mitou A., DDS.............................................................................................................................................74 LSU Health Bogalusa Medical Center....................................................................................................................69 Magee Autoplex.......................................................................................................................................................55 Magee Financial......................................................................................................................................................43 Moore and Jenkins Insurance.................................................................................................... Inside Front Cover Mosley’s Jewelers.....................................................................................................................................................44 Nielson’s Pharmacy..................................................................................................................................................43 Nobles Construction.................................................................................................................................................30 Northshore EMS...........................................................................................................................................................1 Northshore Technical College................................................................................................................................76 Orman & Bickham Real Estate................................................................................................................................35 Parish Credit..............................................................................................................................................................34 Poole-Ritchie Funeral Home....................................................................................................................................26 Premier Heart Centers..............................................................................................................................................71 Resource Bank..........................................................................................................................................................34 Resthaven Living Center..........................................................................................................................................72 Rocky’s Medical Shoppe.........................................................................................................................................29 Romano Investment & Insurance...........................................................................................................................28 Sumrall’s Pharmacy..................................................................................................................................................28 Washington Parish......................................................................................................................................................5 Washington Parish Tourism.....................................................................................................................................7,9 Washington-St. Tammany Elec. Co-Op.....................................................................................................................8 Whitney Bank...............................................................................................................................................................3 Zellco FCU..................................................................................................................................................................26 88 Here’s Washington Parish!

COVERING BOGALUSA, FRANKLINTON, ANGIE, VARNADO, CLIFTON, ENON, MT. HERMON, PINE, SHERIDAN, STATE LINE, THOMAS, WARNERTON AND ALL OF WASHINGTON PARISH.

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Here's Washington Parish!