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DECEMBER 13, 2013

A Chile Christmas

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Chamber of Commerce Parade winners announced

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Beer, wine sales Local option vote passes in special election

San Juan County voters have approved a local option that allows beer and wine sales at restaurants in unincorporated areas of the county. Fisheads San Juan River Lodge in Navajo Dam spearheaded the effort to collect 1,944 signatures on a petition to call for the election. They did so in October and the County Commission called for a vote on Dec. 3 through a resolution. Only 1.97 percent of the county’s 38,954 registered voters went to the polls on

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Out go the lights

Weather contributes to outage

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A lockout at the Sullivan Substation left 1,600 residents without power for 45 minutes early Monday morning. The outage hit an area of north Farmington including Sunset Heights, North Butler Avenue, Cardon Robles and a few schools in those areas. The city of Farmington was flooded with phone calls after the outage hit, and Electric Utility Director Mike Sims told the Farmington City Council during its Dec. 10 meeting, “Yesterday was a real test for our customer service line.” He added that the city learned the phone system could not handle a large outage. Councilor Mary Fischer said she received

VOL. 4 NO. 11

N.M. Democrats in town Saturday

Farmington hosts state meeting DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

Staff reports

DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

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Sullivan Substation lockout left 1,600 residents without power for 45 minutes early Monday morning. – Josh Bishop photo

several phone calls from “nervous” city residents, who were worried their house would get cold quickly in below zero temperatures. She asked what caused the outage.

Sims stated that crews initially could not find what caused the morning outage. However, when the system went down again the same afternoon, the crews

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Bloomfield boundaries

Commission OKs annexing roads into city

The state’s top Democrats will be in Farmington on Saturday, Dec. 14, as the San Juan County Democrats host the Democratic State Central Committee and Resolutions Committee meeting. It will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 14, in the Zia Conference Center at San Juan College. The purpose of the meeting is to develop the Democratic platform for 2014, and it is important for local Democrats to have their voice heard on issues important to this region, said Leslie Scarborough,

Stat Doctor

County employees will have 24-hour online health care

The city of Bloomfield is planning for an oil and gas boom that could come out of production efforts in the Mancos Shale. This is to be done by proposing to annex 6,775 acres of county land into the city limits. “Mancos Shale is going to take off one of these days and we want to control that,” City Manager David Fuqua said, during a Dec. 3 meeting of the San Juan County Commission. “We want to protect our borders from encroachment from anyone. We want to protect our future tax base.” By expanding the boundaries, Bloomfield stands to gain tax revenue from multiple oil and gas producers in the area. This

San Juan County employees will receive a new health care benefit beginning in February when the county contracts with Stat Doctor. This service will allow county employees to access a virtual doctor 24 hours a day, seven days a week in the case of an urgent or emergency health care need. The San Juan County Commission approved a contract with Stat Doctor, a Scottsdale, Ariz.-based business that provides virtual doctor visits via computer, cell phone or electronic tablet. The service will cost the county $1,200 per month plus a $50 co-pay for each person that uses the services. “Staff believes this cost to be reasonable,” said Cricket Long, a benefits coordinator with the county. She asked the commission to waive the $50 co-pay for employees for a period of Feb. 1, 2014, to June 2015, to see if employees use

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Inside

Art walk Tonight at 5 p.m. Downtown Farmington 50¢

Calendar.......................................A4 Editorial ........................................A6 PRCA Tracks..............................A10 Pawsitively Pets .........................A11 Sports.........................................A14 Pets of the Week........................A16

Real Estate.................................A17 Advice You Can Grow With ........A18 Business.....................................A19 Classifieds/Nosey Nellie.............A20 Games ........................................A22 Movies........................................A23

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Luminaria award

Matt and Jeanette deKay honored by state

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE seven-day forecast FRIDAY

36/12

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SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

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38/14

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Rise Set 7:19 a.m. 4:58 p.m. Sun

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Bloomfield includes XTO Energy, Transwestern, ConocoPhillips, El Paso KinderMorgan and the Williams Refinery. “We feel for the future of Bloomfield [that] this is necessary. We need to be proactive and get ready,” Fuqua said. A city master plan calls for improved parks and more walking and biking trails. Fuqua said the increased tax base could pay for the improvements. He estimated an annual property tax increase of $115,000 to Bloomfield through the annexation. The city plans to move forward with the annexation by petitioning the New Mexico Municipal Boundaries Commission, which is a state

agency that has the authority to approve annexation petitions, according to John Meyers, an attorney for Bloomfield. Meyers asked the County Commission to consider allowing the city to take over control county roads that are within the annexation boundaries. Those roads include areas of County Roads 4900 and 4935, Blanco Boulevard and West Newby Lane. County CEO Kim Carpenter pointed out, that under the annexation, boundary lines there would be a small area of county roads that would be left outside of Bloomfield’s new city limits. He asked the city to agree to share in servicing “those

small areas of roads.” The city of Bloomfield representatives stated that it would share costs to maintain the roads. County Commissioner Jack Fortner asked if the Commission’s vote would affect the city’s decision to move forward with the annexation. “Yes it does. If you approve the consent to annexation, the roads within the area – we will include those roads within our petition to the boundaries commission,” Meyers said. “If you elect not to consent to the boundaries of those roads, we will leave them out of our request.” Fortner said he was con-

cerned about the county losing property tax revenue after the acreage is moved into the Bloomfield’s city limits. “Certainly we want to get your opinion on the matter. We can proceed with our petition regardless of what your decision is this evening,” Meyers said, adding the city would prefer the County Commission’s blessing. Commissioner Keith Johns asked what type of economic impact this annexation would have on the county. Carpenter said it was an “unknown,” because the state hasn’t shared tax revenues information with the county, regarding the Fire Excise tax and the Solid Waste Fund.

“There would be losses of our electric franchise fee revenue,” he said, adding that would be approximately $150,000 in losses each year. The annexation would cause the county to lose BLM, state and private land, with the area being broken up into a 78 percent federal parcel, a 9 percent state parcel and 13 percent of privately held land. Potentially, there could be a gain in revenue with regard to animal control, Carpenter said. That is because the county pays a fee to the Farmington and Aztec Animal Shelters for animals brought in from certain areas of the county. If an animal were surrendered by one of

the eight private property owners in the annexation area, or if an animal were picked up by animal control in the area, it would no longer cost the county for the animal’s care. Johns stated that the “vote has no impact.” Fortner pointed out that it would not, “other than the roads. ... There’s no reason for them not to take the roads,” he said. Johns moved to approve the annexation of the roads, and Fortner seconded the vote. It passed unanimously with Commission Chairman Scott Eckstein abstaining from the vote, because he also serves as Bloomfield’s mayor.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

calendar ONGOING EVENTS THREE WATERS TRADING POST EXHIBIT The Three Waters Trading Post exhibit features a walkthrough replica of a 1930’s trading post, including a bull pen stocked with period goods and artifacts, pawn room and an office showcasing jewelry and rugs. The exhibit is on display at the Farmington Museum in the Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St. in Farmington. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been spotted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, located in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for a leisurely walk of 1 to 2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org SETTLEMENT TO CITY EXHIBIT The Farmington Museum invites you to view an expansive display of historic and contemporary photography. Farmington has changed dramatically over the years. Experience a slice of Farmington’s past in comparison to what it is today. This unique exhibit uses both photography and historic objects to show the evolution of Farmington from a small agricultural settlement to the bustling city of today. On display through April 23, 2014. Information: 505.599.1174

MON DEC. 2 FRI JAN. 3, 2014 BLOOMFIELD CHRISTMAS PARADE AND CELEBRATION OF LIGHTS Bloomfield hosts annual lighted Christmas parade beginning at 6:30 p.m. Route starts at the Bloomfield High School. The official lighting of

the celebration of Lights displays follows the Bloomfield Christmas parade and will remain in the park through the Holidays, creating a wonderful winter wonderland at Salmon Park in Bloomfield, N.M., 501 N. 5th Street. Information: 505.632.0880

FRI DEC. 13 ASTROFRIDAY “The Star of Bethlehem” will be shown at 6:30 p.m. and again at 7:30 p.m. in the San Juan College Planetarium. A stargaze follows at 8:30 p.m., weather permitting. The Planetarium reserves the right to substitute shows. This is a free event, but seating is limited. Information: 505.566.3361 or www.sanjuancollege.edu/Planetarium/index.htm HOLIDAY ART WALK Come walk through Historic Downtown Farmington, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., and celebrate the season with art receptions and open houses at many downtown locations. A wide variety of art from regional artists will be showcased throughout many of the downtown shops, galleries and restaurants. Art Walk maps will be available at participating locations. The Art Walk is coordinated by the Farmington Downtown Association and sponsored by Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs. Information: 505.599.1419

SAT DEC. 14 ANNUAL AUDUBON CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT The Riverside Nature Center takes part in this nationwide project which has been carried out for over 100 years. From 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., come spend part or all of the day counting all the birds, common and rare, in their wintering grounds throughout the Farmington area. Information: 505.599.1422 JINGLEBELL JAMBOREE Come in to the Farmington Recreation Center and celebrate the holidays. Visit Santa and tell him what you want for Christmas! We will have a special holiday craft you can make, games you can play and wonderful holiday goodies to eat.

Information: Rec Center 505.599.1184, Aquatic Center 505.599.1167, Sycamore Park 505.566.2480 CHRISTMAS ARTS & CRAFT SALE Annual Arts & Crafts sale at the Farmington Indian Center, 100 W. Elm St. (corner of Orchard Avenue & Elm Street) for this jolly craft fair, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Information: 505.327.6296 or www.fmtn.org/indiancenter HISTORIC DOWNTOWN FARMINGTON WALKING TOUR Brave the winter chill and join the Farmington Museum for a walking tour of downtown Farmington’s fascinating early history. Learn a little about the devastating Main Street fires, early ar-

chitecture, pioneer community builders, and more! This program is FREE and available to all ages, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Transportation will be provided; meet at the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St. Information: Adrienne Boggs, 505.599.1169 or www.fmtn.org/museums. SATURDAY NIGHT FUN 5:30 – 10 p.m. Hey kids ages 7-14!! Come to the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road, the 2nd Saturday of each month through December, for an evening full of lively activities! Dodgeball, basketball, wallyball, four square, music, movies, board games, good eats, and more are on the agenda! This is a great place to hang out with your friends! Event is

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planned and supervised by the Recreation Center staff, with entry sign-in and signout. The Recreation Center is closed to the public during this event. Don’t miss the party! Registration is limited, so sign up now at www.fmtn.org/recreation, under the Quick Links tab on the right. Cost is $8. Info: 505.599.1184.

MON DEC. 16 CHACO CANYON CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT Join volunteers from the Four Corners Bird Club and the Riverside Nature Center in making the winter census of birds at Chaco Culture National Historic Park. Participants should be experienced birders and able to hike in back country areas in winter weather. Information: 505.599.1422

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SAN JUAN COLLEGE CONCERT BAND Join the Silhouette Performing Arts Series at San Juan College Little Theatre for this amazing performance. Show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 adults, $6 students and seniors. Information: 505.566.3430 or www.sanjuancollege.edu/silhouette CHRISTMAS DINNER 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. Come to the Bonnie Dallas Senior Center, 109 E. La Plata St. for a Christmas Dinner with all the trimmings. Lunch is a $3 donation for anyone 60+ and a $6 fee for anyone younger. Merry Christmas to ALL, from the Staff at the Bonnie Dallas Senior Center. Call 505.599.1380 or go online at www.fmtn.org/bdsc for more information.

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The Tri-City Tribune (USPS 5601) is published weekly by Majestic Media, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401. Periodicals postage paid at Farmington, NM 87401. COPYRIGHT: The entire contents of the Tri-City Tribune are copyright 2013 by Majestic Media. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part 100 W. Apache St. by any means including electronic retrieval systems without the written permisFarmington, NM 87401 sion of the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tri-City Trib505-516-1230 une, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401 Fax: 505-516-1231 Subscription Rates: IF YOUR PAPER IS LATE: The Tri-City Tribune should arrive by 9:00 a.m. each Friday. If it hasn’t, www.tricitytribuneusa.com 52 week subscription $27.85 please call our circulation department at 505-51626 week subscription $15 1230, ext. 205. Mail Subscriptions Rates: The publisher reserves the right to change sub52 week subscription $83.54 scription rates during the term of a subscription Printed on 100% Recycled Paper 26 week subscription $41.77 upon one month’s notice. This notice may be by with Soy-Based Ink. All subscriptions payable in advance. mail to the subscriber, by notice contained in the

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PRESIDENT Don Vaughan 505-516-1230 ext. 204 don@majesticmediausa.com EDITOR/PUBLISHER Cindy Cowan Thiele 505-516-1230 ext. 202 editor@tricitytribuneusa.com REPORTER Debra Mayeux 505-320-6512 debra@tricitytribuneusa.com Lauren Seip 505-608-4400 lauren@tricitytribuneusa.com CIRCULATION Shelly Acosta 505-516-1230 ext. 211 circulation@tricitytribuneusa.com PRODUCTION 505-516-1230 ext.203 Suzanne Thurman suzanne@majesticmediausa.com 505-516-1230 ext.203

PRODUCTION Jennifer Hargrove jennifer@majesticmediausa.com Michael Billie michael@majesticmediausa.com ADVERTISING SALES Shelly Acosta shelly@majesticmediausa.com Deyan Valdez deyan@majesticmediausa.com Aimee Velasquez aimee@majesticmediausa.com LEGALS legals@tricitytribuneusa.com

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Friday, December 13, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

calendar THURS DEC. 19 EVENING OF LIGHTS AT AZTEC RUINS The evening begins with an observation of the winter solstice sunset, 4:45 p.m. to 8 p.m. Following sunset there will be an archeoastronomy talk in the Aztec Ruins National Park Visitor Center and 2,000 luminarias lighting the historic Visitor Center district. The Friends of Aztec Ruins will serve cookies and hot cocoa, and the bookstore will stay open late and offer a 15 percent discount for holiday shopping. Join us to take part in a beautiful New Mexico tradition! Information: 505.334.6174 or www.nps.gov/azru

FRI DEC. 20 WINTER SOLSTICE CELEBRATION Come mark the Winter Solstice at the Farmington Public Library and enjoy a “natural light” event at Noon along with activities that brighten up the winter.

Information: 505.599.1270 or www.infoway.org

SAT DEC. 21 REINDER ROMP Join the Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs Department and the Downtown Association for a little holiday cheer and participate in the Reindeer Romp or the North Pole Stroll! Held at Orchard Plaza in Historic Downtown Farmington from 4 to 6 p.m., this event will feature a 5K Reindeer Romp (chip timed) and a 2-mile North Pole Stroll. Registration is $15 which includes a shirt. The 5k will start promptly at 4 p.m., walkers will follow. This is a family friendly event with activities such as children’s winter carnival games, live holiday music, hot chocolate, hot apple cider, holiday cookies, and a chance to see Santa! Register by Thursday, Dec. 19. Late registrations will be accepted on Friday, Dec. 20, until 2 p.m., with a $10 additional fee.

SIMPLE BIRD FEEDERS 1 – 3 p.m. Come to the Riverside Nature Center, in Animas Park, off Browning Parkway for this annual activity. Learn about feeding birds and make tree ornaments which birds can eat, to decorate a tree at the nature center or to take home. Find out what birds eat and how to attract them, and learn the common winter birds in this area. Watch and learn the birds outside the Nature Center as you work. This is a family activity for all ages. Info: 505.599.1422

MON DEC. 23 LIVE NAVAJO NATIVITY This annual live nativity uses traditional Navajo clothing and live animals. The Nativity scene is presented entirely by children at the Four Corners Home for Children, at 2103 W. Main St., in Farmington, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Information: 505.325.0255, 888.325.0255 or www.nava-

joministries.org

MON DEC. 16 SAT JAN. 4, 2014 FARMINGTON AQUATIC CENTER HOLIDAY BREAK HOURS The Farmington Aquatic Center, 1151 N. Sullivan Ave., will have public swim from 1 - 4 p.m. and 4:30 - 7:30 p.m. for Christmas Break. Please call the Farmington Aquatic Center at 505.599.1167 or go online at www.fmtn.org/aquatics for more information.

TUES DEC. 31 SPACE FLIGHT EXPLORERS CHRISTMAS BREAK FUN 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Meet at the E3 Children’s Museum & Science Center, 302 N. Orchard Ave. Let’s blast off to a New Year with some space fun with activities straight from NASA. This program is suitable for ages 7 and up. See you there, and don’t forget your imaginations! Info: 505.599.1425 NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION 6 p.m. At the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St. For information call 505.599.1148. www.fmtn.org/civiccenter.

THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building:.505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Activity Center/The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 – 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Dec. 14 - The Vintage People Dec. 21 - NO DANCE Dec. 28 - NO DANCE Info: 505.599.1380 SPECIAL EVENT DANCE (NEW YEAR’S EVE) 8 p.m. – Midnight (Doors Open at 7 p.m.) Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Dec. 31 (Tuesday Night) – Off the Interstate Cost $ 3 per person 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center

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Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Dec. 18 – Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380 50+ AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. – Noon Friday, Dec. 6 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: $14 - $12 for card carrying AARP Members. Preregistration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay cash or check to the instructor on day of class. A discount on your insurance can be good for 2 to 3 years, check your policy. Please note this is last month for current cost, there will be 2014 rate increase. OLD SCHOOL VS. NEW SCHOOL, PART 2 10 – 11 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 11 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. This presentation will cover the topic of Compare and Contrast between Then and Now. Sexualized media culture and messages such as gender stereotyping will be topics discussed. Handouts and refreshments will be available. Presented by; Heather DePeal, BA. For more information call 505.566.2287. CHRISTMAS DINNER 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Lunch is a $3 donation for anyone 60+ and a $6 fee for anyone younger. Merry Christmas to you from the staff at the Bonnie Dallas Senior Center. Call 505.599.1380 for more information.

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Editorial

Friday, December 13, 2013

A6

E-Mail: editor@tricitytribuneusa.com

Phone: 505-516-1230

Fax: 505-516-1231

Mandela taught us to take injustice personally Nelson Mandela is being remembered as a towering giant, the sort of hero of whom President Barack Obama said “… few of us will share space with on this Earth again.” It is hard to say enough about the courage, wisdom, sacrifice and persistence the former freedom fighter and later South Africa’s president showed in paving the way for an end to apartheid and the birth of a new nation. Equally remarkable was his leadership in forgiving and reaching out to former adversaries without bitterness. But to depict Mandela as superhuman or in a class by himself would be to miss the point of his life, which underscores the moral imperative on each of us, in the face of repression and injustice, to act. His lesson is how one person can summon the will and conviction to take on a brutal system, bring others onboard and keep seeking

new approaches, even from a place of confinement, if one fails. In that vein, it’s also worth acknowledging the American activism that helped create the conditions for an end to the longeststanding system of legalized segregation in history. While everyone denounced it, some went farther, insisting we had a role to play. Rather than military action, that role was isolating South Africa diplomatically and economically, by divesting U.S. holdings, contributing to the government’s downfall. The first impetus was from black Americans reacting to the abhorrent treatment of black South Africans. U.S. Rep. Ron Dellums sponsored anti-apartheid legislation in 1972 with support from members of the Congressional Black Caucus and the House Africa Subcommittee. But it would take several

REKHA BASU SCRIPPS HOWARD more tries before passage. University students in the late 1970s began holding teach-ins and demonstrations and picketing trustee meetings to get their universities to sell their investments in South Africa. Michigan State University was the first. Four years later, Michigan’s legislature and governor agreed to divest 30 state colleges’ and universities’ funds from South Africa, but they were overturned in court. I was covering a board of trustees meeting of the State University of New York in Albany in 1985 when a group of student activists occupied a building in protest. The board’s chairman at the time, Donald Blinken, responded angrily

in an op-ed piece in the New York Times complaining that trustees – “a body of well-mannered, nonviolent citizens” – had been called fascists and murderers. But most significant was his rebuttal of anyone favorably comparing the students’ activism to the antiwar movement. “‘Isn’t it wonderful,’ they say, ‘that students have again found a worthwhile issue,’” Blinken wrote. But unlike the 1960s, when some students reflected concern that imminent departure for Vietnam placed them in personal danger, today’s debate places no students’ rights or life in jeopardy. In other words, if you weren’t affected directly,

you had no reason to be sticking your nose into apartheid. Change would have come much slower to South Africa if that view were universal. Several other colleges and universities did divest. The University of California withdrew $3 billion of investments from South Africa, which Mandela called a significant factor in abolishing white-minority rule. Artists and musicians, including U2, Peter Gabriel, Bruce Springsteen and Stevie Wonder, launched their own actions to get the word out and pressure South Africa’s government to end apartheid and release Mandela from prison, where he spent 27 years. Over President Ronald Reagan’s opposition, Congress passed the 1986 Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act, imposing sanctions against South Africa until

certain conditions were met. Reagan, worried about a communist takeover of South Africa, vetoed it. But Congress, in a rare show of bipartisanship, overrode his veto. South African President P.W. Botha remained defiant, saying, “We have never given in to outside demands and we are not going to do so.” But his administration couldn’t withstand the isolation, and he resigned in 1989 to be replaced by F.W. de Klerk, who freed Mandela and began paving the way to end apartheid. The supportive role Americans played points to the best way to honor Mandela: By taking injustice, no matter the target, so personally that you are compelled to act. Contact Des Moines (Iowa) Register columnist Rekha Basu at rbasu@dmreg.com. Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service, www.shns.com

Faimly is family both far and near When you are little and the world seems so big, it’s hard to understand why someone you love is here one day and gone the next. Actually, that can be hard to understand at any age. I’ve been trying to make sense of it all my life and I still don’t get it. Or like it. But I’ve come to accept it as one of the harder facts of life. Randy doesn’t accept it a bit. He is 3 years old and smart enough to notice that his nana – that would be me – shows up at his door unannounced, only to disappear later like the UPS guy dropping off a package. Yes, there are differences. The UPS guy wears a crisp brown uniform. I dress mostly in rumpled black. And he never sticks around to play with Randy, even for a minute.

SHARON RANDALL SCRIPPS HOWARD I always stay at least a few days, long enough to make Nana pancakes (they’re the best) and read stories (about Curious George) and trick his parents into letting him stay up late. The UPS guy never does that. But sooner or later, I always drive away, not in a big brown van, but in a little rental car. And I’m gone for a very long time. A month. Or two. Or three. Then I get messages on my voice mail: “Nana, can you go to the park with me today?” How do you keep saying no when all you want to say is yes? Randy lives in

California, with his parents and his brother, Wiley, who is almost a year old. Wiley doesn’t care how long I’m gone. I can’t prove it, but I think he likes the UPS guy better. Their cousin Henry and his parents live only a few miles away from them. Henry is 2, and he likes me a lot, but he’s not quite old enough yet to take issue with how long I’m gone. Henry’s mama says when he sees an “older woman,” he will point to her and smile and say “Nana!” She tells me this, I know, to make me feel missed, not old. Either way, I love it.

The reason for my vanishing act is simple, but not easily explained, especially to a child. My husband and I live 500 miles from our children and our grandchildren, in the desert overlooking Las Vegas, with an interesting array of wildlife and all sorts of things to do. Like many of our neighbors, we didn’t plan on the job change that brought us here. But after a few years of trying to make the best of it, we’ve been surprised to find how much we like it. The only thing we don’t like is the 500 miles between us and the people we love. I was almost Randy’s age when my parents divorced. I lived with my mother and will never forget how much I missed my dad. But when I visited my dad, I’d miss my mother, too.

My grandmother helped me come to terms with it. “When someone loves you,” she said, “you don’t have to be in the same room to know you are loved. Love stays forever, even when they’re out of sight.” I remembered those words years later when I lost in slow succession my grandparents, my parents and my first husband. My grandmother was right. You don’t have to be in the same room to know you’re loved. She’s been gone some 30 years and I feel her love every day. I want my grandchildren to feel the same way about me. So I am teaching it to them, starting with Randy. The last day I was with him, I held his face in my hands and said, “Where is your nana when you can’t see

her?” He studied my eyes, waiting for me to tell him. So I did. I told him and I showed him, then I made him show and tell me. “Will you remember?” I said. He nodded and smiled. Then I left. Again. The next day his mama emailed to tell me this story. That morning Randy came out to the kitchen to ask, “Mama, where is Nana?” “She’s gone home, honey,” she said, “with Papa Mark.” “No, Mama,” he said, grinning and pointing to his chest. “Nana is right here in my heart.” Take that, UPS guy. Sharon Randall can be contacted at P.O. Box 777394, Henderson NV 89077, or at www.sharonrandall.com. Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service, www.shns.com.

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Friday, December 13, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

New shelter opens Regional facility offers more room, better accommodations for animals LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune The highly anticipated Farmington Regional Animal Shelter opened Dec. 6 with room to house more than 300 cats and dogs. The 15,600 square foot facility, constructed by Jaynes Corporation, has indoor kennels to keep the animals warm during cold months. “There is a huge difference here. The dogs are more comfortable and warmer and they seem less stressed,” said Theresa Strickland, kennel technician. Along with more space, the new shelter offers several features such as a multi-purpose education conference room, treatment and examination rooms, a feral cat room, and an isolation ward for sick animals that need to be evaluated before being brought into the general boarding area. There also is a courtyard in the center of the building, where potential owners can play with and get to know their new pet. The shelter sits on a city owned lot off of Browning Parkway near Animas Park and the city’s Municipal Operations Center. “We invite anyone to come down and adopt an animal and see our new facility,” said Amber Francisco, community program

coordinator at the shelter. Not only does the shelter encourage adoptions, people also may become foster parents for animals that are 8 weeks old or younger and in need of special attention. Some foster parents also might choose to care for an older animal. If interested in becoming foster parents, contact Francisco at 505.599.1098. With the opening of the new shelter, the newly hired Animal Welfare Director Stacie Voss arrived to take over shelter operations. She stated an appreciation for the Farmington’s new state-of-the-art facility. “It is a beautiful building. The design is aesthetically

very pleasing and a great open place for us to work in.” Voss came to Farmington from a four-year career with the Nebraska Humane Society in Omaha, Neb., where she was the director of veterinary services. Her career allowed her to become acquainted with various shelter tasks such as adoptions, rescue, and maintaining the facility. “There was no job description big enough to describe what I was doing. I love the shelter work,” she said. Her plans for Farmington include hiring a new veterinarian and working toward the opening of a low-cost spay neuter clinic within the new shelter. “We are planning on hir-

ing a shelter vet. The (job position) just closed last week so now we are looking at the applicants,” Voss said. At a Dec. 10 city council meeting, City Manager Rob Mayes said there are four finalists for the veterinarian position at the shelter. “They will be interviewed on Jan. 6, assuming we are able to hire one of those out of that process.” The shelter veterinarian is expected to be hired by late January, said Mayes, adding then the “right protocols” would be set up. The shelter also will include a crematorium, which the old shelter did not have. “It will be for animals that unfortunately had to be euthanized or were hit by a car,” Francisco explained. The crematorium is expected to be installed

at the new shelter early next year. With the new shelter opening, Voss said she has several long-term goals to keep the facility efficient and customer-friendly. “I want us to get to the point where we are capable of taking good care of the animals. They are the number one priority. This building provides such a good basis for that and the longterm goal is to (increase) adoptions. I hope with the new building, people will want to visit.” There will be opportunities for people to volun-

teer at the shelter and take the dogs on walks along the river. “We have always done volunteering but it has been a longer process, this will be a one day waiver for volunteers to walk the dogs,” Francisco said. Educational classes at the new shelter also will be available to anyone who has questions about their pets or wishes to adopt an animal. The shelter’s regular business hours are from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and it is located at 133 Browning Parkway.

Aztec Christmas Festival

Festivities start at 3:30 p.m. today on Main Avenue The city of Aztec is be hosting Santa Claus during its annual Christmas Festival. Scheduled for Friday, Dec. 13, Santa will lead the town’s popular Main Avenue light parade and will be on hand for all the boys and girls later that evening at the town’s holiday events. “Christmas in Aztec is always a very, very special time of the year,” Aztec City Manager Joshua Ray said. “Santa will

be riding the Big Red Fire Truck, hot chocolate will be flowing, and lots more will happen afterward at the Aztec Family Center. It’s all free, and it’s going to be fabulous.” Aztec’s Christmas Parade starts at 6 p.m. on Main Avenue. Float entry is free; groups, businesses and individuals are asked to sign up at the Aztec Visitor Center or call 505.334.9551. This year’s

event title is “A Few of Our Favorite Things!” In addition, the event will include: • Christmas Carnival at the Aztec Boys & Girls Club, 311 S. Ash Ave., from 3:30-5 p.m. Event includes free games, prizes and holiday fun. FREE. • Aztec Library Xmas Fest, 319 S. Ash Ave., from 6 to 8 p.m. There will be crafts to make, stories to read, fingers

to print (by the Aztec Police department), drawings for prizes, refreshments and entertainment. Santa also will be there to bring joy to all the good boys and girls. FREE. • San Juan College East Fest, 315 S. Ash Ave., from 7 to 7:45 p.m. Event will include a concert by Chokecherry Jam performing its special blend of bluegrass music, and free hot cocoa and holiday cookies.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

doctor immediate help and a prescription for antibiotics,” Fortner said, so they might just use the ER or urgent care. Long stated that a visit to the emergency room costs an employee $250, and there was one employee who visited the emergency room 27 times in one year. In the past year, there were 335 employee visits to the emergency room, with only nine of those ended up being admitted to the hospital. “There are people that are using their everyday cold and flu symptom to go to the ER,” County CEO Kim Carpenter said, adding this program is meant to open up access for people who don’t want to go to the ER, but can log onto

their computer, tell the doctor their symptoms and have a prescription waiting for them at the pharmacy the next morning. Open up some access for people who don’t want to pay the $250 at the ER, but could have prescriptions the next morning, for something they called about in the middle of the night. Carpenter began investigating Stat Doctor as a program that could be implemented at the San Juan County Detention Center to help reduce the cost of inmate medical care. “We think we can significantly cut down on medical expenses with the use of Stat Doctor,” he said. The county will have to send the prospect to a Request For Proposal, opening

it up to other doctors in the area, before awarding the contract. Fortner asked if the Stat Doctor service would replace any existing services in the employee medical plan. Long said it would not. It is in place to enhance the plan. Carpenter added that it

democrats a member of the committee, who was elected to the position in April. “Outcomes are really important. I designed education curriculum, and if it is designed, it will be a better outcome,” Scarborough said. She mentioned that in Southern New Mexico, there is a saying “Carpe mañana,” which means “We are going to design tomorrow today.” “What this Saturday’s meeting is allowing is San Juan County to be a part of that design – what we believe in; what are our issues,” she said. Democrats who have announced their intent to run for office in the 2014 elections will be at the event and all registered Democrats living in Congressional District 3 are invited to attend. Scarborough stated this event also will recognize the fact that Sunday, Dec. 15, is Bill of Rights Day. “This

election Dec. 3 to cast their ballot in the special election, which cost the county $50,000. Those voters opted for the option with 458 votes in favor of beer and wine sales and 311 against. The last time this issue went before the voters in the 1970s, it was turned down by voters, who wanted the unincorporated areas of San Juan County to remain “dry,” according to County Operations Officer Mike Stark. This time the local restaurants won out and Fisheads’ owner Chris Taylor

will be allowed to apply for a “beer and wine” liquor license from the county. “Economically, this is important. It is difficult to make money just by selling food and no alcohol,” Taylor said. Under the option, restaurants must operate a full kitchen; have a dining area and a wait staff to qualify for the county-issued license, according to the Regulations and Licensing Department. The restaurant also must be able to show that 60 percent of sales come from food.

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back vegetation,” Sims said, adding people don’t necessarily want the city to come in and cut down their trees. This problem, however, was addressed, and power was restored to the community. Fischer thanked Sims and his electric utility crews for braving the cold and restoring the electric system.

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county has always had a Bill of Rights celebration. … We believe these are rights that require work,” she said, adding that sacrifices were made for the Bill of Rights, and part of the process was the public assembly. Speaking publicly about a party’s belief system and developing that platform is an example of public assembly. Some of the issues expected to be addressed include oil and gas development and sustainable energy; the environment; and increasing the minimum wage. “We will take input and we will listen,” Scarborough said. The party even will provide Spanish and Navajo interpreters at the event. “We want involvement and we want people to pay attention.” For more information call, 505.402.9818.

“God Bless America”

power investigated and found it was caused by a large pine tree on Diamond Street. The electric line went through the tree, which had been covered in snow and ice during the weekend storm. The line then went out, so the tree had to be trimmed by city crews. “There have been problems with trimming

county be provided with a report from the company regarding use by county employees. Fortner stated that he would like the reports to come in every 90 days. The Commission voted to approve the contract with Commissioner GloJean Todacheene voting against the proposal.

also should not be considered to be competing with local doctors. “I don’t want – by no means – to have any local doctor feel that we are circumventing the need to go to their local physician,” he said. County Commissioner Keith Johns moved to approve the contract with Stat Doctor, and asked that the

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

T V{|Äx Parade has great turnout despite cold temps The Farmington Chamber of Commerce Annual

Christmas Parade was Thursday Dec. 6. The winners

include: Commercial Float First Place – City of Farmington Second Place – Automation X Third Place – Alpine Lumber Fourth Place – Brady Trucking Fifth Place – Farmington Fire Equipment Non-Profit Float First Place – Apache Elementary

Second Place – San Juan College Third Place – Farmington Electric Utility Fourth Place – Shiprock High School Marching Band Fifth Place – Tse’ BitA Middle School Band Winners may pick up their ribbons at the Farmington Chamber of Commerce office, 100 Broadway, from 9-4 Monday through Friday.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

Reindeer Romp, North Pole Stroll

City hosts Christmas 5K race, 2-mile walk The department of Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Affairs, along with the Farmington Downtown Association, will host the Reindeer Romp and North Pole Stroll at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 21 in Historic Downtown Farmington.

The Reindeer Romp will be a 5K race and the North Pole Stroll will be a 2-mile walk – both will start and finish at Orchard Park in Downtown Farmington. The last day to enter the race and walk is 10 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 17. Registration is underway

now at the Farmington Recreation Center as well as online at www.fmtn.org/prca. Look for the registration link under the Quick Links tab on the right. Registration costs $15 and includes an event T-shirt. Late registration will be available on Wednesday, December

18, and Thursday, Dec. 19, for an additional $10. Bring the whole family and join us for some holiday cheer. Participate in events starting at 3:30 p.m. These will include the run, walk, live holiday music, children’s winter carnival games,

hot chocolate, hot apple cider, holiday cookies, award presentations, and a chance to see Santa! For more information on the Reindeer Romp and North Pole Stroll, contact the Farmington Recreation Center at 505.599.1184.

Applications available Extension service will offer NMSU Master Gardener classes The San Juan County Extension Service will offer 40 hours of intensive training in horticulture in exchange for 40 hours of volunteer time teaching and helping others about gardening. There will be a $100 fee for materials. Once the 40 hours of volunteer time have been submitted, a $25 reimbursement will be issued to each participant. The training will begin from 8 a.m. to noon on Friday, Jan. 24, 2014, and will continue each Friday until April 4, 2014.

Most classes will be held at the San Juan County Fire Operations Center (next door to the Extension Office), 209 S. Oliver Drive in Aztec. Topics will include botany, insect identification, xeriscape, ornamentals, trees, vegetables, soils, plant diseases, and weed identification and management. These sessions will be taught by a variety of specialists from the San Juan County Cooperative Extension Service, New Mexico State University and local industry experts.

trends in bird populaprca tracks and tions. Beginners and expeBirders unite! If you love birds, and want to be a part of something big, meet at the Riverside Nature Center in Animas Park off Browning Parkway from 8 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 14. The Nature Center will be part of the annual Audubon Christmas Bird Count, a nationwide project and a great opportunity for volunteers to aid in scientific research which has been carried out for over 100 years. Spend part or all of the day with other birders counting all the birds, common or rare, abundant or scarce, in their wintering grounds here. The statistics are used nationwide to follow changes

rienced birders are all able to help. On Monday, Dec. 16, if you are an experienced birder, you can also take part in the Chaco Canyon Christmas Bird Count, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Join volunteers from the Four Corners Bird Club and t h e Riverside Nat u r e Center in making a winter census of the birds at Chaco Canyon National Monument. Participants should be able to hike in backcountry areas in winter weather. Meet in the Riverside Nature Center at 7 a.m. to carpool. To take part, call 505.599.1422. Program: City of Farmington 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Salmon Ruins Noon. – Book Buzz: Guest: Aaron Boggs, Farmington Public Library Computer Support Supervisor

MONDAY – DEC. 16 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Age of Champions Film 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Las Posadas 7:55 a.m.: Monday Reboot: Tech News

KNMI Vertical Radio 88.9 FM Farmington ● 90.5 FM Durango, CO 90.9 FM Pagosa Springs, CO ● 100.9 FM Cortez, CO www.VerticalRadio.org

TUESDAY – DEC. 17 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Attorney Eric Morrow 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Abo Pass Railroad 7:55 a.m.: Adopt-A-Pet Tuesday

MONDAY – FRIDAY 5 a.m. – 5:30 a.m.: Focus on the Family 5:30 – 6 a.m.: Adventures in Odyssey 6 – 9:30 a.m.: "The Morning Show" with Emmet & Leah 9:30 – 10 a.m.: "Four Corners Spotlight" with Jim Baker Dec. 16: Counseling Center– Bill and Linda Eubank Dec. 17: Adopt a Child – Patricia Hall Dec. 18: Farmington Animal Shelter – Stacie Voss, Animal Welfare Dir. Dec. 19: Grace Place – Wendy Curtin Dec. 20: Pro-Relationships – Mike Hattabaugh 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.: "The Lunch Crunch" with Leah 3 – 8 p.m.: "The Drive" with Donnie SATURDAY Noon – 2 p.m.: The Weekend 22 10 p.m. – midnight: The Hype SUNDAY 5 a.m. – 6 a.m.: Focus on the Family's Weekend Magazine 10 a.m. – noon: The Weekend 22

WEDNESDAY – DEC. 18 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Farmington Police Dept. 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: New Buffalo Center 7:30 a.m.: Living Nativity at Navajo Ministries 7:55 a.m.: San Juan Smart Talk THURSDAY – DEC. 19 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning: San Juan County 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Navajo Nativity 7:55 a.m.: Save-A-Buck Thursday: Weekly economic & investing news Noon: A Review Too Far: local movie reviews FRIDAY – DEC. 20 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning

Jammin’ Jingle Bells Join the Recreation Center, Aquatic Center, and Sycamore Park Community Center as we celebrate the holidays at the very first Jingle Bell Jamboree! Come to the Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road, from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Dec. 14, to visit Santa and tell him what you want for Christmas! We will have a special holiday craft you can make, games you can play, and wonderful holiday goodies to eat. For more information call the Recreation Center at

You may pick up an application or contact us for additional information at the San Juan County Extension Office, 213A S. Oliver Drive in Aztec, or call 505.334.9496. The class will be limited to 35 applicants. Applications and fee are due on or before 5 p.m. on Jan.10, 2014. The first 35 completed applications will be accepted and participants will be notified by January 13, 2014. 505.599.1184, the Aquatic Center at 505.599.1167, or Sycamore Park Community Center at 505.566.2480 or go to www.fmtn.org/prca. Santa Paws is coming to town On Saturday, Dec. 14, from 1 to 4 p.m., come to the new Farmington Regional Animal Shelter, 133 Browning Parkway, and have a 4 x 6 photo of your dog (or dogs) taken with Santa. The photo will be printed while you wait. All proceeds will benefit the new Animal Shelter. The cost is $10 per

Five additional participants will be placed on a waiting list. All fees will be fully refunded for applications delivered once the class limit has been reached. New Mexico State University is an equal opportunity employer. All programs are available to everyone regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. New Mexico State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.

photo, or only $8 per photo with adoption paper proving your dog came from the Farmington Animal Shelter. For more information call 505.599.1098 or go online at www.fmtn.org/animalservices. See stars and more! Celebrate the winter skies and learn about our universe at the Farmington Museum’s first Astronomy Night, from 5 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 1 4, at 3041 E. Main St. There will be star legends from many cultures featured in the Stardome planetarium,

and a chance to observe the sky through a telescope on the terrace, weather permitting of course. Join us for many fun stations set up throughout the Farmington Museum such as Spectroscopes, survival in a vacuum-Peeps in Peril!, What is a Serving Size-Space Food, Pop Rockets, measuring hand strength with our Vernier Probes, and much, much more. This event is free, so pack up the family and get to the Farmington Museum!! For more information call 505.599.1174 or go online at www.fmtn.org/museums.

HEAD START/EARLY HEAD START NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS! We offer High Quality Programs which are available at no cost for children 6 weeks -5 years old in the Farmington, Aztec Bloomfield, and Kirtland areas Children with special needs or in foster care are welcome Services offered include: • Quality Early Childhood Education • Developmental,Vision, and Hearing Screenings • Community Referrals and Resources • Parent Involvement • Nutritious Meals • Safe, Licensed Facilities and ...much more!

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A11

Friday, December 13, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Winter care tips for your pet

Winter, holidays create specific pet dangers Winter care is always a relevant and timely subject this time of year, as more companion pets face winter and holiday exposures both indoors and outdoors. If review of these tips to keep pets safe and healthy saves even one life, then it is worth it. Weather As far as weather is concerned, keep cats indoors and shorten exercise walks for dogs when the temperature fall. Safe outdoor temperatures for pets vary by breed and size. Ask your veterinarian for a specific recommendation for your pet. If your pet must be outside at all, provide adequate shelter. A doghouse should be no more than three times the dog’s size. The door should face away from the wind – usually south. Avoid blankets and straw – they can harbor fleas. Instead, use cedar shavings for bedding. Provide similar shelter or access to a building for outdoor cats. Never allow your dog to walk on a lake or pond that looks frozen. The appearance of ice can be deceiving and pets can fall through and drown. Rock salt, used to melt snow and ice, can irri-

PAWSITIVELY PETS Darren Woodson DVM tate paw pads. Clean your pet’s pads thoroughly after a trip outside. Uneven, icy surfaces can slash dogs’ paw pads, so keep your dog on a leash or dress him in canine booties. Also, without hard surfaces to act as a natural file, dogs’ toenails grown longer in winter, so regularly clip your pet’s nails. Parasite prevention Continue using monthly flea, tick, and heartworm preventives. Pets should take these preventives year-round. Remember, it’s often easier and cheaper to prevent parasites than to treat them when a pet is infested or infected. Garage and products When the weather cools, cats like to sleep near a warm car engine, curling up on or under the hood. So be sure you know where your cat is and honk the horn before starting your

car. Antifreeze can be lethal; it tastes sweet to pets and contains ethylene glycol, a toxic agent. It only takes a few teaspoons of antifreeze to kill a dog. Contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has consumed antifreeze. Dogs also like to eat certain fertilizers such as bone meal or blood meal. Keep bags tightly sealed and use products according to label instructions. Grub or snail killers – especially those that include metaldehyde – can be harmful to pets. Avoid them if possible. Yard insecticides that contain organophosphates or carbamates can be very dangerous if ingested in high concentrations. Keep rodenticides away from pets. Keep in mind that rodents can transfer the toxins to accessible locations. Certain rodenticide products do not have treatment anti-

dotes. Check products to learn their ingredients and possible toxicity to pets. Diet and water Like people, outdoor pets can burn more calories in the winter. However, most indoor pets need their diet adjusted – feed less if less active. Your veterinarian can help you determine whether your pet’s diet is adequate and balanced. To prevent dehydration, be sure your pet’s water supply doesn’t freeze. And use a non-metal water dish to keep your pet’s tongue from sticking to the bowl. Candy, especially chocolate, can make pets sick. A stomachache is the milder side effect, but chocolate poisoning – caused by theobromine, a compound found naturally in chocolate and related to caffeine – can affect the heart or be fatal. Know what foods are poisonous to your pet. Watch out for sugar-free chewing gum with xylitol, raisins, grapes, macadamia nuts, onions, garlic, unbaked yeast bread dough, fatty foods, and chocolate. Keep garbage cans behind closed doors. Bathroom In the bathroom, keep medications safely locked

up in secure cupboards – don’t leave them on countertops or tables or store them in plastic zippered baggies, which are easily chewed through. This includes inhalers, dietary aids, and nutraceuticals. Never medicate your pets with human products without first contacting your veterinarian. Always check the container before giving medication to your pet to make sure it’s the correct medication, and store your own medications separately from your pets. Pet Poison Helpline (800.213.6680) receives many calls from people who accidentally gave their own medication to a pet. Be sure to keep cleaning products away from your pet too. Shut them out of the room while spraying bathroom cleansers or other products. Close toilet lids to prevent pets form drinking the water. Holidays For the holidays, if you have a tree-climbing cat or a large dog, consider securing your holiday tree by anchoring the top of the tree to a wall. Make sure any presents accessible to pets are securely wrapped, and don’t use ribbons.

Check the ground around holiday trees frequently. Ingested pine needles can puncture pets’ intestines. Keep all tree ornaments, yarn, ribbon, and garlands well out of pets’ reach by hanging them high on the tree, and do not use tinsel. Keep lit candles out of pets reach. Holly, mistletoe, and poinsettia plants are poisonous when consumed. Enjoy their beauty while keeping pets safe by placing them well out of pets’ reach. Puppies and kittens like to chew, so keep electrical cords out of reach. When entertaining, be sure guests know these and other household rules that help keep your pet safe. Please, please don’t give table foods to your pets. About 90 percent of all vomiting and diarrhea cases are due to “dietary indiscretion.” That means feeding or getting into something other than regular dog or cat food. This is 100 percent preventable! It is hoped that you will heed these tips and have a safe holiday season. As always, your family veterinarian is your best source for questions or issues!

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

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Friday, December 13, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Bringing a Media Revolution to Life!

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MM SPORTS

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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

FHS Scorps win state title RICK’S PICKS

Rick Hoerner For the first time in more than 60 years the Farmington Scorpions claim the state championship in football with at 7-0 win over No. 1 Roswell Goddard. The Scorpions used a stingy defense and a solid running game all year to claim the first title of the year for the District. Last Week… Football Football is in the books for the year with a perfect ending for the Farmington Scorpions winning the 4A state championship 7-0 over Goddard. The blue trophy now rests in San Juan County for the second time in the last three years. Basketball Basketball tournaments abound in the non-district season and the local teams are all playing in one tournament or another over

the next couple of weeks. The Shiprock Girls’ team dominated their own tournament, whipping Farmington, Ignacio and Cortez. Farmington Girls go 2-1 with wins over Ignacio and Cortez and completed their week with another win over Cortez. Piedra Vista girls went 21 at the Santa Fe Indian Tournament with victories over Thoreau and Santa Fe Indian and a loss to preseason No. 2 Santa Fe, who they host on Monday. Kirtland Central Girls’ basketball goes 1-2 at the Gallup Tournament, knocking off Wingate and losing to Cleveland and St. Pius. Outside of the tournament schedules, Bloomfield Girls go 0-2 on the week losing to Crownpoint and Bayfield. Piedra Vista knocked off Cleveland 54-

THE FANTASY GEEK Rick Hoerner

For yours truly, it was a good week to be on a bye in the playoffs. In my two QBs I have both the Lions Matthew Stafford and Philadelphia’s Nick Foles. The weather obviously would have cost me in the playoffs and put an end to my season. Fortunately, a top seed and a bye saved my season. As the weather continues to be a factor, snow and wind becomes just as important as matchups. Each week the Fantasy Geek will give you some unsolicited advice on playing NFL Fantasy Football. Realizing that the Thursday night game is already over, players from Thursday’s game will not be in consideration, and since most leagues let you change players that haven’t played yet, every other squad is fair game. Each week we’ll look at the players that led to victory or disaster in Love Them and Loathe Them followed by a section on Studs and Duds, who you may look at starting and sitting this

week. Finally, there will be a quick section on pickups on the waiver wire for some players that may be available in your league. Last Week with The Geek… Week No, 14 Record – 7-0, 100 No. Overall Record – 96-41, 70 No. Love Them … Broncos QB Peyton Manning– 397 Yards, 4 TDs Bears QB Josh McCown - 348 Yards, 5 TDs, 16 Yards Rushing & now headed to the bench? Eagles RB LeSean McCoy – 221 Total Yards, 1 Catches, 2 TDs Patriots RB Shane Vereen –175 Total Yards, TD, 7 Catches Browns WR Josh Gordon, Yet Again – 7 Catches, 151 Yards, TD Saints WR Marques Colston – Finally breaks out with 9 Catches, 125 Yards, 2 TDs Dolphins TE Charles Clay – 7 Catches 97 Yards, 2 TDs Browns TE Jordan Cameron – 9 Catches, 121 Yards, 2 TDs Chiefs DST – 6 Sacks, Int., Fumble Recovery, 10 Points Allowed, 2 TDs Loathe Them… Lions QB Matthew Stafford – 148 Yards, Fumble in the snow Seahawks QB Russell Wilson – 199 Yards, TD, Int. Washington RB Alfred Morris – 31 Total Yards Dolphins RB Lamar Miller – 33 Total Yards, 2 Catches Ravens WR Torrey smith– 1 catches, 11 Yards, 2 Pt Colts WR T.Y. Hilton – 2 Catches, 7 Yards, Cowboys TE Jason Witen – 1

* geek A15

37 and Kirtland Central fell to Grants 42-35 In boys’ basketball, Kirtland Central went 2-1 in their own tournament beating Whitehorse and Mesilla Valley before falling to Ignacio 57-52. Bloomfield beat Whitehorse after los-

ing to tournament champion, Ignacio. Farmington and Piedra Vista both went 1-1 over this weekend’s home stand against Moriarty and Albuquerque Academy, with PV knocking off Moriarty and falling to Academy while Farm-

ington lost to the Pintos and then came back Saturday to beat the Chargers. The Aztec Tigers go 1-2 at the Santa Fe Indian Tournament in three close games knocking off McCurdy by 1 before losing a 4-point game to Tularosa

and another 1-point game to Santa Fe Indian. On Monday, Bloomfield knocked off Navajo Prep 67-58 and on Tuesday Shiprock defeated Aztec 69-58 and Mancos beat

* Hoerner A15

UNM men’s basketball

Cameron Bairstow is team’s most improved player I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, University of New Mexico senior Cameron Bairstow is one of the most improved players I’ve seen come through the basketball program. When he signed with UNM from Australia, the Lobos had no idea what they were getting. He averaged two points his freshman year, three points a game his sophomore season, 9.7 last year and this season he’s averaging 20

Cameron Bairstow

THIS WEEK IN SPORTS JP Murrieta points a game. “Four years ago he was a scrawny little 6’8” kid, now he’s a man,” said head coach Craig Neal. “He does everything to get better. If I told him he would play better if he ate dog food, he would eat dog food. He

is going to do whatever it takes to get better.” Bairstow regularly works out, lifting weights immediately following a home game. “You’re still pretty amped up on adrenaline, so you might as well take advan-

tage of it,” explained Bairstow of his post-game workout. Bairstow’s hard work resulted in a conference honor this week. Bairstow was named the Mountain West Conference Men’s Basketball Co-Player of the Week. He shares the honor with San Jose State’s Jalen James. Bairstow averaged 22 points and 10 rebounds in a pair of wins last week. The senior scored 24 points and grabbed a career-high 13 rebounds in a win over Cincinnati on Saturday. Earlier in the week, Bairstow totaled 20 points and 8 rebounds in a win over New Mexico State. Neal calls Bairstow the best power forward in the country. “He’s got great finishes and can put it on the floor,” said Neal. “He’s blocking shots and helping Alex (Kirk). He does all the little things all the time.” Bairstow picked a good time last weekend to have another huge game. Not only was it his 23rd birthday, the senior performed for a special audience. Bairstow’s parents made

* Murrieta A15

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Friday, December 13, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Hoerner Navajo Prep 66-64. On the mats this week Piedra Vista finished second in the Rio Rancho Southwest Shootout Duals while Kirtland Central finished 5th at Gallup Duals in the Dunes Tournament. This Week‌ Friday, Dec. 13 The Marv Sanders Webb Toyota Invitational continues with Farmington, Piedra Vista, Kirtland and Shiprock Aztec Girls’ Basketball plays at the Artesia Tournament Bloomfield Girls’ Basketball is at

the Laguna Acoma Holiday Classic Piedra Vista Girls’ Basketball at Shiprock Aztec Basketball at Navajo Prep Saturday, Dec. 14 The Marv Sanders Webb Toyota Invitational concludes Aztec Girls’ Basketball finishes up at the Artesia Tournament Bloomfield Girls’ Basketball completes the Laguna Acoma Holiday Classic Farmington and Piedra Vista Swimming at APS Mini Invite Aztec Wrestlers join Bloomfield at

the Bloomfield Invitational Kirtland Wrestlers head to the Dawg Fight Invitational Kirtland Central Girls host Navajo Prep Monday, Dec. 16 Piedra Vista Girls Basketball hosts Santa Fe Tuesday, Dec. 17 Piedra Vista Basketball hosts Shiprock Farmington travels to Durango Aztec Girls’ Basketball hosts Moriarty Kirtland Central Girls’ Basketball heads to Navajo Prep

Kirtland Central Basketball travels to Miyamura Bloomfield Girls’ basketball hosts Ignacio Thursday, Dec. 19 Piedra Vista Girls’ Basketball hosts Bloomfield Lady Scorpion Webb Invitational begins with Shiprock, and Kirtland Central Aztec, Bloomfield and Shiprock Basketball plays at the Shiprock Round Robin Aztec Girls’ Basketball travels to Moriarty

Sports on Fox Sports New Mexico AM 1340 & 93.9 FM NFL Football: New England Patriots vs. Miami Dolphins Sunday at 11 a.m. NFL Football: New York Jets vs. Carolina Panthers Sunday at 2 p.m. First Sports with Steve Bortstein weekday mornings form 7 to 10 a.m. The Fast Track sponsored by SunRay Park and Casino Saturday and Sunday at 9 a.m.

Murrieta the trip to the Pit to watch their son play, in person, for the first time since he arrived at UNM. Hugh ’da man! University of New Mexico men’s basketball coach Craig Neal admits Hugh Greenwood should not have played Saturday against Cincinnati. Greenwood suffered a hand injury earlier in the week against New Mexico State. “It was a gametime decision and probably shouldn’t have played,� said Neal following the win over the Bearcats. “I can’t say enough about what he does for our team and what he’s done for

our program.� Greenwood finished with 4 points on 2-of-3 shooting. The UNM athletic department says Greenwood is expected to play this Saturday against Kansas. Final Four Bound For the second time in the history of the program, the UNM men’s soccer team is headed to the Final Four. The Lobos punched their ticket last weekend after beating Washington 1-0. The Lobos have yet to give up a goal this postseason. UNM will face Notre Dame this afternoon in

Philadelphia. The NCAA semifinals will be broadcast on ESPNU. Wiggins is special UNM running back Carlos Wiggins was named the Mountain West Special Teams Player of the Year. Wiggins had three returns for touchdowns this season, tying a school record set by Terance Mathis in 1989. The sophomore from Texas is No.5 in the nation in kickoff returns with a 29.6yard average. His 1,303 kick return yards leads the NCAA. UNM punter Ben Skaer

also earned first-team AllMountain West honors. Senior running back Kase Carrier was named AllMW second team. Senior linebacker Dallas Bollema, senior center Dillon Farrell, senior left tackle Darryl Johnson, junior defensive end Brett Bowers and junior left guard LaMar Bratton all earned honorable mention. Something had to go University of New Mexico defensive coordinator/defensive backs coach Jeff Mills will not return for the 2014 football season, head coach Bob Davie announced

over the weekend. “I appreciate the contribution Jeff made to Lobo Football as we continue to rebuild this program,� Davie said. “Jeff is one of the smartest and hardest working coaches I have ever been around. I wish him well and know he will continue to have success in college football.� It was obvious Davie would make some sort of change on defense. The Lobos were one of the worst teams in the country defensively, ranking near the bottom of the NCAA stats in almost every defensive category. The Lo-

bos gave up more than 60 points in a game – twice! Three times they let opponents pass the 50-point mark. Red or Green? The matchup is set for this year’s Gildan New Mexico Bowl. Washington State will face Colorado State on Saturday, December 21 at University Stadium in Albuquerque. The Cougars are bowl eligible for the first time in a decade. This will be Colorado State’s second trip to the New Mexico Bowl. The Rams beat Fresno State in this same bowl game back in 2008.

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Catch, 10 Yards, but the TD saved the day Patriots DST – 1 Sack Studs‌ Eagles QB Nick Foles – Eagles go inside and face porous Vikings DST Falcons QB Matt Ryan – Dysfunctional Washington DST is the gift that keeps on giving Chiefs RB Jamal Charles – Chiefs’ offense is clicking and Charles gets the touches Packers RB Eddie Lacy – Cowboys DST looked non-existent last week Browns WR josh Gordon – No brainer who has been Top Two scorer three straight weeks Texans WR Andre Johnson – Only offensive weapon left. Big PPR numbers Titans TE Delanie Walker – Cardinals DST worst in NFL covering tight ends and lost safety Ty Mathieu Panthers DST – Host Jets and will recover from Monday night Duds‌ Giants QB Eli Manning – Bad year gets worse against Seahawks DST Cardinals QB Carson Palmer – Great at home. Not so much on the road Chargers RB Ryan Mathews – Chargers likely behind Means passing to Woodhead Jets RB Chris Ivory – Everyone loads the box against Jets with Geno Smith playing as he is 49ers WR Anquan Boldin – Niners will continue to try to get Michael Crabtree more involved Broncos TE Jacob Tamme – Thomas is back, but may be used in slot with Welker out Ravens DST – Lions glad to be back inside and should put up good numbers if they don’t turn it over Waiver Wire‌ Desperate to fill some injury holes? Here are a couple of possible pickups Vikings RB Toby Gerhart – Take a gamble if Peterson can’t return from injury Ravens TE Dennis Pitta – Flacco’s security blanket returns Colts WR DaRick Rogers – Rogers most targeted Colts receiver last week

Good luck this week!!

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

farmington pets of the week

We would like all of you to come in and take a look at our beautiful new facility. We have successfully transitioned to our new building, and want to thank all of those who helped with the move. We are open seven days a week, and hope everyone can stop by and take a look at our new location at 133 Browning Parkway.

The Farmington Animal Shelter Hours are Mon. - Fri. 10 a.m. to 5:30p.m.; Sat. and Sun. noon to 3p.m. Also on Sundays at PETCO from noon to 3 p.m. Adoption Prices (Dogs): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $100; 6 mo. to 6 yrs. $80; Over 6 yrs. $50 Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the dog must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) Adoption Prices (Cats): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $70; 6 mo. to a

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Mignon is an adorable little Siamese kitty who is affectionate and caring, with a wild streak in him. He has spent the last two months with a foster family and would love to find a family that will love him forever. He is rambunctious and sweet, fun, and beautiful. He also gets along great with other dogs in the house.

6 yrs $60; Over 6 yrs. $50. Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the cat must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) If you are interested in any of these animals, please give us a call at 505.599.1098. We have a large variety from which to choose, and we want to take the opportunity to thank everyone who chooses to save a life and adopt a local shelter animal.

Tasha is a shy black Lab who just needs someone that will love her forever. She would be great to take hiking, or through the trails at Berg Park, but would also be a great dog to cuddle up with by the fire. She is a loving baby girl only about 2 years old, with a lot of energy and love to give.

Polka Dot is an adorable little Chihuahua mix. She is a young gal, only about 8 months old, and is as sweet and loving as can be. Her favorite thing in the world is to give kisses, and she could sit on your lap for hours. She would be a great addition to any family.

MM REAL ESTATE

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013

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Perfect family Christmas

Located in the Shea Heights Subdivision, this 3-bedroom, 2-bath home would be the ultimate Christmas present for your growing family. The home features beautifully landscaped front and backyards, and an open kitchen / dining room combo. The tiled entryway leads you into the spacious living room, complete with a fireplace. The bright white kitchen has much cabinet space, a breakfast bar and many windows. The kitchen connects to the laundry room at one end, and the other end is the dining area and doors leading out the patio.

The three bedrooms are suitably spaced for ultimate privacy. The third bedroom is currently being used an office but could easily be transformed into a bedroom again by removing the shelving. The large master suite includes a master bath with a shower stall and walk-in closet. The backyard features great views of the mountains from the patio, is landscaped, and has a sprinkler system. There also is an attached garage and storage building and large foyer. The more than 2,600square-foot home has been pre-inspected and is waiting for you to move in. Reasonably priced at $244,900. Call Sam Todd at RE/MAX of Farmington at 505.327.4777 for a private showing and more information.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

Poinsettias say Merry Christmas

Colorful, hearty plant great as a gift or for decorating Poinsettia, the Christmas plant, is one of the most popular plants in the world, because they have become a Christmas tradition for both gift giving and decorating. In 1825 it was first brought to the United States by Joel Robert Poinsett, the first U. S. ambassador to Mexico, who collected plants from the southern Mexico landscape. With the introduction of longlasting cultivars, and numerous beautiful colors, the popularity of the poinsettia has grown considerably over the years. Poinsettias have pale green leaves, and when in bloom they display brightly colored bracts (red, pink,

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white, and many combinations in between) on the top of each stem. Commonly mistakenly for flowers these bracts are leaves, the colorful part of the poinsettia, while the true flowers are the small yellow centers of the bracts.

When choosing plants, look for poinsettias with thoroughly colored and expanded bracts, and look for plants with dense, plentiful foliage all the way to the soil line. The plant should be about 2 1/2 times larger than its pot size. Select plants with strong, stiff stems and no signs of wilting. Be wary of plants displayed in paper, plastic or mesh sleeves, for these can reduce air flow. Another common misconception is that the plant

Care for Poinsettia • Place your plant in indirect sunlight for at least 6 hours per day. • Provide room temperatures between 68 and 70 degrees F. • Water your plant thoroughly when the soil is dry beneath the surface. • Fertilize your plant after the blooming season with a balanced, all-purpose fertilizer. • Avoid cold drafts or excessive heat. • Do not expose your plant to temperatures below 50 degrees F. • Do not over-water poinsettias. is poisonous. Are poinsettias poisonous, or not? Fiction! For years poinsettias had

the bad reputation of being poisonous, so we believed it. The truth is, poinsettias

have undergone extensive testing. Government agencies, health centers, veterinary groups, and plant and flower organizations agree that poinsettias are not toxic and do not pose a health threat to children or pets. The poinsettia has been demonstrated to be a safe plant for your home. In fact, in 1992 the poinsettia was included on the list of houseplants most helpful in removing pollutants from indoor air, and is able to remove up to 87 percent of air toxins in 24 hours! Therefore, poinsettias are breathtaking and breathgiving! They’re beautiful, they’re safe, and they say Merry Christmas.

San Juan College holds Holiday Plant Sale Get your house or office ready for plants, or even check a few names off your Christmas gift list, at the annual San Juan College Horticulture Program Benefit Plant Sale. The sale will take place in the student greenhouse, located within the Outdoor Learning Center, from noon to 7 p.m. on Dec. 12 and 13, on both

days. The greenhouse is located north of the College’s Clock Tower across from the Cultural Center and athletic fields on Golden Circle on the Farmington campus. There will be a variety of indoor and multi-variety plants as well as herbs, cacti and succulents. More than 200 plants are available at or

near cost. All proceeds benefit the San Juan College Horticulture Program. A 10-percent discount is available for all educational organizations. For more information, contact the greenhouse at 505.566.3174 or find the horticulture program on Facebook by searching San Juan College Horticulture Program.

Artifacts Gallery

Art walk Local business to showcase local artists LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune Holiday shoppers are invited to the Holiday Artwalk from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Dec. 13 in downtown Farmington. Local artists and galleries will be showcasing and selling artwork during the event, providing opportunities for people to buy unique Christmas gifts. Artifacts Gallery, 302 E. Main St., will be one of the galleries involved in the Artwalk. “We made sure we added some new artists to our collection who do smaller gift items,” said Bev Taylor, Artifacts owner. The small gift items include paintings, pottery, jewelry, soap, silk scarves, cook

books, hand-painted gourd ornaments by Doug Miller, and chile products. “We always say we have gifts from $3 to $3,000, just depending on their budgets,” said Taylor, adding that she encourages the community to participate in tonight’s Artwalk and support local artists and galleries. “This is a great way to get people downtown. There is always a lot of food and it is a fun thing to walk downtown and see the stores decorated. It has become a social event.” Along with selling small gift items, Artifacts also is featuring two exhibitions titled Enchanters by oil painter Kyle Ragsdale, and Containers, which is a mixed media show that

showcases paintings, sculptures, and books. Artifacts also will feature Richard Kynast’s photography, which is “a process of platinum print over gold leaf. They are truly beautiful prints and he is a new artist to the gallery.” Artifacts holiday hours are from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

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San Juan Local First Business Members Animas Credit Union AMF Clean-Up Armstrong Coury Insurance Artifiacts Gallery AVI Insurance Bedrooms Plus Brown’s Shoe Fit Co. Budget Blinds Carpet One Floor & Home Cheney-Walters-Echols Inc. Citizens Bank Denae’s Boutique Desert Hills Dental Employee Connections Directory Plus Fish Window Cleaning Four Corners Federal Credit Union Glyphic Design and Development Integrity Dental by James Cole Kathy’s Discount Party Store KNMI Vertical Radio Live True 22, LLC Lusk Family Dentistry

Majestic Media Millenium Insurance Namaste House Next Level Audio & Video Parker’s Office Products Partners Assisted Living Services Sandia Hearing Aids San Juan Closet Works San Juan Reproduction San Juan Veterinary Hospital Si Senor Sonia Lukow CPA, LLC Spotless Solutions Sun Glass LLC. Techna Glass The Shoe Shoppe Three Rivers Brewery Ubru at Home Wal Art Gallery Silver River Adobe Inn The Vacuum Shoppe

Membership list effective 11/4/13

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Thank you for Shopping Locally! Strengthen Your Local Economy... Each dollar you spend at independent businesses returns 3 times more money to our local economy than one spent at a chain a benefit we all can bank on.

www.SanJuanLocalFirst.org San Juan Local First is a non-profit organization.

Business

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

A19

Luminaria award

New Mexico Community Foundation honors Matthew and Jeanette deKay Matthew and Jeanette deKay are the recipients of the 2013 Luminaria award from New Mexico Community Foundation. The New Mexico Community Foundation’s annual gala paid tribute to 13 outstanding individuals from throughout the state who are making a profound difference in their communities. Recipients of the prestigious Luminaria award are chosen because they “motivate, inspire, and build community strength

through their leadership and vision.” The deKays were recognized for their humanitarian work on behalf of the Four Corners Foundation’s project A Path Home. While volunteering locally in 2009, the deKays recognized an immediate need to address the growing problem of homelessness affecting the Four Corners. Together with a group of likeminded professionals, the deKay’s established the Four Corners

Foundation as a not-forprofit organization dedicated to meeting the urgent needs of our community. Located at 520 Hydro Plant Road, A Path Home is new Emergency and Transitional Housing for homeless individuals and families in San Juan County. The 13,600-square-foot facility will be able to house 74 residents — more than twice the capacity of the current shelter. The Transitional Living facility is a 12-unit apartment complex

which will house residents who continue working toward independent living. Construction is scheduled for completion in spring of 2014. The Matt deKay’s humanitarian efforts were also recognized by New Mexico’s Coalition to End Homelessness earlier this year. For more information regarding A Path Home, visit the Four Corners Foundation’s website www.fourcornersfoundation.org

Photo by Tony Bennett

The Secret of the Haunted House

Former FHS teacher publishes first book DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune A former Farmington High School teacher is breaking into publishing with the upcoming release of his first young adult novel The Secret of the Haunted House. Set in San Juan County, the story follows the adventures of two tween boys, who discover the mystery of a haunted house that is across the street from their mobile home in Wild Horse Valley. Yerby was inspired by the real-life story of a family with four children that lived in Wild Horse Valley across from a burned out house. “The family had the youngest boy convinced the house was haunted,” he said. “I thought I have to write this up as a story.” His characters Kenny and James investigate the haunted house after James sees a light on the inside of it. He wonders if it is the ghost of old lady

Hampton, who once lived there, or maybe that of the firefighter who died trying to save her. Yerby takes the youths on a mysterious trek to the house as they explore the old ruins for clues. And Kenny knows he is getting close to solving the mystery when he is captured and held hostage by a dangerous criminal. When Yerby was working on the project, which took him two years to complete, he realized the plot was moving too quickly. “I was trying to pad it, so I put in pranks and shenanigans that I did growing up with my brothers and sister, and that my dad did with us,” he said. “It developed the characters more.” He also added a Navajo neighbor, Mrs. Tsosie, who shares Navajo belief and culture with the boys. Yerby likens the book to the old Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys mysteries, which is a genre he would like to stay with as he

continues to write novels. “I’ve got three other books in the mill,” he said. “One is a rewrite of a Nancy Drew mystery. I remember reading those growing up.” His next book also features two boys, who solve a mystery in Flora Vista. Yerby based both his books on young men that he met through church. He is the parish administrator at St. John’s Episcopal Church. Prior to that he worked as a French and English teacher at Farmington High School. Yerby enjoys reading and wants to pass on his love of reading to a new generation. He also enjoys writing with his cat Smudge, who naps on his lap, while he works on his computer. The Secret of the Haunted House is published by Black Rose Writing, an independent publishing company in Castroville, Texas. The company believes in “developing personal relationships” with its au-

thors, according to its website, blackrosewriting.com. “It’s a small publisher that specializes in new writers,” said Yerby, who

found the company on the Internet. He sent out 50 query letters along with the first three chapters of the book.

He received two responses. “I was so surprised,” Yerby said. He decided to go with Black Rose Writing and his book was released in print on Dec. 12. He is expecting copies to arrive in Farmington for a Dec. 21 book signing at Hastings. Yerby will be at the bookseller from 5 to 7 p.m. Dec. 21, promoting the book. It also will be available to order if there are not enough copies to go around. Yerby added that The Secret of the Haunted House will be available as an Ebook in a few weeks for both Kindles and Nooks. He already has received good feedback from a few fifth grade students and teachers, who were given the manuscript to review, and he believes it will be a favorite among tweens looking for a good mystery read. For more information, visit Yerby’s website at jackyerbyauthor.com.

Giving a helping hand

Baby & Me raising money for family of injured boy LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune San Juan County is a giving community, which is why the Farmington store Baby & Me is raising money for local resident Amanda Montano and her family after her son, Sammy Cordova, was seriously injured in a motocross accident. On Nov. 9, Cordova, 12, was injured during a motocross race at the Aztec Motocross track. He was

airlifted to San Juan Regional Medical Center and then airlifted to University of New Mexico Medical Center in Albuquerque. Cordova suffered severe brain trauma and is in a coma. On Dec. 4, Cordova underwent surgery to install a permanent feeding tube and a tracheostomy tube because he continues to be on life support. “He is making slow progress,” Montano said during a Dec. 11 interview.

“He is not on a ventilator (during the daytime). He is breathing on his own.” Because Montano has moved to Albuquerque to be close to her son, Baby & Me is raising money for her to find a permanent home and continue to take care of her two younger children, Anthony, 11, and Maya, 1. “We would like to pay her rent for three months and give her spending money,” said Darla Whitney-

Welles, Baby & Me owner. Currently, Montano is living at the Ronald McDonald House near the UNM Medical Center. She can live in the hospital housing until Dec. 31 and then she must find a permanent place to live. Whitney-Welles said the goal is to raise $7,500, which would provide Montano money for rent and other expenses for three months. One reason why Whit-

ney- Welles would like to raise money for Montano and help her during this devastating time is because Montano worked at Baby & Me for eight years. “We are doing something for Amanda because she was our employee for so many years,” WhitneyWelles explained. “If someone has had a baby in the last 10 years, then they know Amanda. We think all the moms in Farmington will want to help her.”

Baby & Me will be accepting donations from Dec. 9 through Dec. 24 at the store location. In addition, people may mail a check to Baby & Me at 3030 E. 20th St., Farmington, NM 87402. Put AMANDA on the memo line. Donations also may be made by calling the store and providing credit card information and an address. Baby & Me’s phone number is 505.324.6555.

A20

CLASSIFIEDS

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

FURNISHED/ UTILITIES PAID

FOR SALE BY OWNER

OPEN HOUSE SUN, DEC 15TH 12 NOON TO 5 PM

Weekly/Monthly Rates Studios, 1 & 2 BR Mobile Homes Monday-Friday 9am-5pm

505-326-1617 FULL TIME NTSRHCD R@KDR onrhshnm9 DRRBN Ohod & Rtookx rddjr dwodqhdmbdc ntsrhcd r`kdr bg`lohnm sn dwsdmc ntq btrsnldq a`rd hm sgd Entq Bnqmdqr vhsg hmctrsqh`k+ `fqhbtkstq`k+ fnudqmldms`k+ `mc sqha`k dmshshdr- Aqhmf xntq rdkkhmf r`uux+ ptnshmf+ `mc ahcchmf rjhkkr sn ntq rl`kk bnlo`mx sd`l vhsg hsr ekdwhahkhsx `mc rtoonqsEhmc xntq qd`k dbnmnlhb onsdmsh`k vhsg r`k`qx+ bnllhrrhnm+ `mc admdehsrBnms`bs Qnbjx?drrbnohod-, bnl nq b`kk 4/4,214, 6457-

CHILD CARE BGHKCB@QD HM Bgqhrsh`m gnld- 5ol sn 5`l- H sd`bg rhfm k`mft`fd+ Ro`mhrg+ oqdrbgnnk+ jhmcdqf`qsdmLd`kr+ rm`bjr- @bqnrr eqnl E`qlhmfsnm Onrs Neehbd- $1 odq gntqRs`sd khbdmrdc- 4/4, 682,5713-

USED CARS 1//1 ATHBJ Bdmstqx+ entq cnnq+ btrsnlY174674- V`r $5+876+ mnv $3+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Fqd`s rbgnnk b`q- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//2 LHMH Bnnodq+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $5+880 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX36822@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

USED CARS 1//5 RBHNM WA+ ehud cnnq+ `tsnl`shbY/4/455Mnv $05+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Kn`cdc vhsg $7/// ne `cchshnm`k rsdqdn `mc su dptholdmsGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 JH@ Rodbsq`+ entq cnnq- Y325/81- V`r $7+876+ mnv $5+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//7 @UDN KR+ entq cnnq- H/888/@- V`r $5+884+ mnv $4+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BNQNKK@ KD+ $04+882 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X0036//@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 EH@S 4// svn cnnq+ GA RonqsY015268V`r $06+876+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- 'Knv lhkdr(Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 GXTMC@H Rnm`s`+ entq cnnq+ FKRY215636V`r $07+256+ mnv $05+276+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

Great horse property! #17 CR 1740 Four stalls, corral, bordering BLM. Ranch style, 3500+ square feet, four bedrooms, three baths, large kitchen with pantry, living, dining, family, sunroom, hot tub room, two car garage, & more. Three acres. Asking $369,000.

505-325-4307 USED CARS 1/01 JH@ Rnqdmsn+ 22+084 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $11+576 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G114277- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ 20+164 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G087128- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $05+876 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 SNXNS@ X`qhr+ 2/+837 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd $03+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GI/02584- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 JH@ Noshl` DW+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $1/+880 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

Nosey Nellie is looking for work. This is not the first time NN’s gone job hunting and, sadly, it prob’ly won’t be the last. NN has an awesome resumé, which she “adapted” from “friends” who “said” she could “look” at their resumés for “ideas.” NN’s current resumé lists her talents and expertise to include

“political” (that one came from Sarah Palin, who has totally reinvented herself from a political power force to a host of an outdoor television show – talk about movin’ up. . . ), “spiritual leader” (that one came from a fortune cookie that clearly stated that Confucius anointed NN as one), “business executive” (that one came from Al Gore who invented the Internet and, NN thinks, world peace), “fashion designer” (that came from an online class NN took that promised if you invested $5,000 and provided the

USED TRUCKS 1//0 ENQC E,14/ Rtodq B`a+ svn vgddk cqhud+ Onvdqrsqnjd chdrdk+ 103+350 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $6+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38/16@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 CNCFD Q`l 14// 3w3 Pt`c B`a+ Btllhmr chdrdk+ 032+165 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+8// oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38615@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 ENQC E,04/ WKS+ bqdv b`a+ kn`cdc- Oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 CNCFD Q`l 04// Pt`b b`a 3w3Y30527@V`r $06+884+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

company with your credit card and bank account information, you would become a trillionaire in five days – that didn’t quite work for NN, but less so for the company who attempted to use NN’s credit cards and take money from her account because – surprise – NN’s credit cards were maxed out and she had no money in her bank account), and “entrepreneur” (that one came from the guy who invented talking sneakers, which was prob’ly a good idea, but the talking sneakers wouldn’t stop talk-

USED TRUCKS

1//6 ENQC E,04/ 1w1+ 6/+510 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G42/50`- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//8 FLB B`mxnm Bqdv B@a+ entq vgddk cqhud- Y325574@- V`r $10+456+ mnv $08+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 ENQC E,04/ 3w3 Rtodq Bqdv+ 38+04/ lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $16+276 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GC57253- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// qdftk`q b`a 3w3+ 21+082 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07+876- Rsnbj #9 G36582@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// svn vgddk cqhud+ dwsdmcdc b`a+ 05+668 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G40276@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BGDUQNKDS 04// bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $17+130 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX20015@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BGDUQNKDS Bnknq`cn+ bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $12+888 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X07543@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ENQC E,04/ Rtodq Bqdv svn vgddk cqhud+ 47+388 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G244/2@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

SUVS/VANS

1//6 BGQXRKDQ @rodm Khlhsdc+ entq vgddk cqhud- H32734@- V`r $01+876+ mnv $7+884+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 IDDO Khadqsx+ entq vgddk cqhud+ ronqsY455/7/V`r $0/+876+ mnv $8+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//7 IDDO Vq`mfkdq W+ 3w3+ $10+541 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X36152@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/0/ BGDUQNKDS Sq`udqrd KS+ kn`cdc+ $07+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX13657@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Bnlo`rr+ 21+511 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07-876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G123680- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Khadqsx+ 40+8/7 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $05+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G468477- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ATHBJ Dmbk`ud+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $20+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX232574- GH,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ENQC Drb`od WKS+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $1/+488 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddXB27500Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M Lhq`mn+ 11+856 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $13+676 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G102406- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

ing, and they told stories about the wearer of the sneakers that weren’t exactly true, which caused some of the wearers to be hunted down by bill collectors, the mafia and Domino’s Pizza delivery people who weren’t tipped). NN has given her job search some serious thought, though, and because she always wanted to be a cheerleader in high school (NN was a little older than some of the students in her high school on accounta it took her 12 years to complete the high school requirements

MISC.

LEGALS

GNKHC@X BQ@ES E`hq ed`stqhmf g`mcl`cd bq`esr `s sgd @ysdb Rdmhnq Bnlltmhsx Bdmsdq+ 0/0 R- O`qj @udmtdCdbdladq 03sg+ 1/02+ 7`l sn 1ol- Bnld d`s `s ntq xtllx bnmbdrrhnm rs`mcIdvdkqx+ pthkshmf+ o`odq eknvdqr+ ok`rshb b`mu`r+ ankn shdr+ mn rdv ak`mjdsr+ kd`sgdq bq`esr+ bqnbgds.rdvhmf+ annjr+ onkhrgdc rsnmdr+ g`s a`mcr+ qnbj b`mckdr+ snxr+ b`mcx+ g`mc vnudm qtfr+ `mc rnes a`ax annjrEnq hmenql`shnm+ b`kk Cnmm` `s 4/4,223, 6441-

LEGALS STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN IN THE PROBATE COURT

THE FOLLOWING items located at AAA Mini-Storage; 1630 Murray Dr, 2016 Hutton Rd,.6208 E. Main, and 7231 E. Main, Farmington NM, will be sold or donated at the owners discretion by January 7, 2014 Aaron or Tracie Sawyer #33 Rd 3474 Flora Vista, NM 87415 Bobbie Crane Box 3354 Farmington, NM 87499 Rochanda Benally 2609 Southside River Rd #2 Farmington, NM 87401 Tami Gunnell #13 Rd 33200 Aztec, NM 87410 Mario Quintana 2300 West Apache St Farmington, NM 87401 Maria Charley and Shelton Begay PO Box 1528 Kirtland, NM 87417

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PHILIP D. FYKE, deceased.

Fernando Kanawite 305 N. Lorena Farmington, NM 87401

Probate No.5544

Patricia Fochler 404 Andrew Aztec, NM 87410

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that JASON FYKE has been appointed Personal Representative of this estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned Personal Representative at the following address: Jason Fyke Route 3, Box 3874 Roosecelt, UT 84066 or filed with the Probate Court, P.O. Box 550, Aztec, New Mexico, 87410. DATED this 29 day of November, 2013 JASON FYKE, Personal Representative Route 3, Box 3874 Roosevelt, UT 84066 Legal No.147 Dates 12/13, 12/20/2013

– whatever) but the school “officials” didn’t want a 52year-old woman in a short skirt, tube top and nontalking sneakers representing their high school at sporting events. NN really believes it was because the other cheerleaders were jealous of her ability to wear a tube top with suspenders, a short skirt accented by granny panties and sneakers with support hose. Whatever. So, NN applied for a job with the Denver Bronco cheerleaders. NN is a huge Denver Broncos fan and has been her whole entire

Troy King 5596 Roberts Rd Farmington, NM 87402 Paul Linda Az Miriam Joe PO Box 2844 Shiprock, NM 87420 Legal No.146 Dates 12/13, 12/20/2013

The United States Department of Commerce has designated approximately 30 houses across the country as authentic haunted houses.

During the entire presidency of Bill Clinton, he sent two emails.

livelong life and knows she’d be cute in those little outfits. And she can cheer – she sent an audition “tape” that showed her doing her cheerleading routine that included jumps, pompom tossing, smiling at the cameras and doing her best “Rah, rah, ree, tackle ’em in the knee, rah, rah, rass, tackle ’em in the ’nother knee” cheer and putting her foot out to trip opponents who attempt to make a touchdown, then pretending like she didn’t mean to do it.

* Nellie A21

A21

Friday, December 13, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Christmas Jubilee

Bar D Wranglers return to Fort Lewis on Dec. 19 The Bar D Wranglers’ popular Christmas Jubilee returns for the holidays, as Durango’s much-beloved cowboy crooners come off the Bar D and take the stage at the Community Concert Hall at Fort Lewis College on Thursday, Dec. 19, at 7 p.m. Limited tickets remain. The Bar D Wranglers weave together traditional holiday and Western music, cowboy poetry, tall tales and humor. The Christmas Jubilee is a warm-hearted and fun-filled show that inspires the entire family to embrace the true meaning of the holidays. Founded in 1969 in the Animas Valley by Cy Scarborough, the Bar D Chuckwagon and its resident per-

formers, the Wranglers, entertained some 18,000 people in the inaugural year. The attraction grew each subsequent season, both in acreage and visitors, which hit nearly 70,000 in the years before the Missionary Ridge wildfire of summer 2002. In addition to devastating the regional tourism economy, the fire literally lapped at the doorstep of the Bar D. With concerted effort, firefighters saved the venerable entertainment venue. In gratitude, the Wranglers give back to those brave individuals with spirited performances whenever asked. The Wranglers now continue to perform to capacity crowds each summer. The Wranglers are Gary

Cook (guitar), Richard Lee Cody (guitar) Matt Palmer (fiddle) and Joel Racheff (upright bass). For the Christmas Jubilee at the Concert Hall, the now retired Scarborough will make

a special appearance. Nationally known, The Bar D Wranglers have enjoyed performances at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tenn., broadcast on the Grand Ole Opry –

“weight,� and “low center of gravity� – she would make a good “wide� receiver for the New York Giants, who, PM said, could use all the help they can get. NN isn’t real sure she wants to play for the Giants, but if Perfect Peyton thinks she should, she’ll have her people call the Giant’s people and see if they can work out a

deal. NN needs weekends, off, though, on accounta her parole officer has her doing community service on weekends. Whatever. The reason NN is looking for a new “career path� is that next week is her last column for the Tri-City Tribune. NN isn’t very happy about that, because she has enjoyed working with the

nice people at the TCT and the “big money� she was paid. NN and Cindy Cowan Thiele and Suzanne Thurman have known each other for, like, 30 years and NN will miss the almost daily visits she had with both of ’em. (NN isn’t sure that CCT or ST enjoyed the almost daily visits as much as NN did, or the gazillion “suggestions for improvement� NN offered up. NN has considered going into the publishing/writing/editing business herownself because she has such amazing ideas of how to publish/write/edit and she did take a 30-minute class on how to p/w/e one time, so she is certainly qualified. Just sayin’. . . .). However, as in most fun things NN has done her life, the good things always come to an end. Usually, those “ends� were enforced by law enforcement people, but NN will miss the nice people at the TCT and the even more nice people who enjoyed (’K, at least read!) NN’s column. So, next week, NN is turning the column over to you, the readers. If you have a Christmas greeting you’d

television and radio. They are also regular performers at the annual Chuckwagons of the West Jamboree. Tickets for the Bar D Wranglers – $18/$28 – are available by calling 970.247.7657, on the Web a t www.durangoconcerts.com, or visit the ticket office inside the Welcome Center at 8th Street and Main Avenue in Downtown Durango. Showtime is 7 p.m., with doors to the Concert Hall and concessions, serving beer, wine and non-alcoholic beverages and snacks, opening at 6 p.m. On show day, the box office at the Concert Hall will be open one hour prior to curtain, and remain

open through intermission. Purchase tickets to three or more Concert Hall productions in one sales transaction and receive 10 percent off each ticket. Discounts cannot be combined, and all sales final. The Community Concert Hall is a not-for-profit, multi-use performance venue located on the campus of Fort Lewis College. Its ability to bring a diverse spectrum of shows to Southwest Colorado is made possible through a partnership with the college, a state-supported, independent institution of higher education, and through financial and inkind contributions from generous members of the community.

like to offer, a suggestion for world peace or who should get an Oscar or win the next Dancing with the Stars, or something you’d like to see in the column (keep it clean, please, or the newspaper police will throw NN’s rear end in jail and that will end her career with the New York Giants, even though NN would rather be a quarterback or a “tight end� or a center (!) than a wide receiver. Whatever). Please email your greetings, thoughts, suggestions, phone numbers/financial statements/medical history (if you’re an eligible man) to NN’s agent – dorothynobis@yahoo.com. NN’s agent isn’t the best in the world, but she works for free because she promised NN’s parole officer she would “look out� for NN. Whatever. NN plans on a Pity Party and those plans will be announced in next week’s column. NN needs to find out when the publisher/owner of the TCT and Majestic Media, Don Vaughan, is outta town, so she can use his house for the party, and she hasn’t yet crafted his “invitation� to be outta town yet. ’Nother people had parties this week – birthday parties. And NN hopes all of you who never, ever invited NN to your parties (those rumors that NN took the birthday presents and the leftover cake are exaggerated, just so’s ya know) feel kinda bad. If you do, you may send your credit card and bank account information to NN’s agent, who will make purchases on your behalf for NN so you don’t feel guilty. Just sayin’. . . . Celebrating BDs this week were Irene Lunneborg, Robert McCarty, Bob-Ann Frazier, Gretchen Lincoln, Denise Hunter, Mike Wagner, Jim Crowley, Mary Louise Torrez-Bermudez,

Samantha Covert, Marianne Harmon and Kyle Lincoln. These are all lovely and wonderful birthday people and NN wishes them lots more parties and celebrations. NN also congratulates the Farmington High School Scorpions for their state championship. NN would have tried out for their cheerleading squad, too, but her “talents� are more of an “adult� nature. The amazing players include Shane Goeckner, Tierney Staley, Austin Foutz, Kyle Reynolds, Champ Mendoza, Danny Fifer, Diego Elebario, Jacob Lucas, Jack Nguyen, Chayton Salcido, John Estes, Tyler Blades, Brian Farley, Matt Tucson, Daniel Simkins, Cesar Haro, Logan Welling, Jordin Jones, Glen Jones, Adrian Brown, Patrick Goff, Keenen Francis, Kyle Flowers, Jarod Charles, Deangelo Phillips, Xander Walker, Tanner Waite, Jeb Pinckley, Austin Moore, Avery Rasher, Trevor Cahoon and Isaiah Franco (the manager). Coaches include Gary Bradley (head coach who graciously provided NN with the names of everyone!), Travis Clary, Jeff Dalton, Bob Shuttleworth, Rich Wallace, Jerod Burleson, Tim Trotter, Greg Jenks, Cody Gilmore, Travis Hemmingway. Congratulations to the players and the coaches. You guys ROCK!! In other exciting news, Phydeaux Ryan, the everso-cute puppy of Jenny Lee and Brad Ryan, was honored as the Dog of the Month by Canine Castle. NN herownself was named “Dog of the Month� one time, but that was during her Mohawk hair days and when she wore only plaid short shorts, leg warmers, tie dyed shirts and talking sneakers. Anyway, congratulations to Phydeaux – give him a coupla extra dog biscuits, Jenny Lee!

Nellie NN thought she had a really good chance at becoming part of Team Bronco Cheerleaders until she got a call from the night janitor for the team who said Mr. Bolen asked him to call NN and tell her that while she wasn’t the right “fit� for the cheerleader squad, Peyton Manning saw her tape and thinks – given NN’s “size,�

Regi egis gister er No N fo Now for or Sp Sp pri ri rin ing 2014! 4!   

  

     

Cla Cl las ass ssse ses es st sta ta arrt Ja Jan anua arry ry 13! 3!

SAN JUAN SA U C COLLEGE $PPMMFHF#MWWEEt''BSN SNJOOHUPPO /.

Your Dream. Your Future. Our Focus.

A22

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

game page

New York Times Crossword Puzzle TWO HALVES IN ONE By Alan Derkazarian / Edited by Will Shortz

Across

46 Fins

1 Shot from a gun

48 Aquatic singer

4 Hummus, e.g.

49 —

7 One-named rapper with a hyphen in his name

50 Camp treats

12 C2H5OH

55 Nutritional std.

19 “Yuck!” 20 Disney deer

58 Eponym of Warsaw’s airport

21 Company named for a volcano

59 Numismatic classification

22 Ones with bouquets, maybe 23 Actress ___ Dawn Chong 24 Aught 25 Subject for the philosopher Heidegger 26 Dressed with elaborate care

53 Astronomical datum 54 20-Across, e.g.

93 “Do the Right Thing” pizzeria 94 Where the wild things are? 95 Steeply discounted product, maybe 97 Distort

10 Comfort or country follower

5

6

7

23

24

25

26

27

28

29 32

12 Seen

38

13 Revisits an earlier time

42

39

29 Plebiscites

65 Word with holy or sacred

105 Cadenza or Forte maker

30 Stands one’s ground

66 Sweats

106 Terre in the mer

33 Metal fastener

67 Met one’s potential

107 Some badges

34 Yves’s “even”

69 Old capital of Europe

108 ® accompaniers

35 Amphibious rodent

109 Not a reduction: Abbr.

36 Autobahn hazard

16

17

18

34

35

36

37

46

47

55

56

57

86

87

88

45

48

49

15 Tucked away 50

16 Prefix with smoker

28 Lots

110 South of Spain?

37 With 60-Down, carnival treat

111 Anne Bradstreet, for one

40 Stir

113 Fa-la connector

74 Basketball play

43 Parisian possessive

38 Biological ring

114 Conan’s network

75 Inexpensive reprint, maybe

51

52

53

67 71

60 65

76

83

90

93

91

94

95

97 99

85

79

82

89

84

74

78

81

62

70

73

77

61 66

69

72 75

80

54

68

32 Clothing lines

73 Firm (up)

92 96

98

100 101 102

103 104

105

106

107

108

109

110

111

112

113

114

45 — Down 1 Director with three Best Foreign Film Oscars

82 Deuteronomy contents

2 Messengers, e.g.

83 German Expressionist Otto

4 Tooth decay, to professionals

92 Name on some European stamps

15

41

44

103 Speculate, say

90 —

14

33

40

43

64 Part of E.S.L.: Abbr.

89 2005 nominee for Best Picture

13

30

31

64

84 Sin city

12 22

63

80 Less prudish

11

21

18 “Purple haze”

79 Ocean menace

10

20

99 University in Lewiston, N.Y.

78 —

9

19

63 Having macadamias or pecans, say

112 Lane in Hollywood

8

11 Badger

34 Sources of feta and ricotta cheese

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800814-5554.

4

9 End in ___

41 It might be heard when a light bulb goes on

45 “Really?”

3

59

72 YouTube posting, for short

44 Brewer ’s oven

2

58

71 51-Down unit

43 Neptune’s home

1

17 What a picker may pick

31 Unwritten reminder

42 “This I Promise You” band

505-325-7755

60 Private gatherings

30 Scorecard column

41 —

Law Firm

14 Speeds

70 Cat also known as the dwarf leopard

39 Round trip … or the subtitle of “The Hobbit”

Tucker, Burns, Yoder & Hatfield

98 1980 hard rock album that went 22x platinum … or a hint to how to cross this puzzle’s 27-Across

27 Passage from life to death

32 Wedges, e.g.

Brought to you by

3 Todd of Broadway

47 Try very hard 48 Remain undecided 49 Korean money 50 Coach with two Super Bowl championships

57 Part of P.D.A.: Abbr. 58 Jim Cramer ’s network 59 Cause of an audio squeal

5 Not going anywhere?

51 Collection of vehicles available to personnel

6 Michael or Sarah

52 Makes a choice

61 It’s caught by a stick on a field

7 Daughter on “Bewitched”

53 Look after

62 Busy as ___

54 —

65 Go pfft, with “out”

56 Three-time N.B.A. All-Star Williams

8 The Carolinas’ ___ River

60 See 37-Down

73 Atlas index listings

83 Bishop’s place

97 Goods

74 One was blown in Ellington’s band

85 Libran stone

98 Nickname for Georgia’s capital

76 Quizzes

87 Lowest bid in bridge

77 Presentation opening?

88 Buoys, e.g. 90 Mire

78 Dial-up unit

100 Oath-taking phrase

91 Support group since 1951

101 ___-high

79 European capital on the Svisloch River

86 Arp or Duchamp

80 Scale abbr.

92 Cause of weather weirdness

68 Yuri’s “peace”

81 ___ pro nobis

94 —

69 Publicize

82 —

96 Dickens villain

99 Small amount of drink

102 “Little Caesar” weapon 103 Superseded 104 Dish made from a root

thought for the week “Work for a cause, not for applause. Live your life to express, not to impress, don’t strive to make your presence noticed, just make your absence felt.”

— Author Unknown

Answers to this week’s puzzles are on page A23

A23

Friday, December 13, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

at the movies THE CHRISTMAS CANDLE Rating: PG Synopsis: From bestselling author, Max Lucado, comes The Christmas Candle, a timeless holiday film for the entire family. Deep in the heart of the English countryside lies the enchanting village of Gladbury. Legend has it every 25 years an angel visits the village candlemaker and touches a single candle. Whoever lights this candle receives a miracle on Christmas Eve. But in 1890, at the dawn of the electric age, this centuries old legend may come to an end. When David Richmond (Hans Matheson), a progressive young minister, arrives in Gladbury, the villagers discover a new formula for miracles: good deeds and acts of kindness. While David's quest to modernize Gladbury sets him at odds with the old world candlemaker, he finds an unlikely ally in the lovely skeptic, Emily Barstow (Samantha Barks). Now, the fiery candlemaker must fight to preserve the legacy of the Christmas Candle. But when the candle goes missing, the miraculous and human collide in the most astonishing Christmas the village of Gladbury has ever seen.

OUT OF THE FURNACE Rating: R Synopsis: From Scott Cooper, the critically-acclaimed writer and director of Crazy Heart, comes a gripping and gritty drama about family, fate, circumstance, and justice. Russell Baze (Christian Bale) has a rough life: he works a dead-end blue collar job at the local steel mill by day, and cares for his terminally ill father by night. When Russell's brother Rodney (Casey Affleck) returns home from serving time in Iraq, he gets lured into one of the most ruthless crime rings in the Northeast and mysteriously disappears. The police fail to crack the case, so - with nothing left to lose - Russell takes matters into his own hands, putting his life on the line to seek justice for his brother.

FROZEN Rating: PG Synopsis: Featuring the voices of Kristen Bell and Idina Menzel, "Frozen" is the coolest comedy-adventure ever to hit the big screen. When a prophecy traps a kingdom in eternal winter, Anna, a fearless optimist, teams up with extreme mountain man Kristoff and his sidekick reindeer Sven on an epic journey to find Anna's sister Elsa, the Snow Queen, and put an end to her icy spell. Encountering mystical trolls, a funny snowman named Olaf, Everest-like extremes and magic at every turn, Anna and Kristoff battle the elements in a race to save the kingdom from destruction.

HOMEFRONT Rating: R Synopsis: HOMEFRONT is an action movie about a widowed ex-DEA agent who retires to a small town for the sake of his 10-year-old daughter. The only problem is he picked the wrong town.

THE BOOK THIEF Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Based on the beloved international bestselling book, The Book Thief tells the story of an extraordinary, spirited young girl sent to live with a foster family in WWII Germany. Intrigued by the only book she brought with her, she begins collecting books as she finds them. With the help of her new parents and a secret guest under the stairs, she learns to read and creates a magical world that inspires them all.

Answers to this week’s puzzles B E R G M A N

B E A R E R S

S W E E N E Y

M O T O R P L O O B R O S A L C N B C

S H U L A

N I A I D C P O E

A T O N

D E N T A L C A R I E S

I N I D L E

B O E P N T D S O V A P E S E R K E BACK S W W A G A R A R D T E S

P T A A L B I V I N O T T H S E A E S S M F I E N M E D I D R BACK B L A M O U O O D R P A O S L S D

P E E D E E H A N G T O W N S P O I

A I N T N A I N G E W S H O R E A N O A S T U M P BACK S S D E C O C O W B O N N O N E O K M S D I T A I N L O S B A C K I N E G O S A N E

E S P I E D

T U R N S BACK

T W H O E N C L O S C A K X E S L I N K I E N S O

H A N O I T O R E E N E S E W E A G A I H A T S A L E R D L A V E A B O R C E L O R E E N O S O D O S P A N E A D E B L A C A I L L S U L T B

THE HOBBIT: DESOLATION OF SMAUG Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: The second in a trilogy of films adapting the enduringly popular masterpiece The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug continues the adventure of the title character Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) as he journeys with the Wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellan) and thirteen Dwarves, led by Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage) on an epic quest to reclaim the lost Dwarf Kingdom of Erebor.

PHILOMENA Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Based on the 2009 investigative book by BBC correspondent Martin Sixsmith, The Lost Child of Philomena Lee, PHILOMENA focuses on the efforts of Philomena Lee (Dench), mother to a boy conceived out of wedlock - something her Irish-Catholic community didn't have the highest opinion of - and given away for adoption in the United States. In following church doctrine, she was forced to sign a contract that wouldn't allow for any sort of inquiry into the son's whereabouts. After starting a family years later in England and, for the most part, moving on with her life, Lee meets Sixsmith (Coogan), a BBC reporter with whom she decides to discover her long-lost son.

MADEA’S CHRISTMAS Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Madea gets coaxed into helping a friend pay her daughter a surprise visit in the country for Christmas, but the biggest surprise is what they'll find when they arrive. As the small, rural town prepares for its annual Christmas Carnival, new secrets are revealed and old relationships are tested while Madea dishes her own brand of Christmas Spirit to all.

THE BEST MAN HOLIDAY Rating: R Synopsis: After nearly 15 years apart, Taye Diggs (television's Private Practice), Nia Long (Soul Food), Morris Chestnut (Kick-Ass 2), Harold Perrineau (Zero Dark Thirty), Terrence Howard (Hustle & Flow), Sanaa Lathan (Contagion), Monica Calhoun (Love & Basketball), Melissa De Sousa (Miss Congeniality) and Regina Hall (Scary Movie franchise) reprise their career-launching roles in The Best Man Holiday, the longawaited next chapter to the film that ushered in a new era of comedy. When the college friends finally reunite over the Christmas holidays, they will discover just how easy it is for long-forgotten rivalries and romances to be ignited. Malcolm D. Lee returns to write and direct this sequel to his directorial debut. Sean Daniel (The Mummy franchise) will produce alongside Lee for The Sean Daniel Company.

LAST VEGAS Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: The ensemble comedy follows four old friends who decide to throw a Las Vegas bachelor party for the only one of them who has remained single. LAST VEGAS is being produced by Laurence Mark (Julie & Julia, Dreamgirls) and Amy Baer. Nathan Kahane and Lawrence Grey are serving as executive producers. Good Universe's Matt Leonetti is co-producing.

HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE begins as Katniss Everdeen has returned home safe after winning the 74th Annual Hunger Games along with fellow tribute Peeta Mellark. Winning means that they must turn around and leave their family and close friends, embarking on a "Victor's Tour" of the districts. Along the way Katniss senses that a rebellion is simmering, but the Capitol is still very much in control as President Snow prepares the 75th Annual Hunger Games (The Quarter Quell) - a competition that could change Panem forever.

L S D S N O A S S T

THOR: THE DARK WORLD Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Marvel's "Thor: The Dark World" continues the big-screen adventures of Thor, the Mighty Avenger, as he battles to save Earth and all the Nine Realms from a shadowy enemy that predates the universe itself. In the aftermath of Marvel's "Thor" and "Marvel's The Avengers," Thor fights to restore order across the cosmos...but an ancient race led by the vengeful Malekith returns to plunge the universe back into darkness. Faced with an enemy that even Odin and Asgard cannot withstand, Thor must embark on his most perilous and personal journey yet, one that will reunite him with Jane Foster and force him to sacrifice everything to save us all.

M A R K E R S

Movie information and ratings are from Rotten Tomatoes. Ratings are based on 0 - 100%; each star represents a 20% rating.

Puzzles on page xxx

522 E. Broadway

How was 22 down for ya?

327-6271

“We Sell the Best and Service the Rest!”

A24

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

12/13/13-12/16/13

ALL SHOWTIMES GOOD FROM

Prices: Adult (after 6:00 pm) $8.50 | Child $6.50 | Senior $6.50 Matinee (before 6:00 pm) $6.50 | *3D Movie Surcharge $2.00

Online ticket sales available at

www.allentheatresinc.com

ALLEN 8

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available | We installed new seats!

1819 E. 20TH STREET

No Passes or Discounts PG-13 2:35 6:00 9:25 11:10 SAT & SUN

6:50 9:25 R

PG-13

PG-13

No Passes or Discounts R

2:45 6:05 9:15 11:30 SAT & SUN

3:30 6:40 9:50 12:20 SAT & SUN

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG

No Passes or Discounts PG-13 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30 11:25 SAT & SUN

PG-13

R

3D*

No Passes or Discounts 3:05 6:30 9:55 11:40 SAT & SUN

No Passes or Discounts 1:50 4:20 11:20 SAT & SUN

2:10 4:40 7:10 9:45 11:35 SAT & SUN

PG

THE CHRISTMAS CANDLE 5:00 10:00 12:00 SAT & SUN

2:15 7:15

Movie Gift Passes can be purchased at any location. Allen Theatres Gift Ticket Good for ANY movie, any time. Not good for special events. Cost: Normal adult evening price. Good for 3D film with additional cash upcharge.

Allen Theatres Discount Ticket Not good for 3D films or special events. Good for movies before 6:00 pm and nonrestricted movies after 6:00 pm for adults. Cost: Normal adult matinee price

ANIMAS 10

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13

ANIMAS VALLEY MALL 4601 East Main Street

No Passes or Discounts PG-13

PG-13

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13

No Passes or Discounts PG-13 2:20 4:40 7:00 9:20 12:00 FRI-SUN

2:55 11:25 FRI-SUN

6:20 9:45

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

2:05 4:40 7:10 9:40 11:35 FRI & SUN | NO SAT SHOW

PG-13

PG-13

PG-13 3:05 6:15 9:30 11:45 FRI - SUN

PG-13

PG-13

3D*

No Passes or Discounts 2:10 5:35 9:00 10:45 FRI - SUN PG-13

COMING SOON

2:35 5:00 7:25 9:50 12:10 FRI - SUN

3D*

No Passes or Discounts 4:15 7:40 12:50 FRI-SUN

1:45 4:30 7:15 10:05 11:00 FRI - SUN

1:35 4:05 6:35 9:05 11:05 FRI & SUN | NO SAT SHOW

No Passes or Discounts 2:00 7:20 PG-13

Online ticket sales available at

www.allentheatresinc.com

4:45 10:00 11:20 FRI - SUN

ADVANCE SHOWING TUESDAY 12/17/13

December 18

December 20

December 20

December 20

December 25

December 25

December 25

January 10

January 17

DECEMBER 13, 2013

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED • SERVING THE SAN JUAN BASIN

ART EVENT

T R I - C I T Y

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VOL. 4 NO.11

The Importance of Being Earnest KCHS Drama Club performance takes 3rd place in state theater competition JAMES PREMINGER Story and photos by District Public Relations Specialist Is it a serious drama or a light comedy? The answer is both. The Importance of being Earnest, performed by the Kirtland Central High School Drama Club Nov. 22 and 23 at the Brooks/Isham Performing Arts Center, kept the audience – not knowing how the complex plot of tangled relationships and deception would resolve – on the edge of their seats. The social satire of Oscar Wilde’s 1895 Victorian classic play, The Importance of being Earnest, A Trivial Play for Serious People, lands somewhere between Shakespeare’s comedy Much Ado About Nothing and the Marx Brothers’ film A Night at the Opera, minus the overt gags. Our ambition and our institutions are parodied. The joke is on us. The dialogue from the two male protagonists – played by KCHS sophomore actors Alex Torres as Algernon Moncreiff, and Patrick GrubbsHaskie as Mr. Jack “Earnest” Worthing – was witty, purposely full of Victorian double speak, and fast. Blink and you’ll miss a hidden joke. The two actors – who must be convincing for the plot

Patrick Grubbs-Haskie, Kara Mike, Alex Torres, and Hannah Berg as Mr. Gribsby.

Back stage interviews Kirtland Central High School actors Felicia Bahe, left, as Miss Prism; Zachary Joe, with the cane, as the Rev. Canon Chausble; Betsey Roundy, center, as Lady Bracknell; and Patrick Grubbs-Haskie, right, as Mr. Jack “Ernest” Worthing, perform Act III from The Importance of Being Earnest Nov. 8 at the Four Corners Theatre Festival at San Juan College, which drew competition from 19 high schools from across New Mexico.

to unfold – successfully anchored their roles. Torres, who had three acts of dialogue to learn, joined the cast late. “I was here two weeks before (the San Juan College Nov. 8 performance),” Torres said. “I wasn’t doing anything and I figured it was worth a try

– to try something new. I’ve never been in a theatrical performance before.” Asked what he thought the most interesting thing about the role was, Torres said, “The fact that Algernon lies but gets what

* play 2

* interviews 2

Patrick Grubbs-Haskie, Kara Mike, Sera Fuller, and Alex Torres.

We want your stories Send press releases, events and story ideas to editor@tricitytribuneusa.com fax to 505-516-1231 or mail 100 W. Apache St, Farmington, NM 87401

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KCHS drama student teacher Corey Ward: I chose the play because it was free – it’s out of rights. And we could adapt it, which was something very important to us. We could change it without having to ask the publisher if it was OK. And the last reason: It’s really acting driven. A lot of the plays have spectacle. Lights are a big part of it; movement is a big part of it. I really wanted this to be about acting. So the kids’ success is based on their ability to act and react with each other as an ensemble. I felt choosing this play would force them to grow as a group and individually, more than a piece that wasn’t so acting driven. This play fits right back when the modern plays were just starting. It was kind of right in the middle of the change. It was really critical. It’s comedic but really satirical, it’s really poignant. I’m a student teacher from Indiana University. I came out here (to the Central Consolidated School District in Kirtland, N.M.) to teach drama, and we really threw it into full gear. We didn’t hold anything back. We went to (the state theater competition) festival and we brought a oneact, which hasn’t happened for a couple years, we brought monologues, we got the school involved, we got the buyout going again, we have the play (performed at the Brooks/Isham Performing Arts Center at Kirtland Central High School). And there’s a whole drama class that is independent from this. They’re learning

Annual Christmas parade

Kate Malone

Corey Ward

Chris Overson

Photographic Society

Winners of the holiday event

Annual winter show at Farmington Civic Center

PAGE 5

PAGE 7

2

SHIPROCK

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

Christmas Jubilee

Bar D Wranglers return to Fort Lewis on Dec. 19 The Bar D Wranglers’ popular Christmas Jubilee returns for the holidays, as Durango’s muchbeloved cowboy crooners come off the Bar D and take the stage at the Community Concert Hall at Fort Lewis College on Thursday, Dec. 19, at 7 p.m. Limited tickets remain. The Bar D Wranglers weave together traditional holiday and Western music, cowboy poetry, tall tales and humor. The Christmas Jubilee is a warm-hearted and fun-filled show that inspires the entire family to embrace the true meaning of the holidays. Founded in 1969 in the Animas

Valley by Cy Scarborough, the Bar D Chuckwagon and its resident performers, the Wranglers, entertained some 18,000 people in the inaugural year. The attraction grew each subsequent season, both in acreage and visitors, which hit nearly 70,000 in the years before the Missionary Ridge wildfire of summer 2002. In addition to devastating the regional tourism economy, the fire literally lapped at the doorstep of the Bar D. With concerted effort, firefighters saved the venerable entertainment venue. In gratitude, the Wranglers give back to those brave individuals with spirited performances when-

ever asked. The Wranglers now continue to perform to capacity crowds each summer. The Wranglers are Gary Cook (guitar), Richard Lee Cody (guitar) Matt Palmer (fiddle) and Joel Racheff (upright bass). For the Christmas Jubilee at the Concert Hall, the now retired Scarborough will make a special appearance. Nationally known, The Bar D Wranglers have enjoyed performances at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tenn., broadcast on the Grand Ole Opry – television and radio. They are also regular performers at the annual Chuckwagons of the West Jamboree.

Tickets for the Bar D Wranglers – $18/$28 – are available by calling 970.247.7657, on the Web at www.durangoconcerts.com, or visit the ticket office inside the Welcome Center at 8th Street and Main Avenue in Downtown Durango. Showtime is 7 p.m., with doors to the Concert Hall and concessions, serving beer, wine and nonalcoholic beverages and snacks, opening at 6 p.m. On show day, the box office at the Concert Hall will be open one hour prior to curtain, and remain open through intermission. Purchase tickets to three or

more Concert Hall productions in one sales transaction and receive 10 percent off each ticket. Discounts cannot be combined, and all sales final. The Community Concert Hall is a not-for-profit, multi-use performance venue located on the campus of Fort Lewis College. Its ability to bring a diverse spectrum of shows to Southwest Colorado is made possible through a partnership with the college, a statesupported, independent institution of higher education, and through financial and in-kind contributions from generous members of the community.

Aztec Christmas Festival

Festivities start at 3:30 p.m. today on Main Avenue The city of Aztec is be hosting Santa Claus during its annual Christmas Festival. Scheduled for Friday, Dec. 13, Santa will lead the town’s popular Main Avenue light parade and will be on hand for all the boys and girls later that evening at the town’s holiday events. “Christmas in Aztec is always a very, very special time of the year,” Aztec City Manager Joshua Ray said. “Santa will

be riding the Big Red Fire Truck, hot chocolate will be flowing, and lots more will happen afterward at the Aztec Family Center. It’s all free, and it’s going to be fabulous.” Aztec’s Christmas Parade starts at 6 p.m. on Main Avenue. Float entry is free; groups, businesses and individuals are asked to sign up at the Aztec Visitor Center or call 505.334.9551. This year’s

event title is “A Few of Our Favorite Things!” In addition, the event will include: • Christmas Carnival at the Aztec Boys & Girls Club, 311 S. Ash Ave., from 3:30-5 p.m. Event includes free games, prizes and holiday fun. FREE. • Aztec Library Xmas Fest, 319 S. Ash Ave., from 6 to 8 p.m. There will be crafts to make, stories to read, fingers

to print (by the Aztec Police department), drawings for prizes, refreshments and entertainment. Santa also will be there to bring joy to all the good boys and girls. FREE. • San Juan College East Fest, 315 S. Ash Ave., from 7 to 7:45 p.m. Event will include a concert by Chokecherry Jam performing its special blend of bluegrass music, and free hot cocoa and holiday cookies.

play wants – he gets found out but he gets what he wants. I think it’s real interesting.”Grubbs-Haskie added, “I felt nervous, to be honest. I was slightly scared, but just kind of ignored the audience and stared into space.” He also said about working in the ensemble that “It was the most fun I’ve had in a long time. A lot of work has gone into this and I loved every moment of it.” The two female protagonists, deceived into marriage engagements by the two suitors pretending their names were Ernest in order to win their hearts, were played with equal skill by KCHS actors, sophomore Sera Fuller as Gwendolen Fairfax, and junior Kara Mike as Miss Cecily Cardew. They proved to be no less innocent than their suitors, as they based their love for them on their being named Ernest. “There were some times when we had to improvise (a line), but they did really good covering it up,” Fuller said after the first night’s performance. “Whenever somebody drops a line it’s kind of awkward for a little bit, but then we don’t stare at them accusingly. (Instead) it’s OK, hint at the next line,” she said, adding, “I like acting.” The Kirtland Central High School Drama Club took home a 3rd place

Taylor Herzer, left, Alex Torres, and Betsey Roundy perform Nov. 22.

trophy win from the Four Corners High School Theatre Festival and NMAA One Act Play Competition, held Nov. 7 through 9 at San Juan College. The win coincided with the return of KCHS to the state competition after an absence of more than two years. The cast performed the third act of the play not only at the competition, but a couple of days earlier for KCHS students who paid the $2 admission. The club raised more than $1,000 on a single performance of the third act alone. They also performed the third act free for children at the nearby Nenahnezad Community School, where Indiana University student and play director Corey Ward was a student teacher, in addition to be-

ing a student drama teacher at KCHS. “I was elated,” Ward said after the Nov. 22 production of the entire play. “This is the first time they performed the first two acts (in addition to the third). I thought they came off really well. The actors did great. The set did great. Technically they were real close, and it was really good. For a completely student-run student production that had no adults in it whatsoever, I thought it was really awesome. ... From the very beginning I had high expectations of what they could perform. “Also staring were KCHS actors’ junior Felicia Bahe as Miss Prism, junior Hannah Berg as Mr. Gribsby, sophomore Taylor Herzer as Merriman and Elaine, freshman

Zachary Joe as the Rev. Canon Chausble, and sophomore Betsey Roundy as Lady Bracknell.” I thought it would be a

stretch for me as an actor,” Berg said on playing a male character. “I had to change my whole outfit and the makeup (which included a penciled mustache and sideburns) was different.” Asked whether she felt nervous on stage, she said, “At first yeah. But then you feel like you’re performing with your family (and the audience) is the fourth wall. When I was little I wanted to tell the story. Not be an author, but to play different characters – to be something you’re not.” Kirtland Central High sophomore Austin Crawford was the sound engineer; sophomore Rebecca Vandruff was the props mistress and ropes; junior Shundeen Smith was the

stage manager and student director, and sophomore David Allred was the light board operator. An incredible 53-foot wide by 20foot high backdrop used in the second act – rented from a theater supply company in Los Angeles – added just that much more to an already first-class production. District staff on the production included Indiana University KCHS student teacher/director Corey Ward; Brooks/Isham Performing Arts Production Manager Chris Overson, who was the technical director and lighting designer; and KCHS English teacher Kate Malone. Other KCHS staff, students, and community members also contributed to the production.

interviews the same type of stuff, but in a classroom environment. There’s no requirement for them to be in a play. All this rehearsal process is outside of the class. KCHS English and drama teacher Kate Malone: We also liked this play because we knew we could bring in academics. We knew we would have to have the students sit down and identify language they didn’t know, and analyze what the characters said and decode that. It gave us a chance to take all of those things we normally do in the classroom

and take them into the real world, and have the kids apply those skills. The dialect, the old language – there’s very sophisticated vocabulary. So it allowed us to take all those Common Core standards and make them real for the kids. Brooks/Isham Performing Arts Center Production Manager Chris Overson: It’s a new group of students with new opportunities. I think they’ve really stepped up to the challenges of taking a full-blown production, taking a cutting of it, and then mounting it for com-

petition at the high school theater festival. I think they did an excellent job, and it raises the bar for the high school drama program. The students have really enjoyed working with Mr. Ward and Ms. Malone and have really stepped up. We’ve seen this great ensemble develop. All good theater is an ensemble of all the actors and the technicians. Everyone working together toward the common goal. And I’ve seen that develop with this group. And that’s a great sign for future programs.

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Bordetella

A Four Corners necessity for your pets Whether you refer to it as “kennel cough” or, more properly, “infectious tracheobronchitis,” many people are unaware of how common this illness really is. In fact, many pet owners often refuse to vaccinate their dogs for this disease. So, how can a bordetella vaccine be helpful even if your pet is never boarded? Kennel cough is a complex of viral and bacterial causes, for which we have some vaccination. The most common causes are canine adenoviruses, canine distemper virus, parainfluenza, adenovirus type 2, and a bacterial species that goes by the name of Bordetella bronchiseptica. Other viruses, such as canine herpes viruses or reoviruses are also thought to contribute to the disease and it is not uncommon to see more than the pathogen involved, including secondary bacteria. It’s a common comment heard in many veterinary hospitals – “We don’t need the kennel cough vaccination – we never board

PAWSITIVELY PETS Darren Woodson DVM or kennel our dog.” Despite the owner’s insistence that their pet isn’t at risk, most people would be surprised to find out that this disease can be found in a wide variety of places. “Kennel cough” is a communicable bronchitis in dogs that is often found anywhere dogs congregate. Naturally, boarding kennels come to mind, but quite often people will forget that grooming salons, dog parks, and pet superstores can also be potential sources of infection. Dogs that contract tracheobronchitis will produce a rough, hacking cough that many owners will describe as the pet trying to cough something up or even retch. Spasms, or coughing fits, are not uncommon and some people relate that their pets seem worse at night.

Infected dogs will spread the virus or bacteria through airborne particles where healthy dogs can inhale them. In some cases, the germs can also spread via toys or food dishes. Dogs that are exposed will generally show signs of illness within two to 14 days and may act sick for an additional two weeks. In many cases, the disease is very mild and your pup may never run a fever or act as if anything is wrong. However, this is a disease that can progress to pneumonia and be life-threatening. What’s even worse is that a pet that has recovered from this illness could potentially infect other dogs for up to two months! So that normal looking dog at the busy city dog park could, in fact, be sharing some nasty germs as he plays with his doggie pals!

Like many diseases we see in pets, proactive prevention is the key to stopping kennel cough. Most dogs will receive vaccinations against canine adenoviruses and parainfluenza when they receive their canine distemper and canine parvovirus vaccines. In addition, bordetella vaccination is available and can help limit the severity of the illness if your pet is ever exposed to this bacterium. The bordetella vaccine is considered to be a “noncore” vaccine by the American Animal Hospital Association – meaning that not all pets need this vaccination. However, the choice to vaccinate should be based on the pet’s risk factors. Personally, I feel it is a necessary core vaccine in the Four Corners area. We have a lot of wide open space in our county with many unvaccinated stray dogs. The most common spread of this complex is fence line to fence line, via your backyard. There also seems to be higher intranasal infection in the transition

from fall to winter and winter to spring with the temperature variances. As mentioned above, if your pet is routinely groomed, enjoys trips to the local dog park or even gets to go shopping with you at the big box pet food store, he is likely being exposed to the agents that cause kennel cough. Vaccination against the bordetella bacterium will generally provide immunity for about one year. So, pets at risk will need annual boosters and some pets that board frequently or visit grooming salons regularly may actually benefit from re-vaccination every six months. Experts also recommend getting your pet a booster vaccination five days or more prior to possible exposure, if more than six months have passed since the last vaccination. In 2009 we had a small outbreak of kennel cough in our kennel over Thanksgiving. Our protocol at the time was annual bordetella only injectable vaccine. Of course there are other causes of cough, as

previously mentioned, and there are no vaccines for them. However, we changed our cough vaccine recommendation to the intranasal vaccine, which has protection for Bordetella bronchiseptica, adenovirus type 2, and parainfluenza. The vaccine is administered every six months now. We recommend this for all dogs, and as the old saying goes, the proof of the pudding is in the eating. There has been a remarkable decrease in our canine patients becoming infected with infectious tracheobronchitis. There have also been no issues in our kennel. This protocol is important, because with some of the three-year vaccine schedules, dogs are not getting protected for parainfluenza and adenovirus type 2 annually. This is another great example of prevention versus having to visit the veterinarian for treatment with antibiotics and cough suppressants. Thus, your dog is healthier, happier, and your pocket book is spared.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

Get great gifts for

Downtown Holiday Art Walk set for Dec. 13 The Downtown Association is coordinating a Holiday Art Walk in Historic Downtown Farmington on Friday, Dec. 13, with art show receptions and open houses at several Downtown Farmington locations from 5 to 9 p.m. Pick up an Art Walk map at any of the participating downtown locations. 1. Alex Benally’s Hogan Stop in and discover this beautiful trading post. Artifacts Gallery and Studios Stop in to see “Containers” and visit the Artists of Artifacts during their Holiday Open House. 3. B&B Bridal Clay work by Sue Johnson and jewelry by Charlotte Carpenter. 4. Bedrooms Plus Photography by Ken Gordon and paintings by Anne Hartman. 5. Browns Shoe Fit Be sure to stop in to see the glass beads by Pierre Thompson and jewelry and wine charms by Jenny Lee Ryan.

6. Civic Center Four Corners Photographic Society Exhibit. 7. The Daily Times “Two Easels & a Camera” work by Trudy Farrell, Mary MacAdams and Ken MacAdams. 8. Dusty Attic Paintings by Anita Dotson. 9. Fine Line Tattoo Works by Chris DeGiacomo, Natoni Stallings, Brooke Bowers and Allyssa Pacheco. 10. Mon’s Spanish Grill Featuring the work of Anthony Emerson and a variety of mixed media by Venaya Yazzie. 11. Sheerie’s Studio Sculpture and drawings by Ambrose Teasyatwho and drawings and paintings by Tim Essary. 12. SnS Skate Shop Mixed media by Robb Rocket and Tina Marie Farrow. 13. Studio 116 Paintings by Tim Gordon and photography by Patrick Hazen. 14. Teec Nos Pos Pawn Stop in for handmade ornaments, jewelry, and more. 15. Three Rivers Banquet Room Farmington’s First “Ugly Christmas Sweater Silent Auction!” sponsored by Orthopedic Associates P.A. - all proceeds will benefit the Justin Solomon Account. 16. TRAC “Christmas Candlelight” an exhibit of member’s work and live music provided by Charles Stacy. 17. Wal Art Gallery Enjoy ink drawings and wood sculptures by Ambrose Teasyatwho and a beverage from Wines of the San Juan. For additional information on the Holiday Art Walk, contact Elizabeth Isenberg at 505.599.1419.

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Friday, December 13, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

T V{|Äx Parade has great turnout despite cold temps The Farmington Chamber of Commerce Annual Christmas Parade was Thursday Dec. 6. The winners include: Commercial Float First Place – City of Farmington Second Place – Automation X Third Place – Alpine Lumber Fourth Place – Brady Trucking Fifth Place – Farmington Fire Equipment Non-Profit Float First Place – Apache Elementary Second Place – San Juan College Third Place – Farmington Electric Utility Fourth Place – Shiprock High School Marching Band Fifth Place – Tse’ BitA Middle School Band Winners may pick up their ribbons at the Farm-

ington Chamber of Commerce office, 100 Broadway, from 9-4 Monday through Friday.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, December 13, 2013

calendar ONGOING EVENTS THREE WATERS TRADING POST EXHIBIT The Three Waters Trading Post exhibit features a walkthrough replica of a 1930’s trading post, including a bull pen stocked with period goods and artifacts, pawn room and an office showcasing jewelry and rugs. The exhibit is on display at the Farmington Museum in the Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St. in Farmington. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been spotted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, located in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for a leisurely walk of 1 to 2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org SETTLEMENT TO CITY EXHIBIT The Farmington Museum invites you to view an expansive display of historic and contemporary photography. Farmington has changed dramatically over the years. Experience a slice of Farmington’s past in comparison to what it is today. This unique exhibit uses both photography and historic objects to show the evolution of Farmington from a small agricultural settlement to the bustling city of today. On display through April 23, 2014. Information: 505.599.1174

MON DEC. 2 FRI JAN. 3, 2014 BLOOMFIELD CHRISTMAS PARADE AND CELEBRATION OF LIGHTS Bloomfield hosts annual lighted Christmas parade beginning at 6:30 p.m. Route starts at the Bloomfield High School. The official lighting of the celebration of Lights displays follows the Bloomfield Christmas parade and will remain in the park through the Holidays, creating a wonderful winter wonderland at Salmon Park in Bloomfield, N.M., 501 N. 5th Street. Information: 505.632.0880

FRI DEC. 13 ASTROFRIDAY “The Star of Bethlehem” will

be shown at 6:30 p.m. and again at 7:30 p.m. in the San Juan College Planetarium. A stargaze follows at 8:30 p.m., weather permitting. The Planetarium reserves the right to substitute shows. This is a free event, but seating is limited. Information: 505.566.3361 or www.sanjuancollege.edu/Planetarium/index.htm HOLIDAY ART WALK Come walk through Historic Downtown Farmington, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., and celebrate the season with art receptions and open houses at many downtown locations. A wide variety of art from regional artists will be showcased throughout many of the downtown shops, galleries and restaurants. Art Walk maps will be available at participating locations. The Art Walk is coordinated by the Farmington Downtown Association and sponsored by Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs. Information: 505.599.1419 SAN JUAN COLLEGE CONCERT BAND Join the Silhouette Performing Arts Series at San Juan College Little Theatre for this amazing performance. Show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 adults, $6 students and seniors. Information: 505.566.3430 or www.sanjuancollege.edu/silhouette CHRISTMAS DINNER 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. Come to the Bonnie Dallas Senior Center, 109 E. La Plata St. for a Christmas Dinner with all the trimmings. Lunch is a $3 donation for anyone 60+ and a $6 fee for anyone younger. Merry Christmas to ALL, from the Staff at the Bonnie Dallas Senior Center. Call 505.599.1380 or go online at www.fmtn.org/bdsc for more information.

SAT DEC. 14 ANNUAL AUDUBON CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT The Riverside Nature Center takes part in this nationwide project which has been carried out for over 100 years. From 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., come spend part or all of the day counting all the birds, common and rare, in their wintering grounds throughout the Farmington area. Information: 505.599.1422 JINGLEBELL JAMBOREE Come in to the Farmington Recreation Center and celebrate the holidays. Visit Santa and tell him what you want for Christmas! We will have a special holiday craft you can make, games you can play and wonderful holiday goodies to eat. Information: Rec Center 505.599.1184, Aquatic Center 505.599.1167,

Sycamore Park 505.566.2480 CHRISTMAS ARTS & CRAFT SALE Annual Arts & Crafts sale at the Farmington Indian Center, 100 W. Elm St. (corner of Orchard Avenue & Elm Street) for this jolly craft fair, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Information: 505.327.6296 or www.fmtn.org/indiancenter

Center and 2,000 luminarias lighting the historic Visitor Center district. The Friends of Aztec Ruins will serve cookies and hot cocoa, and the bookstore will stay open late and offer a 15 percent discount for holiday shopping. Join us to take part in a beautiful New Mexico tradition! Information: 505.334.6174 or www.nps.gov/azru

FRI DEC. 20 HISTORIC DOWNTOWN FARMINGTON WALKING TOUR Brave the winter chill and join the Farmington Museum for a walking tour of downtown Farmington’s fascinating early history. Learn a little about the devastating Main Street fires, early architecture, pioneer community builders, and more! This program is FREE and available to all ages, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Transportation will be provided; meet at the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St. Information: Adrienne Boggs, 505.599.1169 or www.fmtn.org/museums. SATURDAY NIGHT FUN 5:30 – 10 p.m. Hey kids ages 7-14!! Come to the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road, the 2nd Saturday of each month through December, for an evening full of lively activities! Dodgeball, basketball, wallyball, four square, music, movies, board games, good eats, and more are on the agenda! This is a great place to hang out with your friends! Event is planned and supervised by the Recreation Center staff, with entry sign-in and signout. The Recreation Center is closed to the public during this event. Don’t miss the party! Registration is limited, so sign up now at www.fmtn.org/recreation, under the Quick Links tab on the right. Cost is $8. Info: 505.599.1184.

MON DEC. 16 CHACO CANYON CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT Join volunteers from the Four Corners Bird Club and the Riverside Nature Center in making the winter census of birds at Chaco Culture National Historic Park. Participants should be experienced birders and able to hike in back country areas in winter weather. Information: 505.599.1422

THURS DEC. 19 EVENING OF LIGHTS AT AZTEC RUINS The evening begins with an observation of the winter solstice sunset, 4:45 p.m. to 8 p.m. Following sunset there will be an archeoastronomy talk in the Aztec Ruins National Park Visitor

WINTER SOLSTICE CELEBRATION Come mark the Winter Solstice at the Farmington Public Library and enjoy a “natural light” event at Noon along with activities that brighten up the winter. Information: 505.599.1270 or www.infoway.org

SAT DEC. 21 REINDER ROMP Join the Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs Department and the Downtown Association for a little holiday cheer and participate in the Reindeer Romp or the North Pole Stroll! Held at Orchard Plaza in Historic Downtown Farmington from 4 to 6 p.m., this event will feature a 5K Reindeer Romp (chip timed) and a 2-mile North Pole Stroll. Registration is $15 which includes a shirt. The 5k will start promptly at 4 p.m., walkers will follow. This is a family friendly event with activities such as children’s winter carnival games, live holiday music, hot chocolate, hot apple cider, holiday cookies, and a chance to see Santa! Register by Thursday, Dec. 19. Late registrations will be accepted on Friday, Dec. 20, until 2 p.m., with a $10 additional fee. SIMPLE BIRD FEEDERS 1 – 3 p.m. Come to the Riverside Nature Center, in Animas Park, off Browning Parkway for this annual activity. Learn about feeding birds and make tree ornaments which birds can eat, to decorate a tree at the nature center or to take home. Find out what birds eat and how to attract them, and learn the common winter birds in this area. Watch and learn the birds outside the Nature Center as you work. This is a family activity for all ages. Info: 505.599.1422

MON DEC. 23 LIVE NAVAJO NATIVITY This annual live nativity uses traditional Navajo clothing and live animals. The Nativity scene is presented entirely by children at the Four Corners Home for Children, at 2103 W. Main St., in Farmington, from 6 p.m. to 8

p.m. Information: 505.325.0255, 888.325.0255 or www.navajoministries.org

MON DEC. 16 SAT JAN. 4, 2014 FARMINGTON AQUATIC CENTER HOLIDAY BREAK HOURS The Farmington Aquatic Center, 1151 N. Sullivan Ave., will have public swim from 1 - 4 p.m. and 4:30 - 7:30 p.m. for Christmas Break. Please call the Farmington Aquatic Center at 505.599.1167 or go online at www.fmtn.org/aquatics for more information.

TUES DEC. 31 SPACE FLIGHT EXPLORERS CHRISTMAS BREAK FUN 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Meet at the E3 Children’s Museum & Science Center, 302 N. Orchard Ave. Let’s blast off to a New Year with some space fun with activities straight from NASA. This program is suitable for ages 7 and up. See you there, and don’t forget your imaginations! Info: 505.599.1425 NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION 6 p.m. At the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St. For information call 505.599.1148. www.fmtn.org/civiccenter.

ADULT EVENTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building:.505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Activity Center/The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 – 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Dec. 14 - The Vintage People Dec. 21 - NO DANCE Dec. 28 - NO DANCE Info: 505.599.1380 SPECIAL EVENT DANCE (NEW YEAR’S EVE) 8 p.m. – Midnight (Doors Open at 7 p.m.) Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Dec. 31 (Tuesday Night) – Off the Interstate Cost $ 3 per person

50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Dec. 18 – Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380 50+ AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. – Noon Friday, Dec. 6 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: $14 - $12 for card carrying AARP Members. Preregistration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay cash or check to the instructor on day of class. A discount on your insurance can be good for 2 to 3 years, check your policy. Please note this is last month for current cost, there will be 2014 rate increase. OLD SCHOOL VS. NEW SCHOOL, PART 2 10 – 11 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 11 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. This presentation will cover the topic of Compare and Contrast between Then and Now. Sexualized media culture and messages such as gender stereotyping will be topics discussed. Handouts and refreshments will be available. Presented by; Heather DePeal, BA. For more information call 505.566.2287. CHRISTMAS DINNER 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Lunch is a $3 donation for anyone 60+ and a $6 fee for anyone younger. Merry Christmas to you from the staff at the Bonnie Dallas Senior Center. Call 505.599.1380 for more information. ON-GOING CLASSES AT THE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. & 1 3:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.

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Four Corners photos Photographic Society hosts show at Civic Center in December

DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune The Four Corners Photographic Society’s annual winter

show will be exhibited in the Farmington Civic Center through the month of December. The club’s more than 30

members hang their original photographs and show off the various styles of photography being practiced within the region. The society has a longstanding presence in the Four Corners and includes members of all skill and experience levels. “It’s neat. There is a lot of camaraderie,” said Mickey Ginn, a longtime member. “Everyone has something to offer. Everyone has areas of photography that interest them and that they have expertise in and can share with the group.” The society meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of every month at San Juan College.

During the meetings members share their photographs and receive advice and critiques from other photographers. “It’s a great opportunity to grow in the craft,” Ginn said. Many members also lead field trips to places where they enjoy shooting photographs. The show will include all types of photography from landscapes to stills and portraits. “We will also have a reception at the Civic Center on Dec. 8,” said Donald Campbell, another society member. The reception is from 1 to 4 p.m. and is open to the public. “There will be refreshments.”

Blues in Aztec

Jason Elmore, Hoodoo Witch perform at Crash Music Jason Elmore and Hoodoo Witch will perform at Crash Music on Saturday, Dec. 14. Doors will open at 7:30 p.m. with an opening performance from local band, Living Door. Tickets for the event are $12. Voted “Best Blues” by the 2012 Dallas Music Awards, Jason Elmore is a Dallas, Texas-base guitarist, singer, songwriter who has taken the music scene by storm in just a short period of time. Whether fronting his trio, Jason Elmore and Hoodoo Witch, or performing as a solo acoustic act, Elmore is able to bring together elements of popular blues/rock/soul in his performances that seem to

Contract awarded Jaynes DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Jaynes Corporation was selected to be the construction manager at risk for the Farmington Municipal School District’s Hermosa

Middle School and Northeast Elementary School projects. The school board unanimously approved the selection during a Dec. 4 special meeting at Central Office and awarded the contract for $2.9 million to cover

Guitar workshop

Jason Elmore also will lead a guitar workshop at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 15, at Crash Music. Space is limited, so reserve a spot by calling 505.427.6748. The cost of the workshop is $20 per person. Crash Music is located in the historic Aztec Theater, 104 N. Main Ave. in Aztec. For more information call 505.427.6748. bridge the gap between blues, rock, country, surf, and jazz. He is remarkable in his ability to appeal to

fans of all genres of music with his devastating guitar licks, soulful old-school vocals, keen sense of humor and imaginative-yet-familiar songwriting. Since 2008, he has fronted the trio “Jason Elmore and Hoodoo Witch,” a highenergy melting pot of musical styles that is reminiscent of Cream, Rory Gallagher, Joe Satriani, and Freddie King. Local band Living Door will play at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are available on the Crash Music website crashmusicaztec.com or by calling 505. 427.6748. Terrific guest local band: Living Door will go on at 7:30 p.m. Wines of the San Juan will be there too!

Corp. selected for Hermosa, Northeast projects pre-construction design services, which include the construction manager fee and the maximum general conditions. The construction manager at risk will serve the district by providing “ongoing pric-

ing, design assistance and value added recommendations through the design process,” according to a memo from Ted Lasiewicz, district chief of operations to Superintendent Janel Ryan. Jaynes Corporation was

selected through a request for qualifications process, of which the district received four responses including Jaynes, FCI Constructors of New Mexico LLC, Flintco LLC, and Gerald A. Martin Ltd.

“After scoring the statements of qualifications, the RFP proposals and the interviews themselves, it was determined that the successful offeror was Jaynes Corporation,” the memorandum stated.

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Locally Owned

5200 E. Main Street Farmington, NM 87402 505.516.1030

NO CREDIT | NO PROBLEM STORE HOURS: Mon-Sat 10am-8pm | Sun 12pm-6pm RENT TO OWN www.ashleyfurniturehomestore.com

Previous purchases excluded. Cannot be combined with any other promotion or discount. Discount offers exclude Tempur-Pedic®, Extreme Value, Simmons, Beauty Rest and Ashley Sleep mattress sets, floor models or clearance items, sales tax, furniture protection plans, warranty, delivery or service charge. Although every precaution is taken, errors in price and or specification may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors. A deposit equal to 10% and an amount equal to Sales Tax and delivery charges are requred for all financed purchases and may not be eligible for this credit promotion. SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. HomeStores are independently owned and operated. ©Ashley HomeStores, Ltd. Expires 12/23/2013.


Tri-City Tribune 12132013