Issuu on Google+

THRA E IS BA E R

8th Annual National LESBIAN GAY BISEXUAL TRANSGENDER QUEER & ALLY

COLLEGE STUDENT CAREER CONFERENCE CHICAGO SEPTEMBER 28-30, 2012

I learned how to incorporate my LGBTQ activism onto my resume. —Casey Lyons, Williams College

I found a network of professionals that care about my career development. —John Espinosa, University of Illinois

NATIONAL PRESENTING SPONSOR

Information, tools and resources to educate, prepare, and empower you for the workplace

I learned that being out at work is an advantage instead of an obstacle. —Michael Aguilera, Loyola Marymount University

Recreation Services would like to welcome all MBLGTACC participants to Iowa State University. We hope you have a great conference. Please stop by either Lied Recreation Center or State Gym and show your conference badge for a free, quick workout.

MBLGTACC

/

001

Welcome 3 General Information 4 Schedule 7 Sponsors 8 Glossary of Terms 15 Building Blocks for Dialogue

17

Etiquette for Inclusion

18

Accessibility 19 Gathering Spaces 20 Exhibitor Fair 21 Keynote Speakers 24 Entertainment 25 State Caucuses 27 Identity Caucuses 28 Theme & Pillars 29 Featured Sessions 29 Workshops 30 Maps 48

002

/

MBLGTACC

Welcome to the 20th Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa! All of us here at Iowa State are excited to host each of you for the next three days as we work together to not only build community but to enhance grassroots activism for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, Intersex, Asexual, and Ally communities. This year’s theme “The Butterfly Effect: Evolution to Revolution” highlights the profound impact of our individual and collective actions as we strive to create a more equitable and just world. The chaos theory, which inspired this year’s theme, postulates that a single flap of

a butterfly’s wings can cause a wind, the effects of which can be felt around the world. We believe that the same is true of the extensive impact that is possible as a result of the actions of all of our MBLGTACC 2012 participants. The conference this year is structured around four pillars which foster personal growth and development for each of us to act as agents of social change. The first pillar is History. In order for us to move forward we must also understand how past and current socio-political movements have impacted and continue to impact LGBTQQIAA communities and the larger society. The second pillar, Identity, builds from understanding our history and emphasizes exploration of both the

intricacies of the LGBTQQIAA spectrum and the personal and political significance of identity and inclusion. The third pillar is Individual Intersections. Just as the intricacies of our collective identities must be explored, we must also have a personal understanding and awareness of the intersections between our LGBTQQIAA identities and our other social identities. The fourth and final pillar is Socially-Just Transformative Action. As we work to understand our history and our collective and individual identities, we must also strive to take collaborative actions at the individual, group, and/or institutional levels to create social change that promotes equity for all.

Thank you for joining us and we challenge you to learn about our history and your many intersecting identities and to use that knowledge to create connections that will assist you in taking collaborative action for social change. Use the conference as an opportunity to learn, to grow, and engage with others. Welcome again to Iowa State University! Spread your wings and join a social revolution that will be felt around the world.

-The 2012 MBLGTACC Planning Team MBLGTACC

/

003

The Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference Planning Team wants to ensure you have the best experience while on Iowa State University’s Campus. Ames is a welcoming and safe area, but we want to provide you with as many resources as possible to make your time here safe and enjoyable. We encourage everyone to use the “buddy-fly” system and have a travel route for each conference day planned ahead of time.

Transportation MBLGTACC 2012 participants will have transportation available from their hotel units to conference sites. More information will be available upon check-in. Smoke Free Campus Iowa State University is a Smoke Free campus in accordance with the Iowa Smokefree Air Act. It is the policy of Iowa State University to comply with the Smokefree Air Act by declaring the entire university grounds and properties a smoke-free Campus. This policy applies to all university employees, students and visitors and covers all university owned, leased or operated vehicles, buildings, property, and grounds under the control of the university. Smoking is permitted on the walk located on the north side of Lincoln Way. Smoking is also permitted on the walk on the south side of Lincoln Way and east side of Ash Avenue on the property of Buchanan Hall. Gender Neutral Restrooms Restrooms for use by all genders are located within the Memorial Union on the second floor: Left of the Hotel Registration 004

/

MBLGTACC

Desk, next to the Cardinal Room. Past the Multi Cultural Center (Parking Garage side of MU), right before the Advisor/Staff Gathering Space (Room 2213).

you find places to eat, shop & relax along with navigating Ames. Lastly look for Caterpillar Aides at your hotel as they are here to get you settled and get you to campus.

Monarch Monarchs (MBLGTACC 2012 Volunteers) are here to help throughout the weekend. You will see Monarchs in cardinal MBLGTACC 2012 shirts throughout the weekend in your workshops, checking name badges at events, collecting assessments, and around to help with any conference attendees needs.

Conference Lanyard and Name Badge Your name badge and MBLGTACC 2012 lanyard identify you as a conference participant throughout the weekend. In order to have access to all of the conference workshops, sessions, keynotes, and entertainment events, please be sure that you are wearing your conference badge throughout the weekend. All conference guests will have free access to the Iowa State University Recreation Services Facilities (Lied Recreation Center, State Gym, etc.) by showing your lanyard and name badge.

Caterpillar Aides Have a question? Trying to find your next workshop? Find a Caterpillar Aide! Look for the wonderful staff & faculty at Iowa State University who will be in cardinal red MBLGTACC shirts with Iowa State gold and red name badges. Caterpillar Aides are placed around campus, your hotel, and Campustown just to help you! Caterpillar Aides are here to welcome you with a smiling face, and should know how to assist you in finding any building or room on campus. They are also here to help

Pronouns Additionally, we have worked to identify the pronoun used by each conference guest. Every registrant had the option to list one of the following options as the pronoun others should use for that individual:

She-Her-Hers He-Him-His They-Them-Theirs Ze-Zer-Zers Name as pronoun Other/Fill-in pronoun None - Those who selected this option have their name listed in the space. Below are some examples of pronouns. Subject / Object / Possessive She* / Her* / Hers* He* / Him* / His* Ze / Zir / Zirs Sie / Hir / Hirs Ve / Ver / Vis Thon / Thon / Thons

The MBLGTACC 2012 planning committee would like to ask for your help in making future MBLGTACC conferences even better! This is why we have made assessment a focal point of this year’s conference. As with the rest of the conference, we are using our pillars to frame our objectives for assessment. We believe we are adding history to our conference, thus we must learn from this conference. We believe as this conference continues to grow, we will continue the conversation on expanding the many identities underneath the queer spectrum. We believe students are far more than only an LGBTQQIAA identity which is sometimes placed upon them, and we want to create spaces for students to explore their other identities as intersecting with their LGBTQQIAA identity. Lastly, we believe in giving students the needed tools to create social change in their own communities. These objectives are the reason we must continue to assess this conference and make suggestions so we can continually improve the conference. As an added incentive this year, we will be giving away PRIZES for completing evaluations! These are the simple steps to get entered in the raffle to win a prize.

Attend the Workshops

Evaluations will be handed out at the end of each workshop. In order to receive an evaluation you must be present at the workshop. After completing the evaluations, WRITE YOUR NAME AND AFFILIATION (school, organization, company, etc) LEGIBLY ON THE BACK and please drop them off at the West Lobby in the second floor of the Memorial Union or in the lobby of Carver Hall.

Attend Keynotes

Fill out the Overall Evaluation

There will be an overall evaluation sent to each participant’s email after the conference. In order to be entered for more prizes, please fill out the overall evaluation.

Remember, if you do not tell us what you would like to improve, we cannot improve it.

This is where all raffles will take place. You must be present at the keynotes to win the prizes.

MBLGTACC

/

005

We encourage you to put the following numbers in your phone:

MBLGTACC 2012 Info/help line: 515-294-4114 Should you need assistance during the conference or would like to report an incident, please call the MBLGTACC Info/Helpline. The Info/Helpline will be answered by a MBLGTACC coordinator who can answer your questions about the conference, give directions to help you navigate Iowa State University andAmes, or receive information regarding incidents of discrimination. We are committed to making your participation in the conference meaningful, fun, and stress-free. Department of Public Safety/ISU Police 911 from a campus phone or 515-294-4428 for nonemergencies Ames Police 911 from a non- campus phone or 515-239-5133 for non-emergencies ACCESS (Assault Care Center Extending Shelter and Support) 800-203-3488 for a confidential advocate Mary Greeley Medical Center 515-239-2011 for a confidential health examination or services

006

/

MBLGTACC

Cab Numbers: Ames Taxi Service:515-232-1343 Nightwalk Cab: 515-203-0243 Ames Taxi: 515-232-1343 Help Van & DPS Safety Escort Service: 515-294-4444 If you are a student, faculty, staff or visitor at Iowa State, you are eligible for assistance from the HelpVan and Safety Escort on campus. There is no charge. Please note the Escort Service ONLY escorts within campus grounds. Hours of Operation: 7:30a.m.-3:00am Monday Thursday 7:30a.m.-Midnight on Friday 5:00p.m-Midnight on Sunday DPS Safety Escort Available 6 p.m. to 6 a.m.

Friday, February 10, 2012 Event Location

2:00 pm - 8:30 pm Registration MU South Ballroom 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm Session #1 MU 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm Dinner on Your Own Gathering Spaces (p.20) 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm Opening Ceremony Stephens Auditorium 8:00 pm - 9:00 pm Keynote #1 Stephens Auditorium 9:00 pm - 9:30 pm Travel to Entertainment 9:30 pm - 11:30 pm Andrea Gibson & Stephens Auditorium Katie Wirsing 9:30 pm - 11:30 pm Lucas Silveira MU Great Hall

Saturday, February 11, 2012

Event

7:30 am - 6:00 pm Registration/Info Desk 8:00 am - 9:00 am Session #2 8:00 am - 10:45 am Featured Session: Reverend Dr. Jamie Washington 9:15 am - 10:45 am Session #3 or Identity Caucus 10:00 am - 6:00 pm Exhibitor Fair 10:15 am - 11:00 am Travel to Stephens Auditorium for Keynote 11:00 am - 12:00 pm Keynote #2 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm Lunch on Your Own 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm State/Regional Caucuses 3:15 pm - 8:15 pm MBLGTACC Oversight Committee Meeting 3:15 pm - 4:45 pm Session #4 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm Session #5 or Identity Caucus 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm Featured Session: IN THE LIFE Media 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Dinner on your own 8:00 pm - 8:30 pm Pandora’s Preview 8:30 pm - 9:45 pm Campus Pride Film Screening: Legalize Gay 8:30 pm - 9:45 pm Lady Gaga Bad Romance Choreography 10:00 pm - 12:00 am Drag Show hosted by Pandora Boxx 12:00 am - 2:00 am Dance

Location

MU West Lobby MU, Carver Hall MU Sun Room MU, Carver Hall MU South Ballroom Stephens Auditorium Based on State (p. 27) MU Gold Room MU, Carver Hall MU, Carver Hall MU Sun Room Stephens Auditorium Stephens Auditorium MU Sun Room MU Great Hall MU Great Hall

Sunday, February 12, 2012 Event Location

6:45 am - 7:45 am Registration/Info Desk MU West Lobby 8:00 am - 9:00 am Session #6 MU 9:15 am - 10:45 am Session #7 MU 11:30 am - 12:30 pm Keynote #3 MU Great Hall 12:30 pm - 1:00 pm Closing Ceremony MU Great Hall * MU= Memorial Union

MBLGTACC

/

007

Through supporting MBLGTACC 2012, these sponsors are helping students to gain valuable skills that can empower them to network across universities, build collaborative relationships, and create their own path in the fight for LGBTQQIAA equality, visibility, and community.

Rainbow Sponsors $20,000 + Division of Student Affairs, Iowa State University

Student Affairs is integral to the rich and vibrant Iowa State University student experience, challenging and empowering students to succeed as productive citizens and leaders in a diverse global community. The Division of Student Affairs is proud to support and welcome the Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference to Iowa State University for the third time - Enjoy your adventure!

Platinum Sponsors - $10,000 - $19,999 LGBT Student Services Center, Division of Student Affairs, Iowa State University The LGBTSS was opened in the fall of 1992, staffed by a part-time graduate assistant working 20 hours per week. At that time, the mission was to “develop programs and services to better the campus climate for LGB students” and to “coordinate efforts to retain LGB students at ISU.” In the fall of 1996, the LGBTSS expanded its mission offering services and outreach to students who identify under the transgender umbrella. Twenty years later, LGBTSS is committed to providing information and education that enhances the educational experience and overall quality of student life on the Iowa State University campus. LGBTSS and its staff work to promote advocacy, support, visibility, and diversity through programming, a variety of services, and referral. In achieving this mission, LGBTSS strives to promote full inclusion of LGBT persons and their allies at ISU and to eliminate homophobia, heterosexism, transphobia, and sexism on our campus and across the Midwest. dso.iastate.edu/lgbtss

Gold Sponsors - $5,000 - $9,999

Memorial Union, Division of Student Affairs, Iowa State University The Mission of the Iowa State University Memorial Union is to nurture common ground, enrich and sustain individual lives, and remember.

Silver Sponsors - $3,000 - $4,999

College of Human Sciences, Iowa State University Iowa State University and the College of Human Sciences are widely recognized for excellence in science and technology. In the College of Human Sciences, our excellence is driven by a passion to help people. We study every aspect of their daily lives, whether it’s how they learn, how they eat, or how they exercise. How they spend money. How they vacation. How they stay well. Even how they dress. We help people expand their potential. Welcome to our world. http://www.hs.iastate.edu/ 008

/

MBLGTACC

Bronze Sponsors - $1,500 - $2,999

Campus Pride Founded by M. Chad Wilson, Sarah E. Holmes, and Shane L. Windmeyer in the Fall of 2001 and launched a year later in October of 2002, Campus Pride started as an online community and resource clearinghouse under the name Campus PrideNet. Campus Pride represents the only national nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization for student leaders and campus groups working to create a safer college environment for LGBT students. The organization is a volunteer-driven network “for” and “by” student leaders. The primary objective of Campus Pride is to develop necessary resources, programs, and services to support LGBT and ally students on college campuses across the United States. campuspride.org College of Engineering, Iowa State University The College of Engineering at Iowa State University is dedicated to educating tomorrow’s engineers and conducting research that addresses today’s greatest challenges. True to their land-grant legacy, they emphasize service to the community – locally and globally – and strive to use technology to make a difference in the world. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Iowa State University Iowa State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is one of the world’s leading institutions of agriculture. Building on 150 years of excellence, the college provides leadership in science, education and research, areas vital to the future of Iowa, the nation, and the world. ag.iastate.edu Human Rights Campaign The Human Rights Campaign is America’s largest civil rights organization working to achieve lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality. Founded in 1980, HRC seeks to improve the lives of LGBT Americans by advocating for equal rights and benefits in the workplace, ensuring families are treated equally under the law, and increasing public support among all Americans through innovative advocacy, education and outreach programs. hrc.org Department of Recreation Services, Division of Student Affairs, Iowa State University The Department of Recreation Services offers multiple high-quality recreational facilities to promote a healthy mind and body and enhance the overall quality of the educational experience at Iowa State University. Conference guests can enjoy free entry to the Lied Recreation Athletic Center with their conference lanyard and name badge. Student Disability Resources, Division of Student Affairs, Iowa State University Student Disability Resources is dedicated to improving the educational development of students with disabilities and to enhancing understanding and support within the campus community. As Iowa State University strives to value, embrace and reflect human and intellectual diversity, Student Disability Resources strives to accomplish this through the principles of equal access and opportunity.

Friends of MBLGTACC $250.00 - $1499.00 Thank you to the Friends of MBLGTACC 2012! These sponsors have helped fund scholarships and supported the overall conference. Their contributions and support are of great value to scholarship recipients and the LGBTQQIAA community at large. Facilities Planning and Management, Iowa State University Integral in the operations of Iowa State University, Facilities Planning and Management works with all departments across the university to maintain all buildings and grounds on campus. FP and M is also responsible for all work with improvements to Iowa State facilities. Dogtown University Specializing in Iowa State University swag at fantastic prices! Both classic and hip designs, Dogtown University has something for every age and gender! Be sure to check them out in Campustown, Ames. Peterson Foundation The Peterson Foundation is a proud supporter of the LGBTQQIAA community, organizations, programs and events. They are

happy and proud to contribute to this year’s Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference at Iowa State University. College of Business, Iowa State University The College of Business at Iowa State University conducts and shares research to educate tomorrow’s business leaders so they are prepared to deal with multidisciplinary, global, technological, ethical and diversity challenges. These capabilities, combined with a solid curriculum, nationallyrecognized faculty, and welcoming atmosphere, provide business students with an innovative educational experience. Lynette Plander Lynette is a contributor to the Butterfly Scholarship which allowed additional students to attend the conference by waiving their registration costs. College of Design, Iowa State University The mission of the College of Design at Iowa State University is to learn and help others learn how disciplines in design and art can improve the human condition and address present and future challenges that societies and environments face locally, nationally and internationally.

Media Sponsors Thank you to our Media Sponsors who have provided work that will be screened during MBLGTACC 2012! These sponsors have documented the LGBTQQIAA community’s history and progress, created a space for important discussions, and provided the LGBTQQIAA community with a forum to voice our concerns, issues, and opinions.

In the Life Media In The Life Media was founded in 1992 on the premise that visibility in media is vital to achieving equality and social justice for LGBT people. In The Life, produced by In The Life Media, was the first—and remains the only—national LGBT issueoriented television program to feature the faces, voices, and stories shaping the gay experience.

MBLGTACC

/

009

010

/

MBLGTACC

Campus Sponsors Thank you to the following Campus Sponsors! These sponsors have contributed to MBLGTACC 2012 via in-kind donations. New Student Programs, Iowa State University New Student Programs coordinates Orientation and Destination Iowa State to assist new students in making a smooth and successful transition to Iowa State University by helping students with their academic, personal, and social adjustments to the University. Iowa State University Bookstore Owned and operated by Iowa State University, the University Book Store is a vital part of our diverse academic community that has been serving the faculty, staff, students, and community for over 100 years.

Community Sponsors Thank you to the following Community Sponsors who have donated items for us to raffle off throughout the weekend! We deeply appreciate the support of these sponsors and their commitments to MBLGTACC 2012 as well as the LGBTQQIAA and Ames communities. Lucullan’s Italian Grill For over 33 years, this 4-star rated restaurant has been feeding the friends and family of Ames and ISU. Lucullan’s is located in historic downtown Ames at 400 Main Street. Diners with food sensitivities and allergies take note: the staff at Lucullan’s will work with you to ensure a safe and delicious dining experience. Café Diem A classic coffeehouse located in the heart of Ames at 229 Main Street. Café Diem’s atmosphere compliments their fabulous menu of coffees, teas, drinks, and treats. Why not stop in and seize the coffee?

Community Supporters RADAR Productions Founded in 2003 by writer Michelle Tea, RADAR Productions is a San Franciscobased non-profit. RADAR gives voice to innovative queer and outsider writers and artists whose work authentically reflects the LGBTQA community’s diverse experiences. radarproductions.org Lorry’s Coffee Lorry’s Coffee serves hot and cold drinks, premium quality roasts and tea, deli items, and more. Located across the street from campus at 2320 Lincoln Way, the friendly staff and food will leave you more than satisfied. Parents, Friends, and Families of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG)Ames PFLAG Ames as promoting health and well being of LGBT persons as well as actively supporting their families and friends through education and positive advocacy. Jimmy John’s Subs so fast you’ll freak! Or you’ll just be on time for all the MBLGTACC events! Stop by Jimmy John’s in Campustown for tasty subs, made to order quickly by friendly staff.

Thank you to the following Community Supporters! Community Leaders representing each of these organizations and businesses attended MBLGTACC 2012 orientations to learn more about the conference and its mission, pillars, participants, and vision. Fighting Burrito SuperDog Stand Gyro Stand Battles BBQ Ames City Council Member Matthew Goodman Ames British Foods The Gateway Hotel Octagon Gallery Ames Convention & Visitors Bureau Ames Noon Rotary Club The Hilton Garden Inn The Memorial Union, Iowa State University Lucullan’s Italian Grill Cupcake Emporium Dogtown University A & R Marketing Days Inn Gateway Hampton Inn Hilton Garden Inn Ames Holiday Inn Ames Microtel Quality Inn

MBLGTACC

/

011

Office of the Mayor 515 Clark Avenue P.O. Box 811 Ames, IA 50010 Phone: 515-239-5105 Fax: 515-239-5142

Dear MBLGTACC Conference Attendees: We are thrilled that you have chosen Ames and Iowa State University as the site for your 2012 conference. Ames is a community of nearly 60,000 residents – half of which are Iowa State students. This means that everything that happens on campus brings opportunities for the permanent residents of Ames to participate in many of the events. Your conference certainly illustrates that. We have a lot to show off in Ames – even in February. Concerts, lectures, museums, and athletic events all provide lots of good indoor activities on campus. Of special attraction is always Reiman Gardens, which features a USDA-approved butterfly garden. Also, a variety of ethnic restaurants can be found throughout town. Even on a chilly February day, Ada Hayden Heritage Park located on the north edge of town provides delightful walking and viewing of a host of birds. Thanks for coming. Return again soon. Sincerely yours,

Ann Campbell Mayor

one group from opportunities that are available to another group.

The following terms are by no means an exhaustive list of words related to LGBTQIAA communities. These terms were collectively defined by the MBLGTACC 2012 planning committee utilizing resources such as: The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Foundation’s Creating Change program guidelines, 2010, The Human rights Campaign (HRC), National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE), Wikipedia, and Our personal experiences.

AgeismRefers to oppression that occurs due to someone’s age. AllyA person who does not identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer or asexual whose attitudes and behaviors are anti-heterosexist in perspective and who works towards combating homophobia and heterosexism, both on a personal and institutional level. BigenderRefers to those who feel they have both masculine and feminine sides to their personalities, often used by cross-dressers. Do not confuse this term with Two-Spirit, which is specifically associated with Native American and First Nations cultures Binary Gender / The Gender BinaryA system of viewing gender as consisting solely of two categories, termed male and female, in which no other possibilities for gender or anatomy are believed to exist. This system is oppressive to anyone who defies their coercive birth assignment, but particularly those who are gender-variant people and do not fit neatly into one of the two categories. ButchAn identity or presentation that leans towards masculinity. Butch can be an adjective (she’s a butch woman), a verb (he went home to butch up), or a noun (they identify as a butch). Although commonly associated with masculine queer/ lesbian women, it’s used by many to describe a distinct gender identity and/or expression, and does not necessarily imply that one also identifies as a woman or not.

CAFAB and CAMABAcronyms meaning “coercively assigned female/male at birth.” No one, whether cis or trans, gets to choose what gender they’re assigned when they’re born, which is what makes it coercive. In the rare cases when it’s necessary to refer to the birth-assigned sex of a trans person, this is the way to do it. Cross-dressingThe act of dressing and presenting as the “opposite” binary gender. One who considers this an integral part of their identity may identify as a cross-dresser. Transvestite is an obsolete term with the same meaning. Drag queens and drag kings are cross-dressing performers who take on stylized, exaggerated gender presentations. Crossdressing and drag are forms of gender expression and are not necessarily tied to erotic activity, nor are they indicative of one’s sexual orientation. Do NOT use these terms to describe someone who has transitioned or intends to do so in the future. DragExaggerated, theatrical, or performative gender presentation. Although most commonly used to refer to cross-dressing performers (drag queens and drag kings), anyone of any gender can do any form of drag. Doing drag does not necessarily have anything to do with one’s sex, gender identity, or orientation. DiscriminationThe prejudicial treatment of an individual based on their membership in a certain group or category. It involves the actual behaviors towards groups such as excluding or restricting members of

Ethnic GroupA micro cultural group or collectivity that shares a common history and culture, common values behaviors, and other characteristics that cause members of the group to have a shared identity. FemmeAn identity or presentation that leans towards femininity. Femme can be an adjective (he’s a femme boy), a verb (she feels better when she femmes up), or a noun (they’re a femme). Although commonly associated with feminine lesbian/ queer women, it’s used by many to describe a distinct gender identity and/or expression, and does not necessarily imply that one also identifies as a woman or not. GayCommon word for men with emotional and sexual attraction to other men, but often used in reference to all genders. Gay/Lesbian BaitingAny attempt to control a person by accusing them of being gay or lesbian because their behavior is not acceptable. This term applies to the whole of the LGBTQIA community. Gender Expression / PresentationThe physical manifestation of one’s gender identity through clothing, hairstyle, voice, body shape, etc. (typically referred to as masculine or feminine). Most transgender people seek to make their gender expression (how they look) match their gender identity (who they are), rather than their birthassigned sex.

GenderqueerA general term for non-binary gender identities. Those who identify as genderqueer may identify as neither male nor female, may see themselves as outside of or in between the binary gender boxes, or may simply feel restricted by gender labels. Genderqueer identities do fall under the “trans umbrella.” Gender Non-conformingA term for individuals whose gender expression is different from societal expectations related to gender. Hate CrimeAny act of intimidation, harassment, physical force or threat of physical force directed against any person, or their property, motivated either in whole or in part by hostility to their real or perceived race, ethnic background, religious belief, sex, age, disability, or sexual orientation, with the intention of causing fear or intimidation, or to deter the free exercise or enjoyment of any rights or privileges secured by the Constitution or the laws of that state. HeteroflexibleSimilar to bisexual, but with a stated heterosexual preference. Commonly used to indicate that one is interested in heterosexual romance but is “flexible” when it comes to sex and/or play. The same concepts apply to homoflexible. Heteronormative / HeteronormativityThese terms refer to the stereotypical dynamics between primarily heterosexual masculine men and primarily heterosexual feminine women.

Gender FluidA general term for non-binary gender identities. Overlaps with genderqueer and bigender, implying movement between different gender identities and/or presentations.

HeterosexismThe assumption that all people are heterosexual and that heterosexuality is superior and more desirable than non-heterosexual identities. Heterosexism is also the stigmatization, denial and/or denigration of anything nonheterosexual.

Gender IdentityOne’s actual, internal sense of being male or female, neither of these, both, etc.

HomophobiaIrrational fear or hatred of, aversion to, or discrimination against homosexuals or homosexual behavior.

MBLGTACC

/

015

HomosexualPerson with emotional and sexual attraction to persons of the same gender.

because the individual is not able to make that decision for oneself.

Inclusive LanguageThe use of non-identity specific language to avoid imposing limitations or assumptions no an individual or group. For example, saying “you all” instead of “you guys” in order to not impose assumptions regarding a person’s gender identity.

PassingA term used by transgender people to mean that they are seen as the gender with which they self-identify. For example, a transgender man (born female) who most people see as a man. Also a term used by nonheterosexual people to mean that they are seen as or assumed to be heterosexual.

Internalized Homophobia/ TransphobiaSelf-identification of societal stereotypes by an LGBTQQIA person, causing them to dislike and resent their sexual orientation or gender identity.

PansexualAn identity of someone who has the potential to be sexually and emotionally attracted to various gender expressions, including those outside the gender-conforming binary.

IntersexDescribes a person whose natal physical sex is physically ambiguous. There are many genetic, hormonal or anatomical variations which can cause this (e.g. Klinefelter Syndrome, Adrenal Hyperplasia, or Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome). Parents and medical professionals usually assign intersex infants a sex and perform surgical operations to conform the infant’s body to that assignment, but this practice has become increasingly controversial as intersex adults are speaking out against having had to undergo medical procedures which they did not consent to (and in many cases caused them mental and physical difficulties later in life).

PrejudiceMaking a judgment or assumption about someone or something before having enough knowledge to be able to do so with guaranteed accuracy

LGBT, LGBTQ, LGBTQQIAAAn Acronym representing the many identities within the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Pansexual, Fluid, Asexual, Transgender, Genderqueer, Questioning, Queer, Intersex, Ally (and more) communities.

QueerGeneral term for identities, presentations, and sexual orientations that reject gender conventions and expectations. There’s a lot of overlap between queer and trans, but not all queer people are trans, and not all trans people are queer (many trans people do in fact conform to gender norms and expectations). The word queer is still sometimes used as a hateful slur, so although many have reclaimed it from their oppressors, be careful with its use.

Monosexual / MultisexualUmbrella terms for orientations directed towards one gender (monosexual) or many genders (multisexual).

RacismA belief that human groups can be validly grouped according to their biological traits and that these identifiable groups inherit certain mental, personality, and cultural characteristics that determine their behavior. Racism is not merely a set of beliefs, but is practiced when a group has the power to enforce laws, institutions, and norms, based on beliefs, that oppress and dehumanize another group.

OutingThe process by which an individual’s sexual orientation or gender identity is conveyed to other people without their expressed consent. Outing is generally thought of as a hostile act

Safe SpaceA place where people who identify within the LGBTQIA communities feel comfortable and secure in being who they are. In this place, they can talk about

016

/

MBLGTACC

the people with whom they are involved without fear of being criticized, judged or ridiculed. Safe spaces promote the right to be comfortable in one’s living space, work environments, etc. It is focused toward the right to use the pronoun of a significant other in conversation, and the right to be as outwardly open about one’s life and activities as anyone else.

TransgenderAn umbrella term for people whose gender identity differs from the sex or gender they were assigned at birth, and for those whose gender expression differs from what is culturally expected of them. The term transgender is not indicative of sexual orientation, hormonal makeup, physical anatomy, or how one is perceived in daily life.

Same-Gender LovingA term some prefer to use instead of “lesbian” or “gay” to express attraction to and love of people of the same gender

Transitionthe complex process of leaving behind one’s coercively assigned birth sex. Transition can include: coming out to one’s family, friends, and/or co-workers; changing one’s name and/or sex on legal documents; hormone therapy; and possibly (though not always) some form of surgery. It’s best not to assume that someone will “complete” this process at any particular time.

SexThe assignment and classification of people as male or female based on physical anatomy at birth. SexismSocial, political, and economic structures that advantage one sex group over another. Stereotypes and misconceptions about the biological characteristics of each sex group reinforce and support sex discrimination. Sexual OrientationA person’s enduring physical, romantic, emotional and/or spiritual attraction to others. Gender identity and sexual orientation are not the same. Trans people can be heterosexual, gay, lesbian, pansexual, queer, etc. just like anyone else Trans*Prefix or adjective used as a simultaneous abbreviation of either transgender or transsexual, derived from the Greek word meaning “across from” or “on the other side of.” Because it avoids the political connotations of both those terms, many consider trans to be the most inclusive and useful umbrella term. Trans Woman / Trans ManTrans woman refers to a woman of transgender experience. She might actively identify herself as trans, or she might just consider being trans part of her medical history. It is grammatically and definitionally correct to include a space between trans and woman. The same concept applies to trans man. Unless you’re involved in a conversation specifically about trans issues, you should just stick with woman or man.

TransphobiaFear, discomfort, distrust, or disdain directed towards trans people or trans concepts. This word is used similarly to homophobia, xenophobia, misogyny, etc. TranssexualSimilar to transgender in that it indicates a conflict between one’s gender identity and sex assigned at birth, but with implications of hormonal/surgical transition from one binary sex to the other. Unlike transgender, transsexual is not an umbrella term, as many transgender people do not identify as transsexual. Two-SpiritA contemporary term that references historical multiplegender traditions in many First Nations cultures. Many Native/ First Nations people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, or gender non-conforming identify as Two-Spirit; in many Nations, being Two-Spirit carries both great respect and additional commitments and responsibilities to one’s community.

Our goals at MBLGTACC 2012 include helping our participants (YOU!) better understand your identities, the multiple identities of yourself and others, the historical and social implications of our identities and foster socially-just actions for all communities. This weekend, YOU have the opportunity to live these goals and not only bring their spirit back to your campus, but to embrace living the butterfly effect and inspiring ripples of positive change. That said, our hope is that we can engage each other in dialogue that challenges us to learn and consider beyond our current frameworks. Below is a set of statements- often called guidelines, ground rules, philosophies, norms, standards, expectations, building blocks- but regardless of what they’re called, we hope to offer them to you as encouragement to consider how your voice and background blends with the space and feelings of others.

Confidentiality: Please respect other people’s stories and experiences as their own. Our primary commitment is to learn from each other. We acknowledge differences amongst us in backgrounds, skills, interests, values, scholarly orientations, and experience. We acknowledge that sexism, classism, racism, heterosexism, cissexism, and other forms of discrimination (religion, age, ability, language, education, size, geographic location, etc.) exist, even within our own communities. It is critical to be open to learning more about the ways each of us continues to perpetuate each of these -isms and work towards transforming our perspectives. Challenge the idea, not the person. Speak from your own experience instead of making generalizing statements. Say “I” instead of “They”, “We,” and “You.” Grab the Mic, Pass the Mic: Be mindful of taking up much more space than others. At the same time, empower yourself to speak up when others are dominating the conversation. Check in before you check out: Ask for clarification before jumping to conclusions. Be conscious of body language and non-verbal responses; they can be as telling as words. Practice active listening. We will actively pursue opportunities to learn about our own groups and those of other groups, yet not enter or invade others’ privacy when unwanted. Understand that you may use language that others consider to be exclusive or derogatory. Please welcome the perspectives of others and encourage discussion about these ideas. MBLGTACC

/

017

General Expectations for Inclusion

MBLGTACC 2012 would like to thank you for your support and action by putting forth a genuine effort to reflect our expectations for inclusion. The following expectations are by no means an exhaustive list of recommendations for inclusivity related to LGBTQQIAA communities. These ideas were collectively defined by the MBLGTACC 2012 planning committee utilizing resources such as: The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Foundation’s Creating Change program guidelines, 2010 The Human rights Campaign (HRC) National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE) MBLGTACC 2011 and Our own personal experiences

In addition to utilizing the building blocks for dialogue, below are general tips that will help us create a supportive and safe learning environment throughout the conference. Inclusive Language At MBLGTACC 2012 we expect that participants use inclusive language as often as possible. This means employing non-identity specific language to avoid imposing limitations or assumptions on an individual or group. For example, saying “you all” instead of “you guys” in order to not impose assumptions regarding a person’s gender identity. Additionally, we expect that participants refrain from using derogatory language and encourage individuals to feel inspired to address and discuss instances when exclusive or disempowering language is used. Preferred Terms Terms such as majority and minority are often used to generalize the experiences of people who represent a numerical majority or numerical minority within an environment. These words can be triggering for many individuals; please consider using words such as “dominant-identity” to replace “majority” and “nondominant identity” or “historically underepresented identity” to replace words like “minority”. A Safe Space A place where people who identify within the LGBTQQIAA communities feel comfortable and secure in being who they are. In this place, they can talk about the people with whom they are involved without fear of being criticized, judged or ridiculed. Safe spaces promote the right to be comfortable in one’s living space, work environments, etc. A Brave Space An environment conducive to critical thinking and dialogue on multiple and differing subjects, view points, topics, etc. in order to develop a better understanding and to gain new knowledge. In

018

/

MBLGTACC

the process of active listening and critical dialogue, a brave space provides individuals with a positive environment where one possesses the courage to be vulnerable in fully expressing themselves, listening to differing opinions, and--in the process--possibly making mistakes. When mistakes are made, it is important for all parties involved to recognize that this is an opportunity to learn and grow. Please be patient and open to learning throughout the weekend.

Inclusive Gender Etiquette In order to be more inclusive of all of our trans and gender nonconforming participants, please read and act upon the following: Please do not assume any person’s gender, even people you may have met in the past. A person’s external appearance may not match their internal gender identity. You cannot know the gender or their sex assigned at birth of someone by their physical body, voice, appearance or mannerisms. Pay attention to a person’s purposeful gender expression. We consider it polite to ask: “What pronoun do you prefer?” or “How do you identify?” before using pronouns or gendered words for anyone. We have also allowed for conference participants to have their pronouns shown on their name badge. When you are unsure of a person’s gender identity and you do not have an opportunity to ask someone what pronouns they prefer, try using that person’s name or a gender-neutral phrase like “the person in the red shirt,” instead of “woman” or “man”. Regardless of what bathroom you are in, please let everyone take care of their business in peace. Each of us can decide for ourselves in which bathroom we belong. We encourage you to attend workshops on gender, gender expression, and/or gender identity to help educate yourself.

eating or opening food please try to keep it as contained as possible as others may be highly allergic. The MBLGTACC planning committee has worked hard to make the 2012 conference accessible for all attendees. In the spirit of learning how our communities can be inclusive of and accessible to all people, we have put together these guidelines for creating a community where people of varying abilities are provided with a safe and welcoming space.

Accessible Seating There are seats set aside for people with varying disabilities throughout the plenary space and in the meeting rooms. Please be prepared to move chairs to make room for people using wheelchairs, wherever they may wish to sit at plenary sessions and workshops. Clear Aisles and Hallways In order to make it easier for everyone to move around the conference freely, please keep the aisles clear. Be aware of the people around you when navigating tight, crowded public spaces, and leave plenty of room for people to pass safely. Communication Tips In order to be understood by as many people as possible, speak at a moderate volume and pace. Practice active listening by asking and responding to questions and giving both verbal and nonverbal cues that you are still engaged in the conversation. When you are speaking to someone using an interpreter, address the person you are speaking with, not the interpreter. Flashing Lights Can trigger seizures or other conditions. Avoid wearing or carrying decorative flashing lights and do not take photographs using the flash on your camera in public spaces. Food Allergies Please be considerate and conscious of others with food allergies. When

Invisible Abilities Individuals at MBLGTACC 2012 and throughout the world are differently abled in ways that may or may not be visible. Each person here this weekend learns, understands, and communicates differently. You can show respect for people by practicing patience with those who learn and/or communicate at a different pace or in a different way than you do. If you are having difficulty communicating with someone, try a different form of communication, like writing or demonstration instead of talking. Latex Free Please try and keep MBLGTACC 2012 a latex free space. People may be highly allergic to latex products so we ask that you help us keep the conference latex free. Language Words like “retard,” “cripple,” “lame,” and “crazy” have been used to bully and oppress individuals with differing abilities for many decades. Please consider the implications of your words and do not use these words casually. Service Animals When you encounter someone using a service/assistance or guide dog, do not pet, offer food to, or interact with the animal in any way. Most owners expect their service dogs to be treated as a working animal while in public. The health and safety of their owner may depend on the dog’s ability to focus and resist distraction. Many service dogs are trained to avoid distraction when wearing their gear, but relax and are friendly when the gear is removed. An owner will expect to be asked for permission before another individual interacts with the dog. Scent Free Becoming scent-free is an important step toward access for people with disabilities and/or chronic illnesses and is a skill you can practice everywhere. If you are not accustomed to going scent-free, it is important to think carefully about all the products you use in

your day. You can either not use shampoo, soap, hair products, perfume, essential oils, skin lotion, shaving cream, makeup, etc., or use fragrance-free alternatives that are available in many drug stores. If you must use scented products, please sit or stand as far away as possible from areas designated “scent-safer” areas. If you need to find a scent-safer space while at the conference, please let a MBLGTACC volunteer know. Smoking Iowa State University is a Smoke Free campus in accordance with the Iowa Smoke Free Air Act. It is the policy of Iowa State University to comply with the Smoke Free Air Act by declaring the entire university grounds and properties a Smoke-Free Campus. This policy applies to all university employees, students and visitors and covers all university owned, leased or operated vehicles, buildings,property, and grounds under the control of the university. Smoking is permitted on the walk located on the north side of Lincoln Way. Smoking is also permitted on the walk on the south side of Lincoln Way and east side of Ash Avenue on the property of Buchanan Hall. Utilizing Accommodations Some (dis)abilities are less visible than others. Everyone has a right to use the accommodations they need without being criticized or questioned. If you have questions or concerns regarding accessibility at any time during the conference, please speak with a Caterpillar Aide. Understanding our Experiences We encourage all MBLGTACC participants to share their experiences while listening and respecting the voluntarily shared personal experiences of others. Many individuals with nondominant identities deal with daily curiosity about the details of their lives and we ask that you do not ask unnecessarily intrusive questions. In addition to attending MBLGTACC 2012 workshops about the experiences of those with identities different than yours, we encourage you to educate yourself through books, websites, research studies and respectful conversations. MBLGTACC

/

019

MBLGTACC is a fun filled weekend with multiple opportunities throughout the day but if you need a space to hangout, relax, or find peace and quiet stop into a gathering space. These spaces can be a great place to network and socialize with other conference attendees. We have three designated gathering spaces in the Memorial Union:

1 Reflection Room: MU 3540 The reflection space is a quite and safe space for conference attendees to reflect, meditate, and/or pray. This space is open to everyone and we ask that you respect and maintain this space as a quite and safe space for all forms of reflection. 2 Advisors Room: MU 2213 This space is available to staff, faculty, and advisors who have come with student delegations. This space is for advisors to find one another, network and relax. 3 Open: MU 3534 This space is available to anyone who needs it. Feel free to use it to relax and share your experiences at MBLGTACC 2012 or to spend time getting to know some of the amazing people who have met so far during the conference.

In addition here is a list of great spaces around campus: Ground/East Basement Memorial Union The UndergroundFri., 9 am to Midnight Sat. Noon to Midnight Sun. Noon to 10 pm First Floor - Memorial Union University Book Store Fri 7:45 am - 5:00 pm Sat 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Sun 12:00 pm - 4:00 pm MU Market & Cafe Fri. 7:00 am - 8:00 pm Sat. 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Sun. 10:00 am - 8:00pm Food Court Sat. 11:00 am - 2:00 pm Sun. Closed MU Subway Fri. 7:00 am - 6:00 pm Sat. 9:00 am - 3:00 pm Sun. Closed MU Panda Express Fri. 10:00 am - 3:00 pm Sat. 11:00 am - 2:00 pm Sun. 4:00 pm - 8:00 pm Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Student Services (LGBTSS) 1064 Student Services Building Margaret Sloss Women’s Center (MSWC) - Sloss House Carver Hall Lobby (First Floor)

020

/

MBLGTACC

AIDS Project of Central Iowa

Our mission statement is to provide infinite compassion and unyielding commitment to all

Campus Pride

The primary objective of Campus Pride is to develop necessary resources, programs and services to support LGBT and ally students on college campuses across the United States.

GE

Grow GE by attracting, developing, and engaging GLBT and Allied employees and enhancing GE’s reputation in the GLBT marketplace.

Human Rights Campaign

HRC advocates on behalf of LGBT Americans, mobilizes grassroots actions in diverse communities, invests strategically to elect fairminded individuals to office and educates the public about LGBT issues.

Iowa Coalition Against Sexual Assault (IowaCASA)

Our mission is to promote a society free from sexual violence.

Iowa State University Police The Iowa State University Police Division is the official law enforcement authority for the university. More than 30 fully certified, sworn police officers and dispatchers provide a variety

of services to the community 24 hours a day, seven days a week, including: general patrol, traffic enforcement, criminal investigations, computer forensics, personal threat assistance, crime prevention programming, and victim/witness services.

Magellan Collegiate Promotions

Magellan Collegiate Promotions is a world class promotional product company that specializes in helping collegiate departments market and create awareness on and off campus.

MBLGTACC 2013

Learn how to stay current with updates about next year’s 2013 Midwest Bisexual Lesbian Gay Transgender Ally College Conference!

One Iowa Education Fund

Our mission is to support full equality for LGBT individuals living in Iowa through grassroots efforts and education. Formed in 2005, the organization has been an effective advocate for the community.

OUT!wear

OUT!wear is quality custom Pridewear and Accessories “WORN WITH PRIDE” to promote visibility, unity and self esteem amongst Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered persons. To promote a positive image within our community, whether bold or discreet.

OUT for Work

Our mission is to educate, prepare, and empower LGBTQ College and University students in the transition from academia into the workplace.

Parents Family and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG)

Our Ames chapter of Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays has several functions in our community. First, we provide support by offering a safe place for people to come together and share their experiences. Next, we seek to educate ourselves

Planned Parenthood

To be a leader in providing accessible reproductive health care, education and advocacy; responsive to the needs and rights of families and individuals.

Save Charlie Bracelets

Save Charlie Bracelets is a collaboration between ISU students Charlie Poulson and Alison Gamm that creates hand made bracelets to raise money for Charlie Poulson’s chest reconstruction surgery.

Story County SART (Sexual Assault Response Team)

Our mission is to serve sexual assault victims by coordinating an immediate, high quality, multidisciplinary, victim-centered response which may include health care, law enforcement, advocacy, and judicial support

Tynan Fox - Speaker

My mission is to dispel kinkphobic attitudes and myths, and to promote acceptance of those who live alternative lifestyles everyday, and to do so by providing the next generation with a view into the life of someone who lives this lifestyle every day.

University of Illinois, Graduate School of Library and Information Science

People use information for analysis, inquiry, collaboration, and play- and in so doing, change the world. Our mission is to lead the way in understanding the use of information in science, culture, society, commerce, and the diverse activities of our daily lives.

Vagina Warriors/ Margaret Sloss Women’s Center

To increase awareness across the Iowa State University campus about gender-based violence, to educate ourselves and others on what it means to be a feminist, to fight for women’s and gender equity, and to promote “Vagina Warrior” recruitment.

Youth and Shelter Services

Youth and Shelter Services exists to provide prevention, education, treatment, and residential services to children, youth and families; to advocate on their behalf; and to help them solve problems, grow, and be self sufficient, responsible, and contributing MBLGTACC

/

021

Executive Committee

valerie a. guerrero, Co-Chair Petey Peterson, Co-Chair Brad Freihoefer, LGBT Student Services Center Coordinator Kelly Leonard, LGBT Student Services Center Program Assistant Jody Larson, Conference Planning & Management

Communications

Design - Charlie Poulson Social Media - Dustin Neff & Debra Sanborn Technology - Bryce Williams & Allison Severson

Community Relations Exhibitor Fair - Steve Gilson & Amanda Martin Registration - Conference Planning and Management, Iowa State University

Finance

Sponsorships - Blair Gershenson Community Fundraising Amanda-Rae Barboza Budget Management - Kimberly H. Williamson & Alesha K. Magee

Logistics

Workshops - Thao Pham Volunteers - Buffy Jamison Evaluation & Assessment Kimberly H. Williamson Conference Logistics - Kevin Miller & V. Olsen

022

/

MBLGTACC

Special Thanks To All of Our MBLGTACC Committee Members! Leah Hanus Derrick Moeller Amanda Riesenberg Cyndi Wiley Elijah Dahlke Lauren Sandstrom Brittany Borman Kelsi Wernimont Caitlin Hostetter Dr. Warren J. Blumenfeld Dr. Natasha Croom Marisol Martinez-Escobar Dr. Nancy J. Evans Brian Vanderheyden Darren Johnson Elliott DeVore Anna Gresser Amanda Martin Chris Fowler Amy Popillion Anastasia Prokos Randy Chanthavong Som Mongtin Anna Preston Ruth Hines Carolyn Duven Rio Reddick John Dickerson Ahna Kruzic Abigail Barefoot Jen Andreas Sasha Goldina Ebony Williams Autumn Wilke Cristobal Salinas Jr Michelle Boettcher

Keynote #1 Friday, February 10th, 2012, 8:00 pm 9:00 pm, at Stephens Auditorium

Rev. Dr. Jamie Washington serves as the President and Founder of the Washington Consulting Group, a Multicultural Organizational Development Firm out of Baltimore, MD. Dr. Washington has served as an educator, administrator, and consultant in higher education for over 27 years. He’s served as Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs; an Instructor in Sociology, American Studies and Education, and an Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). Dr. Washington is a founding faculty member of the Social Justice Training Institute. A native Philadelphian, Dr. Washington earned his B.S. degree in Therapeutic Recreation and Music from Slippery Rock State College, and a double Masters’ of Science degrees from Indiana University/Bloomington in

Higher Education Administration and Counseling, with a concentration in Human Sexuality. He holds a Ph.D. is in College Student Development, with a concentration in Multicultural Education from the University of Maryland College Park. Dr. Washington also holds a Masters of Divinity from Howard University School of Divinity with a concentration on Pastoral Care and Christian Social Ethics. Rev. Dr. Washington sees himself as an instrument of change. He works everyday to help people find the best in themselves and others. He lives by the words of one of his favorite songs: “If I can help somebody as I Pass along, If I can cheer somebody with a word or song, If I can show somebody that he’s or she has traveled wrong, Then my Living Shall Not BE in Vain.”

Keynote #2 Saturday, February 11th, 2012, 11:00 am 12:00 pm, at Stephens Auditorium

Stacey Milbern is a powerchairroaring disabled queer mixed-race activist and writer. She grew up in North Carolina and lived on the world’s largest US Army military installation for 18 years. After becoming politicized around disability, she went from being the to secretary of her county’s Teenage Republican club to organizing around the interlocking nature of

ableism, racism, heterosexism and capitalism. Stacey is the Community Outreach Director for the National Youth Leadership Network, an organization run by and for youth activists with disabilities.

Keynote #3 Sunday, February 12th, 2012, 11:30 am 12:30 pm, at Stephens Auditorium

Monica Adams works with Freedom, Inc. as a Queer Youth of Color Organizer, serves as the Middle School Program Assistant at the Gay Straight Alliance for Safe Schools (GSAFE), and is an activist from Wisconsin. Within Freedom, Inc., Adams facilitates a group called People Like Us (PLUS). This group uses culture, media, hirstories, and art to create dialogues and narratives around the struggles of LGBTQ and other self-identified queer people of color. Through working with GSAFE, Adams advances the common goal of creating respect for all students in the classroom. As an activist and community

organizer, Adams has been involved with several grass-roots and community organizations, including: the Wisconsin Network for Peace and Justice, the Madison chapter of Take Back the Land, National Leadership Core, and other projects. From an early age, Adams was an organizer and has worked with low income communities of color on a variety of issues ranging from poverty to challenging subtle forms of misogny. Adams was born and raised in Milwaukee, WI, studied at UW-Madison, and is a graduate of the Wisconsin Apprentice Organizers Project.

024

/

MBLGTACC

Andrea Gibson Friday February 10th, 9:30pm Stephens Auditorium

Andrea Gibson is not gentle with her truths. It is this raw fearlessness that has led her to the forefront of the spoken word movement– the first winner of the Women’s World Poetry Slam –Gibson has headlined prestigious performance venues coast to coast with powerful readings on war, class, gender, bullying, white privilege, sexuality, love, and spirituality. Her work has been featured on the BBC, Air America, C-SPAN, Free Speech TV and in 2010 was read by a state representative in lieu of morning prayer at the Utah State Legislature. Now, on her fifth full-length album FLOWER BOY and her second book THE MADNESS VASE, Gibson’s poems continue to be a rally cry for action and a welcome mat at the door of the heart’s most compassionate room.

Lucas Silveira Friday February 10th, 2012, 9:30pm Great Hall, Memorial Union

Lucas Silveira is best known as the front man, songwriter and founding member of the rock band The Cliks. Having won over fans and critics across North America, the UK, Germany and Australia, Lucas has become a leading force in the LGBTQ community for the promotion and visibility of transgender people. Lucas is the first out transgender male to be signed to a major record label deal and his professional achievements have brought a significant amount of attention to Lucas’s personal identity, including the struggles and transitional processes associated with being a transgender person living in the mainstream music industry’s public spotlight. Lucas has garnered critical acclaim from publications including the Advocate, People Magazine, The Boston Globe, and New York Times. He has also received honors in OUT magazine’s 2007 OUT 100 for outstanding contribution to the LGBTQ community. Most recently, he was named “2009’s Sexiest Canadian Male” in Chart Attack’s 15th annual poll and again broke ground being the first transgender male to be nominated and win. Lucas and The Cliks have toured with established musical veterans Cyndi Lauper (on the 2007/2008 True Colors Tour), The Cult, and the legendary New York Dolls. Lucas’ release “Mockingbird” (2011) is a collection of covers done by his favorite artists as well as including two originals. Lucas is presently writing a memoir about his life experiences which is to be published by Random House Publishing and is living in Toronto, Ontario, Canada after spending a year living in Brooklyn, New York writing songs for the upcoming Cliks album which is slated to be released in the fall of 2012.

MBLGTACC

/

025

Katie Wirsing Friday, February 10th, 2012, 9:30pm, Stephens Auditorium

Katie Wirsing’s word drawings pour from a channel through her body, linking heart, brain and soul in one wide-open, permalinked thoroughfare to her mouth. But that pretty mouth never eschews any issue, from libido to loss to Grandma and dancing. Busy Katie’s team won the National Poetry Slam in 2006, having been a member of four semifinalist National Poetry slam teams. She was Denver city slam champ in 2007, and as well as representing the city at the Women of the World Poetry Competition, she went on to do the same at the Individual World Poetry Slam Competition - twice. Katie has appeared on Dyke TV, NPR, Femme Fatale magazine, the BBC and countless local radio stations, as well as being the poetic voice on a national commercial for Kasassa Banking. Finally, touring internationally with Buddy Wakefield and Andrea Gibson, along with opening for Saul Williams, Sage Francis, The Flobots and legendary lesbian comedian Suzane Westenhoefer, has taken her brand of storytelling from coast to coast, proving her fluency in the language of living is universally appreciated.

Pandora BoXX Saturday, February 11th, 2012 8:00pm, Stephens Auditorium &10:00pm, Great Hall, Memorial Union

Pandora Boxx has been internationally entertaining the masses for more than a decade. Pandora is best known as a contestant on the smash hit RuPaul’s Drag Race (Season 2) on Logo and VH1. Despite not winning, Pandora proved to be the break-out star and was named by Entertainment Weekly “as their America’s Next Drag Superstar.” That popularity lead to becoming a drag professor on the spin-off show called RuPaul’s Drag U (Season 1 and 2). Pandora hosted the all drag queen comedy show, One Night Stand Up: Dragtastic NYC which also aired on Logo. Pandora starred in her own GLAAD award winning Absolut ‘Cocktail Cabaret’ commercials, opened for Leann Rimes and Chely Wright, appeared on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (NBC), Jeffrey & Cole Casserole (Logo), and will be seen in the new NBC show “Are You There, Chelsea?” Pandora is also the creator, writer and star of the public access/ Internet show The GAY (means happy) SHOW! (youtube.com/ gayshow)! Currently, Pandora is a writer for the new Gay Voices section of the Huffington Post. This year Pandora released a debut single called “Cooter!” Pandora continues to tour the world spreading glitter, humor and fabulosity to the masses. For more information on Pandora log on to www.pandoraboxx.com or check Pandora on Facebook: www.face book.com/thepandoraboxx or Twitter: @ThePandoraBoxx.

026

/

MBLGTACC

Saturday, February 11th, 2012 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm Each state is provided their own space (room) listed below. State caucuses provide a great opportunity for conference participants to come together to discuss: What is happening in your state Statewide issues Opportunities to organize across your state Successful organizing strategies Program ideas and resources at the multiple institutions across your state Coordination of statewide efforts on legislation and policy What programs, education, & activism is going on on your campus related to the LGBTQQIA community What you have gained from MBLGTACC 2012 thus far What you wish to see at MBLGTACC 2013 Improvements for MBLGTACC Additionally, during the state caucuses, participants will elect representatives (2) to the MBLGTACC Oversight Committee. These representatives will share feedback on the 2012 conference experience on behalf of your state during the oversight committee meeting. Please read beyond the room listing for more details on the oversight committee. Iowa - Memorial Union Sun Room Michigan - Memorial Union Cardinal Room North Dakota- Memorial Union Gold Room South Dakota - Memorial Union 3512 Nebraska - Carver 0202 Kansas - Carver 0160 Minnesota - Memorial Union Campanile Room Missouri - Carver 0204 Wisconsin - Memorial Union Gallery Room Illinois - Memorial Union Pioneer Room Indiana - Carver 0190 Ohio - Carver 0196 Kentucky - Memorial Union 3505 States that are not listed here with a room assignment please visit the MBLGTACC 2012 information center in the South Ballroom to reserve a space for your state.

All states outside of these 12 states can attend the oversight committee meeting and provide their states input. The purpose of the Oversight Committee meeting is to: Discuss the past, present, and future state and progress of MBLGTACC How MBLGTACC can be improved for future years The presentation of bids to host MBLGTACC 2014 The voting and choosing of who will host MBLGTACC 2014 The host school for the MBLGTACC 2014 will be determined at the 2012 conference. Students organizing to host the MBLGTACC in 2014 will be expected to present a bid proposal to the MBLGTACC Oversight Committee at the 2012 conference. The determination of the site of the 2014 conference will be made on Saturday, February 11th and will be formally announced Sunday, February 12th, 2012 at the closing ceremony. Students organizing to host the MBLGTACC 2014 should prepare an approximately 20 minute presentation for the Oversight Committee. This presentation will outline how students plan to organize the conference in the two years leading to the 2014 conference. The formal presentation should incorporate a hardcopy proposal for distribution to representatives from the 12 states represented at the conference as well as the 2012 and 2013 conference chairs (14 entities, two representatives each). The presenting organization should also prepare an oral presentation to accompany the hardcopy proposal and be prepared to address questions from the Oversight Committee. The presenting organization may include as many presenters as it sees fit; however, presentations by more than 10-15 members may be difficult to accommodate in the meeting space. The MBLGTACC Oversight Committee is an independent 501(c)3 non-profit organization responsible for the continuous support and coordination of the MBLGTACC from year to year. The oversight Committee will meet this year on Saturday February 11th, 2012 from 3:15 pm to 8:15 pm in the Memorial Union Gold room. The Oversight Committee is comprised of 2 representatives from each of the 12 states that make up the Midwest. These states include: Iowa Michigan South Dakota North Dakota Nebraska Kansas Minnesota Missouri Wisconsin Illinois Indiana Ohio MBLGTACC

/

027

Identity Caucus Workshop Session #3 Saturday

Identity Caucus Workshop Session #5 Saturday

1 Transgender & Genderqueer/ Gender Non-Conforming When discussing LGBTQQIAA identities, we often focus on the “L” and the “G”, but not the “T”. This caucus will provide a space for individuals who identify on the Transgender spectrum. We would like to offer the opportunity to discuss the stigmas faced from the LGBTQQIAA community and beyond.

5 QPOC (Queer People of Color) When discussing LBGTQQIAA identities, queer people of color may be left out of the conversation. Historically, LGBTQQIAA activism has been primarily “White” and we would like to offer a space for a discussion of the intersection of LBGTQQIAA identities and race/ethnicity.

9:15 am to 10:15 am

Identity caucuses are an opportunity for conference participants to come together around a specific identity they have. These identity caucuses were created to make a safe space for participants to engage in healthy discussion and dialogues about their experiences. These identity caucuses are intended to be a safe and affirming space for those who share that identity. Because of this, we ask that you do not join caucuses for identities with which you do not self-identify.

2 Military This time and space will be dedicated to discussion based on the intersecting identities of the LGBTQQIAA community and military service. We would like to offer a space for conversations about the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy, the experiences of those that have and continue to serve, inclusion in ROTC programs, and other related topics. 3 Bisexual/Pansexual/Fluid Sexuality When discussing LGBTQQIAA identities, the focus is often on the “L” and the “G,” and other identities may be left out of the conversation. We would like to offer a space of discussion of bisexual, pansexual, and fluid identities and the stigmas they face from the LGBTQQIAA community and beyond. 4 Greek Life This session emerged as a proposed “Make Your Own!” Identity Caucus and is facilitated by its proposers. Greek life on college campuses is stereotyped as unwelcoming to the LGBTQQIAA community. This caucus is an opportunity for LGBTQQIAA members of the Greek community to come and share their stories, discuss best practices for inclusion, and to network with each other.

028

/

MBLGTACC

5:00 pm to 6:00 pm

6 Ability When discussing non-dominant identities, comments on ability are often left out. We would like to offer a safe space for a discussion of the intersection of LGBTQQIAA identities and ability. This caucus may include a discussion of systemic barriers, negative attitudes, and feelings of exclusion for both the LGBTQQIAA identities and the ability identities of participants. 7 Ally When discussing LGBTQQIAA identities, there are limited opportunities for allies’ voices to be heard. This is a safe space to discuss support and advocacy towards the LGBTQQIAA community. Additionally, this is a brave space to discuss the stigmatization that occurs from a heteronormative society. We also want to acknowledge that this is a space for allies to come together and educate one another on how to be better allies. 8 Jewish & LGBTQQIA This session emerged as a proposed “Make Your Own!” Identity Caucus and is facilitated by its proposers. This caucus will start a conversation about where Judaism and queer identities collide. Discussion can range from Israeli gay culture, politics, religious acceptance, religious practice, queer Jewish organizations, popular videos and films, personal stories, or whatever the participants are eager to discuss. By keeping the LGBTQQIAA Jews connected, we can better help serve our own local Jewish community.

Theme

Pillars

Each year, the conference strives to connect both individuals and communities with resources that will help to enrich lives across the Midwest. In hosting the 2012 MBLGTACC, Iowa State University accepts the challenge and privilege of enhancing grassroots LGBTQQIAA activism through this year’s conference theme: The Butterfly Effect: Evolution to Revolution. We have developed the theme from chaos theory, in which a butterfly can flap its wings and cause ripples of change around the world. Similarly, each of our socially just and positive actions work together leading to a more equitable world. With a focus on LGBTQQIAA history & identities, as well as the impact of our multiple identities, MBLGTACC 2012 will provide impetus to expand human potential and transform our communities.

We intend to create an environment that will foster personal growth and development in the areas of: History: Understand how past and current sociopolitical movements have impacted LGBTQQIAA communities and the larger society to better inform our future. Identity: Explore the LGBTQQIAA spectrum and examine the personal and political significance of identity and inclusion. Individual Intersections: Create awareness of intersections between LGBTQQIAA identities and other social identities. Socially-Just Transformation/Action: Encourage participants to take collaborative action at the individual, group, and/or institutional levels to create social change that promotes equity for all. All workshops indicate 1-2 pillars that will be addressed within the content of the workshop.

Saturday, February 11, 2012 8:00 am to 10:45am Sun Room - Memorial Union Featured Keynote Reverend Dr. Jamie Washington presents: “Oh No They Didn’t !”: Reframing and Engaging Resistance A Key To Real Culture Change Are there just days that we want to throw in the towel and give up because we meet so much resistance? Do you feel even greater disappointment when those who are supposed to be in your corner don’t show up in helpful ways. Have you had more than your share of “WTF” moments? Let’s talk about how we reframe resistance and use it as the energy needed to create culture change. Students will learn what resistance looks like in a culture change process Students will examine their own ability to recognize and engage resistance Student will experience of model for reframing resistance Students will learn key concepts and tools steps for engaging resistance as leaders

IN THE LIFE Media presents: Legalizing Stigma (HIV) & Women, HIV & Criminal Law Saturday February 11th 2012, 5:00 pm to 6:00pm Memorial Union- Sun Room More than 30 states have laws criminalizing HIV exposure, transmission, or nondisclosure of an individual’s HIV status. IN THE LIFE looks at the stigma and misinformation embedded in laws meant to curb the spread of the disease and the human cost among those who are HIV positive. This session presents two IN THE LIFE Media segments.

With so many workshops, how do I decide what to attend? The simple answer: Attend some that interest you and some that don’t. The complicated answer: We’ve done our best to spread out the different workshop types and themes, but there will inevitably be more workshops you want to attend than you can make it to. MBLGTACC 2012 urges you to not only meet people similar to yourself but to expand your boundaries by learning about the experiences of others and being open to new ideas. If you are attending the conference in a group, try splitting up all of the workshops you are interested in and sharing your experiences at the workshops over dinner. MBLGTACC 2012 is about finding a safe space, making new friends, and being open and willing to learn from others.So, enjoy yourself! And learn something new that you can share with your friends, family, and campus community!

Campus Pride presents: Film Screening and Q & A Panel: Legalize Gay!: The Civil Rights Movement of a Generation A Movie by Christopher Hines Saturday February 11th 2012, 8:30 pm - 9:45pm, Stephens Auditorium “Legalize Gay” is a documentary that captures the courage and conviction of a new generation of activists—gay and straight—as they campaign, often in parts of the country hostile to gay and lesbian rights, for LGBT equality in marriage, non-discrimination in sports and at work, same-sex sex education, standing up to bullying, and forging inclusive college campuses.

MBLGTACC

/

029

woman who schools Jesus of Nazareth. The great faith of the Roman Centurion. Join us as we reclaim the best of the JudeoChristian tradition - radical hospitality, inclusion and love. 5 Anigay Memorial Union 3538 Gillian Adler

Workshop Session #1 Friday, February 10th 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm 1 Sexuality and the Law: A brief history of the legal rise of LGBT rights in the United States Memorial Union 3534 Joseph Glazebrook The battle for equality under the law began before Stonewall. The first real case for equal rights under the law for LGBT persons was filed. Since then, LGBT persons have been using the courts to slowly advance the boundaries of legal equality. This workshop will present a summary of the history of legal advancements throughout the country under both state and federal law. 2 Embracing the Deaf community: Making your event or club accessible to all! Memorial Union Oak Room Blair Mishleau Diversity is paramount to any queer organization, but oftentimes certain groups, like the Deaf community, can be cast to the side. Embracing the Deaf community isn’t as tricky as it may sound- it can be as simple as insuring that the movie night includes closed captions or a presentation has an ASL-English interpreter. This workshop will help you start finding all 030

/

MBLGTACC

available resources to open your event up to everyone! Oh, and there’s candy! 3 Lady Gaga Studies,” Not Just For Encyclopedia Dramatica Memorial Union Campanile Room Vince Tripi If your college doesn’t have a course for studying LGBT literature, be empowered to start an independent study, but consider queering the idea of a booklist. This workshop will queer classical constructs of literature and examine how a biographical critical lens can be used in the humanities to study pop music from Gaga, Ke$ha, Katy Perry, Divine, Ma Rainey, and more. And yes, there will be tunes. 4 The Bible and Homosexuality: The “Clobber Passages” Memorial Union Pioneer Room Gail Simonds Come read the Christian Bible with 21st Century queer eyes and retell the old, old stories. The alternative family constellation of Ruth, Naomi, and Boaz. The love triangle of David, Jonathan, and Saul. Ester’s coming out saves a nation. The Syro-Phonecian

An anime subgenre has arisen called yaoi, romanticized depictions of gay male sexuality, that is exclusively marketed to young women. Many young women in America are sharing this content through the internet plus creating their own yaoi content through fanfiction, internet forums and social media. This workshop will work as not only an introduction to this new phenomenon, but also a discussion on how yaoi content is affecting these women’s perceptions of gay male sexuality. 6 Straight, bi, gay, other? Memorial Union 3512 Riah Roe This session aims to analyze how gender and sexuality intersect to allow for identity creation. Is a man who sleeps with a man gay or can he still be straight? What if a transgender man sleeps is attracted to a transgender woman? What do these labels mean anyways for people? 7 Surviving the Hot Seat: Protect Yourself and Share Your Story Memorial Union Gallery Room Jes Berndt With assimilation as the main trajectory for gay rights, this workshop explores the effect it has on queerness. The Netherlands, having achieved gay equality, will be used to show how achieving parity can lead to a depoliticized identity. This workshop will use the Occupy Movement as an example of the kind of queer politics that the gay movement should be organizing around.

8 Trans* Survival: Understanding Trans* Folk & Trans* Ally-ship Memorial Union Gold Room Kyle Watson Explanation and description of 25 trans* identities, as well as exploring transphobia within both the normative and GLB communities. Additionally, we will discuss ways to be a trans* ally to all different types of trans*folks in a general sense. 9 In Between Worlds: The Struggle for Identity in Queer Asian America Memorial Union 3505 Randy Chanthavong Queer Asian Americans have historically and constantly tried to find an identity, and many have felt that they do not truly belong in the Asian American or LGBT communities or if they do, they must choose one identity over the other. This workshop will explore queer API’s struggles to belong in either or both worlds. 10 Beyond the Bracelets: Fundraising Effectively for Your Surgery or Cause” Charlie Poulson Memorial Union 3558 Charlie Poulson, founder of Save Charlie Bracelets and trans man, explains the process and tools used to set his fundraising efforts apart from other endeavors. Methods and strategies using social media networking and professional interpersonal skills can be applied to your own cause or organization for a new style of effective fundraising. This workshop is heavily based on trans* issues and how they can be used to successfully utilize fundraising initiatives.

Workshop Session #2 Saturday, February 11th 8:00 am to 9:00 am 11 The Critical Limits and Possibilities of Queer Femininity Sarah Stevens Carver 0202 This session will ask the question can femininity be liberated from heterosexist systems of power? It will look at the binary of lesbian and queer images in the media of the asexual butch and the hypersexual femme. It will contest traditional notions of this binary and examine femme-inism in the queer community. 12 Transgender and Relationships Devin Harcey & Jessica Ernst Carver 0204 This workshop is meant to give an understanding on what transitioning is all about, from coming out to surgery and hormones if one chooses. We will discuss what is like to be in a relationship with a person who is transgender and we will discuss the ins and outs of our own relationship. We take into consideration that not all relationships or transitions are the same but that our discussion will just be an overview. 13 Sexuality and Spirituality Gail Simonds Memorial Union Oak Room Learn how various spiritual traditions/paths understand the intersections of sexuality and spirituality. Share the stories we learned in childhood and adolescence about sex and religion. Reflect on how our queer identities inform our spiritualities. Consider where the intersections of sexuality and spirituality may lead us after MBLGTACC 2012.

14 Debunking Myths about BDSM Tynan Fox Memorial Union Pioneer Room The leather, rubber, and BDSM communities are shrouded in myths and false truths perpetuated by pop culture. Movies like “Pulp Fiction” and “Hostel” make us look dangerous and mentally ill. It’s just not true. This session will examine these myths, discuss their validity, and also provide a basic introduction to BDSM and alternative lifestyles. New, novice, and experienced people are welcome. 15 LBGT History in the US Part I of III Dale Larson & Jacob Dougherty Carver 0184 The presentation will be an in depth discussion of the history of the LGBT movement in the United States during the time period of 1900 (the start of the 20th century) through 1945 (the end of WWII). This presentation will use documentary clips, historical timelines, and a general discussion of important events to understand the history of the movement in the United States. 16 “La primera muerte era una persona transexual”: LGBTQ Resistance and Repression in Post-Coup Honduras Joe Hiller Carver 0268 Following a 2009 military coup d’état, many Honduran organizations coalesced into the Frente Nacional de Resistencia Popular (FNRP) to advocate for the restoration of democracy. The FNRP includes an open LGBTQ presence. However, this expression of coalitional LGBTQ activism has been met by a dramatic spike in trans- and homophobic violence, in which the police are directly implicated. This workshop will strive to do two things: describe queer Honduran activism and unravel the links between political repression, militarism, and heteronormativity in post-coup Honduras.

17 Who Wears the Pants? Understanding the Complexity of Heteronormativity, Gender Expression and Sexual Scripts within Same-Sex Relationships Kristen Altenau & Eric Gudmundson Memorial Union 3512

20 When the Oppressed become the Oppressor: Racism and White Privilege in the LGBTQ Community, Integrating Theory and Practice to Build an Inclusive Community Ashley Watkins & Nic Riek Carver 0174

Butch, masc and fem. These are all words that are used to classify one’s gender role within a samesex relationship. However, how often do individuals in same-sex partnerships deconstruct the perceived need to adopt or perform these labels? In this session we will discuss the complexity of gender expression when intersected with sexual orientation, utilizing the theoretical concept of queer-authorship as a means to deconstruct societal norms.

The LGBT community is no stranger to various forms of oppression, however we must also understand the ways in which we oppress others, specifically in terms of racism. Using the “Taking Back Boystown” Campaign as a microcosm of larger issues of racism and white privilege in the LGBT community, this workshop will present an overview of white privilege and racism and help participants formulate an action plan for inclusiveness in their own communities.

18 Recruitment, Retention and Succession - 3 Keys to a Successful Student Organization Julian Haas Carver 0160 Are you having trouble recruiting new members? Is it hard to keep the members you do recruit? As leaders transition does your organization lose momentum. This workshop will give you the tools you need to overcome these 3 problems that almost every student organization faces. During this session you will learn how to recruit more high quality members, keep the members you do recruit and transition from old leadership to new without a hitch. 19 Empowering the Femme Identity Emily Thomas & Molly Eames Memorial Union Gallery Room Together we will outline the history of queer femmes, create a working definition of what femme means to us, facilitate discussion on femme identity, femme invisibility, and the butch-femme dynamic, empower and affirm the femme lifestyle through the Femme Shark way of life, and chart out how the personal is political.

21 Your Next Great Adventure: Creating LGBTQ Inclusive Workplace Jory Catalpa Carver 0290 Conquered college? Ready for the next challenge? Come learn how it was possible for one person to get a Fortune 500 company to implement gender neutral bathrooms (AND HOW YOU CAN TOO)! The skills you’ve learned in college to develop your campus can and should be applied to your career! In this workshop we cover, legal considerations, intersectional oppression in the workplace, advocating for inclusion, bringing in back up, and so much more! 22 Reaching Out to Rural Communities: The Challenges and the Benefits of Rural Organizing Dana Stuehling Carver 0196 With a significant population of Iowans living in rural communities, we need to examine the specific obstacles we face when working with these regions. This panel will highlight the challenges and benefits or working with Iowa’s smaller and more isolated communities. The panel members MBLGTACC

/

031

will discuss their experiences studying, working, living, and organizing in rural communities as they relates to LGBT activism and community organizing. Audience participation and questions are welcome and appreciated. 23 Oh $#!T We Forgot the “T”: Creating Inclusive Spaces for Trans* Folk Stef Shuster Memorial Union Campanile Room This workshop will address engaging in trans-affirming social justice work. Many times transidentified people are merely “added on” to LGB-focused issues/topics or left out altogether from social justice frameworks. We will start with a basic (and brief) overview of trans-affirmative language, then move towards a discussion of cisprivilege, and end with a discussion of how to make our spaces, programming, and activism more inclusive of all genders - from micro-level interactions to macrolevel structural change. 24 Queer Service Members David Lingerfelt, Jake Eleazer, Rebecca Grant Carver 0190 With the recent repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” queer service members have finally gotten a chance to speak openly about their sexual orientation without fear of disciplinary action. Our panel of three queer service members will discuss their military careers before and after the repeal, and answer questions about our military service. We will talk openly about our years serving under the policy and what the repeal has meant to us. We will also address the current limitations of benefits to same-sex partners in the military, as well as the current ban on transgender service members. 25 NQC & Today Gillian Adler Carver 0274 New queer cinema was an early Sundance phenomenon that redefined filmmaking and 032

/

MBLGTACC

depictions of queerness in films. As a result of this movement, many indie filmmakers have been able to release ‘queer’ themed films. We shall investigate if these films are like the new queer filmmakers and furthering the ideals of queerness, or sticking to strict formulas, which will allow them to receive funding and/or distribution. 26 The Art of Drag: Gender Performance History and Culture JAC Stringer Memorial Union Gold Room Drag is fabulous. Whether it is in a bar or a theatrical stage, drag is more than dressing up; it is addressing gender and culture through a queer lens. Drag is performed across communities and every facet uniquely promotes visibility, validation, and artistry for a wide spectrum of identities. In this workshop, we will discuss the history of gender performance, drag as we know it today, the cultures surrounding it, and what the future may hold. 27 Are We Losing Queerness: Rethinking American Gay Politics through the Netherlands and the Occupy Movement Christan Loggins MU 3538 With assimilation as the main trajectory for gay rights, this workshop explores the effect it has on queerness. The Netherlands, having achieved gay equality, will be used to show how achieving parity can lead to a depoliticized identity. This workshop will use the Occupy Movement as an example of the kind of queer politics that the gay movement should be organizing around. 28 Ally Development Theory: A History and a Critique Kevin Miller & Francis Oakgrove Carver 0305 An Ally is “a person who is a member of the ‘dominate’ or ‘majority’ group who works to end oppression in his or her personal and professional life through

support of, and as an advocate for, the oppressed population.” Join us as we offer a practical look at ally development theory from a critical framework. What does it mean to be an “ally” and how can we critique that privileged identity? 29 Do You Speak Queer? Natalie Klueg Carver 0298 As we move forward in our collective efforts for a queer movement, we faced with ever increasing ways to explain our wants/needs/desires/identities. While the growing list of queer vocabulary can be an aid in the dialogue surrounding the struggle for equality, could we be sending mixed messages to the rest of the world? This workshop will explore a discussion of gender, desire, attraction, and relationships in more universal terms. 30 Connecting Campus Organizations and Community Agencies Julia McGinley & Brad Whipple Carver 0294 Learn how to effectively collaborate with community agencies who serve LGBT youth and adults. Find ways in which your student organization can be a change agency at the community level and extend your focus beyond your campus to build a community of acceptance and support. 31 LGBTQQIA Politics, Networking and Strategies for Success Randy Studt & Laura Black Burn MU 3505 Making the connection between campus and the community on all levels is difficult but crucial for those interested in LGBTQQIA rights. This workshop will provide practical experience on how to create connections with community assets, approach legislators, and push LGBTQQIA legislation. Students will find out how to get internships on state levels as well as the Gay & Lesbian Leadership Institute/ Victory Fund

in Washington DC. The emphasis is on hands-on experience and direct action.

Workshop Session #3 & Identity Caucuses* Saturday, February 11th 9:15 am to 10:15 am 32 Title IX and LGBTQ Students: How the April 4, 2011 “Dear Colleague Letter” levels the playing field for LGBTQ students at all levels Ellyn Bartges & Brandon Johnson Memorial Union Gallery Room This session is a brief history of Title IX of the 1972 Education Act and how recent changes detailed in the April 4, 2011 Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) impact LGBTQA students at all levels of our educational system. What does this mean for students in hostile, beleaguered school districts like Anoka-Hennepin in Minnesota? 33 Queer as Cake: Asexuality, Identity, and Culture Harriet Groenleer Memorial Union Oak Room Confused about the asexuality spectrum? Not feeling ‘queer enough’? As a relative newcomer to the ever-growing queer acronym, asexuality can be confusing even to people who identify as such. We’ll break down and build up ace/demi identity and language as they relate to queerness and gender. Everyone is welcome to share their ace experiences. Finally we’ll talk about [mis]representations of asexuality in the media. There will be laughter for all and cake for the lucky!

34 That’s So.. Girl Wearing A Skirt as a Top! Brent Ploughe & Aaron Hill Memorial Union Pioneer Room

37 How Did An Issue of Gender Roles Become About Sexuality? Autumn Bradley MU 3219

40 Unpacking Privilege Justin Ford Memorial Union Campanile Room

When you hear, “That’s so gay!,” what’s your first response? Are you angry? Do you want to respond? In this workshop, the presenters will explore bystander intervention and its current impact in the LGBTQA community. We will complicate current bystander intervention methods while providing the audience with an alternative perspective for approaching these conversations. The audience will gain an awareness of language as a social construction and its residual effect on the LGBTQA community.

Campus career professionals will be able to identify specific challenges LGBTQ college students face transitioning from academia to the workplace, analyze and evaluate the level of LGBTQ specific career services and resources that their career center offers, compare that to other career centers from across the country, and develop an action plan to increase the level of services and resources, solicit for and receive buy-in campus-wide, and/or assist other career centers to do so.

Privilege is often onedimensionalized as either “Male Privilege” or “White Privilege” but is rarely discussed holistically. This workshop will approach and unpack the multiple dimensions of privilege as they relate to the multiple dimensions of our identities. Additionally, “Unpacking Privilege” hopes to leave participants with, not only a more comprehensive understanding of privilege but also, the tools to replicate or create a privilege workshop at their home institutions.

35 LBGT History in the US Part II of III Dale Larson and Jacob Dougherty Carver 0184 The presentation will be an in depth discussion of the history of the LGBT movement in the United States 1945 (the end of WWII) to 1980 ( the start of AIDS Epidemic) This presentation will use documentary clips, historical timelines, and a general discussion of important events to understand the history of the movement in the United States. 36 Raise the bar: Assessment of LGBTQ specific career services Riley Folds Carver 0204 Campus career professionals will be able to identify specific challenges LGBTQ college students face transitioning from academia to the workplace, analyze and evaluate the level of LGBTQ specific career services and resources that their career center offers, compare that to other career centers from across the country, and develop an action plan to increase the level of services and resources, solicit for and receive buy-in campus-wide, and/or assist other career centers to do so.

38 Intentionally Supporting LGBTQ People of Color Noel Gordon & Zesheng Chen Carver 0174 This workshop will focus on the relationship between Race and LGBTQ student activism. We will encourage participants to think critically about the ways they have or have not been intentionally inclusive of People of Color (POC) in their outreach, recruitment, and programming. The facilitators of the workshop will draw from their experiences as leaders of LGBTQPOC dialogue and initiatives at the University of Michigan. 39 How to Have an Argument Molly Eames, Jyler Donovan, & Emily Thomas MU 3505 Every human interaction can be an argument; especially as queer people, opinions collide constantly in our lives. By learning skills to have affective and constructive conversations, we can foster spaces that will be conducive to everyone’s growth. By identifying where our conversations lie on a spectrum of aggression, it becomes possible to have conversations all people that will always be constructive.

41 Mixed-Orientation Relationships Kevin Zimmerman Carver 0190 Approximately 2 million people are either currently in or have once been in a mixed-orientation relationship. Attendees will participate in an “choose your own adventure” application activity designed to explore the ways homosexual orientation intersects with heterosexual partnership. I will then present with highlights from interviews with gay men and their straight wives in long-term marriages. 42 Rebranding Your Organization Scott Clanin & Mandy Lutes Carver 0294 Learn how your student organization can identify and target a wide range of audiences and create and distribute messages over a variety of mediums that will attract people from all walks of life—lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, allied, religious groups, students, teachers…just to name a few! Explore new social media tools (and learn how to monitor and regulate these tools), as well as examine old methods of communication (i.e. word of mouth, posters, handbills).

43 Trans* and GenderQueer 101 JAC Stringer Memorial Union Gold Room Gender is connected to every aspect of our lives; our identities, our sexualities, and how we experience the world. This workshop sorts out the mass of labels, terms, and theories surrounding gender through the experiences and language of trans*/gender non-conforming communities. We will ask why we think about gender, how culture and practices interact with and affect trans* people today, and find commonalities that will help us build a more inclusive, just community. 44 Navigating Ambiguity, Understanding Queer Competency Kaitlin Korbitz Carver 0274 Navigating Queer Identities- Don’t Yuck My Yum! This session will enrich both personal and social understandings of the meaning of “queerness” and how we can all work on amplifying our ability to become educated leaders in a global society. 45 Confronting Christianity: How to Change the Ultimate Bias Jonathan Page Carver 0290 Christianity remains the single biggest barrier to greater acceptance of LGBTQIA persons in our society. Yet, many queer people and their allies do not know how to engage Christians in dialogue or how to think about Christianity beyond what they were taught as kids. This workshop gives you the tools you need to turn the tide. 46 LGBT and journalism: how readers can voice the LGBT community on a piece of paper Alan Toussaint Carver 0282 Do you want your voice to be heard by your community or even MBLGTACC

/

033

on your college campus? In this workshop, we will discuss some of the ways how you can share your voices to others about the LGBT community and doing it in a safe manner. We will also look at news articles and how these groups/ persons exercised their right to free speech and concern for their rights. 47 Not Queer Enough: Who’s Allowed in the Room? Natalie Klueg Carver 0196 Do you look queer? What does that even mean? What are the rules, who wrote them, and what does it mean to break them? As the Queer (lgbtaqqi…) Movement grows and changes, so too does the face of the movement. Do you feel represented? This workshop is for the outliers and outlaws, for those who are looking for their place, and those willing to carve one out. Let’s find out who is queer enough. 48 T-Time Aiden Ethington & Molly Ferris Carver 0268 This workshop will define and describe the transgender identity as it relates to the college experience. Discussion will include trans* terminology, history, and trans* inclusiveness in residence halls and rural college communities. 49 Wait...Kids Are Gay? Fight the Gender Police: Exploring Non-Normative Gender Identity, Experience, and Inclusion Nancy Baur & Kate Steven Carver 0298 The issues of bullying and intolerance in schools are having a profound negative impact on today’s youth and especially youth that identify as LGBT. School administrators, counselors and teachers need to be aware that there are students in schools that identify as LGBT and need to be trained to work with these students. This presentation is a combination of factual information, definitions, statistics, symbols and personal stories of youth impacted by hate and intolerance in schools.

034

/

MBLGTACC

50 Fight the Gender Police: Exploring Non-Normative Gender Identity, Experience, and Inclusion Aubree Henderson & Dana Ahern Carver 0160 This workshop will explore the wide range of gender expression by discussing the politics of identity and experience as they relate to non-normative gender. Participants will leave this workshop with new knowledge of gender identities and strategies for implementing this knowledge in their interactions with others. If you’d like to learn more about gender expression and identity politics, this workshop is for you! All are welcome. 51 Are We Losing Queerness: Rethinking American Gay Politics through the Netherlands and the Occupy Movement Christan Loggins Memorial Union 3538 This workshop will explore the wide range of gender expression by discussing the politics of identity and experience as they relate to non-normative gender. Participants will leave this workshop with new knowledge of gender identities and strategies for implementing this knowledge in their interactions with others. If you’d like to learn more about gender expression and identity politics, this workshop is for you! All are welcome.

*Identity Caucuses: Bi/Pan/Fluid Fluid Sexuality Carver 0305 Military MU 3512 QPOC MU Cardinal Gay and Greek Carver 0202

Workshop Session #4 Saturday, February 11th 3:15 pm to 4:45 pm 52 Occupy Gay Street: The Occupy Wall Street Movement and the LGBT Community David Pope & Jessica Garraway Carver 0268 The Occupy Wall Street protests have sparked an Occupy movement that is challenging authority and power structures worldwide. Where is our place in it? How does the Occupy movement relate to queer activism, and is there an intersection between them? Non-hierarchical discussion and activities will be facilitated by two queer Iowan Occupiers. 53 DADT: The First Six Months of Living Out and Open Jake Hite Carver 0196 Army or Air Force? Navy or Marines? Military members around the country are starting to shed their masks and come out of the closet. With the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t tell come a victory for one soldier that has been long in the making. Come share in his story of struggle with homosexuality in the U.S. Army, his coming out and how he believes that the military has just become the biggest ally of the LGBTQQIA community. 54 An Overview of the H.A.V.E.N. (Healthy, Accepting Venue & Educational Network) Program Andrew Leigh-Bullard & Luke Wulford Carver 0204 The H.A.V.E.N. Program is designed as the newest evolution of programs such as Safe Zone and Safe Space, designed specifically for Higher Education. This session will provide an abridged H.A.V.E.N. workshop, which will provide the tools for participants to create a welcoming, understanding, supportive and confidential

environment. This is accomplished through activities which examine bias, both societal and personal, as well as addressing situations such as coming out and bullying. 55 The Rainbow Connection: Mental Health Services and the LGBT College Student Erin Williams, Kristin Ploskonka, Kaylee Rogers & Abri Iwanski Carver 0298 The session will discuss helpseeking and stressors among LGBT college students, as well as the historical treatment of the LGBT population by the mental health profession, and guidelines that have been put into place to improve that treatment. Handouts will be provided to audience members. A question and answer portion will conclude the session; audience members are free to share mental health experiences. 56 Conversion Therapy: You Can’t Change What We Didn’t Choose Samuel Brinton Carver 0202 From the recent discussions of Bachmann’s “Pray the Gay Away” center to the history of reparative therapy at Brigham Young University, the concept of changing a person’s sexual orientation is a matter of huge debate. As a young man who has undergone conversion therapy, the presenter will provide information on how to help survivors and counteract those who offer the terrible therapy. 57 Is that a Rainbow Tie You’re Wearing? Educating, Preparing, and Empowering LGBTQ Students in the Transition from Academia into the Workplace Alex Gant Memorial Union 3512 This presentation will give students insight into the LGBTQ specific career materials available and how to get more materials on their campuses. The presentation will promote ways to get involved with OUT for Work. At the end of this presentation, students will be

able to highlight the LGBTQ inclusive career materials available and will feel inspired to share the information and feel better prepared for the workplace after college.

experience. Participants will learn how to create and sustain an oSTEM chapter. They will also learn how to connect with students and professionals in academia and industry.

58 When the Oppressed become the Oppressor: Racism and White Privilege in the LGBTQ Community, Integrating Theory and Practice to Build an Inclusive Community Ashley Watkins & Nic Riek Carver 0294

61 Who Counts? Inclusion and Allyship in Trans* and Queer Communities Membership JAC Stringer Memorial Union 3505

The LGBT community is no stranger to various forms of oppression, however we must also understand the ways in which we oppress others, specifically in terms of racism. Using the “Taking Back Boystown” Campaign as a microcosm of larger issues of racism and white privilege in the LGBT community, this workshop will present an overview of white privilege and racism and help participants formulate an action plan for inclusiveness in their own communities. 59 “It’s Just A Preference”: A Forum On Gay Male Dating Johnathan Fields Memorial Union Pioneer Room “But It’s Just a Preference” will explore the interactions and politics of predominantly gay male spaces, including online and other public forums. This workshop will be largely discussion-based, questioning how preferences are shaped and the social impact they may have. 60 Organizing for LGBTQIA STEM Students: The (R)evolution of STEM Eric Partidge & Cody Morrow Carver 0160 Attendees will learn about “Out in Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics” (oSTEM), a national society for LGBTQA students the STEM fields. Participants will learn the impact of an organization with an academic focus, including the ways oSTEM can specifically contribute to the academic

The trans* and queer community is a diverse combination of identities and experiences, but who decides what count as queer? As language and identities change, our communities must change with them. This workshop works to crack open the question of “who counts” in queer and trans* communities, what identities are included, where friends, family and partners fit, and how we can promote inclusive, responsible community building where everyone has a place to call home. 62 Ally Development Theory: A History and a Critique Kevin Miller & Francis Oakgrove Memorial Union Campanile Room An Ally is “a person who is a member of the ‘dominate’ or ‘majority’ group who works to end oppression in his or her personal and professional life through support of, and as an advocate for, the oppressed population.” Join us as we offer a practical look at ally development theory from a critical framework. What does it mean to be an “ally” and how can we critique that privileged identity? 63 The Bible and Homosexuality: Queering the Good Book Gail Simonds Memorial Union Gallery Room Come read the Christian Bible with 21st Century queer eyes and retell the old, old stories. The alternative family constellation of Ruth, Naomi, and Boaz. The love triangle of David, Jonathan, and Saul. Ester’s coming out saves a nation. The Syro-Phonecian woman who schools Jesus of

Nazareth. The great faith of the Roman Centurion. Join us as we reclaim the best of the JudeoChristian tradition - radical hospitality, inclusion and love. 64 Heterosexism & Cissexism: How We All Pay the Price Warren Blumenfeld Memorial Union Sun Room Heterosexism (the assumption that everyone is or should be heterosexual, and prejudice and discrimination against LGBT people) and cissexism (oppression against people who exist outside the gender/sex binary) are pervasive throughout our society, and each of us, irrespective of sexual or gender identity and expression, is at risk of its harmful effects. 65 Theater of the Oppressed Suegene (Suey) Park & Andrew Haas Memorial Union Oak Room This is a workshop that welcomes people of all different identities to come and play together. Theatre exercises will be used to aesthetically illustrate topics such as power and privilege. Each creative exercise will be followed by dialogue in order to process the experiences. The goal of the dialogue is to promote understanding among participants in order to humanize both the oppressor and the oppressed. 66 Voyeurism in Media: The Art of Lesbian and Bisexual Misrepresentation Marissa Reed Carver 0305 This session will critically analyze current media representations of LGBT individuals and the impact they have upon the LGBT community. More specifically, it will focus on how cisgendered lesbian and bisexual women are objectified and oversexualized with male voyeurism as the overarching theme in media production. By educating the main consumers of media, this session aims to encourage more diverse, factual representations and less objectification of the lesbian/

bisexual female community in media and social life. 67 Queering Reproductive Justice: Reproductive health and rights are LGBTQIA rights Kelley Robinson, Beth Schopis & Miles Brainard Carver 0274 Participants will learn the connections between reproductive justice and the LGBTQIA community, along with strategies to work together moving forward. Reproductive justice holds strong ties to LGBTQIA liberation through a focus on the ability to make healthy decisions about our bodies and sexuality in all areas of our lives. This presentation will highlight health disparities in the LGBTQIA community and the link to reproductive justice work. We will use past and present examples of coalition building between respective movements to model examples for collaboration.

Workshop Session #5 & Identity Caucus #2* Saturday, February 11th 5:00 pm to 6:00 pm 68 Why We’re Still Not Equal: Reviewing the Failures of “Gay Activism” Becky Brasfield Carver 0196 The objective of this presentation is to review the failures of “gay activism” in order to ascertain a better understanding of why we’re still not equal today. Eight major issues in gay activism are presented [(1) Gay marriage/civil unions (2) HIV/AIDS (3) Racism, sexism MBLGTACC

/

035

and the ‘isms between the letters (LGBTQA) (4) LGBT images on television and in film (5) Language use and identifiers (6) Religious arguments (7) Issues of choice and claims of deviancy (8) Hate crimes] in order to discuss and develop transformative, yet potentially controversial approaches to the future of gay activism. 69 Media Circus of the Grotesque: Rhetoric of Privilege and Violence Vince Tripi Carver 0204 One question echoes through Judy Shepard’s memoir, The Meaning of Matthew: Why? Why did they beat and leave him, but also why did Ellen host a vigil in D.C., why did Clinton call the hospital? This section will take a queer look at the insider LGBT and outsider media objectification of Matthew Shepard and Tyler Clementi and examine how coverage of hate crimes, suicide, and war erase people of color, women, and transfolk. 70 “And what does that make me?” Kristopher Langner & Ellie Hail Memorial Union 3505 This workshop will focus on the identities of the partners of trans or gender non-conforming individuals. The question being discussed will be, “so what does that make me?” Much research and work is done about trans/gender non-conforming individuals, but little research is done about their partners, and their identity. We will explore how identities change within a relationship using performance followed by a discussion about identities. 71 Stickers, Flags, and Posters: How Rituals Unite Our Community Joshua Fletcher Carver 0160 Colleges and universities are packed full of everlasting traditions and rituals that unite a campus community. But what happens when all the traditions are heteronormative? Come learn and discuss how you can unite your campus GLTBQ community without saying a word. 036

/

MBLGTACC

72 Connecting the Dots: Identities Intermingled Brittanie Pearson Carver 0174 Identity often dictates experience. But which identities matter? Historically, the strongest social movements have isolated a portion of identity, creating a platform to push for change. But we are not just LGBTQIA- we are Black, Latino, Asian, White, male, female, rich, poor, parents, children, students, professionals and everything in between. This workshop will explore the intersections of key identifiers, focusing primarily on race and sexuality, and explore their role in the LGBTQIA equality movement. 73 LBGT History in the US Part III of III Dale Larson & Jacob Dougherty Carver 0184 The presentation will be an in depth discussion of the history of the LGBT movement in the United States 1980 (the start of AIDS Epidemic) through (the first decade of the 21st century).This presentation will use documentary clips, historical timelines, and a general discussion of important events to understand the history of the movement in the United States. 74 The LGBTQ Perspective: Preparing LGBTQ students for the Transition from Academia into the Workplace Alex Gant Memorial Union 3538 This presentation will bring together “out” LGBTQ employees on a panel to share their pros and cons experiences in the workplace, their coming out stories, provide students with the resources to prepare them for the workplace after college, help show them know how to find LGBTQ inclusive organizations, and provide tips on the difficult topics such as being out on resumes and in interviews.

75 Unlearning Internalized Oppression Warren Blumenfeld Memorial Union Campanile Room Lesbians, gay males, bisexuals, pansexuals, intersexuals, people along the trans spectrum, and our heterosexual allies have been brought up in a homophobic, heterosexist, biphobic, and trans oppressive society, and therefore are not immune to the effects of these forms of oppression. This interactive workshop investigates the ways in which we have internalized those subtle and not-so-subtle messages, how this limits our ability to function to our fullest potential, and how we can dismantle this internalization and move forward. This workshop also provides an opportunity for our heterosexual allies to learn more about the pressures placed on lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, pansexuals, intersexuals, and people along the trans spectrum. 76 Speakers Panels: Educating your campus in order to create change. Beric Wessely Carver 0290 Come learn a way to educate your campus and enlighten them on LGBTQIA related topics through the process of speakers panels. You will learn how to establish an effective outreach program which is focused on peer to peer education within a multi-discipline classroom setting. Speakers panels try to educate and enlighten individuals on terminology, topics, and identity using individuals personal experiences along with educational resources and activities. Education is the key to change. 77 Equality Talks: Using everyday conversations & teachable moments to advance Queer equality Candace Gingrich-Jones Memorial Union Gallery Room Talking about LGBT equality is the most effective way to educate others. Equality Talks offers a hands-on, practical look at

how to communicate issues of LGBT equality to others in your community. Participants discuss strategies, practice having often challenging conversations and gain experience to confidently advocate for LGBT equality. 78 An External Excuse for the Abuse Cailan Sockness, Nikki Laug & Marcy Webb Carver 0274 This workshop is designed to help demonstrate and explore the negative effects of stereotypical media portrayals of LGBTQIA relationships and how they perpetuate and enhance violence within LGBTQIA relationships. 79 Queer as Cake: Asexuality, Identity, and Culture Harriet Groenleer Memorial Union Oak Room Confused about the asexuality spectrum? Not feeling ‘queer enough’? As a relative newcomer to the ever-growing queer acronym, asexuality can be confusing even to people who identify as such. We’ll break down and build up ace/demi identity and language as they relate to queerness and gender. Everyone is welcome to share their ace experiences. Finally we’ll talk about [mis]representations of asexuality in the media. There will be laughter for all and cake for the lucky! 80 Unpacking Privilege Justin Ford Memorial Union Pioneer Room Privilege is often onedimensionalized as either “Male Privilege” or “White Privilege” but is rarely discussed holistically. This workshop will approach and unpack the multiple dimensions of privilege as they relate to the multiple dimensions of our identities. Additionally, “Unpacking Privilege” hopes to leave participants with, not only a more comprehensive understanding of privilege but also, the tools to replicate or create a privilege workshop at their home institutions.

81 Mixed-Orientation Relationships Kevin Zimmerman Carver 0298 Approximately 2 million people are either currently in or have once been in a mixed-orientation relationship. Attendees will participate in an “choose your own adventure” application activity designed to explore the ways homosexual orientation intersects with heterosexual partnership. I will then present with highlights from interviews with gay men and their straight wives in long-term marriages. 82 LGBTQ Suicides and Solutions David Lingerfelt & Meghan Lampe Carver 0282 This workshop will seek to raise awareness for the suicides of LGBT youth and focus on possible solutions. While stories of suicide will be presented, the focus will be mainly on the possible solutions. The goal of legislation to prevent bullying in our schools will be focused on heavily. Other forms of prevention will be discussed, including the signs of depression and what to do if you feel your friend is depressed. 83 Our Greek Community Miles Brainard & Chris Celania Carver 0294 Sororities and fraternities have grown more affirming and have allowed more openly gay, bi, and progressive people to be members. Also interesting is the rise of GLBTQIA specific fraternities and sororities. Resources available to GLBTQIA members of the Greek system, and how to start a GLBTQIA specific chapter, will be discussed. Anyone interested in having a greater understanding of sororities and fraternities or starting a chapter is welcome. 84 Intentionally Supporting LGBTQ People of Color Noel Gordon & Zesheng Chen Carver 0268 This workshop will focus on the

relationship between Race and LGBTQ student activism. We will encourage participants to think critically about the ways they have or have not been intentionally inclusive of People of Color (POC) in their outreach, recruitment, and programming. The facilitators of the workshop will draw from their experiences as leaders of LGBTQPOC dialogue and initiatives at the University of Michigan.

*Identity Caucuses #2 Jewish Queer Caucas Carver 0202 Ability MU 3512 Allies Cardinal Transgender & Gender Fluid Carver 0305

Workshop Session #6 Sunday, February 12th 8:00 am to 9:00 am 85 The Critical Limits and Possibilities of Queer Femininity Sarah Stevens Memorial Union Oak Room This session will ask the question can femininity be liberated from heterosexist systems of power? It will look at the binary of lesbian and queer images in the media of the asexual butch and the hypersexual femme. It will contest traditional notions of this binary and examine femme-inism in the queer community. 86 Walking around corners Frank Vaca Memorial Union Gallery Room Are you scared to be open about your sexual orientation, gender

identity, or disability in the workforce? What have others done to make this an easier process? You too can be confident and succeed in work you do by living openly. 87 LBGT History of the Holocaust Dale Larson & Jacob Dougherty Memorial Union 3512 The presentation will trace the history of the LGBT movement in Europe prior to and during the period of World War II. This presentation will use documentary clips, historical timelines, and a general discussion of important events to understand the history of this period from the perspective of members of the LGBT community. 88 #MyWordsMatter: Developing a grassroots initiative Bob Just & AJ Lutz Memorial Union 3505 People misuse words every day, both intentionally and unintentionally. The #MyWordsMatter campaign at Western Illinois University has been designed to do three things: Think. Choose. Act. Come learn how to develop a grassroots campaign to help influence change on your campus. 89 Unlearning Internalized Oppression Warren Blumenfeld Memorial Union Pioneer Room Lesbians, gay males, bisexuals, pansexuals, intersexuals, people along the trans spectrum, and our heterosexual allies have been brought up in a homophobic, heterosexist, biphobic, and trans oppressive society, and therefore are not immune to the effects of these forms of oppression. This interactive workshop investigates the ways in which we have internalized those subtle and not-so-subtle messages, how this limits our ability to function to our fullest potential, and how we can dismantle this internalization and move forward. This workshop also provides an opportunity for our heterosexual allies to learn more about the pressures placed on lesbians, gay men, bisexuals,

pansexuals, intersexuals, and people along the trans spectrum. 90 We were classified this way: Queerly Transforming the Library Jane Sandberg, Jeanie Austin, Melissa Funfsinn & Lucas McKeever Memorial Union 3538 No shushing here! We will discuss how some library practices have historically served to isolate and stigmatize queer patrons, along with the evolution of transformative action within the library community. We will also explore revolutionary library work to sustain queer histories, provide digital access to informational resources, and meaningfully serve queer youth. Participants will leave with concrete ideas to effect change in their information communities.

Workshop Session #7 Sunday, February 12th 9:15 am to 10:45 am 91 Theatre of the Oppressed; Queering Performance Stephen Hammoor Memorial Union Gold Room This workshop will combine techniques from Augusto Boal’s “Theatre of the Oppressed” with other physical theatre games and exercises to actively queer the human body and the body of oppression it faces in performance. This work will provide a multitude of tools for individuals and communities to use in overcoming oppression both on the ground and in specifically theatrical spaces as well.

MBLGTACC

/

037

92 The Other Sides of the Coin: Breaking the Gender Binary Andrew Leigh-Bullard, Luke Wulford, & Kelly Roberts Memorial Union 3512 The Other Sides of The Coin combines activity, discussion, statistics and personal experience to provide a safe place that enables cigender/gender conforming individuals to explore gender roles outside of the gender binary and the effects of gender socialization. It also provides insight and tools to interact with people of all genders. The goal of this exercise is to develop empathy, understanding and communication with and about the transgender/gender nonconforming community. 93 Developing Critical Consciousness of Heterosexual Privilege and How It Impacts Daily Lives of Us All Marcia Purdy Memorial Union Pioneer Room This session will address the overarching system of heterosexism and heterosexual privilege. Heterosexism is defined as the overarching system of advantages bestowed on heterosexuals. Heterosexism, which has its roots in sexism, is the institutionalization of a heterosexual norm or standard, which establishes and perpetuates the notion that all people are or should be heterosexual, thereby privileging heterosexuals and heterosexuality, and excluding the needs, concerns, cultures, and life experiences of lesbians, gay males, bisexuals, and transgender people (LGBTs). At time subtle, heterosexism is oppression by neglect, omission, erasure, and distortion (Blumenfeld, 2000). 94 Debunking Myths about BDSM Tynan Fox Memorial Union Gallery Room The leather, rubber, and BDSM communities are shrouded in myths and false truths perpetuated by pop culture. Movies like “Pulp Fiction” and “Hostel” make us look dangerous and mentally ill. It’s just not true. This session will examine these myths, discuss 038

/

MBLGTACC

their validity, and also provide a basic introduction to BDSM and alternative lifestyles. New, novice, and experienced people are welcome.

98 Dissecting the Trans Masculine Box(es) Jyler donovan & John Pachja Memorial Union 3505

95 Branding & 4 Steps to Brand a Department on a Budget Michael Wolaver Memorial Union Oak Room

This workshop seeks to empower individuals who identify as transmasculine or FTM or masculine performing/presenting genderqueer, to pinpoint and dissect current pressures existing within transmasculine communities. This will be achieved by constructing a literal “transmasculine” box, eliciting ideas from the attendees and then discussing critically both in small groups and as a larger body what contributes to these pressures as well as ways to alleviate it. The attendees will gain empowerment and identity confirmation, which in turn lends itself to improved leadership abilities.

This interactive workshop will review branding, why it is a hot topic, its importance and the four steps to implementing an effective brand strategy in a LGBT office. We also will discuss social media and how its use reflects upon a brand. 96 Who Wears the Pants? Understanding the Complexity of Heteronormativity, Gender Expression and Sexual Scripts within Same-Sex Relationships Kristen Altenau & Eric Gudmundson Memorial Union Campanile Room Butch, masc and fem. These are all words that are used to classify one’s gender role within a samesex relationship. However, how often do individuals in same-sex partnerships deconstruct the perceived need to adopt or perform these labels? In this session we will discuss the complexity of gender expression when intersected with sexual orientation, utilizing the theoretical concept of queer-authorship as a means to deconstruct societal norms. 97 Heterosexism & Cissexism: How We All Pay the Price Warren Blumenfeld Memorial Union Sun Room Heterosexism (the assumption that everyone is or should be heterosexual, and prejudice and discrimination against LGBT people) and cissexism (oppression against people who exist outside the gender/sex binary) are pervasive throughout our society, and each of us, irrespective of sexual or gender identity and expression, is at risk of its harmful effects.

Lady Gaga Dance Workshop Saturday 8:00 - 10:00pm MU Sun Room Join us as we learn the Bad Romance choreography so when it comes on, you know how to werk it! In a fun and interactive workshop, we’ll learn the choreography to Bad Romance, with a video guide, and when we’re done, we can do it together in a finale that’ll rock your world!

Use this space to bookmark your top choice workshops you would like to attend.

 Trans

 People

 Disabilities

 Under-Served

 Un-Served  Social

 Queer

of Color

& Economic (In)justice

www.equalityiowa.org

mblgtacc 20 THIRTEEN MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

mosaic: putting the pieces together

February 8-10, 2013 info@mblgtacc2013.org

mblgtacc2013.org

facebook.com/mblgtacc2013

twitter.com/mblgtacc2013

MBLGTACC

/

043

044

/

MBLGTACC

MBLGTACC

/

045

046

/

MBLGTACC

MBLGTACC

/

047

048

/

MBLGTACC

MEMORIAL UNION Carver c.y. stephens auditorium


MGLGBTACC 2012