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INSIDE iQ

COV ER STORY Time is short this time of year when it comes to gift giving. Local iQ’s Last Minute Gift Guide is here to save the holidays.

PUBLISHER

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Francine Maher Hopper fran@local-iQ. com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/ART DIRECTOR

Kevin Hopper kevin@local-iQ.com EDITOR

Mike English mike@local-iQ.com VP OF SALES & NEW BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Colt Brown colt@local-iQ.com FASHION EDITOR

Lisa VanDyke fabu@local-iQ.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Chela Gurnee 505.264.6350, chela@local-iQ.com

FOOD

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Lindsay Gillenwater 505.550.3362 lindsay@local-iQ.com

Whether you’re a Thai food aficionado or you just like fresh, affordable food, Thai Cuisine II has you covered.

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

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Derek Hanley 505.709.0364 derek@local-iQ.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Elisabeth Zahl 505.480.4445, elisabeth@local-iQ.com AD PRODUCTION MANAGER

Jessica Hicks jessica@local-iQ.com AD DESIGNER

Rachel Baker rachelb@local-iQ.com EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT/CALENDAR COORDINATOR

Amanda Stang amanda@local-iQ.com

M US I C

DESIGN ASSISTANT

Hannah Reiter hannah@local-iQ.com PHOTOGRAPHER

Wes Naman wes@local-iQ.com

A R TS

Albuquerque Americana act, The Porter Draw, marks its considerable evolution as a band with the upcoming release of California Widow.

Andrew Connors brings infectious enthusiasm to his job as curator at Albuquerque Museum and opens the doors wide to the public.

PHOTO ASSISTANT

Joy Godfrey joy@local-iQ.com

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COLUMNS Fabü. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Key Ingredient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Stir It Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 An Ounce of Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Sound Advice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Paw Prints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Credit Corner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 FEATURES Places To Be . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Marquee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Crossword/Horoscope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Red Meat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Santa Fe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 CALENDARS Arts Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Community Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Live Music. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Book Signings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

Nancy Harbert EDITORIAL INTERNS

Jessica Depies, Jessey Cherne

ON THE COVER

After pulling major strings with our man Leonard Johns, Local iQ was able to nab Old St. Nick to pose for photographer Wes Naman’s lens.

CONTRIBUTORS

FI LM Music doc captures the punk rock ethos of seminal Los Angeles ska act, Fishbone and its more than twodecade journey.

COPY EDITOR

EDITORIAL

DISTRIBUTION

Nellie Bauer Jeff Berg Max Cannon Jessey Cherne Charlie Crago Justin de la Rosa Jessica Depies Karla Koch Jeff Kerby Paul Lehman Jim & Linda Maher Kyle Mullin Shavone Otero Michael Ramos Susan Reaber Ronnie Reynolds Ben Williams

Miguel Apodaca Jessey Cherne Kristina De Santiago Sean Duran Jesse Gurnee Jessica Hicks David Leeder Ronnie Reynolds Distributech Stephanie James Andy Otterstrom

Local iQ P.O. Box 7490 Albuquerque, N.M. 87194 TEL 505.247.1343 FAX 888.520.9711 TWITTER @iQLocal

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PLACES TO BE

Mariachi Christmas 3p, Sun., Dec. 11

Outpost Performance Space 210 Yale SE, 505.268.0044

$15

Popejoy Hall On the UNM campus, 575.277.8010

Tickets: 505.268.0044

$9-$29

outpostspace.org

popejoypresents.com

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LUMINARIAS Light Among the Ruins: Christmas Celebration 5p, Sat., Dec. 10

FREE nmmonuments.org

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he luminaria in the Roman Catholic faith symbolizes the light that guides the way of the spirit of the Christ child on Christmas Eve. This tradition has been passed down from generation to generation and is seen widely throughout the state of New Mexico during the holiday season. One of the most beautiful settings for luminarias is the ruins of the Giusewa Pueblo and San José Mission Church in Jemez Springs. The dancers from Jémez Pueblo will perform, accompanied by traditional Native American flute music. There will be bonfires, free refreshments, free horse-drawn wagon rides and other festivities throughout the evening. —JC

Popejoy Hall On the UNM campus, 575.277.8010

$29/$39/$49 popejoypresents.com

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tomping feet, thrilling horns, swirling dresses and lively violins will fill the air when Mariachi Christmas, now in its 13th year, returns to Popejoy Hall to ring in the holiday season with a touch of Mexico. This year, Mariachi Aztlán of San Jose, Calif., will join Ballet Folklórico Paso del Norte of El Paso, Texas, in the celebration. Mariachi Aztlán has traveled throughout Mexico and the Americas as ambassadors representing the beauty of Hispanic music and cultural traditions, and creating a bridge of cultural understanding between countries. Ballet Folklórico has performed with artists like Linda Ronstadt and Mariachi Reyna De Los Angeles. The show will feature holiday favorites from both sides of the border. —JD

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An Irish Homecoming 3p, Sun., Dec. 18

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Jemez State Monument, Jemez Springs, 575.829.3530

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PERFORMANCE

FOOTBALL Gildan New Mexico Bowl Noon, Sat., Dec. 17 University Stadium 1414 University SE, 505.925.5500

$25/$30/$40 Tickets: unmtickets.com or 505.925.5999 gildannewmexicobowl.com

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he University of New Mexico football team just wrapped up its third one-win season in a row, much to the dismay of local football fans. Yet bowllevel college football is not lost to Albuquerque, thanks to the Gildan New Mexico Bowl. Started in 2006, the bowl is held each December at UNM’s University Stadium and has quickly become a staple of the local sports scene. Last year’s tilt included Brigham Young and the University of Texas El Paso. While teams were not yet selected for this year’s contest at press time, foes are likely to include a team from the Mountain West Conference (San Diego State and Wyoming are possibilities) against a team from the Pac-12 (Washington, Utah and California are possible). The game airs nationally on ESPN. —ME

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

o one has ever questioned the Irish ability to celebrate an occasion, so it’s quite timely that the holidays in Albuquerque will be marked by the arrival of this touring Irish songand-dance show. The dance ensemble includes members of past traditional Irish dance extravaganzas like Riverdance. The musical part of the show features all-woman Irish band Cherish the Ladies, along with Maura O’Connell. Cherish the Ladies has been performing together for 25 years and has toured North and South America, the United Kingdom, Europe, China, Australia and New Zealand. O’Connell is a Grammynominated singer most known for her contemporary interpretations of Irish folk songs. —JC

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PERFORMANCE

Jon Gagan Quartet 7:30p, Thu., Dec. 8

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MUSIC

assist Jon Gagan points to his meeting with Ottmar Liebert in the late 1980s as the most significant event in his working career. It led to Gagan playing bass on Liebert’s seminal Nouveau Flamenco, and set the stage for the Santa Fe resident’s own prolific career as composer, studio musician and solo artist. He has recorded the noted solo records Transit and Transit 2, netted three Grammy nominations and established a reputation as an innovative arranger. Gagan sold out the Outpost the last time he played there in 2007. He will be joined for this show by good friends Kanoa Kaluhiwa, tenor saxophone; John Bartlit, drums; and Bob Fox, piano. —ME

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where to go and what to do: December 8 to December 21

CELEBRATION Grand Menorah Lighting and Chanukah Celebration 3:30p, Tue., Dec. 20 1 Civic Plaza, 877.747.5382

$10 per person, $25 per family chabadnm.org

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n the first night of Chanukah, Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry will help light the largest Menorah in the state of New Mexico. This is the 20th year for the celebration, and festivities will include a performance by Israeli folk singer Yoel Sharabi and the Pink Flamingos. The following dinner buffet at the Convention Center will be prepared by Chef Rick Pedram. Entertainment for children includes face painting, a clown and an art and poetry contest. And that’s not the only Chanukah celebration in town. The Jewish Community Center is also hosting its own Chanukah Festival on Dec. 11 from 12-5p at 5520 Wyoming NE. For more information on that event visit jccabq.org. —JC

MARQUEE

Sailing closer to the truth Multi-talented raconteur Kinky Friedman turns again to music after entertaining forays into writing and politics BY KYLE MULLIN t was under scalding Southeast Asian sun that Kinky Friedman became a true redneck. He was there on a Peace Corps stint from 1966 to 1968. It was the first of many odd jobs for the now 67-year-old novelist, animal rights activist, politician and singer, who will showcase the latter talent on Dec. 10 at Sol Santa Fe. As an enlisted man, he traveled to the island of Borneo in the South China Sea. While there he worked for 11 cents an hour with the Dayak aboriginals. “I was supposed to be an agricultural extension worker,” Friedman says in an interview Kinky with Local iQ. “My job was to Friedman teach these people who’d been WITH ANTHONY LEON farming successfully for over “UNCHAINED” 2,000 years how to improve 7:30p, Sat., Dec. 10 their methods. It was daunting; Sol at Santa Fe Brewery I learned a lot more than they 37 Fire Place, Santa Fe, did.” 505.424.9637 Those locals would invite $25, $35 VIP Friedman onto their flimsy Tickets: holdmyticket.com rafts to drift along the glassy or 505.988.1234 rivers, the jungle steaming with kinkyfriedman.com solofsantafe.com humidity behind them, schools of yellowfin tuna and barracuda sloshing rhythmically just within earshot. “Their idea of fishing translates to visiting the fish, because they (the aboriginals) get drunk on this jungle wine and make a lot of noise, so they rarely catch anything,” Friedman chuckled at the memory, before adding that the Far East setting soon made the United States seem exotic. “It’s a real healthy thing to look at America from thousands of miles across the sea. That’s when I started writing country music.” Upon his return, Friedman formed and fronted The Texas Jewboys. The moniker was a winking tribute to his Hebrew roots, which were southern-fried when his family moved from Chicago to The Lone Star State in the late 1940s. The Jewboys’ tunes were indeed twangy, but their tone was snidely satirical. In 1974 Friedman released his self-

audible as he sings about slugging a racist hick who accuses him of killing “God’s only son,” before shouting, “They ain’t Makin’ Jews like Jesus anymore, they ain’t makin’ carpenters who know what nails are for.”

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The folk fan cult those songs nabbed prompted Bob Dylan to invite Friedman on tour in the mid-1970s, and before long POWERED BY ROCKWIRED MEDIA Friedman was befriending the likes of Willie Nelson. That latter kinship proved to be fruitful when Friedman’s music career stalled and he began writing scathingly, barely fictional detective novels starring himself and a certain pot-smoking, pig-tailed outlaw. That sidekick also offered Friedman a bit of advice in real life about the Democratic Party and its donkey symbol when Friedman ran for governor of Texas in 2006. “Before I ran for governor, Willie said, ‘If you’re gonna have sex with an animal always make it a donkey. Because that way if things don’t work out, at least ya know ya have a ride home.’”

Kinky Friedman brings his current musical tour to Santa Fe Dec. 10. “Being a musician is a much higher calling (than politics),” Friedman said in a recent interview with Local iQ. “I think it sails much closer to the truth.”

titled breakthrough solo album. On it he evoked the Asian barracuda rhythms the aboriginals showed him with “Wild Man From Borneo,” an allegory about a captured native turned circus freak with lines like “in a bamboo cage I crossed the ragin’ sea/a livin’ page torn clean from history/ … the wild man from Borneo/ … you come to see, but you never come to know.” But the song that drew the most notice from that album, unsurprisingly, was the closing number, “They Ain’t Makin’ Jews Like Jesus Anymore.” On it Kinky’s smirk is almost

At the time Friedman laughed at Nelson’s comment without heeding it, before going on to nab only 13 percent of the vote as an independent. “Here’s my definition of politics,” Friedman said. “’Poli’ means more than one and ‘tics’ are blood sucking parasites.” Friedman lost that Texas governor race to several candidates, including current presidential hopeful, Rick Perry. That loss made him detour off the campaign trail, perhaps for good, in favor of hitting the road again as a musician. “In the campaign I said musicians could run our country better than politicians. We wouldn’t get a hell of a lot done in the morning, but we work late and we’d be honest,” he said. Friedman added that this current tour just might help him see America anew once again, as if he were still bobbing up and down on the South China Sea. “For the moment being a musician is a much higher calling (than politics). I think it sails much closer to the truth.”

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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LIFESTYLE

Time to get creative on the holiday gifting frontier

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just flew in from Bali, and boy, are my arms rejuvenated. This is because I received spa treatments nearly every day. Some days, I even went twice. Massages ran about $7. Yes, seven dollars. And they aren’t wimpy, either; these women jump up on the table like 98-pound spider monkeys and knead you into oblivion. At one point, I opened my eyes, and there was a strand of saliva hanging about midway between my mouth and the floor. Charming, no? That’s how blissed-out I was. It was like living one of my best dreams ever. Oh, there were facials, reflexology treatments, scalp massages, scrubs, aromatherapy, and more, all for about the cost of a specialty cocktail! Now that, my friend, is money well spent. Spa blather aside, the rest of the journey was — you guessed it — fabulous. Total dream honeymoon, complete with remote beach coves, monkeys, fantastic cuisine, moonshine (hooch, not planet), behemothic geckos and loads of eye-batting at my groom. We were also in great company. Pals Sterling Grant 3 (halflife* digital) and Dream Mullick (Adorn) renewed their wedding vows there on 11/11/11. Mullick’s business production is Balibased, so she knows the land, the language and everything in between. This, of course, made the experience so much richer. After being away for three weeks, I’m a bit discombobulated. Jet lag in full effect, tired, lethargic and crowd-intolerant. I’m also fairly broke. What does this all mean? Gotta get creative for holiday shopping. You simply can���t go wrong with a Flying Star

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Café (flyingstarcafe.com) gift card. We all eat there. There’s one near every person in the everlovin’ 505. Get one for me too, will ya’? I’d kill for an éclair. Often, I like to give gifts that I would enjoy receiving. Naturally, this means spa and beauty products. The Soothing Touch line at Sukhmani Nob Hill (105 Amherst SE, 505.255.2883) is exquisite. Their generously-sized organic creams, scrubs, oils and balms are a pamperista’s dream. For the beauty buffs: Aveda gift sets from Mark Pardo (MarkPardo.com). Hair, skin, candles, makeup — they’re all on my wish list. Get them here. For our four-legged friends, I suggest drugs … for the cats, at least. Catnip cigars ($6.95) at the Old Town Cat House (400 San Felipe NW, 505.924.1166) make kitty oh-so-happy and give us hours of cheap entertainment. Watching a cat looped-out on crazy-plant is a gift in itself. Am I right, or am I right? For the pooches, hit Albuquerque Dogtown (3845 Rio Grande NW, 505.341.4484) for new and gently used dog clothing and accessories. Be sure to check out the beds; they have the most over-the-top luxurious pet beds that I’ve ever seen around

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

Among the top choices for Fabü-friendly holiday gifts: Stocking stuffers from Sukhmani Nob Hill. Each of these is $20 or less. How’s that for fabulous?

these parts. Every kid needs his/her own copy of The Green Album, a 2011 release featuring covers of classic Muppets (muppetsmusic.com) songs by modern artists, including Weezer, OK Go, My Morning Jacket and Andrew Bird. Fabü fave: Rachael Yamagata’s “I’m Going to Go Back There Someday.”

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

Finally, who doesn’t need a Diane von Furstenberg (dvf.com) iPhone case? It’s only $20. You’re totally online right now ordering it, aren’t you? Could you at least finish reading the column first, please? Manners. Per tradition, I’ll close with my favorite gift of all: help. When we add charity to our wish lists, we reconnect with the true holiday spirit. Support hunger and poverty relief — or myriad other fantastic causes — with a JustGive (justgive. org) gift. JustGive is the most well-rounded giving site out there. Make a donation in your recipient’s name, or allow them to choose from JustGive’s database of over 1.5 million charities. Another JustGive perk: Their “Act Locally” tool, which provides donors with causes in their own backyards. I wish you the happiest of holidays, dahling. May your days be merry and bright.

PROFILE

Comic book brigade Nonprofit group provides support for aspiring comic artists of New Mexico BY CHARLIE CRAGO hile so much of life in the modern world is spent tied up at work, maintaining financial obligations through a delicate balance of family and home, New Mexican nonprofit 7000 B.C. seeks to reignite the creative flame in all of us. Rather than focusing on success at the corporate level, the main focus of 7000 B.C. revolves around the promotion of its artists and of the art itself. 7000 B.C. is a group of comic writers and artists. It’s focused on providing opportunities for those artists to develop their personal styles and storytelling “voices,” while 7000 promoting an B.C. understanding of the MONTHLY cultural significance MEETING of comic art. The 1-4p, Sat., group accomplishes Dec. 17 those tasks Collected Works through illustration Bookstore workshops, 202 Galisteo conventions and its Suite A, Santa Fe, monthly publication, 505.988.4226 String. 7000bc.org 7000 B.C. operates more like an artist collective than any kind of regimented organization, acting as a motor driving the artistic endeavors of its members. After attending one of the group’s monthly meetings (second or third Saturday of every month, check 7000bc.org), it is clear that the artists who make up 7000 B.C. are far more concerned with building one another’s craft than they are with adhering to strict codes of conformity. There is no leader at 7000 B.C. During my visit, everyone was incredibly enthusiastic in speaking with me, about whatever — comics, film, Local-iQ. Before long, small groups had formed, allowing members to examine one another’s art more intimately, at which point I was taken in by 7000 B.C.’s more senior members. Thankfully, seniority appears not to be indicative of maturity on any level. A jovial, festive mood swelled through the meeting, while acting president, or vice-president, or nearest man to the job — I’m not sure it matters — Chuck Larntz was serious about illustrating the group’s priority of actively promoting its members: “7000 B.C. is like a springboard for aspiring comic creators,” Larntz explained. “Once you get published, it’s like a snowball. The hardest part is getting your first piece published. Then, once you break that barrier, the sky’s the limit. I’ve seen it.” A wealth of information concerning the comic subculture, dating back nearly 40 years and covering industry necessities such

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This is the cover of a published comic book written and drawn by 7000 B.C. administrator Bram Meehan and former group member Jamie Chase, who now works for Dark Horse comics. Members of 7000 B.C. provide feedback and support to each other in the interest of getting more New Mexicans into the comic books business.

as pricing, selling and printing, are but a few among the many avenues of support offered by 7000 B.C. to its artists. Perhaps even more enticing for members is the prospect of inclusion into the group’s monthly publication, String (check out 7000bc.org for back editions), which, as an easy-toread, four-page publication, serves as an immediate outlet for burgeoning ideas. Still, according to Larntz, the “largest benefit” to being part of 7000 B.C. is the potential for having works sold at the various conventions coming to the state, for which the group provides table space for artists to promote their crafts (next up: Albuquerque Comic Con, Jan. 13-15 at Hard Rock Casino). Member Todd Bernardy said 7000 B.C. provides invaluable support. “The great thing about the group is everyone loves creating comics,” Bernardy said. “These aren’t selfloathing fine artists who show their work at galleries and believe art is life and life is pain. These are creators who want to capture a sequence and make a story, fictional or non-fictional, by observation.” Long before the great masters of the Renaissance were painting cathedrals or sculpting the human form, our Paleolithic ancestors were scribbling the contents of their minds onto the walls of their homes. 7000 B.C. gives this prehistoric art form modern-day relevance, reminding its audience to stop and take a moment to draw a pretty picture.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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FOOD

PHOTOS BY WES NAMAN

The Pad Ped Ga Prow with Chicken, Pad Thai with Shrimp and Koo Pad Ga Prow with Shrimp (left to right) are just three of the many dishes available from the voluminous menu at Thai Cuisine II, located in a small East Nob Hill A-frame, formerly a Wienerschnitzel.

Spice/lime/basil Whether you’re a Thai food aficionado or you just like fresh, affordable food, Thai Cuisine II has you covered BY MIKE ENGLISH ’ve eaten at countless Thai restaurants in my life, but every time I go to one and look at the menu I feel like a first-timer, as I stare at the vast and confusing array of choices. Pad woon what? Thom yum who? Help me out here, waiter. Thai Cuisine II, the inconspicuous eatery in East Nob Hill (Central and Sierra) housed in an A-frame building that looks like a Pop N Taco, but actually is a former Wienerschnitzel, doesn’t really solve this problem for me. Opening the menu, with its numbered items ranging from A1 to 303, feels kind of like cracking open War and Peace, as written by Leekpai Tolstoy. But let me just say up front that navigating the menu at Thai Cuisine II (yes there is a sister restaurant, Thai Cuisine I, on Coors and Montaño) is well worth the effort. It’s packed with affordable, delectable dishes that offer something for any eater. My first experience at Thai Cuisine II was a recent solo work-day lunch when I was a little short on time and long on hunger. Takeout is always a speedy option at this restaurant, but I prefer to sit when I can, so I took a table and ordered the Green Curry with Chicken lunch special ($7.95). First a word about the atmosphere. The exterior of Thai Cuisine II is deceptive. It’s tidy and freshly stuccoed, but it still looks like the fast-food shack it once was. Step inside;

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however, and you’ll find a modest elegance. Sure, the tables are covered by plastic-over-lace tablecloths and there’s a muted flatscreen TV mounted in the corner playing the local news, but there’s an orderliness and cleanliness that suggests someone cares. Ceramic tile floor, golden Thai artwork Thai hanging on the orange walls, a granite-topped bar with seating for diners and warm lighting all help create a pleasant feeling. Cuisine II The lunch special rocks. In speedy succession (service was flawless), here’s what I got: a cup of 4201 Central NE, lemongrass soup (exceptional fresh flavor); two fried vegetable egg rolls and the house sweet and sour 505.232.3200 sauce (don’t leave without trying it); the green curry (basically a limey, coconut-milk bowl of chicken 11a-9p, Mon.-Fri.; soup, with bamboo shoots, zucchini and fresh basil leaves), served with an accompanying plate of 4-9p, Sat.; 5-9p, rice; a fruit plate consisting of a watermelon wedge and three purple grapes; and a cup of coconutSun. milk tapioca. thaicuisinenm.com I got the lunch curry with medium spice, which landed it in the heat realm of your typical New Mexican red chile. I raise this issue because it’s one of the variables at Thai Cuisine II that seems a little unpredictable. When I returned for a recent dinner with a couple of friends, one of them ordered the Pad Thai with Tofu (stir-fried rice noodles with egg, green onions, bean sprouts and roasted ground peanuts, $8.95) at medium heat and nearly had her head burned off. There were literally pockets of red pepper seeds hiding in the noodles. So beware. On that same dinner trip my other friend tried the Kao Pad Ga Prow with Shrimp (stir-fried rice with Thai chili, garlic, egg, basil, lime leaves, onions and topped with fried egg, $9.95) at spicy heat, and he was pleased by the flavors, if not the presentation (kind of block-o-rice-y-fried-egg). I tried the Pad Ped Ga Prow with Chicken (stir-fried Thai chili, garlic, basil, onions, lime leaves, bamboo shoots and sliced jalapeno, $8.95). It comes in the traditional two-plate serving so you can mix your entree and rice as you please. I’m a sucker for the spice/lime/basil combo you often find with Thai food, and Thai Cuisine II serves those flavors to fresh perfection. We also tried the House Sampler as an appetizer (a deep-fried collection of wontons, butterfly shrimp, etc., $8.95). I found everything overly crispy and not too notable, except for that sweet and sour sauce. Thai Cuisine II serves beer and wine, including sake. It also offers a soy-based vegan menu, for those so inclined. REVIEW

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

FOOD

Persimmons: flavor-packed juiciness for the holidays

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ersimmons are foreign fruits. Unlike other exotics whose names describe them — starfruit, Buddha’s hand — persimmons appear just at peak holiday hour and tempt us with their glossy smooth orange skin and weird name that does little to suggest what to do with them. At first glance, they could easily be mistaken for misshapen, off-season tomatoes, but a longer look suggests flavor-packed juicy goodness with the potential to delight. In college, I heard poet Li-Young Lee read from his work “Persimmons”:

Some things never leave a person: scent of the hair of one you love, the texture of persimmons, in your palm, the ripe weight. To the young physics major I was, the word “persimmons” hung in my memory for days, years, until I found myself in a grocery store absentmindedly fondling a persimmon and discovered the pendant weight he so poetically expressed. These could quite possibly be the sexiest of produce, I thought to myself. Persimmons are the edible fruits of trees belonging to the ebony wood family. They taste like a tart cross between peach and apricot. Most common to our produce departments are those of the Asian variety, known as “kaki.” They are native to warm temperate and sub-tropical climates and were brought to the U.S. in the past few hundred years; the eastern seaboard was already growing wild with smaller American persimmon varieties. Of the more than 2,000 types cultivated throughout Asia, “hachiya” and “fuyu” are the two examples with which Americans are most familiar. Hachiyas look like big golden acorns. They are considered “astringent” because they contain super-high levels of tannins (the same polyphenolic compounds in wine) that make them particularly bitter. Consumption of unripe hachiyas offers a fuzzy mouth feel, as if the inside of one’s mouth is coated in fur. For this reason they have to be dead-ripe to be eaten; ripening softens the tannins and increases the sweetness. How do you know how ripe? Leave them on your counter until that moment when the skin has lost its glossy sheen and you think

pudding, a baked pudding common in midcentury kitchens. It is dense like pumpkin pie and can be served cold, warm or hot. This recipe, from Classic Home Desserts, serves 8-10.

Persimmon Buttermilk Pudding Ingredients: they will burst if you so much as try to move them — just on the brink of rotten mush. Fuyus look like bright orange squashed tomatoes with dryish leaves at their stem end. They are non-astringent. Low tannin levels make them perfect out-of-hand snacks, and they are edible off the tree while still firm. They lend themselves beautifully to raw preparations with subtle crispness or soft fruity tang. As with any fresh produce, purchase persimmons free of visible blemishes. Since hachiyas will be used soft, softness of the overall fruit is not an indication of poor quality, but individual bruised spots may indicate the potential for rot. The leaves should be dry and crumbly, though fresher fruits will have fresher leaves; they will dry as the fruit ripens and will be easier to remove. Persimmons should be stored in cool, wellventilated areas. Refrigeration will retard ripening, so fuyus not to be consumed immediately will do well there. Hachiyas are best suited to open-air ripening. If they are turned and rotated every so often, they will ripen more evenly. To expedite the ripening process, store them in a brown paper bag. To capture the pulpy flesh of super soft persimmons, cradle the fruit in one hand while gently removing the leafy cap off the top of the fruit — a paring knife works well here. Then use a spoon to scoop the fleshy mess out of its skin and into a measuring cup or bowl. If you don’t plan to cook the flesh until sometime in the future, freeze it in an airtight zip-top bag until you need it. At Jennifer James 101, we serve both kinds of persimmons. We use fuyus sliced in a salad, just as we would a plum or pear, and we use hachiyas to make persimmon buttermilk

2 large ripe Hachiya persimmons (about 1 lb.) 3 Tbsp. Unsalted butter 2 cups Buttermilk 3 large Eggs 3/4 cup Light brown sugar, packed 1/4 cup White sugar 1 tsp. Vanilla extract 1 cup All-purpose flour 1 tsp. Baking powder 1 tsp. Baking soda 1 tsp. Ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp. Nutmeg, fresh-grated Pinch salt Whipped cream, for serving Method: Preheat oven to 375 F. Put the butter in an eight-inch-square baking pan with straight sides, and place the pan in the oven until the butter is melted; set aside. Scoop the flesh from the persimmons and purée in a food processor. (You should have about one cup of raw persimmon purée). Scrape pulp into a bowl and add most of the melted butter,

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

leaving a little in the pan. Add the buttermilk, eggs, sugars and vanilla. Whisk until blended. Sift dry ingredients together and add to persimmon mixture. Mix just until combined. Scrape mixture into buttered baking dish. Bake until edges are lightly browned and center is set, about 40 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. Cut into squares and serve topped with whipped cream. Nelle Bauer is co-chef/co-owner of Jennifer James 101. She continues to be fascinated by persimmons, the most intriguing of fruits.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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DRINK

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he holiday season in New Mexico is most certainly unique in terms of culinary delicacies. We have the opportunity to enjoy myriad fantastic traditional items like posole, tamales, menudo (if you can stomach it) and, of course, biscochitos. The cinnamon-andsugar-dusted, melt-in-your-mouth cookies have warmed New Mexicans for generations. Family recipes have been dedicated to memory and scribbled on pieces of scratch paper in near-legible form. Much like its confectionary counterpart, there are many variations of the Biscochito cocktail that have been unselfishly shared by past generations of local barkeeps. The warm cocktail is designed to emulate the semisweet, anise-laced pastry dunked in a hot cup of coffee (my favorite way to enjoy). I recommend you share one with your abuela.

Biscochito Ingredients: 1 oz. Tia Maria Liqueur 1 oz. White Sambuca 2 oz. Half and half, steamed or

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

warmed Cinnamon Method: Combine the Tia Maria Liqueur and White Sambuca in a warm snifter. Top with the heated half and half and dust with cinnamon.

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

Ben Williams tends bar at Scalo Northern Italian Grill in Nob Hill and teaches beer brewing classes at Victor’s Grape Arbor. He is also a member of local ska/reggae band CrazyFool.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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SANTA FE

SANTA FE SCENE MUSIC

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PHOTOS BY WES NAMAN

The casual menu at Santa Fe restaurant Tomme offers multiple menu options for either lunch or dinner. The Slow-Braised Short Rib Gougeres (left) are light, doughy packages of tender meat toped with blue cheese and apricot puree. The Cranberry Mousse Cake (right) is a dessert highlight.

Tomme gun

Joe West and he lyrics of the Santa Fe Joe West songs encompass Revue Christmas topics from Spectacular broken hearts 8p, Fri.; 3 and 8p, Sat., to stories about Dec. 16-17 El Museo Cultural Theatre unidentified flying 555 Camino De La Familia, objects — which 505.988.1234 leaves fans excited to find $20 out how West, Tickets: ticketssantafe.org the well-loved joewestmusic.com Santa Fe singer and songwriter, will handle the classic music of the holidays. Joe West and The Santa Fe Revue is a musical and theatrical Christmas production that West has modeled after old wild-West shows and traveling carnivals that granted audiences grand entertainment for one price. The orchestrations of the Barrel Cactus String Quartet will be featured along with West’s band and other special guests, including Felecia Ford and her Snow Angel Choir, Ben Wright, The Sugar Plum Dancers, Cello maestro Michael Knott, Santa Fe’s 1967 Rodeo Queen, Doña Dillonschneider, Phoenix Avalon, Frank Rolla, Uncle Archie West and the Singin’ Cowboy. —JC STAGE

Santa Fe eatery lifts casual dining to hip, elevated heights BY PAUL LEHMAN omme: a Restaurant can also be read as Tomme: a Cheese — a cheese from the Savoy region of France, to be specific. There are three kinds of Tomme: Tomme de Beauges, Tomme de Fenouil and Tomme de Boudave. The restaurant is the creation of highly creative team of owners Maria Renteria, chef Mark Connell and chef Brian Rood, all of whom opened Max’s in 2007 and combined forces to open this cheese-centric eatery that boasts a contemporary bistro menu. The trio found a perfect location at the site REVIEW of the former Louie’s Corner Café, where Galisteo Street meets West Alameda near Tomme the Santa Fe River. It’s a large, open, airy 229 Galisteo, space with subtle gray walls, black tables and 505.820.2253 chairs with wooden seats to match the newly 11:30a-2:30p, laid wooden floor. 5:30–9p, Tue.–Sat. There’s a big outside patio for the warmer weather and the interior is large enough and perfect for this office party season. A curved bar, modern lighting and impressive minimalist art provide a comfortable, easy atmosphere. The casual menu is the same for lunch and dinner, and we sampled a few of the interesting appetizers. The Slow-Braised Short Rib Gougeres ($10) were light doughy packages of delicious, tender meat topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and an apricot puree. They were so full of flavor that they could have made a delightful main course. We also tried Tomme’s version of the traditional posole they have named “Pozole” ($9), which consisted of braised pork shoulder, hominy soufflé, New Mexican chile and cilantro. It was a surprise treat unlike any other posole and featuring the pudding-like hominy creation. One other appetizer choice could have been a Baby Greens Salad ($7) with candied pecans, local apples, South Mountain Dairy chevre and sherry vinaigrette.

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For our entrée we ordered the Tomme special Southern Fried Chicken ($15) with herb mashed potatoes, brown gravy and bacon braised kale. Made up of an ample portion of tender meaty thighs, this dish surprised us with its glamorized kale (not normally our favorite veggie!). It was about the best fried chicken we’ve ever tasted. We also tried the Pan Seared Market Fish of the Day ($18) which turned out to be an excellent portion of cod with golden raisins, brown butter, Dr. Loosen Riesling, haricot vert and warm potato salad. The fish was tender with a fine, rich flavor, which was enhanced by the wine, butter and vegetables. Other entrées we could have chosen included: Fried Chicken Cobb Salad with ham, bacon lardons, chopped egg and gouda ($14); Little Neck Clam Mariniere ($16); Fettuccini Primavera with fried eggplant, zucchini, cherry tomatoes and caponata ($14); a Wagyu Burger ($13) on a brioche bun with house made pomme frites (or added bacon, gruyere, Swiss, Blue or cheddar); Steak Frites (flank steak, pomme frites, lemon confit aioli, haricot verist, $25); Coq au Vin Pot Pie ($14) with celery root, carrot, mushrooms and red onion; Croque Monsieur ($12) with gruyere, Serrano ham and pommes frites; Veggie Melt ($11) with roasted zucchini, eggplant, Roma tomatoes, gouda and pommes frites; and a Reuben ($12) on house-made rye, with pastrami, Russian dressing, sauerkraut and pommes frite. The Soup of the Day on our visit was Roasted Bean with Pickled Onion ($7). We tried the Green Apple Galette dessert ($8) with smoked chevre ice cream and rosemary caramel and found it to be enough for two sets of sweet teeth. The other desserts included a Flourless Chocolate Torte ($10) with coconut ice cream, a Cranberry Mousse Cake ($8) and a Cheese Board ($12), without Tomme at present, but with Lou Bergier, Cana de Cabra and Roaring ‘40s cheeses. The staff at Tomme is young, enthusiastic and friendly and the modern crockery, cutlery and glassware are of high quality. Tomme is a fine new and outstanding choice for a casual lunch or dinner and a welcome addition to the Santa Fe restaurant scene.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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he firing began that A Dramatic morning at nine Reading of John o’clock, but it was three Brown’s Body before the attacks were 7p, Sun., Dec. 11 launched. The Lensic Santa Performing Arts The first line in the Center poem John Brown’s 211 W. San Body, written in 1928 by Francisco, Stephen Vincent Benét, 505.988.1234 sends chills down one’s $10/$15 spine, as the words lensic.org bring the Civil War into crystal-clear focus. In honor of 2011 marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, Benét’s poem will be read in its entirety in this dramatic rendering. The cast for the reading will include author Jonathan Richards, Executive Director of the Lensic Robert Martin and actress and activist Ali MacGraw. Molly Sturges, vocalist and musician, will play the background music and sound effects for the reading. Each member of the cast will read aloud select portions of the poem, portraying various historical characters. The historical characters represented include President Abraham Lincoln and John Brown, and fictional characters like Jack Ellyat of the Union Army and Clay Wingate of the Confederacy. —JD

HEALTH

Study on supplements paints a blurry picture

A

few weeks ago, big news emerged in the nutrition world. Female multivitamin users were purported to succumb to earlier deaths, according to a study released in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Is this a valid study and analysis? There are some powerful interests at play here: the pharmaceutical industry, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the American Medical Association (which owns the journal). All three of these groups work hard to limit consumers taking care of their own health for various reasons. As well, “Big Pharma” contributes billions of dollars to advertising in publications like the Archives of Internal Medicine, as well as more mainstream media outlets, which fans flames generated by a medical study like this. However, the science in the study doesn’t hold up to scrutiny. First of all, the study (nicknamed the “Iowa Women’s Health Study”) is based on observational data, which is notoriously unreliable as a study methodology. Using a survey, the researchers asked white postmenopausal women, approximately every nine years (from 1986 to 2004), which supplements they used. This question was not specific in terms of inquiring about the quality of vitamins, nor was it determined whether they started taking vitamins to treat a specific illness (had they gotten cancer, diabetes or heart disease and started taking vitamins after their bodies were breaking down?) versus using them for

preventive health. In fact, adjusting to control for caloric intake and age, most of the vitamins appeared to add to years lived, or were neutral (except for copper). Controlling for healthy lifestyle made everything except B-complex and calcium either neutral or negative for lifespan. Further controlling for healthy diet factors manipulated the data again so that only calcium intake had a positive impact on lifespan, while B complex and vitamin D had no impact. One thing I learned when I was doing research during graduate school in the mid 1990s is that statistics can be endlessly manipulated to find results that you seek. The authors of this study started with a hypothesis that supplements wouldn’t add to life. Looking at the results, though, it appears that supplement users did live longer, but the data was manipulated with statistical analyses until supplements not only didn’t help, but were considered killers! The only clearly statistically significant conclusion regarding a specific nutrient is that copper was associated with earlier mortality. The most accurate conclusion that can be

drawn from this study is that supplement users are generally healthier people. Quality in vitamins makes a difference. A one-a-day tablet may well be more harmful than helpful and is definitely harder to absorb. Vitamin D2 has less than one-third the potency of D3, yet D2 was the primary form used by the medical establishment until very recently. Most standard multivitamins contain too much vitamin A relative to D, which negates the benefit of the D. Beta-carotene is safer than preformed vitamin A. These are some of the known issues with supplements. A good study needs to differentiate between cheaply manufactured or formulated vitamins and quality supplementation. Natural sources of nutrients tend to be better used by the body and also are more likely to be combined with necessary co-factors to facilitate absorption and utilization.

The FDA is currently working to revise regulations governing supplements that would raise prices prohibitively high and restrict consumer choice. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) also has a bill in the U.S. Senate that would accomplish the same end. Both of these tactics would expand the power and wealth of the pharmaceutical industry while undermining the health and freedom of the American people. This supplement bashing study is very timely in furthering these interests. For more details on this see the Alliance for Natural Health at www. anh-usa.org. Karla runs Salubrio Natural Healthcare (salubrio. net), a private practice in the SE Heights, as a licensed doctor of naturopathic and Oriental medicine as well as RN. Her passion is in combining ancient and cutting edge medical approaches to restore and maintain vibrant health.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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Local iQ’s 2011

Last Minute Gift Guide

Local iQ’s annual Last Minute Gift Guide is designed to make your life a little easier when the clock is ticking and you’re scrambling to find that special gift for a certain someone on your list. We’ve focused on 10 types of people you’re likely to need Christmas gifts for — from your boss and coworkers to film fanatics or tech junkies — and given you three gift options each: “standard,” “unique” and “if all else fails.” So get out there and get shopping! And happy holidays!

COMPILED AND WRITTEN BY JESSEY CHERNE PHOTOGRAPHY BY WES NAMAN

The Kiddos STANDARD:

Paper Dolls: Sasha & Jasmine

$20

FIND IT AT: All of us girls remember placing our childhood doll on GALLERY ONE a piece of colored construction paper and tracing her 3500 CENTRAL SE, outline, right? What followed were several attempts at 505.268.7449 making her different outfits out of more construction paper and a madness of tape and glue. Thanks to Paper Dolls: Sasha & Jasmine, the wait is finally over for those who have wished for an out-of-the-box version of this childhood favorite. The dolls come with multiple mix-and-match outfits and are sure to be any little girl’s favorite stocking stuffer this year. UNIQUE:

Squirrel Pull Toy

The Cinema/Theater Buff

FIND IT AT:

STANDARD:

Revolutions Passport

$120

FIND IT AT: To go to the theater or to not go to the theater? That TRICKLOCK COMPANY is the question. Are you wanting to make the theater 505.304.8189 buff in your life happy by providing an answer to this tricklock.com/revolutions question? The Revolutions International Theatre Festival features three weeks of theater and 11 mindblowing theatrical productions, all brought to you live on stage. The Revolutions Passport grants fans a show pass to any four productions of your choice during the festival.

UNIQUE:

Gremlins Mogwai Figurines

$44.99/SET OF THREE

There are three rules that you must not break after FIND IT AT: purchasing the following item. No. 1, you cannot feed a Mogwai after midnight. No. 2, you cannot get a Mogwai ASTRO-ZOMBIES 3100 CENTRAL SE, wet. No. 3, Mogwais must avoid bright light. The Mogwai 505.232.7800 creature originated in the 1984 film Gremlins — perhaps astrozombies.com one of the only classic American Christmas horror comedies ever made. The three figurines of the Mogwai (Gizmo, George and Lenny) come sealed in original packaging and can be posed in many ways.

IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

Official Twilight Saga Breaking Dawn Movie Poster

$19.95 FIND IT AT:

LOUIE’S ROCK-NPrepare to ask yourself the hardest question you will REELS ask in your lifetime: Are you Team Edward or Team 105 HARVARD SE, Jacob? Louie’s Rock-N-Reels is more than prepared 505.232.7510 for Twilight paraphernalia madness with the official Twilight Saga Breaking Dawn movie poster. The enchanting quality of the books and movies is conveyed in a way that you can now memorialize in your own home this holiday season. Just be prepared to defend your choice of vampire or werewolf to friends and family.

This issue’s guest modeling duo is wife and husband Stefanie and Sean Montano. Stefanie is the owner of Stilo Lifestyle Accessories (3339 Central SE, Ste. D, 505.242.6260, stiloabq.com), and Sean is a co-owner/general manager of Monroe’s New Mexican Food (6051 Osuna Road NE, 505.881.4224 and 1520 Lomas NW, 505.242.1111, monroeschile.com). Thankfully, both are extremely fashionable and very good sports.

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$19.95

Due to advances in technology, the toy industry has ZAP … OH! experienced drastic change over the years. Yet, at 103 AMHERST SE, least one standard has remained on the shelves each 505.268.2050 and every year: the pull toy. This Squirrel Pull Toy, zapoh.net available at Nob Hill shop Zap … Oh!, helps develop hand-eye coordination, motor skills and perception, without sacrificing the excitement of playing with a cute creature. Your kids can help the squirrel chase the toy’s acorn lunch and listen to its happy little squeak as it moves across the floor, wagging its tail the whole time. IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

Skippy Jon Jones Class Action Book

$17.99

My name is Skippito Friskito (clap, clap). I fear not a single bandito (clap, clap). Everyone’s favorite siamese cat that thinks it’s a chihuahua, is back in the newest children’s hardcover book by Judy Schachner, Skippy Jon Jones Class Action. Skippy really just wants to go to school. One problem: the school is for training dogs, not cats. True to form, Skippy dips into his closet and imagination, in order to transport himself into the school yard, where he learns to deal with bullies, French poodles and gets to visit the library. Children of all ages will not only enjoy this book thoroughly, they will learn a lesson or two in the process.

FIND IT AT:

BOOKWORKS 4022 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.344.8139

bkwrks.com

The Office Mates STANDARD:

Pocket Posh Crosswords 75 Puzzle

$7.99

Word fanatics say that there is nothing more daring than doing a crossword puzzle in ink. Dare your boss or coworker this holiday season with the Pocket Posh Crossword Puzzle, with 75 different mind-bending puzzles. The pocket-sized books are great for an on-thego challenge or as a brain teaser during your next “bored” meeting.

FIND IT AT:

PAPERS 108 AMHERST SE, 505.254.1434

UNIQUE:

Donation to the Community Fund

$Name Your Price

FIND IT AT: Everyone feels good about giving back and making sure UNITED WAY OF we are supporting our community. What better way to CENTRAL NEW help someone make a difference than by donating to MEXICO a charity on their behalf? The United Way of Central uwcnm.org New Mexico Community Fund helps individuals in need through over 100 different programs ranging from grants to qualifying health and human service agencies. You can also designate your donation to a specific charity of your choice. The organization supports Bernalillo, Sandoval, Torrance and Valencia counties.

IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

Falling Whistles Necklace

$34-$54

The distress call of the children in the Congo is calling like a loud whistle to the people of the Western world. The Falling Whistles Necklace originated from a journal written about boys sent to the front lines of the war in the Congo, armed with only a whistle for protection. The 32-inch Falling Whistles necklace is worn in protest against that war. A full 100 percent of the proceeds go to support war-affected children in the Congo.

FIND IT AT:

AQUI 101 BRYN MAWR SE, 505.255.2926

aqui-nobhill.com

LOCAL iQ | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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Local iQ’s 2011

Last Minute Gift Guide The Sports Fan/Adventurer STANDARD:

Sandia Tramway Ride

$20

You simply cannot call yourself a New Mexico resident until you have taken a “flight” on the historic Sandia Tramway. No matter what time of day you ride it, whether it be during the early morning hours, the lateafternoon sunset or when the glistening evening stars are shining bright, you will appreciate the beauty of the city of Albuquerque with a view like no other. The Sandia Peak Tramway offers a ride on the tram for anyone adventurous enough to ascend atop the 10,378foot Sandia Peak in the Cibola National Forest.

FIND IT AT:

SANDIA PEAK TRAMWAY 505.856.7325

sandiapeak.com

UNIQUE:

2011-2012 Olympic Sports Season Pass

$50

¡Vamos Lobos! It’s time to don your cherry red and silver attire and attend one of the University of New Mexico’s Lobo sports games! The 2011-2012 Olympic Sports Season Pass is perfect for the sports fanatic in your life. Sports included range from men’s and women’s soccer, volleyball, softball and baseball, and the pass includes pre-season and regular season home games. In addition, pass holders will gain access to over 80 events and are automatically entered into a variety of athletic contests.

FIND IT AT:

UNM TICKETING SERVICES 505.925.LOBO

golobos.com

IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

UNM Lobos Red Mini Basketball & Hoop Set The crowd grows quiet as the basketball flies through the air. He shoots ... he scores! The Red Mini Basketball Hoop Set, adorned with UNM Lobo and Pit logos, is the perfect gift for the would-be hoops superstar in your life. The hoop fits perfectly over the back of any door, allowing hipsters an easy way to create a makeshift basketball court in almost any room.

$19.95 FIND IT AT:

UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO BOOKSTORE 2301 CENTRAL SE, 505.277.5451

bookstore.unm.edu

The Animal Lover STANDARD:

New Mexico Biopark Society Membership

$49/PERSON OR $79/FAMILY

Be it the roar of a lion, the splash of a sting ray or the scent of the wild rose, a membership to the New FIND IT AT: Mexico Biopark Society offers any animal lover nature’s NEW MEXICO best. Member perks include free unlimited admission BIOPARK SOCIETY bioparksociety.org/ to the zoo, botanic gardens and aquarium, plus free membership or discounted admission to over 150 zoos across the nation. Add to that a subscription to BioScape magazine, discounts at all gift shops and invitations to special events, and it’s easy to see how this thoughtful gift can brighten the season for the nature lovers on your list. UNIQUE:

Dog Grooming Gift Card

$Name Your Price

Scrub a dub dub, looks like a doggie in a tub! Every pet owner knows that wrangling Fido into the bath is no easy task. This holiday season, take a load off your pet owner by wrapping up a gift card for one or more sessions at Scot’s Dog Grooming. There is something refreshing about being able to breathe in the familiar, comforting scent of a Christmas tree, rather than the odor of your four-legged friend.

FIND IT AT:

SCOT’S DOG GROOMING 3421 CENTRAL NE, 505.266.0767

IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

Pet Memorial Brick

$75

FIND IT AT: There are hundreds of thousands of animals euthanized WATERMELON every year because they don’t have a home. By giving the MOUNTAIN RANCH gift of a brick in someone’s name you not only create a 505.771.0140 memorial for your friend and their pet, but help support wmranch.org the organization that keeps homeless animals off the streets. Since 1996, Watermelon Mountain Ranch has rescued stray or abandoned animals and provided care for homeless animals in its “no-kill” facility while its staff helps to find them new homes. The red brick is customized with a dog or cat paw print and is sandblasted with the words of your choice. Finished bricks are placed in a memorial display case in front of the Watermelon Mountain Ranch clinic.

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LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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Local iQ’s 2011

Last Minute Gift Guide

The Art Connoisseur STANDARD:

Watercolor Postcards: A Portable Studio

$19.95

FIND IT AT: The postcard is an everyday art form where HEY JHONNY adventures in travel are meant be shared with loved 3418 CENTRAL SE, ones through words and images. Make your holiday 505.256.9244 card stand out this season by unleashing your heyjhonny.com inner artistic side with paint-your-own Watercolor Postcards: A Portable Studio. Each kit includes an instructional booklet, 10 Strathmore postcards, four paint tubes — brilliant red, ultramarine blue, sap green and deep yellow — two brushes and a mixing palette. UNIQUE:

Mitten Patterns

$8.50

Three little kittens, they lost their mittens and they began to cry. Thankfully tears are not necessary if you missed designer Pamela Schwab’s class on mitten patterns. Don’t worry: it’s not too late to take a chance at knitting your very own hand-warming creations. A wide-variety of patterns is available, along with a helpful staff of experts to get you started.

FIND IT AT:

THE YARN STORE AT NOB HILL 120 AMHERST NE, 505.717.1535

theyarnstoreatnobhill.com

IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

Albuquerque Museum of Art & History Foundation Membership

$40-$500 FIND IT AT:

ALBUQUERQUE Immerse the art lovers on your gift list in culture, art MUSEUM FOUNDATION and history with a membership to the Albuquerque PO BOX 7006, 87194, Museum of Art & History Foundation. Since 1967, 505.842.0111 city residents and visitors alike have flocked to the albuquerquemuseum.org museum to take in its sometimes groundbreaking exhibits. With a membership, the artsy types in your life can perpetually fill their free time with trips to the museum. Membership benefits include free admission to both the museum and Casa San Ysidro, invitations to membersonly openings, family art workshops, special lectures and a discount in the museum’s Gallery Store.

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LOCAL iQ | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

Local iQ’s 2011

Last Minute Gift Guide The Techie UNIQUE:

STANDARD:

Flip Cam

$149 FIND IT AT:

Life moves BAILLIO’S fast and the 5301 MENAUL NE, Christmas season 505.338.3375 moves even faster. baillios.com Capturing life’s most incredible moments is next to impossible without the proper equipment. The Flip Cam from Baillio’s is a great stocking stuffer for anyone who wants to do more than freeze moments. With its compact design and easy share capabilities, this camcorder is as easy to use as it is to fit into your purse or pocket.

Microsoft Life Cam VX2000

IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

$24.99 FIND IT AT:

COMPUTER CORNER

Talking to a faraway loved 4410 MENAUL NE, one on the phone 505.881.2333 is precious time compcorner.com spent, but being able to see them at the same time can mean so much more. Stay in touch with your family and friends this holiday season across the globe with the Microsoft Life Cam VX2000. This handy gadget features 16-bit color quality and is a snap to install.

Happy Day iPad Cases

$45 FIND IT AT:

STILO “Smile and be 3339 CENTRAL happy” is a simple SE, STE. D, 505.242.6260 and appropriate stiloabq.com phrase that aptly describes this fashion-forward tech accessory by Tech Candy. The set includes two soft cases and one hard shell case, each designed to hug your tech treasure perfectly. All three of the cases are vibrantly colored in hues of yellow and pink and are playfully adorned with retro smiley faces on the back.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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Local iQ’s 2011

Last Minute Gift Guide

The Close Friends STANDARD:

Annual Rail Runner Pass

$340

Choo choo! All aboard! What better way to help a friend in need of transportation, while helping to save the environment at the same time? The New Mexico Rail Runner Express offers an annual pass that grants unlimited trips through one zone on the Rail Runner route. Taking the train to and from work, or just for fun on the weekends, is a great way to either experience New Mexico’s treasured landmarks and culture, or to just arrive at your destination and/or meet some new people.

FIND IT AT:

NEW MEXICO RAIL RUNNER nmrailrunner.com

UNIQUE:

Overnight “Staycation”

$119-$149

The easiest way to unwind after the busy holiday season is to get away, if even just for a night and a few miles away from home. What better way to make this happen than spending a night at a local bed and breakfast? Located in the historic village of Corrales, the adobe-style Chocolate Turtle Bed & Breakfast is great for a night away or a weekend stay, when you just want to relax and breathe in the fresh air close to home.

FIND IT AT:

CHOCOLATE TURTLE BED & BREAKFAST 1098 WEST MEADOWLARK, CORRALES, 505.898.1800

chocolateturtlebb.com

IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

20

LOCAL iQ | OCTOBER 13-26, 2011

Wine Club Membership

$115

Cheers! The three-month gift membership to St. Clair Winery’s “Wine-of-the-Month Club” includes two speciality wines each month. The first set consists of bottles of DH Lescombes’ Syrah and Dry Riesling. The second set includes bottles of Blue Teal Pinot Grigio and Blue Teal Merlot. And the last set features bottles of the St. Clair Cab-Zin and Chardonnay. No need to wait before placing an order — your lucky gift recipient will begin receiving wine as early as January of 2012.

FIND IT AT:

ST. CLAIR WINERY 901 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.243.9916

stclairwinery.com

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

21

Local iQ’s 2011

Last Minute Gift Guide The Musician IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

STANDARD:

$23.95

1,000-piece Sheet Music Puzzle

FIND IT AT: Musicians keep music close to their MUSIC MART hearts in every possible way, because 3301 CARLISLE NE, music is ostensibly a part of them. 505.889.9777 Perhaps it is only natural, then, that musicmart.com their games and puzzles reflect that same passion. This 1,000-piece Sheet Music Puzzle is for die-hard puzzle and music fanatics, with its intricate pieces and complicated imagery. Once completed, the puzzle depicts a traditional sheet of music with hundreds of treble clefs and half and eighth notes.

UNIQUE:

A Month of Guitar Lessons

$80

FIND IT AT: Do you know an aspiring musician MARC’S GUITAR who owns a guitar otherwise CENTER gathering dust in their walk-in 2324 CENTRAL SE, closet? 505.265.3315 I do. marcsguitarcenter.com I won’t point fingers, but we all know would-be musicians who have gotten a little too busy in their daily lives to follow through with their grand idea to teach theirselves how to play an instrument. Let’s leave the teaching to the professionals at Marc’s Guitar Center, where instructors are more than willing to hand down their respective talents. All you need is a guitar and a fresh pair of strings with your name on it under the tree.

Popejoy Hall “Arts Gift Card”

$10-$100 FIND IT AT:

UNM TICKETING SERVICES

From special performances to unmtickets. com ballet, comedic and dramatic productions, the Arts Gift Card from UNM’s Popejoy Hall offers endless opportunities for arts enthusiasts. If you’re not sure which ticket is the most coveted, cover all the bases and purchase the universal ticket, which can be used for any Popejoy performance. This gift is sure to get you a standing ovation at the end of the gift giving season.

The Foodie STANDARD:

Porcelain Name Plates

$12/SET OF FOUR

The hors d’oeuvres are ready and the main dish is in the oven. The last step for any cook is setting the dinner table. Why not make the job a little easier this holiday season with porcelain name plates to adorn a glistening table? Hosts can write each guest’s name on the plates, allowing for an extra-personal touch. Each box of name plates includes four place plates and an erasable marker, for constant reuse. Soiree seating arrangements have never

FIND IT AT:

THE A STORE 3500 CENTRAL SE, 505.266.2222

theastore.com

been so simple.

UNIQUE:

Ducky Tea Infuser Rubber ducky you’re the one, you make tea time lots of fun! There is nothing more relaxing than slipping into a bubble bath and sipping a steaming cup of tea. The Ducky Tea Infuser is great for the tea addict, because it allows for the fresh tea leaves to continuously steep slowly into the hot water. The rubber duck topper on the infuser gives the appearance of a duck floating in the tea cup, adding a cute and fun alternative to your boring, traditional metal mesh infuser.

$10.99 FIND IT AT:

BEEPS 3500 CENTRAL SE, 505.262.1900Ð

IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

Cook’s Gift Card

$Name

Your

Pots and pans and utensils, oh my! There is certainly Price something for everyone at Now We’re Cooking. From the master chef to the microwave novice, the store is full FIND IT AT: of kitchen and dining “toys” they will love unwrapping. NOW WE’RE COOKING 5901 WYOMING NE, Add to your fave cook’s kitchen cabinets with a set of 505.857.9625 interestingly shaped plates or increase their arsenal of techniques with a quality mandoline or bacon press. A gift card here will provide them a fantastic opportunity to expand their culinary knowledge and beef up their ingredient list or collection of kitchen gadgets.

22

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

23

MUSIC

L I V E MU S I C

SUBMIT TO LO CAL i Q The next deadline is Dec. 14 for the Dec. 22 issue. Please send calendar entries to: calendar@local-iQ.com f: 888.520.9711 a: PO Box 7490 ABQ., N.M. 87194 USE THIS FORMAT:

Venue Band GENRE Time, Cost List events any time for free at local-iQ.com *Events are always subject to change, check with individual venues before heading out

PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

Members of Albuquerque’s The Porter Draw like to say their brand of Americana music owes as much to hardcore punk as country and western. The band’s lineup (left to right) includes Joshua Gingerich, Dandee Fleming, Ben Wood, Russell Pyle and Joey Gonzalez.

Hard work, high times Albuquerque Americana act, The Porter Draw, marks its considerable evolution as a band with the upcoming release of California Widow chorus to “Before You Go,” I actually believed in him.

BY JEFF KERBY

T

he first time I heard The Porter Draw’s new record, California Widow, was just a handful of days ago at 3:05 in the morning. The ass end of a pint of Dark Eyes stared up while simultaneously giving me the finger. She left. Not only did she leave, but she took my music. It was all gone. Molly Hatchet. Slayer. George Jones. These musical treasures were as much a part of my past as she was. The only reason I still possessed this disc was the fact that it had been living in my jacket pocket since banjo player Ben Wood, had given it to me a week prior because he’s a really horrible card player, and, at the end of the night, he still owed me $20. Of course, he didn’t have it. Never play poker with a banjo player. They are always broke.

CD RELEASE

The Porter Draw WITH SUPERGIANT, THREE STRING BALE, MOTHER DEATH QUEEN

9p, Fri., Dec. 16 Launchpad 618 Central SW, 505.764.8887 $5 Tickets: holdmyticket. com theporterdraw.com launchpadrocks.com

As I sat in my trailer, I was really kind of hating him, thinking that if he had given me the cash, I would have had money to drink something more respectable than Dark Eyes. But that hate soon wore off after the opening notes of “Dirty Trade” hit my weary ears. I instantly felt at home (in a home that no longer felt like one) as I heard Russell Pyle’s vocals pouring out tales full of moonshine and hard luck. Pyle once told me that The Porter Draw’s personal brand of Americana music owed as much of a debt to hardcore punk as it did to country and western. I couldn’t help but believe him. When he told me that he didn’t care that much about fortune or fame, I also believed him. But it was when I heard Pyle belt out the

24

POWERED BY ROCKWIRED MEDIA

Of the 10 songs on California Widow, The Porter Draw shows, on each song, just how the band’s sound has evolved since its debut. This is most notable in the area of production, which is vastly superior to its predecessor. As the band’s drummer Joey Gonzales said, “California Widow is the culmination of more than two-and-a-half-years of hard work and growth as a band.” Part of this growth stems from the group being blessed with three very talented vocalists, all of whom possess their own sense of self and style. There is no competition here, only a unified vision told through three distinct voices. There’s the aforementioned Pyle. Then Wood’s countrified swing and auditory craftsmanship stamped all over “La Pine,” “Davey” and “Myra Joyce.” Wood described the band’s vocal triad this way: “We all have sadness, and our job as artists is to tease out the pieces that are remarkably human.” When the band’s third vocalist, Joshua Gingerich, told me that he “tends to draw themes from those living the hard life, the downtrodden and the most vulnerable in society,” the proof is in the timbre of his voice as he sings the lyrics to “Six by Nine” with all the gravelly emotion of a man actually doing hard time. If you can’t relate to the concept of laying it all out emotionally on a pay phone while making one last frantic grasp at trying to save a relationship that you just know is doomed to failure — a scenario Gingerich sings about in “Anthems”), then you simply aren’t from my side of the tracks, son. When members of this band unveil their masterwork at the Launchpad on Dec. 16, I will likely feel most happy for the group’s drummer, Gonzales, and bass player Dandee Fleming — two hard-working local musicians who make up the backbone of the band. When Fleming told me that The Porter Draw’s music “brings back memories of riding around in the truck with my mother listening to Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard,” I immediately knew what he meant.

Thinking back on that awful night that led to my introduction to the music of The Porter Draw, I realized that there are no other bandmates that I would rather call my friends. Let’s face it: women come and go, but great country songs last forever. If The Porter Draw would actually ever perform a bluegrass version of “Lick It Up,” by KISS, they just might be perfect.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

THU

8

Blackbird Buvette Cosmic Dancing with Brendangerous and Nicolatran DANCE 10p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge The Universal - Original Weekly Dance Party w/CLKCLKBNG & Guests DANCE/ELECTRO/ INDIE 8:30p-2a, FREE

Cowgirl BBQ The Littlest Bird BLUEGRASS 8p, FREE

Jazzbah Sez Who JAZZ/GROOVE 9p-12a, FREE

Launchpad Camp Lo, Myka9, Mane Rok, Sense & Change, DJ Clout, and Shakedown 9p, $15

Low Spirits Tumbleweed Wanderers 9p, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson JAZZ 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Molly’s Doug Muchmore 1:30-5p, FREE Jam Night with Jimmy Jones 5:30-9:30p, FREE

Mykonos Cafe & Taverna Jazz Night 6:30p, FREE

Outpost Performance Space Jon Gagan Quartet 7:30p, $10-$15

Popejoy A Charlie Brown Christmas with David Benoit and Special Guest Ethan Bortnick 7:30p, $29-$39

Public Academy for Performing Arts Guitar Concert 7p, FREE

Scalo II Bar Ryan McGarvey ACOUSTIC BLUES 8:30p, FREE

St. Clair Winery & Bistro Felix y Los Gatos 6p, FREE

FRI 9 ABQ Brew Pub Shane Wallin ACOUSTIC ROCK/BLUES 7-10p, FREE

Annapurna World Vegetarian Cafe DeBoSa BOSSA NOVA 7-9p, FREE

MUSIC

L I V E M USIC Blackbird Buvette

Low Spirits

Planet Rock - Funky Dance Party 10p, FREE

Le Chat Lunatique, Round Mountain, Phantom Lake 9p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge

Macey Center

The Roust Abouts, Everett Howl and The Wolves, Cowboy and Indian, 5 Star Motelles 8p-2a, FREE

Flying J Wranglers 7:30p, $14-$16

Casa Esencia DJ Devin TOP 40 8p, $20

Casa Esencia (Small Dance Floor)

Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson Duo JAZZ 6:309:30p, FREE

Mine Shaft Tavern Open Mic Night hosted by Shelly 8p-midnight, FREE

DJ LD TOP 40 8p, $20

Molly’s

CoolWater Fusion

Sally Townes 1:30-5p, FREE Leap of Faith 5:30-9:30p, FREE

Matt Jones SOUL/POP/ROCK 6-8p, FREE

Monte Vista Fire Station

Cowgirl BBQ

La Junta SKA 9p, FREE

The Fallen Stars AMERICANA/ROOTS

Mykonos Cafe & Taverna

8p, FREE

Sid Fendley Duo 6:30p, FREE

El Rey Theater

Qbar

NM Artists United IV with headliner Fat City 7p, $10-$20

DJ Aquattro TOP 40 8p, $10

GiG Jesus Bas 7:30p, $15

Railyard Second Street Brewery

Low Spirits

Scalo II Bar

Church of Beethoven

Acid Jazz Reflux, The Wychdokta Project, Seth Hoffman’s Tribal Troubadour 9p, $5

Pretty Girl Orchestra VOCAL JAZZ 9p,

Mendelssohn Konzerstuck CLASSICAL

FREE

10:30a, $5-$15

Marcello’s Chophouse

Sol Santa Fe

Cowgirl BBQ

Tony Rodriguez Duo JAZZ 6:30-

Kinky Friedman and Anthony Leon “Unchained” 7:30p, $25

ABQ Brew Pub

The Bob Dylan Brunch 12-3p, FREE Philip Gibbs SINGER 8p, FREE

9:30p, FREE

St. Clair Winery & Bistro

Chris Raven ACOUSTIC/CLASSIC ROCK

Mine Shaft Tavern

Saudade BOSSA NOVA/SAMBA/CHORO/

7-10p, FREE

The Jakes CLASSIC ROCK 8p-12a,

Holy Cross Episcopal Church

SAMBA/REGGAE 6:30p, FREE

Blackbird Buvette

FREE

Shoulder Voices, Lousy Robot, Adam Hooks and His Hangups, Fart House 10p, FREE

Molly’s

St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church

Burt’s Tiki Lounge

Monte Vista Fire Station

SAT

10

Brookside, Willy J and the Storytellers, Good As Dead 8p-2a, FREE

Bluegrass Jam hosted by Cathy Faber 1-4p, FREE The Sean Healen Band ROCK/FOLK/POP/BLUES 8p, $5

7p, $20

Alpha Cats SWING/JAZZ 9p, FREE

New Mexico Gay Men’s Chorus

Immanuel Presbyterian Church

St. Clair Winery & Bistro

New Mexico Gay Men’s Chorus

7:30p, $15-$20

Combo Special with Joani 6:30p,

7:30p, $15-$20

Jazzbah

FREE

Jazzbah

Sunshine Theater

Soulman Sam and the Soul Explosion 12-1a, $10

Soulman Sam and the Soul Explosion 9p-12a, FREE

Jinja

Mushroom, One Eyed Doll, Tenafly Viper, Until Chaos 8p, $15

The Peacemakers FOLK/AMERICANA

The Cathedral of St. John

7-10p, FREE

Polyphony: Voices of New Mexico,

Launchpad

7p, $5-$25

St. Petersburg, Mrdrbrd, Bullettooth, Alan George Ledergerber, and DJ Nicolatron 9p, FREE

Popejoy

Cowgirl BBQ

Scalo II Bar

Immanuel Presbyterian Church

Dallas Brass: A Merry Christmas with Brass 7:30-9:30p, FREE

Erik Knudson FOLK 6-9p, FREE

Cadillac Bob & The Rhinestones

DJ Rotation 10p, FREE

Old San Ysidro Church

Corrales Bistro Brewery

COUNTRY/FOLK 6-9p, FREE

Mykonos Cafe & Taverna FREE

En-Joy CUBAN/SALSA 9:30p, $7

El Rey Theater

Baracutanga LATIN 9p, FREE Karl Richardson & Kompany 6:30p,

Cooperage

The Littlest Birds BLUEGRASS/

Imbibe

Rudy Boy Experiment 1:30-5p, FREE Dangerous Curvz 5:30-9:30p, FREE

New Mexico Phillharmonic presents Tchaikovsky and Copland 6p, $15.50-$42.50

Qbar DJ Chil TOP 40 8p, FREE

Musica Antigua de Albuquerque presents “Thys Yool, Thys Yool,” Christmas music from the Middle Ages and Renaissance 7:30p, FREE

SUN

11

Asbury United Methodist Church The Albuquerque Civic Chorus HOLIDAY/CHORAL 3p, $10

Blackbird Buvette Camino Del Soul with Mello and Tahnee 7p, FREE

Marc Tatum Trio presents Music for the Soul CHRISTMAS JAZZ 2:30-4p, FREE

Il Vicino Canteen Brewery Boris McCutcheon AMERICANA/ COUNTRY 3-6p, FREE

Immanuel Presbyterian Church New Mexico Mass Choir 4-5:30p, FREE New Mexico Gay Men’s Chorus 7:30p, $15-$20

Jazzbah Jazz Brunch featuring Entourage 11a-2p, FREE

Mine Shaft Tavern Gene Corbin AMERICANA 3-7p, FREE

Cathedral of St. John Polyphony: Voices of New Mexico Christmas Concert 3p, $5-$25

CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

Launchpad Local iQ presents The Funky Sweater Get Down! featuring Felonious Groove Foundation, 2Bers, Hidden Whale, Todd and The Fox, DJ Flo Fader, Peanut Butter Johnson 9p, $10

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

25

MUSIC

LI V E M US I C

Molly’s Jamie Sue Seal & John Latini 1:305p, FREE

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

Mine Shaft Tavern Evoli 7p, FREE

O’Niell’s Pub

Molly’s

Holy Water and Whiskey FOLK 4-7p,

505 Blues Band 5:30-9:30p, FREE

FREE

Qbar

Old San Ysidro Church Michael Chapdelaine GUITAR 3p, $15

Popejoy

Frank Chewiwie LATIN/JAZZ 8p, FREE

Scalo II Bar Keith Sanchez SONGWRITER 8:30p,

Mariachi Christmas 3-5p, $19-$29

FREE

Sol Santa Fe

Sunshine Theater

Trampled By Turtles and William Elliot Whitmore 7p, $12

St. Clair Winery & Bistro The Peacemakers 6p, FREE

The Cathedral of St. John

As I Lay Dying, Of Mice and Men, The Ghost Inside, Iwrestledabearonce, Sylosis 7p, $22

WED 14

Polyphony: Voices of New Mexico 3p, $5-$20

Blackbird Buvette

MON 12

Body Language 9p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Vinyl & Verses with UHF B-Boy Crew

Blackbird Buvette Blackbird Karaoke with DJ Kammo

UNDERGROUND HIP HOP 8p-2a, FREE

Cowgirl BBQ

9p, FREE

Billy the Cello Player 6:30-7:30p,

Burt’s Tiki Lounge

FREE

The Breaklites and Xibalbalola 8p-

Kevin Higgins and Barbara Malteze

2a, FREE

SINGER/SONGWRITER 8p, FREE

Cowgirl BBQ

Jazzbah

Cowgirl Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig 9p, FREE

Chris Dracup 7-10p, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Open Piano Night 6:30-9:30p,

Blood On the Dancefloor and JJ Demon 7:30p, $12

FREE

Low Spirits

TUE 13

AnarKomedy Anniversary, Vertigo Venus, Kevin Kennedy, Ann Gora, Sarah Kennedy, Black Mike 8p, $5

Blackbird Buvette

Marcello’s Chophouse

Geeks Who Drink 7p, FREE Low Life with DJ Caterwaul 9p, FREE

Tony Rodriguez JAZZ 6:30-9:30p,

Cowgirl BBQ

Molly’s

Ray Tarintino SINGER/SONGWRITER

Bella Luna 5:30-9:30p, FREE

8p, FREE

Scalo II Bar

Esther Bone Memorial Library

Cali Shaw Acoustic Showcase

Rebbe’s Orkestra SEPHARDIC/MIDDLE-

Sol Santa Fe

EASTERN 6:30p, FREE

Imbibe

Launchpad

FREE

SONGWRITER 8:30p, FREE

Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin 7:30p, $10

College Night with DJ Automatic & Drummer Camilo Quinones 9p,

St. Clair Winery & Bistro

FREE

UNM Hospital’s Barbara and Bill Richardson Café

Launchpad D.R.I., Suspended, Domestic Violence, Torture Victim 8p, $12

Low Spirits The Black Heart Procession, Story Ark 9p, $12

26

Joani & Darin 6p, FREE

The Windbags Saxophone Quartet with Dr. Fred Hashimoto and Dr. George Comerci Noon-1p, FREE

THU

Missing Stateside 5:30-9:30p, FREE

15

Monte Vista Fire Station Felonious Groove Foundation FUNK/

Blackbird Buvette

AMERICANA 9p, FREE

KGB Klub 10p, FREE

Ned’s On The Rio Grande

Burt’s Tiki Lounge

The Electric Edric Project ROCK 9p-

The Universal - Original Weekly Dance Party w/CLKCLKBNG & Guests DANCE/ELECTRO/INDIE 8:30p-

1a, FREE

2a, FREE

Scalo II Bar

Qbar DJ Aquattro TOP 40 8p, FREE

Cowgirl BBQ

Stu MacAskie Trio JAZZ 9p, FREE

Brent Berry and Josh Martin AFRO-

Sol Santa Fe

COASTAL/AMERICANA 8p, FREE

Brown Chicken Brown Cow and The Imperial Rooster 7:30p, $8

Imbibe College Night with DJ Flo Fader 9p,

St. Clair Winery & Bistro

FREE

Tony and The Bandits 6:30p, FREE

Jazzbah

Taylor Ranch Library

Sez Who JAZZ 9p-12a, FREE

Watermelon Mountain Jug Band

Jinja

6p, FREE

The Peacemakers FOLK/AMERICANA

SAT 17

6:30-9:30, FREE

Launchpad Dezert Banditz presents Ras Kass with DJ Salam Wreck, Sac One & I.Q., Masta of Ceremoniez, The Flood, Big J, Micro & Info, DJ Flo Fader. Hosted by J-Ara 9p, $15

Blackbird Buvette Magic Saturday with The Genius of Love 10p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Shoulder Voices, Tectonic Movement, Molat the Tank 8p-2a,

Low Spirits Gimme My Moon Back and Techtonic Movement 9p, $5

Marcello’s Chophouse Karl Richardson JAZZ 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Thrash metal carryovers D.R.I. (Dirty Rotten Imbeciles) have returned to the stage and will perform at Launchpad (618 Gold SE, 505.764.8887, launchpadrocks.com) on Dec. 13 with Suspended, Domestic Violence and Torture Victim . All ages show at 8p. Tickets: $12, available at holdmyticket.com.

Mine Shaft Tavern

Skip Batchelor 1:30-5p, FREE The Impalas 5:30-9:30p, FREE

Scalo II Bar Chris Dracup ACOUSTIC BLUES 8:30p, FREE

St. Clair Winery & Bistro Paid My Dues Blues 6p, FREE

Sunshine Theater Winds of Plague, Chelsea Grin, As Blood Runs Black, For The Fallen Dreams, Upon A Burning Body, In The Midst Of Lions, Like Moths to Flames, Volumes 5p, $17

Cool Water Fusion Shane Wallin SOUL/POP/ROCK 6-8p, FREE

Cooperage Nosotros SALSA 9:30p, $7

Gypsy Dancers and Music 7p, FREE

Molly’s

FREE

Corrales Bistro & Brewery

FRI 16

GiG

Spankey Lee 6-9p, FREE Luna Moth & Blue Valley Farmer

ABQ Brew Pub

Roger Landes and Douglas Goodhart 7:30p, $15

Imbibe

Oscar Butler ACOUSTIC ROCK/BLUES 7-10p, FREE

Blackbird Buvette The MashUp Test with Kent 10p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Leaches of Lore, Fast Heart Mart, Pancakes 8p-2a, FREE

DJ Rotation 10p, FREE

Jazzbah Felix y Los Gatos 9p-1a, $10

Launchpad The Porter Draw CD Release Party, SuperGiant, Three String Bale, Mother Death Queen 9p, $5

Cowgirl BBQ FOLK/PSYCHEDELIC/ROCK 2-5p, FREE Breaking Blue BLUEGRASS 8p, $5

First Christian Church The Albuquerque Civic Chorus HOLIDAY/CHORAL 7:30p, $10

Imbibe DJ Rotation 10p, FREE

Jazzbah

Low Spirits

Claudio Tolousse with Sugar On Top

DJ Devin TOP 40 8p, $20

Reviva Revival, Mondo Vibrations, and Li Chll 9p, $5

Launchpad

Watermelon Mountain Jug Band

Casa (Small Dance Floor)

Marcello’s Chophouse

BLUEGRASS 6p, FREE

DJ Chil TOP 40 8p, FREE

Karl Richardson Duo JAZZ 6:30-

Cowgirl BBQ

9:30p, FREE

The Little Sister Band ROCK/SOUL/ FUNK/WORLD/BLUES 8p, $5

Mine Shaft Tavern

Taylor Ranch Library

Casa (Large Dance Floor)

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

9p-1a, $10

Bloody Phoenix, Pretty Little Flower, Abborant, Laughing Dog, Catheter 9p, FREE

Open Mic Night hosted by Shelly 8p-12a, FREE

CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

MUSIC

smart MUSIC

W

I

n the music biz, there are entertainers and there are songwriters. There is Cher and there is Bob Dylan. There is Jagger and Richards and there is Steve and Eydie. Brian Wilson is easily one of the greatest songwriters in the history of music, but who would ever think to book him as an emcee? Music critics rightly rain praise on great FREE songwriters. But it is entertainers who move vanillapop.com mountains in the pop culture landscape — hhandr.com/qbar.php frontman David Lee Roth comes to mind. New Mexican lounge-pop act Vanilla Pop resides comfortably and unapologetically in a gaudy, bejeweled house of entertainment. Easily one of the state’s most sought-after party bandsfor-hire, the larger than life act consists of just two artists, Al Dente and Lester Moore (a.k.a. - Alan Vetter and Greg Thum), a one-two punch in the musical face of live music fans who have grown weary of paying hard-earned money to stare blankly at pale, rail-thin musicians who fail miserably at returning even this small favor. For music/dance fanatics seeking nothing more than unabashed entertainment, Vanilla Pop is akin to a pot of gold at the end of the yellow brick road. More accurately, the duo of Vetter and Moore can make all of your Las Vegas dreams come true via a glittery backdrop and a one-of-a-kind rendition of Frank Sinatra doing Tom Jones doing The Bangles doing The Ramones. —Kevin Hopper Vanilla Pop 9p, First Fridays, monthly Q Bar at Hotel Albuquerque 800 Rio Grande NW, 505.222.8718

E

xisting among the greatest The Black Heart pioneers of the mid-’90s Procession indie sound, The Black Heart WITH STORY ARK Procession (TBHP) has released 8p, Tue., Dec. 13 albums that consistently score high Low Spirits marks among music connoisseurs 2823 2nd NW, 505.344.9555 the world over. Harnessing a sound $12 that is at the same time melancholic theblackheartprocession.com and uplifting, the San Diego twolowspirtslive.com piece leads the way in angst-ridden breakup tunes. TBHP’s 2010 offering Bloody Bunny/Black Rabbit is the most recent in a long line of releases by the band. Maintaining the dark, steady sound drenched with organ and guitar that TBHP has become synonymous with, nothing’s been lost with the passage of time. Centered around the creative instincts of Pall Jenkins and Tobias Nathaniel, TBHP has been known to add and subtract musicians and instruments as deemed necessary, allowing for a smooth transition from studio recordings to live performances. Incorporating haunting vocal patterns with driving organ and percussion rhythms, TBHP will help you to fall in love with heartbreak all over again. —Charlie Crago

ith the month of December Sixth Annual Funky upon us, we tend to participate Sweater Get Down! Ugly in seasonal trends that give Sweater Party the full effect of the holidays, like hot FELONIOUS GROOVE FOUNDAchocolate, egg nog and holiday parties TION, 2BERS, HIDDEN WHALE, TODD & THE FOX, PEANUT BUTcentered around big, funky sweaters. TER JOHNSON, DJ FLO FADER Yes, that’s right. Local iQ’s Funky Sweater 9p, Sat., Dec. 10 Get Down! is back for its sixth year in a Launchpad row, so that we may all bust out those 618 Central SW, 505.764.8887 oddly lovable ugly sweaters and get down $5 (w/donation, $10 without) to some funky local tunes. The night, a launchpadrocks.com canned food and clothing drive to benefit The Storehouse, promises to deliver a healthy, diverse serving of music sure to delight everyone’s ears. Felonious Groove Foundation is headlining the night with its signature sound comprised of Latin rhythms, ’70s-era funk and a taste of hip hop. Supporting Felonious will be other local favorites like the hip hop outfit 2bers, Santa Fe’s indie-funk duo Hidden Whale (ex-Gluey Brothers), some funky folk from Todd and the Fox and DJ Flo Fader spinning rare groove between live sets. The Funky Sweater Get Down isn’t just a party without a purpose — it’s a charity event. Everyone is encouraged to bring a canned food or clothing donation to benefit The Storehouse. Bring a friend, bring some food and bring your funky sweaters. —Justin De La Rosa

MUSIC

LI VE M USI C

Cowgirl BBQ

SO U N D ADV I C E

Qorichaska WORLD 8p, FREE

Imbibe CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26

Low Spirits Felix y Los Gatos and Wagogo 9p, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Tony Rodriguez Duo JAZZ 6:309:30p, FREE

Mine Shaft Tavern Anthony Leon and the Chain COUNTRY ROCK/AMERICANA 7-11p,

FREE

Molly’s Rock Bottom 1:30-5p, FREE Group Therapy 5:30-9:30p, FREE

Hotel Andaluz Sunday Jazz Brunch with Jazz Brasileiro 10a, FREE

Il Vicino Canteen Brewery Three String Bale FOLK/AMERICANA 3-6p, FREE

Immanuel Presbyterian Church The ABQ Civic Chorus CHORAL 3p, $10

Keller Hall - UNM Main Campus Enchantment presents its Holiday 2011 handbell concert “All In A Winter’s Night” 3-4p, $5

Launchpad

Monte Vista Fire Station

RAWRR, Techtonic Movement, Rochester Fosgate, Striges 8p, $4

The Rudy Boy Experiment BLUES

Mine Shaft Tavern

9p, FREE

The Ruebarbs BLUES 3-7p, FREE

Outpost Performance Space

O’Niell’s Pub

Roger Landes & Doug Goodhart

FREE

CAJUN/IRISH/BALKAN 8p, $15-$20

St. Clair Winery & Bistro

Press Room

Laura Lee & Co 6p, FREE

The Electric Edric Project ROCK 9p-

MON 19

1a, FREE

Los Radiators FOLK/ROCK 4-7p,

Qbar DJ Josh TOP 40 8p, $10

Blackbird Buvette

Scalo II Bar

Blackbird Karaoke with DJ Kammo

Vynil featuring Patty Stephens and Caesar Beauvalet R&B/SOUL 9p,

9p, FREE

FREE

Dance, Lounge and Groove 8p-2a,

St. Clair Winery & Bistro

FREE

Soul Sanctuary 6:30p, FREE

Cowgirl BBQ

SUN 18

Cowgirl Karaoke hosted by Michele Leidig 9p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge

Immanuel Pres. Church Blackbird Buvette

Holiday Concert 7:30p, FREE

Blackbird Brunch with Chase Dabney 12p, FREE La Misa with DJ Speed HIP HOP/

Launchpad

LATIN GROOVE 6p, FREE

Sugar Babies Burlesque Presents A Generic Holiday Party: The Red Light Cameras and Techtonic Movement

Church of Beethoven

9p, FREE

Beethoven Septet with Guillermo Figueroa CLASSICAL 10:30a, $5-$15

Marcello’s Chophouse

Cibola High School Rio Ranchop Symphonic Band presents “Ring Christmas Bells”

Open Piano Night 6:30-9:30p, FREE

TUE

20

3p, FREE

Blackbird Buvette

Cowgirl BBQ

Geeks Who Drink 7p, FREE

The Bob Dylan Brunch Noon-3p,

Burt’s Tiki Lounge

FREE

The Bill Hearne Duo COUNTRY/

Tiki Tuesdays with Jenny Invert, Wanderlusk, and Lysolgang 8p-2a,

WESTERN 8p, FREE

FREE

College Night with DJ Automatic & Drummer Camilo Quinones 9p, FREE

Launchpad Stay Gold Christmas Party featuring Leeches of Lore, Tom Between Worlds, more.Live Tattooing by Leo Gonzales, Tattoo Raffle 9p, $4

BY RONNIE REYNOLDS

B

Molly’s Southwest Wind 5:30-9:30p, FREE

Qbar Frank Chewiwie LATIN/JAZZ 8p, FREE

Scalo II Bar John Maestas Group JAZZ/SOUL 8:30p, FREE

WED 21 Blackbird Buvette The Vinyl Frontier: featuring DJ’s Lunchbox and Green 10p, FREE

Burt’s Tiki Lounge Vinyl & Verses with UHF B-Boy Crew UNDERGROUND HIP HOP 8p-2a, FREE

Cowgirl BBQ Cowboys & Indians HILLBILLY/ ROCKABILLY/BLUES/COUNTRY 8p, FREE

Jazzbah Tony Rio and the Atomic Spies 7-10p, FREE

Launchpad Black Cobra, Ronoso, Laughing Dog, Gusher 9p, $7

Low Spirits Possessed by Paul James and The Lengthy 9p, FREE

Marcello’s Chophouse Larry Friedman 6:30-9:30p, FREE

Mine Shaft Tavern Christmas Movie & Dinner Night featuring Dr. Seuss “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” 6p, FREE

Molly’s Badfish 5:30-9:30p, FREE

Scalo II Bar Cali Shaw Acoustic Showcase SONGWRITER 8:30p, FREE

St. Andrew Presbyterian Church Albuquerque Philharmonic Orchestra presents its Holiday Concert 7:30p, FREE

St. Clair Winery & Bistro Sally Townes Duo 6p, FREE

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eginning in the mid 1970s and continuing into the 1980s, mega-corporations began buying smaller independent record labels. The one percent began infiltrating the 99 percent. The result was a quick breakdown in the variety of music available to consumers, as well as an influx of overly commercialized music geared toward people who are comfortable with mega-corporations telling them what to like and buy. Unfortunately for music, many people fell into this category. As the quality of music began to suffer, the independent record label began to make a comeback. Subsequently many highly motivated independent record labels that were willing to risk competing with mega-corporations began signing bands that produced innovative modern music. Many of those labels are still going strong. The following are three favorites featuring a quality new release.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

GIRLS

ATLAS SOUND

KID KOALA

Title: Father, Son, Holy Ghost

Title: Parallax

Title: Space Cadet

Label: 4AD 2011

Label: Ninja Tune 2011

Label: True Panther 2011

In 1979, amidst the soulsucking height of disco and the backlash of heavy metal, Englishmen Ivo Watts Russell and Peter Kent started this quiet little label originally called Axis Records. They released the first single, “Dark Entries,” by what would soon become the gothic mega-giants Bauhaus, then quickly changed the name of the label to 4AD. Some 32 years later, 4AD released the second full-length record from Deerhunter’s front man Bradford Cox. Cox uses this side project to delve deeply into his many childhood demons as he did when he invented Atlas Sound in the sixth grade using a cassette tape karaoke machine. The haunting simplicity of Parallax allows Cox to juxtapose his dark side with his lighter, melodic side, drenching them both with his lo-fi, electronic orchestration and lyrics.

Ninja Tune Records turned 20 years old last year. For a label that exclusively caters to electronic music lovers, this is quite a feat and says a great deal about the state of modern music. Kid Koala has been on the label since his debut recording Carpal Tunnel Syndrome was released in 2000. The Montreal native was the first North American artist signed to the British label because of his incredible innovation with turntables. No one sounds like Kid Koala. He gathers record samples from his vast and unique record collection and carefully places them next to his trademark beats. On his new release, Kid Koala tones it down with subtle piano replacing the beats and his incredible samples woven underneath.

True Panther, started in 2004 and owned by independent record label pioneers Matador Records, is the newest kid on the block but is becoming a heavy hitter in the independent record label world. True Panther did it the right way. They signed one band, hoping to make enough money to sign another. It worked, as True Panther has signed 29 bands thus far. The release of Father, Son, Holy Ghost has vaulted Girls and True Panther into independent music relevance very quickly. The hype is real. The creativity is legit. The band is unlike any other, showing an ability to write guitarheavy ‘90s Brit rock on one song, ‘70s-inspired math rock ballads on another, and quite literally everything in between. Somehow the album sounds modern and fresh. It’s definitely one of those releases that will have listeners scratching their heads wondering exactly why they like this band.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

29

ART

OPENI NGS

SUBMIT TO LO CAL i Q The next deadline is Dec. 14 for the Dec. 22 issue. Send entries to: calendar@local-iQ.com f: 505.243.8173, a: PO Box 7490 ABQ., N.M. 87194 Name of Exhibit/Event Description of exhibit/event VENUE/GALLERY ADDRESS website List events any time @ local-iQ.com

Events are always subject to change, check with individual venues before heading out ** CALENDAR LISTINGS ARE A FREE SERVICE AND MAY BE CUT DUE TO SPACE. PREFERENCE IS GIVEN TO FREE EVENTS.

THU

8

THROUGH DEC. 10/EXHIBITION

17th Annual UNM Print Sale and Art Show PHOTO BY WES NAMAN

Andrew Connors has worked as the curator of art at the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History for the past two years, after stints at the Smithsonian and National Hispanic Cultural Center earlier in his career. He says a constant desire to learn is what drives him to stage innovative exhibits at the museum. “When you truly love something, you can never learn enough about it,” he told Local iQ.

A not so hidden passion Andrew Connors brings infectious enthusiasm to his job as curator at Albuquerque Museum and opens the doors wide to the public BY JESSICA DEPIES

A

ndrew Connors’ eyes light up when he is asked to detail upcoming projects slated for the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History. He starts with December’s exhibition, Social Satire and Commentary, and a subsequent feature of prints from Francisco De Goya, circa 1795. Connors grows animated as he continues to speak. As the curator of art for the museum (a job he’s held for the past two years), the passion Connors displays for his position is to be expected, but one that has been building over the course of PROFILE his entire life.

Andrew

Even though he grew up in suburban Denver, Connors’ Connors parents would take him and CURATOR OF ART his siblings to New Mexico Albuquerque Museum of around the holidays, where Art and History he first became enchanted with the idea of working with art. Visiting the Palace of the Governors and the Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe, as well as the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos, Connors’ engagement in art at a young age began to mold his future. “In Taos, we loved to visit the Millicent Rogers Museum, and I was drawn to the drama and theatricality of the installation of a Penitente Morada, with a lit candle burning in the middle of the floor,” Connors recalled in a recent interview with Local iQ. “It was probably the power of the Millicent

30

Rogers installation that really made me want to create that magic for other people.” Connors certainly has succeeded in that task. His zeal for art has stayed with him since those days in Taos. After finishing college, he moved to Washington, D.C., where he spent 15 years working at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. In 1999, Connors returned to the southwest, and established roots in New Mexico. Once here, Connors continued his work in museums, spending seven years helping found the National Hispanic Cultural Center. He then became the chair of the art department at the Albuquerque Academy. The way he sees it, Connors said, “I’ve been an art curator my whole life.” In 2009, Connors brought his rich background in art to the Albuquerque Museum. Since his appointment, the curator’s hard work has been made evident to local art enthusiasts. As Connors’ co-worker and the Albuquerque Museum’s Curator of Education, Elizabeth Becker, commented to Local iQ, “I admire Andrew’s commitment to making art accessible to everyone. People tend to feel more confident looking at art after attending a training, program or having a conversation with Andrew. He brings (a tangible) energy to his work (that) is infectious.” So what, exactly, is the work that Connors does? In his own words, being a curator is “a job that not a whole lot of people have, therefore not a whole lot of people have a concept of really what is done.” Connors went on to desribe his job as one that is comprised of three parts: organizing and finding exhibitions, building the museum’s permanent collection and public service. While the first two parts are the most visible, public service (which includes responding to inquiries on pieces of art, cooperation with various artists and basically providing information on Albuquerque and its signature museum) takes up a good deal of Connors’ time. “There are weeks that go by where I do nothing but public service, and really can’t focus on the exhibitions that everybody thinks I spend all my time doing,” he says. Connors’ commitment to educating the public on art — something he clearly cares about — is an undeniable aspect of his job. And while the city’s curator is full of knowledge on art, his favorite part of the job, he revealed, is ‘constant learning.’ It’s that constant education that I really love,” Connors said, “and exposing myself to things that I’ve never thought of before. And suddenly they become my favorites. When you truly love something, you can never learn enough about it.” As Connors elaborates on the museum’s efforts to further connect to the community; to open up to collaborators in the arts world; even to expand the hours of free admission each month, one thing is clear: that kind of passion means that you never stop learning.

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

A variety of UNM and Tamarind lithographs, etchings, monoprints, silkscreens and photographs, as well as, live printmaking demonstrations. 9a-6p, Thu.; 9a-8p, Fri.; 12-5p, Sat., FREE FINE ART BUILDING (#84) UNM CENTER FOR THE ARTS, 505.277.6779

THROUGH DEC. 17/PERFORMANCE

The Show Composed of eight incredibly talented performers from Albuquerque and Santa Fe. The Show is a whip-smart short form improv group. 9p, $8 THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE AND IMPROV THEATRE 100 GOLD SW STE. 112B, 505.404.1578

theboxabq.com THROUGH JAN. 11/EXHIBITION

Ed Girdner - Fine Art Oils Girdner puts his own touches to everyday scenes and strives to emphasize the light, shapes and color of simple things to put new faces on those unnoticed treasures. 9a-5p, FREE THE WATERMELON GALLERY 12220 N. HIGHWAY 14, 505.286.2164

thewatermelongallery.com THROUGH DEC. 24/PERFORMANCE

You Can’t Get A Decent Margarita At The North Pole Sharing life with a skeet-shooting Mrs. Claus, workaholic Santa juggles his smitten office elf and his disgruntled reindeer, Rudolf while taking on his nemesis, The Tooth Fairy. 8p, Thu. & Fri.; 2p & 8p, Sat.; 6p, Sun., $10-$30 THE CELL, 700 1ST NW, 505.766.9412

fusionabq.org LECTURE

James Siena - Demystification From the Whitney Museum in NYC to the Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco, Siena weaves intricate repetitive patterns that evoke natural and mechanical worlds. Siena is a guest artist at Tamarind Institute, and will be creating lithographs with Tamarind master printers. Come join Siena in the Tamarind Gallery as he demystifies this collaborative process. Please RSVP. 5:30p, FREE TAMARIND GALLERY 2500 CENTRAL SE, 505.277.3901

tamarind@unm.edu

ART

O P E NI N G S/ PER F O R M A NC E S THROUGH DEC. 17/EXHIBITION

THROUGH DEC. 18

Reverb

Sinners & Saints: 15th-19th Century Paintings

A group gallery exhibit featuring the sculptural work of local artists. Reverb references an acoustical phenomenon in which parallel surfaces produce sound waves that encounter each other head on at directly opposing angles. Features work by Chuck Cook, Brandon Eagan, Brittney Herpolsheimer, Crystal Kralian and more. 5-8p, FREE THE TAN GALLERY 1514 SOUTH 4TH, 773.516.1692

andrewtlyman@gmail.com THROUGH MAR. 1/EXHIBITION

Quilts of the Southwest The exhibit features the newest works of hand-stitched and designed quilts by Mary Ezell. Many designs include appliqué work, as on the Kokopeli and Tepee quilt. Ezell has been awarded first place in several contests. 11a-5p, FREE COWGIRL RED 2865 TURQUOISE TRAIL, 505.474.0344

A visual feast of religious painting from the 15th century Renaissance through the 19th century neoclassical period in Europe and the New World. Drawn entirely from the museum’s collection. 10a-4p, Tue.-Fri.; 1-4p, Sat.-Sun., FREE

THROUGH APR. 22/RECEPTION

THROUGH DEC.16/EXHIBITION

THROUGH DEC. 18/PERFORMANCE

THROUGH MAY 1/EXHIBITION

James Drake: Salon of a Thousand Souls

Emerging Creatives: ABSTRACTS

The House of the Spirits/La Casa de los espíritus

Woven Identities

This exhibition includes 19 sculptures and works on paper by the Santa Fe-based artist spanning nearly 25 years. The contrast of baroque embellishment and hardedge geometry characterizes Drake’s work as a whole in the exhibition.

The Emerging Creatives Juried Exhibition and Professional Development Program serves local artists and designers who are establishing their creative pursuits as their careers. A Downtown ARTScrawl event. 5-8p, FREE

This play charts the rise and fall of a family in an un-named Latin American country from the 1920s to the 1970s, as the country experiences enormous social and political changes. 7:30p, Fri. & Sat.;

10a-5p, Tue.-Sun.; 5-8p, Fri., $6/ Free on Fri.

CREATIVE ALBUQUERQUE 115 4TH NW, 505.268.1920

THE VORTEX THEATRE 2004 1/2 CENTRAL SE, 505.247.8600

SANTA FE PLAZA 107 WEST PALACE, 505.476.5072

creativealbuquerque.org

vortexabq.org

UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

nmartmuseum.org

unm.edu/-artmuse

¡Encantada!

THROUGH DEC. 18

An Inquisitive Eye, Seeing Into Prints This show provides visitors a chance to view significant prints and printed books from the museum’s permanent collection, which span the history of printmaking from 1493 to the present. Highlights include works by such artists as Andy Warhol, Donald Judd and William Kentridge. 10a-4p, Tue.-Fri.; 1-4p,

aapacnm.org THROUGH DEC. 31/RECEPTION

cowgirlred.com THROUGH DEC. 18/PERFORMANCE

unm.edu/-artmuse

Wooden Snowflakes

THROUGH DEC. 18

Two rooms filled with men’s art including a wall of Ford Robbins B/W photos and a wall of Ralph Williams’ oil paintings. 3-5p, FREE JOHNSONS OF MADRID GALLERIES OF FINE & FIBER ART 2843 HIGHWAY 14

THROUGH DEC. 18

This photography show seeks to provoke discussion about how we individually and collectively define ourselves as Americans. Drawn from the museum’s extensive collection of photographs, these portraits brings us face to face with the diversity of American life. 10a-4p, Tue.-Fri.;

Dead Leg

1-4p, Sat.-Sun., FREE

Richard Deacon’s “Dead Leg” is a tour-de-force sculpture composed of bent and twisted oak lumber, bound together with custom-fabricated stainless steel couplings. 10a-4p,

unm.edu/-artmuse

THROUGH DEC. 31 RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

THROUGH JAN. 6/EXHIBITION

Marcia Petty

Sun., $10-$20

dukecityrep.com

Tue.-Fri.; 1-4p, Sat.-Sun., FREE UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

unm.edu/-artmuse THROUGH DEC. 31/EXHIBITION

David Solomon - New Works A new selection of oil paintings on aluminum supports by David Solomon. The flat metallic finish provides a unique surface on which to work - the paint floats and sits on the surface, allowing Solomon to mix and layer the paint; thus, providing both texture and depth.

UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

Young Brides, Old Shirts: Macedonian Embroidered Dress The ground breaking exhibition features 27 mannequins dressed in multiple layers, including jewelry, as well as single garments, highlighting the cultural activity of making and wearing clothes. 10a-5p, Tue.-Sun., $9-$20 THE MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MUSEUM HILL, CAMINO LEJO OFF OLD SANTA FE TRAIL, SANTA FE, 505.476.1200

saturdaysatjohnsons.blogspot.com THROUGH DEC. 31/RECEPTION

Quilts, quilts, quilts Group show featuring quilts. 3-5p, FREE JOHNSONS OF MADRID GALLERIES OF FINE & FIBER ART 2843 HIGHWAY 14

saturdaysatjohnsons.blogspot.com

Textiles, dyed and sun dyed shibori. Featured artist in the wearables and wallables gallery 3-5p, FREE JOHNSONS OF MADRID GALLERIES OF FINE & FIBER ART 2843 HIGHWAY 14

saturdaysatjohnsons.blogspot.com THROUGH DEC. 31/RECEPTION

100 Gallery Artist’s Group Show 3-5p, FREE JOHNSONS OF MADRID GALLERIES OF FINE & FIBER ART 2843 HIGHWAY 14

10a-6p, Mon.-Sat., FREE

internationalfolkart.org

saturdaysatjohnsons.blogspot.com

DAVID RICHARD CONTEMPORARY 130 LINCOLN SUITE D, SANTA FE, 505.983.9555

THROUGH JAN. 7/RECEPTION

THROUGH DEC. 31/RECEPTION

Superheroes: Icons of Good, Evil & Everything In Between

3-5p, FREE

davidrichardcontemporary.com

Art of Historic Madrid Area

Superheroes is a multi-media group exhibition about heroes, villains and other less-definable examples of human possibility. It explores the way we absorb these archetypes, and for good or ill, use them to inspire, author and rationalize our behavior.

JOHNSONS OF MADRID GALLERIES OF FINE & FIBER ART 2843 HIGHWAY 14

Fri.; 9a-12p, Sun., FREE

6-8p, Sat., Oct. 1; 12-5p, Tue.-Sat., FREE

Acrylic paintings in his studio/ gallery. 3-5p, FREE

NHCC, PETE V. DOMENICI EDUCATION CENTER 1701 4TH NW, 505.724.4771

516arts.org

JOHNSONS OF MADRID GALLERIES OF FINE & FIBER ART 2843 HIGHWAY 14

THROUGH APR. 22/RECEPTION

saturdaysatjohnsons.blogspot.com

Michael Berman, David Taylor, and Connie Samaras

THROUGH DEC. 30/RECEPTION

THROUGH DEC. 31/EXHIBITION

Visas for Freedom A series of photographs and documents that honor the memory of Spanish diplomats who in the Second World War were able to save the lives of many Jews. 9a-5p, Mon.-

nhccnm.org THROUGH DEC. 13/EXHIBITION

Element Decanter Series: Ice, Earth, Fire, and Wind Artist Xavier Zamarripa’s Element Decanter Series: Ice, Earth, Fire and Wind. Showing at the 1629 Club. Viewing exhibitions are by appointment only (josh@ joshuafrancoart.com). FREE CASA RODENA WINERY 733 CHAVEZ NW, 505.550.7220

516 ARTS 516 CENTRAL SW, 505.242.1445

Each of the three photographers in this exhibition portray a desert landscape that is simultaneously of the present, reflecting the past and hinting at the future. 10a-5p, $6-$15 THE NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART SANTA FE’S PLAZA AT 107 W. PALACE, 505.476.5072

nmartmuseum.org

CONTINUED ON PAGE 33

SHERYL STAPLETON AFRICAN AMERICAN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 310 SAN PEDRO NE, 505.222.0785

Gents

THE KOSMOS 1715 5TH NW, 505.797.7081

indianartsandculture.org

The Rio Grande Art Association presents ¡Encantada!, the 9th Annual Juried Oil and Acrylic Painting Exhibition. The painting subjects range from portraits to landscapes to abstraction. 5p, FREE

UNM ART MUSEUM UNM MAIN CAMPUS, 505.277.4001

Re-Imagining American Identities

MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE, SANTA FE, 505.476.1269

THROUGH DEC. 23/RECEPTION

Sat.-Sun., FREE

Join Duke City Rep this holiday season for the story of a world-weary and cynical woman who finds herself stranded at a stranger’s cabin in the dead of winter. 8p, Thu.-Sat.; 2p,

2p, Sun., $10-$15

For the first time in over 30 years, the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture opens a major exhibition of North American Indian baskets. The weavers’ ancestral lands are in six culture areas of Western North America. 10a-5p, Tue.-Sun., $6

saturdaysatjohnsons.blogspot.com THROUGH DEC. 31/RECEPTION

Mel Johnson’s Peoplescapes, Treescapes, Mountainscapes

Fall/Winter International Show The Korea Fine Art Association presents the Fall/Winter International Show featuring 60 artists. 5-8p, FREE PARK FINE ART 20 FIRST GALLERIA PLAZA SUITE 65, 505.764.1900

parkfineart.com

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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smart ARTS ABQ WOW: Women of the World Poetry Slam Championship 7:30p, Sat., Dec. 10 Outpost Performance Space 210 Yale SE, 505.268.0044

T

Jessica Billey: Antler here is something wildly unique about an entire family of abstract Family individuals with interesting Through Dec. 31 facial expressions and a set of antlers. Blackbird Buvette Downtown’s Blackbird Buvette is 509 Central NW, the setting for artist and musician 505.243.0878 Jessica Billey’s newest exhibition, Free featuring images from her Antler Family blackbirdbuvette.com collection. The Antler Family exhibition jessicabilley.com is compiled of a series of small oil paintings on paper, ranging in size from 3-by-3 inches to 4-by-4 inches. Billey has created over 73 members of the Antler family, all with a name and story behind each. The mixture of portraiture with fantasy provides a signature look to her collection that is all her own. Billey has an extensive art resume from solo exhibitions, group exhibitions, album cover art, films and various illustrations. She has won multiple awards for her artwork. The Antler Family exhibit runs through December. —Jessey Cherne

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L

et’s get ready to rumble! Relish in the acoustics of poetic excellence and the revolution of spoken word with eight of the eloquent best for ABQ WOW: Women of the World Poetry Slam Championship. In conjunction with the National $5-$10 Poetry Slam, WOW is an all-woman outpostspace.org PSI (Poetry Slam, Inc.) event created by women for women poetry slam competitors. Participants slamming into the four-round audible ring at the Outpost Performance Space for the title of Best Woman Slammer will include former ABQ WOW champs Erin Northern, Brooke von Blomberg and Esme Vaandrager, as well as competitors Jessica Helen Lopez, Jasmine Cuffee, Olivia Gatwood, Patricia Gillikin and Eva Crespin. The new silvertongued title holder will represent ‘Burque at the International Women of the World Poetry Slam in Denver in March 2012. Don’t miss the return of this mind-awakening articulation. “ABQ Wow is a spectacular event that I am proud to participate in,” said Lopez. “It makes me feel like a proactive advocate for positive community and feminine perspective.” —Shavone Otero

Jessica Helen Lopez

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

S

ardonic humor, grief, unveiled secrets and family ties are just a few of the things that one experiences at the time of death of a loved one. The Mother Road Theatre Company explores those issues and more in a new production that was the winner of the prestigious Laurence Olivier Award for Best New Comedy, The Memory of Water. Written by Shelagh Stevenson and directed for Mother Road by Mark Hisler and Vic Browder, the play follows the lives of three sisters who are planning their mother’s funeral. The dark humor of the devastating situation grants audiences a piercing look into family dynamics. The notable cast consists of veteran Albuquerque theater actors Morse Bicknell, Pip Lustgarten, Vivian Nesbitt, Tom Schuch, Wendy Scott and Julia Thudium. —Jessey Cherne

The Memory of Water Dec. 9-24 OPENING NIGHT GALA

7p, Fri., Dec. 9; SHOW TIMES:

8p, Thu.-Fri.; 2 and 6p, Sat.; 2p, Sun. The Filling Station 1024 4th SW, 505.242.0596

$18, $10 (Stu./ Sen.)/$10 (Thu.) motherroad.org

ART

OPE NI N G S/ PER F O R M A NC E S CONTINUED FROM PAGE 31

THROUGH DEC. 31/SPECIAL EVENT

UNM Holiday Ornament Sale THROUGH JAN. 29/RECEPTION

John Loengard: Age of Silver Celebrates the new book: Age of Silver, an ode to the art form to which Loengard has dedicated his life. In the book, Loengard has photographed some of the most important photographers of the last half-century, including Annie Leibovitz and Henri Cartier-Bresson among others. 5-7p, FREE MONROE GALLERY OF PHOTOGRAPHY 112 DON GASPAR, SANTA FE, 505.992.0800

The 2011 Holiday Ornament was designed by artist Jana Fothergill, senior graphic designer for University Communications and Marketing. Proceeds from the sale of the ornament directly benefit the UNM Parent Association Scholarship Fund. $18.89 UNM BOOKSTORE MAIN CAMPUS, LOBO DEN, AND MEDICAL/LEGAL BOOKSTORE 2301 CENTRAL, 505.821.6127

bookstore.unm.edu/c-234-ornaments. aspx

monroegallery.com THROUGH DEC. 18/PERFORMANCE

The Long Christmas Ride Home This play dramatizes a road trip by two parents and their three young children to visit grandparents for the Christmas holiday. 8p, Fri.-Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10-$12 DESERT ROSE PLAYHOUSE 6921 MONTGOMERY NE, 505.881.0503

THROUGH DEC. 31/RECEPTION

Jill Erickson and Suzanne Kane Jill Erickson reveals oil paintings on wood of lyrical imagery with delicate detail. Suzanne Kane extolls with her newest incarnations: leaf-life bowls and exotic pods that have a calming quality. 5-10p, FREE

desertroseplayhouse.com

MARIPOSA GALLERY 3500 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.6828

THROUGH DEC. 30/RECEPTION

mariposa-gallery.com

Up From Down Under: The Photography of Ward Russell To the land of Kiwis, chippies, good on you, panel beaters and chilly bins, Ward takes his camera and cinematic eye on an adventure through the islands of New Zealand. 4-7p, FREE WARD RUSSELL PHOTOGRAPHY 102 W. SAN FRANCISCO #10 (UPSTAIRS), SANTA FE, 505.231.1035

wardrussellphoto.com

THROUGH DEC. 31/EXHIBITION

Renee Brainard Gentz: Fiber Arts “Wallables - Not Wearables”

THROUGH JAN. 14/EXHIBITION

THROUGH JAN. 28/EXHIBITION

Sacred Mountain: Modernist Portraits of Taos Mountain

New Grounds Annual Holiday Sale

Beginning in the late 19th century, East Coast artists began to flock to the nearby village of Taos. Kindred spirits followed in their wake, including the many modernist artists inspired by Taos Mountain, whose work has been collected for this exhibition. 9:30a-5:30p, FREE

There is something for everybody and every pocket book in this holiday sale with hundreds of works of art by new Grounds Members for sale. 5-8p, Sat.; 10a-6p,

WILLIAM R. TALBOT FINE ART, ANTIQUE MAPS & PRINTS 129 W. SAN FRANCISCO ON THE SECOND FLOOR, SANTA FE, 505.982.1559

williamtalbot.com THROUGH DEC. 18/PERFORMANCE

Cat On A Streetcar Named Iguana This show is an homage to Tennessee Williams. Returning to their original roles are Hugh Wittemeyer as Big Dad, Becky Mayo as Big Mom and Jeannie Westwood as the man-hungry Branch. 8p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $13-$15 ADOBE THEATER 9813 4TH NW, 505.898.9222

Tondreau’s high-resolution photographs are dramatic Albuquerque landscapes and landmarks capturing the city’s colorful terrain and breathtaking sky.

JOHNSONS OF MADRID GALLERIES OF FINE & FIBER ART 2843 HIGHWAY 14

sumnerdene.com

SUMNER & DENE 517 CENTRAL NW 505.842.1400

THROUGH JAN. 22/EXHIBITION

Daily Burdens

Small art offerings by Frank Buffalo Hyde, Nocona Burgess, Fritz Casuse, Carol Hagan, Nicholas Herrera, Rhett Lynchand many others. Reception will be held Friday night with artists in attendance with demonstrations by Dominique Toya. 5-7p,

“You’ll shoot your eye out!” All the favorite elements from the beloved 1983 film are included in this stage version of the story about a nine-year-old boy growing up in Hohman, Indiana in the late 1930s. 8p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10-$22

Fri., FREE

LEGENDS SANTA FE 125 LINCOLN, 360.739.9689

ALBUQUERQUE LITTLE THEATRE 224 SAN PASQUALE SW, 505.242.4750

legendssantafe.com

albquerquelittletheatre.org

INPOST ARTSPACE AT THE OUTPOST PERFORMANCE SPACE 210 YALE SE, 505.268.0044

THROUGH JAN. 20/RECEPTION

THROUGH DEC. 24/PERFORMANCE

oupostspace.org

A Christmas Carol

THROUGH DEC. 11/RECEPTION

The Inaugural Affordable Art Group Show and a newly designed print room featuring 250 works on paper in a broad range of media including watercolors, pastels, oil crayon and photographs. 5-7p,

Blackout Theatre presents an ensemble adaptation of this classic Christmas story. Charles Dickens’ world of abrasive bah humbugging has never been seen quite like this before. 8p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun.,

The Orange Chair

FREE

$12-$15

Works by Micaela Buckingham, Brandon Eagan, Laurisa Galvan, Nicholas Guzzardi, Zack Herrera, Rochelle Higgin, Jamie Ho, Brianna Kerwin, Stewart Linthicum, Veve Rammelsberg, and Jodi Rosenblum. 6-8p, FREE

ZANE BENNETT CONTEMPORARY ART 435 SOUTH GUADALUPE, SANTA FE, 505.982.8111 EXT. 1008

VSA NORTH 4TH ART CENTER 4904 4TH NW, 505.672.8648

blackouttheatre.com

ONTRACK GALLERY AND ART SPACE 1719 5TH NW, 505.228.0229

zanebennettgallery.com

THROUGH MAR. 31/PERFORMANCE

THROUGH JAN. 28/RECEPTION

THROUGH APR. 7/WORKSHOP

Family Can Be Murder

Illuminating the Word: The Saint John’s Bible - Calligraphy Demonstrations

When Alex and Toby Hubbard show up to spend the holidays with their father, Joseph, they find that his new young wife may be maneuvering to make herself the sole heir to their father’s fortune. 7:30p,

Calligraphers from Albuquerque and Santa Fe will demonstrate a wide variety of book crafts in the History Museum’s second-floor Gathering Space. How do quills, ink and vellum work together? How delicate is gold leaf? How does one stitch a medieval book? How does one’s name look in calligraphic script? 10a-12p & 1-3p, Sat., $6-$9 NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM 725 CAMINO LEJO, SANTA FE, 505.476.1141

$55 (includes dinner and the show) FOUL PLAY CAFE - SHERATON UPTOWN 2600 LOUISIANA NE, 505.377.9593

fouldplaycafe.com THROUGH JAN. 14/RECEPTION

Nurturing Inner Peace Art exhibition by Catherine Scali and Ruth Cohen. 5-8p, FREE

THROUGH DEC. 18/PERFORMANCE

ALBUQUERQUE PEACE AND JUSTICE CENTER 202 HARVARD SE, 505.268.9557

All About Christmas Eve

THROUGH DEC. 29/EXHIBITION

nmhistorymuseum.org

This adaptation of the Charles Dickens’ classic features God as a drag queen who sends his most trusted and fabulous angel, Norma Desmond to Earth to help the mousy misfit Eve by showing her a succession of Christmas Eves in her life, from sweet young thing to sordid stripper to horrid hag who will be murdered on Christmas Eve. 8p, Thu.-Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10 AUX DOG THEATRE 3011 MONTE VISTA NE, 505.254.7716

auxdog.com

Photography of Dorothy A. Garcia The Loma Colorado Main Library is pleased to host an exhibit of works of photographer Dorothy A. Garcia. 10a-8p, Mon.-Thu.; 10a-5p, Fri. & Sat., FREE LOMA COLORADO MAIN LIBRARY 755 LOMA COLORADO NE, 505.891.5013

FREE EXPO NEW MEXICO FINE ARTS BUILDING 300 SAN PEDRO NE, 505.977.6899

anmpas.com

FRI

9

For three days in December, over 60 classically trained dancers will once again inspire audiences with ballet and jazz performances choreographed to traditional and contemporary Christmas music. 7:30p, Fri.; 2p, Sat., FREE NHCC 1701 4TH ST NW, 505.246.2261

theperformers.org THROUGH JAN. 21/RECEPTION

Just Fine Art

Stacy Hawkins is a scientist and an artist and his work reflects both the discipline of the laboratory and the freedom of experimentation. He encourages drips, splashes and pooled paint co-mingling with hard edged imagery and design elements. An artist’s reception will be held on Jan. 6 from 5-8p. 2-5:30p, Mon.-

Affordable Art Group Show

Showcases 250 images from 100 top New Mexico photographers. 10a-5p,

Holiday Joy

Bill Tondreau Panoramic Photographs

Holiday Small Works Show

Fri.; 1-3p, Sat. & Sun., FREE

3rd Annual New Mexico Photographic Arts Show

THROUGH DEC. 11/PERFORMANCE

10a-6p, Mon.-Fri.; 10a-5p, Sat.; 10a-6p, Sun., FREE

A Christmas Story

THROUGH DEC. 28/EXHIBITION

THROUGH DEC. 31/EXHIBITION

A solo exhibition of a large wall hanging by Renee Brainard. This has been selected to hang, soon, in the Capital Art Collection. 3-5p, FREE

saturdaysatjohnsons.blogspot.com

newgroundsgallery.com

adobetheater.org

THROUGH DEC. 24/PERFORMANCE

THROUGH DEC. 23/SPECIAL EVENT

Wed.-Sun.; 10a-4p, Tue., FREE NEW GROUNDS PRINT WORKSHOP & GALLERY 3812 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.8952

1X15 (One Model, 15 Photographers) In this very intriguing exhibition, several different photographers were given the opportunity to photograph the same model. 5-8p, Sat.; 9a-6p, Wed.-Sun.;

Exhibit/208 will close out it’s 2011 exhibition schedule with a group show of gallery artists. 10a-4p, FREE EXHIBIT/208 208 BROADWAY SE, 505.450.6884

exhibit208.com PERFORMANCE

French Gypsy Fiddle: What Do ‘Gypsy’ and ‘Fiddle’ Mean, Anyway? Musician Muni Kulasinghe (Le Chat Lunatique) will discuss the genesis of the terms and their application to violin and French culture. He will also demonstrate and explain improvisation in relation to jazz violin. 10:30a-12p, $7 ALBUQUERQUE MENNONITE CHURCH 1300 GIRARD NE, 505.889.0927

oasisnet.org/Albuquerque THROUGH DEC. 11/PERFORMANCE

Christmas Joy A beautiful ballet and jazz performance choreographed to traditional and contemporary Christmas music. 7:30p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sat. & Sun., $20-$22 NHCC 1701 4TH SW, 505.246.2261

nhccnm.org

CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

10a-4p, Tue., FREE MATRIX FINE ART 3812 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.8952

matrixfineart.com THROUGH JAN. 28/ EXHIBITION

In the Moment Memorial Exhibition for Gerald Fitz-Gerald The Albuquerque art scene experienced a great loss with the passing of Gerald Fitz-Gerald. His bold and colorful monotypes are true reflections of the artist’s spirit. 5-8p, Sat.; 10a-6p, Wed.-Sun.; 10a4p, Tue., FREE NEW GROUNDS PRINT WORKSHOP & GALLERY 3812 CENTRAL SE, 505.268.8952

newgroundsgallery.com

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

33

ART

OP E N I N G S/ P E R F O R M A N C E S CONTINUED FROM PAGE 33

Fri.; 2p & 6p, Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10

THROUGH DEC. 24/ PERFORMANCE

theboxabq.com

The Memory of Water Set in a small English seaside town in the dead of winter, this comical, touching account of three estranged sisters at the wake of their mother’s funeral takes a unique look at grieving and colorful family dynamics. 8p, Thu. & Fri.; 2p & 6p, Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10-$18 THE FILLING STATION 1024 4TH SW, 505.243.0596

reservations&motherroad.org or motherroad.org THROUGH DEC. 18/PERFORMANCE

Into the Woods Jr. The Brothers Grimm “go Broadway” as Sondheim and Lapine offer up a cockeyed fairy tale where all of your favorite characters — Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, Jack (and his beanstalk), and The Witch — meet and interact on their journeys. 6p,

THE BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE 100 GOLD SE STE. 112B, 505.404.1578

THROUGH DEC. 18/PERFORMANCE

Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some)! Unable to muster up excitement for their umpteenth performance of Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol,’ three actors decide to perform every Christmas story ever told, including holiday traditions and songs from around the world, with a few more bells and whistles than ever seen before. 7p, Fri. & Sat.; 2p, Sun., $10-$20 EAST MOUNTAIN CENTRE FOR THEATRE (VISTA GRANDE COMMUNITY CENTER) 15 LA MADERA, 505.286.1950

emct.org

SAT

10

THROUGH DEC. 11/PERFORMANCE

Great American Indian Dancers

15

RECEPTION/EXHIBITION

12-1p, FREE

PERFORMANCE

Art By The Yard

INDIAN PUEBLO CULTURAL CENTER 2401 12TH NW, 505.843.7270

RoadOpera: Deserting Las Vegas

THROUGH DEC. 24/ PERFORMANCE

Freely inspired by Bertold Brecht’s “Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny,” this piece stages characters in search of meaning, torn between their contradictory desires to think, entertain themselves and make money. 7:30p,

Art by the yard is a group exhibition of new works by the artists, each approximately 36” (one yard) tall by 18” wide. There will be paintings, wall sculpture, fabric art, assemblage and more. 6-8p, FREE SOUTH BROADWAY CULTURAL CENTER 1025 BROADWAY SE, 505.842.6196

rainbowartists.com PERFORMANCE

Open Mic Poetry Night A night of Spoken Word Poetry featuring Oscar Lester, who has appeared on Def Poetry Jam and Brenda “Mama” Mathews. Also on the show local poet Hakim Bellamy and others hosted by Carlos Contreras. Food provided by Powdrell’s BBQ. 6-10p, FREE

The Nutcracker Ballet Repertory Theatre’s holiday classic has been a family favorite since 1996 and is a great way to relax and reflect on the beauty of the season. 1p & 7p, Sat.; 2p, Sun; 2p, Tue., $5-$30 KIMO THEATRE CENTRAL AND 5TH, 505.768.3544

kimotickets.com

Donation TEATRO PARAGUAS STUDIO 3221 RICHARDS, 505.424.1601

teatroparaguas.org

FRI

FESTIVAL/FAIR

Holiday Arts & Crafts Bazaar and Fashion Show

SOUTH BROADWAY CULTURAL CENTER 1025 BROADWAY SE, 505.848.1320

Enjoy a live fashion show displaying clothing by Native American designers Genevieve Hardy and Penny Singer. Native American art work and crafts will be on display and available for purchase. 10a-4p,

www.cabq.gov/sbcc

FREE SOUTHWESTERN INDIAN POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 9169 COORS NW, 505.346.2371

16

THROUGH DEC. 18/PERFORMANCE

Shoes for the Santa Niño Based on the children’s story by Peggy Pond Church, this performance includes a libretto by Andrea Fellows Walters, the Opera Director of Education and Community Programs. The 35 minute work will be conducted by Bradley Ellingboe. The show is free but tickets are required. 7p, Fri.; 2p & 7p, Sat.; 2p, Sun., FREE

MON 12

NATIONAL HISPANIC CULTURAL CENTER 1701 4TH SW, 505.724.4771

DISCUSSION/LECTURE

nhccnm.org

Elmo Baca, “Nuevomexicanos and the Rhetoric of Statehood”

THROUGH JAN. 1/PERFORMANCE

Baca serves on the board of the New Mexico Humanities Council and owns a Las Vegas, NM consulting firm that specializes in downtown revitalization services. 12p, FREE NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM’S FRAY ANGELICO CHAVEZ HISTORY LIBRARY 113 LINCOLN, 505.476.1141

media.museumofnewmexico.org

TUE 13 DISCUSSION

Reflections/Refractions: SelfPortraiture in the Twentieth Century Explore how modern artists Edward Hopper, Andy Warhol, Jasper Hockney, Robert Rauschenberg, Louise Bourgeois, Jacob Lawrence, and others-have viewed themselves and the world. Join a discussion of the intricacies of self-representation turned inward. Discussions led by Elaine Trzebiatowski. 6-7:30p, FREE

Camelot King Arthur nervously prepares to meet his new Queen, Guinevere, Arthur establishes the Knights of the Round Table, and soon, Lancelot and Queen Guinevere fall in love. The affair is brought public with the help of Arthur’s evil illegitimate son Mordred. As a result, peace ends and war breaks out as Arthur’s troops fight Lancelot’s French army.

$10-$15 ALBUQUERQUE COUNTRY CLUB 601 LAGUNA SW, 505.890.5062

furiediane@yahoo.com

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

3p, FREE UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST WESTSIDE CONGREGATION 1650 ABRAZO (ABOUT A MILE WEST OF UNSER NEAR THE CORNER OF ABRAZO AND INCA)

FESTIVAL/FAIR

The Funky ‘Khanikeh Freylekh! Dancing to a 20-piece Klezmer Orchestra, kids activities and presentations. Silent auction, raffle, used book sale, arts and crafts items, and delicious food are available for purchase. Please bring items for Roadrunner Foodbank’s canned food drive and warm clothing/blankets for Project Share’s winter clothing drive. 5:38-9:38p, $1-$2 CONGREGATION NAHALAT SHALOM 3606 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.343.8227

nahalatshalom.org LECTURE/DEMO

Rio Rancho Art Salon A monthly meeting for artists and non-artists interested in discussing issues regarding the arts and related topics. 10a-12p, FREE RIO RANCHO ART SALON 1761 14TH SE, 505.891.8146

rioranchoartsalon.blogspot.com

SUN

18

THROUGH DEC. 16/RECEPTION

Gallery With A Cause Art Show

FREE (donations accepted)

A Christmas Story 7:30p, $8-$10

THE NEW MEXICO CANCER CENTER FOUNDATION 4901 LANG NE, 505.828.3789

KIMO THEATRE 423 CENTRAL NW, 928.699.2295

TUE 20

Bring a toy and get free popcorn!

cabq.gov/kimo and abqfilmfestival. com

SAT

17

Marco Polo and His Description of the World

The Albuquerque Professional Business Women of New Mexico present an entertaining evening with Sandra McKnight performing her new musical adventure, “Love, Light and Laughter.” Sandra’s sensitive ballads and sexy tributes to Sophie Tucker make her a consummate performer in the style of modern cabaret. Please RSVP. 5:30-7:30p,

International actress VanAnn Moore will perform a one woman show. Dolley Madison was one of the most beloved women of the 19th Century America. Her enthusiasm, wisdom and humor were infectious.

FILM SCREENING

PERFORMANCE

Holiday Party

Dolley Madison: The First Lady Speaks Out!

musicaltheatresw.com

AFRICAN AMERICAN PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 310 SAN PEDRO NE, 505.265.9119

okmuseum.org

SPECIAL EVENT

PERFORMANCE

A special holiday opening will also be combined with the New Mexico Cancer Center Founation’s 4th annual arts and crafts fair featuring over 25 local crafters showcasing jewelry, handbags, hair accessories, blankets, household items, etc. 1-4p,

7:30p, Fri.; 2p & 7:30p, Sat.; 2p & 6p, Sun., $16-$20

MUSEUM EDUCATION ANNEX 123 GRANT, 505.946.1039

WED 14

34

THU

Travel with Marco Polo and learn how this famous 13th century explorer reached China without a map. 1p & 3p, Sat., FREE EXPLORA THEATER 1701 MOUNTAIN NW, 505.224.8323

explora.us

PERFORMANCE

Red FUSION Theatre Company presents the regional premiere of Red, a play by John Logan. Winner of six 2010 Tony Awards, including “Best Play.” The play about artist Mark Rothko, and is directed by Jacqueline Reid. Reservations are highly recommended. 2p, $10-$30 THE CELL THEATRE 700 1ST NW, 505.766.9412

fusionabq.org

WED

FESTIVAL/FAIR

First Annual Pueblo Fiber Arts Show The newly formed Pueblo Weavers Guild is reviving and maintaining the millennia old Pueblo weaving tradition. Come meet the weavers, enjoy and purchase beautifully handmade gifts for the holidays. Pueblo textiles are rich and meaning as they connect us with our ancestors. All interested Pueblo fiber artists welcome! For more information please contact Louie Garcia (Tiwa/ Plro). 9a-4p, FREE

21

FESTIVAL/FAIR

13th Annual Las Posadas Celebration

INDIAN PUEBLO CULTURAL CENTER 2401 12TH NW, 505.363.1294

The Corrales Historical Society presents the 13th annual Las Posadas celebration. It is the Christmas story of Jesus, Mary and Joseph’s journey to Bethlehem, where Jesus was born 2044 years ago. It will be held in the Historic Old San Ysidro Church. Refreshments will be served afterwards. Suggested donations of non-perishable food will be distributed to local charities. 7p,

4akatl@gmail.com

FREE OLD SAN YSIDRO CHURCH 966 OLD CHURCH ROAD, 505.897.9109

BOOKS

TAL K S /SIGNI NGS SAT

10

SUN

11

BOOK SALE

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

December Used Book Sale

Schmidt’s Mill

MAIN LIBRARY 908 EASTRIDGE NE, 505.291.6295

Richard E. Peck will sign his new novel, Schmidt’s Mill, about John Schmidt who “returns” to a hometown that he has never seen before. His discoveries lead him to uncover mysteries, crimes and passions he did not know existed.

cabq.gov/library

1p

The Main Library will be selling “like new” books and gifts for both children and adults. All proceeds from the sales will support programs at ABQ Libraries. 10a

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Belle’s Trial Connie Gotsch will sign her second novel starring Belle, the dog who just wants to be with her owner at all times. Readers will take a journey with Belle while discovering the benefits of discipline, obeying and learning something new. 1p TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505.242.7204

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller BOOK TALK/SIGNING

King Pachuco and Princess Mirasol Author Bonnie Rucobo will sign copies and read from her book King Pachuco and Princess Mirasol. 2p SOUTH VALLEY LIBRARY 3904 ISLETA SOUTHWEST, 505.877.5170

libguides.cabq.gov

TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505.242.7204

SAT

17

BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Sweeney Robert Julyan will sign his book about the fictional High Plains village of Sweeney, N.M. The citizens of Sweeney partake in the hilarious hijinks of small-town life, including aliens, nudists, naked bull riders and Druids.2p TREASURE HOUSE BOOKS & GIFTS 2012 SOUTH PLAZA NW, 505.242.7204

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller

TUE

20

myspace.com/oldtownbookseller

TUE 13 BOOK TALK/SIGNING

Adobe Walls Open Mic Night & Poetry Reading Hosted by Kenneth P. Gurney, local poets are invited for an open mic night of poetry reading. Featured poet of the evening is Jessica Helen Lopez, who is a three-time member of the city of Albuquerque Slam Team and the 2008 National Champion-winning UNM Lobo Slam Team. 7p PAGE ONE BOOKSTORES 11018 MONTGOMERY NE, 505.294.2026

page1book.com

BOOK READING

The Twelve Days of Christmas: A Piñata for the Piñon Tree This storytime event features the reading of The Twelve Days of Christmas: A Piñata for the Piñon Tree. Attendees receive a biscochito coloring sheet and recipe. 6:30-7p TAYLOR RANCH LIBRARY 5700 BOGART NW, 505.897.8816

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

35

PETS

Be sure dog is good roommate

W

hen I think of roommates, I’m reminded of a time when I was in my 20s and lived in different houses in Berkeley, Calif. Roommates came and went, but what I tend to remember are the ones who drove me crazy. Whether they kept very odd hours, brought a variety of friends home, were messy or just downright inconsiderate, the annoying ones are hard to forget. What characteristics make for a poor fit in a roommate? I think it comes down to the ability to respect each other’s space, needs and differences. These same things matter when it comes to living peacefully with our dogs. We need to appreciate their needs, just as they learn to respect ours. There are a few common situations that seem to cause the biggest headaches for dog owners. These are access to furniture (I guess I can share your bed with you), appropriate greeting behavior (you mean you don’t like to be jumped on?) and appropriate play (what do you mean we can’t play fetch all day long?). Whether you have a new dog or one that already has proven to be a bad roommate, you can still work out a peaceful coexistence. When training dogs, look at the way in which parents teach small children to have good manners. We’ve all noticed parents in a restaurant giving their children crayons and paper to occupy them. Parents could yell, beg and cajole their children to be quiet and sit still, but instead they teach them the foundation of how to behave in a restaurant by giving them an activity. We can follow these same guidelines when teaching our dogs what we expect of them. When I see a dog owner crammed in the corner of the couch with their dog splayed out and covering the majority of it, I flash back to some of my bad roommate memories in Berkeley. Teach your dog to respect your space on the couch by only allowing him up there upon invitation. When you are not at home to supervise your dog, flip up the cushions or put dining room chairs on the couch. Provide him with a big comfy dog bed of his own so he has a great alternative.

When you are sitting on the couch and do not want your dog to join you, it is easy to keep him focused on staying on his bed. Occasionally toss treats on the doggie bed. Quickly, your dog will learn that hanging out quietly on the bed trumps sitting on the couch. Obnoxious greeting behavior is a polite way of saying your dog barrels people over at the front door. Now that is an annoying roommate. By simply teaching your dog to sit or keeping him on a leash while giving him treats, you will encourage sitting over vaulting. Of course, there is another challenge. You also must teach your arriving friends to “behave” themselves by not encouraging rowdy jumping behavior. Respect your dog’s needs for exercise by taking him for long walks, playing fetch and doing training exercises. These are great ways to give both his brain and body a good workout. But set limits. Too often I hear pet owners complain that their dog constantly harasses them to play fetch in the house. They describe how their ball chasing maniac repeatedly puts the slimy ball on their lap and backs up staring, waiting for the ball to be thrown. This is usually accompanied by barking to entice the owner to throw it again. While I am all in favor of a good game of fetch, you do not want your dog manipulating you to do this all evening in the house. Only bring out the ball for fetch when you are ready. When you have had enough, simply put the ball up where your dog cannot get it. While roommates may come, and hopefully go, set limits with your canine companion so you two can live happily ever after. Susan Reaber, CPDT-KA, is an Animal Humane New Mexico animal behavior specialist. She teaches puppy and adult training classes and assists pet parents through Animal Humane’s free pet behavior helpline: 505.938.7900.

Adoptions ROSE, ID #24516

For info about these pets and many others, visit AnimalHumaneNM.org or call 505.255.5523 Find us: facebook.com/animal humanenm

36

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

Rose is an 8-month-old, female, Labrador Retriever Australian Cattledog Cross. This youngster has a lot of energy and a lot of personality. Rose enjoys any toy she can get her paws on. Labs are also quick to learn commands. With patience and kindness, Rose could become your next best friend.

SIMON, ID #24434 Simon is an 8-year-old, male, Domestic Short Hair Cross. He’s gorgeous and a gentleman. His gold eyes appear to look right into your soul. Simon likes to keep his fur soft and silky by being combed. He’s very social, sweet and loving. Simon wants a new home that he can fill with happiness.

FILM

FILM SHORTS BY JEFF BERG

W

erner Herzog continues to turn out interesting documentaries, as witnessed in Into the Abyss, a sometimes unsettling but very lacking-in-detail look at death-row inmates Michael Perry and Jason Burkett. The two young men, Into the Abyss charged with three DIRECTED BY WERNER murders, are given HERZOG ample camera time Opens Dec. 9 to explain what Call for show times happened, but for CCA Santa Fe naught. Herzog 1050 Old Pecos Trail, makes it clear that 505.982.1338 he is against the ccasantafe.org death penalty and ifcfilms.com/films/ into-the-abyss interviews family, law enforcement and those who administer the death penalty, while Perry, executed a short time after the interview, remains rather nonchalant about his upcoming dispatch. Chilling but unfocused.

I

Love Crime really wanted to like Love Crimes much DIRECTED BY ALAIN CORNEAU more than I did, but Dec. 16-21 alas, it was not to be. 4:30 and 7p Kirsten Scott Thomas Guild Cinema stars as Christine, 3405 Central NE, the most autocratic, 505.255.1848 heartless boss ever guildcinema.com known to man or ifcfilms.com/videos/ woman. Her ambitious love-crime-trailer new assistant, Isabelle, takes the brunt of her viciousness, only to try and turn the tables later on. The plot holes are pretty numerous, and the story becomes rash and unbelievable, marring the good performances of Thomas and Ludivine Sagnier, which is further marred by a declaration of love by one of the main characters. Dark and cloudy.

PHOTO BY JOHN SCARPATI

Everday Sunshine captures the evolution of Los Angeles band Fishbone, which got its start when the members were junior high schoolers in South Central Los Angeles. The group, which released its first record in 1986, is still creating music today.

Slow bus movin’ Music doc captures the punk rock ethos of seminal Los Angeles ska act, Fishbone and its more than two-decade journey DOCUMENTARY

Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone* Directed by Chris Metzler and Lev Anderson

9:30p, Dec. 9-13 Guild Cinema 3405 Central NE, 505.255.1848 guildcinema.com

9p, Dec. 9-11 CCA Santa Fe 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 505.982.1338 ccasantafe.org

F

ootprints is an odd but interesting little film that opens with a young woman awakening one morning in front of the infamous Footprints Grauman’s Chinese DIRECTED BY STEVEN Theatre in Los PEROS Angeles with either Dec. 17-18 a strong case of 1 and 2:45p amnesia or the Guild Cinema longest and most 3405 Central NE, vivid dream about 505.255.1848 Hollywood Past that guildcinema.com one could possibly footprintsthefilm.com have. Numerous characters try to help, from Hollywood tour guides to a couple of the superhero imitators that populate the area, but to no avail. Footprints is a unique nod to many things of the past, and the cameo by the still-elegant Pippa Scott is worth the price of admission. Tender but curious.

Dec. 11-13 2p, Sun; 7:30p, Mon.-Tue. Taos Center for the Arts 133 Paseo del Pueblo Norte, Taos, 575.758.2052 taostca.org fishbonedocumentary.com/thefilm. html *Note: Chris Metzler will be present at the Dec. 9 screening at the Guild, in Santa Fe Dec. 10-11 and Taos Dec. 12.

BY JEFF BERG irector Chris Metzler seems to have a knack for lining up performers with distinctive and strong voices to narrate his documentaries, which cover slightly offbeat subjects. In his earlier film, Plagues and Pleasures of the Salton Sea, a gentle look at some of the spirited souls who live by the only inland “sea” in the U.S., he was able to nab John Waters to do voiceover for the piece. For his newest, lively and detailed work, Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone, about the iconic punk/funk/ska/jazz Los Angeles band Fishbone, Metzler and co-director Lev Anderson recruited actor Lawrence Fishburne to narrate. Metzler, a USC graduate, kind of shrugs it off. “As a filmmaker, you don’t want to use narration to tell the story; you want to show it via the film,” he told Local iQ in a recent interview. “With narrators, you sometimes need to take a risk and want to have the narrator be an asset.” Fishburne is certainly that. “He has a kick-ass voice and we thought it would set the right tone to tell the black experience in California,” Metzler said. “Then, I found out that he was a fan and friend — Fishburne first heard them while working as a bouncer at an L.A. punk club in the early ’80s — so his name went straight to the top.” It is a great choice, and even though the intriguing story of Fishbone doesn’t need any added energy, Fishburne’s contribution to the music doc does make a difference. Metzler and Anderson’s film follows the band’s long journey, starting in the late ’70s when the original members of Fishbone were still in junior high school. These early years are aided with clever animation that introduces viewers to younger versions of the musicians. The movie then switches to live interviews with members of Fishbone, blended with offerings from the group’s contemporaries, such as Flea of The Red Hot Chili Peppers and rapper Ice-T. “Here’s a confession: I was not familiar with the band, other than seeing their logo in the early ’90s when I was in college,” Metzler admitted. “In ’93, they played a show on

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campus. I remember asking someone, ‘What are they like?’ I then found out that they were some black guys playing heavy metal.” Like many people unfamiliar with Fishbone, Metzler was surprised to find this out, but later discovered that Fishbone’s repertoire went far beyond metal; it incorporated a very unique mix of genres — from punk to funk to hardcore and ska, to name a few. It wasn’t until much later that Metzler worked with codirector Anderson to make the film. “We were talking shop,” Metzler said, “and thought this would make a really interesting documentary, a story of outsiders that didn’t fit in. These were six guys from South Central L.A. who chose their own path and they made it to the other side.” Everyday Sunshine includes clips of several of the bands dynamic live performances, both past and present. And while very appreciated by its core fanbase, record companies didn’t know how to categorize Fishbone. Were they ska? Reggae? Funk? Rock? In the end, it matters not, since good music is good music, but that inability to pigeonhole the band’s sound played a big part in Fishbone’s near-miss at full-time fame. That and, as Metzler succinctly points out in the film, the fact that the six musicians who made great music together, also had six very distinct personalities. “They started when some of them were only 13,” Metzler explained, “and had a (record) contract by the time they were 18, but their responsibilities outside the band became very different. There were personality struggles, but on the other hand, there might not have been a band at all if they started this as adults.” Today, Fishbone endures, but with only two of its original members, Angelo Moore and Norwood Fisher, still involved. Ex-Fishbone members all remain in the music business, with several doing solo projects or hooking up with other hard-to-define bands, such as Alice in Chains. “(Fisher and Moore) like what Fishbone allows them to express,” Metzler noted, “and the spirit is very similar to how it has always been.”

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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COMMUNITY

C O M M UNI TY EVENTS THU 8 THU. THROUGH DEC. 15 CLASS/WORKSHOP

Enjoying the Holidays Explore practical ways to stay connected to one’s “good heart” during the holidays. This busy time of year can provide perfect opportunities to increase one’s “inner wealth.” 7-8:30p, $10 KADAMPA MEDITATION CENTER NEW MEXICO 8701 COMANCHE NE, 505.292.5293

meditationnewmexico.org

SAT

10

WORKSHOP

THROUGH DEC. 11 WORKSHOP/CLASS

Solar Electricity: Make It Yourself ! PV Panel making workshop. Learn about PV technology and how to make your own PV panel with Dr. Richard Komp. 9a-5p, $150 (30% discount for students with a valid ID) AAA SOLAR 2021 ZEARING NW, 505.268.0106

africanhealthnet.org

SPECIAL EVENT

Ecstatic Dance Albuquerque

Luminaria Tour

Experience free-form movements to “world beat” recorded music in a safe and non-judgmental space. 6:30-8p, $10 STUDIO SWAY 1100 SAN MATEO NE #32, 505.681.4339

meetup.com/ecstatic-dance-abq SPECIAL EVENT (SANTA FE)

PeacePal Be on the lookout for PeacePal during the holidays and support local businesses while helping create peace. 2-5p, FREE LA MONTANITA CO-OP 913 WEST ALAMEDA, 505.255.2042

THROUGH DEC. 11 WORKSHOP/CLASS

peacepalenevieve@gmail.com

Chakra Yoga: Exploring The Chakras Through Asana, Breath Exercises & Guided Meditation

Light Among the Ruins: Christmas Celebration

Learn how to make a lovely wreath for giving or decorating with Kathy Hallquist and Rena Jackson, staff members of the Rio Rancho Public Library. Materials will be provided, but there is a NONREFUNDABLE materials fee of $5, cash only.

A 2-day weekend workshop with Lauren Brenner, Marcus Armijo, and Chantel Lopes, including vinyasa flow yoga, Ashtanga yoga, Sacred Hot Yoga Method, pranayama breath exercises, guided meditation and an introduction to the magic within us all: the chakra system and kundalini. 12p & 4p, Sat.; 4p, Sun.,

10a-12p, $5

$75-$125

LOMA COLORADO MAIN LIBRARY 755 LOMA COLORADO NE, 505.891.5013 EXT 3039

CLOUD 9 DIVINE YOGA 6910 MONTGOMERY, 323.219.4580

Wreath-Making Workshop for Adults

WORKSHOP/CLASS

solyogahollywood.com

SPECIAL EVENT

With one of the most beautiful prehistoric and historic sites in the Southwest as a backdrop, the ruins of Giusewa Pueblo and San José de los Jémez Mission Church will be decorated with hundreds of traditional luminarias. The program will include traditional Native American flute music and Jémez Springs Park holiday festivities are on the same evening with free horse-drawn wagon rides available to the Monument. 5-9p, FREE JEMEZ STATE MONUMENT JEMEZ SPRINGS, 575.829.3530

History buffs will enjoy visiting with soldiers (living history re-enactors) who set up camp for this event. Warm cider will be served from their camp fires and at a chuck wagon other free refreshments may be had. Listen to stories about this long abandoned fort. More than camp fires light up the evening, enjoy the spectacle of one thousand luminarias. 5-9p, FREE

Enchantment presents its Holiday 2011 handbell concert on the Westside. 7-8p, $5

ANIMAL HUMANE NEW MEXICO 615 VIRGINIA SE, 505.265.3087

petlosscounselor@aol.com

RIO RANCHO UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 1652 ABRAZO NE, 505.366.3168

SUN 18

enchantmenthandbells.org

SUN 11

SPECIAL EVENT

JCC Chanukah Festival The JCC of Greater Albuquerque will be hosting a community Chanukah Festival, a huge Jewish holiday celebration. This year’s celebration will feature Jewish foods from around the globe including New York deli sandwiches and kosher hot dogs, scrumptious latkes, falafel on pita, hummus, Mideast salad, sufganiot (Israeli Chanukah jelly donuts) and other delicious desserts. 12-5p, $4-$15 JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER 5520 WYOMING NE, 505.348.4518

jccabq.org

TUE 13

Pet Loss Group

All In A Winter’s Night

SAT 17

FESTIVAL/FAIR

SUPPORT GROUP

A group supporting those who have lost or anticipate the loss of an animal companion. 10-11a, $20

SPECIAL EVENT

FORT SELDEN STATE MONUMENT RADIUM SPRINGS, 575.526.8911

1st Annual Notah Begay II Foundation Game Changer Awards Please join 4-time PGA Tour winner, Notah Begay III, in celebrating New Mexico’s Game Changers, making a difference in the lives of youth through excellence in sports and philanthropy. 6-9p, $100-$1000 HOTEL ALBUQUERQUE 800 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.867.0775

valarie@nb3.org WORKSHOP/CLASS

Ecstatic Dance Albuquerque Experience free-form movements to “world beat” recorded music in a safe and non-judgmental space. 6:30-8p, $10 STUDIO SWAY 1100 SAN MATEO NE #32, 505.681.4339

LECTURE/DISCUSSION

Trap Free New Mexico Phil Carter, Wildlife Campaign Manager, Animal Protection of NM and Dr. Robert Harrison of UNM illustrates how people, pets and wildlife-including endangered and protected species-bear the brunt of this cruel, dangerous and unsustainable practice. 11a, FREE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH 3701 CARLISLE NE, 505.681.6063

animaladvocates@uuabq.com

WED

21

SPECIAL EVENT

Winter Solstice Potluck A potluck to celebrate the Winter Solstice. 6-8p, $25 suggested donation FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 2801 LOMAS, 505.275.6638

gloria@yogasimpleandsacred.com

meetup.com/ecstatic-dance-abq

SPECIAL EVENT (TAOS)

SUPPORT GROUP

SPECIAL EVENT

Sun Salutes

Pet Loss Group

PeacePal

A group supporting those who have lost or anticipate the loss of an animal companion. 6-7p, $20

Be on the lookout for PeacePal during the holidays and support local businesses while helping create peace. 1-4p, FREE

In celebration of the winter solstice, the Harwood Museum of Art will offer a special yoga experience of 108 Sun Salutes with Jayne Schell.

VCA VETERINARY CARE ANIMAL HOSPITAL AND REFERRAL CENTER 9901 MONTGOMERY NE, 505.265.3087

petlosscounselor@aol.com

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FRI 16

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

8:30-10a, FREE

LA MONTANITA CO-OP 2400 RIO GRANDE NW, 505.255.2042

HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 LEDOUX, 575.758.9826

peacepalenevieve@gmail.com

harwoodmuseum.org

PLANET WAVES ARIES (MAR. 20-APR. 19) Your rational ideas may be conflicting with things to take for granted. If you’re in conflict, check where these two seemingly different levels of reality are trying to establish the truth. This kind of tension can be uncomfortable, particularly if you find yourself questioning cherished beliefs. It would be worth your time, however, to ask yourself why you believe what you believe. It would be just as worthwhile to inquire whether your ideas about life stand up to the available facts, and a few other facts that you are digging out. The good news is that baseless beliefs don’t really provide you with any comfort, and the better news is that facts don’t always add up to the truth. TAURUS (APR. 19-MAY 20) You may feel like you’ve gone through a transformation, perhaps right down to the cellular level, which has left you feeling raw and vulnerable. At the same time, you’re in a highly structured environment, which you may think is limiting you but which is really providing you with a measure of stability as you go through some deep and necessary changes. Therefore you can focus on your growth, trusting that you’re supported in that experience. Whether you feel safe is another question, but I suggest you treat vulnerability as an opportunity rather than a threat. All of the finer things in life — love, sensuality, desire, self-expression, learning and friendship — are facilitated by your openness. You may have the feeling that your surroundings are not supportive of these things, but your astrology suggests that you have some excellent opportunities for authentic contact. GEMINI (MAY 20-JUN. 21) Anger is a controversial emotion among spiritual types, most of whom would prefer to outlaw it. However, anger still exists and it has many causes. Whether it’s a productive emotion in the long run is another question. In the immediate timeframe it is calling your attention to something that you should pay attention to. The danger of anger is turning it inward. Another danger is projecting it outward in ways that are not healthy or respectful, but it’s better to err on the side of expression rather than suppression. Your attention is being called to a significant issue, and you know that you will need to take action sooner rather than later. There is no rush; investigate your feelings and the history behind them before making any decisions. CANCER (JUN. 21-JUL. 22) This is a good time to consider what you owe the world, or what you absolutely want above all else to give the world. You may have a significant debt that you are here to pay off in some form of selfless service. Or, you may have noticed that you’ve been doing that for a long time and need to think of it in a different way. You may be someone who has never considered the concept of world service. It’s time to give that idea a thorough and introspective investigation and find out what it means for you. You are formulating a deep relationship to this idea, and something akin to being a spiritual disciple is awakening in you. Whatever the karma behind this awakening may be, you are receiving a deep inheritance. True, you may not think of gaining an inheritance as “taking action,” but what you have is the privilege of authentic participation.

By Eric Francis • planetwaves. net LEO (JUL. 22-AUG. 23) You have a creative opportunity to make a lot of money, with the emphasis on creative first and money second. This will require you to take some specific, carefully chosen action, which I suggest you think of as an experiment. You can wait for “something to happen” but you would benefit from knowing your goal, planning your approach and making a move to see how it goes. An old friend or colleague may be involved. During this Mercury retrograde, you may find yourself digging up undeveloped ideas, dreams or desires that serve a diversity of purposes — and which will enrich your life if you follow up on them. If there’s an abundance of these, pick from the ones that you think will make you the happiest. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEP. 22) You are gaining confidence, but it seems to be a delicate walk because losing your courage is only a thought away. The good news is that reconnecting with your courage is only a thought away. But being rebellious is not enough to get you there. Rebellion in itself is a tool, not a value, be cautious where you apply it. The uprisings that worked for you as a child no longer work. There is something else you want from your predecessors, which is the example of their authentic relationship to the world. You will gain confidence by being fully in your environment, and by proceeding if not with a sense of entitlement, a sense of belonging to the human family. You are not an outcast. You’re a fully vested participant in life on the planet. LIBRA (SEP. 22-OCT. 23) Acquire some political skills, or refine and enhance the ones you have. Politics is the basic game of human society. It’s influenced by many things: privilege, sex, strength, resources and the propensity of certain individuals to violence — but to be a skilled player you need none of that. You merely need an understanding of the game and why it is important. I am suggesting this not to get you further entrenched in an idea or an institution of some kind but to help you find some freedom. Getting along with others, learning to get your agenda going, and having some skill in give and take, are all essential talents worth developing. In any situation where politics is necessary, the antithesis is to stay in touch with your sexual desire. When you lose that contact, the game can become dangerous. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 22) You may be inclined to push a financial deal, but you better check the details carefully before you sign anything. There is promise and potential here, and possibly the chance to realize a very specific dream or desire. Yet, the combination of a stellar Mars aspect (driving you forward) simultaneously with Mercury retrograde (potential misunderstanding or misinformation) is the cause for concern. You could do a handshake deal now, and finalize the real agreement in the last two weeks of the year, after Mercury stations direct and become privy to certain levels of information that you may not be aware even exist. The details count for a lot, and I suggest you invest you find out what is going on below the surface. Chances are you will be able to use the information well, and resolve your lingering questions — but those questions have to come to the surface before you can do that.

UNIVERSAL CROSSWORD

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 22) You better make sure your opinions are backed up by some data. It would be adequate to be able to say, “In my opinion, such and such is true, for the following three reasons.” I don’t mean to undermine your confidence in what you know is right, but rather bolster your confidence when it comes to knowing you’re not always right. I would give yourself extra points if you or anyone else spots an error in your thinking, particularly an error of interpretation. This may come from someone who you are sure is inexperienced or uninformed; don’t let that stop you from factchecking if someone nudges you. At the heart of the matter is a lingering question about something you believe and are inclined to hold onto at all costs, despite your doubts. You may think you’re a brave holdout, but check the freshness date. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 20) I am pretty sure you have not heard of the Red Goat incident in the little town where I live. This consisted of two artists tagging these brand-new, certifiably ugly white tree planters with a stencil of red goats. A little street art caused a huge uproar. Everyone was suspect in what amounted to a two-week police dragnet. The mayor took it so personally he nearly had an aneurysm. The masses were rallied for a fantastic cause. It was great fun — and the symbol of the unintentional revolt was a goat, just being him/herself. Over the next few weeks, you’re likely to have a similar kind of impulse power, causing reactions you could never have predicted and getting results you were not expecting. This will be fun, if you keep your eye on the effects you’re having. You have some luscious, charismatic sex appeal working for you. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 19) The deepest core of your psyche has gone from spitting out demons, to the sensation of angels flying out the windows of your soul. I would dare say there have likely been a few spaces in between, when you wondered what it was you were possessed by. All of this is part of a necessary catharsis that will extend into early next year, when Neptune leaves your sign and enters Pisces. This is a phase of resolution; of tying up the loose ends and making sure that you’re being honest with yourself, and with the people around you, before you move onto your next adventure. What feels like madness or turmoil in your soul will connect you to your deepest and most authentic creativity. PISCES (FEB. 19-MAR. 20) The emphasis of your charts is focused on your career — I suggest that’s where you keep the emphasis of your energy flow. There is more happening than you recognize, and despite a few things that could be going better than they seem to be, you will have energy to spare as long as you moderate your pace and keep your communications clear. This is a seed moment for you, a time when you will make decisions and act on long-delayed plans. But don’t stop there. You are under rare astrology that is about expanding your vision and making forays into the world that you might have deemed impossible. Part of the emphasis is on partnership; the people you encounter now could prove to be truly significant collaborators.

SOLUTION ON PAGE 40 LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

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LOCAL iQ

classified@local-iq.com

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Be proactive, track your health care bills

O

ver the past 24 years I have seen a very big problem consistently show up on consumers’ credit reports: Many people who have had medical issues think their medical care was paid for by insurance, only to see the unpaid bills end up on their credit report, with a collection agency in pursuit for back payment. This is not a minor problem for consumers. It costs a person’s credit score 45 points for each unpaid bill turned over for collections. But there are things you can do to educate yourself about the issue and avoid this mistake. If you go to the doctor or receive a medical procedure at a hospital or clinic, the visit is given a code by a medical transcriber, who then submits that code to your insurance company. This does not mean the bill will get paid automatically. Given how complicated medical coverage is these days, it’s quite possible the bill will not get paid, and the whole time you may think it has been. You have to be proactive with your health care and make sure you follow the process from doctor to insurance company. I have been through six major surgeries myself and I learned this from personal experience. It is important to always make sure to have your hospital bills

LOCAL iQ | ALBUQUERQUE’S INTELLIGENT ALTERNATIVE | DECEMBER 8-21, 2011

audited. I personally was charged $700 for a prescription, and when the audit was done it turned out to be a $700 box of tissue. As you can see, it’s best to make sure to have your medical bills audited, which you can request from the hospital. If the insurance is being billed correctly and they are hesitating to pay, this is another issue to look into. The New Mexico Department Of Insurance (DOI) governs all insurance companies, and no insurance company wants your claim to be investigated, because your case will not be the only one looked into. Remember, be proactive. And until next time, good credit to you. Michael Ramos is owner and consumer credit counselor with Credit Rescue Now, which offers free credit educational workshops and free credit manuals on the second Saturday of each month. Sign up by calling 505.899.1448 or visit creditrescuenow.com.


Issue 146, Dec. 8 - Dec. 21, 2011