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Booking Information/Ticket Prices

Esa-Pekka Salonen Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor

How to book your tickets SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE! GREAT DISCOUNTS IF YOU BOOK FOR 3 OR MORE CONCERTS! Philharmonia Orchestra 6th Floor, The Tower Building, 11 York Road, London SE1 7NX

Subscription ticket prices (for seating plan see page iv)

ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL Balcony

Royal Festival Hall Pricing Codes

P7 P6 P5 P4 P2

Rear P7 P6 P4 P3 P2

P7 P6 P5 P4 P3 P2 P1

P7 P6 P4 P3 P2

Stalls

Side Stalls

P2 P6

Front Stalls

P2

P1 P4

P2

P2 P6

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

P4

Boxes

Price per ticket

Full price (1–2 concerts)

£38.00

£29.00

£23.00

£18.00

£14.00

£11.00

£8.00

3–5 concerts

£34.20

£26.10

£20.70

£16.20

£12.60

£9.90

£7.20

10%

6–8 concerts

£32.30

£24.65

£19.55

£15.30

£11.90

£9.35

£6.80

15%

9–11 concerts

£30.40

£23.20

£18.40

£14.40

£11.20

£8.80

£6.40

20%

12–14 concerts

£28.50

£21.75

£17.25

£13.50

£10.50

£8.25

£6.00

25%

15 + concerts

£26.60

£20.30

£16.10

£12.60

£9.80

£7.70

£5.60

30%

Take advantage of up to 30% discount on your tickets by booking a subscription package (minimum 3 concerts booked in one transaction).

Performance Area

P1

P7

P2

HOW TO BOOK:

Boxes

Choir

Single ticket prices Price Codes

Premium

P1

P2

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

Full ticket price

£45

£38

£29

£23

£18

£14

£11

£8

Selected Front Stalls Front Stalls* (FS) Rear Stalls (RS) Boxes (BX)

Front Stalls (FS) Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Boxes (BX) Side Stalls (SS)

*PREMIUM SEATS We have selected the front stalls seats in the auditorium with the best acoustic and view (concerts with a piano soloist will have keyboard side premium seats) and will sell these on a firstcome first-served basis at £45 each. Subscription discounts do not apply although these events can be included in the total number of concerts when applying the subscription discount. Please call FREEPHONE 0800 652 6717 for more information.

Front Stalls (FS) Rear Stalls (RS)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Choir (CH) Wheelchair (WH)

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE: Great discounts if you book for 3 or more concerts! Book for 3 or more concerts and receive the following discounts on your tickets:3–5 concerts 10% discount 6–8 concerts 15% discount 9–11 concerts 20% discount 12–14 concerts 25% discount 15+ concerts 30% discount For discounted ticket prices see page i of the booking form Philharmonia Orchestra subscribers also receive other special benefits, including: Free ticket exchange scheme (up to 2 working days before concert) Flexible payment: spread the costs of your tickets over 3 months No booking fee

www.philharmonia.co.uk

PHONE: Call the FREEPHONE Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office on 0800 652 6717 to book your tickets (Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm) NO BOOKING FEE and call back answerphone service out of hours POST: Fill in the booking form and post to Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX ONLINE: www.philharmonia.co.uk (NB this facility is not available for group bookings) E-MAIL: boxoffice@philharmonia.co.uk FAX: Complete the booking form and fax it to 020 7921 3950

Discount (%)

Design WITH RELISH 020 7503 3171 Print CANTATE 020 7622 3401

Philharmonia Orchestra and Southbank Centre are both registered charities.

Tickets may also be purchased from Southbank Centre PHONE: 0844 847 9921 (9am-8pm daily)* ONLINE: www.southbankcentre.co.uk* FAX: 020 7921 0607* IN PERSON: Ticket Office, Royal Festival Hall 10am–8pm daily *Transaction fees apply. No fee for Southbank Centre Members

CONCESSIONS

We have selected the front stalls seats in the auditorium with the best acoustic and view (concerts with a piano soloist will have keyboard side premium seats) and will sell these on a first-come first-served basis at £45 each. Subscription discounts do not apply although these events can be included in the total number of concerts when applying the subscription discount.

A limited allocation of half-price tickets is available for recipients of Jobseekers Allowance, Income Support, Pension Credit, Under 16s and full-time students. Appropriate cards to be shown.

Book 10 or more tickets for one concert and qualify for the Philharmonia Orchestra Group rate: 25% discount off all tickets. Other benefits include 1 free ticket for every 20 purchased, flexible reservations and exclusive ticket offers. School parties: 50% discount and 1 free teacher’s ticket for every 10 purchased.

FAMILY TICKETS – SPECIAL DISCOUNTS FOR CHILDREN Each adult attending a concert can purchase up to 2 tickets for under-16s at half-price. Philharmonia Orchestra concerts are usually suitable for children aged 7 upwards. Children under 6 may not be admitted at the discretion of the orchestra and hall management. Please contact us to discuss your requirements if you need additional guidance.

Please note that discounts/ concessions cannot be combined.

All the information in this brochure was correct at the time of going to press, but changes may be unavoidable.

“blazing

PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES Southbank Centre is accessible to people with disabilities. Visitors with a disability should join Southbank Centre’s free Access Scheme. You may be eligible for tickets at concessionary prices; a free ticket for a companion who can assist you during your visit; and receive information in alternative formats. To join please call 0844 847 9910, email accesslist@southbankcentre.co.uk or visit www.southbankcentre.co.uk/access

an unstoppable The Guardian on

Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Philharmonia Orchestra, February 2011

The auditorium is fitted with Sennheiser infra-red systems. Receivers can be collected from the cloakroom in Royal Festival Hall.

LEVEL ACCESS There is level access throughout Royal Festival Hall from the internal lifts (some of the lifts have a limited weight capacity; please call 0844 847 9910 to confirm), and there are wheelchair spaces in the boxes, choir seats, side and rear stalls of the auditorium. Tickets for wheelchair spaces can be booked online or by phone on 0800 652 6717 or 0844 847 9910.

This brochure is available in alternative formats Call 0800 652 6717

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

FREEPHONE PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA BOX OFFICE: 0800 652 6717 email boxoffice@philharmonia.co.uk www.philharmonia.co.uk

PREMIUM SEATS

GROUP BOOKINGS

“momentum originality” ” Tel 020 7921 3900 Fax 020 7921 3950

No. of concerts

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE!

P1

P3

P2

P7

iv

P2

P7

Side Stalls

Location (Royal Festival Hall)

P1

2011/12 concert season Royal Festival Hall

i

The Sunday Times on Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Philharmonia Orchestra, February 2011

Esa-Pekka Salonen © Clive Barda

Welcome to the Philharmonia Orchestra’s 2011/12 season at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall. Highlights include: “ The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era A series of 5 concerts featuring iconic works of the late 19th and 20th centuries; works that both reflect the spirit of their age and that continue to resonate in our own times. All these works have a particularly personal resonance for their conductors: Esa-Pekka Salonen, Christoph von Dohnányi, Vladimir Ashkenazy and Lorin Maazel The final part of Salonen’s 2011 pan-European Bartók retrospective, Infernal Dance: Inside the World of Béla Bartók, featuring a semistaged production of his masterpiece one-act opera Duke Bluebeard’s Castle The conclusion of Lorin Maazel’s Mahler Symphony Cycle, featuring the final three symphonies and Das Lied von der Erde

Esa-Pekka Salonen opening the season with Sibelius’s epic choral symphony Kullervo and returning in March to conduct Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 5 and 7: works that form part of his entire Beethoven symphony cycle at the Beethovenfest in Bonn

Sunday 25 September 2011 7.30pm ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor VIKTORIA MULLOVA violin MONICA GROOP mezzo-soprano JUKKA RASILAINEN bass-baritone ORPHEI DRÄNGAR chorus

This concert is supported by The Meyer Foundation

BRAHMS Violin Concerto SIBELIUS Kullervo Sibelius’s epic ‘choral symphony’ Kullervo was written some eight years before his conventional First Symphony, when the composer was just 27 years old. Its five movements depict the exploits of the hero of the great Finnish mythic poem, the Kalevala, and chronicle different parts of his complex,

The continuation of the International Conductors’ Academy of the Allianz Cultural Foundation, featuring three exciting young conductors on the brink of their professional careers

tragic personality and his life, including his childhood in slavery, his seduction of his own sister and his atonement on the battlefield for her subsequent suicide. Scored for male chorus, soloists and orchestra, this is an extraordinary piece of choral writing of dramatic power, rarely heard in the concert hall due to its sheer size and scale.

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Salonen Schoenberg Gurrelieder; Berlioz Symphonie fantastique; Mahler Symphony No. 9 6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall A pre-concert recital by Finnish male chorus Orphei Drängar. FREE admission

Events marking the 150th Anniversary of the birth of Delius, the 500th Anniversary of the founding of St John’s College Cambridge, and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee

Music of Today 2011/12 Unsuk Chin artistic director

1

“Salonen’s conducting Unsuk Chin © Woenki Kim

The Philharmonia’s series of free, cutting-edge contemporary music concerts continues this season under the new artistic direction of Unsuk Chin. Join members of the Philharmonia at 6pm in Royal Festival Hall for free concerts of some of the most exciting contemporary classical music in the world. This season includes music by Ivan Fedele, Johannes Schöllhorn, Ondřej Adámek, Perttu Haapanen and Gérard Grisey.

www.philharmonia.co.uk

was

exceptional”

The Guardian, September 2010

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

2

Esa-Pekka Salonen © Clive Barda

Welcome to the Philharmonia Orchestra’s 2011/12 season at Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall. Highlights include: “ The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era A series of 5 concerts featuring iconic works of the late 19th and 20th centuries; works that both reflect the spirit of their age and that continue to resonate in our own times. All these works have a particularly personal resonance for their conductors: Esa-Pekka Salonen, Christoph von Dohnányi, Vladimir Ashkenazy and Lorin Maazel The final part of Salonen’s 2011 pan-European Bartók retrospective, Infernal Dance: Inside the World of Béla Bartók, featuring a semistaged production of his masterpiece one-act opera Duke Bluebeard’s Castle The conclusion of Lorin Maazel’s Mahler Symphony Cycle, featuring the final three symphonies and Das Lied von der Erde

Esa-Pekka Salonen opening the season with Sibelius’s epic choral symphony Kullervo and returning in March to conduct Beethoven’s Symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 5 and 7: works that form part of his entire Beethoven symphony cycle at the Beethovenfest in Bonn

Sunday 25 September 2011 7.30pm ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor VIKTORIA MULLOVA violin MONICA GROOP mezzo-soprano JUKKA RASILAINEN bass-baritone ORPHEI DRÄNGAR chorus

This concert is supported by The Meyer Foundation

BRAHMS Violin Concerto SIBELIUS Kullervo Sibelius’s epic ‘choral symphony’ Kullervo was written some eight years before his conventional First Symphony, when the composer was just 27 years old. Its five movements depict the exploits of the hero of the great Finnish mythic poem, the Kalevala, and chronicle different parts of his complex,

The continuation of the International Conductors’ Academy of the Allianz Cultural Foundation, featuring three exciting young conductors on the brink of their professional careers

tragic personality and his life, including his childhood in slavery, his seduction of his own sister and his atonement on the battlefield for her subsequent suicide. Scored for male chorus, soloists and orchestra, this is an extraordinary piece of choral writing of dramatic power, rarely heard in the concert hall due to its sheer size and scale.

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Salonen Schoenberg Gurrelieder; Berlioz Symphonie fantastique; Mahler Symphony No. 9 6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall A pre-concert recital by Swedish male chorus Orphei Drängar. FREE admission

Events marking the 150th Anniversary of the birth of Delius, the 500th Anniversary of the founding of St John’s College Cambridge, and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee

Music of Today 2011/12 Unsuk Chin artistic director

1

“Salonen’s conducting Unsuk Chin © Woenki Kim

The Philharmonia’s series of free, cutting-edge contemporary music concerts continues this season under the new artistic direction of Unsuk Chin. Join members of the Philharmonia at 6pm in Royal Festival Hall for free concerts of some of the most exciting contemporary classical music in the world. This season includes music by Ivan Fedele, Johannes Schöllhorn, Ondřej Adámek, Perttu Haapanen and Gérard Grisey.

www.philharmonia.co.uk

was

exceptional”

The Guardian, September 2010

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

2

MAAZEL: MAHLER CYCLE 2011

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

LORIN MAAZEL conductor ALICE COOTE mezzo-soprano STEFAN VINKE tenor MAHLER Symphony No. 10, Adagio MAHLER Das Lied von der Erde Mahler’s valedictory symphonic song cycle Das Lied von der Erde is one of his most beautiful works. The six songs are settings of translated ancient Chinese poems that celebrate life’s joy and mourn its brevity. It is performed this evening alongside Mahler’s final symphonic statement, the Adagio from his unfinished Tenth Symphony.

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall Memory, mortality and the eternal blooming of nature: Julian Johnson examines the themes of Mahler’s Song of the Earth. FREE admission

Saturday 1 October 2011 7.30pm LORIN MAAZEL conductor MAHLER Symphony No.9 An intensely personal work heard as both the ultimate farewell and a final homecoming. Leonard Bernstein said of Mahler’s last completed work ‘It is terrifying, and paralyzing, as the strands of sound disintegrate … in ceasing, we lose it all. But in letting go, we have gained everything.’

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall Farewell, homecoming, or new challenges?: Julian Johnson reflects on Mahler’s late works. FREE admission

Sunday 9 October 2011 7.30pm Please note this concert is SOLD OUT: returns only. LORIN MAAZEL conductor SALLY MATTHEWS soprano AILISH TYNAN soprano SARAH TYNAN soprano SARAH CONNOLLY mezzo-soprano ANNE-MARIE OWENS mezzo-soprano STEFAN VINKE tenor MARK STONE baritone BRINDLEY SHERRATT bass PHILHARMONIA CHORUS BBC SYMPHONY CHORUS BOYS FROM THE CHAPEL CHOIRS OF ETON COLLEGE MAHLER Symphony No. 8 Mahler’s mightiest symphony, often known as ‘The Symphony of a Thousand’ calls for huge orchestral forces, eight soloists, a boys’ chorus and large mixed chorus. Described by the composer as his ‘gift to the whole nation’ it is an epic drama in two parts, the first a setting of a Medieval Latin hymn Veni Creator Spiritus, and the second a setting of the final scene of Goethe’s Faust.

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall ‘The resounding of the universe’: Julian Johnson considers the extraordinary vision of Mahler’s Eighth Symphony. FREE admission

GRIEG Suite No. 1, Peer Gynt MOZART Piano Concerto No. 24, K491 PROKOFIEV Romeo and Juliet (excerpts) This afternoon’s programme of classical masterpieces contrasts the dark grandeur of Mozart’s fiery Piano Concerto No. 24 with Prokofiev’s dramatic portrayal of Shakespeare’s star-crossed lovers and Grieg’s first suite from his incidental music to Ibsen’s Peer Gynt. Romeo and Juliet is still regarded today as one of the finest ballet scores ever written; this afternoon’s programme features excerpts from the three suites that the composer made for performances of the ballet’s main numbers.

Thursday 13 October 2011 7.30pm International Conductors’ Academy of the Allianz Cultural Foundation ARTURO ALVARADO conductor DARRELL ANG conductor YORDAN KAMDZHALOV conductor SUNWOOK KIM piano BRITTEN Four Sea Interludes PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 2 ADÈS Dances from Powder Her Face STRAVINSKY Suite, The Firebird (1945) This concert marks the culmination of the 2011 International Conductors’ Academy of the Allianz Cultural Foundation, an annual joint initiative of the Allianz Cultural Foundation, the Philharmonia and London Philharmonic orchestras and Southbank Centre, whereby three exceptionally talented young conductors on the brink of their professional careers are offered intensive mentoring and training. Previous participants have included Gustavo Dudamel. This evening’s programme features all three conductors and has been designed to showcase their skills and to offer audiences the chance to witness the stars of the future making their Royal Festival Hall débuts. Presented by the International Conductors’ Academy of the Allianz Cultural Foundation.

Martin Helmchen © Marco Borggreve

Thursday 29 September 2011 7.30pm

DIEGO MATHEUZ conductor MARTIN HELMCHEN piano

Arturo Alvarado

Lorin Maazel © Chris Lee

Sunday 16 October 2011 3.00pm

“succulent and subtly

electrifying playing”

The Times on the Philharmonia Orchestra, March 2010

philharmonia.co.uk/mahler 3

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

4

MAAZEL: MAHLER CYCLE 2011

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

LORIN MAAZEL conductor ALICE COOTE mezzo-soprano STEFAN VINKE tenor MAHLER Symphony No. 10, Adagio MAHLER Das Lied von der Erde Mahler’s valedictory symphonic song cycle Das Lied von der Erde is one of his most beautiful works. The six songs are settings of translated ancient Chinese poems that celebrate life’s joy and mourn its brevity. It is performed this evening alongside Mahler’s final symphonic statement, the Adagio from his unfinished Tenth Symphony.

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall Memory, mortality and the eternal blooming of nature: Julian Johnson examines the themes of Mahler’s Song of the Earth. FREE admission

Saturday 1 October 2011 7.30pm LORIN MAAZEL conductor MAHLER Symphony No.9 An intensely personal work heard as both the ultimate farewell and a final homecoming. Leonard Bernstein said of Mahler’s last completed work ‘It is terrifying, and paralyzing, as the strands of sound disintegrate … in ceasing, we lose it all. But in letting go, we have gained everything.’

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall Farewell, homecoming, or new challenges?: Julian Johnson reflects on Mahler’s late works. FREE admission

Sunday 9 October 2011 7.30pm Please note this concert is SOLD OUT: returns only. LORIN MAAZEL conductor SALLY MATTHEWS soprano AILISH TYNAN soprano SARAH TYNAN soprano SARAH CONNOLLY mezzo-soprano ANNE-MARIE OWENS mezzo-soprano STEFAN VINKE tenor MARK STONE baritone BRINDLEY SHERRATT bass PHILHARMONIA CHORUS BBC SYMPHONY CHORUS BOYS FROM THE CHAPEL CHOIRS OF ETON COLLEGE MAHLER Symphony No. 8 Mahler’s mightiest symphony, often known as ‘The Symphony of a Thousand’ calls for huge orchestral forces, eight soloists, a boys’ chorus and large mixed chorus. Described by the composer as his ‘gift to the whole nation’ it is an epic drama in two parts, the first a setting of a Medieval Latin hymn Veni Creator Spiritus, and the second a setting of the final scene of Goethe’s Faust.

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall ‘The resounding of the universe’: Julian Johnson considers the extraordinary vision of Mahler’s Eighth Symphony. FREE admission

GRIEG Suite No. 1, Peer Gynt MOZART Piano Concerto No. 24, K491 PROKOFIEV Romeo and Juliet (excerpts) This afternoon’s programme of classical masterpieces contrasts the dark grandeur of Mozart’s fiery Piano Concerto No. 24 with Prokofiev’s dramatic portrayal of Shakespeare’s star-crossed lovers and Grieg’s first suite from his incidental music to Ibsen’s Peer Gynt. Romeo and Juliet is still regarded today as one of the finest ballet scores ever written; this afternoon’s programme features excerpts from the three suites that the composer made for performances of the ballet’s main numbers.

Thursday 13 October 2011 7.30pm International Conductors’ Academy of the Allianz Cultural Foundation ARTURO ALVARADO conductor DARRELL ANG conductor YORDAN KAMDZHALOV conductor SUNWOOK KIM piano BRITTEN Four Sea Interludes PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 2 ADÈS Dances from Powder Her Face STRAVINSKY Suite, The Firebird (1945) This concert marks the culmination of the 2011 International Conductors’ Academy of the Allianz Cultural Foundation, an annual joint initiative of the Allianz Cultural Foundation, the Philharmonia and London Philharmonic orchestras and Southbank Centre, whereby three exceptionally talented young conductors on the brink of their professional careers are offered intensive mentoring and training. Previous participants have included Gustavo Dudamel. This evening’s programme features all three conductors and has been designed to showcase their skills and to offer audiences the chance to witness the stars of the future making their Royal Festival Hall débuts. Presented by the International Conductors’ Academy of the Allianz Cultural Foundation.

Martin Helmchen © Marco Borggreve

Thursday 29 September 2011 7.30pm

DIEGO MATHEUZ conductor MARTIN HELMCHEN piano

Arturo Alvarado

Lorin Maazel © Chris Lee

Sunday 16 October 2011 3.00pm

“succulent and subtly

electrifying playing”

The Times on the Philharmonia Orchestra, March 2010

philharmonia.co.uk/mahler 3

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

4

DUKE BLUEBEARD’S CASTLE

ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor YEFIM BRONFMAN piano SIR JOHN TOMLINSON Bluebeard MEASHA BRUEGGERGOSMAN Judith NICK HILLEL director

ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor YEFIM BRONFMAN piano ZSOLT-TIHAMÉR VISONTAY violin MARK VAN DE WIEL clarinet BARTÓK Contrasts BARTÓK Suite, The Wooden Prince BARTÓK Dance Suite BARTÓK Piano Concerto No. 2

A Philharmonia Orchestra production in collaboration with Yeast Culture A co-commission with the Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon and Konzerthaus Dortmund

For Bartók the world of fairytale was often a dark and dangerous one. The mysterious Mandarin dies in a violent sexual frenzy; Bluebeard’s castle is a living prison. Only in the ballet The Wooden Prince, written between 1914 and 1917, did Bartók allow love to triumph over adversity, in a far-off land of forests and fairies. In this world of enchantment and infatuation, the princess heroine ultimately discards her beloved Wooden Prince doll, and learns to love the real prince, the power of human emotion overwhelming the jealous fairy’s mischief. The Wooden Prince was a huge success at its première, and is notable for its extraordinarily large orchestral forces, the biggest Bartók ever wrote for; this evening’s performance features the orchestral suite from the ballet music, alongside the percussive sonorities of the Second Piano Concerto, the seminal chamber work Contrasts and the folk rhapsody of the Dance Suite.

DEBUSSY Prélude à l'après-midi d’un faune BARTÓK Piano Concerto No. 3 BARTÓK Duke Bluebeard’s Castle (semi-staged) The extraordinary Duke Bluebeard’s Castle, Bartók’s only opera, is widely regarded as his masterpiece. Its world is sinister, dark and deeply disturbing. There are just two voices throughout, Duke Bluebeard and his new wife, Judith, and the entire one-act opera takes place in the hall of its castle. Judith opens the hall’s seven doors, one by one; each door reveals its own horror. In one, a torture chamber; in another, an armoury filled with bloody weapons; and in another, a garden where blood stains the plants’ leaves. The final door opens and reveals Bluebeard’s three former wives, who step forward and receive Judith into their eternally imprisoned group. This is chilling, psychological drama, one of the great achievements of 20th century music.

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall Malcolm Gillies introduces this evening’s programme. FREE admission

“a superb display of virtuosity, with not a note out of place” The Guardian on Salonen and the Philharmonia performing Bartók’s The Miraculous Mandarin, January 2011

Visit philharmonia.co.uk/bartok for films exploring Bartók’s life and music, programme notes, audio extracts and details of the full series. www.philharmonia.co.uk

Images: stills from video images for ‘Duke Bluebeard’s Castle’, © Yeast Culture

Inside the World of Béla Bartók 5

Thursday 3 November 2011 7.30pm

Thursday 27 October 2011 7.30pm

This production has been created by the Philharmonia Orchestra in collaboration with digital artist collective Yeast Culture. Specially created films will be used as video projections onto unusual projection surfaces, surrounding the Orchestra as it performs Bartók’s score. These immersive projections create an evocative atmosphere that suggests the different rooms in Bluebeard’s castle and the emotions of the two protagonists. This haunting and cutting-edge production will also travel to Birmingham, Lisbon and Dortmund.

Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall Malcolm Gillies introduces this evening’s programme. FREE admission

Infernal Dance is supported by The Meyer Foundation We are grateful to the Edwin Fox Foundation for its support of these concerts.

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

6

DUKE BLUEBEARD’S CASTLE

ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor YEFIM BRONFMAN piano SIR JOHN TOMLINSON Bluebeard MEASHA BRUEGGERGOSMAN Judith NICK HILLEL director

ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor YEFIM BRONFMAN piano ZSOLT-TIHAMÉR VISONTAY violin MARK VAN DE WIEL clarinet BARTÓK Contrasts BARTÓK Suite, The Wooden Prince BARTÓK Dance Suite BARTÓK Piano Concerto No. 2

A Philharmonia Orchestra production in collaboration with Yeast Culture A co-commission with the Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon and Konzerthaus Dortmund

For Bartók the world of fairytale was often a dark and dangerous one. The mysterious Mandarin dies in a violent sexual frenzy; Bluebeard’s castle is a living prison. Only in the ballet The Wooden Prince, written between 1914 and 1917, did Bartók allow love to triumph over adversity, in a far-off land of forests and fairies. In this world of enchantment and infatuation, the princess heroine ultimately discards her beloved Wooden Prince doll, and learns to love the real prince, the power of human emotion overwhelming the jealous fairy’s mischief. The Wooden Prince was a huge success at its première, and is notable for its extraordinarily large orchestral forces, the biggest Bartók ever wrote for; this evening’s performance features the orchestral suite from the ballet music, alongside the percussive sonorities of the Second Piano Concerto, the seminal chamber work Contrasts and the folk rhapsody of the Dance Suite.

DEBUSSY Prélude à l'après-midi d’un faune BARTÓK Piano Concerto No. 3 BARTÓK Duke Bluebeard’s Castle (semi-staged) The extraordinary Duke Bluebeard’s Castle, Bartók’s only opera, is widely regarded as his masterpiece. Its world is sinister, dark and deeply disturbing. There are just two voices throughout, Duke Bluebeard and his new wife, Judith, and the entire one-act opera takes place in the hall of its castle. Judith opens the hall’s seven doors, one by one; each door reveals its own horror. In one, a torture chamber; in another, an armoury filled with bloody weapons; and in another, a garden where blood stains the plants’ leaves. The final door opens and reveals Bluebeard’s three former wives, who step forward and receive Judith into their eternally imprisoned group. This is chilling, psychological drama, one of the great achievements of 20th century music.

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall Malcolm Gillies introduces this evening’s programme. FREE admission

“a superb display of virtuosity, with not a note out of place” The Guardian on Salonen and the Philharmonia performing Bartók’s The Miraculous Mandarin, January 2011

Visit philharmonia.co.uk/bartok for films exploring Bartók’s life and music, programme notes, audio extracts and details of the full series. www.philharmonia.co.uk

Images: stills from video images for ‘Duke Bluebeard’s Castle’, © Yeast Culture

Inside the World of Béla Bartók 5

Thursday 3 November 2011 7.30pm

Thursday 27 October 2011 7.30pm

This production has been created by the Philharmonia Orchestra in collaboration with digital artist collective Yeast Culture. Specially created films will be used as video projections onto unusual projection surfaces, surrounding the Orchestra as it performs Bartók’s score. These immersive projections create an evocative atmosphere that suggests the different rooms in Bluebeard’s castle and the emotions of the two protagonists. This haunting and cutting-edge production will also travel to Birmingham, Lisbon and Dortmund.

Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall Malcolm Gillies introduces this evening’s programme. FREE admission

Infernal Dance is supported by The Meyer Foundation We are grateful to the Edwin Fox Foundation for its support of these concerts.

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

6

Thursday 24 November 2011 7.30pm

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

Thursday 8 December 2011 7.30pm

Thursday 15 December 2011 7.30pm

CHRISTOPH VON DOHNÁNYI conductor MELANIE DIENER soprano

Sunday 4 December 2011 3.00pm

VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY conductor VALERIY SOKOLOV violin

ANDREW NETHSINGHA conductor DAVID STOUT baritone THE CHOIRS OF ST JOHN'S COLLEGE, CAIUS COLLEGE, CLARE COLLEGE, JESUS COLLEGE AND TRINITY COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE

Christoph von Dohnányi © Bertold Fabricius

STRAUSS Don Juan STRAUSS Four Last Songs MOZART Symphony No. 25, K183 STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel

An evening dedicated almost entirely to one of the composers most championed by Christoph von Dohnányi during his distinguished musical career: the last great German Romantic composer, Richard Strauss. The programme spans more than 60 years of Strauss’s compositional life and is framed by two sparkling miniature musical pen portraits – the flamboyant Don Juan, his first tone poem, which set the musical world on fire in 1888, and the nimble and witty Till Eulenspiegel, chronicling its eponymous hero’s ‘merry pranks’. In between, a different Strauss altogether is heard in the sublime and deeply moving Four Last Songs: an autumnal, eloquent and deeply honest meditation on the end of life.

TUGAN SOKHIEV conductor EVGENI BOZHANOV piano

BEETHOVEN Violin Concerto 3 BERLIOZ Symphonie fantastique

BERLIOZ Overture, Le carnaval romain CHOPIN Piano Concerto No. 1 RACHMANINOV Symphony No. 2

Berlioz composed his revolutionary masterpiece Symphonie fantastique a mere three years after his hero Beethoven’s death. The ultimate musical statement of the Romantic movement, it describes a series of increasingly lurid and violent hallucinatory visions experienced by the artist under the influence of opium. In this evening’s concert it is paired with Beethoven’s own Violin Concerto, regarded by many as the first great Romantic work for the instrument.

Rachmaninov’s Second Symphony is a work of tremendous richness and power, composed some 12 years after the spectacular failure of the composer’s First Symphony, and a subsequent period of profound depression. It was pronounced a masterpiece at its première, a visionary journey through the Russian landscape; notable for its brooding opening movement, a thrilling Scherzo, the romantic sweep of its glorious slow movement and finally a sweeping and dramatic finale. Chopin’s exquisite Piano Concerto No. 1 precedes the symphony, performed by charismatic young pianist Evgeni Bozhanov who caused a stir at the 6th International Fryderyk Chopin Piano Competition in 2010.

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Salonen Berlioz Symphonie fantastique

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by pianist Grace Yeo, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

“That’s the

Sunday 11 December 2011 3.00pm

real Chopin…

VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY conductor JEAN-EFFLAM BAVOUZET piano

he really lives

A special concert celebrating the 500th Anniversary of the founding of St John’s College Cambridge; the College Choir is joined by other Cambridge College Choirs and a number of alumni singers. The focal point of the evening is a performance of Walton’s incomparable oratorio Belshazzar’s Feast. A dramatic cantata on the scale of Carmina Burana, Belshazzar’s Feast is set to a biblical text selected by Osbert Sitwell, primarily from the Book of Daniel, and is characterised by a wild, almost pagan, energy that shocked listeners at its première in 1931 and led to its banning from the Three Choirs Festival until 1957.

DUKAS The Sorcerer’s Apprentice RAVEL Piano Concerto in G DE FALLA Nights in the Gardens of Spain DEBUSSY La mer

that music” Kevin Kenner, juror at the 16th International Fryderyk Chopin Competition, on Evgeni Bozhanov

This afternoon’s concert is suffused with drama and Impressionism in equal measure. De Falla’s lush and brilliant score for piano and orchestra depicts three Spanish gardens, and weaves the scent of jasmine with exotic gypsy dancers and feasting. Debussy’s La mer is equally evocative, conjuring the sweep and power of the sea’s moods.

This concert is supported by The Meyer Foundation

6pm Music of Today, Royal Festival Hall A portrait of Johannes Schöllhorn conducted by Roland Kluttig. FREE admission

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Vladimir Ashkenazy © Keith Saunders

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Dohnányi Strauss Ein Heldenleben and Till Eulenspiegel; Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 3 & 5; Brahms Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3 & 4

7

ELGAR Alassio (In the South) HOWELLS One thing have I desired of the Lord HARVEY I love the Lord HOWELLS A Spotless Rose PARRY I Was Glad WALTON Belshazzar’s Feast

This concert is supported by

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

8

Thursday 24 November 2011 7.30pm

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

Thursday 8 December 2011 7.30pm

Thursday 15 December 2011 7.30pm

CHRISTOPH VON DOHNÁNYI conductor MELANIE DIENER soprano

Sunday 4 December 2011 3.00pm

VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY conductor VALERIY SOKOLOV violin

ANDREW NETHSINGHA conductor DAVID STOUT baritone THE CHOIRS OF ST JOHN'S COLLEGE, CAIUS COLLEGE, CLARE COLLEGE, JESUS COLLEGE AND TRINITY COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE

Christoph von Dohnányi © Bertold Fabricius

STRAUSS Don Juan STRAUSS Four Last Songs MOZART Symphony No. 25, K183 STRAUSS Till Eulenspiegel

An evening dedicated almost entirely to one of the composers most championed by Christoph von Dohnányi during his distinguished musical career: the last great German Romantic composer, Richard Strauss. The programme spans more than 60 years of Strauss’s compositional life and is framed by two sparkling miniature musical pen portraits – the flamboyant Don Juan, his first tone poem, which set the musical world on fire in 1888, and the nimble and witty Till Eulenspiegel, chronicling its eponymous hero’s ‘merry pranks’. In between, a different Strauss altogether is heard in the sublime and deeply moving Four Last Songs: an autumnal, eloquent and deeply honest meditation on the end of life.

TUGAN SOKHIEV conductor EVGENI BOZHANOV piano

BEETHOVEN Violin Concerto 3 BERLIOZ Symphonie fantastique

BERLIOZ Overture, Le carnaval romain CHOPIN Piano Concerto No. 1 RACHMANINOV Symphony No. 2

Berlioz composed his revolutionary masterpiece Symphonie fantastique a mere three years after his hero Beethoven’s death. The ultimate musical statement of the Romantic movement, it describes a series of increasingly lurid and violent hallucinatory visions experienced by the artist under the influence of opium. In this evening’s concert it is paired with Beethoven’s own Violin Concerto, regarded by many as the first great Romantic work for the instrument.

Rachmaninov’s Second Symphony is a work of tremendous richness and power, composed some 12 years after the spectacular failure of the composer’s First Symphony, and a subsequent period of profound depression. It was pronounced a masterpiece at its première, a visionary journey through the Russian landscape; notable for its brooding opening movement, a thrilling Scherzo, the romantic sweep of its glorious slow movement and finally a sweeping and dramatic finale. Chopin’s exquisite Piano Concerto No. 1 precedes the symphony, performed by charismatic young pianist Evgeni Bozhanov who caused a stir at the 6th International Fryderyk Chopin Piano Competition in 2010.

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Salonen Berlioz Symphonie fantastique

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by pianist Grace Yeo, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

“That’s the

Sunday 11 December 2011 3.00pm

real Chopin…

VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY conductor JEAN-EFFLAM BAVOUZET piano

he really lives

A special concert celebrating the 500th Anniversary of the founding of St John’s College Cambridge; the College Choir is joined by other Cambridge College Choirs and a number of alumni singers. The focal point of the evening is a performance of Walton’s incomparable oratorio Belshazzar’s Feast. A dramatic cantata on the scale of Carmina Burana, Belshazzar’s Feast is set to a biblical text selected by Osbert Sitwell, primarily from the Book of Daniel, and is characterised by a wild, almost pagan, energy that shocked listeners at its première in 1931 and led to its banning from the Three Choirs Festival until 1957.

DUKAS The Sorcerer’s Apprentice RAVEL Piano Concerto in G DE FALLA Nights in the Gardens of Spain DEBUSSY La mer

that music” Kevin Kenner, juror at the 16th International Fryderyk Chopin Competition, on Evgeni Bozhanov

This afternoon’s concert is suffused with drama and Impressionism in equal measure. De Falla’s lush and brilliant score for piano and orchestra depicts three Spanish gardens, and weaves the scent of jasmine with exotic gypsy dancers and feasting. Debussy’s La mer is equally evocative, conjuring the sweep and power of the sea’s moods.

This concert is supported by The Meyer Foundation

6pm Music of Today, Royal Festival Hall A portrait of Johannes Schöllhorn conducted by Roland Kluttig. FREE admission

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Vladimir Ashkenazy © Keith Saunders

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Dohnányi Strauss Ein Heldenleben and Till Eulenspiegel; Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 3 & 5; Brahms Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3 & 4

7

ELGAR Alassio (In the South) HOWELLS One thing have I desired of the Lord HARVEY I love the Lord HOWELLS A Spotless Rose PARRY I Was Glad WALTON Belshazzar’s Feast

This concert is supported by

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

8

“The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era

DELIUS 150TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

Quotation from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets

Sunday 29 January 2012 3.00pm

IL PRIGIONIERO Thursday 26 January 2012 7.30pm ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor LAURI VASAR The Prisoner PAOLETTA MARROCU The Mother PETER HOARE The Gaoler/Grand Inquisitor BRIAN GALLIFORD, FRANCISCO JAVIER BORDA The Priests PHILHARMONIA VOICES

SIR ANDREW DAVIS conductor JULIAN LLOYD WEBBER cello ZSOLT-TIHAMÉR VISONTAY violin

never be as light and carefree as it once was. The composer’s unique blend of lyrical writing with serialist technique makes this opera searingly moving; and it ends with the prisoner simply whispering the word ‘Freedom?’.

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS The Lark Ascending DELIUS Cello Concerto DELIUS Brigg Fair ELGAR Enigma Variations

Delius’s 150th birthday is marked to the day with this concert of beautiful English music. At the heart of the programme is the composer’s Cello Concerto and his orchestral work Brigg Fair, where his very personal blend of musical impressionism and lush chromaticism create a uniquely English pastoral soundworld. Vaughan Williams’s ever-yearning violin rhapsody The Lark Ascending opens the concert, and Elgar’s well-loved suite of variations closes this celebration. This concert is supported by The Delius Trust

In partnership with Amnesty International to mark their 50th Anniversary

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Davis Works by Elgar including Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2 and Enigma Variations

This series is supported by The Meyer Foundation

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 5 DALLAPICCOLA Il prigioniero

Esa-Pekka Salonen also conducts Beethoven’s Symphonies 1, 3 and 7 on 1 and 15 March (see page 13)

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Julian Lloyd Webber © Simon Fowler

9

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall An introduction to the evening’s concert by Dallapiccola expert Peter Roderick. FREE admission

© Robert E Jones and Cleon Throckmorton, stage design for The Hairy Ape / Lebrecht Authors

An opera of chilling political statement, Dallapiccola’s Il prigioniero tells the story of a political prisoner whose jailor allows him to escape, apparently in a gesture of fraternity. In reality it is a cruel joke, as the prisoner reaches the fresh, open air only to run into the arms of the Grand Inquisitor who leads him away to be burned alive. The opera was composed between 1944–48 and reflects Dallapiccola’s disillusionment with Mussolini’s politics: he claimed that his writing would

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

10

“The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era

DELIUS 150TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

Quotation from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets

Sunday 29 January 2012 3.00pm

IL PRIGIONIERO Thursday 26 January 2012 7.30pm ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor LAURI VASAR The Prisoner PAOLETTA MARROCU The Mother PETER HOARE The Gaoler/Grand Inquisitor BRIAN GALLIFORD, FRANCISCO JAVIER BORDA The Priests PHILHARMONIA VOICES

SIR ANDREW DAVIS conductor JULIAN LLOYD WEBBER cello ZSOLT-TIHAMÉR VISONTAY violin

never be as light and carefree as it once was. The composer’s unique blend of lyrical writing with serialist technique makes this opera searingly moving; and it ends with the prisoner simply whispering the word ‘Freedom?’.

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS The Lark Ascending DELIUS Cello Concerto DELIUS Brigg Fair ELGAR Enigma Variations

Delius’s 150th birthday is marked to the day with this concert of beautiful English music. At the heart of the programme is the composer’s Cello Concerto and his orchestral work Brigg Fair, where his very personal blend of musical impressionism and lush chromaticism create a uniquely English pastoral soundworld. Vaughan Williams’s ever-yearning violin rhapsody The Lark Ascending opens the concert, and Elgar’s well-loved suite of variations closes this celebration. This concert is supported by The Delius Trust

In partnership with Amnesty International to mark their 50th Anniversary

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Davis Works by Elgar including Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2 and Enigma Variations

This series is supported by The Meyer Foundation

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 5 DALLAPICCOLA Il prigioniero

Esa-Pekka Salonen also conducts Beethoven’s Symphonies 1, 3 and 7 on 1 and 15 March (see page 13)

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Julian Lloyd Webber © Simon Fowler

9

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall An introduction to the evening’s concert by Dallapiccola expert Peter Roderick. FREE admission

© Robert E Jones and Cleon Throckmorton, stage design for The Hairy Ape / Lebrecht Authors

An opera of chilling political statement, Dallapiccola’s Il prigioniero tells the story of a political prisoner whose jailor allows him to escape, apparently in a gesture of fraternity. In reality it is a cruel joke, as the prisoner reaches the fresh, open air only to run into the arms of the Grand Inquisitor who leads him away to be burned alive. The opera was composed between 1944–48 and reflects Dallapiccola’s disillusionment with Mussolini’s politics: he claimed that his writing would

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

10

Thursday 2 February 2012 7.30pm

Thursday 9 February 2012 7.30pm

KURT MASUR conductor ARABELLA STEINBACHER violin

TUGAN SOKHIEV conductor ARCADI VOLODOS piano

MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7

BRAHMS Piano Concerto No. 2 SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 8

Throughout his life, Bruckner was devoted to the music of Wagner; at the time of Wagner’s death, he was working on his Seventh Symphony, which became his elegy to his musical hero. The symphony opens with a broad and serene melody on the cellos, described by Julian Johnson as a “complete, divinely given melodic whole”, which is conjured out of a near-silent string tremolando. The lyrical and heart-rending second movement is permeated with the essence of the Catholic liturgy, with the orchestra imitating the timbre of a church organ and choir. The movement also introduces a quartet of Wagner tubas, which reappears in the final movement as part of a blazing fanfare.

The central work in the trilogy of Shostakovich’s so-called ‘War Symphonies’, the Eighth Symphony is an incredibly powerful work and one that emanates a profound feeling of tragedy. The great arch of the first movement leads into two movements reminiscent of the mechanistic industry of war; and the finale tries to sound light and pastoral but is slowly beaten into an exhausted peace. The evening also features Arcadi Volodos performing Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto, a work that encompasses a passionate Scherzo, a lyrical slow movement and a finale suffused with Brahms’s Hungarian gypsy idiom.

This concert is supported by The Zvi and Ofra Meitar Family Fund

6pm Music of Today, Royal Festival Hall A portrait of Ivan Fedele conducted by Wen-Pin Chien with soprano Valentina Coladonato. FREE admission

“The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era

EIN DEUTSCHES REQUIEM

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by trumpeter Tom Poulson, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission

Arcadi Volodos in recital

Thursday 16 February 2012 7.30pm

Tuesday 22 May 2012 7.30pm

CHRISTOPH VON DOHNÁNYI conductor SUSAN GRITTON soprano SIMON KEENLYSIDE baritone PHILHARMONIA CHORUS PHILHARMONIA VOICES

11

www.philharmonia.co.uk

© ‘Requiem’ poster by Lozenko / RIA Novosti / Lebrecht Music & Arts

Tickets £10-£52, Students’ Platform Seats £7; bookable through Southbank Centre only. Call 0844 847 9921 or visit www.southbankcentre.co.uk

Kurt Masur © Chris Christodoulou/Lebrecht Music & Arts

Part of Southbank Centre’s International Piano Series SCHUBERT Sonata in A minor, D.784 BRAHMS 3 Intermezzi, Op. 117 LISZT Sonata in B minor

Quotation from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 4 BRAHMS Ein deutsches Requiem Brahms first considered writing a Requiem Mass after the death of his close friend Robert Schumann, but was only catapulted into its composition a decade later after the death of his mother caused him inconsolable grief. He completed his tribute to her four years later with a mass unlike any conventional Requiem. Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

This German Requiem sets sections of Luther’s translation of the Bible, dwelling far more on the hope of the resurrection than on the fear of Judgement Day. The first movement, ‘Blessed are they that mourn’, consoles those that remain on Earth with achingly beautiful suspensions from the chorus; the work moves through divinely beautiful music to the dramatic highlight of Brahms’s tone-painting of the resurrection of the dead. Yet the work ends back on an earthly level, a reminder that we cannot know what awaits us. This series is supported by The Meyer Foundation

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by violinist Ben Baker, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission 12

Thursday 2 February 2012 7.30pm

Thursday 9 February 2012 7.30pm

KURT MASUR conductor ARABELLA STEINBACHER violin

TUGAN SOKHIEV conductor ARCADI VOLODOS piano

MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto BRUCKNER Symphony No. 7

BRAHMS Piano Concerto No. 2 SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 8

Throughout his life, Bruckner was devoted to the music of Wagner; at the time of Wagner’s death, he was working on his Seventh Symphony, which became his elegy to his musical hero. The symphony opens with a broad and serene melody on the cellos, described by Julian Johnson as a “complete, divinely given melodic whole”, which is conjured out of a near-silent string tremolando. The lyrical and heart-rending second movement is permeated with the essence of the Catholic liturgy, with the orchestra imitating the timbre of a church organ and choir. The movement also introduces a quartet of Wagner tubas, which reappears in the final movement as part of a blazing fanfare.

The central work in the trilogy of Shostakovich’s so-called ‘War Symphonies’, the Eighth Symphony is an incredibly powerful work and one that emanates a profound feeling of tragedy. The great arch of the first movement leads into two movements reminiscent of the mechanistic industry of war; and the finale tries to sound light and pastoral but is slowly beaten into an exhausted peace. The evening also features Arcadi Volodos performing Brahms’s Second Piano Concerto, a work that encompasses a passionate Scherzo, a lyrical slow movement and a finale suffused with Brahms’s Hungarian gypsy idiom.

This concert is supported by The Zvi and Ofra Meitar Family Fund

6pm Music of Today, Royal Festival Hall A portrait of Ivan Fedele conducted by Wen-Pin Chien with soprano Valentina Coladonato. FREE admission

“The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era

EIN DEUTSCHES REQUIEM

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by trumpeter Tom Poulson, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission

Arcadi Volodos in recital

Thursday 16 February 2012 7.30pm

Tuesday 22 May 2012 7.30pm

CHRISTOPH VON DOHNÁNYI conductor SUSAN GRITTON soprano SIMON KEENLYSIDE baritone PHILHARMONIA CHORUS PHILHARMONIA VOICES

11

www.philharmonia.co.uk

© ‘Requiem’ poster by Lozenko / RIA Novosti / Lebrecht Music & Arts

Tickets £10-£52, Students’ Platform Seats £7; bookable through Southbank Centre only. Call 0844 847 9921 or visit www.southbankcentre.co.uk

Kurt Masur © Chris Christodoulou/Lebrecht Music & Arts

Part of Southbank Centre’s International Piano Series SCHUBERT Sonata in A minor, D.784 BRAHMS 3 Intermezzi, Op. 117 LISZT Sonata in B minor

Quotation from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 4 BRAHMS Ein deutsches Requiem Brahms first considered writing a Requiem Mass after the death of his close friend Robert Schumann, but was only catapulted into its composition a decade later after the death of his mother caused him inconsolable grief. He completed his tribute to her four years later with a mass unlike any conventional Requiem. Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

This German Requiem sets sections of Luther’s translation of the Bible, dwelling far more on the hope of the resurrection than on the fear of Judgement Day. The first movement, ‘Blessed are they that mourn’, consoles those that remain on Earth with achingly beautiful suspensions from the chorus; the work moves through divinely beautiful music to the dramatic highlight of Brahms’s tone-painting of the resurrection of the dead. Yet the work ends back on an earthly level, a reminder that we cannot know what awaits us. This series is supported by The Meyer Foundation

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by violinist Ben Baker, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission 12

SALONEN CONDUCTS BEETHOVEN

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES Sunday 26 February 2012 3.00pm VASILY PETRENKO conductor JAMES EHNES violin

In 2012 Esa-Pekka Salonen begins a Beethoven symphonic series with the Philharmonia Orchestra, an exploration of some of the cornerstones of the orchestral repertoire that culminates in a complete symphony cycle at the Bonn Beethovenfest in October 2012.

HINDEMITH Symphonic metamorphosis of themes by Carl Maria von Weber SIBELIUS Violin Concerto RACHMANINOV Symphonic Dances

This concert is supported by the Principal Friends of the Philharmonia Orchestra

Esa-Pekka Salonen also conducts Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 on 26 January (see page 9) and will conduct Symphony No. 9 in September 2012.

Vasily Petrenko © Mark Mcnulty

The Symphonic Dances were among Rachmaninov’s last works; originally with programmatic movement titles of ‘Noon’, ‘Twilight’ and ‘Midnight’, the three movements almost seem to summarise Rachmaninov’s compositional life, with quotations from his First Symphony and the Dies irae leitmotif that haunts so many of his works. The programme opens with one of Hindemith’s most popular works, full of the dancing melodies of Weber set into a true showpiece for orchestra; and Sibelius’s Violin Concerto forms the haunting and dark-hued heart of this concert.

ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor MITSUKO UCHIDA piano BRAHMS Variations on a Theme of Joseph Haydn SCHOENBERG Piano Concerto BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7 When Schoenberg was composing his Piano Concerto, his markings at the beginning of each movement suggested an autobiographical connection: “Life was so easy”, “Suddenly hatred broke out”, “A grave situation was created” and “But life goes on”. Although these markings were removed in the final published version, the underlying dramatic structure still affects the listener intensely. In contrast, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7, with its driving rhythms and sparkling joie de vivre, is full of bright orchestral colours. This concert is supported by Michael and Mercedes Hoffman

Thursday 15 March 2012 7.30pm ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor VIVIANE HAGNER violin

PHILHARMONIA ONLINE SHOP Latest releases Esa-Pekka Salonen conducts Mahler’s Symphony No. 9

Thursday 1 March 2012 7.30pm

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 1 UNSUK CHIN Violin Concerto BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 3, Eroica

Sir Charles Mackerras conducts Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6

Recordings available on CD or by MP3 download Visit www.philharmonia.co.uk/shop 13

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Esa-Pekka Salonen © Clive Barda

Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony is the work that rethought the classical symphonic structure, with unexpected recapitulations and an unprecedented depth of emotion in the second movement. Before this is the Violin Concerto by Unsuk Chin, new Artistic Director of the Music of Today series: the work won the prestigious Grawemeyer Award in 2004 and was described by the judging committee as “a synthesis of glittering orchestration, rarefied sonorities, volatility of expression, musical puzzles and unexpected turns”.

6pm Music of Today, Royal Festival Hall Works by Ondřej Adámek and Perttu Haapanen conducted by Pierre-André Valade with soprano Helena Juntunen. FREE admission

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

14

SALONEN CONDUCTS BEETHOVEN

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES Sunday 26 February 2012 3.00pm VASILY PETRENKO conductor JAMES EHNES violin

In 2012 Esa-Pekka Salonen begins a Beethoven symphonic series with the Philharmonia Orchestra, an exploration of some of the cornerstones of the orchestral repertoire that culminates in a complete symphony cycle at the Bonn Beethovenfest in October 2012.

HINDEMITH Symphonic metamorphosis of themes by Carl Maria von Weber SIBELIUS Violin Concerto RACHMANINOV Symphonic Dances

This concert is supported by the Principal Friends of the Philharmonia Orchestra

Esa-Pekka Salonen also conducts Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 on 26 January (see page 9) and will conduct Symphony No. 9 in September 2012.

Vasily Petrenko © Mark Mcnulty

The Symphonic Dances were among Rachmaninov’s last works; originally with programmatic movement titles of ‘Noon’, ‘Twilight’ and ‘Midnight’, the three movements almost seem to summarise Rachmaninov’s compositional life, with quotations from his First Symphony and the Dies irae leitmotif that haunts so many of his works. The programme opens with one of Hindemith’s most popular works, full of the dancing melodies of Weber set into a true showpiece for orchestra; and Sibelius’s Violin Concerto forms the haunting and dark-hued heart of this concert.

ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor MITSUKO UCHIDA piano BRAHMS Variations on a Theme of Joseph Haydn SCHOENBERG Piano Concerto BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7 When Schoenberg was composing his Piano Concerto, his markings at the beginning of each movement suggested an autobiographical connection: “Life was so easy”, “Suddenly hatred broke out”, “A grave situation was created” and “But life goes on”. Although these markings were removed in the final published version, the underlying dramatic structure still affects the listener intensely. In contrast, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7, with its driving rhythms and sparkling joie de vivre, is full of bright orchestral colours. This concert is supported by Michael and Mercedes Hoffman

Thursday 15 March 2012 7.30pm ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor VIVIANE HAGNER violin

PHILHARMONIA ONLINE SHOP Latest releases Esa-Pekka Salonen conducts Mahler’s Symphony No. 9

Thursday 1 March 2012 7.30pm

BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 1 UNSUK CHIN Violin Concerto BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 3, Eroica

Sir Charles Mackerras conducts Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6

Recordings available on CD or by MP3 download Visit www.philharmonia.co.uk/shop 13

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Esa-Pekka Salonen © Clive Barda

Beethoven’s Eroica Symphony is the work that rethought the classical symphonic structure, with unexpected recapitulations and an unprecedented depth of emotion in the second movement. Before this is the Violin Concerto by Unsuk Chin, new Artistic Director of the Music of Today series: the work won the prestigious Grawemeyer Award in 2004 and was described by the judging committee as “a synthesis of glittering orchestration, rarefied sonorities, volatility of expression, musical puzzles and unexpected turns”.

6pm Music of Today, Royal Festival Hall Works by Ondřej Adámek and Perttu Haapanen conducted by Pierre-André Valade with soprano Helena Juntunen. FREE admission

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

14

“The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era

THE YEOMEN OF THE GUARD SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

Quotation from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets

Sunday 15 April 2012 3.00pm

WAR REQUIEM

BRITTEN War Requiem Although titled as a Requiem, Benjamin Britten’s work intersperses elements of the traditional Latin mass with settings of poems by Wilfred Owen. This juxtaposition emphasises the tragic loss of life during the First and Second World Wars (the work was composed

GILBERT AND SULLIVAN The Yeomen of the Guard

This series is supported by The Meyer Foundation

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall An introduction to the evening’s concert. FREE admission

© Lebrecht Music & Arts

LORIN MAAZEL conductor NANCY GUSTAFSON soprano MARK PADMORE tenor MATTHIAS GOERNE baritone PHILHARMONIA CHORUS TIFFIN BOYS’ CHOIR

in 1961-62), and Britten makes the contrasts all the more apparent through his emotional music and use of separate instrumental groups, who only join together in full force towards the end of the last movement as the tenor and baritone soloists sing “Let us sleep now” whilst the choruses sing “Into Paradise lead them”. This is truly one of the defining works of the twentieth century.

© RA / Lebrecht Music & Arts

Sunday 25 March 2012 7.30pm

JOHN WILSON conductor PHILHARMONIA VOICES Cast to include SARAH FOX, SIMON BUTTERISS, RICHARD ANGAS, HEATHER SHIPP AND JILL PERT

John Wilson brings his unique touch to one of Gilbert and Sullivan’s most popular operettas, regarded as Sullivan’s finest score. The Yeomen of the Guard is set in the 16th century at the Tower of London and is the darkest and most emotionally engaging of the Savoy Operas, notable for the marked absence of their characteristic satires of British institutions. It closes with a broken-hearted protagonist and two very reluctant engagements rather than the more usual happy ending.

Thursday 19 April 2012 7.30pm JURAJ VALCˇUHA conductor SERGEY KHACHATRYAN violin

15

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Sergey Khachatryan © Marco Borggreve

MUSSORGSKY Overture, Khovanshchina TCHAIKOVSKY Violin Concerto MUSSORGSKY arr. Ravel Pictures at an Exhibition Composed in the space of just one month, Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto is full of endless melodic beauty. The second movement, a Canzonetta, requires the solo violin to be muted: an unusual technique in a concerto, but one that lends the movement a far-away, nostalgic quality. This leads straight into an exhilarating finale, a hectic dance-like movement. Memorable melodies continue into the second half of the concert with the ‘Promenade’ theme of Pictures at an Exhibition linking the descriptive movements, ending with the majestic and blazing ‘Great Gate of Kiev’. Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by flautist Samantha Pearce, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission 16

“The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era

THE YEOMEN OF THE GUARD SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

Quotation from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets

Sunday 15 April 2012 3.00pm

WAR REQUIEM

BRITTEN War Requiem Although titled as a Requiem, Benjamin Britten’s work intersperses elements of the traditional Latin mass with settings of poems by Wilfred Owen. This juxtaposition emphasises the tragic loss of life during the First and Second World Wars (the work was composed

GILBERT AND SULLIVAN The Yeomen of the Guard

This series is supported by The Meyer Foundation

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall An introduction to the evening’s concert. FREE admission

© Lebrecht Music & Arts

LORIN MAAZEL conductor NANCY GUSTAFSON soprano MARK PADMORE tenor MATTHIAS GOERNE baritone PHILHARMONIA CHORUS TIFFIN BOYS’ CHOIR

in 1961-62), and Britten makes the contrasts all the more apparent through his emotional music and use of separate instrumental groups, who only join together in full force towards the end of the last movement as the tenor and baritone soloists sing “Let us sleep now” whilst the choruses sing “Into Paradise lead them”. This is truly one of the defining works of the twentieth century.

© RA / Lebrecht Music & Arts

Sunday 25 March 2012 7.30pm

JOHN WILSON conductor PHILHARMONIA VOICES Cast to include SARAH FOX, SIMON BUTTERISS, RICHARD ANGAS, HEATHER SHIPP AND JILL PERT

John Wilson brings his unique touch to one of Gilbert and Sullivan’s most popular operettas, regarded as Sullivan’s finest score. The Yeomen of the Guard is set in the 16th century at the Tower of London and is the darkest and most emotionally engaging of the Savoy Operas, notable for the marked absence of their characteristic satires of British institutions. It closes with a broken-hearted protagonist and two very reluctant engagements rather than the more usual happy ending.

Thursday 19 April 2012 7.30pm JURAJ VALCˇUHA conductor SERGEY KHACHATRYAN violin

15

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Sergey Khachatryan © Marco Borggreve

MUSSORGSKY Overture, Khovanshchina TCHAIKOVSKY Violin Concerto MUSSORGSKY arr. Ravel Pictures at an Exhibition Composed in the space of just one month, Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto is full of endless melodic beauty. The second movement, a Canzonetta, requires the solo violin to be muted: an unusual technique in a concerto, but one that lends the movement a far-away, nostalgic quality. This leads straight into an exhilarating finale, a hectic dance-like movement. Memorable melodies continue into the second half of the concert with the ‘Promenade’ theme of Pictures at an Exhibition linking the descriptive movements, ending with the majestic and blazing ‘Great Gate of Kiev’. Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by flautist Samantha Pearce, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission 16

Tuesday 24 April 2012 7.30pm

Thursday 3 May 2012 7.30pm

Thursday 17 May 2012 7.30pm

Saturday 19 May 2012 7.30pm

LEIF SEGERSTAM conductor DENIS MATSUEV piano

PHILIPPE JORDAN conductor SIMON TRPCˇESKI piano

DANIELE GATTI conductor

JURAJ VALCˇUHA conductor ALISA WEILERSTEIN cello

SIBELIUS Night Ride and Sunrise RACHMANINOV Piano Concerto No. 2 TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 6, Pathétique Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 2 is an ever-popular staple of the piano repertoire, and it’s easy to hear why. Full of romantic, sweeping melodies and stormy dramatic episodes, the fiendish virtuosity required alongside deep emotional insight is a powerful blend that never fails to affect the listener. Similarly, Tchaikovsky’s Pathétique Symphony is renowned for its memorable moments; the lopsided 5/4 waltz of the second movement, for example, which leads into the march of the third movement. The finale builds to an impassioned climax before fading away into silence. This was the last work composed before Tchaikovsky’s sudden death; and he described it as “my very best… I love it as I have never loved any of my musical children.”

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

WAGNER Parsifal, Prelude to Act III and Good Friday Music MAHLER Symphony No. 5

BEETHOVEN Overture, Leonore No. 3 LISZT Piano Concerto No. 2 BRAHMS Symphony No. 1

After the first performance of his Fifth Symphony, composed between 1901 and 1903, Mahler is said to have declared, “Nobody understood it. I wish I could conduct the first performance fifty years after my death.” More than a hundred years after his death it is certainly recognised as one of the most emotionally complex and ambitious symphonies of the twentieth century. From its famous funereal opening trumpet solo to its blazing finale, it encompasses an extraordinary range of styles and moods. At its heart is the Adagietto, an extended love poem to his wife Alma, who he met in 1901 and proposed to just three weeks after their first meeting.

Overwhelmed by the spectre of his hero Beethoven’s symphonic achievements, Brahms took 21 years to complete his first symphony. In the event it was a monumental critical success, celebrated around Europe as ‘Beethoven’s 10th’ and full of conscious homage in its idiom and musical language. It is paired in this evening’s concert with music by Beethoven himself, one of his workings of the Leonore material from his opera Fidelio, and by his close contemporary Franz Liszt. Liszt’s Second Piano Concerto is less frequently performed than his First, but is widely regarded as the more original and interesting of the two works, composed during Liszt’s Virtuoso Period.

Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony follows a familiar musical trajectory from despair to triumph over its four movements. Though declared a failure both critically and by the composer himself after its first performances, it has become one of his most popular works, and was particularly championed during World War II. One of the most notable performances was by the Leningrad Radio Symphony Orchestra in 1941 during the Siege of Leningrad, which was also broadcast live to London. As the second movement began, bombs started to fall nearby, but the orchestra continued playing until the final note.

“a whirlwind of excitement”

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Dohnányi Brahms Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3 & 4

Sunday 29 April 2012 3.00pm ANDRIS NELSONS conductor BAIBA SKRIDE violin

MOZART Overture, Don Giovanni DVOŘÁK Cello Concerto TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 5

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by violinist Tianyun Jia, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission

The Telegraph on Daniele Gatti, September 2010

17

Simon Trpčeski © Jillian Edelstein, EMI Classics

Dvořák’s tuneful Sixth Symphony is typical of the composer’s style: the music dances throughout with tunes reminiscent of his Czech background. Yet it came during a period of experimentation and development of his personal style, having originally developed his compositional voice in the German classical tradition. The result is a joyful work, full of vigorous rhythms and exuberant colour. The third movement is written as a Furiant, a Czech dance, and it was this work that first drew international attention and firmly established Dvořák as a composer of ‘nationalistic’ music.

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Daniele Gatti © Marco Dos Dantos

WAGNER Overture, Die Meistersinger BRUCH Violin Concerto No. 1 DVOŘÁK Symphony No. 6

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

18

Tuesday 24 April 2012 7.30pm

Thursday 3 May 2012 7.30pm

Thursday 17 May 2012 7.30pm

Saturday 19 May 2012 7.30pm

LEIF SEGERSTAM conductor DENIS MATSUEV piano

PHILIPPE JORDAN conductor SIMON TRPCˇESKI piano

DANIELE GATTI conductor

JURAJ VALCˇUHA conductor ALISA WEILERSTEIN cello

SIBELIUS Night Ride and Sunrise RACHMANINOV Piano Concerto No. 2 TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 6, Pathétique Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 2 is an ever-popular staple of the piano repertoire, and it’s easy to hear why. Full of romantic, sweeping melodies and stormy dramatic episodes, the fiendish virtuosity required alongside deep emotional insight is a powerful blend that never fails to affect the listener. Similarly, Tchaikovsky’s Pathétique Symphony is renowned for its memorable moments; the lopsided 5/4 waltz of the second movement, for example, which leads into the march of the third movement. The finale builds to an impassioned climax before fading away into silence. This was the last work composed before Tchaikovsky’s sudden death; and he described it as “my very best… I love it as I have never loved any of my musical children.”

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

WAGNER Parsifal, Prelude to Act III and Good Friday Music MAHLER Symphony No. 5

BEETHOVEN Overture, Leonore No. 3 LISZT Piano Concerto No. 2 BRAHMS Symphony No. 1

After the first performance of his Fifth Symphony, composed between 1901 and 1903, Mahler is said to have declared, “Nobody understood it. I wish I could conduct the first performance fifty years after my death.” More than a hundred years after his death it is certainly recognised as one of the most emotionally complex and ambitious symphonies of the twentieth century. From its famous funereal opening trumpet solo to its blazing finale, it encompasses an extraordinary range of styles and moods. At its heart is the Adagietto, an extended love poem to his wife Alma, who he met in 1901 and proposed to just three weeks after their first meeting.

Overwhelmed by the spectre of his hero Beethoven’s symphonic achievements, Brahms took 21 years to complete his first symphony. In the event it was a monumental critical success, celebrated around Europe as ‘Beethoven’s 10th’ and full of conscious homage in its idiom and musical language. It is paired in this evening’s concert with music by Beethoven himself, one of his workings of the Leonore material from his opera Fidelio, and by his close contemporary Franz Liszt. Liszt’s Second Piano Concerto is less frequently performed than his First, but is widely regarded as the more original and interesting of the two works, composed during Liszt’s Virtuoso Period.

Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony follows a familiar musical trajectory from despair to triumph over its four movements. Though declared a failure both critically and by the composer himself after its first performances, it has become one of his most popular works, and was particularly championed during World War II. One of the most notable performances was by the Leningrad Radio Symphony Orchestra in 1941 during the Siege of Leningrad, which was also broadcast live to London. As the second movement began, bombs started to fall nearby, but the orchestra continued playing until the final note.

“a whirlwind of excitement”

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Dohnányi Brahms Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3 & 4

Sunday 29 April 2012 3.00pm ANDRIS NELSONS conductor BAIBA SKRIDE violin

MOZART Overture, Don Giovanni DVOŘÁK Cello Concerto TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 5

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by violinist Tianyun Jia, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission

The Telegraph on Daniele Gatti, September 2010

17

Simon Trpčeski © Jillian Edelstein, EMI Classics

Dvořák’s tuneful Sixth Symphony is typical of the composer’s style: the music dances throughout with tunes reminiscent of his Czech background. Yet it came during a period of experimentation and development of his personal style, having originally developed his compositional voice in the German classical tradition. The result is a joyful work, full of vigorous rhythms and exuberant colour. The third movement is written as a Furiant, a Czech dance, and it was this work that first drew international attention and firmly established Dvořák as a composer of ‘nationalistic’ music.

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Daniele Gatti © Marco Dos Dantos

WAGNER Overture, Die Meistersinger BRUCH Violin Concerto No. 1 DVOŘÁK Symphony No. 6

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

18

“The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era

Quotation from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets

Thursday 31 May 2012 7.30pm

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

EDWARD GARDNER conductor DAVID FRAY piano

Sunday 3 June 2012 3.00pm

JANÁČEK Sinfonietta MOZART Piano Concerto No. 22, K482 DVOŘÁK Symphony No. 7

SIR ANDREW DAVIS conductor NATALIE CLEIN cello PHILHARMONIA VOICES

Edward Gardner © Jillian Edelstein

WALTON Crown Imperial ELGAR Cello Concerto HOLST The Planets

BABI YAR

PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 3 SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 13, Babi Yar Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 13 takes the composer’s critique of the Soviet regime as far as he ever publicly went in his lifetime. Setting poems by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, the first movement describes the mass murder of the Jews by the Nazis in Babi Yar, near Kiev, during the Second World War, in a series of theatrical episodes including a depiction of the story of Anne Frank. The movement ends with the breaking down of the door to the Franks’ hiding place, in a haunting and menacing illustration. The remainder of the symphony 19

This series is supported by The Meyer Foundation

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall Anthony Burton interviews Vladimir Ashkenazy about this evening’s programme. FREE admission

“For me, Shostakovich’s Babi Yar Symphony is a work which strongly reflected a freer Soviet Union and a gathering momentum towards change. Using Yevgeny Yevtushenko’s words, Shostakovich expresses a strong hope of great transformation of the Soviet system and society as a whole.” Vladimir Ashkenazy

www.philharmonia.co.uk

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Davis Works by Elgar including Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2, Enigma Variations and Cello Concerto

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Mackerras Dvořák Symphonies Nos. 7 & 8

Natalie Clein © Sussie Ahlburg

VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY conductor NOBUYUKI TSUJII piano SERGEI ALEKSASHKIN bass PHILHARMONIA VOICES

mocks the Soviet government and aspects of Soviet life. Written for enormous forces, including chorus and soloist, it is an epic piece full of powerful criticism.

© RIA Novosti / Lebrecht Music & Arts

Thursday 24 May 2012 7.30pm

Janáček was inspired to write his festive Sinfonietta, scored for an extraordinary fourteen trumpets, after listening to brass bands performing in his native Czechoslovakia. Dedicated to the Czech Armed Forces, Janáček said that it was intended to express ‘contemporary free man, his spiritual beauty and joy, his strength, courage and determination to fight for victory.’ Dvořák’s motivation in composing his Seventh Symphony was equally patriotic. “What is in my mind is Love, God, and my Fatherland”, he said of it, and it is suffused with musical references to the Czech nation, in particular in the final movement, which he said was symbolic of the determination of the Czech people to resist political oppression.

This afternoon of great English music has been put together in celebration of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. Holst wrote his Planets Suite after being introduced to astrology by a friend. Premièred in September 1918, it came to be identified with the nation’s collective emotional outpouring in the wake of the First World War, the theme to Jupiter being re-written in 1921 as the patriotic hymn I Vow to Thee My Country. Elgar’s Cello Concerto has similar overtones, an elegy for the loss of the England that he loved. The concert opens, appropriately, with Walton’s Crown Imperial March, first performed at the coronation of King George VII in 1937, and subsequently at the coronation of HM Queen Elizabeth II in 1953.

6pm Music of Today, Royal Festival Hall A portrait of Gérard Grisey conducted by Pascal Rophé. FREE admission

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

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“The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era

Quotation from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets

Thursday 31 May 2012 7.30pm

SUNDAY MATINEE SERIES

EDWARD GARDNER conductor DAVID FRAY piano

Sunday 3 June 2012 3.00pm

JANÁČEK Sinfonietta MOZART Piano Concerto No. 22, K482 DVOŘÁK Symphony No. 7

SIR ANDREW DAVIS conductor NATALIE CLEIN cello PHILHARMONIA VOICES

Edward Gardner © Jillian Edelstein

WALTON Crown Imperial ELGAR Cello Concerto HOLST The Planets

BABI YAR

PROKOFIEV Piano Concerto No. 3 SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 13, Babi Yar Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 13 takes the composer’s critique of the Soviet regime as far as he ever publicly went in his lifetime. Setting poems by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, the first movement describes the mass murder of the Jews by the Nazis in Babi Yar, near Kiev, during the Second World War, in a series of theatrical episodes including a depiction of the story of Anne Frank. The movement ends with the breaking down of the door to the Franks’ hiding place, in a haunting and menacing illustration. The remainder of the symphony 19

This series is supported by The Meyer Foundation

6pm Pre-concert talk, Royal Festival Hall Anthony Burton interviews Vladimir Ashkenazy about this evening’s programme. FREE admission

“For me, Shostakovich’s Babi Yar Symphony is a work which strongly reflected a freer Soviet Union and a gathering momentum towards change. Using Yevgeny Yevtushenko’s words, Shostakovich expresses a strong hope of great transformation of the Soviet system and society as a whole.” Vladimir Ashkenazy

www.philharmonia.co.uk

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Davis Works by Elgar including Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2, Enigma Variations and Cello Concerto

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Mackerras Dvořák Symphonies Nos. 7 & 8

Natalie Clein © Sussie Ahlburg

VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY conductor NOBUYUKI TSUJII piano SERGEI ALEKSASHKIN bass PHILHARMONIA VOICES

mocks the Soviet government and aspects of Soviet life. Written for enormous forces, including chorus and soloist, it is an epic piece full of powerful criticism.

© RIA Novosti / Lebrecht Music & Arts

Thursday 24 May 2012 7.30pm

Janáček was inspired to write his festive Sinfonietta, scored for an extraordinary fourteen trumpets, after listening to brass bands performing in his native Czechoslovakia. Dedicated to the Czech Armed Forces, Janáček said that it was intended to express ‘contemporary free man, his spiritual beauty and joy, his strength, courage and determination to fight for victory.’ Dvořák’s motivation in composing his Seventh Symphony was equally patriotic. “What is in my mind is Love, God, and my Fatherland”, he said of it, and it is suffused with musical references to the Czech nation, in particular in the final movement, which he said was symbolic of the determination of the Czech people to resist political oppression.

This afternoon of great English music has been put together in celebration of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. Holst wrote his Planets Suite after being introduced to astrology by a friend. Premièred in September 1918, it came to be identified with the nation’s collective emotional outpouring in the wake of the First World War, the theme to Jupiter being re-written in 1921 as the patriotic hymn I Vow to Thee My Country. Elgar’s Cello Concerto has similar overtones, an elegy for the loss of the England that he loved. The concert opens, appropriately, with Walton’s Crown Imperial March, first performed at the coronation of King George VII in 1937, and subsequently at the coronation of HM Queen Elizabeth II in 1953.

6pm Music of Today, Royal Festival Hall A portrait of Gérard Grisey conducted by Pascal Rophé. FREE admission

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

20

MENDELSSOHN Overture, A Midsummer Night’s Dream BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No. 4 BRAHMS Symphony No. 2

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by oboist Suzanne Thorn, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission

BEN HUR Saturday 9 June 2012 7.00pm (please note start time) CARL DAVIS conductor/composer DAVIS Ben Hur (film screening with live orchestral accompaniment) A very special opportunity to experience a screening of one of the great epics of cinema history with a live orchestral soundtrack. The 1925 silent film of Ben Hur was a blockbuster in its day for the newly merged MGM studios, and was the most expensive silent film ever made. Telling the story of Prince Judah BenHur, who is enslaved by his friend and rival but returns to take his revenge, its centrepiece is a spectacular and thrilling chariot race featuring a dramatic real-life crash, which is still regarded as one of the most extraordinary sequences ever recorded on film.

Brahms certainly had a sense of humour: he wrote to his publisher that his Second Symphony was melancholy in tone and that the score must sound like mourning. In fact his Symphony No. 2 is cheerful, lighthearted and picturesquely pastoral in style, with one of Brahms’s friends commenting “Why, it is all blue sky, babbling streams, sunshine, and cool green shade!”. Beethoven’s Fourth Piano Concerto is similarly sparkling and lively in its outer movements, though its sombre and etiolated slow movement – widely associated with the image of Orpheus taming the Furies – provides a moment of contrast.

21

© Photoplay Productions

CHRISTOPH VON DOHNÁNYI conductor ANDREAS HAEFLIGER piano

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Dohnányi Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 3 & 5; Brahms Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3 & 4; Strauss Till Eulenspiegel & Ein Heldenleben

Christoph von Dohnányi © Fotostudio Heinrich

Thursday 7 June 2012 7.30pm

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

“a stunning mixture of action,

spectacle, religious conflict and

personal tragedy” Carl Davis on Ben Hur

22

MENDELSSOHN Overture, A Midsummer Night’s Dream BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No. 4 BRAHMS Symphony No. 2

6pm Pre-concert recital, Royal Festival Hall Recital by oboist Suzanne Thorn, award-winner of the Martin Musical Scholarship Fund. FREE admission

BEN HUR Saturday 9 June 2012 7.00pm (please note start time) CARL DAVIS conductor/composer DAVIS Ben Hur (film screening with live orchestral accompaniment) A very special opportunity to experience a screening of one of the great epics of cinema history with a live orchestral soundtrack. The 1925 silent film of Ben Hur was a blockbuster in its day for the newly merged MGM studios, and was the most expensive silent film ever made. Telling the story of Prince Judah BenHur, who is enslaved by his friend and rival but returns to take his revenge, its centrepiece is a spectacular and thrilling chariot race featuring a dramatic real-life crash, which is still regarded as one of the most extraordinary sequences ever recorded on film.

Brahms certainly had a sense of humour: he wrote to his publisher that his Second Symphony was melancholy in tone and that the score must sound like mourning. In fact his Symphony No. 2 is cheerful, lighthearted and picturesquely pastoral in style, with one of Brahms’s friends commenting “Why, it is all blue sky, babbling streams, sunshine, and cool green shade!”. Beethoven’s Fourth Piano Concerto is similarly sparkling and lively in its outer movements, though its sombre and etiolated slow movement – widely associated with the image of Orpheus taming the Furies – provides a moment of contrast.

21

© Photoplay Productions

CHRISTOPH VON DOHNÁNYI conductor ANDREAS HAEFLIGER piano

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Dohnányi Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 3 & 5; Brahms Symphonies Nos. 1, 2, 3 & 4; Strauss Till Eulenspiegel & Ein Heldenleben

Christoph von Dohnányi © Fotostudio Heinrich

Thursday 7 June 2012 7.30pm

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

“a stunning mixture of action,

spectacle, religious conflict and

personal tragedy” Carl Davis on Ben Hur

22

ANDRÁS SCHIFF conductor/piano MOZART Symphony No. 29 MOZART Piano Concerto No. 20, K466 MOZART Symphony No. 41, Jupiter András Schiff has described Mozart as “a gift to mankind”, his music of “such sublime quality, its message so universal”. This evening he conducts three of Mozart’s most extraordinary works, including the darkly brooding D minor piano concerto, No. 20, in which he also performs as soloist. This piece is thought by many to anticipate the shadowy world of Don Giovanni, written two years later. The concert ends with Mozart’s final – and to most, greatest – symphony, the Jupiter, in many ways the summation of his compositional life, notable for its dazzling Finale, combining five themes simultaneously.

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philharmonia.co.uk/shop Schiff Schubert Symphonies Nos. 2, 5, 8 & 9, plus piano sonatas

“I have seldom heard this work’s drama more

brilliantly realised… there was authority in every bar” The Independent on Schiff and the Philharmonia performing Beethoven, March 2011

András Schiff © Clive Barda

Thursday 14 June 2012 7.30pm

“The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era

RESURRECTION SYMPHONY Thursday 28 June 2012 7.30pm ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor KATE ROYAL soprano EKATERINA GUBANOVA mezzo-soprano PHILHARMONIA CHORUS JOSEPH PHIBBS New commission MAHLER Symphony No. 2, Resurrection Mahler’s Resurrection Symphony takes the listener on a truly transcendental journey. In Mahler’s own words, “The first movement depicts the titanic struggles of a mighty being still caught in the toils of this world; grappling with life and with the fate to which he must succumb – his death”. The last movement deals with “the resolution of the terrible problem of life – redemption”. In Mahler’s original programme, he details the sounding of the Last Trumpet, the resurrection of the dead with wailing and gnashing of teeth, and then the fading away of all noise as everything ‘ceases to be’ before the enormous E flat major climax, with a chorus joined by soprano

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Quotation from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

and mezzo-soprano soloists and pealing bells, representing souls reborn in Heaven. Although Mahler later withdrew his detailed ‘programme’, this enormous work clearly represents a huge personal journey: Mahler wrote of the last movement, “The increasing tension, working up to the final climax, is so tremendous that I don’t know myself, now that it is over, how I ever came to write it.” The first half of the programme is the London première of a co-commission with The Anvil, Basingstoke: composer Joseph Phibbs’s soundworld has been described as offering “a kaleidoscopic range of colour” (The Times). This series is supported by The Meyer Foundation

6pm Music of Today, Royal Festival Hall Young Composers Academy: new works by three young composers, all of whom are recipients of the Royal Philharmonic Society’s Composition Prize, conducted by David Robert Coleman. FREE admission

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ANDRÁS SCHIFF conductor/piano MOZART Symphony No. 29 MOZART Piano Concerto No. 20, K466 MOZART Symphony No. 41, Jupiter András Schiff has described Mozart as “a gift to mankind”, his music of “such sublime quality, its message so universal”. This evening he conducts three of Mozart’s most extraordinary works, including the darkly brooding D minor piano concerto, No. 20, in which he also performs as soloist. This piece is thought by many to anticipate the shadowy world of Don Giovanni, written two years later. The concert ends with Mozart’s final – and to most, greatest – symphony, the Jupiter, in many ways the summation of his compositional life, notable for its dazzling Finale, combining five themes simultaneously.

23

philharmonia.co.uk/shop Schiff Schubert Symphonies Nos. 2, 5, 8 & 9, plus piano sonatas

“I have seldom heard this work’s drama more

brilliantly realised… there was authority in every bar” The Independent on Schiff and the Philharmonia performing Beethoven, March 2011

András Schiff © Clive Barda

Thursday 14 June 2012 7.30pm

“The still point of the turning world”: Music that defines an era

RESURRECTION SYMPHONY Thursday 28 June 2012 7.30pm ESA-PEKKA SALONEN conductor KATE ROYAL soprano EKATERINA GUBANOVA mezzo-soprano PHILHARMONIA CHORUS JOSEPH PHIBBS New commission MAHLER Symphony No. 2, Resurrection Mahler’s Resurrection Symphony takes the listener on a truly transcendental journey. In Mahler’s own words, “The first movement depicts the titanic struggles of a mighty being still caught in the toils of this world; grappling with life and with the fate to which he must succumb – his death”. The last movement deals with “the resolution of the terrible problem of life – redemption”. In Mahler’s original programme, he details the sounding of the Last Trumpet, the resurrection of the dead with wailing and gnashing of teeth, and then the fading away of all noise as everything ‘ceases to be’ before the enormous E flat major climax, with a chorus joined by soprano

www.philharmonia.co.uk

Quotation from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

and mezzo-soprano soloists and pealing bells, representing souls reborn in Heaven. Although Mahler later withdrew his detailed ‘programme’, this enormous work clearly represents a huge personal journey: Mahler wrote of the last movement, “The increasing tension, working up to the final climax, is so tremendous that I don’t know myself, now that it is over, how I ever came to write it.” The first half of the programme is the London première of a co-commission with The Anvil, Basingstoke: composer Joseph Phibbs’s soundworld has been described as offering “a kaleidoscopic range of colour” (The Times). This series is supported by The Meyer Foundation

6pm Music of Today, Royal Festival Hall Young Composers Academy: new works by three young composers, all of whom are recipients of the Royal Philharmonic Society’s Composition Prize, conducted by David Robert Coleman. FREE admission

24

Sponsors and Supporters The quality and diversity of the Philharmonia Orchestra’s work would not be possible without the support, past and present, of its sponsors and supporters. The Philharmonia Orchestra’s 2011/12 Royal Festival Hall season would not be possible without the particular support of Mr Vincent Meyer and The Meyer Foundation The Philharmonia Orchestra would also like to thank Mrs Joscelyn Fox Mr Philip Green Mr & Mrs A Michael Hoffman Mrs Chrisanthy Lemos Sir Sydney & Lady Lipworth The Zvi & Ofra Meitar Family Fund Mr & Mrs G Modiano Dr David Potter CBE Mr Geoff Richards The Dowager Viscountess Rothermere Mr Daniel Salem Professor & Mrs Gerald Westbury Allianz Cultural Foundation The Ernest Cook Trust The Delius Trust The Maud Elkington Charitable Trust The Amaryllis Fleming Foundation Robert Fleming Hannay Memorial Charity Edwin Fox Foundation The Foyle Foundation The Golsoncott Foundation Paul Hamlyn Foundation The Meyer Foundation Adam Mickiewicz Institute The Paul Morgan Charitable Trust The David and Elaine Potter Foundation Royal Philharmonic Society Rubin Foundation Charitable Trust SFIA Educational Trust For more information on supporting the Philharmonia Orchestra, please contact the Development Department, Philharmonia Orchestra, 6th Floor, The Tower Building, 11 York Road, London SE1 7NX. Tel 020 7921 3903 Email development@philharmonia.co.uk

Welcome to Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall

Booking form

Southbank Centre is located on the Thames riverside between Golden Jubilee and Waterloo Bridges.

CUT OUT AND FAX THIS BOOKING FORM TO: 020 7921 3950 OR POST IT TO: Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX

GETTING TO SOUTHBANK CENTRE Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 7NX

1. Select the concerts you wish to attend 2. Select where you would like to sit in the concert hall from the plan overleaf (NB you do not have to sit in the same area for all of your concerts – please indicate your requirements on the booking form) Please note that choir seats are not available for the concerts marked ‘choir n/a’ 3. If you require additional tickets for any concerts please indicate the number you require in the ‘additional tickets’ box

By underground: To Waterloo or cross the river from Temple, Embankment or Charing Cross By rail: To Waterloo or Waterloo East or cross the river from Charing Cross By bus: To Waterloo: 1, RV1, 4, 26, 59, 68, X68, 76, 139, 168, 171, 172, 176, 188, 243, 341, 521 stop on Waterloo Bridge; 77, 211, 381, 507 stop in York Rd and Stamford St. 24-hour bus information 020 7222 1234

P

Access Southbank Centre is accessible to people with disabilities. Access line 0844 847 9910 www.southbankcentre.co.uk/accessibility Shop & Eat at Southbank Centre With sweeping views across the river Thames from the London Eye to St Paul’s Cathedral, Festival Riverside and Festival Terrace are lined with shops and a range of restaurants, linking the constantly evolving creative spaces in Southbank Centre.

Southbank Centre Car Park – Belvedere Road (7am–1am daily) Southbank Centre Car Park – Hayward Gallery (7am–1am daily) Congestion charge payment machines (credit/debit card only) are situated in both car parks.

Join Us The Friends of the Philharmonia Orchestra play an essential role in perpetuating the tradition of the Philharmonia as a great musical institution in Britain today. With the support of its Friends, the Orchestra is able to maintain the very highest standards of music making, and takes this message from its London home at the Royal Festival Hall to the finest venues throughout the world. Become a Friend and discover all that the Philharmonia Orchestra has to offer.

Membership – from £35 pa Priority Booking Members’ Bar Open Rehearsals Regular Newsletters Special Event Invitations and much more!

If you would like help completing your booking form, please call us on FREEPHONE 0800 652 6717 If you would prefer us to calculate the total costs of your tickets, please feel free to leave the payment totals blank: we will advise you of the costs when we send your tickets.

Example 25 Sept 2011 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a) 29 Sept 2011 Maazel/Coote/Vinke 1 Oct 2011 Maazel 9 Oct 2011 Maazel/Soloists (Choir n/a) 13 Oct 2011 Conductors’ Academy 16 Oct 2011 Matheuz/Helmchen 27 Oct 2011 Salonen/Bronfman (Choir n/a) 3 Nov 2011 Salonen/Tomlinson/Brueggergosman (Choir n/a) 24 Nov 2011 Dohnányi/Diener 4 Dec 2011 Sokhiev/Bozhanov 8 Dec 2011 Ashkenazy/Sokolov 11 Dec 2011 Ashkenazy/Bavouzet 15 Dec 2011 Nethsingha/Choir of St John’s College (Choir n/a) 26 Jan 2012 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a) 29 Jan 2012 Davis/Lloyd Webber 2 Feb 2012 Masur/Steinbacher 9 Feb 2012 Sokhiev/Volodos 16 Feb 2012 Dohnányi/Gritton/Keenlyside (Choir n/a) 26 Feb 2012 Petrenko/Ehnes 1 Mar 2012 Salonen/Uchida 15 Mar 2012 Salonen/Hagner 25 Mar 2012 Maazel/Soloists (Choir n/a) 15 Apr 2012 The Yeomen of the Guard (Choir n/a) 19 Apr 2012 Valčuha/Khachatryan 24 Apr 2012 Segerstam/Matsuev 29 Apr 2012 Nelsons/Skride 3 May 2012 Jordan/Trpčeski 17 May 2012 Gatti 19 May 2012 Valčuha/Weilerstein 24 May 2012 Ashkenazy/Tsujii/Aleksashkin (Choir n/a) 31 May 2012 Gardner/Fray 3 Jun 2012 Davis/Clein 7 Jun 2012 Dohnányi/Haefliger 9 Jun 2012 Ben Hur (Choir n/a) 14 Jun 2012 Schiff 28 Jun 2012 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a)

Preferred Pricing & Area Code

1st choice

2nd choice

FS/P1

RS/P1

Phone: 020 7921 3906 E-mail: friends@philharmonia.co.uk Online: philharmonia.co.uk/friends

No. of subscription tickets

No. of additional tickets (charged at full price)

Forename/Initial

Surname

Friend/Customer Number (if known)

Day

Evening

Address Postcode

2

S O L D

O U T

S O L D

O U T

Please tick as many of the boxes below EVEN IF you received this brochure from the Philharmonia Orchestra and have ticked similar boxes before. I would like to join/remain on the Philharmonia Orchestra’s Marketing List, and give my permission to the Orchestra to send me information about future Philharmonia Orchestra events. I am happy to receive information from other carefully selected arts organisations. PAYMENT DETAILS I enclose a cheque/postal order stating an upper limit and made payable to Philharmonia Ltd (this is in case your first choice of seats is not available). I enclose three cheques stating an upper limit made payable to Philharmonia Ltd, one with today’s date, two post-dated with dates in the next two months. Cheque 1: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ Cheque 2: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ Cheque 3: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ I wish to pay by credit card (Mastercard, Visa, Amex, Maestro) Card number

Issue number & start date (Maestro only)

Expiry date

/

CSC number*

Signature

Today’s date

Send your booking form to: Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX or fax it to: 020 7921 3950. Your tickets will be posted to you free of charge within 28 days of receipt of your booking form.

£

Sub-total: cost of additional tickets

£

TOTAL

£

ii

Title

E-mail address

In the unlikely event that we are unable to allocate tickets in either your first or second choice seating areas, would you like us to supply the next best available at the same price? YES/NO Sub-total: cost of subscription tickets Add together the discounted prices of your tickets – see p.i for details

How to join

Please fill in your name and address and payment details below (BLOCK CAPITALS PLEASE)

Contact phone numbers (in case we have a query with your booking)

Unshaded concerts are newly on sale: this is your first opportunity to book for these events (September 2011) Date

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE! GREAT DISCOUNTS IF YOU BOOK FOR 3 OR MORE CONCERTS!

www.philharmonia.co.uk

*For most credit/debit cards the CSC number is the last 3 digits of the number printed on the signature band on the REVERSE of your card. For AMEX cards the CSC number is 4 digits and is printed on the FRONT of the card after and above the main number. This is an additional security measure to help prevent credit card fraud and is required before your transaction can be completed. Please ensure you have written your postcode on the booking form, as this is also required.

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

iii

Sponsors and Supporters The quality and diversity of the Philharmonia Orchestra’s work would not be possible without the support, past and present, of its sponsors and supporters. The Philharmonia Orchestra’s 2011/12 Royal Festival Hall season would not be possible without the particular support of Mr Vincent Meyer and The Meyer Foundation The Philharmonia Orchestra would also like to thank Mrs Joscelyn Fox Mr Philip Green Mr & Mrs A Michael Hoffman Mrs Chrisanthy Lemos Sir Sydney & Lady Lipworth The Zvi & Ofra Meitar Family Fund Mr & Mrs G Modiano Dr David Potter CBE Mr Geoff Richards The Dowager Viscountess Rothermere Mr Daniel Salem Professor & Mrs Gerald Westbury Allianz Cultural Foundation The Ernest Cook Trust The Delius Trust The Maud Elkington Charitable Trust The Amaryllis Fleming Foundation Robert Fleming Hannay Memorial Charity Edwin Fox Foundation The Foyle Foundation The Golsoncott Foundation Paul Hamlyn Foundation The Meyer Foundation Adam Mickiewicz Institute The Paul Morgan Charitable Trust The David and Elaine Potter Foundation Royal Philharmonic Society Rubin Foundation Charitable Trust SFIA Educational Trust For more information on supporting the Philharmonia Orchestra, please contact the Development Department, Philharmonia Orchestra, 6th Floor, The Tower Building, 11 York Road, London SE1 7NX. Tel 020 7921 3903 Email development@philharmonia.co.uk

Welcome to Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall

Booking form

Southbank Centre is located on the Thames riverside between Golden Jubilee and Waterloo Bridges.

CUT OUT AND FAX THIS BOOKING FORM TO: 020 7921 3950 OR POST IT TO: Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX

GETTING TO SOUTHBANK CENTRE Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 7NX

1. Select the concerts you wish to attend 2. Select where you would like to sit in the concert hall from the plan overleaf (NB you do not have to sit in the same area for all of your concerts – please indicate your requirements on the booking form) Please note that choir seats are not available for the concerts marked ‘choir n/a’ 3. If you require additional tickets for any concerts please indicate the number you require in the ‘additional tickets’ box

By underground: To Waterloo or cross the river from Temple, Embankment or Charing Cross By rail: To Waterloo or Waterloo East or cross the river from Charing Cross By bus: To Waterloo: 1, RV1, 4, 26, 59, 68, X68, 76, 139, 168, 171, 172, 176, 188, 243, 341, 521 stop on Waterloo Bridge; 77, 211, 381, 507 stop in York Rd and Stamford St. 24-hour bus information 020 7222 1234

P

Access Southbank Centre is accessible to people with disabilities. Access line 0844 847 9910 www.southbankcentre.co.uk/accessibility Shop & Eat at Southbank Centre With sweeping views across the river Thames from the London Eye to St Paul’s Cathedral, Festival Riverside and Festival Terrace are lined with shops and a range of restaurants, linking the constantly evolving creative spaces in Southbank Centre.

Southbank Centre Car Park – Belvedere Road (7am–1am daily) Southbank Centre Car Park – Hayward Gallery (7am–1am daily) Congestion charge payment machines (credit/debit card only) are situated in both car parks.

Join Us The Friends of the Philharmonia Orchestra play an essential role in perpetuating the tradition of the Philharmonia as a great musical institution in Britain today. With the support of its Friends, the Orchestra is able to maintain the very highest standards of music making, and takes this message from its London home at the Royal Festival Hall to the finest venues throughout the world. Become a Friend and discover all that the Philharmonia Orchestra has to offer.

Membership – from £35 pa Priority Booking Members’ Bar Open Rehearsals Regular Newsletters Special Event Invitations and much more!

If you would like help completing your booking form, please call us on FREEPHONE 0800 652 6717 If you would prefer us to calculate the total costs of your tickets, please feel free to leave the payment totals blank: we will advise you of the costs when we send your tickets.

Example 25 Sept 2011 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a) 29 Sept 2011 Maazel/Coote/Vinke 1 Oct 2011 Maazel 9 Oct 2011 Maazel/Soloists (Choir n/a) 13 Oct 2011 Conductors’ Academy 16 Oct 2011 Matheuz/Helmchen 27 Oct 2011 Salonen/Bronfman (Choir n/a) 3 Nov 2011 Salonen/Tomlinson/Brueggergosman (Choir n/a) 24 Nov 2011 Dohnányi/Diener 4 Dec 2011 Sokhiev/Bozhanov 8 Dec 2011 Ashkenazy/Sokolov 11 Dec 2011 Ashkenazy/Bavouzet 15 Dec 2011 Nethsingha/Choir of St John’s College (Choir n/a) 26 Jan 2012 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a) 29 Jan 2012 Davis/Lloyd Webber 2 Feb 2012 Masur/Steinbacher 9 Feb 2012 Sokhiev/Volodos 16 Feb 2012 Dohnányi/Gritton/Keenlyside (Choir n/a) 26 Feb 2012 Petrenko/Ehnes 1 Mar 2012 Salonen/Uchida 15 Mar 2012 Salonen/Hagner 25 Mar 2012 Maazel/Soloists (Choir n/a) 15 Apr 2012 The Yeomen of the Guard (Choir n/a) 19 Apr 2012 Valčuha/Khachatryan 24 Apr 2012 Segerstam/Matsuev 29 Apr 2012 Nelsons/Skride 3 May 2012 Jordan/Trpčeski 17 May 2012 Gatti 19 May 2012 Valčuha/Weilerstein 24 May 2012 Ashkenazy/Tsujii/Aleksashkin (Choir n/a) 31 May 2012 Gardner/Fray 3 Jun 2012 Davis/Clein 7 Jun 2012 Dohnányi/Haefliger 9 Jun 2012 Ben Hur (Choir n/a) 14 Jun 2012 Schiff 28 Jun 2012 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a)

Preferred Pricing & Area Code

1st choice

2nd choice

FS/P1

RS/P1

Phone: 020 7921 3906 E-mail: friends@philharmonia.co.uk Online: philharmonia.co.uk/friends

No. of subscription tickets

No. of additional tickets (charged at full price)

Forename/Initial

Surname

Friend/Customer Number (if known)

Day

Evening

Address Postcode

2

S O L D

O U T

S O L D

O U T

Please tick as many of the boxes below EVEN IF you received this brochure from the Philharmonia Orchestra and have ticked similar boxes before. I would like to join/remain on the Philharmonia Orchestra’s Marketing List, and give my permission to the Orchestra to send me information about future Philharmonia Orchestra events. I am happy to receive information from other carefully selected arts organisations. PAYMENT DETAILS I enclose a cheque/postal order stating an upper limit and made payable to Philharmonia Ltd (this is in case your first choice of seats is not available). I enclose three cheques stating an upper limit made payable to Philharmonia Ltd, one with today’s date, two post-dated with dates in the next two months. Cheque 1: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ Cheque 2: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ Cheque 3: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ I wish to pay by credit card (Mastercard, Visa, Amex, Maestro) Card number

Issue number & start date (Maestro only)

Expiry date

/

CSC number*

Signature

Today’s date

Send your booking form to: Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX or fax it to: 020 7921 3950. Your tickets will be posted to you free of charge within 28 days of receipt of your booking form.

£

Sub-total: cost of additional tickets

£

TOTAL

£

ii

Title

E-mail address

In the unlikely event that we are unable to allocate tickets in either your first or second choice seating areas, would you like us to supply the next best available at the same price? YES/NO Sub-total: cost of subscription tickets Add together the discounted prices of your tickets – see p.i for details

How to join

Please fill in your name and address and payment details below (BLOCK CAPITALS PLEASE)

Contact phone numbers (in case we have a query with your booking)

Unshaded concerts are newly on sale: this is your first opportunity to book for these events (September 2011) Date

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE! GREAT DISCOUNTS IF YOU BOOK FOR 3 OR MORE CONCERTS!

www.philharmonia.co.uk

*For most credit/debit cards the CSC number is the last 3 digits of the number printed on the signature band on the REVERSE of your card. For AMEX cards the CSC number is 4 digits and is printed on the FRONT of the card after and above the main number. This is an additional security measure to help prevent credit card fraud and is required before your transaction can be completed. Please ensure you have written your postcode on the booking form, as this is also required.

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

iii

Booking Information/Ticket Prices

Esa-Pekka Salonen Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor

How to book your tickets SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE! GREAT DISCOUNTS IF YOU BOOK FOR 3 OR MORE CONCERTS! Philharmonia Orchestra 6th Floor, The Tower Building, 11 York Road, London SE1 7NX

Subscription ticket prices (for seating plan see page iv)

ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL Balcony

Royal Festival Hall Pricing Codes

P7 P6 P5 P4 P2

Rear P7 P6 P4 P3 P2

P7 P6 P5 P4 P3 P2 P1

P7 P6 P4 P3 P2

Stalls

Side Stalls

P2 P6

Front Stalls

P2

P1 P4

P2

P2 P6

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

P4

Boxes

Price per ticket

Full price (1–2 concerts)

£38.00

£29.00

£23.00

£18.00

£14.00

£11.00

£8.00

3–5 concerts

£34.20

£26.10

£20.70

£16.20

£12.60

£9.90

£7.20

10%

6–8 concerts

£32.30

£24.65

£19.55

£15.30

£11.90

£9.35

£6.80

15%

9–11 concerts

£30.40

£23.20

£18.40

£14.40

£11.20

£8.80

£6.40

20%

12–14 concerts

£28.50

£21.75

£17.25

£13.50

£10.50

£8.25

£6.00

25%

15 + concerts

£26.60

£20.30

£16.10

£12.60

£9.80

£7.70

£5.60

30%

Take advantage of up to 30% discount on your tickets by booking a subscription package (minimum 3 concerts booked in one transaction).

Performance Area

P1

P7

P2

HOW TO BOOK:

Boxes

Choir

Single ticket prices Price Codes

Premium

P1

P2

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

Full ticket price

£45

£38

£29

£23

£18

£14

£11

£8

Selected Front Stalls Front Stalls* (FS) Rear Stalls (RS) Boxes (BX)

Front Stalls (FS) Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Boxes (BX) Side Stalls (SS)

*PREMIUM SEATS We have selected the front stalls seats in the auditorium with the best acoustic and view (concerts with a piano soloist will have keyboard side premium seats) and will sell these on a firstcome first-served basis at £45 each. Subscription discounts do not apply although these events can be included in the total number of concerts when applying the subscription discount. Please call FREEPHONE 0800 652 6717 for more information.

Front Stalls (FS) Rear Stalls (RS)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Choir (CH) Wheelchair (WH)

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE: Great discounts if you book for 3 or more concerts! Book for 3 or more concerts and receive the following discounts on your tickets:3–5 concerts 10% discount 6–8 concerts 15% discount 9–11 concerts 20% discount 12–14 concerts 25% discount 15+ concerts 30% discount For discounted ticket prices see page i of the booking form Philharmonia Orchestra subscribers also receive other special benefits, including: Free ticket exchange scheme (up to 2 working days before concert) Flexible payment: spread the costs of your tickets over 3 months No booking fee

www.philharmonia.co.uk

PHONE: Call the FREEPHONE Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office on 0800 652 6717 to book your tickets (Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm) NO BOOKING FEE and call back answerphone service out of hours POST: Fill in the booking form and post to Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX ONLINE: www.philharmonia.co.uk (NB this facility is not available for group bookings) E-MAIL: boxoffice@philharmonia.co.uk FAX: Complete the booking form and fax it to 020 7921 3950

Discount (%)

Design WITH RELISH 020 7503 3171 Print CANTATE 020 7622 3401

Philharmonia Orchestra and Southbank Centre are both registered charities.

Tickets may also be purchased from Southbank Centre PHONE: 0844 847 9921 (9am-8pm daily)* ONLINE: www.southbankcentre.co.uk* FAX: 020 7921 0607* IN PERSON: Ticket Office, Royal Festival Hall 10am–8pm daily *Transaction fees apply. No fee for Southbank Centre Members

CONCESSIONS

We have selected the front stalls seats in the auditorium with the best acoustic and view (concerts with a piano soloist will have keyboard side premium seats) and will sell these on a first-come first-served basis at £45 each. Subscription discounts do not apply although these events can be included in the total number of concerts when applying the subscription discount.

A limited allocation of half-price tickets is available for recipients of Jobseekers Allowance, Income Support, Pension Credit, Under 16s and full-time students. Appropriate cards to be shown.

Book 10 or more tickets for one concert and qualify for the Philharmonia Orchestra Group rate: 25% discount off all tickets. Other benefits include 1 free ticket for every 20 purchased, flexible reservations and exclusive ticket offers. School parties: 50% discount and 1 free teacher’s ticket for every 10 purchased.

FAMILY TICKETS – SPECIAL DISCOUNTS FOR CHILDREN Each adult attending a concert can purchase up to 2 tickets for under-16s at half-price. Philharmonia Orchestra concerts are usually suitable for children aged 7 upwards. Children under 6 may not be admitted at the discretion of the orchestra and hall management. Please contact us to discuss your requirements if you need additional guidance.

Please note that discounts/ concessions cannot be combined.

All the information in this brochure was correct at the time of going to press, but changes may be unavoidable.

“blazing

PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES Southbank Centre is accessible to people with disabilities. Visitors with a disability should join Southbank Centre’s free Access Scheme. You may be eligible for tickets at concessionary prices; a free ticket for a companion who can assist you during your visit; and receive information in alternative formats. To join please call 0844 847 9910, email accesslist@southbankcentre.co.uk or visit www.southbankcentre.co.uk/access

an unstoppable The Guardian on

Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Philharmonia Orchestra, February 2011

The auditorium is fitted with Sennheiser infra-red systems. Receivers can be collected from the cloakroom in Royal Festival Hall.

LEVEL ACCESS There is level access throughout Royal Festival Hall from the internal lifts (some of the lifts have a limited weight capacity; please call 0844 847 9910 to confirm), and there are wheelchair spaces in the boxes, choir seats, side and rear stalls of the auditorium. Tickets for wheelchair spaces can be booked online or by phone on 0800 652 6717 or 0844 847 9910.

This brochure is available in alternative formats Call 0800 652 6717

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

FREEPHONE PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA BOX OFFICE: 0800 652 6717 email boxoffice@philharmonia.co.uk www.philharmonia.co.uk

PREMIUM SEATS

GROUP BOOKINGS

“momentum originality” ” Tel 020 7921 3900 Fax 020 7921 3950

No. of concerts

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE!

P1

P3

P2

P7

iv

P2

P7

Side Stalls

Location (Royal Festival Hall)

P1

2011/12 concert season Royal Festival Hall

i

The Sunday Times on Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Philharmonia Orchestra, February 2011

Sponsors and Supporters The quality and diversity of the Philharmonia Orchestra’s work would not be possible without the support, past and present, of its sponsors and supporters. The Philharmonia Orchestra’s 2011/12 Royal Festival Hall season would not be possible without the particular support of Mr Vincent Meyer and The Meyer Foundation The Philharmonia Orchestra would also like to thank Mrs Joscelyn Fox Mr Philip Green Mr & Mrs A Michael Hoffman Mrs Chrisanthy Lemos Sir Sydney & Lady Lipworth The Zvi & Ofra Meitar Family Fund Mr & Mrs G Modiano Dr David Potter CBE Mr Geoff Richards The Dowager Viscountess Rothermere Mr Daniel Salem Professor & Mrs Gerald Westbury Allianz Cultural Foundation The Ernest Cook Trust The Delius Trust The Maud Elkington Charitable Trust The Amaryllis Fleming Foundation Robert Fleming Hannay Memorial Charity Edwin Fox Foundation The Foyle Foundation The Golsoncott Foundation Paul Hamlyn Foundation The Meyer Foundation Adam Mickiewicz Institute The Paul Morgan Charitable Trust The David and Elaine Potter Foundation Royal Philharmonic Society Rubin Foundation Charitable Trust SFIA Educational Trust For more information on supporting the Philharmonia Orchestra, please contact the Development Department, Philharmonia Orchestra, 6th Floor, The Tower Building, 11 York Road, London SE1 7NX. Tel 020 7921 3903 Email development@philharmonia.co.uk

Welcome to Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall

Booking form

Southbank Centre is located on the Thames riverside between Golden Jubilee and Waterloo Bridges.

CUT OUT AND FAX THIS BOOKING FORM TO: 020 7921 3950 OR POST IT TO: Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX

GETTING TO SOUTHBANK CENTRE Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 7NX

1. Select the concerts you wish to attend 2. Select where you would like to sit in the concert hall from the plan overleaf (NB you do not have to sit in the same area for all of your concerts – please indicate your requirements on the booking form) Please note that choir seats are not available for the concerts marked ‘choir n/a’ 3. If you require additional tickets for any concerts please indicate the number you require in the ‘additional tickets’ box

By underground: To Waterloo or cross the river from Temple, Embankment or Charing Cross By rail: To Waterloo or Waterloo East or cross the river from Charing Cross By bus: To Waterloo: 1, RV1, 4, 26, 59, 68, X68, 76, 139, 168, 171, 172, 176, 188, 243, 341, 521 stop on Waterloo Bridge; 77, 211, 381, 507 stop in York Rd and Stamford St. 24-hour bus information 020 7222 1234

P

Access Southbank Centre is accessible to people with disabilities. Access line 0844 847 9910 www.southbankcentre.co.uk/accessibility Shop & Eat at Southbank Centre With sweeping views across the river Thames from the London Eye to St Paul’s Cathedral, Festival Riverside and Festival Terrace are lined with shops and a range of restaurants, linking the constantly evolving creative spaces in Southbank Centre.

Southbank Centre Car Park – Belvedere Road (7am–1am daily) Southbank Centre Car Park – Hayward Gallery (7am–1am daily) Congestion charge payment machines (credit/debit card only) are situated in both car parks.

Join Us The Friends of the Philharmonia Orchestra play an essential role in perpetuating the tradition of the Philharmonia as a great musical institution in Britain today. With the support of its Friends, the Orchestra is able to maintain the very highest standards of music making, and takes this message from its London home at the Royal Festival Hall to the finest venues throughout the world. Become a Friend and discover all that the Philharmonia Orchestra has to offer.

Membership – from £35 pa Priority Booking Members’ Bar Open Rehearsals Regular Newsletters Special Event Invitations and much more!

If you would like help completing your booking form, please call us on FREEPHONE 0800 652 6717 If you would prefer us to calculate the total costs of your tickets, please feel free to leave the payment totals blank: we will advise you of the costs when we send your tickets.

Example 25 Sept 2011 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a) 29 Sept 2011 Maazel/Coote/Vinke 1 Oct 2011 Maazel 9 Oct 2011 Maazel/Soloists (Choir n/a) 13 Oct 2011 Conductors’ Academy 16 Oct 2011 Matheuz/Helmchen 27 Oct 2011 Salonen/Bronfman (Choir n/a) 3 Nov 2011 Salonen/Tomlinson/Brueggergosman (Choir n/a) 24 Nov 2011 Dohnányi/Diener 4 Dec 2011 Sokhiev/Bozhanov 8 Dec 2011 Ashkenazy/Sokolov 11 Dec 2011 Ashkenazy/Bavouzet 15 Dec 2011 Nethsingha/Choir of St John’s College (Choir n/a) 26 Jan 2012 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a) 29 Jan 2012 Davis/Lloyd Webber 2 Feb 2012 Masur/Steinbacher 9 Feb 2012 Sokhiev/Volodos 16 Feb 2012 Dohnányi/Gritton/Keenlyside (Choir n/a) 26 Feb 2012 Petrenko/Ehnes 1 Mar 2012 Salonen/Uchida 15 Mar 2012 Salonen/Hagner 25 Mar 2012 Maazel/Soloists (Choir n/a) 15 Apr 2012 The Yeomen of the Guard (Choir n/a) 19 Apr 2012 Valčuha/Khachatryan 24 Apr 2012 Segerstam/Matsuev 29 Apr 2012 Nelsons/Skride 3 May 2012 Jordan/Trpčeski 17 May 2012 Gatti 19 May 2012 Valčuha/Weilerstein 24 May 2012 Ashkenazy/Tsujii/Aleksashkin (Choir n/a) 31 May 2012 Gardner/Fray 3 Jun 2012 Davis/Clein 7 Jun 2012 Dohnányi/Haefliger 9 Jun 2012 Ben Hur (Choir n/a) 14 Jun 2012 Schiff 28 Jun 2012 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a)

Preferred Pricing & Area Code

1st choice

2nd choice

FS/P1

RS/P1

Phone: 020 7921 3906 E-mail: friends@philharmonia.co.uk Online: philharmonia.co.uk/friends

No. of subscription tickets

No. of additional tickets (charged at full price)

Forename/Initial

Surname

Friend/Customer Number (if known)

Day

Evening

Address Postcode

2

S O L D

O U T

S O L D

O U T

Please tick as many of the boxes below EVEN IF you received this brochure from the Philharmonia Orchestra and have ticked similar boxes before. I would like to join/remain on the Philharmonia Orchestra’s Marketing List, and give my permission to the Orchestra to send me information about future Philharmonia Orchestra events. I am happy to receive information from other carefully selected arts organisations. PAYMENT DETAILS I enclose a cheque/postal order stating an upper limit and made payable to Philharmonia Ltd (this is in case your first choice of seats is not available). I enclose three cheques stating an upper limit made payable to Philharmonia Ltd, one with today’s date, two post-dated with dates in the next two months. Cheque 1: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ Cheque 2: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ Cheque 3: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ I wish to pay by credit card (Mastercard, Visa, Amex, Maestro) Card number

Issue number & start date (Maestro only)

Expiry date

/

CSC number*

Signature

Today’s date

Send your booking form to: Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX or fax it to: 020 7921 3950. Your tickets will be posted to you free of charge within 28 days of receipt of your booking form.

£

Sub-total: cost of additional tickets

£

TOTAL

£

ii

Title

E-mail address

In the unlikely event that we are unable to allocate tickets in either your first or second choice seating areas, would you like us to supply the next best available at the same price? YES/NO Sub-total: cost of subscription tickets Add together the discounted prices of your tickets – see p.i for details

How to join

Please fill in your name and address and payment details below (BLOCK CAPITALS PLEASE)

Contact phone numbers (in case we have a query with your booking)

Unshaded concerts are newly on sale: this is your first opportunity to book for these events (September 2011) Date

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE! GREAT DISCOUNTS IF YOU BOOK FOR 3 OR MORE CONCERTS!

www.philharmonia.co.uk

*For most credit/debit cards the CSC number is the last 3 digits of the number printed on the signature band on the REVERSE of your card. For AMEX cards the CSC number is 4 digits and is printed on the FRONT of the card after and above the main number. This is an additional security measure to help prevent credit card fraud and is required before your transaction can be completed. Please ensure you have written your postcode on the booking form, as this is also required.

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

iii

Sponsors and Supporters The quality and diversity of the Philharmonia Orchestra’s work would not be possible without the support, past and present, of its sponsors and supporters. The Philharmonia Orchestra’s 2011/12 Royal Festival Hall season would not be possible without the particular support of Mr Vincent Meyer and The Meyer Foundation The Philharmonia Orchestra would also like to thank Mrs Joscelyn Fox Mr Philip Green Mr & Mrs A Michael Hoffman Mrs Chrisanthy Lemos Sir Sydney & Lady Lipworth The Zvi & Ofra Meitar Family Fund Mr & Mrs G Modiano Dr David Potter CBE Mr Geoff Richards The Dowager Viscountess Rothermere Mr Daniel Salem Professor & Mrs Gerald Westbury Allianz Cultural Foundation The Ernest Cook Trust The Delius Trust The Maud Elkington Charitable Trust The Amaryllis Fleming Foundation Robert Fleming Hannay Memorial Charity Edwin Fox Foundation The Foyle Foundation The Golsoncott Foundation Paul Hamlyn Foundation The Meyer Foundation Adam Mickiewicz Institute The Paul Morgan Charitable Trust The David and Elaine Potter Foundation Royal Philharmonic Society Rubin Foundation Charitable Trust SFIA Educational Trust For more information on supporting the Philharmonia Orchestra, please contact the Development Department, Philharmonia Orchestra, 6th Floor, The Tower Building, 11 York Road, London SE1 7NX. Tel 020 7921 3903 Email development@philharmonia.co.uk

Welcome to Southbank Centre’s Royal Festival Hall

Booking form

Southbank Centre is located on the Thames riverside between Golden Jubilee and Waterloo Bridges.

CUT OUT AND FAX THIS BOOKING FORM TO: 020 7921 3950 OR POST IT TO: Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX

GETTING TO SOUTHBANK CENTRE Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 7NX

1. Select the concerts you wish to attend 2. Select where you would like to sit in the concert hall from the plan overleaf (NB you do not have to sit in the same area for all of your concerts – please indicate your requirements on the booking form) Please note that choir seats are not available for the concerts marked ‘choir n/a’ 3. If you require additional tickets for any concerts please indicate the number you require in the ‘additional tickets’ box

By underground: To Waterloo or cross the river from Temple, Embankment or Charing Cross By rail: To Waterloo or Waterloo East or cross the river from Charing Cross By bus: To Waterloo: 1, RV1, 4, 26, 59, 68, X68, 76, 139, 168, 171, 172, 176, 188, 243, 341, 521 stop on Waterloo Bridge; 77, 211, 381, 507 stop in York Rd and Stamford St. 24-hour bus information 020 7222 1234

P

Access Southbank Centre is accessible to people with disabilities. Access line 0844 847 9910 www.southbankcentre.co.uk/accessibility Shop & Eat at Southbank Centre With sweeping views across the river Thames from the London Eye to St Paul’s Cathedral, Festival Riverside and Festival Terrace are lined with shops and a range of restaurants, linking the constantly evolving creative spaces in Southbank Centre.

Southbank Centre Car Park – Belvedere Road (7am–1am daily) Southbank Centre Car Park – Hayward Gallery (7am–1am daily) Congestion charge payment machines (credit/debit card only) are situated in both car parks.

Join Us The Friends of the Philharmonia Orchestra play an essential role in perpetuating the tradition of the Philharmonia as a great musical institution in Britain today. With the support of its Friends, the Orchestra is able to maintain the very highest standards of music making, and takes this message from its London home at the Royal Festival Hall to the finest venues throughout the world. Become a Friend and discover all that the Philharmonia Orchestra has to offer.

Membership – from £35 pa Priority Booking Members’ Bar Open Rehearsals Regular Newsletters Special Event Invitations and much more!

If you would like help completing your booking form, please call us on FREEPHONE 0800 652 6717 If you would prefer us to calculate the total costs of your tickets, please feel free to leave the payment totals blank: we will advise you of the costs when we send your tickets.

Example 25 Sept 2011 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a) 29 Sept 2011 Maazel/Coote/Vinke 1 Oct 2011 Maazel 9 Oct 2011 Maazel/Soloists (Choir n/a) 13 Oct 2011 Conductors’ Academy 16 Oct 2011 Matheuz/Helmchen 27 Oct 2011 Salonen/Bronfman (Choir n/a) 3 Nov 2011 Salonen/Tomlinson/Brueggergosman (Choir n/a) 24 Nov 2011 Dohnányi/Diener 4 Dec 2011 Sokhiev/Bozhanov 8 Dec 2011 Ashkenazy/Sokolov 11 Dec 2011 Ashkenazy/Bavouzet 15 Dec 2011 Nethsingha/Choir of St John’s College (Choir n/a) 26 Jan 2012 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a) 29 Jan 2012 Davis/Lloyd Webber 2 Feb 2012 Masur/Steinbacher 9 Feb 2012 Sokhiev/Volodos 16 Feb 2012 Dohnányi/Gritton/Keenlyside (Choir n/a) 26 Feb 2012 Petrenko/Ehnes 1 Mar 2012 Salonen/Uchida 15 Mar 2012 Salonen/Hagner 25 Mar 2012 Maazel/Soloists (Choir n/a) 15 Apr 2012 The Yeomen of the Guard (Choir n/a) 19 Apr 2012 Valčuha/Khachatryan 24 Apr 2012 Segerstam/Matsuev 29 Apr 2012 Nelsons/Skride 3 May 2012 Jordan/Trpčeski 17 May 2012 Gatti 19 May 2012 Valčuha/Weilerstein 24 May 2012 Ashkenazy/Tsujii/Aleksashkin (Choir n/a) 31 May 2012 Gardner/Fray 3 Jun 2012 Davis/Clein 7 Jun 2012 Dohnányi/Haefliger 9 Jun 2012 Ben Hur (Choir n/a) 14 Jun 2012 Schiff 28 Jun 2012 Salonen/Soloists (Choir n/a)

Preferred Pricing & Area Code

1st choice

2nd choice

FS/P1

RS/P1

Phone: 020 7921 3906 E-mail: friends@philharmonia.co.uk Online: philharmonia.co.uk/friends

No. of subscription tickets

No. of additional tickets (charged at full price)

Forename/Initial

Surname

Friend/Customer Number (if known)

Day

Evening

Address Postcode

2

S O L D

O U T

S O L D

O U T

Please tick as many of the boxes below EVEN IF you received this brochure from the Philharmonia Orchestra and have ticked similar boxes before. I would like to join/remain on the Philharmonia Orchestra’s Marketing List, and give my permission to the Orchestra to send me information about future Philharmonia Orchestra events. I am happy to receive information from other carefully selected arts organisations. PAYMENT DETAILS I enclose a cheque/postal order stating an upper limit and made payable to Philharmonia Ltd (this is in case your first choice of seats is not available). I enclose three cheques stating an upper limit made payable to Philharmonia Ltd, one with today’s date, two post-dated with dates in the next two months. Cheque 1: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ Cheque 2: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ Cheque 3: date: __ /__ /__ £: ___:__ I wish to pay by credit card (Mastercard, Visa, Amex, Maestro) Card number

Issue number & start date (Maestro only)

Expiry date

/

CSC number*

Signature

Today’s date

Send your booking form to: Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX or fax it to: 020 7921 3950. Your tickets will be posted to you free of charge within 28 days of receipt of your booking form.

£

Sub-total: cost of additional tickets

£

TOTAL

£

ii

Title

E-mail address

In the unlikely event that we are unable to allocate tickets in either your first or second choice seating areas, would you like us to supply the next best available at the same price? YES/NO Sub-total: cost of subscription tickets Add together the discounted prices of your tickets – see p.i for details

How to join

Please fill in your name and address and payment details below (BLOCK CAPITALS PLEASE)

Contact phone numbers (in case we have a query with your booking)

Unshaded concerts are newly on sale: this is your first opportunity to book for these events (September 2011) Date

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE! GREAT DISCOUNTS IF YOU BOOK FOR 3 OR MORE CONCERTS!

www.philharmonia.co.uk

*For most credit/debit cards the CSC number is the last 3 digits of the number printed on the signature band on the REVERSE of your card. For AMEX cards the CSC number is 4 digits and is printed on the FRONT of the card after and above the main number. This is an additional security measure to help prevent credit card fraud and is required before your transaction can be completed. Please ensure you have written your postcode on the booking form, as this is also required.

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

iii

Booking Information/Ticket Prices

Esa-Pekka Salonen Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor

How to book your tickets SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE! GREAT DISCOUNTS IF YOU BOOK FOR 3 OR MORE CONCERTS! Philharmonia Orchestra 6th Floor, The Tower Building, 11 York Road, London SE1 7NX

Subscription ticket prices (for seating plan see page iv)

ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL Balcony

Royal Festival Hall Pricing Codes

P7 P6 P5 P4 P2

Rear P7 P6 P4 P3 P2

P7 P6 P5 P4 P3 P2 P1

P7 P6 P4 P3 P2

Stalls

Side Stalls

P2 P6

Front Stalls

P2

P1 P4

P2

P2 P6

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

P4

Boxes

Price per ticket

Full price (1–2 concerts)

£38.00

£29.00

£23.00

£18.00

£14.00

£11.00

£8.00

3–5 concerts

£34.20

£26.10

£20.70

£16.20

£12.60

£9.90

£7.20

10%

6–8 concerts

£32.30

£24.65

£19.55

£15.30

£11.90

£9.35

£6.80

15%

9–11 concerts

£30.40

£23.20

£18.40

£14.40

£11.20

£8.80

£6.40

20%

12–14 concerts

£28.50

£21.75

£17.25

£13.50

£10.50

£8.25

£6.00

25%

15 + concerts

£26.60

£20.30

£16.10

£12.60

£9.80

£7.70

£5.60

30%

Take advantage of up to 30% discount on your tickets by booking a subscription package (minimum 3 concerts booked in one transaction).

Performance Area

P1

P7

P2

HOW TO BOOK:

Boxes

Choir

Single ticket prices Price Codes

Premium

P1

P2

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

Full ticket price

£45

£38

£29

£23

£18

£14

£11

£8

Selected Front Stalls Front Stalls* (FS) Rear Stalls (RS) Boxes (BX)

Front Stalls (FS) Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Boxes (BX) Side Stalls (SS)

*PREMIUM SEATS We have selected the front stalls seats in the auditorium with the best acoustic and view (concerts with a piano soloist will have keyboard side premium seats) and will sell these on a firstcome first-served basis at £45 each. Subscription discounts do not apply although these events can be included in the total number of concerts when applying the subscription discount. Please call FREEPHONE 0800 652 6717 for more information.

Front Stalls (FS) Rear Stalls (RS)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Choir (CH) Wheelchair (WH)

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE: Great discounts if you book for 3 or more concerts! Book for 3 or more concerts and receive the following discounts on your tickets:3–5 concerts 10% discount 6–8 concerts 15% discount 9–11 concerts 20% discount 12–14 concerts 25% discount 15+ concerts 30% discount For discounted ticket prices see page i of the booking form Philharmonia Orchestra subscribers also receive other special benefits, including: Free ticket exchange scheme (up to 2 working days before concert) Flexible payment: spread the costs of your tickets over 3 months No booking fee

www.philharmonia.co.uk

PHONE: Call the FREEPHONE Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office on 0800 652 6717 to book your tickets (Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm) NO BOOKING FEE and call back answerphone service out of hours POST: Fill in the booking form and post to Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX ONLINE: www.philharmonia.co.uk (NB this facility is not available for group bookings) E-MAIL: boxoffice@philharmonia.co.uk FAX: Complete the booking form and fax it to 020 7921 3950

Discount (%)

Design WITH RELISH 020 7503 3171 Print CANTATE 020 7622 3401

Philharmonia Orchestra and Southbank Centre are both registered charities.

Tickets may also be purchased from Southbank Centre PHONE: 0844 847 9921 (9am-8pm daily)* ONLINE: www.southbankcentre.co.uk* FAX: 020 7921 0607* IN PERSON: Ticket Office, Royal Festival Hall 10am–8pm daily *Transaction fees apply. No fee for Southbank Centre Members

CONCESSIONS

We have selected the front stalls seats in the auditorium with the best acoustic and view (concerts with a piano soloist will have keyboard side premium seats) and will sell these on a first-come first-served basis at £45 each. Subscription discounts do not apply although these events can be included in the total number of concerts when applying the subscription discount.

A limited allocation of half-price tickets is available for recipients of Jobseekers Allowance, Income Support, Pension Credit, Under 16s and full-time students. Appropriate cards to be shown.

Book 10 or more tickets for one concert and qualify for the Philharmonia Orchestra Group rate: 25% discount off all tickets. Other benefits include 1 free ticket for every 20 purchased, flexible reservations and exclusive ticket offers. School parties: 50% discount and 1 free teacher’s ticket for every 10 purchased.

FAMILY TICKETS – SPECIAL DISCOUNTS FOR CHILDREN Each adult attending a concert can purchase up to 2 tickets for under-16s at half-price. Philharmonia Orchestra concerts are usually suitable for children aged 7 upwards. Children under 6 may not be admitted at the discretion of the orchestra and hall management. Please contact us to discuss your requirements if you need additional guidance.

Please note that discounts/ concessions cannot be combined.

All the information in this brochure was correct at the time of going to press, but changes may be unavoidable.

“blazing

PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES Southbank Centre is accessible to people with disabilities. Visitors with a disability should join Southbank Centre’s free Access Scheme. You may be eligible for tickets at concessionary prices; a free ticket for a companion who can assist you during your visit; and receive information in alternative formats. To join please call 0844 847 9910, email accesslist@southbankcentre.co.uk or visit www.southbankcentre.co.uk/access

an unstoppable The Guardian on

Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Philharmonia Orchestra, February 2011

The auditorium is fitted with Sennheiser infra-red systems. Receivers can be collected from the cloakroom in Royal Festival Hall.

LEVEL ACCESS There is level access throughout Royal Festival Hall from the internal lifts (some of the lifts have a limited weight capacity; please call 0844 847 9910 to confirm), and there are wheelchair spaces in the boxes, choir seats, side and rear stalls of the auditorium. Tickets for wheelchair spaces can be booked online or by phone on 0800 652 6717 or 0844 847 9910.

This brochure is available in alternative formats Call 0800 652 6717

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

FREEPHONE PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA BOX OFFICE: 0800 652 6717 email boxoffice@philharmonia.co.uk www.philharmonia.co.uk

PREMIUM SEATS

GROUP BOOKINGS

“momentum originality” ” Tel 020 7921 3900 Fax 020 7921 3950

No. of concerts

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE!

P1

P3

P2

P7

iv

P2

P7

Side Stalls

Location (Royal Festival Hall)

P1

2011/12 concert season Royal Festival Hall

i

The Sunday Times on Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Philharmonia Orchestra, February 2011

Booking Information/Ticket Prices

Esa-Pekka Salonen Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor

How to book your tickets SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE! GREAT DISCOUNTS IF YOU BOOK FOR 3 OR MORE CONCERTS! Philharmonia Orchestra 6th Floor, The Tower Building, 11 York Road, London SE1 7NX

Subscription ticket prices (for seating plan see page iv)

ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL Balcony

Royal Festival Hall Pricing Codes

P7 P6 P5 P4 P2

Rear P7 P6 P4 P3 P2

P7 P6 P5 P4 P3 P2 P1

P7 P6 P4 P3 P2

Stalls

Side Stalls

P2 P6

Front Stalls

P2

P1 P4

P2

P2 P6

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

P4

Boxes

Price per ticket

Full price (1–2 concerts)

£38.00

£29.00

£23.00

£18.00

£14.00

£11.00

£8.00

3–5 concerts

£34.20

£26.10

£20.70

£16.20

£12.60

£9.90

£7.20

10%

6–8 concerts

£32.30

£24.65

£19.55

£15.30

£11.90

£9.35

£6.80

15%

9–11 concerts

£30.40

£23.20

£18.40

£14.40

£11.20

£8.80

£6.40

20%

12–14 concerts

£28.50

£21.75

£17.25

£13.50

£10.50

£8.25

£6.00

25%

15 + concerts

£26.60

£20.30

£16.10

£12.60

£9.80

£7.70

£5.60

30%

Take advantage of up to 30% discount on your tickets by booking a subscription package (minimum 3 concerts booked in one transaction).

Performance Area

P1

P7

P2

HOW TO BOOK:

Boxes

Choir

Single ticket prices Price Codes

Premium

P1

P2

P3

P4

P5

P6

P7

Full ticket price

£45

£38

£29

£23

£18

£14

£11

£8

Selected Front Stalls Front Stalls* (FS) Rear Stalls (RS) Boxes (BX)

Front Stalls (FS) Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Boxes (BX) Side Stalls (SS)

*PREMIUM SEATS We have selected the front stalls seats in the auditorium with the best acoustic and view (concerts with a piano soloist will have keyboard side premium seats) and will sell these on a firstcome first-served basis at £45 each. Subscription discounts do not apply although these events can be included in the total number of concerts when applying the subscription discount. Please call FREEPHONE 0800 652 6717 for more information.

Front Stalls (FS) Rear Stalls (RS)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Wheelchair (WH)

Rear Stalls (RS) Balcony (BY) Side Stalls (SS) Choir (CH) Wheelchair (WH)

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE: Great discounts if you book for 3 or more concerts! Book for 3 or more concerts and receive the following discounts on your tickets:3–5 concerts 10% discount 6–8 concerts 15% discount 9–11 concerts 20% discount 12–14 concerts 25% discount 15+ concerts 30% discount For discounted ticket prices see page i of the booking form Philharmonia Orchestra subscribers also receive other special benefits, including: Free ticket exchange scheme (up to 2 working days before concert) Flexible payment: spread the costs of your tickets over 3 months No booking fee

www.philharmonia.co.uk

PHONE: Call the FREEPHONE Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office on 0800 652 6717 to book your tickets (Mon–Fri 9.30am–5.30pm) NO BOOKING FEE and call back answerphone service out of hours POST: Fill in the booking form and post to Philharmonia Orchestra Box Office, FREEPOST RRGT-AHSU-GXRE, London, SE1 7NX ONLINE: www.philharmonia.co.uk (NB this facility is not available for group bookings) E-MAIL: boxoffice@philharmonia.co.uk FAX: Complete the booking form and fax it to 020 7921 3950

Discount (%)

Design WITH RELISH 020 7503 3171 Print CANTATE 020 7622 3401

Philharmonia Orchestra and Southbank Centre are both registered charities.

Tickets may also be purchased from Southbank Centre PHONE: 0844 847 9921 (9am-8pm daily)* ONLINE: www.southbankcentre.co.uk* FAX: 020 7921 0607* IN PERSON: Ticket Office, Royal Festival Hall 10am–8pm daily *Transaction fees apply. No fee for Southbank Centre Members

CONCESSIONS

We have selected the front stalls seats in the auditorium with the best acoustic and view (concerts with a piano soloist will have keyboard side premium seats) and will sell these on a first-come first-served basis at £45 each. Subscription discounts do not apply although these events can be included in the total number of concerts when applying the subscription discount.

A limited allocation of half-price tickets is available for recipients of Jobseekers Allowance, Income Support, Pension Credit, Under 16s and full-time students. Appropriate cards to be shown.

Book 10 or more tickets for one concert and qualify for the Philharmonia Orchestra Group rate: 25% discount off all tickets. Other benefits include 1 free ticket for every 20 purchased, flexible reservations and exclusive ticket offers. School parties: 50% discount and 1 free teacher’s ticket for every 10 purchased.

FAMILY TICKETS – SPECIAL DISCOUNTS FOR CHILDREN Each adult attending a concert can purchase up to 2 tickets for under-16s at half-price. Philharmonia Orchestra concerts are usually suitable for children aged 7 upwards. Children under 6 may not be admitted at the discretion of the orchestra and hall management. Please contact us to discuss your requirements if you need additional guidance.

Please note that discounts/ concessions cannot be combined.

All the information in this brochure was correct at the time of going to press, but changes may be unavoidable.

“blazing

PATRONS WITH DISABILITIES Southbank Centre is accessible to people with disabilities. Visitors with a disability should join Southbank Centre’s free Access Scheme. You may be eligible for tickets at concessionary prices; a free ticket for a companion who can assist you during your visit; and receive information in alternative formats. To join please call 0844 847 9910, email accesslist@southbankcentre.co.uk or visit www.southbankcentre.co.uk/access

an unstoppable The Guardian on

Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Philharmonia Orchestra, February 2011

The auditorium is fitted with Sennheiser infra-red systems. Receivers can be collected from the cloakroom in Royal Festival Hall.

LEVEL ACCESS There is level access throughout Royal Festival Hall from the internal lifts (some of the lifts have a limited weight capacity; please call 0844 847 9910 to confirm), and there are wheelchair spaces in the boxes, choir seats, side and rear stalls of the auditorium. Tickets for wheelchair spaces can be booked online or by phone on 0800 652 6717 or 0844 847 9910.

This brochure is available in alternative formats Call 0800 652 6717

Freephone Box Office 0800 652 6717

FREEPHONE PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA BOX OFFICE: 0800 652 6717 email boxoffice@philharmonia.co.uk www.philharmonia.co.uk

PREMIUM SEATS

GROUP BOOKINGS

“momentum originality” ” Tel 020 7921 3900 Fax 020 7921 3950

No. of concerts

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE!

P1

P3

P2

P7

iv

P2

P7

Side Stalls

Location (Royal Festival Hall)

P1

2011/12 concert season Royal Festival Hall

i

The Sunday Times on Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Philharmonia Orchestra, February 2011


Philharmonia Orchestra 2011/12 Brochure