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EXCEPTIONAL FURNITURE & WORKS OF ART

141 New Bond Street London W1S 2BS 929 Madison Avenue at 74th Street New York 10021

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As I write this introduction to our splendid 2011 catalogue, we are beginning to ‘wrap up’ our stand at our annual excursion to Masstricht for the TEFAF. It has been a most successful few weeks with sales to a wide variety of collectors from across the globe. It maintains its reputation as a worldwide showcase for the finest selection of the arts competing with the factory ships of the auction houses in a more erudite manner with many layers of scholarship and experience. Our own fair Masterpiece London will have its second anniversary at the end of June on the south lawns of the Royal Hospital, its now permanent home and has expanded to 150 international dealers who are the recognised leaders in their disciplines. This fair has instantly become the most talked about art fair in the world with its unique approach to display and service alongside museum vetted works of art and the greatest global luxury. Sales included the first car ever sold in an art fair – the famed “Fast Lady” Bentley built in 1927 and star of the movie of the same title. Other less racy sales included a clock by Thomas Tompion and a great canvas by Sisley, among the billion pounds of artwork on view. Mallett will again be exhibiting pieces acquired from important private collections alongside a small exhibition in our gallery of exceptional garden sculpture, some of which you will see within these pages. As always, we look forward to meeting you in our galleries in London and New York and at the various fairs during the year.

Giles Hutchinson Smith Chief Executive

Left, the Mallett stand at the International Fine Art and Antique Dealers Show, New York, October 2010

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AN IMPORTANT PAIR OF GEORGE II CARVED GILTWOOD TERMS

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An important pair of George II carved giltwood candle stands or terms attributed to Benjamin Goodison or John Boson, the tapered terms surmounted with classical female heads, each supporting flower head carved ionic capitals, the shoulders with draped swags above embrocated panels centred by richly carved drop pendants of oak leaves and acorns, the sides similarly embrocated with all over fish scale carving, the bases with ribbon and rose carved mouldings and terminated with embrocated and acanthus ornamented inverted scrolled feet. England, circa 1730 Height: 58½in (148.5cm) Width: 17½in (44cm) Depth: 15in (38cm) PROVENANCE

Vanderbilt and Astor families, Newport, Rhode Island. F3A0242

With the revival of classical taste and the opening-up of Europe to the sophisticated, wealthy traveller, gilt stands of this term form were introduced to complement the Palladian designs so much favoured by Lord Burlington and his architect, William Kent. Although a motif used in applied decoration since the Renaissance, as portable stands

they were a novelty in English design and were derived directly from contemporary Continental fashion. These terms were used mostly to support candelabra for light, although they also supported other objects such as vases or busts. Not many examples survive today, although a number of different designs are known.

Benjamin Goodison supplied a set with female heads and similar Ionic capital to the pair here illustrated for Hampton Court in 1732. Another pair now at Chatsworth, and formerly in Devonshire House, were designed by William Kent and share similar details as to the facial carving, the fish scales and scrolled feet.

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A VERY RARE PAIR OF WILLIAM AND MARY LACQUER CHAIRS A very rare pair of William & Mary black japanned highback hall chairs, the arched back with stylized ducal coronet and fleur-de-lis above a caned back with fluted column supports richly decorated with gilt scrolling and polychrome foliate details, the caned seat with further gilt and painted decoration above shaped legs and arched cross-stretcher, all with rich giltwork detailing. England, circa 1690 Height: 54in (137cm) Width: 18in (46cm) Depth: 15in (38cm) F3A0363

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A PAIR OF JAPANESE SIX FOLD PAPER AND SILK SCREENS A pair of late nineteenth century six fold Japanese paper and silk screens both depicting flocks of wild cranes (tsuru) with their young on a seashore setting interspersed with trees (matsu), rocks and dunes. The sky with speckled gold leaf. Japan, circa 1875 Height: 70in (178cm) Width: 137in (348cm)

White cranes are most associated with long life and well being in Japan. They are used in decoration when associated with marriage as a symbol of long lasting relationships and good fortune.The Japanese believed that tsuru could live for more than 600 years and were often thought to be the carriers of good spirits to heaven. F2I0406

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A PAIR OF VENETIAN MURANO GIRANDOLES A rare pair of eighteenth century Venetian rococo girandoles, fashioned with a profusion of glass scrolls, leaves and polychrome flowers. They retain their original arms and mirror plates. Italy, circa 1750 LITERATURE

Venetian Palazzi, Mazzariol, G and Dorigato, A. Taschen, 1998, p.131. Arts and Crafts in Venice, Davanzo Poli, D. Cologne, 1999, p.188. Height: 31½in (80cm) Width: 18in (46cm) Depth: 12in (30cm)

The Murano factories of Venice have been producing some of the finest glass works in Europe from as early as the thirteenth century. Protected under the authority of the Republic, the Guild of glass makers’ methods were very highly valued and kept strictly secret. During the mid fifteenth century, a flawless clear glass known as “Cristallo Veneziano” was created by Angelo Barovier (1405-1460). The chemical composition of this type of glass allowed for more complex and extensive designs to be used by subsequent generations of makers, with particular reference to chandeliers and mirrors. These girandoles feature aesthetic characteristics of the Venetian glass maker, Giuseppe Lorenzo Briati (16861772). He pioneered the use of metal supports and curved side branches which were decorated with pieces of hollow glass arranged on different tiers, allowing for greater luminosity. Briati also invented a new design of chandelier known locally as ‘ciocche’ (literally meaning ‘wisp’) where a clear glass base was lavishly adorned with polychrome glass volutes, flowers and pendants. His elaborate designs became very popular with nobility of the time. A large chandelier commissioned for the Palazzo Rezzonico in Venice has been attributed to Briati, clearly demonstrating his stylistic innovation. L3A0349A

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A LOUIS XV ORMOLU CARTEL CLOCK BY CHARLES BALTHAZAR A fine Louis XV ormolu cartel clock, the ormolu crisply chased, with rococo ‘C’ scrolls supporting the arcadian love scene of noble shepherdess and supplicant suitor. The ormolu retains its original gilding, and the clock face its original enamel.The clock stamped with the crowned ‘C’ poinçon, denoting that it was made between 1745 and 1749. France, circa 1745 Height: 27in (68.5cm) Width: 12½in (32cm) Depth: 6in (15cm)

Henri-Charles Balthazar (Charles, Père l’Aîné) was a member of a large family of clockmakers. He became a Master in 1717 and worked first in the Place Dauphine and then in the Rue du Roule (1747-1772). O3A0252

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A PAIR OF LOUIS XV FAUTEUILS A large scale pair of giltwood Louis XV fauteuils. They have a serpentine top rail with a boldly carved vase at the centre hung with a laurel swag. The arms are scrolled and elegantly join the seat rails. The front rail is similarly decorated to the back top rail and the vase motif is repeated. The fauteuils stand on cabriole legs, each surmounted by a carved fan motif. Throughout, the carving is of exceptional quality. France, circa 1765 Height of seat: 16½in (42cm) Height: 40½in (103cm) Width: 29in (74cm) Depth: 26½in (67cm)

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This pair of fauteuils is noteworthy for a number of reasons. Primarily, they are of unusually generous proportions. Secondly, though pre-eminently of rococo design the swag-hung vase is a neoclassical motif and therefore places these chairs very much at the birth of the Neo-classical revival. The menuisier, Louis Delanois, was one of the forerunners in the classical revival and there is a chair illustrated by Svend Eriksen, plate XXIV in his monograph on Louis Delanois published in 1968. This chair which is in the Metropolitan Museum in New York bears various decorative parallels which might suggest Delanois as a name but there is no certainty. The vase motif which is the only neo-classical element on the fauteuils is probably the most ubiquitous of all decorative devices from this era. To find such a confident use of this motif in a pair of chairs, otherwise wholly rococo in expression, is most unusual. The reaction against the perceived frivolity of rococo design began almost at once. However, it is not until the mid 1750’s that one begins to see menuisiers starting to introduce a hybrid of the two schools. Svend Eriksen’s seminal work Early neo- classicism in France, published in 1974, explores how what we know as the Louis XVI style had fully

eroded the fluidity of the Louis XV rococo style by the time of his coronation in 1774. In the above-mentioned volume, the derivation of the vase motif as coming from students at the French Academy in Rome is discussed. Once a student had won the Grand Prix de Rome at the Académies Royales they were sent, at the King’s expense, to Rome to study and draw from classical antiquity. Many of these young students sent back drawings and capricci of vases and other ornament. These were then published and distributed as an inspiration for menuisiers, bronziers and ébénistes. Several albums of these survive and Eriksen illustrates examples by Neufforge 1755, Le Lorrain 1752 or earlier, Vien 1753 and Saly as early as 1746, and several others. The vase seems to have been used as a rallying cry for a neo-classical idea representing not only classical antiquity but also the flowering of the late Baroque in Rome which reminded artists of the decorative grammar of the Louis XIV period and before. By employing the vase as a decorative motif, designers were thus able to sandwich the rococo period between the perceived gravitas and simplicity of classical epochs. F3A0403

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A TABLE CLOCK In burr yew and gilt mounted case of unusual small size and particularly detailed chasing. The eight-day movement with original verge escapement. The gilded dial with Roman numerals has an extremely finely engraved lower plate signed Viner London. England, circa 1825

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Charles Edward Viner (b. 17881829) worked from both the Royal Exchange and premises at 151 New Bond Street from 1776 to 1820 before moving to Sackville Street, manufacturing exquisite carriage and bracket clocks, watches and chronometers. O3A0415

Height: 16in (40.5cm) Width: 7in (18cm) Depth: 5½in (14cm)

A PAIR OF GEORGE III PIER GLASSES A pair of mid eighteenth century rococo giltwood pier glasses, the frames extravagantly carved with stylised leaves, fruit and flowers entwined amongst interlocking ‘s’ and ‘c’ scrolls on a pierced rocaille ground. The original mirror plates retaining their original backing panels and wool cushioning. England, circa 1760 Height: 66in (168cm) Width: 22½in (57cm)

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Llanharan House was built around 1750 by Rees Powell and later occupied by Richard Jenkins and the Blandy-Jenkins family. Its most distinguished visitor was King George II of Greece in 1923. Squire Jenkins, who bought the house in 1806, made Llanharan a focus for hunting in South Wales buying 21 kennels of hounds. O3A0265

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A PAIR OF COADE STONE FIGURES OF A SYBIL AND A VESTAL

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A pair of female figures in Coade stone both wearing finely detailed classical gowns and each bearing a bronze candleholder, the Sybil with a scrolled document in her right hand and her head showing, the Vestal with her head and face partially covered. England, circa 1815 Height: 56in (142cm) Diameter: 16½in (42cm)

Coade Stone is an artificial stone, created by a Mrs Eleanor Coade, born June 1733, died November 1821. It closely resembles a natural stone and has many times been misidentified as such. The Coade Stone Artificial Manufactory produced various kinds of architectural details including ornaments, fountains, statues and vases and many pieces were made especially for George III and Admiral Lord Nelson. The chief designer from 1771 was the sculptor John Bacon who supplied various designs, to be made by the factory, for Ham House in Surrey. The drawings for these two figures were produced by Bacon(1740-1799) and were probably the most successful model through the firm’s history as these elegant figures are finished all round with exceptional detailing easily viewed from different positions. Coade sold these figures most successfully during the Regency period with the taste for classical ornament and they were easily adapted to carry either single or multi branch candelabrum. O3B0034

A PAIR OF FRENCH PORCELAIN CACHEPOTS A pair of late eighteenth century bulb pots of demi-lune form, painted with classical motifs and floral cartouches, the undersides with marks for the Queen's Factory, Paris. France, circa 1780. Height: 6in (15cm) Width: 10½in (27cm) Depth: 5½in (14cm) The mark on the underside of these cachepots refers to the Fabrique de la Reine – a porcelain factory patronised by Queen Marie Antoinette. The company was initially established in the rue Thiroux

as a hard paste porcelain factory by Andre-Marie Leboeuf in 1776. His wares were received with immediate phenomenal success, which subsequently resulted in a fine for infringing on the ‘decorative privileges’ reserved for the Sèvres factory. These tribulations, however, secured him the protecting patronage of the Queen who also granted him permission to mark his china with her monogram. She commissioned Leboeuf’s pieces for her dairy at Versailles as well as gifts, distinguishable by his fine decorations of birds, figures, cupids and cornflower sprigs. O3B0091

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A GEORGE III MAHOGANY SERPENTINE COMMODE A very finely coloured serpentine mahogany commode, of particularly good patina and figuring, having three drawers and retaining its original brass ware and rococo foliate sabots terminating in castors. Attributed to John Cobb. England, circa 1760 Height: 32½in (82cm) Width: 48in (122cm) Depth: 25in (64cm)

This commode belongs to an important and distinctive group dating from the 1760s in the manner of the Royal cabinetmakers William Vile and John Cobb. Discussed in depth by Lucy Wood in her Catalogue of Commodes, London, 1994, pp.43-53. This group is anchored by the Alscot Park commode, which was supplied by Cobb to James West in 1766 and invoiced as an ‘extra fine wood commode chest of drawers with large handsome wrought furniture, good brass locks, etc. £16’ (H. Honour, Cabinet Makers and Furniture Designers, London, 1969, p.112 and Mark Girouard, ‘Alscot Park, Warwickshire’, Country Life, 16 May 1958. Although not adorned with such decorative brasses, the present commode and the Alscot Park piece share similar profiles and both examples have running

cockbeading along the lowest drawer set an inch above the base of the apron. John Cobb (d.1778), is first recorded in the London Directory in 1750. He joined William Vile in 1751. Shortly after this, on the 31 May 1755, he married Sukey Grendey and became the son-in-law of the celebrated cabinet- maker Giles Grendey. Cobb continued in business for thirteen years after Vile’s retirement in 1764, during which time he produced the documented inlaid commode and two pedestals for Paul Metheun (1772), which have become seminal to the construction of his identity as a producer of high quality furniture often incorporating a variety of exotic timbers (cf. Anon., Corsham Court, 1993, p.11, fig.111). The documented work

of Cobb shows a close understanding of French prototypes, not only in marquetry decoration, but also in construction techniques. The aprons of his commodes, as in the present example, are frequently formed from a lower sans traverse drawer, in the French manner, rather than incorporating the apron as part of the carcass, which is more typical of English pieces. It is thus notable that in 1772 he was implicated for smuggling French furniture into England through the use of Italian diplomatic bags in an attempt to avoid import duty (cf. Geoffrey Beard and Christopher Gilbert, Dictionary of English Furniture Makers 1660-1840, 1986, p.182). F3A0262A/B

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A SATINWOOD BREAKFRONT DWARF BOOKCASE A late eighteenth century George III figured satinwood breakfront bookcase, the top with a broad cross banding of tulipwood, the frieze with two short and one long central drawer above open adjustable bookshelves, the top and sides with ebony and holly stringing, the whole supported on splayed feet. England, circa 1790 Height: 35in (89.5cm) Width: 60in (153cm) Depth: 18in (46cm)

Dwarf bookcases were designed to allow for the hanging of paintings in rooms outside of the main library while containing "all the books required in a sitting room without reference to the library." Household Furniture, George Smith, 1808. F3A0374

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AN IMPORTANT PAIR OF GILTWOOD CHANDELIERS ATTRIBUTED TO JEAN PELLETIER A rare and important pair of late seventeenth century giltwood chandeliers attributed to Jean Pelletier, each having six double ‘C’ scroll, foliate carved arms issuing from a baluster stem carved with scrolling foliage and strapwork and surmounted by eagles’ heads. England, circa 1700 Height: 34½in (87cm) Diameter: 37in (94cm) PROVENANCE

Picton Castle, Pembrokeshire Probably commissioned by Sir John Philipps, 4th Baronet, thence by descent. LITERATURE

Mark Girouard, Picton Castle, Pembrokeshire - III, Country Life, 28 January 1960, page 173, figure 8. cf: Geoffrey Beard and Christopher Gilbert, ‘Dictionary of English Furniture Makers 1660-1840’, Leeds, 1986. Tessa Murdoch, ‘Jean, Rene and Thomas Pelletier, A Huguenot Family of carvers and gilders in London 1682- 1726’, Burlington Magazine, November 1997 and June 1998. Ralph Edwards, ‘The Dictionary of English Furniture’, Volume 1, page 331.

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Jean Pelletier (fl. 1680-1704) brought his family to England towards the end of the seventeenth century, like so many Huguenots who sought refuge after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. The Edict had been issued by Henry IV in 1598 to give certain rights to French Protestants, the Huguenots, in what was a largely Catholic country. This was later renounced by Louis XIV in 1685, bringing about an exodus from France to escape religious persecution. Many craftsmen came to England at that time. Pelletier took English citizenship in 1681 and he and his sons, who followed him became established as carvers and gilders. Over the years, he acquired a clientele of prestigious patrons, notably the Duke of Montagu who was Ambassador to the Court of Louis XIV and Master of the Bedroom to William III. Through this connection, Pelletier went on to supply giltwood furniture to the King at Hampton Court. At a cost of some six hundred pounds, the commission included six tables with giltwood frames supporting marble slabs flanked by pairs of large giltwood candle stands. The group of Hampton Court Palace candle stands supplied in 1700 bear close comparison to this pair of chandeliers in terms both of construction and of style. In particular, the unusual bird head terminals on the upper stem as seen on the upper stem of the chandeliers is extremely unusual. The almost certain involvement by Pelletier in the making of these chandeliers is further supported by the use of

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oak to make the arms and the stem being in limewood. The combination of oak and limewood was a French technique and these woods correspond to that used in the construction of the Hampton Court Palace candle stands. A further aspect of the chandeliers that suggest a French maker is the influence of the designs of Daniel Marot. Another Huguenot, Marot had entered the service of the then William Prince of Orange in 1685. Marot’s designs were widely published and were highly influential, bringing as they did the glamour of the popular French taste to London. Issued in sets of six, his ‘Nouveau Livre d’Orfeuverie’, 1703 and 1713, contained a plate illustrating eight chandeliers related to the present pair. Pelletier must surely have been acquainted with Marot in the 1690s when he executed his designs, with each possibly influencing the other. Though the survival of such a pair as this is rare, not simply as a result of changing fashion but also due to the progress from candle power to gas and electricity. It is thought that the first giltwood chandeliers appeared in England in the last decade of the seventeenth century and they continued to be made into the eighteenth century until they were gradually superseded by glass. Comparable giltwood chandeliers with characteristic double C-scroll branches of this form are described in early accounts and inventories as ‘branches’. One of the earliest examples were supplied by Gerrit Jensen (fl. 1680-1715)

to the Earl of Albemarle for his house in Kensington and by James Moore to the Earl of Burlington for Burlington House. Two further examples include one at the Treasurer’s House in York and another at Speke Hall in Lancashire, both illustrated in The Dictionary of English Furniture. Picton Castle in Pembrokeshire dates back to the thirteenth century and came into the Philipps family in the fifteenth century. They were a highly important family in Wales and held great power and influence over four centuries in Pembrokeshire. Their large estates enabled them to become politicians, philanthropists and leaders of society and cultural life. Picton Castle has undergone considerable alterations over the centuries, not least under the ownership of Sir John Philipps, 4th Baronet (16601736). His son, the 6th Baronet, made further renovations in the mid eighteenth century and further additions were made in the early part of the nineteenth century. It is, therefore, most likely, given the date of the chandeliers coinciding with the contemporary improvements and changes made at Picton in the late seventeenth century by the 4th Baronet, that these chandeliers were commissioned by him at that time as part of these developments at his ancient family home. One of the pair was photographed outside the dining room at Picton by Country Life in 1960. L2I0440

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A CHINESE EXPORT TABLE A very rare and unusual Chinese export folding lacquer and bamboo tea table. The stand is constructed from finely wrought sections of bamboo, the upper frieze having pierced ornament. The bamboo itself is painted to enhance its appearance with stylised cloud patterns. Each element is numbered in both Chinese and English. The top is of fine quality black and gold lacquer and has a carved simulated bamboo gallery. Inspired by Sir William Chambers. China, circa 1790. Height: 32in (81cm) Width: 32in (81cm) Depth: 21in (53cm) LITERATURE

Äke Setterwall (with other contributions), The Chinese Pavilion at Drottningholm, Allhems Förlag Malmö, Sweden, 1974. Clifford Musgrave, Royal Pavilion: An Episode in the Romantic, published by Leonard Hill [Books] Limited, London, 1959. Gervase Jackson-Stops, John Nash: Views of the Royal Pavilion, published by Pavilion Books Limited, London, 1991.

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Sir William Chambers was born in Gôteborg, Sweden, of Scottish parentage in 1723. At the age of sixteen, he joined the Swedish East India Company and voyaged to India and China for nine years. His architectural education began in 1749 under Blondel (17051774) in Paris and then in Italy between 1750 and 1755, where he went to see Rome’s ancient grandeur at first hand. In Rome, he met Lord Charlemont who was touring the Mediterranean, collecting artworks and books and was to be his greatest nonroyal private patron. In 1757, back in England, he was appointed architectural tutor to the Prince of Wales from which position he became Architect to the King with Robert Adam (1728-1792), Comptroller in 1769 and Surveyor General in 1782. In 1770 he received a knighthood. This royal patronage allowed Chambers to experiment in small-scale architectural ornament for the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew. This experience was to provide him with an essential background in the design of the Casino at Marino, Dublin. His style is best described as scholarly but eclectic, heavily based on English Palladianism but with overtones of the NeoClassicism prevalent in France at the time. After 1759 and the publication of his first book The Treatise on Civil Architecture, Chambers had risen to the top of his profession allowing him lucrative commissions including the reworking of Buckingham House in London. His best known works are the Pagoda (1757-1762) at Kew Gardens and Somerset House in London and the Casino for Lord Charlemont at Marino in Dublin.

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Other works in Dublin included work at Trinity College where he designed the examination hall and the chapel in the main college quadrangle. Apart from the Casino, Chambers also designed Charlemont House (1763) for Lord Charlemont, now the Municipal Gallery of Modern Art in Parnell Square, and Lucan House in County Dublin. Chambers completed these commissions even though he never set foot in Ireland during his lifetime. Sir William Chambers’ Designs for Chinese Buildings, Furniture, Dresses, etc (published in 1757 after he visited China in his youth), heavily influenced the interior decorative schemes of Brighton Pavilion. These interiors were designed by the firm of John Crace & Sons, who the Prince Regent hired to give the Pavilion a “Chinese look”. Originally it was furnished in 1802 with real bamboo acquired by Crace, possibly through the cargoes of Dr James Garrett. Garrett was an agent employed previously by the Prince at Carlton House to buy a variety of Oriental objects and decorations directly from China. The London firm of Elward, Marsh and Tatham were also commissioned at the same time, to make a large amount of furniture in beech simulating bamboo. In some cases these pieces incorporated real bamboo, Chinese lacquer panels and rattan fretwork into their designs. In addition two tables with similar richly decorated bamboo friezes and legs are housed in the Chinese Pavilion at Drottningholm Palace, which is the largest residence of the Swedish Royal Family near

Stockholm. The Pavilion was a birthday present to Queen Lovisa Ulrica from her husband King Adolf Fredrik on her 33rd birthday in 1753. Less than a decade later, the royal architect, Carl Fredrik Adelcrantz, was commissioned to build a new “China” and this is the pavilion which still stands. It has been described as “an exquisite and unique monument to the passion for ‘the Chinese taste’ which swept through eighteenth century Europe, an extremely charming blend of the genuinely Chinese and of Swedish Rococo, with touches of Classicism, of French-inspired chinoiserie and ‘Chinese’ furnishings based on contemporary English prints.” During the eighteenth century, attempts were made to create a convincing Chinese interior by using lacquer screens and wall coverings but the use of authentic Chinese furniture was rare. Two exceptions are bamboo tables in the Bedchamber and the Anteroom to the Cabinet on the upper floor. One is rectangular and the other one has an octagonal frieze. The tops are both of black lacquer with no decoration, the legs of natural bamboo while the frieze is more ornate. In both tables the joining is done entirely by wooden pegs and plugs, and the round table has folding legs. This type of furniture is wholly Chinese, but could very well have been used in eighteenth century exotic interiors. Bamboo furniture is to be found in several other Chinese milieux in Sweden, such as Godegård and Värnanäsm. F2H0554

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THE STEEPLECHASE (JOHN FREDERICK HERRING JR, 1815-1907) Signed ‘J.F.Herring’ & dated 1845, lower left Oil on canvas Unframed: Height: 24in (61cm) Width: 42in (107cm) Framed: Height: 29½ (75cm) Width: 47½in (120.6cm)

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Herring's Steeplechase does not depict any recorded race and indeed the rider's colours are not identifiable, apart from the red with black cap of Mr Allan McDonough, the leading Irish amateur, riding the black horse with two white hind socks in the centre of the field. The scene was probably painted to record the increasing popularity of the sport, and its date of 1845 was coincidently the year that a “Steeplechase Calendar” was first published. Steeplechasing, riding across country in a direct line between two given points, is known to have taken place in the last years of the eighteenth century.  However, the sport did not become commonplace until the 1830's when it was transformed by the introduction of the sweepstake principle, the marking of courses with flags, concern for the spectators and by the profits made by the local innkeepers. All these changes resulted in a growth from just three meetings in 1832 to sixty-six ten years later, the

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main courses being at Cheltenham, the Vale of Aylesbury and Aintree. Although the initial development of steeplechasing in the 1830's is pictorially well recorded, there are few paintings of actual races from the 1840's and even J.F. Herring Senior's well known Steeplechase Cracks, painted in 1846, does not show an actual race, but an amalgam of the leading riders of the day. There had always been some opposition to the sport and “Nimrod”, one of the leading sporting journalists of the period, described it as having “all the false excitement of gambling without its fair chances; and all the show of hunting without its beautiful spirit”. Nevertheless, until about 1850, steeplechasing grew in esteem as well as in frequency, and by 1870 there were clear rules and a recognised authority, composed mainly of members of the Jockey Club and Gentleman riders. P2I0378

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A SET OF SIX CHINESE EXPORT WATERCOLOURS ON PAPER Each depicting a scene from daily life: playing music, spinning yarn, negotiating the sale of fans, and buying fish, fowl, and flowers. Gouache on paper. China, circa 1780 Height: 17in (43cm) Width: 13in (33cm)

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The tradition of Chinese watercolour and gouache was one firmly rooted in the export market, where scenes of Chinese people and westernbound goods were very common, and the finest became some of the most sought after items of the export trade. Particularly in the late eighteenth century, watercolours depicting porcelain, silk, rice and especially tea production were often put together in sets of twelve or more individual sheets. The present set of six sheets vary from these as the subject matter is focused on daily life and the trade of everyday goods. Their scale is also unusual, being significantly larger than most comparative scenes of the period. P3B0063

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AN OBELISK WITH INTAGLIOS An early nineteenth century ‘Grand Tour’ giltwood and glass obelisk containing a collection of plaster intaglios depicting the heads of Roman Emperors, classical scenes and muses. With makers label: ‘William Davis. Carver, Gilder, Printseller.’ Script on label: Christmas 1816. England, 1816 Height: 22in (56cm) Width: 4½in (11cm) Depth: 4½in (11cm) O3A0346

A PAIR OF ORMOLU AND PATINATED BRONZE WALL APPLIQUES A pair of ormolu and patinated bronze four light wall appliqués, the foliate cast sockets on scrolling branches held aloft by cherubs. France, circa 1830 PROVENANCE

Property of the late Lady Anne Cowdray, Broadleas House. Height: 18½in (47cm) Width: 11in (28cm) Depth: 12in (31cm) L3A0342

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A PAIR OF TELESCOPIC BRASS TORCHERES

A PAIR OF DECALCOMANIA VASES

A pair of unusual nineteenth century telescopic brass torchere stands, the circular dished tops above square shafts have an adjustable key, each supported on circular stepped turned base. England, circa 1880

A pair of nineteenth century bulb shaped decalcomania vases, the eau de nil ground with central cartouche of Indian miniatures surrounded by polychrome chinoiseries, exotic birds and flowers. England, circa 1880

Height: 43½in (110cm) Diameter: 12in (30cm)

Height: 12in (30cm) O3B0073

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AN OUTSTANDING LARGE SCALE CHARLES X PERIOD CENTRE TABLE The top is decorated with lavish use of flame veneer mahogany bordered in satinwood and ebony, having at the centre a large star inlaid in the same woods. The table is supported by three large- scale scroll legs mounted with gilt bronze acanthus leaves and cornucopiae terminating in claw feet. The whole stands on an elaborate tripod plinth similarly richly veneered in mahogany and with a smaller scale marquetry star at the centre. France, circa 1825 Height: 28½in (73cm) Diameter: 62in (157cm) F3A0446

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A CHARLES II SEAWEED MARQUETRY CABINET ON STAND A Charles II seaweed marquetry, tulipwood and pietre dure cabinet on silver leaf stand, the rectangular top with moulded edge, above an arrangement of eight drawers inset with pietre dure pictures of animals, centred by a cupboard with marquetry depicting a lion. The panels probably from the Grand Ducal workshops, Florence, Italy. The silver leaf stand possibly Ireland, circa 1680 The cabinet, England, circa 1680

A PAIR OF LIBRARY ARMCHAIRS A pair of Regency library armchairs of large scale with caned seat, back and sides, the channelled hand rests above ring turned supports and ring turned front legs all with brass castors. The deep buttoned seat and arm supports upholstered in tobacco coloured suede. England, circa 1820 Height: 40½in (103cm) Width: 27½in (70cm) Depth: 32½in (82cm) PROVENANCE

Height: 59½in (151.5cm) Width: 35½in (90cm) Depth: 18½in (47cm) F3A0343

Rushbrooke Hall, Bury St. Edmunds

During the refurbishment of Stourhead, Wiltshire at the beginning of the nineteenth century, chairs such as these where the framework is filled by caning, were referred to by Thomas Chippendale the younger (1749-1822) as hunting chairs. Also referred as such by Thomas Sheraton in his Cabinet Dictionary of 1803 in which it is noted that they “formed a temporary resting place for one that is fatigued as hunters generally are.” Other examples are sometimes furnished with a reading slide or foot rest, see: Shorter Dictionary of English Furniture, Ralph Edwards. Country Life, 1964, p.169, pl.3. F3A0371A/B

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A PAIR OF FACETED GLASS COLUMN CANDLESTICKS A rare pair of large late eighteenth century glass candlesticks, the facet cut nozzles with large cut and scalloped pans, on a hexagonal cut collar, over a diamond faceted stem, the foot domed, flat cut and with scalloped edge. England, circa 1780 Height: 11in (28cm) Diameter: 5in (12.5cm) LITERATURE

Glass from Restoration to Regency, G Wills 1968 L3A0339

A SHELL AND WHITE CORAL MIRROR A mid century large scale pier mirror having a domed cresting profusely and lavishly encrusted with white shells and corals all mounted on a monogrammed clothed ground. Spain, circa 1950 Height: 60in (152cm) Width: 40in (102cm) F3A0388

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A SET OF THREE TOLE TEA CANISTERS Three nineteenth century tea canisters, the Persian red ground decorated with key pattern gold bands framing chinoiserie scenes of figures in landscapes. Each numbered 35, 36 and 39 with retailers stamp Parnell and Sons. Bristol. England, circa 1880 Height: 16½in (42cm) Width: 10in (26cm)

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H G Parnall founded the business in 1820 in Bristol and by 1890 it had become a limited company supplying grocery shop fittings, with a well established client base. Their main warehouse and showroom was on Narrow Wine Street, along with a steam joinery on Fairfax Street and an iron and brass foundry on Rosemary Street. As well as canisters, Parnall and Sons manufactured a wide range of items from tobacco cutters and coffee mills to gas engines and weighbridges. O3A0419

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AN EMPIRE NIGHT CLOCK An early nineteenth century bronze and ormolu night clock, the enamel face signed ‘Bofenschen à Paris’ with Roman numerals set into a classical vase with lions head handles, the reverse with glass projection lens, the main body with ormolu ornamentation supported on a bronze plinth with large ormolu starburst. France, circa 1820 Height: 20in (51cm) Width: 8½in (22cm)

This very unusual clock is designed to be used both during the day and at night. The vase contains an oil reserve and wick that can be lit at night which projects the time through an adjustable lens in the reverse. The gilded finial is removed to act as a chimney for the flame. Bofenschen was an expert clock maker and inventor who flourished in Paris between 1780 when he was first recorded and 1813 when he was last recorded working in the Rue de Temple during which time he worked alongside arguably the greatest of all French horologists Abraham Louis Breguet (17471823). O3A0390

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A VERY RARE HEPPLEWHITE OPEN SHIELDBACK ARMCHAIR An extremely rare Hepplewhite open shield back armchair in solid satinwood. The arched back with beaded scrolling and five curved splats having foliate carving and ending in a sunburst, supports, splayed arms with repeating foliate and scrolling carving above elegantly tapering carved legs. England, circa 1780 Height: 37in (94cm) Width: 24in (61cm) Depth: 20in (51cm)

This chair has a number of unusual carving details, particularly the linear side details on the arms, and also the foliate corner carving on each back support. However, the most unusual feature is the fact that it is made of solid satinwood. The density of this timber makes it extremely difficult to carve and shape easily, and accounts for the fine condition with which this chair has survived for more than two centuries. F3A0356

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A SEXTANT A mid nineteenth century brass sextant stamped F H Palmen Barrow in Furness, in excellent condition retaining all original components within the original mahogany case. England, circa 1850 Height: 11in (28cm) Width: 10in (25cm) Depth: 5in (13cm)

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A sextant measures an angle 쑯 AN OUTSTANDING PAIR between two objects primarily OF REGENCY BURR ELM a celestial body and the horizon CARD TABLES which allows for great precision when navigating at sea. It A pair of D-shaped folding developed from the invention card tables of extremely fine in 1730 of an octant by John quality, veneered with burr elm Hadley (1682-1744) an English wood and crossbanded with mathematician and Thomas satinwood, the borders of the Godfrey (1704-1749) a glass top and the frieze banded with maker in Philadelphia. A sextant pierced brass inlay; each table reads 60 degrees of a circle having a single drawer in the hence the origin of its name. frieze, raised on square tapering Barrow-in-Furness in 1846 was legs with ebony stringing, a village of 50 inhabitants until headed by cast brass oak leaf the discovery of ore to make and acorn motifs and ending in iron and steel in 1848 which spade feet; the interior of the combined with its natural table lined with green baize. harbour established it within England, circa 1810 20 years as the largest naval yard in the world. Height: 28½in (72cm) Width: 38in (96.5cm) O3A0245 Depth: 18in (46cm) F3A0402

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THE MANSION HOUSE WALL BRACKETS An exceptionally rare and fine set of four carved Rococo giltwood wall brackets, in the manner of Matthias Lock and attributed to the carver, John Gilbert, the shelf supported by carved C-scrolls and floral swags entwined around boldly carved dragons with open mouths and with wings spread. For a direct comparison, see the set of six brackets carved by John Gilbert for the vestibule in the Mansion House, London, in 1752. England, circa 1755

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The Mansion House was designed specifically as the official residence for the Lord Mayor of London. The Corporation of London instructed George Dance the Elder as architect and interior coordinator. It took 14 years to complete and was ready for its first occupant, Lord Mayor Alderman Crisp Gascoyne, in November 1752. Gilbert’s six brackets were described as ‘6 Stands for Candles for the Vestable’ in the first inventory of the Mansion

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House. Both Thomas Chippendale and Matthias Lock published designs with close similarities to these brackets, each incorporating dragon-like feathered creatures amongst C and S curves, leaves and flowers. It is likely that Dance would have had access to these designs. A group of designs by Chippendale are titled ‘Brackets for Bust’s’ but the Mansion House brackets were included in Dance’s ‘Proposal to Light the Mansion House’ and were never intended for busts.

John Gilbert was at one time trading from Mount Street, Mayfair. The Mansion House commission involved the set of brackets and some carved tables. He also unsuccessfully proposed work for the Great Hall in 1755. This commission came early in his career. He went on to work on designs for Robert Adam at Lansdowne House and Osterley. He was paid £15 (£2 10s. each) for the brackets at the Mansion House. F3B0056

Height: 22in (56cm) Width: 28in (71cm) Depth: 9in (23cm) LITERATURE

Sally Jeffery, The Mansion House, 1st published for the Corporation of London by Phillimore, 1993.

Above, the vestible in the Mansion House; above right, sketch of carved bracket from the Dance office marked ‘D’

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A VIENNESE TRAVELLING COMPANION A very fine and rare Viennese workbox elaborately mounted in steel on a birchwood frame bordered in ebony. The box is mounted with snake handles to each side and the top has a central cartouche of crossed laurel leaves with a lyre and elaborate border, all worked in faceted bright polished steel. The interior is completely fitted for sewing with ivory elements and polished steel enriched with rolls of thread. There are also raisable fire screens which disguise hidden views of Vienna. A secret button releases the lower drawer which is fitted for writing and watercolours. Austria, circa 1800 Height: 5½in (13.5cm) Width: 15in (38cm) Depth: 10in (25.5cm) O3A0328

A TALL KASHMIRI STANDING LAMP A rare and unusual late nineteenth century tall standing lamp, the shaped and turned wooden column elaborately painted with flowers and foliage on a dark ground, the decoration based on a Persian form and adapted in Kashmir; originally fitted for a candle or oil and now wired for electricity and mounted with a pleated silk shade. India, circa 1870 Height of standard lamp: 79in (201cm) L3A0494

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A PAIR OF DUMB WAITERS An unusual pair of early nineteenth century Regency mahogany and brass two tier dumb waiters; the circular shelves with pierced brass gallery divided by three circular barley twist brass shafts all supported on a ring turned baluster column, the channelled sabre legs with carved acanthus on the knee and terminating in brass lion’s paw feet on castors. Attributed to Mack, Williams and Gibton. Ireland, circa 1820 Height: 39½in (100cm) Width: 23in (59cm)

By the beginning of the nineteenth century, the more usual style of dumb waiter with a central column support was giving way to more inventive forms. This pair, with two shelves separated by brass barley twist supports, are particularly rare. An example, but with simulated bamboo supports, can be seen at Inveraray Castle, Argyle. The sabre tripod legs on the pair above are the same model used by the celebrated cabinet making firm of Mack, Williams and Gibton. John Mack set up his business in Dublin in 1784 and was joined by Robert Gibton d.1812 the firm becoming Mack Williams and Gibton when his son in law Zachariah Williams joined in 1829. The richly carved pedestal and barley twist ornamentation were a hall mark of the firm in the early nineteenth century. F3A0467

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A RARE PAIR OF GEORGE III GILTWOOD GIRANDOLES A particularly rare pair of giltwood girandoles of most unusual design, retaining their original gilding and much of their original mirror plate. The boldly carved shell at the top, with foliate central scrolling, sits above a scalloped top frame, bordered by foliage and bell flower drops, which come to rest on a shaped broken pediment with deep C-scrolls and ribbed fluting. The central plate is divided by floral swags and ends in a foliate volute, from which emanate two scrolling candle arms. To either side palm fronds issue forth above elaborately scrolled foliate frame which encloses the lower mirror plate. England, circa 1780 Height: 64in (162cm) Width: 41in (104cm) Depth to candle arms: 12in (31 cm)

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PROVENANCE

Probably purchased by James Lowther, 1st Earl of Lonsdale, for Whitehaven Castle, Whitehaven; Then Lowther Castle; Lowther Castle Sale; Maple & Co., London, April 1947. One of the girandoles with a paper label on the back from which the heading W. & M. KING is missing. The remainder reads as follows: “looking Glass Manufacturers, Carvers, Gilders &C. / WHITEHAVEN, / Return the Nobility, Gentry, Merchants, and Public in general, their most grateful Thanks for the many Favours conferred on their late Father, and acquaint them that they succeed him in the Business, in all its various Branches: and continue to manufacture and sell looking Glasses, in rich burnished Gold, Metal, Mahogany, and all other Sorts of Frames: Gerandoles, Chandeliers, Brackets, &c. to the most elegant and fashionable Patterns, and to any Size and Price”.

Michael King (1713-1787) had a glass grinding business in King Street, Whitehaven established prior to 1762, and subsequently moved to premises in nearby Tangier Street. After his death in 1787, his sons William (17561832) and Michael (1758-1813), succeeded him carrying on the business which only closed doors after 1850. Whitehaven Castle was bought by Sir John Lowther in 1675, and was re-designed by Robert Adam for Sir William Lowther in 1769 and remained with the Lonsdale’s until 1920. At the time the mirrors probably moved to Lowther Castle. Seat of the Earls of Lonsdale since medieval times, Lowther Castle was first rebuilt in the seventeenth century, by the first Viscount Lonsdale, John Lowther. The house then known as Lowther Hall was transformed into a magnificent gothic castle between 1806 and 1814 by the hand of Robert Smirke. The extravagant life of the 5th Earl diminished enormously the family fortune and the castle had to be closed in 1937 and a twenty day sale of its contents took place in 1947. F3B0169

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A PAIR OF MAHOGANY OCCASIONAL TABLES

A SATINWOOD COMMODE STOOL

A pair of early twentieth century mahogany occasional tables. The hexagonal tops supported on circular legs framing brass ring turned cross supports below a lattice apron. Arts and Crafts, possibly manufactured by Liberty’s of London. England, circa 1900

A mid nineteenth century satinwood commode stool by Holland & Sons the seat upholstered in sienna velvet opening to reveal a well, the sides with scrolled and turned arm supports, on a square base, the whole decorated with gilded highlights and rosettes. Stamped Holland and Sons England, circa 1845

Height: 21½in (54cm) Width: 15½in (39cm) F3A0474

Height: 23in (59.5cm) Width: 28in (72cm) Depth: 18½in (47cm)

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Holland and Son was founded in 1803 by William Holland ( fl 1803-43). From 1803 to 1843, the cabinetmakers and upholsterers William Holland and Stephen Taprell (d 1847) were in partnership. Their firm was called Taprell & Holland until 1835, Taprell, Holland & Son until 1843, and Holland & Sons after 1843. In 1851, the firm employed over 350 men. In 1852, it incorporated the prestigious firm of Thomas Dowbiggin (1788-1854), taking over its Mount Street premises in London. Holland & Sons received commissions for furnishing many of the

government buildings and clubs built in nineteenth century London, including the Athenaeum, the Reform Club, and the British Museum. The firm worked on many royal commissions, making furniture for Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, Berks, Osborne House, Isle of Wight, and Balmoral. Holland & Sons exhibited a bookcase at the Great Exhibition of 1851, for which they won a prize, and continued to show at major exhibitions throughout the century. F3B0010

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A PAIR OF EARLY 18TH CENTURY MARBLE FOUNTAIN HEADS

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These unusual water spouts are carved in the form of the head of a greenman, a mystical figure from the woods, who in folklore represented the cycle of nature particularly Spring and the renaissance of the garden. The heads are carved emerging from large acanthus leaves creating a romantic image of pagan deities. As gardens developed from just the growing of food, they became as much about seducing the senses with both the colour and perfume of flowers, while designed to surprise and entertain with the use of water and sculpture. For comparisons see Campo san Giacomo Venice. France, circa 1720 Height: 24½in (62cm) Width: 10in (26cm) LITERATURE

French sculptures, The reign of Louis XIV, Francois Souchal 1993 O3A0389

AN EARLY 20TH CENTURY MURANO MIRROR An early twentieth century Venetian octagonal bevelled glass mirror, the cushioned border of large multi-coloured Millefiori panels edged with clear glass rods and green glass panels. Italy, circa 1900 Height: 33in (84cm) Width: 27in (69cm)

Millefiori glass beads were made famous in Venice in the 1800’s, and the word Millefiori translates in Italian as "a thousand flowers". The colourful borders of this mirror are created by thin rods of different colours of glass bundled together, with the ends of the rods forming a design, such as flowers. The bundle is fused together, then cross section slices are cut off. These slices are applied and then melted over a glass core. F3B0076

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A REGENCY MAHOGANY LIBRARY TABLE A regency mahogany library table in the manner of Marsh and Tatham. The table has a circular top with radiating banded panels of finely figured veneers and a central compartment with lid. The outside border is inset with gilt metal lettered plaques, interspaced by paterae above four doors in the frieze mounted with anthemion lock plates, all supported on a column with elaborate foliate and scrolling mounts on the legs. England, circa 1810 Height: 28½in (73cm) Diameter: 45½in (115cm)

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PROVENANCE

From the 5th Marquis of Camden’s Trust. The Pratt family descends from Sir John Pratt, Lord Chief Justice from 1718 to 1725. The Pratt family were lawyers and politicians and Sir John’s son, Charles (1713-1794), served as Lord Chancellor between 1766 and 1770. He was created Baron Camden of Camden Place in the county of Kent in 1765, and Earl of Camden and Viscount Bayham in 1786. He acquired large property holdings in the then northern outskirts of London, the area subsequently becoming known as Camden Town. F3A0340

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A PAIR OF GILTWOOD SIDE TABLES A very rare pair of early eighteenth century Queen Anne giltwood side tables, the rectangular tops having carved strap work and foliate decoration surrounding a central cartouche with lambrequin border, supported on a carved base with shaped front and side rails with acanthus stylised carved knees on cabriole legs, terminating in carved pad feet. England, circa 1710 Height: 30in (76cm) Width: 29in (74cm) Depth: 17in (43cm) F3B0058

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AN 18TH CENTURY MAHOGANY CARD TABLE A very fine and rare George II mahogany card table with concertina action. The shaped finely figured top opening to reveal four square corners for candles and a green baize playing surface. The shaped frieze with carved inset relief above elegant shaped tapering legs, having carved knees, decorated with shells above acanthus leaves and foliate ears on an engraved background. The centre of each leg has a dividing ring, all supported on ball and claw feet. England, circa 1750 Height: 29½in (75cm) Width: 40½in (103cm) Depth: 19½in (50cm) F3A0372

A PAIR OF SWEDISH EMPIRE CONSOLE TABLES A magnificent pair of early nineteenth century giltwood console tables, the carrara marble tops above a rectangular frieze inset with anthemion band supported by a proud swan with outspread wings and curved neck set amongst a background of bullrushes all on a carved stepped plinth. Sweden, circa 1830 Height: 30in (76cm) Width: 40in (101.5cm) Depth: 18½in (47cm) LITERATURE

Nouvel, Odile, Symbols of Power: Napoleon and the Art of the Empire Style, 1800-1815. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 2007.

The Empire style reflected Napoleon’s desire to align himself with the great civilisations of the past as a means of legitimising his reign; he incorporated elements of classical Greek and Roman iconography, thus helping shape the architectural and decorative arts of the period. Napoleon adopted the eagle, an ancient Roman symbol of power and independence, as the centre piece of his coat of arms. Meanwhile the Empress Josephine chose the swan which was linked to the Greek god Apollo and also bore connotations of love; her fondness led to the bird becoming a dominant motif throughout the State rooms of Malmaison and serving as decorative features on furniture.

General Bernadotte, later crowned King Karl XIV Johan of Sweden and Norway in 1818, introduced the Napoleonic style to Sweden. Adopted as heir to the Swedish throne in 1810 due to the royal family having no descendents. Karl XIV introduced the Empire style to Sweden following his military training in France and due to his influence, this French style dominated Swedish interior design and decorative arts until the 1840’s. This particular pair of consoles exemplifies many aspects of the Empire style such as the gilt work, the swan motif, and the presence of GrecoRoman architectural details on the plinth and anthemia frieze. F3A0146xt

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A PAIR OF MAHOGANY BOOKCASES A pair of early nineteenth century free standing mahogany bookcases, the four tiers with x-frame sides and moulded corners, all in the richest patterned mahogany. France, circa 1810 Height: 34in (86.5cm) Width: 22in (56cm) Depth: 10in (25.5cm) F3A0464

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A PAIR OF SCOTTISH VICTORIAN PAINTED IRON DOOR STOPS An unusual pair of painted doorstops, each modelled as a Highland soldier, one inscribed ‘Prince Charlie,’ the other ‘Lochiel’. Donald Cameron of Lochiel (1695-1748), was the first of the major Clan chieftains to join Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, in the unsuccessful Jacobite uprising of 1745. Possibly by the Carron Foundry of Falkirk. Scotland, circa 1880 Height: 15½in (39cm) Width: 14in (35cm) Depth: 3in (7cm)

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A PAIR OF EMBOSSED BIRD PICTURES A fine and rare pair of George III embossed bird paintings in watercolour, attributed to William Hayes, depicting beautifully rendered examples of a spoonbill and a scarletheaded heron shown within their natural watery habitats, in modern gilt frames with wash bevelled mounts. England, circa 1775 Height: 27in (68cm) Width: 21in (53cm) Depth: 3½in (8.5cm)

William Hayes (1729-199) was an artist and ornithologist, who produced pictures of birds native to Great Britain and Europe as well as exotic tropical birds. Hayes was author of several celebrated eighteenth century volumes of work featuring various ornithological studies and would be the first author to record a single private collection of live birds. Hayes’ work reflects eighteenth century styles, often depicting a single bird resting on a branch or on the ground. The colourful illustrations were observed both from real life and from specimens in the collections of his patrons. P3A0361

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A PAIR OF UNUSUAL GLOBE LAMPS A pair of nineteenth century desk oil lamps, the faceted opaline glass bases below a pierced brass socle supporting opaque glass terrestrial globes with central glass chimney. Now wired for electricity. France, circa 1875 Height: 22in (56cm) L3A0481

A LEMON SQUEEZER A novelty silver plated lemon squeezer by Hukin & Heath. The central squeezer with simulated lemon textured surface, with separate compartments to hold lemons, soda bottles, glasses and stirring sticks. Registration and patent marks displayed. England, circa 1880. Height: 12in (30cm) Width: 9½in (24cm) F3B0035

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A LARGE GEORGE III NEEDLEWORK CARPET A late eighteenth century English needlework carpet with a large central basket of flowers on a brown field and all over decoration of colourful birds and flowers. England, circa 1790. PROVENANCE

Sir Phillip Sassoon, Park Lane (Dressing Room), Private Secretary to Prime Minister David Lloyd George. Phillip Sassoon's sister was Lady Cholmondley of Houghton. Length: 94in (239cm) Width: 177in (450cm) T2I0658

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A VENETIAN MIRROR A magnificent early nineteenth century blue and clear glass Venetian mirror, the bevelled central plate with diamond cut edge, within an inner and outer rope twist border, below an elaborate shaped cresting. The mirror covered throughout with clear and acid etched foliate ornamentation on a blue glass background. Italy, circa 1835

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A PAIR OF GREEN GLASS BELLS

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A pair of large Victorian glass bells with wrythen green bowls and flint handles. England, circa 1900 Height: 13in (33cm) O3A0413

Height: 59in (150cm) Width: 35in (89cm)

This highly decorative and elaborate mirror’s origin lies in the revival of the glass works on the island of Murano during the second quarter of the nineteenth century. The design is directly influenced from drawings by Pietro Longhi (1702-1785) now in the Correr Museum, Venice and a plain version is illustrated in World Mirrors, pl 651. Graham Child. Sotheby's Publications 1990. P3A0341 쑯

A PAIR OF LOUIS XV BERGERES A fine pair of polished walnut Louis XV coved back bergeres of exceptionally generous and rare scale, each having a deeply fluted back rail of elegantly restrained design leading to scrolled arms sweeping to a stylised shell. The serpentine seat rail is centered by an oval cartouche and supported on cabriole legs.Each chair stamped JB. Boulard. France, circa 1770 Height of seat: 18in (46cm) Height: 35in (89cm) Width: 29½in (75cm) Depth: 38in (97cm)

Jean-Baptiste Boulard, born c.1725 – died 1789, served his apprenticeship with Michel Avisse and after being received as master in 1755 became one of the select few, with Jacob and Séné, who were commissioned by the GardeMeuble supplying the royal Château of Versailles, Fontainebleau, Compiègne and the Tuileries. One of the most respected menuisiers of his age, his work was known for its balance and refinement and the quality of the timbers chosen. F3A0463

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A GEORGE IV BRASS FOUR POSTER BED A George IV lacquered brass four-poster bed, the four reeded posts cast with lotus leaves, surmounted by similarly cast finials and resting on large, spoked castors. Upholstered throughout in Persian red and pale lemon-coloured silk. England, circa 1825 Height: 108½in (275cm) Width: 79in (201cm) Depth: 72in (183cm) PROVENANCE

From the property of the late Lord Elliott. Broughton Place, Peebleshire, Scotland.

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The use of bold inverted lotus leaves as sculptural decoration to each of the four posts are distinct features of furnishings from this period and in particular the designs of George Bullock (1782/3 -1818). Bullock was one of the most important furniture makers involved in the re-flowering of Greek and Roman taste in the early nineteenth century. He moved from Liverpool to 4 Tenterden St. Hanover Square, London in 1812, where he had an established business as a sculptor, modeller and cabinetmaker. His patrons included Sir Walter Scott for Abbotsford in the Scottish borders, Matthew Boulton at Great Tew Park, Oxfordshire and the exiled Napoleon Bonaparte’s house

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on the island of St Helena. The impressive height of this grand example indicates that it was commissioned to take advantage of the full height of the intended bedroom’s ceiling space. The four poster’s long history in England had made it an ideal furnishing item for the display of lavish bed hangings, that provided a spectacle for the room and very necessary protection against draughts. By the beginning of the nineteenth century, various alternatives on the theme became more popular, for example the tent or field bed, the campaign bed and the French style, that involved curtains draped from a fixed pole above the bed or rich

hangings from a domed tester. A considerable change in construction took place from the 1820’s with the use of cast iron and polished brass as the favoured materials, replacing carved or painted posts. F3A0267

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FOUR CHINESE RICE PAPER PAINTINGS A set of four mid eighteenth century Chinese rice paper paintings depicting scenes of courtly life amongst pleasure gardens, lakes, and temples. China, circa 1780 Height:19in (49cm) Width: 23in (59cm) P3A0465

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A SET OF FOUR F & C OSLER THREE BRANCH WALL LIGHTS A set of four, three branch ruby glass wall lights having three scrolled candle arms with tulip shaped storm shades, decorated with acanthus leaf highlights. The white opaline faceted drip-pans with diamond cut drops. The metalwork stamped F & C Osler of Birmingham. England, circa 1870 Height: 25½in (65cm) Width: 22in (56cm) Depth: 15in (38cm)

Founded in 1807 by Thomas Osler, the firm of F & C Osler of London and Birmingham became one of the leading glass chandelier and gasolier manufacturers during the second half of the nineteenth century. The quality and detail of Osler's glass was exceptional due to superb engineering and every piece being produced 'in house'. L3A0496

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A PAIR OF WILLIAM AND MARY GILTWOOD TORCHERES Each with a circular dished top above a reeded, fluted and acanthus-carved shaft having satyr masks on a scrolled foliate tripod base with reeded feet. England, circa 1700 Height: 53in (134cm) Width: 19½in (49cm)

Designed in the Louis XIV ‘Roman’ fashion, this style was introduced to Britain by William III’s Paris-trained ‘architect’ Daniel Marot (d. 1752), and related stands introduced in the late 1690s to Hampton Court Palace, were executed by the Paris-trained sculptor-carver Jean Pelletier

(see T. Murdoch, Jean, René and Thomas Pelletier, Part I, Burlington Magazine, November 1997, pp. 732-742). This pattern of satyr mask also features on a pier-table, bearing an Earl’s coronetensigned cipher at Chatsworth, Derbyshire (O.Brackett, An Encyclopaedia of English

Furniture, 1927, p. 101). A related pair of stands, formerly at Avebury Manor, Wiltshire, are now at Temple Newsam, Leeds (C. Gilbert, Furniture at Temple Newsam House and Lotherton Hall, Leeds, 1978, p. 291, no. 351). F2J0342

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A 19TH CENTURY SKELETON VIOLIN A rare mute or practice violin, the guitar shaped frame in mahogany with maple neck, pegbox and scroll, ebony chin rest and button with rich original varnish. England, circa 1830 Height: 24in (61cm) Width: 8½in (21cm) EXAMPLE

The National Music Museum, University of South Dakota. PROVENANCE

Previously sold by Mallett at Bourdon House, 1976.

This violin is specifically designed without the resonating chamber to amplify sound, making it friendly to neighbours while practising technique. They are referred to in Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s father Leopold’s publication A Treatise on the Fundamentals of Violin Playing published in 1756 for practise violins. O3A0347

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A MARQUETRY TABLE BY LUIGI AND ANGIOLO FALCINI The rectangular top with central cartouche of birds with flowers, flanked by floral medallions and butterflies, surrounded by elaborate scrollwork and griffins' heads in fruitwood, mother of pearl and ivory, enclosed by a moulded border inlaid with stylised ivory flowers. Italy, circa 1840 Height: 29in (73.5cm) Width: 47in (119.5cm) Depth: 31in (78.5cm)

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LITERATURE

Colle, Enrico, Il Mobile dell’Ottocento in Italia, Arredi e Decorazioni d’Interni dal 1815 al 1900. Milan, 2007, pp.190-191. Gonzalez-Palacios, Alvar, Il Tempio del Gusto, La Toscanan e L’Italia Settentrionale. Vol I, pp.194-199. Chiarugi, Simone, Botteghe di Mobilieri in Toscana. Florence, 1994, Vol I, pp.181-186

Luigi (1794-1861) and Angiolo (1801-1850) Falcini were active in Florence during the second quarter of the nineteenth century, a period when the city was famed for its intarsia craftsmanship. They operated from workshops in via delle

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Fosse and via Rosa, becoming two of the finest marqueteers in Europe. They were inspired by the Renaissance and Baroque marquetry produced during the last courts of the Medici, in particular the work of Flemish-born Leonardo Van Der Vinne (d. 1713), perhaps best known for his contributions to Ferdinando I de Medici’s famed workshop, the Opificio delle Pietre Dure. Through the elegant incorporation of various woods including ebony, fruitwood and walnut alongside precious materials such as ivory and mother-of-pearl, they developed a reputation for their exquisite designs and superbly executed inlay work.

Their first piece to be exhibited was an octagonal marquetry table, displayed at the Accademia delle Belle Arti in Florence in approximately 1835; the table was subsequently purchased by Leopold II, Grand Duke of Tuscany in 1839, testament to their high level of expertise. They also exhibited to great acclaim at the Grand Exhibition in London in 1851 and gained the patronage of the Duchess of Castigliano, Prince Demidoff and Countess Borghese. Two other examples of this table are in public collections, at the Detroit Institute of Arts and in the National Gallery of Ottawa. F3A0445

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A CHIPPENDALE PEMBROKE TABLE A very fine George II Pembroke table, the rectangular top with drop leaves all in finely figured mahogany of outstanding colour, fitted with a long central drawer in the frieze containing inlaid caddies; the square legs joined by a chamfered X frame stretcher. Retaining its original handles and castors throughout. England, circa 1755 Height: 27in (69cm) Width: 28in (71cm) Depth: 18in (45.5cm)

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A PAIR OF SHERATON TWO TIER SATNWOOD ETAGERE SIDE TABLES A pair of fine and unusual Sheraton period satinwood side tables of unusual form with turned and square tapering legs terminating in deep brass toes with castors, the woodwork crossbanded and inlaid with lines in various woods including kingwood; the top with painted flowers on vellum and the shelf bound with brass mouldings. England, circa 1790 Height: 35½in (90cm) Width: 43in (109cm) Depth: 15in (38cm)

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A LARGE MAIOLICA VASE A very unusual mid nineteenth century Italian pottery classical vase decorated in relief with swags and laurel leaf flutes, glazed in burnt sienna and green. The upper section perforated possibly for the burning of incense. Italy, circa 1860 Height: 43½in (110cm) Width: 12in (30.5cm) Depth: 16½in (41.5cm) O3A0322

A SILVER-PLATED SPIRIT BARREL A late nineteenth century silver-plated spirit barrel of coopered form, supported on a trolley stand. England, circa 1880 Height: 9in (23cm) Width: 16½in (42cm) Depth: 6½in (16cm) O3A0409

THE NEWHAILES LIBRARY CHAIRS An important pair of mid eighteenth century carved mahogany Gainsborough armchairs, the rectangular backs, seats and armrests upholstered in their original Aubusson tapestry depicting, within a cartouche, on one a cockerel and a fox and on the other a pheasant and a hare; the arms with outcurving hand rests and moulded, sloping supports with flowerhead terminals and beading; raised on square, pierced legs at the front and back, with fret brackets embellished with entwined flowers and leaves, ending in guttae feet and

joined by four pierced fret stretchers. The cockerel chair back is inscribed M.R. DAUBUSSON.MAGe. PROVENANCE

The Dalrymple family at Newhailes House, Midlothian, Scotland until 1928. Partridge 1928 Percy R Pyne, New York Mrs Robert G Elbert, New York Partridge, New York Walter P Chrysler Jr, sold ParkeBernet Galleries, New York, May 1960

London 1931 P Duncan, Newhailes, East Lothian, Country Life 29 January & 5 February 1987 J Cornforth, Newhailes, East Lothian, Country Life 21 & 28 November 1996 I Gow, Scottish Houses and Gardens, London 1997 J Cornforth, Newhailes, Midlothian, Country Life 22 August 2002 Depth of seat: 24in (61cm) Height: 40in (101cm) Width: 29½in (75cm) Depth: 30in (76cm)

LITERATURE

L Weaver, ‘Newhailes, Midlothian’, Country Life 8 September 1917 H Cescinsky, ‘The Gentle Art’,

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A CARVED GILTWOOD WALL BAROMETER A very fine Louis XVI giltwood wall barometer, the case surmounted by a laurel wreath above carved garland of fruit. The marble incised thermometer stands above the round painted wooden dial of the barometer, which is enclosed by trellis work and carved oak leaf decoration. Inscribed “Par Pedralio L’ainé au Thelescope Anglois quai Srancase”. By Pedralio, the Elder. France, circa 1780 Height: 57in (145cm) Width: 27in (69cm) Pedralio or Pedraglio seems to have been a family of makers of scientific instruments recorded in Normandy, France in the last quarter of the eighteenth century (in Nantes, Cherbourg and Vannes). O3B0046

A PAIR OF GEORGE IV MAHOGANY COVE BACK ARMCHAIRS A fine pair of George IV cove back armchairs in solid mahogany, with caned seats, backs and sides, having scrolled top rails and armrests with carved leaf decoration, standing on turned, reeded front legs, and brass cup castors. Now having pale yellow silk squab cushions. England, circa 1830 PROVENANCE

Rushbrooke Hall, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. Height: 35½in (90cm) Seat height: 17½in (45cm) Width: 22in (56cm) Depth: 29½in (75cm) F3A0375

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A PAIR OF FOUR BRANCH CANDELABRA A very unusual pair of Empire bronze and gilt four branch candelabra. The branches are of scroll outline with dolphin head socles and are supported by three gilt owls standing upon a sphere. The group rests on a triangular column plinth, mounted with an allegorical group, with one representing love divided and the other love united. The candelabra terminates in finely chased winged claw feet, upon a triangle concave sided plinth terminating in bun feet. Attributed to Claude Galle France, circa 1805 Height: 29in (74cm) Width: 11in (28cm)

This unusual pair of candelabra with the three owls relate to a pair described in the 1807 inventory of the Chateau de Fontainebleau, listed as being in the second salon of the Empress Josephine: "une paire (flambeaux) en cuivre gaines rondes griffes et hiboux dores or mat hauteur 29c". These are illustrated in "J-P Samoyault, Pendules at bronzes d’ameublement entres sous le Premier Empire, Paris, 1989, p176, fig 157". Claude Galle was one of the greatest bronziers of his age, employing unusual motifs and tour de force quality. He was at the forefront of the neo-egyptian taste prevalent under the reign of Napoleon. It is noted that at his peak there were over 400 craftsmen in his workshop. He supplied many items for the GuardeMeuble and many of the great noblemen of the age. It is noted that from a document in his archive dated August 1795 that he had "une paire de flambeaux a hibou", which shows that Galle was using the owl motif during this period. L3A0399

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A MAGNIFICENT PAIR OF FAMILLE ROSE CHINESE PORCELAIN VASES A pair of famille rose porcelain vases, each of well potted baluster form, painted with a pair of cranes standing in elaborate rockwork formations amongst sprays of peony and beneath a flowering prunus tree contained in a walled garden, with very unusual lotus flowers finials on the lids. China, circa 1730 Height: 34½in (88cm) Diameter: 18½in (47cm)

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A similar pair of vases is found at the Blue Room in the Chinese Pavilion at Drottningholm Royal Palace near Stockholm (Ake Setterwall, The Chinese Pavillion, 1972, p. 157). The Chinese Pavillion is an exquisite monument to the passion for Chinese taste in Europe and includes great examples of porcelain. O3A0452

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WILLIAM FITZWILLIAM, 1ST EARL FITZWILLIAM (1643-1719) The genealogy of the Fitzwilliam family, with three coats of arms combined by Samuel Stebbing. The vellum panel finely decorated with three richly coloured Coats of Arms in fine condition, retaining its original gilt embossing. England, circa 1735 Height: 35 in (89.5cm) Width: 50½in (128.5cm)

This magnificent achievement of arms would have been the foot of a pedigree prepared for

the 1st Earl Fitzwilliam in the year 1713. It features the central crest of the ‘Right Honourable William Lord Fitzwilliam of Liffer in the Kingdom of Ireland’ flanked by ‘The Arms and Quarterings of William Fitz-William of Witham in the County of Lincoln Esqr.’ on the left, and ‘The Arms and Quarterings of William FitzWilliam of Clixby in the County of Lincoln Esqr.’ on the right; all listing the various names and quarterings represented. Although, no precise mention of the artist has been found, it is undoubtedly of the highest quality. P3A0359

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A MAHOGANY DOUBLE CHEST OF DRAWERS A very fine mahogany chest of drawers of unusual proportion and rich colour, having two parallel sets of drawers, with finely worked handles and escutcheon plates. England, circa 1760 Height: 32in (81.5cm) Width: 51in (130cm) Depth: 18in (46cm) F3A0449

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A GEORGE II BRASS CHANDELIER A George II single tier brass chandelier of small scale, the baluster stem and globe supporting four sinuous candle arms with circular, dished drip pans having shaped candle nozzles, with gadrooned cap and base and elegant pull handle. Now wired for electricity. England, circa 1750 Height: 20½in (52cm) Width: 23½in (60cm) L3A0502

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A WILLIAM IV WRITING TABLE A very rare and unusual late William IV "Buhl" writing table employing ebony and rosewood as a ground to the brass marquetry. The top is decorated with musical vignettes and floral arabesques inspired by the Louis XIV designer, Jean Berain (1637-1711). The frieze conceals a drawer on each side and is decorated with foliate ornament against a brass ground. The writing table

stands on rectangular, tapering columns. Each is supported by a plinth base and joined by a shaped stretcher. Bearing the trade label of Town & Emanuel. England, circa 1840 Height: 30in (76cm) Width: 46in (117cm) Depth: 27in (68cm) The contre partie pair to this table is now at Hinton Ampner, Hampshire. F3A0495

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A PAIR OF DUTCH BRASS ARTILLERY CANNONS MOUNTED ON CARRIAGES A pair of Dutch brass artillery cannons mounted on oak carriages, of typical form, mounted with dolphins above the end of the barrel, raised on a frame flanked by large metalbound wheels, together with one caisson. Holland, circa 1800 Height: 11½in (29cm) Width: 15in (38cm) Length: 26in (66cm)

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A MID 19TH CENTURY ROPE TWIST STOOL A Napoleon III finely-carved rope twist stool, in the form of intertwined rope knotted at the base. Now upholstered with deep-buttoned golden silk velvet. In the manner of A.M.E Fournier. France, circa 1870 Height: 16in (40cm) Diameter: 21in (54cm)

The model for this stool was created by the upholsterer A.M.E Fournier who worked in the boulevard Beaumarchais, Paris, from 1850 onwards. A pouf à cordes by Fournier is in the Château de Compiègne and is illustrated in H. Hayward, World Furniture, London, 1965, p. 241, pl. 928. As well as exceptional case furniture, Fournier was famed for his upholstered work, exhibiting at many of the great exhibitions of the period, including l’Exposition Universelle of 1867. F3A0479

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A PAIR OF ITALIAN GILTWOOD ARMCHAIRS

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A pair of Genoese carved walnut giltwood fauteuils in the English taste with shaped backs enriched with raised foliate carving and carved ribbon at the centre of the top rail. The scroll arms are fluted and carved with beading and further foliate ornament. The chairs stand on cabriole legs and have a serpentine front rail. Each element is carved with further beading and low relief foliate swags. Italy, circa 1760 Seat Height: 16in (41cm) Height: 35in (89cm) Width: 24in (61cm) Depth: 21in (53cm) F3A0260

A PAIR OF SHIP’S WINE COOLERS In brass and copper, with brass carrying handles. Stamped, London, SS YORK. England, circa 1930 Height: 15in (38cm) Width: 8½in (21.5cm) Depth: 5in (12.5cm)

The SS Duchess of York was a luxury steam driven cruise liner that voyaged between England and the USA. Its heyday was in the first decades of the twentieth century when well to do travellers used it to cross the Atlantic ocean at great speed and luxury. O3B0055

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A PAIR OF QUEEN ANNE CARD TABLES With herringbone banding, the eared rectangular tops opening on concertina actions to reveal a playing area with candlestands and guinea wells, standing on slender cabriole legs and terminating in pad feet. England, circa 1710 Height: 27½in (70cm) Width: 35in (89cm) PROVENANCE

Melplash Court Melplash Court was first built in 1350 but was modelled into a great country manor in the early seventeenth century by the Paulet family. It passed through many hands until acquired by the Lewis family in 1984. F3A0367

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A VERY FINE LATE REGENCY JAPANNNED CABINET The scroll red t么le cornice with splayed corners, supported on four double baluster columns flanking an ivory door, painted with a Chinese pheasant and song bird on a rocky landscape with exotic chinoiserie peonies opening to reveal two shelves, all above a simulated verde antico top. The lower section has a pair of red t么le doors flanked by four baluster columns, each decorated with chinoiserie scenes and pagodas, opening to reveal ten japanned drawers, all elaborately painted. Retaining much of its original decoration. England, circa 1825. Height: 85in (216cm) Width: 43in (109cm) Depth: 15in (38cm)

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From the days of the early explorers, the exotic orient and its culture held a fascinating curiosity for Europeans. With the expanding trade routes between hemispheres during the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, Europe was exposed to these innovative methods and styles, the desirability of which sparked a new aesthetic movement in the decorative arts. This exotic cabinet is characteristic of the European fashion for oriental decoration during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The design on the ivory panel is reminiscent of Chinese wall-paper patterns while the painted oriental landscapes on the lower section relate to wall-paintings introduced around 1817 by the decorative painter Frederick Crace, in the Pavilion at Brighton for the Prince Regent. The exotic combination of Oriental painted chinoseries and Grecian architectural detail typifies the eclectic fashion of the Early Regency, creating a fusion of European and Oriental styles. The Pompeian columnettes and the enriched acroteria cornice are

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illustrated in Richard Brown's Rudiments of Drawing Cabinet and Upholstery Furniture. Similar polychrome panels painted on metal appear on a group of low side cabinets associated with the Allgood family of Pontypool, a center of decorated metalwork during the early nineteenth century. COMPARABLE

A similarly decorated cabinet, attributable to Frederick Crace, formed part of the collection in The State Closet at Chatsworth. The Duke was a close friend of the Prince Regent and would have known of his commissions for the Pavilion at Brighton and as the piece is unlike anything else in the Devonshire collection, it is reasonable to presume the piece was a gift. A second cabinet of exactly similar design but with different chinoserie decoration was sold from Saccombe Park in 1993. LITERATURE

M.Aldrich ed. The Craces: Royal Decorators 1768-1899, Brighton, 1990, fig.3 F3B0075

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AN EMPIRE ORMOLU MOUNTED TABLE BY J.J.WERNER The top frieze enriched with a cross-banding of ebony and mahogany, supported on a flame veneer hexagonal baluster stem, standing on a tripod plinth with each element carved in low relief with a scroll and mounted with gilt-bronze anthemion mounts, retaining its original dished white marble top and the whole standing on carved mahogany claw feet. Stamped J.J.Werner France, circa 1815 Height: 29½in (75cm) Diameter: 37in (94cm)

A PAIR OF GEORGE III TABLE CANDELABRA

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A PAIR OF GEORGE II WALNUT STOOLS

A fine pair of Adam period cut glass table candelabra, the central urn on a turned column above a domed foot, supporting a pair of scrolling candle arms having cut drip pans and festooned with drops and swags. The central spire with spiral twist finial and canopy supports two swags to the lower side arms, again with canopies and star cut finials. England, circa 1775

A very fine pair of George II walnut stools of large scale. The rectangular seats with red velvet upholstery, supported on cabriole legs, the knees carved with stylised vine leaves with acanthus ears terminating in claw and ball feet. England, circa 1740

Height: 27in (69cm) Width: 16in (41cm) Depth: 10in (25cm)

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Height: 17in (43cm) Width: 22in (56cm) Depth: 17½in (44.5cm)

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A FINE 18TH CENTURY MAHOGANY BOOKCASE An unusual mid eighteenth century mahogany pier bookcase of slim proportions, the interior with adjustable shelves, the doors retaining their original glazing and lock, all supported on bracket feet. England, circa 1765 Height: 92in (234cm) Width: 37½in (95cm) Depth: 12½in (32cm) F3B0113

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THE ROCHEFOUCAULD GLOBES A pair of Swedish globes, each with brass median ring measured with degrees of latitude, having a smaller ring with a 24-hour dial and rotating pointer, on painted pine base with gilded lead mounts, by Anders Akerman (d.1778). Sweden, 1767 Height: 37in (94cm) Diameter: 32in (81cm)

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The horizon ring retaining its original printed months of the year, on a pine frame supported by four red painted pine cabriole legs, with chamfered edges mounted with gilt lead scalloped shells and foliate details, joined by an x-shaped stretcher and with gilded lead sabot feet. The terrestrial globe with printed cartouche-shaped label inscribed "GLOBUS TERRAQUEUS Secundum Adcuratissimas descriptiones Adornatus Cura SOCIETATIS COSMOGRAE UPSALENSIS Manu Andrae Akerman Reg: Soc: Scient: Ups: Scultoris. 1766"; the celestial globe with differently shaped label printed "GLOBUS COELESTIS Ex Catalogo Britannico et De la Caillii observationibis ad Annum F.C.N. 1800, Cura Soc. Cosmogr. Upsal delineatus ab Andrea Akerman Reg. S. S. Ups. Sculptore 1766"

PROVENANCE

Reputely presented by King Gustav II of Sweden (then Compte de Haga) in 1768 to the Duchesse d’Enville (17161797), daughter of Alexander de Durtal, Duc de la Rochefoucauld (1690-1762). Inherited in 1797 by her sonin-law, the Duc the Rohan (1761-1816). Inherited in 1816 by LouisFrancois-Alexandre, Cardinalduc de Rohan, Prince de Léon (1788-1833). Purchased with the château de la Roche-Guyon and its contents in 1829 by the Duc de la Rochefoucauld. The Ducs de la Rochefoucauld, château de la Roche-Guyon, France, by descent until the death, in the 1980s, of Gilbert de la Rochefoucauld, Duc de la Roche-Guyon. O3A0416

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A MAHOGANY LONGCASE CLOCK BY MAGELLAN A fine George III mahogany longcase clock, the arched dial surmounted by a stepped hood with blind fretwork border and flanked by mahogany columns with a swan neck pediment with paterae, the whole case in mahogany of superb colour, grain and patination. The dial with silvered chapter ring and brass filigree spandrels, enclosing Roman and Arabic numerals and seconds subsidiary dial, below two further chime and sound dials inscribed 'J H de Magellan Fieti Curavit Londini'. The movement of eight day duration and striking the hours. England, circa 1760 Height: 87in (221cm) Width: 17in (43cm) Depth: 8遜in (22cm)

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Jo達o Jacinto de Magalh達es or John Hyacinth de Magellan, was born in Aveiro, Portugal on the 4 November 1722 and was to become one the most prominent Portuguese writers and developers of scientific instruments in the eighteenth century. From 1755 to 1764, he travelled throughout Europe before eventually settling in London, where he remained until his death in 1790. He developed a network of scientific acquaintances, including Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), before being elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1784, alongside serving as a correspondent to other scientific institutions such as the Imperial Academy of Science in Saint Petersburg and the Royal Society of London. Magalh達es also designed mechanical devices and scientific instruments, most notably a set of astronomical and meteorological instruments for the Court of Madrid and a clock for the blind Duke of Arenberg, that indicated the time and day through various bells. O3B0112

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A VERY RARE CHINESE LACQUER SCREEN A most unusual Chinese screen with central paper panels, having a gold ground and exotic birds standing in rocky flowering landscapes with peonies and chrysanthemums, all in particularly fine condition. The paper mounted within a black lacquer and gilded frame with predella panels of black lacquer decorated with landscapes in three colours of gold, depicting warriors among rocks and trees. Paper panels: China, circa 1790 Lacquer, circa 1820 Height: 116in (295cm) Width of each panel: 30½in (77cm) O3B0069

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A 19TH CENTURY WOOD CARVED EAGLE A fine quality late nineteenth century Swiss limewood carving of an open winged eagle perched on a rock carved in fine naturalistic detail. Switzerland, circa 1880 LITERATURE

Swiss Carvings The Art of the “Black Forest” 1820-1940 by Jay Arenski, Simon Daniels Height: 9in (23cm) Width: 18in (45.5cm) Depth: 5in (13cm)

The popularity of these naturalistically carved animals and birds came to prominence with the visit of Queen Victoria to Switzerland in 1868 and the building of a Swiss chalet at Osbourne House which was furnished with Swiss carvings. The English romantic vision of Switzerland was fuelled by the heroics of mountaineers such as Edward Whymper (18401911) who made the first ascent of the Matterhorn in 1865.

A LOUIS XV CARVED BERGERE OF LARGE SCALE A Louis XV bergère with finely carved scroll arms and seat rails. The knees and front seat rail frieze are carved with foliate ornament in low relief. The chair stands on short cabriole legs terminating in scroll toes. France, circa 1760 Height: 43in (109cm) Width: 26in (65.5cm) Depth: 20½in (52cm)

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A TABLE DE SALON BY ADAM WEISWEILER An extremely elegant oak framed, ebony veneered table with a Breche de Vendome marble top set in a narrow gilt bronze edge. The tapering faceted column-shaped legs are veneered in ebony and pewter, retaining their original brass castors. Stamped underneath A. WEISWEILER France, circa 1785 Height 30in (76cm) Width 33in (84cm) Depth 13in (33cm) PROVENANCE

Carole Weisweiler; J. Kugel, Paris; Private Collection, United States. LITERATURE

Patricia Lemonnier, Weisweiler, Paris, 1983.

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The German-born Adam Weisweiler (1744-1820, Master in 1778) was one of the most influential ébénistes of eighteenth century France. He produced pieces for several members of the French Royal Family and Court, including Queen Marie-Antoinette. Through the most preeminent marchand-mercier in France, Dominique Daguerre, Weisweiler furniture was delivered to collectors like the King of Naples and George IV of England, when Prince Regent. Weisweiler is known for his incredibly elegant Neoclassicalstyle furniture, avoiding pictorial marquetry and using plain veneers of rich woods. To Daguerre, he also supplied many pieces of furniture set with Japanese lacquer and pietre dure panels. After the death of Martin Carlin, he became the major supplier to Daguerre, for whom he produced many pieces with important Sèvres porcelain plaques inset.

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It is very likely that this table was commissioned by Daguerre probably in the latter part of his career. The combination of ebony and tin is a feature particular to Weisweiler and we can include this table in a small group of unusual pieces of tables de salon. The rare feature of this table is the detachable legs, which meant that it could be easily stored or moved. Also, this feature justifies the fact that the table does not have the scrolled stretcher, so characteristic of many of his works and also of the rest of the pieces in this group of tables de salon veneered in ebony and pewter. These include the table sold at the Yves Saint Laurent-Pierre Berge Sale (Christie’s Paris, 2009), the one at the Hubert de Givenchy collection (Christie’s Monaco, 1993) and the pair ex-Collection Stroganoff and now at the Museum Nissim de Camondo. O3B0107

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A GERMAN PIER MIRROR

A POLISHED STEEL FIRE IRON SET

An early nineteenth century German pier mirror, the two tone giltwood border enriched with neo-classical beading, vine leaves and grapes, the upper section divided by an egg and dart moulding below a gilt wood figure of Ceres and a wheat sheaf with an abundance of flora and fauna. The mirror retains its original mirror plates. Probably Mannheim, Germany, circa 1830

A set of mid nineteenth century polished steel fire irons with facet turned handles and barley twist shafts, supported on their original stand with barley twist stem terminating in larger faceted finials and supporting rests; the shaped base raised on bun feet. England, circa 1840

Height: 79in (201cm) Width: 32in (82cm)

The Empire style came to Baden – South West Germany when Stephanie Beauharnais, the daughter of Napoleon, married Prince Karl of Baden in 1806. Their residence was the Scholss in Mannheim. The present mirror was probably made in the workshop of Peter Schmuckert in Mannheim. He established a gilding workshop in Mannheim in 1806 and advertised himself as a gilder of all sorts of mirrors and chandeliers. F3B0108

Height: 37 in (94cm) Width: 15½in (39cm) Depth: 14½in (37cm)

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A PAIR OF GEORGE II GILTWOOD TABLES The frieze with carved central shell and trailing acanthus leaves, the sides also carved with trailing acanthus leaves on boldly carved cabriole legs terminating in lions paw feet, with later white marble slab tops. England, circa 1730 Height: 31½in (80cm) Width: 35in (88.5cm) Depth: 20in (50cm) F3A0032

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AN IMPORTANT REGENCE BOULLE CLOCK BY BERNARD I VAN RISENBURGH Inlaid overall with strapwork panels of scrolling foliage and flowers the circular cabochonenamelled dial with both Roman and Arabic chapters centered by foliate chasing, signed Rabby a Paris to both dial and movement, the foliatetrailed case with a central Apollo mask and domed canopy surmounted by a seated Putto emblematic of Athena in armour flanked by female Caryatids to each side, the glazed door with a relief of Prudence seated in her chariot, on scrolled foliate feet with grotesque masks, the tapering pedestal base with an Anthemion strapwork base band and waisted top with laurel-wreathed with espagnolette-masks to the angels issuing from acanthus foliage, above a strapwork band and a central fan with husktails, the rectangular tapering panel with winged maidens suspending a canopy over a cockerel and with two eagles suspending a canopy over Minerva, flanked by canted foliate-trailed angles and the sides with Apollo, Diana and Jupiter Masks with their relevant attributes, the spreading socle with acanthus angles and a fluted rim above

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the stepped and lambrequined plinth with foliate band, restorations, one mount incised BII and the seated Putto-Finial re-supported. France, circa 1715 Height 113in (287cm) Width 27½in (70cm) Depth 11½in (29cm) PROVENANCE

The Viscounts Hampden Hampden House, Green Street, London until sold by the widow of the 3rd Viscount Hampden. The Marquises of Linlithgow, Hopetoun House, South Queensferry, Scotland thence by descent at Hopetoun. Alexander and Berendt, London LITERATURE

J.D.Augarde and J.N.Ronfort, Le Maitre du Bureau de L’Electeur, L’Estampille/L’Objet d’Art, January 1991, p. 69, fig. 25. J.D. Augarde, Les Ouvriers du Temps, Antiquorum Editions, 1996, p. 48, fig. 29

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This clock and its pedestal represent the missing link between the first pieces produced by Bernard I van Risenburgh’s workshop around 1695 and those, such as the bureau l’Electeur, dating after 1715. There are only two other documented bracket clocks of this model, one in premiere partie, was sold by Lt. Col. William Stirling of Keir, Sotheby’s London, 12 July 1963, Lot 134. The other was sold from the collection of Mrs. Elizabeth Parke Firestone, Christie’s, New York, 22023 March 1991, lot 890. A single pedestal was sold anonymously in Paris, Palais d’Orsay, 21 February 1978, lot 74. All the pedestals are embellished with berainesque marquetry, the scrolling foliage, birds and animals under canopies, with urns and masks being recurring motifs. They can be found en partie on bureaux and tables from the earliest productions pf the atelier. The marquetry of the upper section on all the pedestals is similar to that which occurs on the back door of a clock with movement by Thuret in the Wallace Collection. (F.J.B.Watson, Catalogue, London 1956, F. 40.)

Francois Rabby Francois Rabby (1655-circa 1720), was appointed Maitre Horloger between 1686 and 1688. In 1686, he married the widow of the Horloger, Corneille Godefroy (d. 1681) and in the same year he was appointed horloger de la Duchess d’Orleans. His other clients included la Duchess du Maine and also the painter Nicolas Largilliere. He was imprisoned in the Bastille in 1718 for allowing his daughter to marry a Huguenot from Geneva in the English Ambassador’s chapel. O3A0103

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A COLLECTION OF SILVER-MOUNTED NAMUR POTS A rare collection of late eighteenth century Namur brown pottery, consisting of five coffee pots, five teapots, five chocolate pots, two milk jugs, a tea caddy and a lidded sugar bowl. Many of the pieces have silver mounted covers and spouts in boldly modelled foliate and classical designs cast in low relief. Belgium, circa 1780 Height of largest pot: 37cm O3B0152

A PAIR OF JAPANESE LACQUERED VASES

A MAHOGANY CANTERBURY

A pair of nineteenth century Japanese porcelain vases of large scale, decorated with lacquered over glaze showing panels of flowers within a geometric floral background. Japan, circa 1880

A fine late eighteenth century mahogany canterbury with turned spindle supports and two compartments. England, circa 1790

Height: 22in (56cm) Diameter: 11in (28cm)

Height: 20in (51cm) Width: 18in (45.5cm) Depth: 12in (30.5cm) F3A0318

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Giles Hutchinson Smith Chief Executive Michael Smyth-Osbourne Financial Director Richard Cave Director Felicity Jarrett Director Nicholas Wells Associate Director Justin Evershed-Martin Associate Director Gina Hamilton Tess Greig

Telephone +44 (0)20 7495 5375 Fax +44 (0)20 7495 3197 Email: hello@madebymeta.com www.madebymeta.com Eleonore Halluitte Production Manager

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RESTORERS OF FURNITURE & WORKS OF ART

Hatfields is one of the world’s longest established restoration firms. It has a history which dates back to 1834 when the original Hatfield family established the business. Initially founded to produce fine miniature frames, the company expanded to include furniture workshops and quickly established its reputation as the leading firm in its field, restoring and conserving furniture and works of art for Royalty, private and museum collections throughout the world. In the 1930s the company proudly noted on its letterhead that it had warrants from Queen Victoria, The Prince of Wales, King Edward VII, Queen Alexandra and King George V. The high standards of the time have been maintained and Hatfields is proud to have restored outstanding pieces for institutions such as The Getty Museum in California, and the Badminton Cabinet, now in the Liechtenstein Museum in Vienna. Hatfields are equally proud of their record in restoring all types of pieces needing repair and of their capacity to produce fine works to commission. In 2007, Hatfields took over premises in London on Clapham High Street. Scholars House is a fine late 18th century building, from which the company is developing a range of services that will offer clients a complete ‘one stop shop’ for all their restoration needs.

Hatfields Restoration Scholars House 49 Clapham High Street London SW4 7TL

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ABRAHAM PETHER (1756-1812) “A view near Stroud in Sussex” - view taken from the hill on the London road near Petersfield, with travellers and their donkey resting by a milestone “LXV Miles from London” Oil painting on canvas, 28 x 36 inches, contained in a fine original Georgian carved and gilded frame (35 x 43 ins framed) Signed and dated 1788. EXHIBITED Royal Academy 1788, number 422 as “A view near Stroud in Sussex” PROVENANCE Private Collection, Devon The view is taken from the old London Road (subsequently the A3 trunk Road). Stroud is a small village 1½ miles to the west of Petersfield in Hampshire, and on the Hampshire and West Sussex border. Abraham Pether was born at Chichester, where he was a pupil of George Smith, one of the three brother landscapists of that town in the mid-18th century. He derived much of his early style from Smith, whose influence is discernible until the late 1790’s, but he also progressed his art by a careful observation of the romanticism of Richard Wilson RA..

15 Langton Street, Chelsea, London SW10 0JL E: info@jhba.co.uk | W: jamesharveybritishart.com | T: +44 (0)20 7352 0015 All business transacted is subject to our standard terms and conditions of sale, copies of which are available on request Registered office is 141 New Bond Street London W1S 2BS

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Made to Order Pieces of Contemporary Design Commissioned by Mallett

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Mallett Catalogue 2011