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A Brief History of the United Kingdom

High Intermediate English Language Studies

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High Intermediate Book English Language Studies Published and Edited by Jacaranda Education Inc. S.C. Writen by Michael Andrew Beckwith Design by Andrea Vargas FernĂĄndez MĂŠxico 2011 This curriculum is the sole property of Jacaranda Education Inc. S.C. It cannot be reproduced without the prior writen consent from the author.

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INDEX

chapter 1 . The Arts Chapter ONE 1599: A Year in the Life of Shakespeare ...............................................11 The Players and the Scenery

Julius Caesar. 6&7. Act 1: Politics and Religion:

1&2. The Players and Scenery: Part 1 ....13

Part 1 ............................................................31

Reading: Main Ideas and Supporting Sentences

Reading: Act 1: Julius Caesar, Main Ideas and

Writing: Paraphrasing

Details

Speaking: Sharing a Point of View.

Speaking: Sharing a Point of View

3. Theatre and the Arts in London:

Writing: Connecting Themes, Paraphrasing

1599 .............................................................20

Other: Synonyms.

Grammar: The Definitive Article

8. Politics and Religion: Part 2 ..............38

Speaking: Sharing a Point of View

Grammar: Past Perfect or Past Perfect

Reading: Main Ideas and Details

Progressive/ Writing: Past Perfect and Past

Writing: Connecting Themes.

Perfect Progressive/ Speaking: Sharing a Point

4. The Players and Scenery: Part 2 ......24

of View/ Reading: Main Ideas and Details.

Speaking: Presenting.

9. Julius Caesar:

5. The Globe Theatre ..............................26 Grammar: Present Perfect or Present Perfect Progressive, Adverbs

A Mexican Adaptation: Part 1 ................43 Speaking: Creative Thought/ Writing: Play Adaptation.

Speaking: Sharing an Idea

10. Julius Caesar:

Writing: Present Perfect or Present Perfect

A Mexican Adaptation: Part 2 ...............43

Progressive, Main Ideas and Supporting Ideas.

Speaking: Creative Thought/ Writing: Play Adaptation.

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High Intermediate - English Language Studies

chapter 1 . Shakespeare: The Man and His Home. 11&12. Shakespeare: The Business Man and Coriolanus .........................................48 Grammar: Past Conditional Speaking: Sharing a Point of View Reading: Main Ideas and Details, An Excerpt from a Play Writing: Past Conditional, Connecting Themes. 13&14. Shakespeare: The Family Man ........................................54 Grammar: Past Conditional, Paraphrasing Writing: Paraphrasing, Synonyms, Antonyms. 15. Shakespeare in Love: A Mid-Summer´s Night Dream, Twelfth Night .............................................61 Listening: Ke-Word, Note-Taking Reading: Excerpts from Plays Speaking: Sharing an Idea, Inferring Writing: Short Paragraphs, Connecting Themes.

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INDEX

chapter 2 . Security Chapter TWO Spies Like Us ...........................................65 The Life of Spies 1. The Madness of Spies ..........................67 Speaking: Sharing an Idea Reading: Main Ideas and Details

4. The Polygraph ......................................78 Grammar: Questions all Tenses Reading: Main ideas Writing: Building a Story.

Writing: Short Answer Responses

5. Gadgets ..................................................81

Listening: Main Ideas and Details.

Grammar: Another, Other, Others, The Other

2. The Mad Villain ......................................71

Writing: Another, Other, Others, The Other

Grammar: Perfect or Perfect Progressive:

Speaking: Sharing an Idea.

A Review

6. The Assassin Game: Role Play ..........85

Speaking: Sharing an Idea, Presenting a

Speaking and Listening: Following Instructions.

Character Writing: Perfect and Perfect Progressive, Creating a Character. 3. Codes ......................................................74 Grammar: Future Progressive Reading: Main Ideas and Details Writing: Future Progressive.

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High Intermediate - English Language Studies

chapter 2 . The Cambridge Five 7. An Introduction to The Cambridge

Will the real James Bond Please Stand-Up

Five .............................................................88

11. Fact or Fiction: Will the Real James

Speaking: Sharing a Point of View

Bond Please Stand-Up ..........................108

Writing: Identifying and Sharing a Point

Listening: Main Ideas and Details. Voice:

of View, Designing the Front Page of a

Persuasion and Attitude.

Newspaper.

12. Vodka Martini,

8. Kim Philby ..............................................91

Shaken Not Stirred .................................112

Grammar: The Future in the Past: About to,

Grammar: Future Perfect and Future Perfect

Was Going To

Progressive

Speaking: Sharing an Idea

Speaking: Sharing an Idea

Reading: Future in the Past, Main Ideas and

Writing: A Dialogue for a Script

Details.

Reading: Humor and Sarcasm.

9. Leading Double Lives .........................96

13&14.Bond: Icon .....................................116

Reading & Listening: Identifying Attitude,

Speaking: Sharing an Idea, Conducting an

Motivation, and Point of View in Speech.

Interview

10. The Men They Became:

Grammar: Future Perfect and Future Perfect

Sir Antony Blunt .....................................102

Progressive

Reading: Main Ideas and Details Listening: Identifying Attitude, Motivation, and Point of View in Speech.

Listening: Voice and Opinion Reading: Main Ideas and Details. 15. Fleming vs. Bond ..............................123 Critical Thinking: Connecting the Dots Writing: Comparative Writing Reading: Main Ideas and Details Listening: Main Ideas and Details.

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INDEX

chapter 3 . Music and Popular Culture in the Eighties and Nineties Chapter THREE Brit-Pop ....................................................127 Factory Records 1.Where It All Began (Perhaps): The Sex Pistols Gig .................................129 Listening: Comprehension Critical Thinking Writing: Connecting Themes Reading: Lyrics to a Song. 2. The Story of Icarus: The Rise and Fall of Joy Division ........133 Listening: Main Ideas and Details Grammar: Transition Words Speaking: Sharing an Idea

4. Nothing Useless Can Be Beautiful: Fac 51: The Hacienda .............................142 Speaking: Sharing an Idea Writing: Paraphrasing Listening: Opinions Reading: Main Ideas and Details. 5. American Lives Don’t Have Second Acts, But In Manchester They Do: New Order ................................................145 Speaking: Discussing Solutions to a Problem, Connecting Themes Listening: Arguments and Opinion.

Writing: Compare and Contrast, Cause and

6. Yeats and Ryder:

Effect Essay.

The Happy Mondays ..............................148

3. Joy Division: Part 2:

Speaking: Poem Recital, Sharing an Idea

Post Modernism ......................................137

Listening: Lyrics to a Song

Grammar: Modal Phrases

Writing: Comparing and Contrasting.

Reading: Understanding Concepts Speaking: Connecting Themes Writing: Modal Phrases.

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High Intermediate - English Language Studies

chapter 3 . Blur: No Distance Left to Run 7. From the Suburbs to the City: No Distance Left to Run: Part 1 ...........153

12. Don’t Look Back in Anger ...............171

Listening: Comprehension

Reading: Main Ideas and Supporting Sentences

Writing: Comparing and Contrasting, Cause

Writing: Connecting Themes

and Effect

Speaking: Sharing a Preference.

Speaking: Sharing Ideas.

13. Where Are They Now? ....................175

8. From the Suburbs to the City:

Grammar : Progressive Forms of Modal Phrases

No Distance Left to Run: Part 2 ...........157

Writing: Progressive Forms of Modal Phrases,

Listening: Comprehension, Lyrics to a Song

Predicting

Writing: Comparing and Contrasting, Cause

Speaking: Sharing an Idea.

and Effect, Connecting themes

14. The Second Wave .............................181

Speaking: Sharing Ideas

Reading & Writing: Comprehension, Identifying

Note-Taking.

Opinion, Comparing and Contrasting Opinions.

9. Born in the US of K:

15. New Brit-Pop: N-Dubz .....................185

No Distance Left to Run: Part 3 ..........162

Grammar: Present and Past Participles as

Grammar Activities: Present Perfect Tense: For

Adjectives

and Since

Writing: Describing a Video, Present and Past

Listening: Comprehension

Participles as Adjectives

Writing: Present Perfect Tense: For and Since.

Reading: Lyrics to a Song

10. Park Life:

Speaking: Sharing an Experience

No Distance Left To Run: Part 4 .........166

Listening: Music Video.

Writing: Describing a Music Video Listening: Comprehension Speaking: Sharing an Idea Critical Thinking. 11. Coming Full Circle: No Distance Left to Run: Final Part ...................................169 Listening: Comprehension Note-Taking.

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Behind the Scenes: The Past, the Present, the Future.

INDEX

chapter 4 . Sport Chapter FOUR The Olympic Games ............................189 Politics and Religion in the Games

4. Politics and Religion: Chariots of Fire: Part 3 .........................202

1. Politics and Religion:

Writing: A News Report: The Passive Voice

Chariots of Fire ........................................191

Grammar: The Passive Voice

Speaking: Explaining a Concept Reading: Poem Recital, Plot of a Film Writing: Paraphrasing, Short Opinion Essay. 2. Politics and Religion: Chariots of Fire: Part 1: Harold Abrahams .......................195 Listening: Comprehension Writing: Main Ideas and Supporting Sentences, Short Opinion Essay.

Speaking: Sharing a Point of View Listening: Comprehension. 5. The Nazi Olympics: Hitler and Jesse Owens ........................207 Speaking: Explaining an Idea Writing: Short Opinion Essay Grammar: Mixed Verb Tenses Listening: Main Ideas and Details.

3. Politics and Religion: Chariots of Fire: Part 2: Eric Liddell ................................199 Listening: Comprehension Writing: Main Ideas and Supporting Sentences Speaking: Comparing and Contrasting.

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High Intermediate - English Language Studies

chapter 4 . Olympic Culture 6. Amateur vs. Professional ..................212

11. The Logo ............................................232

Listening: Comprehension

Reading: Main Ideas and Supporting Ideas

Writing: Short Paragraphs, Comparing and

Critical Thinking

Contrasting, Describing Daily Lives

Speaking: Explaining and Defending an Opinion

Reading: Main Ideas

Other: Designing a Logo.

Speaking: Explaining a Concept.

12. The Tickets ........................................235

7. Super Athletes:

Reading: Main Ideas and Details

The Tarahumara ......................................215

Writing: Paraphrasing

Reading: Main Ideas and Details

Speaking: Sharing a Point of View.

Writing: Short Opinion Essay, Explaining an

13. The Bid ...............................................239

Argument Speaking: Sharing Ideas and Opinions, Identifying an Argument. 8. Super Runners: The Athletes of the Future ...................218 Reading: Main Ideas Writing: Short Paragraphs Speaking: Sharing Ideas and Opinions Grammar: Mixed Tense Review. 9. Who Pays the Bill? ............................222 Speaking: Sharing an Idea Grammar: Modals: Review Reading: Main Ideas and Supporting Ideas.

Grammar: Passive Voice: It and That Writing: A Report: It and That with the Passive Voice/ Reading: Main Ideas and Details. 14. Fire: An Olympic Tradition ............244 Listening: Comprehension Reading: Main Ideas and Details Grammar: Mixed Tense Review Writing: Mixed Tense Review Speaking: Sharing an Idea, Connecting Themes. 15. Stories of The World: Cultural Olympiad 2012 ........................247 Listening: Details and Main Ideas Writing: Connecting Themes, Comparing and

10. Olympic Fashion ..............................226

Contrasting

Grammar: Mixed Tense Review, Passive Voice

Reading: Main Ideas and Details

with Modals and Modal Expressions

Speaking: Sharing an Opinion.

Speaking: Sharing an Opinion/ Reading: Main Ideas and Mixed Tenses.

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London 2012

chapter ONE

The Arts

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Chapter ONE

The Players and the Scenery. 1-5. One to Five. [Discipline] Speaking: Main Ideas and Supporting Ideas

Writing: Paraphrasing, Present Perfect or Present Perfect Progressive, Main Ideas and Supporting Ideas

Grammar: The Definitive Article, Present Perfect and Present Perfect Progressive, Adverbs

Speaking: Sharing an Idea and Opinion, Presenting

Listening: For main ideas and details.

[Objective] To build communicative language skills through an in-depth look at the major players and performers on the English political, social, and cultural stage in 1599. [12]

1599: A Year in the Life of Shakespeare

1&2. The Players and Scenery: Part 1. Reading: Main Ideas and Supporting Ideas Writing: Paraphrasing Speaking: Sharing a Point of View.

Vocabulary: albeit

to hide scenery

noble

to rumor

to speculate

step-son

to butter up

concession

foolish feisty

to dislodge

Introduction: Defining Our World. [Instructions] Read the short introduction. Then discuss and answer the question with your class.

In each of Shakespeare’s works he expressed and created the world around him albeit through the forms and lives of fictitious characters. For example, one at that time could not write or express openly ones thoughts about the queen, her lords, or the governing classes as this would inevitably cost one one’s head in the Tower, the Tower of London that is. Fully aware of this fact, Shakespeare instead created fictitious characters and poetic language to provide an outlet for expression and commentary on the world around him, a world that theatre going public would no doubt have been highly attuned to. If we look carefully, therefore, beyond the surface of the plays and their characters, we can find a hidden social commentary of the social, political, and economical life on England at the end of the 16th century. In order to better understand this world and the plays that Shakespeare wrote to express that world we must first understand the players and the scenery.

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Chapter ONE If you had to define the world where you live today, who or what do you think would be the five main players?

________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ Share your answers.

Activity 1: Setting the Stage. [Instructions] First get into groups of five. In the spirit of the play we are going to perform an activity that will enable us to create our own understanding and learning and build our knowledge of the world in which we have entered, 1599: England. In your groups, you are each going to choose one of the five characters presented. Your first task is to learn the main characteristics which surround this person and the themes that are important to him or her.

Queen Elizabeth I

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Earl of Essex

John Knox

Lord Mayor Soame

King Philip II

1599: A Year in the Life of Shakespeare Queen Elizabeth I of England. Elizabeth I was a very special queen. For example, she did not marry. Moreover, she survived and became as powerful as any man. She lived during a time of great danger and religious transformation. For instance, she was Protestant, like her father Henry VIII, but her elder sister, Mary was Catholic. Furthermore, England was changing from a Catholic country to a Protestant country. As a result, there were many attempts to kill her. England in 1599 was under attack and was relatively weak. For example, several times the more powerful Spain sent hundreds of ships to try and invade England to restore Catholic power. Moreover, both Scotland and Ireland remained Catholic and represented a constant threat.

Earl of Essex The Earl was a very powerful nobleman in the court of Elizabeth and perhaps her favorite subject. For example, his grandmother was Mary Boleyn, sister to Anne, the queen´s mother. He was educated at Cambridge and was raised well. However, what made the Earl powerful was his success in battle. For example, as a young man he fought in many different campaigns around the world. As a result, he became a favorite of the people of England who saw in him their leader. Court was a very important part of life in England.

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Chapter ONE For example, if a nobleman wanted to have money he needed to please the queen in order to receive business contracts. The Earl received the contract in England for the importation of sweet wines. The power of the Earl, however, overtook his judgment. For example, he would often shout at the queen and throw tantrums. Because she liked him she always forgave him, well not always. The downfall of the Earl began when the queen sent him off to Ireland to battle the rebels. The campaign failed and the Earl returned without permission. His enemies in court used this opportunity to push the Earl out. As a result, he was, shortly afterwards, beheaded by the queen. In conclusion, one can say that the Earl let the power get the better of him.

John Knox. John Knox was a very important man during the time of Queen Elizabeth I. However, it is more the movement that he represented that was the cause of change. For example, John Knox was a new Protestant. He was a thinker and reformer of the Church of England, which was changing from being Catholic to Protestant. For instance, Henry VIII had created a new church but not the reforms or laws to go in it. John Knox did this. John Knox promoted three different changes in the church. For example, he wanted to create freedom of will, remove mass and other rituals, and move away from the corruption of Rome. In conclusion, John Knox was a thinker, and a theologian who helped to form the rules of law and culture of the Church of England during a time when Catholics were still angry and pressing for a return to the Catholic church.

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1599: A Year in the Life of Shakespeare Lord Mayor Soame and the City Merchants. In 1599 something incredible was happening that would help create the world as we know it today. It was the end of chivalry, knights and noblemen and the birth of the merchant and the businessman. For example, the merchants were the ones controlling the city and paying for the queen to wage war around the world. This gave them power. The merchants saw that the future power was only to be found in the exploration and opening of new markets of trade around the world. For instance, the Dutch in 1599 had already discovered new treasures such as pepper, cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon. As a result, the merchants formed the East India company, the first stock company in the world. In conclusion, the East India company went onto become the backbone of the future British Empire.

King Phillip II King Phillip II of Spain was the most powerful monarch in Europe. For example, his empire extended to the lower part of Italy, Holland, as well as New Spain (Mexico/ Latin America). However, one of the problems in Spain was that it did not have that many people. As a result, the king did not collect as many taxes as in France or England and therefore had to rely on Money coming from New Spain to pay for his wars. Philip was the arch enemy of England because he was Catholic. He married Mary, Elizabeth´s sister and became for a short time the King of England. In conclusion, Philip was a powerful king, but Spain was not able to sustain its power over a long period of time allowing Northern Europe to become independent and Protestant. [17]

Chapter ONE Activity 2: Lecture. [Instructions] You are going to discuss with the teacher the main points and issues surrounding plagiarism. The main points are given below to help you.

Main Points: What is a paraphrase? •

When we paraphrase we re-write or restate an idea in our own words.

Whereas a summary can be more general a paraphrase is generally more detail orientated and

covers each of the main points put forward.

Main Points: Why do we need to paraphrase? •

Paraphrasing is a skill used widespread and daily in North American Universities and universities

around the world. •

As a student one is constantly asked to explain in written or spoken exercises and activities

information, ideas, and opinions that have been heard or read through courses of study. •

Most English speaking universities take plagiarism very seriously indeed. So seriously in fact that

failure to paraphrase correctly can result in expulsion from the institution. Main Points: What skills do we need to paraphrase? •

Having as large a vocabulary as possible is key to being able to re-state or re-write ideas into one’s

own words. This is why synonym activities are very important skill builders. •

One also has to have an ability to restructure sentences or to change the tense of a particular

sentence without losing the overall meaning therein. Example: Original Text: Of the more than 1, 000 bicycling deaths each year, three-fourths are caused by head injuries. Half of those killed are school-age-children. One study concluded that wearing a bike helmet can reduce the risk of head injury by 85 percent. In an accident, a bike helmet absorbs the shock and cushions the head. (53 words).

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1599: A Year in the Life of Shakespeare Paraphrased Text: The use of a helmet is the key to reducing bicycling fatalities, which are due to head injuries 75% of the time. By cushioning the head, a helmet can reduce accidental injury by as much as 85%, saving hundreds of lives annually, half of whom are school children. (48 words). This example is taken from: Source: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_paraphr.html

Activity 3: Putting it in your own words. [Instructions] Paraphrase the information that you have been given on your character and any other information that you may have found. Paraphrased Text: ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ Share your results.

Homework: Research and Preparation. [Instructions] Research the character that you have been given for a homework. Prepare a short presentation for the class.

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Chapter ONE

3. Theatre and the Arts in London 1599. Grammar: The Definitive Article Speaking: Sharing a Point of View Reading: Main Ideas and Details Writing: Connecting Themes.

Vocabulary: scarcity

to tour

to stage

bookstall score

itinerant

to demand

curtain

inn

to perform

to consider full

apprentice

Introduction: Theatre. [Instructions] Discuss and answer the question with your class. What would you consider the more dangerous and violent of entertainments, football or the theatre? Explain. ________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ Share your answers.

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1599: A Year in the Life of Shakespeare Activity 1: Theatre, the football of the 1600’s. [Instructions] Read the short text and then discuss and answer the question.

“1597 and 1598 were not good years for theatre in London. We know this because there is not much evidence of plays in bookstalls. Nonetheless, Londoner’s loved the theatre. In addition to the Chamberlain’s Men at the Curtain and the Admiral’s Men at the Rose there were many different companies touring through the English countryside, some no doubt performing in London while passing through town. By 1600, in response to popular demand, business minded men had rushed to build permanent new theatres around the city, including the Globe, the Fortune, and the Boar’s Head Inn, while resident children’s companies began playing at St Paul’s and Blackfriars. In 1600, four million people lived in England. The population of London was two hundred thousand. Historians can calculate that if, on any given day, the plays were staged in playhouses that held as many as two to three thousand spectators each, it’s likely that with theatres even half full, as many as three thousand or so Londoners were attending a play. Over the course of a week-conservatively assuming five days of performances each week- fifteen thousand Londoners paid to see a play. …But on the average, it’s likely that over a third of London’s adult population saw a play every month. “

This text has been adapted from - Shapiro, J. 2005. A year in the life of William shakepseare:1599. Harcourt: New York. pp8-9.

1. How does the text support or discredit the claim that theatre in London in the 1600’s was what football is today as a popular form of entertainment?

________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ Share your answers.

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Chapter ONE Activity 2: The Definitive Article. [Instructions] Listen to the explanation from the teacher on the form and function of the definitive article. The main points are given below to help you.

Main Points We use The

We do not use The

When we are talking about a specific count or non count noun or one that is already known to those communicating

In relation to plural count nouns and non count nouns when we are talking about something in general.

Can you bring the book to school tomorrow.

Coca Cola tastes sweet.

Can you tell the driver where to go please.

Fruit is good for you.

When there is only one of something.

With names of days, months, drinks, meals, and languages.

The world is a big place.

I go to school on Mondays and stay home on Saturdays. I always eat Chinese food on Tuesdays.

With countries that include a count noun or a plural.

With most countries. Mexico

The Falklands New Zealand The United Arab Emirates

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With the names of musical instruments and scientific inventions.

With names of hotels or restaurants named after the people who founded them.

He can play the drums very well.

McDonald’s

Marconi invented the radio.

Macy’s

With adjectives and adverbs in the superlative form.

With names of illnesses.

He took the longest route to Mexico City.

They have the flu.

The rich should finance the program.

She has the measles


High Intermediate English Language Studies Textbook: Book 1.