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CATALOG 1984-1986

: : COMMUNITY COLLEGE CONTENTS Cuyahoga Community College .................... 1 Admission, Fees, Financial Aid ... ............ .... ....... 5 Education Programs ................................. 11 Degrees Granted Certificates and Awards of Study Career Resources Institute Education Services Program Course Plans ............................... 29 Short -Term Program Course Plans ..................... 129 Course Descriptions ...... ...... ........... ..... .•.. 139 General Information . .... ...... .... ... . .... ...... ... 243 Student Development Services Executive, Officers, Deans and Faculty ................. 263

Notification of Nondiscrimination Cuyahoga Community College is committed to continuing affirmative action and equal opportunities for access to employment and education and thus does not discriminate against current or potential employees or students on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin or ancestry, age, handicap, or status as a disabled or Vietnam¡ era veteran . In. quires concerning the College's affirmative action/equal opportunity policy should be directed to: The Coordinator of Affirmative Action, Cuyahoga Community College, 700 Carnegie Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115, (216) 348-4000. Changes in Curriculum, Fees, and Other Requirements The Board of Trustees of the Cuyahoga Community College District reserves the right to change, at any time, without notice, graduation requirements, fees and other changes, cur. riculum, course structure and content, and such other matters as may be within its control, notwithstanding any information set forth in this catalog. Because of increasing publication costs, this catalog is intended to serve students and staff for two academic years and therefore should be kept through the summer of 1986. Course offerings approved after publication of this catalog are reflected in class schedule booklets which are issued quarterly.

I.

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE As Cuyahoga Community College enters its third decade of service to Cuyahoga County and Northeast Ohio, our success will continue to be measured by how well we prepare students to succeed in a rapidly changing world. The emerging demands to address new technological applications in all facets of our lives and work require changes cce is making in its curriculum and programs. To help ourstudents attain new heights of individual excellence in the classroom, the workplace and their personal lives, CCC has adopted an institutional game plan that will guide our educational efforts in the decade ahead. The college's Blueprint for Excellence in the Third Decade pledges ou r resources to improving student achievement and retention, maintaining high academic standards and applying the latesttechnology for learning and innovation in teaching. The Blueprint commits CCC to assisting Ohio as business and industry to prepare for economic revitalization and growth. Our new Unified Technologies Center will emerge as a centerpiece of this effort by linking high technology education and training programs to the shifting requirements for new job skills. Our newest curriculum option, the Associate of Technical Study degree, will enable students to design career training programs that meet their specific career goals by combining subjects from CCC's technical majors with those offered by other area colleges and training schools. We are committed to strengthening our relationships with existing partners: • PUBLIC SCHOOLS to ensure adequate preparation of students seeking college-level study. •

FOUR-YEAR COLLEGES and universities to ensure CCC students receive the best possible preparation forthe baccalaureate degree and that CCC credits continue to transfer to four-year universities.

• BUSINESS, government and human service sector to ensure that excellence goes hand-in-hand with job requirements and success. This catalog is your personal roadmap for educational and career opportunities at Cuyahoga Community College.

~L.~~ I

J

Dr. Nolen M. Ellison President

II.

BOARD OF

TRUSTEES

Acton

Bucur

Davis

Hughes

Keith

McCullough

Panzica

Singerman

Richard Acton

Business Manager, Local 38 International Brotherhood,of Electrical Workers Nicholas Bucur

Bucur & Kaplow, Attorneys Beverly Davis

Vice President Administration, Cleveland Institute of Dental Medical Assistants Inc. Marsha Hughes

Executive Vice President, Northeastern Ohio Savings and Loan League Tyler

George Keith

President, George Keith & Associates Ruble McCullough

Director, Harvard Community Service Center Nacy Panzica

President, Panzica Construction Gilbert Singerman

President, Wright Airlines Ralph Tyler

President, Ralph C. Tyler P.E., P.S., Limited

III.

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

Ellison

Brown

Shumaker

Dr. Nolen M. Ellison

President Dr. GraceC. Brown

Executive Vice President, Academic Affairs Mr. Paul E. Shumaker

Executive Vice President, Human Resources and Administrative Affairs Dr. William Burges Vice President, Development Mr. T. Alan Hoffman Vice Presrdent, Facilities and Business Services Mr. Albert K. Jones (C.P.A.) Treasurer Dr. David E. Mitchell Vice President, Educational Planning Mr. Jo.seph S. Nolan Vice President, Personnel Mr. Maurice D. Weidenthal Vice President, Public Affairs and Information Dr. Curtis F. Jefferson

ProvostlVice President, Metropolitan Campus Dr. Jan H. Jonas

ProvostlVice President, Eastern Campus Mr. Ronald M. Sobel

Provost/Vice President, Western Campus

IV.

EASTERN CAMPUS 4250 Richmond Rd. Warrensville Twp. Ohio 44122 292-2000 General calls 464-3535 Admissions

METROPOLITAN CAMPUS 2900 Community College Ave. Cleveland, Ohio 44115 348-4000 General calls 348-4400 Admissions

WESTERN CAMPUS

-

11000 W. Pleasant Valley Rd .. Parma, Ohio 44130 845-4000 General calls 842-7773 Admissions

CAREER RESOURCES INSTITUTE 4250 Richmond Rd. Warrensville Twp. Ohio 44122

292路2220

THE UNIFIED TECHNOLOGIES CENTER

To open in 1986 on the Metropolitan Campus, the center will house the major programs offered by the Career Resources Institute.

v.

Academic Calendar Fall Quarter 1984 Registration July 30路September 14 September 17 Classes begin September22 Last day to petition for winter quarter 1985 graduation September22 Last day for90 percent refund September29 Last day to withdraw from a course wifhout record September29 Last day for70 percent refund Last day for50 percent refund October6 October 20 Last day to remove incomplete grades for spring quarter 1984 or summer ~ession 1984 October20 Last day to withdraw from a course with a "W" (withdrawal) grade November 12 Veterans' Day recess November 13 Classes resume November21 Thanksgiving recess begins after last class November 26 Classes resume December5 End of fall quarter December? Final grades due by noon

Winter Quarter 1985 Registration November 13路January 4 January 7 January 12 January 12 January 19 January 19 January 21 January 22 January 26 February 9 February 9

I r

March 25 March 27

Classes begin Last day to petition for spring quarter 1985 graduation Last day for 90 percent refu nd Last day to withdraw from a course without record Last day for70 percent 'refund Martin Luther King Day recess Classes resume Last day for 50 percent refund Last day to remove incomplete grades for fall quarter 1984 Last day to withdraw from acoursewith a "W" (withdrawal) grade End of winter quarter Final grades due by noon

Spring Quarter 1985 Registration February 18路 March 29 April 1 April6 April6 April 13 April 13

VI.

Classes begin Last day to petition for summer quarter 1985 graduation Last day for90 percent refund Last day to withdraw from a course without record Last day for70 percent refund

April20 May4 May4 May 30 May 31 June17 June19 June 21 June22 June23

Last day for50 percent refund Last day to remove incomplete grades for winter quarter 1985 Last day to withdraw from a course with a "W" (withdrawal) grade Memorial Day recess Classes resume End of spring quarter Final grades due by noon Commencement exercises, Metropolitan Campus Commencement exercises, Western Campus Commencement exercises, Eastern Campus

Summer Quarter 1985 Five-and-one-half week summer session Registration May 20-June 21 June 24 June 28 June 28 July 4 July 5 July 5 July 5 July 12 August 1 August 5

Classes begin Last day to petition for fall quarter 1985 graduation Last day for90 percent refund Independence Day recess Classes resume Last day to withdraw from a course without record Last day for 50 percent refune!. Last day to withdraw from a course with a "W" (withdrawal) grade End of five-and-one-half week session Final grades due by noon

Eight week summer session Registration May 20-June 21 June24 June28 June28 July4 July5 July 5 July5 July 19 August 15 August 19

Classes begin Last day to petition for fall quarter 1985 graduation Last day for 90 percent refund Independence Day recess Classes resume Last day to withdraw from a course- without record Last day for 50 percent refund Last day to withdraw from a course with a "W" (withdrawal) grade End of eight-week session Final grades due by noon

Fall Quarter 1985 Registration to be announced September23 Classes begin September28 Last day to petition for winter quarter 1986 graduation September28 Last day for90 percent refund October5 Last day to withdraw from a course without record October5 Last day for 70 percent refund October 12 Last day for 50 percent refu nd October26 Last day to remove incomplete grades for spring quarter 1985 or summer session 1985

VII.

October 26 NGvember11 November 12 November27 December2 Oecember11 December13

Last day to withdraw from a course with a "W" (withdrawal) grade Veterans' Day recess Classes resume Thanksgiving recess begins after last class Classes resume End of fall quarter Final grades due by noon

Winter Quarter 1986 Registration to be announced January 6 January 11 January 11 January 18 January 18 January 20 January 21 January 25 February 8 February 8 March 24 March 26

Classes begin Last day to petition for spring quarter 1986 graduation Last day for90 percent refund Last day to withdraw from a course without record Last day forlO percent refund Martin Luther King Day recess Classes resume Last day for 50 percent refu nd Last day to remove incomplete grades for fall quarter 1985 Last day to withdraw from a course with a "W" (withdrawal) grade End of winter quarter Final grades due by noon

Spring Quarter 1986 Registration to be announced March 31 April5 April5 April12 April12 April 19 May3 May3 May 30 May 31 June16 June18 June20 June 21 June22

VIII.

Classes begin Last day to petition for summer quarter 1986 graduation Last day for 90 percent refund Last day to withdraw from a course without record Last day for 70 percent refund Last day for 50 percent refund Last day to remove incomplete grades for winter quarter 1986 Last day to withdraw from a course with a "W" (withdrawal) grade Memorial Day recess Classes resume End of spring quarter Final grades due by noon Commencement exercises, Eastern Campus Commencement exercises, Metropolitan Campus Commencement exercises, Western Campus

Cuyahoga Community College Cuyahoga Community College welcomes evervone who wishes to develop abilities beyond present skills. Whether students plan to continue studies at a four-year college, pursue vocational or professional programs, or undertake studies that will broaden their cultural or social lives, CCC believes it must give students a better understanding and appreciation of themselves and their environment and help them objectively evaluate new ideas and concepts. Since learning ,extends beyond the classroom and the campus, the College promotes the intellectual activities of the community to help enrich the culture of the area which it serves. The College has committed itself to extending broad educational opportunities to the youth and adults of its community. At the same time, it expects high performance from all those who participate in its programs. The College's dedication to the concept that the individual talent and fiber of America's citizenry constitute the nation's most valuable resource was incorporated into the College's mission statement developed in 1975 by faculty, staff, students, Trustees and community representatives. The mission of Cuyahoga Community College is: "To provide I.ow-cost, quality, lifelong educational opportunities accessible with a minimum of barrier.s to all, while assuming leadership, ina metropolitan multi-racial setting, for meeting the changing educational needs and thereby improving the quality of life of the individual and the community."

Philosophy The College's Official Plan includes the following statements of educational philosophy: "The strength of a community is the educated citizens who recognize and respect the dignity and work of themselves and others; all citizens should have available to them learning opportunities required to assist them to make meaningful contributions to their fellow citizens and communities. "The opportunity for continuing educational development should be readily available and accessible to every person seeking education--without regard to race, ethnic origin, religion, sex, handicap or level of income, which should not be impediments to an individual's growth and development. Learning is a lifelong process that helps individuals dev.elop their potentials, increase their awareness of and capabilities for making reasoned choices and accept responsibility for personal actions in community settings. Differences among persons, particularly in goals, learning styles and attitudes, require i:I variety of means of satisfying educational needs of individuals. "The ColI'ege environment should be responsive to the varied educational and other needs of the students and other constituen-

cies that it serves. College leadership shou.ld assume the responsibility for identifying and responding to these needs. _ "Cuyahoga Community Colleg~ is an essential .c omponent of the total educational system that eXists to serve the lifelong educational needs of citizens of Cuyahoga County."

Objectives The Board of Trustees has adopted the following objectives for students enrolled at Cuyahoga Community College: " To see one's cultural heritage in its historical perspective. To live effectively in accordance with the condition of one's physical environment. To recognize and guard the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a free society. To guide one's life by sound moral and spiritual values. To appreciate and participate in creative activities. To achieve satisfactory personal, social and community relationships. To apply critical and discriminating thought to the solution of problems. To accept responsibility for one's decisions. To develop the basic skills of communication. To enjoy the benefits of a rewarding and productive vocation . To acquire a positive attitude toward, and strengthened foundation for, lifelong learning." In pursuit of these objectives, the College offers a diverse curriculum. It maintains an outstanding faculty whose primary duties consist of their teaching assignments. It has accepted the challenge of providing an environment conducive to learning, with special emphasis on library and laboratory resources. The College encourages independence of thought and action as essential ingredients of a functioning democracy, streSSing the development of value judgments and self-discipline. Cuyahoga Community College expects all students to achieve competence in the fun.damental processes of reading, writing, speaking, listening and computation. Another prime concern of the College is that students develop an awareness of the unique values that are our national heritage, including the primacy of moral concerns. The College expects its students to manifest an increasing sensitivity to those responsibilities inherent in American citizenship. As one way of fulfilling these responsibilities, the College seeks to inspire each student to achieve and maintain a high level of occupational proficiency. Furthermore, Cuyahoga Community College expects all students to show their respect for educational opportunities provided to them through appropriate behavior. Students are to attend classes regularly, display exemplary conduct and apply themselves diligently in the quest for the wisdom and knowledge upon which their contributions to society will be based.

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Rights and Responsibilities of the College Community In December 1968, the College's Board of Trustees adopted the Policy on Rights and Responsibilities developed and recommended by a committee on student conduct composed of representatives of the College's student body, Board of Trustees, faculty and administration. The policy, codified in response to a directive by the 107th General Assembly of the State of Ohio, was prepared in an effort to encourage an environment conducive to the growth and development of all members of the College community. In preparation of the document, . a positive attitude and a consistency with the mores of American society were maintained. The policy stresses the .responsibilities necessary to maintain freedom, and establishes and- protects the rights of all members of the College community. The College's Policy on Rights and Responsibilities may be found in the Student Handbook.

History On Sept. 23, 1963, the largest first day enrollment for a community college in the nation's history took place at C!Jyahoga Community College's first home, the 19th century Brownell school building leased from the Cleveland Board of Education in downtown 路Cleveland. The initial enrollment was just over 3,000 students. Today, the College serves over 40,000 students each year. Now the third largest college in Ohio and the largest in Greater Cleveland, CCC has expanded to three modern campuses in downtown Cleveland, Parma and Warrensville Township.

Eastern Campus The Eastern Campus in Warrensville Township, opened its permanent, three-level facility in the fall of 1981 after a 10-year residence in temporary facilities. Its mall design brings a welcome informality to an educational setting. Modern classrooms, laboratories, a computer center, a library, a gymnasium, an indoor jogging track, an auditorium and a cafeteria are amon路g Eastern's many features. A complete Child Care Center is available for students with young children. The campus is easily reached from interstates 271 and 480. Lighted parking is provided at the Eastern Campus' parking lot located next to the facility.

Metropolitan Campus The Metropolitan Campus opened in the fall of 1969. Located in downtown Cleveland, the modern, 10-building complex was the College's first permanent campus. It is easily reached by car from interstates 90, 77 and 71 . Regional Transit Authority buses stop at the campus. The RTA Campus Rapid Station stop is nearby at E. 34 St. 3

The campus has outstanding science, engineering and health career laboratories. Its computer center, theatre and athletic facil.ities are among the finest in Greater Cleveland. A complete Child Care Center is available for students with young children. Parking is available in an underground garage and in outdoor lots at the west end of the campus.

Western Campus The Western Campus opened in 1966 in the former Crile Veterans, Hospital quarters in Parma. The facilities were replaced in 1975 with a modern, six-building inter-connected complex. At the center of the campus is a three-story galleria, a glass-roofed mall surrounded by student service offices, the library and cafeteria. Other facilities include a computer center, an indoor pool, a gymnasium , an outdoor track, athletic fields and a theatre. A complete Child Care Center is available for studeots with young children. The Western Campus is easily reached via interstates 71 and 77. Parking is available in outdoor lots adjacent to the building .

Career Resources Institute The Career Resources Institute (CRI) is the unit of the College responsible for developin9 programs that link with business, industry, labor and government. It also has a longstanding commitment to community service programs and continuing education . Its programs are administered through four divisions: the Career Development Institute, the Workforce Development Center, the Business Resource Technology Center and the Continuing Education Center. CRI programming is explained in more detail in the Curriculum section of this catalog .

Accreditations and Memberships Cuyahoga Community College is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. In addition , a number of the College's career programs are approved or accredited by appropriate specialized associations or agencies. These are the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association, National League of Nursing, National Shorthand Reporters' Association , American Council of Dental Education of the American Dental Association , and the American Physical Therapy Association . The following organ izations are among those in which the College holds institutional memberships: Ameri can Association of Comm unity and Junior Colleges Cleveland Commission on Higher Education Council for the Ad vancement and Support of Educati on League for Innovation in the Community College Ohio College Association Ohi o Tech nical and Community College Association 4

College Foundation The Cuyahoga Community College Foundation was chartered in 1973. By seeking gifts, building endowments and expanding partnerships for the College, the Foundation will create opportunities for human and regional development through the students and staff of Cuyahoga Community College. The Foundation is dedicated to supporting the College's vigorous pursuit of educational , cultural , social and economic development excellence. Information on membership and activities is available from the Foundation office by phoning 348-4851 .

Admission, Fees, Financial Aid Admission to Cuyahoga Community College is open to ALL high school graduates as well as to non-high school graduates, 18 years of age or older. Submit your application to the Office of Admissions and Records at the campus of your choice. A nonrefundable fee of $10 must accompany each application. It is not necessary to enroll in a specific program to be admitted to the College. Students can enroll in as few as one or two courses to pursue a general interest or, they can enroll in a two-year program to prepare to transfer to a four-year college or choose a two-year career / occupational program to prepare for a job upon completion. THE GENERAL ADMISSIONS POLICY OF THE COLLEGE DOES NOT ENSURE ADMITTANCE TO A PARTICULAR COURSE OR PROGRAM. In some instances, certain courses may be restricted to program majors. Some students may be requested to enroll in special courses to eliminate deficiencies in academic preparation. You may attend more than one campus or move from campus to campus, but you should submit your application and pay fees at the campus where you expect to enroll for the majority of your courses. If you wish to have your permanent records transferred from one campus to another you should complete a CHANGE OF STUDENT RECORDS form in the Admissions and Records Office at the campus where your records are located.

Eastern Campus, 4250 Richmond Road, Warrensville Township, Ohio 44122, (216) 464-3535. Metropolitan Campus, 2900 Community College Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115, (216) 241-5365. Western Campus, 11000 West Pleasant Valley Road, Parma, Ohio 44130, (216) 842-7773.

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How To Apply 1. Submit a completed APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION form. 2. Submit a $10 application fee. 3. Submit an official high school transcript. (Ask your high school to forward this transcript directly to the Office of Admissions and Records at the campus you plan to attend.) 4. Submit official transcripts from ' all colleges and universities you have attended. (Ask your former college or university to forward these transcripts directly to the Office of Admissions and Records at the campus you plan to attend.) 5. Submit a letter of permission if you are currently enrolled at another college or university and plan to continue enrollment there. (A letter of permission, which should be submitted before or at the time of registration , is necessary each time you enroll as a transient student at CCC .) 6. Consult with a counselor before completing admission procedures if you are 18 years of age or older and have not been awarded a high school diploma.

Credit In Escrow Admission The Credit in Escrow Program provides opportunities for high school students to enroll in college courses in subject areas that are not available to them at their local schools and/or in subject areas in which the high school sequence of courses has been completed . Cuyahoga Community College credit will be awarded for successful completion of such course work. The Credit in Escrow Program benefits students in several ways. Students take courses not available in their schools that complement their educational program. This enriches the high school experience and encourages exploration of new fields through exposure to collegiate teaching methods, course content and procedures. Students should consult with a high school counselor or a CCC Office of Admissions and Records representative for more information .

Fee Schedule Cuyahoga Community College, supported by the taxpayers of Cuyahoga County and assisted by the state, maintains modest ir)structional and general fees, both of which are subject to review during any academic year by the Board of Trustees and may be changed at its discretion with the approval of the Ohio Board of Regents. New students must submit a $10 fee with their application. The fee does not apply to former students who are returning to classes. . Instructional Fee per Quarter Hour of Credit Cuyahoga County Residents . . ....... ... . ... .... ... $18 Other Ohio Residents ..................... ....... $25

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Out-of-State Residents

. . .... . . . ........... . . ... . . $41

General Fee Per Quarter Hour of Cwdit Cuyahoga County Residents .. . . . .. . .. ... . .... . . .. . . $2 Other Ohio Residents ..... . . . ... . ..... . ... . . . . . ... $2 Out-of-State Residents ... . . . . . .. .. . .. . . .. . ... . . . .. $2

Maximum Quarterly Fees (Instructional & General) Cuyahoga County Residents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $300 Other Ohio Residents .. .. . ... .... ....... ... .. . .. $405 Out-of-State Residents . . .. . . .......... . ......... $645

Supplementary Course and Incidental Fees In addition to the general and instructional fees, students may be charged supplementary course and incidental fees due to the nature of certain cou rses.

Refunds FULL REFUNDS of instructional fees for credit courses and non-credit offerings will be granted if a student officially withdraws prior to the first day of class or if the College cancels a course or does not permit a student to enter or continue in a course, except for disciplinary reasons. PARTIAL REFUNDS for credit courses during the regular academic year will be granted if a student officially withdraws during the refund period (see the following schedule) . Through Through Through After the

the end of the end of the end of end of the

the first week of class . . . . . . . . . .. 90% the second week of class ... . . ... 70% the third week of class .......... 50% third week of class ........ no refunds.

A 90 percent refund will be made for official withdrawal from scheduled non-credit courses that meet in class sessions one or more times through the term if requested by the end of the of 路the first week of class. A 90 percent refund will be made路 for official withdrawal from workshops, seminars and mini-courses if requested before the time of the first meeting. Refunds during the summer session or any session having more than or less than 11 weeks will be prorated . No refunds will be granted if a 路s tudent is dismissed for disCiplinary reasons or if the student has financial obligations to the College.

Program Adjustment (Drop/Add) Any registered student who finds it necessary to make a schedule change can do so from the time of registration through the program adjustment period . The full fee-will be charged for courses

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added . A full refund will be granted for courses dropped prior to the first week of class. A 90 percent refund will be granted for courses dropped during the first week of class.

Financial Aid Aid consisting of scholarships, grants, loans and part-time employment is designed to supplement a student's own resources. Financial aid may be available for an entire academic year or for part of the year. Primary considerations in selecting aid recipients are financial need and the potential to succeed in an academic program at the College. Some types of financial aid are based on criteria other than financial need. No student who is interested in CCC should hesitate to apply to the College due to 'Iack of financial resources. Application Procedures for Financial Aid Students applying for assistance are required to complete an Application for Admission and the Application for Federal Student Aid or other approved need analysis forms. All application forms for financial aid programs listed below are available In the Student Financial Aid Office at each campus. Upon request, the Office of Student Financial Aid at any CCC campus will fo rward a brochure explaining, in greater detail, financial aid opportunities at Cuyahoga Community College. Scholarships and Grants: Funds to support CCC Financial Aid Programs are obtained primarily from various government sources . Additional contributions are received from individuals and groups who believe in the work 路 of the College and who wish to support its programs. Cuyahoga Community College is committed to administer its Financial Aid Programs in accordance with the purposes set by those who provide the means to help deserving and eligible students. In selecting aid recipients, consideration is given to the degree of need . Because scholarship and grant funds are limited , a student's entire need cannot always be met from anyone source . Therefore, several types of aid may be combined into an aid package which represents the most beneficial assistance the College can offer within the limits of existing student aid resources. Financial aid will be used solely for expenses related to initial or continued attendance at CCC . Ohio Instructional Grants Program (DIG): This program provides financial aid for full-time (12 quarter credits or more) college students who are Ohio residen ts. Grants are award ed solely on the basis of financial need and cover all or part of the instructional fees. Students should apply for this assistance directly to the Ohio Board of Regents. Appl ications may be obtained at local high schools or in the Student Financial Aid Office at a CCC campus. Pelf Grants: The federal government makes funds available for 8

tuition and other college-related expenses to needy undergraduate students who are United States citizens or have permanent or immigration visas, registered for no less than six credit hours, and show evidence of academic or creative promise and the capability of maintaining satisfactory progress in their course of study. Applications are available in the Student Financial Aid Office at each campus. Completed applications must be mailed directly to Los Angeles, Calif., for determination of grant eligibility. A certificate of eligibility will be mailed to the applicant approximately six weeks after the application is received. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG): The SEOG Program provides grants to students who demonstrate financial need to help meet their costs of postsecondary education . SEOG recipients are eligible to receive awards from this program for the period required to complete the first undergraduate bachelor's degree. Guaranteed Student Loans (GSL): Undergraduate students may borrow an amount, not to exceed the cost of education , up to $2,500 per year to a maximum indebtedness of $12,500 under the GSL program. During the in-school period, and through the grace period after the borrower leaves school, all interest is paid by the federal government on eligible loans. Long term repayment, currently at 9 percent simple interest, begins six months after the student leaves school. Application forms are available at banks, savings and loan offices and credit unions. National Direct Student Loans (NDSL): Students registered for at least six quarter cred its who are in good academic standing are eligible to apply for this need-based program. Repayment of the loan currently begins six months after a student graduates or leaves school. The current interest rate is 5 percent. Interested students should contact the campus Financial Aid Office. All loans are contingent on available funds. Nursing Student Loans (NSL): Students who are registered for six quarter cred its or more and are pursuing the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing may apply to this need-based loan program. Interested students should contact the campus Financial Aid Offi ce. College Work-Study Program (CWSP): This federal program provides part-time employment at th e College for students needing current income to pursue their education . To be el igible, students must be enrolled fo r si x or more cred its and submit the appropriate financial aid applications.

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路EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS ,

11

Degrees Granted Cuyahoga Community College ~ffers thre~ types of a~sociate degree programs: (1) in arts and SCience, (2) In the technical and career areas, and (3) in labor studies. T~e arts and sCience de~rees include courses in humanities, social SCiences, arts, natural sCience and mathematics. The technical and career programs concentrate on studies in business, health careers, engineering technologies and public service careers such as law enfOr?ement. A .new associate of technical studies degree allows students to combine courses from any two technical programs to create a degree that focuses on a special interest. Or they can pursue the degree through combining training received at other post-secondary institutions with technical program courses taken at CCC. The labor studies degree is offered for students interested in collective bargaining, labor law and other facets of the labor movement.

Arts and Sciences The Arts and Sciences curriculum includes a range of course offerings in liberal arts and sciences for all students at the College. Students may enroll in a sequence of courses to earn either the Associate of Arts degree or the Associate of Science degree. A large number of students plan programs that will to transfer to four-year colleges and universities. These students enroll in what is usually referred to as the Transfer, or University Parallel, curriculum that parallels courses offered during the first two years at a four-year institution . Most of the credits earned in this curriculum r)1ay be transferred to colleges and universities as the first and second years of a baccalaureate degree program. Students are urged to consult early with a counselor to plan for transferring to any four-year college. CCC's arts and sciences curriculum includes many courses designed to prepare students for upper division study in business, education, engineering, social sciences, public services, health careers, law and the arts. A specially designed general transfer sequence of courses is also available for students who have not decided upon a specific major but intend to transfer their credits toward a four-year degree. Requirements for the first two years of study vary at each fouryear school. Therefore, students who intend to transfer their credits should plan their courses with a CCC counselor to be sure they will meet the current requirements at four-year colleges and universities.

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Associate of Arts Degree Degree candidates at Cuyahoga Community College must be in good standing . An Associate of Arts degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements: A. General Graduation Requirements 1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a C (2.00) average for all work at the College. B. Specific Graduation Requirements 1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by completion of the following sequence: English 101, 102, 103. 2. The completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101, 102 and 103. b. History 151, 152 and 153. c. History 170, 171 and 172. d. Political Science (any three courses). e. Social Science 103 or Sociology 101, Social Science 104 and 105. f. Sociology 101 and 102 plus one additional course in sociology or anthropology. g. Anthropology 101 or 102 or 103 plus any two additional courses chosen from either anthropology or sociology. 3. The completion of Health 101 or three quarter hours of physical education . 4. Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following : a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT. b. Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College. c. Achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test administered .by the College. C. Elective Graduation Requirements 1. A total of no fewer than 18 quarter hours of electives to be selected from the area of humanities. 2. A total of no fewer than 10 quarter hours to be selected from the areas of science and mathematics. 3. A total of no fewer than six quarter hours to be selected from the area of social sciences. Courses used to satisfy the requirement specified in paragraph 8-2 may not be used again to meet this elective requirement.

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Associate of Science Degree Degree candidates at Cuyahoga Community C~lIege must be in good standing. An Associate of ~cience ?egree ~III be granted to the student completing the following requirements. A. General Graduation Requirements 1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a C (2.00) average for work at the College.

B. Specific Graduation Requirements

1. The completion of no fewer than 18 quarter hours selected from the areas of sci~nce and mathematics. Students must complete a sequence of courses in both the mathematics and science areas at course levels not lower than those represented in the sequences listed below. Course sequence selection should relate to the upper division degree objective of the student. a. Biology 101, 102 and 103. b. Chemistry 101 and 102. c. Physics 101, 102 and 103. d. Physical Science 101, 102 and 103. e. Mathematics 121, 122 and 151 or equivalent. f. Mathematics 105, 115 and 151 or equivalent. g. Mathematics 109, 110 and 151 or equivalent. 2. Minimum competency in communication as verified by completion of the following sequence: English 101, 102 and 103. 3. The completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101, 102 and 103. b. History 151, 152 and 153. c. History 170, 171 and 172. d. Political Science (any three courses). e. Social Science 103 or Sociology 101, Social Science 104 and 105. f. Sociology 101 and 102 plus one additional course in sociology or anthropology. g. Anthropology 101 or 102 or 103 plus any two additional courses chosen from either anthropology or sociology. 4. The completion of Health 101 or three quarter hours of physical education.

C. Elective Graduation Requirements 1. A total of no fewer than 10 quarter hours to be selected from the area of humanities. 2. A total of no fewer than six quarter hours to be selected from the area of social sciences. Courses used to satisfy the requirement specified in B-3 above may not be used again to meet this elective requirement.

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Transfer Requirements Transfer (or University Parallel) courses in liberal arts, sciences and professional fields such as Business Administration, Education (see specifie state certification requirements), Pre-law, Pre-chi ropractic, Pre-pharmacy or Pre-medicine are planned in consultation with the student's counselor. The courses provided by the College to serve transfer purposes are designed to parallel those that comprise the first two years of study leading to the baccalaureate degree at a four-year college or university. It is the responsibility of the student to become acquainted with and follow the requirements of the institution to which the student intends to transfer. In general, transfer students specialize at the senior institution during the junior and senior years. During the freshman and sophomore years, students typically select courses from the following subject areas. English College Composition Humanities Foreign Language, Humanities, Journalism, English (Literature), Art, Dance, Music, Theatre Arts, Philosophy and Speech Social Sciences Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology and Social Science Natural Science and Mathematics Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physical Science, Mathematics and Physics Electives General Studies, Health and Physical Education

Students planning to pursue a baccalaureate degree in business administration need at least a year of college-level mathematics as preparation for later courses involving statistics and other quantitative methods. Engineering students nl?ed a concentration of courses in higher mathematics. Science or pre-medical students need a series of biology and chemistry courses. The College offers preparatory or refresher courses in English composition, reading comprehension, mathematics and speech communication for students who are deficient in those basic skills. Such courses are not designed for transfer but are intended to provide students with an opportunity to improve their skills. It should be noted that Cuyahoga Community College is on the quarter system. However, a number of other institutions of higher education are on the semester system. Transferring to schools on the semester system entails converting quarter hours to semester hours (nine quarter hours equates to six semester hours). Study on a full- or part-time basis, day or evening, is possible when you enroll in a transfer program.

15

Associate of Arts and Associate of Science Degree: Suggested Program for the Transfer Student with an Undetermined Major This plan meets the distribution of 90-quarter credits exclusive of physical education recommended by the Ohio Board of Regents for receipt of the Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degree. The Associate of Arts or the Associate of Science degree is normally the half-way point in the progression toward a bachelor's degree. It is the responsibility of the student to include courses that meet the requirements of Cuyahoga Community College and the particular four-year college to which the student desires to transfer. A conference with a CCC counselor is necessary to determine the current requirements of the four-year colleges: however, the acceptance of CCC courses is determined by the four-year college at the time of transfer. ENGLISH (9 credits) English 101, 102 and 103. SOCIAL SCIENCES (15 credits) 1. Completion of one of the following sequences: History 101, 102 and 103. History 151, 152 and 153. History 170, 171 and 172. Political Science (any three courses). Social Science 103 or Sociology 101, Social Science 104 and 105. Sociology 101, 102 plus one additional course in sociology or anthropology. . Anthropology 101 or 102 or 103 plus any two additional courses chosen from either anthropology or sociology. 2. Electives totaling 6 credits from Social Sciences HUMANITIES (10-18 credits depending on major and degree) Courses selected from art, literature (see English), journalism, music, philosophy, speech, theatre, dance, foreign languages or humanities. SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS (10-18 credits depending on major and degree) 1. Completion of one of the following sequences: Biology 101, 102, 103 Biology 111, 112, 113 Chemistry 101, 102, 111, 112, 113 Physics 101, 102, 103 Physical Science 101, 102, 103, 107, 108, 109 2. Any approved transferable three-course mathematics sequenc~

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3 credits) Physical Education credit courses or Health 101 GENERAL ELECTIVES To complete 93 credit hours, select additional electives from Humanities, Social Sciences, Mathematics and Science that do not duplicate any of the above courses.

16

Career Programs The Career and Technical/Occupational preparation programs meet the ever-changing needs of the local community for technicians and paraprofessionals trained at the associate degree level. Specialized instruction is offered in more than 40 occupational fields. Many students enroll in a sequence leading to an associate degree; others take shorter sequences leading to a certificate of proficiency or achievement award. Others take only a few courses in order to refresh or improve the knowledge and skills they already possess. Career and technical/occupational programs are provided in business, engineering, health careers and public service technologies. Study on a full- or part-time basis, day or evening, is possible in the career fields.

Two Plus Two Option An option in some career programs enables students to earn an associate degree at CCC and then transfer to a four-year institution to work toward a baccalaureate degree. Credits earned at CCC in this 2 plus 2 concept are fully transferable toward a four-year degree in a specialized field at cooperating four-year colleges and universities. Students should consult with a CCC counselor if interested in the 2 plus 2 option. In all cases, knowledgeable professionals are available at CCC to help students identify occupational goals in line with their interests and abilities. In each area, an advisory committee works with the College to ensure that the academic preparation of students is as job-related as possible. These civic-minded representatives of local business, labor, industry, government, health and public service agencies assist the College in identifying needs and developing new areas of career preparation. Programs are planned not just for today, but for tomorrow, so that students may anticipate realistic opportunities for employment following the attainment of their educational objectives.

17

Health Careers

Dental Hygiene Dental Laboratory Technology Dietetic Technology Emergency Medical Technology Medical Assisting Medical Laboratory Technology Medical Record Technology Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology Ophthalmic Dispensing (Opticianry) Physical Therapist Assisting Technology Physician Assistant Physician's Surgical Assistant Radiography Registered Nursing Respiratory Therapy Technology Business Technologies

Accounting Business Management Commercial Art Court and Conference Reporting Data Processing Financial Management Hospitality Management - Culinary Art - Food Service Management - Hotel-Restaurant - Housekeeping Management Interior Design Technology Marketing Office Administration Purchasing Management Real Estate Small Business Management Transportation Engineering and .Industrial Technologies

Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology Industrial Management Manufacturing and Industrial Technology Mechanical Engineering Technology Production and Inventory Management Public Service Technologies

Aviation Technology Community Mental Health Technology Early Childhood Education Fire Technology Graphic Communications Management and Technology Labor Studies Law Enforcement - Corrections - Security Administration Library Iinstructional Media Technology -Audio-Visual Communications - Library Iinstructional Media

Short-Term Career Programs Health Careers

Electrocardiograph (ECG) Technology Emergency Medical Technology-Ambulance Emergency Medical Technology-Paramedic Laboratory Phlebotomy Medical Assisting Medical Office Receptionist Medical Terminology Medical Transcription Optical Mechanics* Respiratory Therapy*

Architectural and Construction Engineering. Technology *These are 45-hour Certificate of Proficiency programs.

18

Associate of Applied Business Degree Degree candidates at Cuyahoga Community College must be in good standing. An Associate of Applied Business degree will be' granted to the student completing the' following requirements: A. General Graduation Requirements 1. Satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 quarter hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College: A student is to attain a C (2.00) average for all work at the College. 8. Specific Graduation Requirements 1. Minimum competency in communication as v.erified by one of the following sequences: a. English 101 , 102 and 103. b. English 101, 102 and Speech Communication 100 or 101 . c. English 099 and 101 . d. English 099, Speech 100 or 101 . e. English 098 and 099. f. English 097, 098 and 099. 2. The completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101, 102 and 103. b. History 151, 152 and 153. c. History 170, 171 and 172. d. Political Science (any three courses). e. Social Science 103 or Sociology 101, Social Science 104 and 105. f. Geography 103, History 164, Economics 151 or History 251 . 3. The completion of Health 101 or three quarter hours of physical education. 4. Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following : a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT. b. Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga CommunitY. College. c. Achievement 路 of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test administered by the College. C. Elective Graduation Requirements 1. A total of no fewer than 18 quarter hours of eleGtives to be selected from any two of the following three areas: a. Humanities. b. Science and Mathematics. c. Social Sciences. 2. No fewer than nine quarter hours may be chosen from any one area. Courses used to satisfy the requirements specified in paragraphs B-1 or B-2 may not be used again to meet this elective requirement. In addition to the preceding requirements the student is to fulfill curricula requirements for the particular program quarter sequences listed in this catalog . -

19

Associate of Applied Science Degree Degree candidates at Cuyahoga C~mmun~ty College must .be in good standing. An Associate of Applied s~lence ~egree wIll be granted to the student completing the following reqUIrements: A. General Graduation Requirements 1. The satisfactory completion of no fev.:er than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 quarter hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a C (2.00) average for all work at the College. B. Specific Graduation Requirements 1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by one of the following sequences: a. English 101, 102 and 103. b. English 101, 102 and Speech Communication 100 or 101. c. English 099 and 101. d. English 099 and Speech Communication 101. e. English 098 and 099. f. English 097, 098 and 099. 2. The completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101, 102 and 103. b. History 151, 152 and 153. c. History 170, 171 and 172. d. Political SCience (any three courses). e. Social Science 103 or Sociology 101, Social Science 104 and 105. . 3. The completion of Health 101 or. three quarter hours of physical education. 4. Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following: a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT. b. Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College. c. Achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test administered by the College. C. Elective Graduation Requirements

1. A total of no fewer than 18 quarter hours of electives to be selected from any two of the following three areas: a. Humanities. b. Science and Mathematics. c. Social Sciences. 2. No fewer than nine quarter hours may be chosen from any one area. Courses used to satisfy the preceding 8-1 or 8-2 requirement may not be used again to meet this elective requirement. In addition to the preceding requirements, a student is to fulfill the curricula requirements for the particular program quarter sequences as listed in this catalog .

20

Associate of Labor Studies Degree Degree candidates at Cuyahoga Community College must be in good standing. An Associate of Labor Studies degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements: A. General Graduation Requirements

1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 quarter hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the above 93 quarter hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a C (2.00) average for all work at the College. B. Specific Graduation Requirements

1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by one of the following sequences: a. English 101, 102 and 103. b. English 101, 102 and Speech Communication 100 or 101. c. English 099 and 101. d. English 099 and Speech Communication 100 or 101 : e. English 098 and 099. f. English 097, 098 and 099. 2. The completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101, 102 and 103. b. History 151, 152 and 153. c. History 170, 171 and 172. d. Political Science (any three courses). e. Social Science 103 or Sociology 101, Social Science 104 and 105. 3. The completion of Health 101 or three quarter hours of physical education. 4. Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following: a. A satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT. b. Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College. c. Achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test administered by the College.

C. Elective Graduation Requirements 1. A total of no fewer than 18 quarter hours of electives to be selected from any two of the following three areas: a. Humanities. b. Science and Mathematics. c. Social Sciences. 2. No fewer than nine quarter hours may be chosen from any one area. Courses used to satisfy the preceding 8-1 or 8-2 requirement may not be used again to meet this elective requirement. In addition to the preceding requirements, a student is to fulfill the curricula requirements for the Labor Studies quarter sequence listed in this catalog.

21

Associate of Technical Study Degree Degree candidates at Cuyahoga Community College must be in good standing. An Associate of Technical Study degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements: A. General Graduation Requirements

1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 93 credit hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 30 of the preceding 93 credit hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a C (2.00) average for all work at the College. B. Specific Graduation Requirements

1. Completion of a minimum of 45 credit hours in technical studies which are clearly identifiable with a career objective and are composed of a combination of technical courses drawn from two or more technical programs currently offered by the College; or awarded by Cuyahoga Community College for completed training received by a student at other public, private, or proprietary postsecondary institutions, postsecondary vocational centers and schools conducted by business or industry judged by Cuyahoga Community College as meeting its academic standards. 2. Completion of a minimum of 12 credits of mathematics, biological sciences, and/or physical science, of which nine must be related to, or supportive of, the technical component of the degree program . A minimum of three credits in mathematics at the level of MATH-102, or higher, is required. 3. Completion of ENG-101, plus an additional six credit hours from any combination of the following: ENG-102, 103, and 200-level courses; Speech 100 or higher; business communica1ions; and technical writing. 4. Completion of a minimum of 1路2 credit hours selected from the areas of the social sciences and humanities, with a minimum of three hours selected from each of these two areas. 5. Completion of HLTH-101 or three credit hours of physical education . C. Elective Graduation Requirements

Completion of a minimum of 12 quarter hours of coursework that shall be related to the occupational objective of the" student or basic to the further development of technical competencies. Note: students must have an approved educational pla'n in order to be eligible for any A.T.S. program. The process to gain approval begins with an appointment with a college counselor.

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Certificates and Awards of S-t udy The Board of Trustees of Cuyahoga Community College has authorized the following certificates and awards to complement the College's associate degree programs.

Certificate of Proficiency The Certificate of Proficiency is an award which recognizes the attainment of specified levels of proficiency in an occupational field which can be demonstrated by a student who successfully completes a prescribed educational program consisting of a minimum of 45 college credit hours designed to develop specific skills and knowledge. Each program which offers a Certificate of Proficiency is approved through the established College curriculum process and by the Board of Trustees. Requirements for the award of such certificates are uniformly applied throughout the College; the issuing authority is the district president.

Achievement Award The Achievement Award is a written record of achievement, attendance or performance which may be granted to students who have successfully completed a credit or non-credit 路course, seminar or group of courses which have been established for a specified purpose. The Achievement Award is approved and issued by a provost. Approval by the Board of Trustees is not required.

Competency Award The Competency Award is a written record of accomplishment by students who have demonstrated their mastery of special skills or knowledge in accordance with pre-specified . performance standards defined by the College which result from the student's participation in either a credit or non-credit educational course or series of courses presented by the College. Levels of competency or skills accomplishment are indicated on the award itself with a listing evidencing courses completed, speeds attained or other relevant standards of performance. The Competency Award is approved by the provost having lead responsibility for the program. Appr.oval by the Board of Tr.ustees is not required. 23

Appreciation Award The Award of Appreciation is issued in recognition of a service to the College or a unit of the College by a n<:>n-college ef!1ployee or group which is deemed significant by a cabm~t-Ievel officer .of the College. The award is issued at the conclusion of the period of service performed. The Award of Appreciation is approved and issued by a campus provost or an executive officer of the College. Approval by the Board of Trustees is not required.

Career Resources Institute The Career Resources Institute (CRI) offers a variety of educational and occupational training/retraining opportunities to foster, enhance and support economic renewal in Greater Cleveland. CRI is responsible for developing these innovative programs through linkages with business, industry, labor and government. With special emphasis on new technology, CRI researches, tests and develops traditional and non-traditional programs that provide workable alternatives that respond to emerging educational and training needs. The focal point for these programs will be the College's Unified Technologies Center, scheduled to open on the Metropolitan Campus in 1986. In addition, the College's longstanding commitment to community service programs and continuing education is realized through CRI. The Institute's services are delivered through four divisions.

Career Development Institute The Career Development Institute is a comprehensive career assessment, counseling, job development and placement service. CDI is designed to assist unemployed persons, dislocated workers, out-of-school youth and people who are employed but feel that a career change is necessary. The Institute is the entry point for persons beginning training and retraining programs in the College. It develops programs for business and industry as well as programs for public sector agencies and organizations.

Economic Development Center The Economic Development Center offers custom-designed training programs for production workers, technicians and first-line supervisor.s in business and industry. These programs c~n be combined with a company's in-house training activities or with the College's associate degree technology programs. Access to

24

technological research from Ohio universities and colleges is also available through the center. .

Business Resource Technology Center The Business Resource Technology Center (BRTC) focuses on increasing area economic development by providing small busi- â&#x20AC;˘ nesses with effective management assistance, education and training. BRTC assists these organizations with the exchange of current technical information through the Ohio Technology Transfer Organization (OTTO). Information is obtained as a result of OTTO's ability to act as a " clearinghouse," accessing computer data from institutional, local and referral sources of assistance and information . BRTC also offers international programs which aid small businesses in expanding their services to overseas markets.

Continuing Education Division The Division of Continuing Education brings credit and noncredit classes to various location~ in Cuyahoga County to meet a variety of needs. Based on the concept that education is a lifelong process and commitment, this division serves students of all ages with classes close to their homes, their workplace and at the College's three campuses. These convenient locations increase the opportunity for skill development, professional and personal development and for beginning degree programs. In addition, Continuing Education offers seven "special programs" designed to meet the needs of specific target audiences. Elders' Program comprises a comprehensive range of educational services for older adults, including seminars, workshops, special events 'and community-based and on-campus classes. Project Talent Search provides disadvantaged minorities with academic, career and financial aid counseling as well as post-secondary placement services. Special Services extends support and guidance to the handicapped, persons of limited English-speaking abilities, students with financial needs and students who require unique assistance to successfully continue college work. Women's Programs provide professional and personal counseling, courses, seminars and workshops for the female population. These programs are initiated through the Displaced Homemakers Program--designed for women who have suddenly become independent--and Women Focus, a program with skills and training opportunities for those who wish to enhance their professional development. Youth Development Programs offer junior and senior high school and out of school youth academic and support services to assist them in completing high school and continuing on to college. Veterans Upward Bound presents Vietnam and Vietnam era Vet-

25

erans an array of services that includes tutoring, advising, counseling and career planning. Human Development focuses on programs for adults and children highlighting topics on family relations, child rearing and interpersonal behavior.

26

Education Services Developmental Education Services The mission of the College to provide open and equal access and opportunity for education to all persons in the local community carries with it an implicit commitment to provide educational services and programs supportive of each student's needs and capabilities. The College's Developmental Education Services program offers students the opportunity to improve skills, develop strengths and talents and correct weaknesses. The services include tutoring, access to educational technology, alternative instructional opportunities, mini-courses and workshops and print and media learning aids.

Courses by Television A variety of introductory-level television credit courses are available equivalent to those taught on the campus, in many cases by the same full-time faculty. These professionally produced television courses take students to distant locations, dramatize events and feature on-location interviews with experts and a program host knowledgeable in the subject area. Students may register for courses by television using the same registration procedures that apply to the campuses or off-campus credit sites. Students registering for other college credit courses should register for TV courses at the same time. Students must attend a number of required seminars conducted by full-time CCC instructors assigned to each course who will be available for telephone and in-person consultation . Midterm and final examinations will be given.

Cultural Heritage Education In accordance with Cuyahoga Community College's mission statement, cultural heritage is recognized by the College as a prime ingredient in educational programming. Courses are taught in French, German, Hebrew, Italian and Spanish. Intercultural communication (Speech 251) is offered, as are non-credit courses on various cultural topics, such as foreign language instruction and the history of Cleveland. The College was a partner with the Cleveland Public Library's Cleveland Heritage Program that sponsored ethnic and cultural history projects in Cleveland neighborhoods. One product of this joint effort is the anticipated development of a new credit history course on the cultural heritage of Cleveland.

27

PROGRAM COURSE PLANS

29

Accounting Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Accounting

There is an increasing demand for the services of accountants in business, industry and government. Highly qualified accountants are well prepared for promotion to management positions of responsibility. Career opportunities are available in the financial area of accounting as well as in the administration of other business activities such as . sales, procurement, credit and collections, business research, data compilation and reporting . This curriculum prepares individuals for immediate employment, working under supervision in the preceding areas. It also provides a sound basis for advancement as experience and further education are 路acquired. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business Accounting ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting

3 3

3 3 4 17

SECOND' QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Data Processing DATA-110 Introduction to Computers and Their Use Accounting ACCT-122 Principles of Accounting

THIRD QUARTER English or Speech (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' SOCial Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration OI>.DM-104 Machine Calculations Accounting ACCT-221 Intermediate Accounting

Cr. Hrs. 3

3

4 4 15 Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 4 14

30

FOURTH QUARTER Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-1oo Basic Economics or ECON-151 Development of the American Economy Business Administration BADM-213 Business Law Accounting ACCT-222 Intermediate Accounting

FIFTH QUARTER Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Financial Management FIN-110 Principles of Finance Accounting ACCT-231 Cost Accounting ACCT-266 Taxation I

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 or 4

4

4 17 or 18 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 4 4

17

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Office Administration OADM-210 Business Communications Accounting ACCT-232 Cost Accounting ACCT- or BADM-Elective

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 4

4 4

18

-English ENG-l01, ENG-l02 and ~ Communications Sf'CI+.l00 or Sf'CI+.l0l recommended.

31

Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree in Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology

Property development personnel make up one of the largest groups in the nation's labor force. This program is designed to prepare students for paraprofessional employment in the construction industry. Possible career positions include architectural draftsman, field 路engineer, materials and job estimator, construction supervisor, specifications writer, building materials salesperson, contractor or building inspector. The building construction technician often serves as a liaison between the architect or engineer and the building contractor. FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Engineering ENGR-110 Engineering Technology Orientation * Mathematics MATH-108 Technical Mathematics IU Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology ARCH-121 Architectural Drawing

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

2

5 3 17

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physics PHY8-101 Introductory Physics Mathematics MATH-109 Technical Mathematics II Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology ARCH-122 Architectural Drawing

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 4 5

3 18

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Engineering ENGR-151 Statics and Strength of Materials Physics . PHY8-102 Introductory Physics Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology ARCH-123 Architectural Drawing

32

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 4

3 16

FOURTH QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Engineering ENGR-211 Introduction to Surveying ENGR-251 Strength of Materials Psychology PSY-l0l General Psychology Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology ARCH-221 Building Equipment ARCH-241 Principles of Structural Design

Cr. Hrs:

3 3

3 3

3 16

FIFTH QUARTER Psychology . PSY-l02 General Psychology Engineering ENGR-212 Surveying Architectural and Construction Engineering ARCH-222 Building Equipment ARCH-231 Contracts and Specifications ARCH-242 Principles of Structural Design ARCH-251 Construction Procedures

SIXTH QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Econom[cs ECON-l00 Basic Economics Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology ARCH-223 Building Equipment ARCH-232 Construction Estimating ARCH-243 Principles of Concrete Design ARCH-261 Contract Drawing Preparation

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 2 3 3 17 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3

3 3 16

'Engineering ENGR-120 may be substiMed by evening engineering students. "Students may begin 1he Mathematics sequence at a higher level depending upon prior accomplishments in this area

33

Aviation Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree in Aviation Technology This program provides education and training for a career in aviation with Federal Aviation Administration licenses for private pilot, commercial pilot, instrumentation rating and instructor's rating. It also provides training for general aviation industry careers.

FIRST QUARTER English ' (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)" Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Aviation Technology AVIA-101 Private Pilot Theory AVIA-1S1 Primary Flight""

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 4

3 3 17

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Engineering ENGR-120 Engineering Calculating Devices Office Administration ~DM-120 Beginning Typewriting Aviation Technology AVIA-121 Commercial Pilot Theory AVIA-171 Commercial Pilot""

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

2 2

3 3 17

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Aviation Technology AVIA-172 Commercial Pilot"" AVIA-221 Instrument Pilot

34

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

3 3 13

FOURTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements)·" Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business Mathematics MATH-105 Trigonometry···· Aviation Tech.nology AVIA-141 Aviation Meteorol~¥ AVIA-201 Intermediate Flight

Cr.Hrs.

3 3 3 4 3 3

19

FIFTH QUARTER Transportation TRAN-121 Transportation Principles Mathematics and Science Elective····· Aviation Technology AVIA-105 Aviation Communications AVIA-202 Intermediate Flight" AVIA-271 Flight Instructor

SIXTH QUARTER Mathematics and Science Elective (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-112 Principles of Management Aviation Technology AVIA-281 Ground Instructor AVIA-285 Advanced Ground Instructor/Dispatcher

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3 15 Cr. Hrs.

3 4

3 3 13

'Geography recommended. "Right experience: 38 hours. ···Economics r8COfMleOded.

::::?~~~~~;~':.ctschool ~~~

SPRING AND SUMMER:

~~FUGHT HOURS AS REQUIRED 35

Business Management Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration In Business .Management

More than 4,500,000 salaried workers today are engaged in managing the business activities of our nation's enterprises. Many others are self-employed managers who carryon all or part of the activities necessary for the management of their own businesses. This curriculum offers a working knowledge of varied business procedures as preparation for a middle-level management career with a small or large company. FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)* Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications Data Processing DATA-110 Introduction to Computers and Their Use Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3

4

3 16

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-1oo Basic Economics" Accounting ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting Business Administration BADM-216 Introduction to Purchasing

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 or 4

4

3 17 or 18

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-122 Principles of Accounting Business Administration BADM-112 Principles of Management

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4

415

36

FOURTH QUARTER Humanities. Social SCiences or SCience and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)·** Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Marketing MARK-201 Principles of Marketing Business Administration BADM-213 Business Law BADM-Elective****

FIFTH QUARTER Humanities. Social SCiences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities. Social SCiences or SCience and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Office Administration Q6.DM-210 Business Communications Business Administration BADM-214 Business Law BADM-Elective****

Cr. Hrs. 3

4 4 3 15 Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4 4 4

18

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities. Social Sciences or SCience and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities. Social SCiences or SCience and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities. Social SCiences or SCience and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-241 Office Management Elective

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3

4 4 17

'English ENG-101 , ENG-102 and Speech Communication SPCH-100 or SPCH-101 recommended. "Economics EC<JN.161 (4 cr.) and EC<JN.162 (4 cr.) may be SlJbstituted. "'Psychology PSY-101 and PSY-102 recommended. ····student may elect 8 COIJrse of his or her choice from among offllrings in the Business Administration area from COIJrses not required in this program.

37

Business Management (Small-Business) Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Business Management and Emphasis on Small-Business Management

This career program is designed for students who wish to go into business for themselves or would like to manage a small business. It also affords opportunities to strengthen managerial skills of those currently managing a small business. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business

3 3

3 3 3 15

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) SOCial Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-121 'Principles of Accounting Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology BUSiness Administration BADM-130 Small-Business Management I

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4

3 3 17

THIRD QUARTER Speech Communication SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication SOCial Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-151 Development of the American Economy BUSiness Administration . BADM-131 Small-Business Management II

Cr. Hrs. 4

3

4

3 15

38

FOURTH QUARTER Humanities or Science and Mathematics (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-201 Management Finance and Accounting Marketing MARK-201 Principles of Marketing Business Administration BAOM-213 Business Law

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 4

4 16

FIFTH QUARTER Accounting ACCT-202 Management Finance and Accounting Business Administration BAOM-214 Business Law BAOM-245 New-Business Seminar BAOM-Elective

Cr: Hrs.

4 4 4 3 15

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Manufacturingllndustrial Technology INOT-Elective Business Administration BAOM-246 New-Business Seminar BAOM-Elective

Cr. Hrs. 3

3 3

4 3 16

39

Commercial Art Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Commercial Art

This degree program is based on the professional standards followed by advertising agencies, art studios, and free-lance artists. Students in this program prepare for a variety of employment opportunities in commercial art including agencies, studios, letter press, lithography and silk screen process companies, department stores and newspapers. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art ART-102 Art History ART-105 Drawing I ART-108 Fundamentals of Design I ART-201 Life Drawing I

3

3 3 3 3 16

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art ART-103 Art History ART-106 Drawing II ART-109 Fundamentals of Design ART-202 Life Drawing II

Cr. Hrs. 3

3 3 3 3 16

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art ART-104 Art History ART-107 Drawing III ART-110 Fundamentals of Design

Cr. Hrs. 3

3

3 3 3 16

40

FOURTH QUARTER Science and Mathematics or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art ART-131 Commercial/Advertising Art Graphic Communications and Management Technology GCMT-113 Beginning Photography Commercial Art CART-111 Typography and Layout CART-201 Graphic Drawing CART-221 Graphic Production

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 2

2 2 18

FIFTH QUARTER Science and Mathematics or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Graphic Communications Management and Technology GCMT-Elective* Art ART-132 Commercial/Advertising Art Commercial Art CART-112 Typography and Layout CART-202 Graphic Drawing CART-211 Illustration CART-222 Graphic Production

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 or 4

3 2

2 3

2 18 or 19

SIXTH QUARTER Science and Mathematics or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art ART-133 Commercial / Advertising Art Commercial Art CART-113 Typography and Layout CART-212 fffustration CART-262 Commercial Art Practicum

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 2 3 2 16

'To be chosen from the following: GCMT-114 Intermediate Pflotography or GCMT-117 Copy Preparation or GCMT-171 Negative Stripping and Camera

41

Community Mental Health Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree In Community Mental Health Technology (Generalist Option)

The community mental health technician who completes the generalist option, is a person who has the competencies which enable him/her to work with a variety of different people, with a variety of problems, under a variety of circumstances. Primary career opportunities are in community-based mental health and related programs which emphasize a practical approach to problem solving. 1. Requisites for program acceptance: a. Demonstrated competency in ENG-101 College Composition. b. Successful completion (C or better) of CMHT-121 Introduction to Community Mental Health and CMHT-126 Inquiry, Observation and Assessment. c. Departmental approval. 2. All CMHT students are required to have trial schedule approved by their faculty advisor prior to registration for second quarter and beyond. 3. All CMHT majors are expected to maintain a grade point average of 2.50 or better in CMHT courses. 4. Persons who are not declared as program majors may select courses from the program for which they have satisfied the stated prerequisites. 5. A detailed program description is available from the CMHT office.

FIRST QUARTER English ENG-101 College Composition Speech SPCH-100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY -101 General Psychology Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-121 Introduction to Community Mental Health

SECOND QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) El)glish ENG-102 College Composition Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-126 Inquiry, Observation and Assessment CMHT-224 Roles in Community Mental Health or CMHT-229 Community Mental Health Issues in Chemical Dependency I

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

3

3

4 18 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 4

3 17

42

THIRD QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See 'Specific Graduation Requirements) English ENG-103 College Composition Sociology SOC-102 Social Institutions or SOC-121 Marriage and Family Life or SOC-201 Social Problems or Anthropology ANTH-101 Cultural Anthropology or Health Education HLTH-106 Health and Medical Aspects of Chemical Dependency Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-127 Social Ecology CMHT-128 Commun ity Resources

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 or 4

4 3 14 or 15

FOURTH QUARTER Psychology PSY-202 Human Growth and Development Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-200 Service Strategies in Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-202 Community Mental Health Technology Principles and Practices I CMHT-225 Legal Issues in Mental Health or CMHT-230 Community Mental Health Issues in Chemical Dependency II

Cr. Hrs.

5 4 4

3 16

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Speech SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Psychology PSY-207 Behavior Modification Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-203 Community Mental Health Technology Principles and Practices II CMHT-226 Alternatives to Institutional Care or CMHT-231 Community Mental Health Issues in Chemical Dependency III

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 4 4

3 18

SIXTH QUARTER Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Speech SPCH-121 Group Discussion Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-204 Community Mental Health Technology Principles and Practices III CMHT-227 Prevention of Psychopathology or CMHT-232 Community Mental Health Issues in Chemical Dependency IV CMHT-251 Community Mental Health Seminar

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 4

3 3 17

43

Court and Conference Reporting Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Court and Conference Reporting

This program provides a practical and theoretical preparation for career reporters in the courtroom and business community in general, where there is a serious shortage of qualified personnel. The student is prepared to work as a court reporter, or as a freelance reporter in a civil, criminal, municipal or supreme court. To be considered for admission to the program the student must possess typing skills of 50 words per minute or must have completed OADM-220 with a grade of C or better. FIRST QUARTER English ENG-101 College Composition Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement LAWE-121 Criminal Law Procedure Political Science POL-101 American National Government Court' and Conference Reporting C&CR-101 Legal Concepts and Communications I C&CR-113 Machine Reporting I

Cr. Hrs. I

3

3 4

3 3 17

SECOND QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition Health and Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement LAWE-122 Constitutional Law Political Science POL-102 State and Local Government Court and Conference Reporting C&CR-102 Legal Concepts and Communications II C&CR-114 Machine Reporting II

Cr. Hrs.

3

2 3 4 3 3 18

THIRD QUARTER Speech Communication SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement LAWE-123 Laws of Evidence Court and Conference Reporting C&CR-115 Machine Reporting 111 * C&CR-116 Court Orientation and Transcription*

Cr. Hrs.

4 3 or 4

3 3 3 17 or 18

44

FOURTH QUARTER Humanities or Sciences and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Court and Conference Reporting C&CR-212 Court and Conference Reporting Principles and Practices' â&#x20AC;˘ C&CR-213 Machine Reporting IV' C&CR-216 Testimony and Depositions'

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 2 3 3 17

FIFTH QUARTER Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-213 Business Law Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Court and Conference Reporting C&CR-212 Court and Conference Reporting Principles and Practices' C&CR-214 Machine Reporting V' C&CR-217 Testimony'

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 3 2

3 3 18

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Sociology SOC-121 Marriage and Family Life Court and Conference Reporting C&CR-212 Court and Conference Reporting Principles and Practices' C&CR-215 Machine Reporting VI ' C&CR-218 Jury Charge' C&CR-219 Court Orientation and Advanced Transcription '

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 2

3 3 3 17

'Each Court and Conference Reporting course requires a minimum of one weekly court visit. Highly recommended courses: Business Administration BADM-214, BAOM-220 and llADM-241, Law EnforcementlAWE-201 and OffICe Administration CW>M-251 .

45

Data Processing Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration In Data Processing

Through continuing research, the number and diversity of electronic data processing applications are growing rapidly. More and more firms today are turning to electronic computers to expedite and accurately process the complex facts and figures of their business operations. This curriculum focuses attention on the programming aspects of machine use, and offers instruction in hardware organization and systems methodology. Graduates are eligible for career opportunities as programmers, junior analysts and operations personnel. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English ENG-101 College Composition Humanities (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business Accounting ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting Data Processing DATA-110 Introduction to Computers and Their Use

3 3 3

4 4 17

SECOND QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition MathematiCS MATH-1.01 Basic Algebra II Business Administration BADM-112 Principles of Management Accounting ACCT-122 Principles of Accounting Data Processing DATA-121 COBOL Programming I

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 4 4

5 19

THIRD QUARTER English ENG-103 College Composition Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) MathematiCS MATH-102 Intermediate Algebra Data Processing DATA-122 COBOL Programming II DATA-131 RPG Programming I

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 4 4 16

46

FOURTH QUARTER social Sciences SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics MATH-141 Elementary Probability & Statistics I Data Processing DATA-123 COBOL Programming III DATA-223 Assembly Language Programming

Cr. Hrs.

3

4

4 4

16

FIFTH QUARTER Speech SPCH-121 Group Discussion Social Sciences SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science Data Processing DATA-232 Systems Analysis DATA-Elective'

Cr. Hrs.

4

3 4 4 15

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences SSCI-105 Introduction to Social Science Health or Physical 'Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Data Processing DATA-271 Individual Project in Data Processing DATA-Elective'

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

1

4 12

' To be chosen from !he following : I:I'.TA-132 RPG Prcx,lramming " I:I'.TA-260 Cooperative Field Experience I:I'.TA-270 Special and Current Topics in Data Processing

47

Dental Hygiene Associate of Applied Science Degree in Dental Hygiene

Dental hygienists work in private practice, in school systems' dental health programs, for health agencies, on government research programs and as teachers. Working under the supervision of a dentist, dental hygienists scale and polish teeth, chart abnormalities, take radiographs, apply fluoride, impart dental health information and perform other chairside and office duties. Upon successful completion of this curriculum, the student is eligible to take a licensing examination prescribed by the board of dental examiners of the state in which the student chooses to practice. To be considered for admission to the program, the following requirements must be completed by March 1. 1. High school seniors must submit statements from a responsible school administrator that they are expected to be able to fulfill requirements 4, 5, and 6 by the end of the spring term. 2. Completion of College Application for Admission Form. 3. Completion of Allied Health Application Form. 4. High school graduate or successful completion of G.E.D. equivalency. 5. Completion of high school biology or one general biology course in college; high school chemistry is recommended . 6. Submission of two original transcripts from high school and any colleges attended. 7. Completion of the English proficiency examination at the ENG-101 College Composition level.

FIRST QUARTER Biology BI0-121 Principles of Medical SCience* BI0-128 Anatomy and Physiology· Dental Hygiene DENT-101 Preventive Oral Health Service I DENT-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology DENT-105 General and Oral Histology

Cr. Hrs.

4 4

5 3 2 18

SECOND QUARTER Biology BI0-129 Anatomy and Physiology· Dental Hygiene DENT-112 Head and Neck Anatomy DENT-113 Preventive Oral Health Service II DENT-123 Radiology DENT-125 General and Oral Pathology

THIRD QUARTER Biology B10-130 Anatomy and Physiology· BI0-221 Microbiology·· Dental Hygiene DENT-130 Clinical Restorative Dentistry I DENT-131 Preventive Oral Health Service III

Cr. Hrs.

4 3 5 3 2 17 Cr. Hrs.

3 4 5 3 15

48

SUMMER SESSION English ENG-101 College Composit ion speech Commun ication SPCH-100 Fundame ntals of Interpers onal Commun ication or SPCH-101 Fundame ntals of Speech Commun ication Sociology SOC-101 Introduct ory Sociology Health or Physical Educatio n (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Dental Hygiene DENT-200 Preventive Oral Health Service IV

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 4

3 15

FOURTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) '" Psycholo gy PSY-101 General Psycholo gy Dental Hygiene DENT-201 Preventive Oral Health Service V DENT-203 Pharmac ology and Therapeu tics DENT-206 Commun ity Oral Health I

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 6 4 2

18

FIFTH QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composi tion Social Sciences (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents)' " Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Dental Hygiene DENT-221 Preventive Oral Health Service VI DENT-222 Commun ity Oral Health II DENT-225 Dental Hygiene Extended Functions

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4 3 3 17

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents)' " Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Psycholo gy PSY-102 General Psycholo gy Dental Hygiene DENT-231 Preventive Oral Health Service VII DENT-232 Commun ity Oral Health III DENT-234 Dental Hygiene Practice

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 1 2 13

'May be taken at the Eastern, Western or the Metropolitan Camp!Js. "To be taken at Metro Camp!JS during third quarter. Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) '''Completion of one of the following sequences: a. History 101 , 102 and 103. b. History 151 , 152 and 153. c. History 170, 171 and 172. d. Political Science (any three courses). e. Social Science 103, 104 and 105. (Sociology 101 may be substituted for 103; however, if this is done, student must take an additional 3 credit hour social science course.)

49

Dental Laboratory Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree In Dental Laboratory Technology

The dental laboratory technician provides an essential auxiliary service to the dental profession. The dental laboratory technician fabricates prosthetic appliances, as authorized by the dentist only, through written hand prescriptions, impressions, and casts. The dental laboratory technician works with various specialized hand instruments and equipment using materials such as gypsum products, waxes, plastics, ceramics materials, precious and semi-precious metals. The work of the dental laboratory technician is confined to the dental laboratory in private dental practices, in commercial dental laboratories, or in public clinical laboratories at local, state or federal levels.

Admission to the Den.tal Laboratory Technology program is on the basis of numerical order of receipt of completed application materials, limited only by the number of students to pe accepted into the program. To be considered for admission to the program, the following requirements must be completed : 1. Completion and submission of Application for Admission Form.

2. Completion and submission of Allied Health Application Form by May 15th. 3. Completion of CCC English course 098 or 099 (or equivalent course from another college) with a grade of C or better; or completion of the English assessment examination and placement above the English 099 level.

FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Dental Laboratory Technology DLAB-100 Dental Materials DLAB-102 Dental Anatomy and Terminology DLAB-103 Dental Morphology

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

4 4 4 19

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-121 Principles of Medical Science Dental Laboratory Technology DLAB-105 Dental Design DLAB-150 Fixed Dentures DLAB-160 Removable Dentures

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 2

5 2 17

50

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics or SCience Elective ' (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Dental Laboratory Technology DLAB-155 Fixed Restorations DLAB-165 Complete Dentures I

3

3

5 4 16

SUMMER SESSION

Cr. Hrs.

Dental Laboratory Technology . DLAB-250 Fixed Partial Dentures I DLAB-260 Wrought Prosthesis

4 4 8

FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-130 Small Business Management I Dental Laboratory Technology DLAB-255 Fixed Partial Dentures II DLAB-265 Complete Dentures II DLAB-267 Removable Partial Dentures

3 3 3

3 4 3 19

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-131 Small Business Management II Dental Laboratory Technology DLAB-270 Precision Attachments DLAB-280 Dental Ceramics I

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 5

4 18

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Dentai' Laboratory Technology DLAB-285 Dental Ceramics II DLAB-290 Dental Professional Concerns

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 4 13

51

Dietetic Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree In Dietetic Technology

Dietetic technicians qualified as allied health management technicians will be considered generalists. They will work in hospitals, nursing homes, extended care facilities, health departments, early child development centers, community nutrition programs, schools and other groups care agencies that provide food and nutrition services. To be considered for admission to the program, the following requirements must be completed by March 1. 1. High school seniors must submit statements from a responsible school administrator that they are expected to be able to fulfill requirements 4 and 5 by the end of the spring term . 2. Completion of College Application for Admission Form . 3. Completion of Allied Health Application Form . 4. High school graduate or successful completion of G.E.D. equivalency (if high school student, must have a C average or must have taken college courses and demonstrated a minimum of a C average). 5. Successful completion of a high school algebra sequence or eligibility to take MATH-100 Allied Health Sciences Mathematics according to college math placement test. 6. Eligibility to take ENG-101 College Composition according to college English placement test. 7. Letter of intent to pursue program in Dietetic Technology.

FIRST QUARTER English ENG-101 College Composition Biology BI0-128 Anatomy and Physiology Mathematics MATH-100 Allied Health Sciences Mathematics Medical Assisting MA-100 Introduction to Medical Terminology Dietetic Technology DIET-101 Dietetic Orientation and Management Techniques DIET-120 Nutrition Care I

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 4 3

3 3 20

SECOND QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition Biology BI0-129 Anatomy and Physiology Psychology PSY-107 Psychology of Human Behavior Dietetic Technology DIET-121 Nutrition Care II DIET-132 Fundamentals of Dietetic Basic Foods

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

4 3 4 18

THIRD QUARTER Chemistry CHEM-109 Introduction to Biochemistry Speech SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Dietetic Technology DIET-124 Nutrition and Diet Therapy DIET-133 Dietetic Quantity Food Production Management DIET-160 Normal and Therapeutic Nutrition Clinical Field Experience

Cr. Hrs.

5

4 4 3

2 18

52

FOURTH QUARTER History of Political Sc ience (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Dietetic Technology DIET-123 Advanced Diet Therapy and Nutritional Problems DIET-134 Therapeutic Nutrition Meal Planning Evaluation DIET-161 Dietetic Technician Clinical Field Experience DIET-235 Dietetic Quantity Food Procedures for Nutrition Services

Cr. Hrs. 3

3 3 4 3 17

FIFTH QUARTER History or Political Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Dietetic Technology DIET-220 Dietetic Technician Employment Trends and Requirements DIET-222 Geriatric Nutrition DIET-223 Geriatric Nutrition Clinical Field Experience DIET-236 Dietetic Organization and Management Procedures

Cr. Hrs. 3

2 4 2 3 15

SIXTH QUARTER . History or Political Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-207 Behavior Modification Sociology SOC-101 Introductory Sociology Dietetic Technology DIET-253 Community Nutrition and Public Health DIET-254 Public Health Nutrition Clinical Field Experience

Cr. Hrs . 3

4 4 3 2 17

' ENG-I03 College Composilion is suggesled for those wishing to transfer to a university.

53

Early Childhood Education Associate of Applied Science Degree in Early Childhood Education

The Early Childhood Education program provides training for those wishing to teach young children in preschool centers of all kinds. Students will receive a basic understanding of principles of early childhood education, child growth and development and specific skills in planning and conducting the curriculum of centers for young children. Upon completion of the program, students will be prepared to take charge of groups of young children, working under the supervision of educational directors. This program is not intended to train students for state teacher certification as elementary school teachers. FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology . . PSY-101 General Psychology Sociology SOC-101 Introductory Sociology Early Childhood Education ECED-101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 4

4 15

SECOND QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) SCience (See Elective Graduation Requirements)* Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Early Childhood Education ECED-102 Early Childhood Education ECED-120 Early Language Development ECED-124 Music for Early Childhood

Cr. Hrs.

3 or 4

3 4 3 3 17 or 18

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science or Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)** Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-201 Child Growth and Development Early Childhood Education ECED-122 Art for Early Childhood ECED-125 Music for Early Childhood

54

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 or 4

4

3 3 17 or 18

FOURTH QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)·" Psychology PSY-207 Behavior Modification Social Sciences SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science Early Childhood Education ECED-121 Literature for Early Childhood ECED-123 Science for Early Childhood

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 3

3 3 16

FIFTH QUARTER Science (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences SSCI-105 Introduction to Social Science Early Childhood Education ECED-220 Child Behavior and Guidance ECED-230 Early Childhood Practicum ECED-240 Infant and Toddler Care

Cr. Hrs. 3 or 4

3

3

5 3 17 or 18

SIXTH QUARTER Sociology SOC-102 Social Institutions, or SOC-121 Marriage and Family Life DietetiC Technology DIET-115 Nutrition for Children and Families Early Childhood Education ECED-221 Early Childhood Relationships ECED-231 Early Childhood Practicum ECED-250 The Special Child

Cr. Hrs. 3 or 4

3

2 5 3 16 or 17

'A Laboratory Science is preferable for those wf10 plan to transfer to a foor.year college. "Nine credit hOlJrs of Science and a minimum competency in Mathematics are required for graduation. If necessary, one ~uarter of Mathematics may be substituted for one Quarter of Science. . •• ~ Communication Sf'CH.l00 or SPCH-l0l is strongly recommended as the last quarter in the English sequence, unless the student plans to transfer to a fOlJr.year college.

55

Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree in Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology

The 路needs of an expand ing and increas ingly comple x techno logical age have greatly intensified the demand for technic ians to assist engiAeers and sCientists. Career opportu nities exist in. a broad range of electric al-elect ronic fields. They are to be found in aerospace research, in commu nication s, with manufa cturers of electric al equipment, and with electric light and power companies. Potenti al position s include electric al or ei'ectronic enginee ring aide, motor test technic ian , instrum ent technic ian, technic al writer and commu nications specialist. FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Engineer ing ENGR-110 Engineer ing Technolo gy Orientatio n ' ENGR-121 Engineer ing Drawing Mathema tics MATH-108 Technica l MathematiCS I" Physics PHY5-101 Introduct ory Physics Electrical -Electron ic Engineer ing Technolo gy ELEC-125 Electric Circuits

Cr. Hrs.

3 2 3

5 4 3 20

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Engineer ing ENGR-112 Engineer ing Report Construc tion Mathema tics MATH-109 Technica l Mathema tics II Electrical -Electron ic Engineer ing Technolo gy ELEC-126 Electric Circuits ELEC-140 Direct Current Machines

Cr. Hrs.

3 1 or 4

3

5 3 3 18 or 21

THIRD QUARTER English or Speech Commun ication (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Mathema tics MATH-110 Technica l MathematiCS III Electrical -Electron ic Engineer ing Technolo gy ELEC-127 Electric Circuits ELEC-150 Alternatin g Current Machines ELEC-160 Semicon ductor and Electroni c Circuits

Cr. Hrs.

3 or 4 4

3 3 3 16 or 17

56

FOURTH QUARTER SoCial Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-100 Basic Economics Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology ELEC-170 Electrical/Electronic Drafting ELEC-250 Industrial Electronics ELEC-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits ELEC-262 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology ELEC-237 路Electronic Communication Transmission ELEC-251 Industrial Electronics ELEC-252 Logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry ELEC-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences . (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology ELEC-211 Electrical Construction and Application ELEC-253 Computer Circuitry ELEC-263 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation ELEC-272 Integrated Circuit Analysis

Cr. Hrs.

3 1 or 4

3 3

3 3 3 19 or 22 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3 3 18 Cr. Hrs.

3 1 or 4

3 2 3 3 3 18 or 21

'This course should be taken In the filii quarter of 1IIIendMce. "SIudents may begin the MaIhematica aequence at a higher level depending upon prior accompIishmen1s in this ....

57

Emergency Medical Technol.ogy Associate of Applied Science Degree in Emergency Medical I Technology This program is designed to provide training for individuals employed in emergency medical services. Three levels of training are available. EMT-Ambulance State Certification (Division of Vocational Education . Ohio Department of Education). EMT-Paramedic State Certification (Ohio Board of Regents) and Associate of Applied Science Degree in Emergency Medical Technology . Program is designed so that the graduate may function on the levels required by Ohio Law to provide basic and advanced life support under the direction of a physician as well as to provide supervision of operations in an emergency service. To be considered for admission to the program. the following requirements must be completed: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Completion and submission of Application for Admission Form. Completion and submission of Allied Health Application Form . High school graduate or successful completion of G.E.D. equivalency. Submission of official transcript(s) from high school and all colleges or universities attended. 5. Applicant must be 18 years of age and hold a current valid driver's license. 6. Applicant must currently be engaged, or will be engaged, in some phase of emergency medical services.

SUMMER SESSION Emergency Medical Technology EMT-131 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation EMT-132 Emergency Medical TechnologyAmbulance I EMT-133 Skills and Techniques for Determining Vital Signs

FIRST QUARTER Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I Biology B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology' Emergency Medical Technology EMT-134 Emergency Medical TechnologyAmbulance II EMT-137 Defensive Driving EMT-156 Emergency Medical TechnologyParamedic Theory I

Cr. Hrs.

5 1

- -7 Cr. Hrs.

3

4

7 16

58

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Social Sciences SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science Biology BI0-129 Anatomy and Physiology Health Technology HTEC-251 Ethics for Allied Health Technologies Emergency Medical Technology EMT-138 Emergency Medical Services Communications EMT-157 Emergency Medical TechnologyParamedic Theory II

3 4

2 7

17

THIRD QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

English ENG-101 College Composition Biology BI0-130 Anatomy and Physiology Emergency Medical Technology EMT-158 Emergency Medical TechnologyParamedic Theory III

3 3 7

13

FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

English ENG-102 College Composition Social Sciences 路 . SSCI-104 Introduction. to Social Science Physical Education PE-117 Body Conditioning or PE-119 Body Dynamics Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Emergency Medical Technology EMT-210 The Profession of Emergency Medical Services EMT-211 Advanced Techniques of Assessment and Triage

3 3 2

3 2 2

15

FIFTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Social Sciences SSCI-105 Introduction to Social Science Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics MATH-100 Allied Health Sciences路 Mathematics Sociology SOC-101 Introductory Sociology Emergency Medical Technology EMT-220 Emergency Medical Technology Supervision EMT-221 Emergency Medical Technology-Paramedic Theory IV

3

4 4

2 3 17

SIXTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Speech Communication SPCH-100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication Business Administration BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Sociology SOC-201 Social Problems Emergency Medical Technology EMT-136 Heavy Rescue EMT-230 Emergency Medical Technology Technical Management

4 3

4

3 3

17

'It is recommended that students take BI()'121 Principles of Medical Science to prepare for Anatomy and Physiology.

59

Financial Management Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration In Financial Management and Emphasis on Banking

This program is designed for persons currently employed in the fields of banking, savings and loans, credit unions and other financial institutions or persons wishing to enter these fields. FIRST QUARTER English ENG-101 College Composition Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting Financial Management FIN-101 Principles of Bank Operations

SECOND QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition SOCial SCiences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-122 Principles of Accounting Financial Management FIN-110 Principles 'of Finance FIN-Elective

THIRD QUARTER SOCial Sciences , (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities (See Elective Graduation ReqUirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-161 Principles of Economics Financial Management FIN-115 Bank Management FIN-Elective

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 4 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4

3 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4

3 3 17

60

FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Speech Communication SPCH-100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication or SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-162 Principles of Economics Financial Management FIN-120 Analysis of Financial Statements FIN-146 Home Mortgage Lending

4

4

3 3 15

FIFTH QUARTER路

Cr. Hrs.

Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BAOM-213 Business Law. Office Administration OCIOM-210 Business Communications Financial Management FIN-125 Installment Credit FIN-132 Trust Funcfions and Services FIN-142 Credit Administration

4 4 3 3 3

18

SIXTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Humanities (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BAOM-212 Supervisory Techniques Data Processing 'DATA-110 Introduction to Computers and Their Use Financial Management FIN-140 International Banking FIN-Elective

3 3

4 3 3 16

61

Fire Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree in Fire Technology

This curriculum offers a balanced and broad education to students who plan to enter fire service as a career. It also helps active firefighters upgrade themselves for advancement within the service. Included are such specialized areas of instruction as fire prevention , inspection, fire protection systems and municipal public relations. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science or Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology FIRE-100 Introduction to Fire Science

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences ' (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science or Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology . FIRE-110 Fire Fighting Tactics Elective

THIRD QUARTER Speech Communication (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology FIRE-120 Fire Protection Systems FIRE-210 Fire-Fighting Command FIRE-240 Fire Hydraulics

3 3

3 3 13 Cr. Hrs.

3

3

3 3 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

4

3

3 3 3 17

62

FOURTH QUARTER Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Fire Technology FIRE-211 Fire Fighting Command and Administration FIRE-230 Building Construction for the Fire Service

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 3 3 15

FIFTH QUARTER Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology FIRE-220 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials FIRE-231 Fire Prevention Practices FIRE-235 Fire Investigation Methods Elective

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 4 16

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Fire Technology FIRE-236 Fire Investigation Methods FIRE-270 Fire Services Training and Public Relations FIRE-280 Managing Fire Services Elective

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 4 16

63

Graphic Communications Management and Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree In Graphic Communication s Management and Technology

Career opportu nities in the graphic arts industr y include a variety of supervi sory and mid-management position s in printing establishments and aliied industries. Positions open to gradua tes of this program include printing administrative technic ian, printing produc tion technic ian, reprodu ction graphic s technic ian, and sales in graphic arts services, equipm ent and supplies. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Art ART-108 Fundame ntals of Design I or ART-121 Calligrap hy Business Administr ation BADM-108 Introduct ion to Business Graphic Commun ications Managem ent and Technolo gy GCMT-101 Graphic Arts Orientatio n GCMT-105 Science of Graphic Arts

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Accounti ng ACCT-107 Business: Accounti ng Applicatio ns 路 Office Administr ation Qo\DM-120 Beginnin g Typewriti ng* Graphic Commun ications Managem ent and Technolo gy GCMT-109 Graphic Arts Materials GCMT-113 Beginnin g Photogra phy

THIRD QUARTER Speech Commun ication (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) SOCial Sciences (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Accounti ng ACCT-121 Principles of Accounti ng Graphic Commun ications Managem ent and Technolo gy GCMT-117 Copy Preparati on GCMT-171 Negative Stripping and Camera

3 3 3 3 2

4 18 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3

2 2 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

4 3

4

3 4 19

64

FOURTH QUARTER Humanities (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-112 Principles of Management Marketing MARK-201 Principles of Marketing Graphic Communications Management & Technology GCMT-201 Platemaking and Presswork

Cr. Hrs. 4

4

4 4 17

FIFTH QUARTER Humanities (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-212 Supervisory Techniques Economics ECON-161 Principles of Economics Marketing MARK-225 Principles of Advertising Graphic Communications Management & Technology GCMT-211 Finishing and Bindery"

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

4

4 2 17

SIXTH QUARTER Business Administration BADM-213 Business Law BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Economies ECON-162 Principles of Economics Graphic Communications Management & Technology GCMT-220 Graphic Arts Production " GCMT-225 Graphic Arts Estimating "

Cr. Hrs.

4 3 4

3 2 16

â&#x20AC;˘ Alternate course BA!)M.220 Human Relations in Business recommended for students possessing adequate typing slUlls. "May substitute Cooperative FMIkt Experience in the graphic arts field.

65

Hospitality Management (Culinary Art) Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Hospitality Management and Emphasis on Culinary Art This program is designed to prepare the student for a midmanagement career in culinary art. Major emphasis is on developing practical culinary skills and developing expertise in the field of food handling, preparation and service for on-premise consumption . FIRST QUARTER . Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Hospitality Management HOSP-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management HOSP-111 Food Technology .

3 3

3 6

15

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Hospitality Management HOSP-102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and Lodging Establishments HOSP-115 Culinary Theory and Production

THIRD QUARTER Social SCiences SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science SCience and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management HOSP-118 Advanced Culinary HOSP-119 Layout and Equipment HOSP-125 Quantity Food Purchasing

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 6 15 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3 15

SUMMER SESSION English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

66

FOURTH QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-212 Supervisory Techniques Hospitality Management HOSP-116 Baking Principles and Production HOSP-214 Food and Beverage Control

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

6 3 16

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management HOSP-205 Buffet Catering and Decorating HOSP-208 Classical Cuisine HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 1

11

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences SSCI-105 Introduction to Social Science Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration . BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Dietetic Technology DIET-120 Nutrition Care I Economics ECON-100 Basic Economics or ECON-161 Principles of Economics Hospitality Management HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 3 3 or 4

17 or 18

67

Hospitality Management (Food Service) Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Hospitality Management and Emphasis on Food Service Management

This is a mid-management program designed to prepare the student for a career in the hotel-restaurant field . The series of courses prepares students for a variety of positions in the hotelrestaurant area. Theory is combined with practical experience during the student's preparation for an Associate of Applied Business degree. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Hospitality Management HOSP-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management HOSP-111 Food Technology

3 3 3 6 15

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-102 Genllral Psychology Hospitality Management HOSP-102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and Lodging Establishments HOSP-115 Culinary Theory and Production

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 6 15

THIRD QUARTER Social Sciences SSCI-1031ntroduction to Social Science Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management HOSP-119 Layout and Equipment HOSP-125 Quantity Food Purchasing HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 1 13

SUMMER SESSION English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

68

FOURTH QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science and Mathematics (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-212 Supervisory Techniques Hospitality Management HOSP-118 Advanced Culinary HOSP-214 Food and Beverage Control HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 3 1 14

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management HOSP-202 Management Operations HOSP-226 Hotel-Motel Ma:intenance and Engineering HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience ,

Cr. Hrs.

3

6 3 1 14

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences SSCI-105 Introduction to Social Science Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Dietetic Technology DIET-120 Nutrition Care I Economics ECON-1oo Basic Economics or ECON-161 Principles of Economics Hospitality Management HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 3 3 or 4

17 or 18

69

Hospitality Management (Hotel-Restaurant) Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Hospitality Management and Emphasis on Hotel-Restaurant

This is a mid-management program designed to prepare the student for a career in the hotel-motel management field . The series of cpurses prepares students for a variety of positions in the hotelrestaurant area. Theory is Gombined with practical experience during the student's preparation for an Associate of 'Applied Business degree. FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Hospitality Management HOSP-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management HOSP-111 Food Technology

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 6 15

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Hospitality Management HOSP-102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and Lodging Establishments HOSP-115 Culinary Theory and Production

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 6

16

THIRD QUARTER Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-212 Supervisory Techniques Hospitality Management HOSP-119 Layout and Equipment HOSP-125 Quantity Food Purchasing HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 1

13

SUMMER SESSION English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Hospitality Management HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

70

FOURTH QUARTER Social Sciences SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting Hospitality Management HOSP-202 Management Operations HOSP-214 F.ood and Beverage Control

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 6 3 17

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-100 Basic Economics or ECON-161 Principles of Economics Hospitality Management HOSP-226 Hotel-Motel Maintenance and Engineering HOSP-227 Hotel-Motel Front Office Procedure

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 or 4

3 3 15 or 16

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences SSCI-105 Introduction to Social Science Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Hospitality Management HOSP-224 Hotel-Motel Sales Promotion HOSP-240 Supervisory Housekeeping

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 3 3 16

71

Hospitality Management (Housekeeping) Associate of Applied Business Degr~ with Concentration In Hospitality Management and Emphasis on Housekeeping Management A program for career preparation in the field of executive housekeeping for hotels, motels, hospitals and institutions. FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Hospitality Management HOSP-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management HOSP-102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and Lodging Establishments

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social SCiences SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science or Sociology SOC-101 Introduction to Sociology Accounting ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications Manufacturing / Industrial T':3chnology INDT-126 Principles of Work Simplification in Industry Hospitality Management HOSP-240 Supervisory Housekeeping

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-111 Practical Accounting or ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting Business Administration BADM-212 Supervisory Techniques Hospitality Management HOSP-126 Housekeeping Procedures HOSP-128 Fundamentals of Interior Design

3

3 3 3 13 Cr. Hrs.

3

3 or 4

3 3

3 15 or 16 Cr. Hrs.

3

3 or 4 3 3 3 16 or 17

72

SUMMER SESSION

Cr. Hrs.

Hospitality Management HOSP-260 Cooperative Field Experience

FOURTH QUARTER social Sciences SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science Biology BI0-128 Anatomy and Physiology Business Admmistration BADM-216 Introduction to Purchasing Manufacturing/Industrial Technology INDT-125 Elements of Time Study Hospitality Management HOSP-202 Management Operations

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

- 3 3 6

19

FIFTH QUARTER Business Administration BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Manufacturing / Industrial Techn.o logy INDT-134 Employee and Plant Safety Hospitality Management HOSP-224 Hotel-Motel Sales Promotion HOSP-226 Hotel-Motel Maintenance and Engineering

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 12

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences SSCI-105 Introduction to Social Science Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-1oo Basic Economics Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Hospitality Management HOSP-227 Hotel-Motel Front Office Procedure

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3

3 3 16

73

Industrial Management Associate of Applied Science Degree with Concentration in Industrial Management

This career program is tailored for individu als who are or will be working in industrial manage ment position s where a high degree of technic al enginee ring skill is not required. Emphasis is placed on the behavioral aspects of management rather than machines and techniques of management. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounti ng ACCT-111 Practical Accounti ng Business Administration BADM-108 Introduct ion to Business Economics ECON-100 Basic Economics

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Data. Processing DATA-110 Introduct ion to Computers and Their Use Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Business Administration BADM-112 Principles of Management BADM-Elective*

3 3

3 3 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3

4 3 17

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3

4 3 17

74

FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

SOCiology SOC-101 Introductory Sociology Business Administration BADM-121 Labor-Management Relations BADM-Electives'

4 3 10 17

FIFTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective. Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-201 Work Simplification BADM-211 Production Control BADM-220 Human Relations in Business BADM-Elective*

3 3 3 3 4 16

SIXTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-212 Supervisory Techniques BADM-216 Introduction to Purchasing BADM-Elective* or INDT-260 Cooperative Field Experience

4

3 3 3

14

'The elective(s) in Business Administrafion should be interpreted in relafion to the career oIJjectives of the student.

75

Interior Design Technology Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration In Interior Design Technology

The interior design technican, working with and under the direction of the interior designer, helps to fulfill the need for creatively expressed contemporary living in residential and commercial interi" ors. The technician may do certain aspects of drafting, delineation, material or component selection or specification. Students in this program prepare for employment opportunities in interior deSign studios, photography studios, architectural firms, retail department and furniture stores, related manufacturing firms and other types of business dealing with interior furnishing. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications Art ART-102 Art History ART-105 Drawing I ART-108 Fundamentals of Design I Interior Design INTD-101 Introduction to Interior Design

3 3 3 3 3

2 17

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art ART-103 Art History ART-106 Drawing II ART-109 Fundamentals of Design Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 3 3 18

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Art ART-104 Art History ART-107 Drawing III ART-110 Fundamentals of Design Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology ARCH-121 Architectural Drawing

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 3 3 16

FOURTH QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-107 Psychology of Human Behavior Interior Design INTD-201 Introductory Interior Design INTD-205 History of Interiors 1NTD-206 Architectural Materials and Methods Marketing. MARK-202 Principles of Salesmanship

Cr. Hrs.

4 3 3 3 4 18

76

FIFTH QUARTER social Sciences (see Specific Graduation Requirements) social Sciences or Science and Mathemtics (see S~ifiC Graduation Requirements) Interior DeSign INTD-202 Intermediate Interior Design iNTD-207 Interior Design Materials and Methods INTD-208 Textiles INTD-210 Interior Design Presentation

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Interior Design INTD-203 Advanced Interior Design INTD-220 Professional Practice of Interior Design INTD-221 Interior Design Practicum

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 2

15

77

Labo r Stud ies Associate of Labor Studies Degree

The Labor Studies program is designed to provide a broader unders tanding and perspective of econom ic, social and politica l problems of our society and the role which labor unions and workers should play in it and to equip membElrs of labor organiz ations with skills needed to exercise their union and civic respons ibilities, especially those arising in urban areas. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs.

English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science SSCI-103 Introduct ion to Social Science Humanities HUM-101 Introduction to Humanities: Man as an Individual Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-100 Basic Economics Labor Studies LAB-101 Introduct ion to Organized Labor in America

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Science SSCI-104 Introduct ion to Social SCience Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounti ng ACCT-107 Business : Accounti ng Applications Labor Studies LAB-102 The American Labor Movement: Its Heritage and Achievements LAB-103 Structure and Administration of Unions

THIRD QUARTER Speech Communication SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Social SCience SSCI-105 Introduct ion to Social Science Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Labor Studies LAB-104 Union Leadership Skills LAB-105 Collective Bargaining I (Negotiations) LAB-114 Theories of the Labor Movement

78

3

3 3

3 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

3

3

3 3 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

4

3

3 3 3 17

FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

~h

Communication S SPCH-201 Advanced Public Speaking political Science POL-101 American National Government Labor Studies LAB-106 Collective Bargaining II (Administration) LAB-108 Labor Law LAB-113 Contemporary Labor Problems: The Search for Dignity

4

4 3 3 3 17

FIFTH QUARTER Manufacturing / Industrial Technology INDT-134 Employee and Plant Safety Political Science POL-102 State and Local Government Labor Studies LAB-107 Collective Bargaining III (Arbitration) LAB-109 Time Study Systems from Labor's Viewpoint

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 3 3 13

SIXTH QUARTER Accounting ACCT-111 Practical Accounting Journalism JOUR-101 Introduction to Mass Communications Labor Studies LAB-110 Urban Labor Problems Project LAB-111 The American Labor Movement: A Continuing Process LAB-112 Creative Use of Leisure Time

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 3 3 3 16

79

Law Enforcement Associate of Applied Science Degree in Law Enforcement

Various aspects of police work are covered, from administrative and investigative to industrial security and juvenile delinquency. The course sequence offers a balanced and broad education to students who plan to enter law enforcement as a career. It helps in-service police officers upgrade themselves for advancement within the ranks. Most students join a municipal force but career opportunities also are available in county, state and federal governments. Position possibilities include work as a detective or security guard for a railroad, store or industrial plant. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English ENG-101 College Composition Humanities or Sciences and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Political Science POL-101 American National Government Law Enforcement LAWE-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement LAWE-121 Crimi'nal Law Procedure

3 3 4 4 3 17

SECOND QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition Humanities or Science e.nd Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Political Science POL-102 State and Local Government Law Enforcement LAWE-111 Patrol Administration LAWE-122 Constitutional Law

THIRD QUARTER Speech SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Political Science POL-103 Liberal-Democratic Governments Office Administration Q6.DM-120 Beginning Typewriting Law Enforcement LAWE-123 Laws of Evidence LAWE-201 Delinquency Prevention and Control

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

4 4

3 18 Cr. Hrs.

4

3 2

3 3

16

80

FOURTH QUARTER Health or Physical Education (see Specific Graduation Requirements) PsYchology PSY-101 General Psychology SOCiology SOC-101 Introductory Sociology Law Enforcement LAWE-141 Police-Community Relations LAWE-221 Police Administration LAWE-223 Fundamentals of Traffic Law

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 3 3

3 17

FIFTH QUARTER Data Processing Ot\TA-110 Introduction to Computers and Their Use PsYchology PSY-102 General Psychology Law Enforcement LAWE-142 Police-Community Relations LAWE-211 Criminal Investigation LAWE-222 Police Supervision

Cr. Hrs.

4

3 2 3 3 15

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities or Science and Mathematics (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement LAWE-150 Introduction to Security LAWE-212 Criminalistics LAWE-232 Accident Investigation LAWE-Elective

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3

3 15

81

Law Enforcement (Corrections ) Associate of Applied SCience Degree with Concentration in Law Enforcement and Emphasis on corrections This prog ram prov ides a broa d ove rvie w of corr ecti ons , prob ation and paro le in both con cep ts and proc edu res. The re are opp ortuni ties for emp loym ent in this grow ing field in local, stat e and federal age ncie s wor king in corr ecti ons and reha bilit atio n. FIRST QUARTER Engl ish (See Spec ific Grad uatio n Requ . irements) Political Scie nce POL-101 Ame rican National Gove rnme nt Soci ology SOC-101 Intro ducto ry Soci ology Health or Physical Educ ation (See Spec ific Grad uatio n Requ irements) Law Enfo rcem ent LAWE-101 Intro ducti on to Law Enfo rcem ent

SECOND QUARTER

Engl ish (See Spec ific Grad uatio n Requ irements) Speech Com muni catio n SPCH-100 Fund amen tals of Inter perso nal Com muni catio n Health or Physical Educ ation (See Spec ific Grad uatio n Requ ireme nts) Polit ical Scie nce POL- 102 State and Local Gove rnme nt Law Enfo rcem ent LAWE-121 Criminal Law Proc edur e LAWE-144 Prob ation and Paro le

THIRD QUARTER

Engl ish (See Spec ific Grad uatio n Requ ireme nts) Spee ch Com muni catio n SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Spee ch Com muni catio n Health or Physical Educ ation (See Spec ific Grad uatio n Requ ireme nts) Political Scie nce POL-103 Liber al-De mocr atic Gove rnme nts Law Enfo rcem ent LAWE-122 Cons titutio nal Law LAWE-141 Polic e-Co mmu nity Relations

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

4

4

16 Cr. Hrs.

3

4

4

3 3 18 Cr. Hrs.

3 4

3 3 3 17

82

FOURTH QUARTER Humanities HUM-101 Introduction to Humanities: Man as an Individual PsychOlogy PSY-101 General Psychology Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-121 Introduction to Community Mental Health Law Enforcement LAWE-201 Delinquency Prevention and Control LAWE-226 Institutional Services

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 4

3 3 16

FIFTH QUARTER Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Office Administration Q4.DM-120 Beginning Typewriting Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-126 Inquiry, Observation and Assessment Law Enforcement LAWE-227 Community Intervention Resources LAWE-228 Correctional Case Management

Cr. Hrs.

3 2 4 3 3 15

SIXTH QUARTER Sociology SOC-201 Social Problems Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-225 Legal Issues in Mental Health Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Law Enforcement LAWE-229 Corrections: Principles and Practices LAWE-230 Criminology

Cr. Hrs.

4 3 3

3 3 16

83

Law Enforcement (Security Administration) in Law Associate of Applied Science Degree With Concentration stration Admini y Securit on sis Empha and ment Enforce

This program is designed to prepare individu als working in variadminous aspects of private or contrac t security service to assume those of dge knowle the n broa'de to istrative roles, as well as y to asemploy ed in limited function al activities within the industr ion and sume more respons ible position s in areas of loss prevent detectio n, protect ion of life and propert y or investigative work, FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Physical Science PSCI-101 Introduct ion to Physical Science Law Enforcem ent LAWE-101 Introduct ion to Law Enforcem ent LAWE-121 Criminal Law Procedur e LAWE-150 Introduct ion to Security

Cr, Hrs,

3 3 3 4

3 3

19

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Physical Science PSCI-102 Introduct ion to Physical Science Law Enforcem ent LAWE-122 Constitut ional Law LAWE-151 Principles of ~oss Prevention LAWE-152 Physical Security

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Health HLTH-223 Standard First Aid and Personal Safety Physical Education PE-116 Jogging Manufact uring / Industrial Technolo gy INDT-134 Employee and Plant Safety Fire Technolo gy FIRE-120 Fire Protectio n Systems Law Enforcem ent LAWE-123 Laws of Evidence

84

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3 3 18 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 2

3 3

3 18

FOURTH QUARTER Mathematics MATH-Elective Physical Education PE-117 Body Conditioning I Office Administration Q6.DM-120 Beginning Typewriting Sociology SOC-101 Introductory Sociology Law Enforcement LAWE-154 Security Administration LAWE-1S5 Security Investigation

FIFTH QUARTER Accounting ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting Business Administration BADM-212 Supervisory Techniques Office Administration Q6.DM-121 Business Typewriting Sociology SOC-231 American Black-White Relations

SIXTH QUARTER Business Administration BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Physical Education PE-154 Self-Defense" Psychology PSY-107 Psychology of Human Behavior Emergency Medical Technology EMT-131 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Law Enforcement LAWE-156 Contemporary Security Problems LAWE-1S7 Legal Considerations in Security LAWE-230 Criminology

Cr. Hrs.

3

2 2

3 4 3 17 Cr. Hrs.

4 3 3 4 14 Cr. Hrs.

3

4

4 3 3 19

85

.Library / Instructional Media (Audio-Visual) Associate of Applied Science Degree with Concentration in Library !Instructlonal Media Technology_and Emphasis on AudioVisual Communications

This program is designed to prepare students for employment in commercial, industrial and educational settings as audio-visual technicians. Program graduates are prepared to provide for the operation of and preventive maintenance related to audio-visual equipment. Students will acquire productions skills in the areas of instructional graphics, television, audio recording and systems, and stiU and motion picture photography. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English ENG-101 College Composition 路Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Office Administration OADM-120 Beginning Typewriting Library/Instructional Media Technology LlB-101 Introduction to Library/Instructional Media Technology LlB-111 Audio-Visual Meth09s and Materials

SECOND QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Graphic Communications Management and Technology GCMT-113 Beginning Photography Library /Instructional Media Technology LlB-121 Technical Processes I LlB-131 Instructional Graphics I LlB-270 Circulation Control Systems

3

3 2 3 3 15 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

THIRD QUARTER Speech SPCH-100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-203 Educational Psychology Graphic Communications Management and Technology GCMT-213 Color Transparencies Library /Instructional Media Technology LlB-132 Instructional Graphics II

86

Cr. Hrs.

4

4

3 3 15

FOURTH QUARTER social Sciences (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Science/ Mathematics (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration Qll.DM-121 Business Typewriting Library / Instructional Media Technology LlB-221 Operation and Maintenance of Audio-Visual Equipment LlB-240 Television Production I

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 3

16

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Science/ Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Library / Instruction Media Technology LlB-211 Motion Picture Production LlB-231 Audio Recording and Systems LlB-241 Television Production II

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3

15

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Science / Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Library/ Instructional Media Technology LlB-242 Television Production III LlB-254 Media Services for the Handicapped LlB-281 Library/ Instructional Media Practicum

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3

15

87

Library Iinstructional Media (Library I Media) Associate of Applied Science Degree with Concentration in Library/Instructional Media Technology and Emphasis on Library/ Media

The general objective of this curriculum is to produce a competent Library/ Media Technical Assistant (LMTA) to work directly with librarians, media specialists, clerks, pages and other technical assistants who aid cli_entele in using the resources of Library/Media and Information Centers. Specifically, the LMTA will develop skills in a particular area such as technical processes and public services with a general background knowledge of various types of information centers and their organizational patterns. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English ENG-101 College Composition Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Office Administration Q6.0M-120 Beginning Typewriting Library/ Instructional Media Technology LlB-101 Introduction to Library/Instructional Media Technology LlB-111 Audio-Visual Methods and Materials

3

3 2

3 3 15

SECOND QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Office Administration Q6.0M-121 Business Typewriting Library/ Instructional Media Technology LlB-121 Technical Processes I LlB-131 Instructional Graphics I LlB-270 Circulation Control Systems

THIRD QUARTER Speech SPCH-100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication Psychology PSY-203 Educational Psychology Office Administration Q6.0M-104 Machine Calculations Library / Instructional Media Technology LlB-151 Technical Processes II LlB-153 Bookcraft

88

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 3 3 18 Cr. Hrs.

4 4

3 3 2 16

FOURTH QUARTER social Sciences (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Science/Mathematics (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration Q&.DM-107 Information and Records Management Library/Instructional Media Technology LlB-221 Operation and Maintenance of Audio-Visual Equipment LlB-252 Readers' Services

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 3 16

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Science/Mathematics (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Library/Instructional Media Technology LlB-255 Storytelling LlB-260 Introduction to Children 's Books LlB-261 Technical Information Centers

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences (see Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Science/ Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Library/Instructional Media Technology LlB-254 Media Service for the Handicapped LlB-262 Information Centers and Computers LlB-281 Library/Instructional Media Practicum

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3 3 3 16 Cr. Hrs. 3

3 3

3 3 15

89

Manufacturing/Industrial Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree In Manufacturing/Industrial Technology This pattern of courses prepares students for entry occupations in the field of industrial management. It also enables people now working in business and industry to ready themselves for advancement to supervisory positions. In add ition, this set of courses provides opportunities for currently employed supervisory personnel to improve their skills.

FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requ irements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Manufacturing / Industrial Technology INDT-122 Introduction to Manufacturing Management Mathematics MATH-101 Basic Algebra II "

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specifi c Graduation Requirements) Business Admin istration BADM-212 Supervisory Techniques Engineering ENGR-110 Engineering Technology Orientation ENGR-121 Engineering Drawing Mathematics MATH-108 Technical Mathematics I

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 2

3 5 20

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requ irements) Mechanical Engineering Technology MECH-152 Manufacturing Processes Mathematics MATH-109 Technical Mathematics II Manufacturing / Industrial Technology INDT-125 Elements of路 Time Study

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 5

3 18

90

FOURTH QUARTER psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Accounting ACCT-111 Practical Accounting or ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting Engineering ENGR-112 Engineering Report Construction Manufacturing/ Industrial Technology INDT-126 Principles of Work Simplification in Industry INDT-128 Motion and Job Analysis

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 or 4

3 3 3 15 or 16

FIFTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Business Administration BADM-121 Labor-Management Relations BADM-211 Production Control Science or Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Manufacturing/Industrial Technology INDT-291 Material Handling and Plant Layout

3 3 3 3

3 15

SIXTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Sociology SOC-101 Introductory Sociology Mechanical Engineering Technology or Engineering MECH-150 Machine Tools or MECH-151 Metal Fabrication Methods or ENGR-101 Metallurgy I Business Administration BADM-232 Collective Bargaining and Labor Laws Manufacturing/Industrial Technology INDT-134 Employee and Plant Safety INDT-222 Manufacturing Management

4

3

3 3 3 16

'Students may begin the Mathematics sequence at a higher level depending upon poor accomplishments in this area.

91

'-

Marketing Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Marketing

This curriculum is concerned with the activities performed in supplying products and services to the consuming sectors of the economy. These activities include sales, warehousing, promotion, credit maintenance and market research. It is the responsibility of the marketing department of any company to see that the appropriate product, at the right price, is made available to the buyers in the proper quantities when demanded. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science Humanities or Social Sciences' (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accountirfg ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences _ . SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Marketing MARK-201 Principles of Marketing

3

3 3 or 4

3 3 16 or 17 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3

4 14

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)" Social Sciences SSCI-105 Introduction to Social Science Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Marketing MARK-225 Principles of Advertising

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3

4 14

92

FOURTH QUARTER SCience and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Accounting . ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting Business Administration BADM-213 Business Law BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Marketing MARK-Elective' **

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 4 3 4 18

FIFTH QUARTER Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-122 Principles of Accounting Business Administration BADM-214 Business Law Office Administration Q\DM-210 Business Communications Marketing MARK-Elective' ••

SIXTH QUARTER SCience and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-112 Principles of Management Business Elective···· Marketing MARK-Elective" •

Cr. Hrs. 3

4 4 4

3 18 Cr. Hrs.

3 4 3 4 14

' Economics ECON-100 or ECON-161 recommended.

" Speech Communication SPCH-100 or Si'CH-101 recommended. ' ''Coorse selection in MaI1<eting will depend on major concentration. (Does not include MARK-260 Cooperative Fteid

Experience.) ....Course may be selecled from (ICCT) Accounting, (BADM) Business Administration, (O'.TA) Data Processing or (ECON) Economics.

93

Mechanical Engineering Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree In Mechanical Engineering Technology

A curriculum planned as preparation for a career as a member of an engineering or scientific team in mechanical engineering research and development. Positions related to this series of courses include engineering laboratory aid, materials tester, quality control technician, draftsman, mechanical design technician and technical writer. Opportunities include technical sales work for a wide variety of companies such as manufacturers of automobiles, heavy equipment or office machines. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physics PHYS-101 Introductory Physics Engineering ENGR-11 0 Engineering Technology Orientation* ENGR-121 Engineering Drawing Mathematics MATH-108 Technical Mathematics 1** Mechanical Engineering Technology MECH-150 Machine Tools

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Engineering ENGR-122 Engineering Drawing Mathematics MATH-109 Technical Mathematics II Physics PHYS-102 Introductory Physics Mechanical Engineering Technology MECH-151 Metal Fabrication Methods

3 4

2 3 5

3 20 Cr. Hrs.

3 3

5 4 3 18

THIRD QUARTER English or Speech Communication (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics MATH-110 Technical Mathemathics III Electrical-Electronic En!,lineering Technology ELEC-125 ElectriC Circuits Engineering ENGR-151 Statics and Strength of Materials Mechanical Engineering Technology MECH-152 Manufacturing Processes

94

Cr. Hrs. 3 or 4

4 3 3

3 16 or 17

FOURTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Engineering ENGR-112 Engineering Report Construction ENGR-251 Strength of Materials ENGR-252 Applied Dynamics Mechanical Engineering Technology MECH-201 Industrial Hydraulics

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 3

4 17

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Electrical Electronic Engineering Technology ELEC-140 Direct Current Machines Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Mechanical Engineering Technology MECH-211 Mechanisms MECH-221 Applied Instrumentation-Measurement and • Control

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3

4 3 17

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-100 Basic Economics Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Engineering. Mechanical Engineering Technology or Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology ENGR-101 Metallurgy or ENGR-123 Engineering Drawing or MECH-160 Fundamentals of Numerical Control for Machine Tools or ELEC-126 Electric Circuits Mechanical Engineering Technology MECH-212 Machine Design

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3

3 3 16

'Engineering ENGR·l20 may be eIec1ed by evening students instead . ..students may begin the Mathematics sequence a1 a higher level depending upon priOr accomplishments in this area.

95

Medical Assisting Associate of Applied Science Degree in Medical Assisting

The medica l assistan t assists the physicia n in a private office, clinic or other health care facility. This curricu lum combin es special ized medical assisting courses with genera l educati on in prepara tion for a career in medical assisting. Job opportu nities also exist with pharma ceutica l companies, public health agencies, and health maintenance organiz ations. CCC's Medica l Assisting program is accredited by the Commi ttee on Allied Health Educat ion and Accred itation upon recomm endatio n of the Americ an Associa tion of Medica l Assistants (CAHE AI AAMA) . To be conside red for admission to the program , the followin g require ments must be comple ted by March 1.

1. High school seniors must submit statements from a respons ible school administrator that they are expected to fulfill requirements 7,4,8 and 9 by the end of the spring term . 2. Completion of College Applicat ion for Admission Form. 3. Completed Allied Health Applicat ion Form. 4. High school graduate or successful complet ion of G.E.D. equivalency. 5. Submission of official transcript(s) for high school and all college I universities attended . 6. Eligibility for placement in ENG-101 College Composition. 7. Completion of OADM-120 Beginning Typewriting with a C grade or better or equivalent within one year of program application . 8. Completion of two semesters of high school chemistry or B10-121 Principles of Medical Science with a C grade or better. 9. Completion of two semesters of high school biology or B10-128 Anatomy and PhySiology with a C grade. or better.

FIRST QUARTER English ENG-101 College Composition Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Biology BI0-128 Anatomy and Physiology Office Administration QO.DM-121 Business Typewriting " Medical Assisting MA-101 Medical Assisting Orientation MA-102 Medical Terminology I

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

4

3 1

3 18

SECON D QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Biology BI0-129 Anatomy and Physiology Office Administration QO.DM-122 Intermediate Business Typewriting Medical Assisting MA-103 Medical Terminology II

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 4

3 3 17

96

THIRD QUARTER Speflch Communication SpCH-100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Commun ication or SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology . BI0-130 Anatomy and PhysIology psychology PSY-201 Child Growth and Development or PSY-205 Dynamics of Human Behavior Medical Record Technology MREC-204 Medical Machine Transcription

Cr. Hrs.

4

3 4 2

14

SUMMER SESSION Social SCiences路 (See Spepific Graduation Requirements) Accounting or Mathematics ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications or MATH-100 Allied Health Sciences Mathematics Health HLTH-223 Standard First Aid and Personal Safety

FOURTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-221 Microbiology Office Administration Q4.DM-220 Advanced Business Typewriting Medical Laboratory Technology MLT-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures MLT-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

2 9 Cr. Hrs. 3

4

3 4 4 18

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration Q4.DM-221 Basic Information Processing Medical Assisting MA-205 Introduction to Electrocardiography or MA-248 Medical Office Procedures MA-249 Clinical Medical Assisting MA-251 Medical Assisting Ethics

Cr. Hrs. 3

3 4 or 5 5 2 17 or 18

SIXTH QUARTER Emergency Medical Technology EMT-131 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Medical Assisting MA-206 Clinical Electrocardiography or MA-250 Applied Medical Assisting MA-252 Medical Office Practicum MA-256 Allied Health Seminar

Cr. Hrs.

2 or 3

4 3 10 or 11

' Students may begin typing at a higher 0( lower level d8llEl1ding upon demonstrated proficiency; however. completion of Q\O/M20 Advance,j"Business Typewriting necessary (0( completion of the Program.

97

Medical Laboratory Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree in Medical Laboratory Technology

The medical laboratory technician works in a supportive role in a hospital, private or research laboratory or clinic, performing a wide variety of complex biochemical, bacteriological, serological, hematological and other diagnostic tests. Assisting the medical technologist, pathologist or other physician, the medical laboratory technician makes it possible to meet the increasing demand for clinical laboratory tests. The MLT program is accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation upon recommendation of the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (CAHEAINAACLS). To be considered for admission to the program, the following requirements must be completed by March 1. 1. High school seniors must submit statements from a responsible school administrator that they are expected to be able to fulfill requirements 4, 8 and 9 by the end of the spring term. 2. Completion of College Application for Admission Form. 3. Completion of Allied Health Application Form. 4. High school graduate or satisfactory completion of G.ED. equivalency. 5. Submission of ACT or SAT scores. 6. Submission of official transcript(s) from high school and all college/ universities attended. 7. Eligibility to enroll in ENG-101 College Composition. 8. Completion of two semesters of high school chemistry or CHEM-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or CHEM-111 General Chemistry I with a C grade or better. 9. Completion of two semesters of high school mathematics or MATH-101 Basic Algebra II with a C grade or better.

FIRST QUARTER English ENG-101 College Composition Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-128 Anatomy and Physiology Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Medical Laboratory Technology MLT-100-lntroduction to Medical Laboratory Technology

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

4

3 3 17

98

SECOND QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-129 Anatomy and Physiology Chemistry CHEM-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or CHEM-111 General Chemistry I Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4 4 or 5 3 18 or 19

THIRD QUARTER Speech Communication SPCH-100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication or SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requ irements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation ReqUirements) Chemistry CHEM-106 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or CHEM-112 General Chem i~try II Psychology PSY-205 'Dynamics of Human Behavior Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I

Cr. Hrs. 4

3

4 or 5

4 3 19 or 20

SUMMER SESSION Mathematics MATH-100 Allied Health Science Mathematics Medical Laboratory Technology MLT-202 Medical Laboratory Procedures MLT-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures MLT-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures MLT-205 Medical Laboratory Procedures

Cr. Hrs.

4 4 4 4 4 20

FOURTH QUARTER Medical Laboratory Technology MLT-102 Medical Laboratory Ethics MLT-103 Introduction to Blood Collection or MLT-214 Medical Technology Procedures MLT-215 Medical Laboratory Technology Practicum

Cr. Hrs.

4 or 5

4 9 or 10

FIFTH QUARTER Medical Laboratory Technology MLT-104 Clinical Phlebotomy Techniques or MLT-214 Medical Technology Procedures MLT-215 Medical Laboratory Technology Practicum

Cr. Hrs. 2 or 5 4 6or9

SIXTH QUARTER Medical Laboratory Technology MLT-214 Medical Technology Procedures MLT-215 Medical Laboratory Technology Practicum

Cr. Hrs.

5 4 9

99

Medical Record Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree in Medical Record Technology

The medical record technician works in a medical record department of a hospital, clinic or nursing home, and is responsible for many phases of preparing, analyzing and preserving health. information needed by patients, hospital and the public. Upon successful completion of the program, the graduate is eligible to take the national accreditation examination given by the American Medical Record Association. Successful candidates can add the initials A.R.T. (Accredited Record Technician) to their names. The Medical Record Technology program is accredited by the American Medical Record Association and the 路Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation of the American Medical Association. To be considered for admission to the pr o拢!ram, the following requirements must be completed by March 1. 1. High school seniors must submit statements from a responsible school administrator that they are expected to fulfill requirement 4 by the end of the spring term . 2. Completion of College Application for Admission Form . 3. Completion of Allied Health Application Form: 4. High school graduation or successful completion of G.E.D. equivalency. 5. Completion of Observation Verification Form. 6. Completion of OADM-120 Beginning Typewriting or demonstrated ability to type 35 words per minute. 7. Eligibility to enroll in the ENG-101 English Composition .

. FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology B10-121 路 Principles ai- Medical Science B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I Medical Record Technology 路MREC-101 Introduction to Medical Record Science

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 4

3 3 17

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health HLTH-101 Health Education Biology B10-129 Anatomy and Physiology Office Administration OADM-121 Business Typewriting ' Medical Assisting MA-103 Medical Terminology II Medical Record Technology MREC-102 Analysis of the Medical Record

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 4

3 3

3 20

100

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-130 Anatomy and Physiolpgy Office Administration ~DM-122 Intermediate Business Typewriting Medical Record Technology MREC-103 Introduction to Health Statistics MREC-104 Auxiliary Health Facilities

FOURTH QUARTER Social SCiences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-222 Pathophysiology Data Processing DATA-110 Introduction to Computers and Their Use Medical Record Technology MREC-201 Classifications, Indices, and Registers MREC-211 Directed Practice

Cr. Hrs. 3

3 3 3 3 3 18 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 4

3 4 17

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Medical Record Technology MREC-202 Legal Aspects of Medical Records MREC-204 Medical Machine Transcription MREC-212 Directed Practice

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Adm inistration BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Medical Record Technology MREC-203 Medical Record Seminar MREC-205 Medical Machine Transcription MREC-206 Tumor Registry MREC-213 Directed Practice

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 2

5 16 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 2

2 3 5 21

'Students having no typing proficiency should take CWlM-120.

101

Nursing Associate of Applied Scienc e Degree In Nursing .

This curricu lum combin es nursing instruction and experie nce with general educati on as preparation for a career in register ed nursing. Clinical experie nce include s caring for all age groups -- infancy to senior adultho od--in medical, surgical, obstetrical, pediatr ic and psychia tric settings at major Cuyaho ga County health facilities . Graduates are able to take the examination leading to state licensu re as a registered nurse. Students are admitted into the nursing program annually. The nursing program admits as many qualifie d students as its facilities permit. The nursing program is college -wide which means that courses are scheduled at one or more of the campus sites. Clinica l experie nces are schedu led at agencie s through out Cuyaho ga County to meet course requirements. To be conside red for admission to the program, the followin g require ments must be comple ted by February 1. Two options are provided. 1. Option I: For those students who are currently high school seniors or within one academ ic year of high school graduati on at the time of applicat ion . A. Complet ion of College Applicat ion for Admission Form . B. Complet ion of Nursing Program Applicat ion . C. Evidence of Mathematics proficien cy demons trated by 1) completion of MATH-100 Allied Health Science Mathematics at Cuyahog a Commu nity College with a C grade or better or 2) success ful completion of Allied Health Science / Math Proficien cy Test. D. Evidence of eligibility for placeme nt in ENG-101 College Compos ition as determin ed by 1) English Placement Test adminis tered by the College or by the 2) complet ion of ENG-101 College Compos itior} with a C grade or better. E. Evidence of achieve ment of a compos ite score on the American College Test (ACT) of 18 or higher. 2. Option II : This option is for all post-hig h school students . A. Complet ion of College Applicat ion for Admissi on Form. B. Complet ion of Nursing Program Applicat ion . C. Complet ion of a minimum of 14 quarter credit hours at a college or university. D. 2.5 overall grade point average (GPA). E. A grade of C or better in each of the following , if attempte d. A minimum of one course is required from those listed below. 1. B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology. 2. B10-129 Anatomy and Physiology. 3. B10-130 Anatomy and Physiology. 4. B10-121 Principle s of Medical Science (Introdu ction to Organic Chemistry and Bio-chemistry may be substitu ted for B10-121 for students planning to transfer to a baccala ureate nursing program ). 5. B10-221 Microbio logy. F. A grade of C or better in English-101 College Compos ition . G. Proficien cy in Mathem atics as demonstrated by: 1. Obtainin g a C grade or better in MATH-100 Allied Health Sciences Mathematics or 2. Success ful complet ion of the Nursing Math Proficien cy Test. H. A C or better in a college-level psycholo gy course.

102

FIRST QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-121 Principles of Medical Science' BI0-128 Anatomy and Physiology psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Nursing NUR5-125 Nursing Fundamentals

Cr. Hrs.

4 4

3 7 19

SECOND QUARTER Biology BI0-129 Anatomy and Physiology BI0-221 Microbiology Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Nursing NURS-126 Nursing Fundamentals

Cr. Hrs.

4 4

3 7 18

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology B10-130 Anatomy and Physiology Psychology PSY-201 Child Growth and Development Nursing NURS-127 Psychiatric Nursing"

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 4 7 18

FOURTH QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health Technologies HTEC-251 Ethics for Allied Health Technologies Nursing NURS-228 Maternal and Child Health Nursing""

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

10

17

FIFTH QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Nursing NURS-229 Nursing of Adults"

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 11 17

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Nursing NURS-212 Nursing Trends NUR5-230 Nursing of Adults

Cr. Hrs.

3

1 11

16 'CHEM-102 Introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry may be substituted for BI()'121 Principles of Medical Science for students planning to transfer to a Baccal8lJreate Nursing Program. "NURS-127 Psychiatric Nursing. NURS-228 Maternal and Child Health Nursing and NURS-229 Nursing of Adults may be taken in any sequence over three quarters. BI()'I30 Anatomy and PhysiolO!jY and PSY-201 Child Growth and Development may be taken before or concurrently with the first of these three nursmg COIJISeS.

103

Occupational Therapy Assisting Associate of Applied Science Degree In Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology The occupational therapy assistant wo~~s as an ~ssistant to !he registered occupational therapist in a CliniC: hospital or ~urslOg home setting. The occupational therapy assistant works with patients of all ages and teaches them basic skills for therapy purposes. The American Occupational Therapy Association requires a written examination after completion of this program to become a Certified Occupational Therapist Assistant. This certification is required to become licensed by the State of Ohio. To be considered for admission to the program, the following requirements must be completed by March 1. 1. Completion of College Application for Admission Form. 2. Completion of Allied Health Application Form. 3. High school graduate or successful completion of G.E.D. equivalency. 4. Submission of two official transcripts from high school and all colleges and universities attended . 5. Forms certifying completion of the minimum of 25 hours of work or voluntary experience in an occupational therapy department or in an allied human services area. 6. Four letters of recommendation. 7. Autobiographical essay indicating personal qualifications, knowledge and interest in occupational therapy. 8. C grade or better in 810-128 Anatomy and Physiology. 9. C grade or better in PSY-101 General Psychology. 10. C grade or better in ENG-101 College Composition.

FIRST QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology . BI0-129 Anatomy and Physiology Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Occupational Therapy Assisting OTAT-105 Introduction to Occupational Therapy OTAT-106 Occupational Therapy Media I

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 3

4 4 19

104

SECOND QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-130 Anatomy and Physiology Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I psychology PSY-202 Human Growth and Development Occupational Therapy Assisting OTAT-107 Occupational Therapy Process and Function I OTAT-108 Occupational Therapy Media II

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 5 2

4 18

THIRD QUARTER Social Sciences SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Occupational Therapy Assisting OTAT-109 Occupational Therapy Clinical Conditions I OTAT-110 Occupational Therapy Therapeutic Techniques I OTAT-114 Occupational Therapy Field Practice I OTAT-120 Occupational Therapy Therapeutic Recreation

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

4 4 2

3 20

FOURTH QUARTER Social Sciences . SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science Psychology PSY-207 Behavior Modification Occupational Therapy Assisting OTAT-209 Occupational Therapy Clinical Conditions II OTAT-210 Occupational Therapy Therapeutic Techniques II OTAT-214 Occupational Therapy Field Practice II

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 4 4

2 17

FIFTH QUARTER Speech Communication SPCH-100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication Social Sciences SSCI-t05 Introduction to Social Science Occupational Therapy Assisting OTAT-207 Occupational Therapy Process & Function II OTAT-211 Occupational Therapy Clinical Conditions III OTAT-212 Occupational Therapy 'Therapeutic Techniques III OTAT-216 Occupational Therapy Field Practice III

Cr. Hrs.

4

3 2 4 4 2 19

SIXTH QUARTER Occupational Therapy ASSisting OTAT-264 Occupational Therapy Field Work Experience I , OTAT-265 Occupational Therapy Field Work Experience II

Cr. Hrs.

4 4

8

105

Office Administration Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Office Administration This curriculum provides preparation for career secretaries in business, industry and government. Graduates are qualified for positions with educational institutions, law firms, medical and insurance offices, hospitals, industrial plants and business firms. Other employment opportunities exist with county, city, state and federal government agencies. FIRST QUARTER English ENG-101 College Composition Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-107 BUSiness: Accounting Applications Office Administration OA.OM-110 Beginning Shorthand 1* OA.OM-120 Beginning Typewriting 路

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

3 3 2 15

SECOND QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition Social SCiences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-111 Practical Accounting Office Administration OA.OM-104 Machine Calculations OA.OM-111 Shorthand II 路 OA.OM-121 Business Typewriting 路

THIRD QUARTER English ENG-103 College Composition Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration OA.OM-107 Information and Records Management OA.OM-112 Shorthand III " OA.OM-122 Intermediate Business Typewriting "

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3

3 3 3 18 Cr. Hrs.

3

3

3 3 3

16

106

FOURTH QUARTER Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Office Administration Qt\DM-203 Advanced Shorthand I路 Qt\DM-210 Business Communications Qt\DM-220 Advanced Business Typewriting路

Cr. Hrs.

6 3 4 3

16

FIFTH QUARTER Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Office Administration Qt\DM-204 Advanced Shorthand II��� Qt\DM-215 Information Processing Concepts Qt\DM-221 Basic Information Processing

Cr. Hrs. 6

3 3 3

16

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Office Administration Qt\DM-205 Advanced Shorthand '" Qt\DM-222 Advanced Information Processing Qt\DM-225 Information Processing Management Qt\DM-251 Office Administration

Cr. Hrs.

6 3 3 3 4 19

'Contact department if completed in high school or eIsewf1ere.

107

Ophthalmic (Optician) .Dispensing Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree In Ophthalmic ,(Optician) Dispensing Technology

The ophthalmic dispensing technician, following the prescription of an ophthalmologist or optometrist, interprets, compounds, and dispenses that prescription by applying knowledge, both technical and mechanical , for the production of lenses for the correction of visual errors. In addition, a personal relationship must exist between the ophthalmic dispenser and the patient. To assure patient satisfaction, the ophthalmic dispenser must make accurate -facial measurements, assist in the selection of frames, and carefully fit the glasses for comfort and visual efficiency. The ophthalmic dispensing technician works in a private or public office-laboratory and may operate an independently owned business. Sp~cialized opportunities are available in all phases of ophthalmic dispensing, laboratory, and contact lens work. Employment opportunities also are available as a branch manager of a wholesale laboratory, a technician in a wholesale laboratory or an optical goods salesperson. Admission to the Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology program is on the basis of nummerical order of receipt of completed application materials, limited only by the number of students to be accepted into the program. To be considered for admission to the program, the following requirements must be completed: 1. Completion of College Application for Admission Form. 2. Completion of Allied Health Application Form by May 15th. 3. Eligibilty for enrollment in MATH-101 Basic Algebra II as evidenced by one of the following: A. Completion of CCC MATH-095 Basic Algebra I (or equivalent course from another college) with a grade of C or better, or B. Completion of a mathematics assessment examination and placement at the MATH-101 Basic Algebra II level or above.

FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or SOcial Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics MATH-101 Basic Algebra II Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology OPT-101 Theoretical Optics OPT-121 Mechanical Optics

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3 3 3 16

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics MATH-102 Intermediate Algebra . (Continued next page)

108

Cr. Hrs.

3

4

PhysiCS PHY5-131 Physics of Optical Materials ophthalmic Dispensing Technology OPT-102 Theoretical Optics â&#x20AC;˘ OPT-122 Mechanical Optics

4 2

3 17

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physics PHY5-132 Geometric Optics Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology OPT-103 Theoretical Optics OPT-123 Mechanical Optics

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4 2 3

16

SUMMER SESSION Biology BI0-121 Principles of Medical Science Physics PHY5-133 Geometric Optics Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology OPT-104 Theoretical Optics OPT-124 Mechanical Optics

FOURTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-132 Anatomy of the Eye Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology OPT-211 Lens Design OPT-225 Mechanical Optics OPT-231 Ophthalmic Dispensing I

Cr. Hrs.

4 4 2

3 13 Cr. Hrs.

3 2

3 3 6 17

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology B10-133 Physiology of the Eye Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology OPT-210 Contact Lens I OPT-226 Mechanical Optics OPT-234 Ophthalmic Dispensing II OPT-252 Ophthalmic Instruments

Cr. Hrs. 3 2

4 3 4 1

17

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology OPT-213 Contact Lens II OPT-227 Mechanical Optics OPT-235 Ophthalmic Dispensing III OPT-253 Trends in Opticianry

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

5 3 2 1

17

109

Physical Therapist Assisting Associate of Applied Science Degree in Physical Therapist Assisting Technology

The physical therapist assistant assists in the provision of physical therapy treatments under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. The program prepares the graduate to work in acute and chronic hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, residences tor the aged, for the mentally retarded and in other health care centers where physical therapists are employed. Upon successful completion of the program , the student is eligible to take an examination to qualify tor licensure in the state in which the graduate chooses ~o practice. To be considered for admission to the program, the following requirements must be completed by March 1. 1. High school seniors must submit statements from a responsible school administrator that they are expected to be able to fulfill requirements 4 and 6 by the end of the spring term. 2. Completion of College Application for Admission Form. 3. Completion of Allied Health Application Form. 4. High school graduate or successful completion of G.E.D. equivalency. 5. Submission of transcripts from high school and any colleg e/ universities attended. Applicant must have a high school and/or college grade point average of 2.0 or better. 6. Completion of a high school or college laboratory science course with a grade of C or better. 7. Completed work experience form verified by employer to confirm any paid or voluntary work experience(s) or observation in a physical therapy or health care setting.

FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements Biology BI0-128 Anatomy and Physiology Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I Physical Therapist Assisting Technology PTAT-100 Health Care Orientation PTAT-101 Fundamentals of Physical Therapy PTAT-102 Functional Anatomy I

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 3

2 3 4 19

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-129 Anatomy and Physiology Emergency Medical Technology EMT-131 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Physical Therapist Assisting Technology PTAT-103 Functional Anatomy" PTAT-151 Physical Therapy Procedures

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

3 4 3 18

110

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physics PHY8-111 Physics for Health Technologies Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Physical Therapist Assisting Technology PTAT-120 Introduction to Clinical Conditions PTAT-153 Clinical Observation PTAT-201 Physical Therapy Procedures

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

3 2 2 3 17

SUMMER SESSION Physical Therapist Assisting Technology PTAT-254 Application of Physical Therapy

Cr. Hrs.

4 4

FOURTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physical Therapist Assisting Technology PTAT-122 Neuro-Musculo-Skeletal Dysfunction PTAT-202 Physical Therapy Procedures PTAT-251 Application of Physical Therapy

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 2 6 15

FIFTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-201 Child Growth and Development Physical Therapist Assisting Technology PTAT-203 Physical Therapy Procedures PTAT-252 Application of Physical Therapy PTAT-261 Stress in Illness

SIXTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physical Therapist Assisting Technology PTAT-204 Physical Rehabilitation Procedures PTAT-253 Application of Physical Therapy

Cr. Hrs.

3

4

2 6 2 18 Cr. Hrs.

3

3 3 6 16

111

Physician Assistant Associate of Applied Science Degree in Physician Assistant

The physician's assistant is a new member of the allied health professions. The assistant will work under the direction of a physician and will carry out many tasks previously performed only by physicians. These will include duties such as taking detailed patient histories, performing physical examinations, requesting and carrying out various laboratory and diagnostic tests, performing certain therapeutic procedures, and coordinating the work of other allied health assistants. The physician 's assistant, as part of the physician 's team , will be able to provide support in any setting , hospital, clinical or otherwise, in which the physician functions professionally. To be considered for admission to the program , the following requirements must be completed by February 15. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

A minimum of 2,000 hours of significant health care experience. Completion of College Application for Admission Form . Completion of Allied Health Application Form . Submission of a personal narrative. Submission of a description of prior m'edical experience. Submission of at least two references. . Submission of additional documentation , such as a copy of certification, registration or license. Veterans must submit a copy of form DD214. 8. Evidence of mathematics proficiency demonstrated by either: A. Placement eligibility for MATH-101 Basic Algebra II or B. Completion of MATH-101 Basic Algebra II at Cuyahoga Community College with a C grade or better or the transfer of an equivalent course from another college. 9. Evidence of English proficiency demonstrated by either: A. Placement eligibility for ENG-101 College Composition or B. Completion of ENG-101 College Composition at Cuyahoga Community College with a C grade or better or the transfer of an equivalent course from another college. 10. Evidence of Medical Terminology proficiency demonstrated by either: A. Successful completion of MA-102 Medical Terminology I proficiency examination or B. Completion of MA-102 Medical Terminology I with a C grade or better or the transfer of an equivalent course from another college.

FIRST QUARTER English or Speech Communication (See Specific 6raduation Requirements)" Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 810-121 Principles of Medical Science 810-128 Anatomy and Physiology Health Technology HTEC-2S1 Ethics for Allied Health Technologies Physician Assistant PA-104 Clinical Skills I PA-260 Primary Care Psychiatric and Social Problems

Cr. Hrs.

3 or 4

4 4

3 2

18 or 19 'E~~~~~NG-l0l ,

112

ENG-l02 and ENG-l03. Speech Communication SPCH-l00 or SPCH-l0l may be substituted for English

SECOND QUARTER Biology . 610-129 Anatomy and Physiology BI0-221 Microbiology Physician's Surgical Assistant PSA-131 Surgical Anatomy I Physician Assistant PA-105 Clinical Skills II PA-120 Pharmacology and Therapeutics I PA-240 Emergency Medicine and Surgery

Cr. Hrs.

4 4 2

3 2 3

18

THIRD QUARTER Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology 610-130 Anatomy and Physiology Medical Laboratory MLT-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures Physician's Surgical Assistant PSA-132 Surgical Anatomy II Physician Assistant PA-106 Clinical Skills III PA-121 Pharmacology and Therapeutics II PA-220 Differential Diagnosis I

FOURTH QUARTER (Summer) Social SCiences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Physician Assistant PA-107 Clinical Skills IV PA-230 Differential Diagnosis II PA-250 Obstetrics, Gynecology and Pediatrics

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 2

3 2 3 18 Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 2

3 14

FIFTH QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)" Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology PSY-201 Child Growth and Development Physician Assistant PA-212 Directed Clinical Practice I

SIXTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 4 8 18 Cr. Hrs.

English

(See Specific Graduation Requirements)" Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physician Assistant PA-213 Directed Clinical Practice II

3

3

8 15

SEVENTH QUARTER Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Physician Assistant PA-214 Directed Clinical Practice III

Cr. Hrs.

3

8 11

113

Physician's Surgical Assistant Associate of Applied Science Degree in Physician's Surgica l Assistant

Physician 's surgica l assisting is a compar atively new field and there are not enough physici an's surgica l assistants to meet the demand s of the hospita ls. The physici an's surgica l assistant works in the hospital operati ng room directly under the supervi sion of a surgeo n and perform s many of the duties custom arily done by interns and residents. Career opportu nities are excelle nt becaus e ' of the rapidly decreasing supply of interns and residents, and the salary scale has been steadily climbin g . To be conside red for admission to the program, the followin g require ments must be completed by April 15. 1. A minimum of two years of significa nt health care experien ce. (Graduate of a formal health care occupat ion program preferred). 2. Completion of College Application for Admission Form. 3. Completion of the Allied Health Applicat ion Form. 4. Submission of a personal narrative . 5. Submis sion of a narrativ e stateme nt describ ing all medical experiences. 6. Submission of three references. 7. Evidence of mathematics proficien cy demonstrated by either: A. Placement eligibility for MATH-101 Basic Algebra II) or B. Completion of MATH-101 Basic Algebra II at Cuyahoga Commu nity College with a C grade or better or the transfer of an equivale nt course from another college. 8. Evidence of English proficien cy demonstrated by either: A. Placement eligibility for ENG-101 College Composition or B. Completion of ENG-101 College Composition at Cuyahoga Community College with a Cgrade or better or the transfer of an equivalent course from another college. 9. Evidence of Medical Terminology proficien cy demonstrated by either: A. Successful completion of MA-102 Medical Terminology I proficiency examination or B. Completion of MA-102 Medical Terminology I with a C grade or better or the transfer of an equivalent course from another college.

FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Health or Physical Educatio n (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Biology BI0-121 Principles of Medical Science BI0-128 Anatomy and Physiolog y Health Technolo gy HTEC-251 Ethics for Allied Health Technolo gies Physician 's Surgical ASSistant PSA-110 Principles of Surgical Patient Care PSA-111 Surgical Care Techniqu es PSA-112 Electroca rdiograph y

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 4

3 2 1 19

SECON D QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Biology BI0-129 Anatomy and Physiolog y (Continued next page)

114

Cr. Hrs.

3

4

Physician Assistant PA-120 Pharmacology and Therapeutics I Physician's Surgical Assistant _ PSA-1 15 Operating Room Techniques PSA-121 Fundamentals of General Surgery I PSA-131 Surgical Anatomy I

2 2

3 2 17

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-130 Anatomy and Physiology BI0-221 Microbiology Physician Assistant PA-121 Pharmacology and Therapeutics II Physician's Surgical Assistant PSA-113 Pulmonary Function Test and Inhalation Therapy PSA-122 Fundamentals of General Surgery II PSA-132 Surgical Anatomy II

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 4 2 1 3 2

19

SUMMER QUARTER Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I Medical Laboratory Technology MLT-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures Physician's Surgical Assistant PSA-114 Roentgenogram Interpretation PSA-140 Medical History and Physical Evaluation PSA-281 Clinical Service I

FOURTH QUARTER Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Physician Assistant PA-260 Primary Care Psychiatric and Social Problems Physician's Surgical Assistant PSA-282 Clin ical Service II PSA-283 Clinical Service III

FIFTH QUARTER Social SCience (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology. Physician Assistant PA-220 Differential Diagnosis I Physician's Surgical Assistant PSA-284 Clinical Service IV PSA-285 Clinical Service V

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 1

3 3 14 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 2

3 3 14 _ Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3 15

SIXTH QUARTER Social Science (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-201 Child Growth and Development Physician Assistant PA-230 Differential Diagnosis II Physician 's Surgical Assistant PSA-286 Clinical Service VI PSA-287 Clinical Service VII

Cr. Hrs. 3

4 2

3 3 15

1.15

Production and Inventory 路Management Associate of Applied Science Degree with Concentration In Production and Inventory Management

This career program is tailored to individuals who are or will be working in production and inventory control departments in industry, business and other organizations. This program combines basic theory with the latest techniques in the field of production and inventory management. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-111 Practical Accounting or ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business Economics .ECON-100 Basic Economics

3

3 3 or 4

3 3 16 or 17

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-Elective* Data Processing DATA-110 Introduction to Computers and Their Use Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3

4

3 17

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-112 Principles of Management Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Manufacturing / Industrial Technology INDT-164 Inventory Management

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

4 ' 3

3 17

116

FOURTH QUARTER Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-121 Labor-Management Relations Economics ECON-151 Development of the American Economy Manufacturing / Industrial Technology INDT-165 Production and Inventory Forecasting INDT-166 Materials Requirements Planning

FIFTH QUARTER Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-220 Human Relations in Business BADM-Elective' Manufacturing /I ndustrial Technology INDT-122 Introduction to Manufacturing Management INDT-168 Shop Capacity Planning

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4

3 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3 15

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-212 Supervisory Techniques BADM-216 Introduction to Purchasing or INDT-291 Materials Handling and Plant Layout Manufacturing / Industrial Technology INDT-167 Shop Floor Control Elective "

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 3 3 15

'The elective(s) in I!<Jsiness Administration should be interpreted in retation to the career objectives of the student. "Electives for this program should be selected from the following areas: Accounting (PCCT), I!<Jsiness Administration (BAOM), Engineerill9(ENGR), Financial Management (AN), Industrial Technology (I NOT), Mar1<eting (MAR~, Office Administration (Q\OM), Real Estate (REAL), Transportation (TRAN).

117

Purchasing Management Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Purchasing Management

Purchases of materials, supplies and equipment represent a large part of a business or industrial firm's total cost of operation. Purchasing, because of its importance, is often designated as a separate responsibility to be handled by one or more individuals. Purchasing agents and their assistants are responsible for obtaining raw materials, goods and services at the lowest cost consistent with required quality. The majority of the nation's purchasing personnel are employed in manufacturing firms. Many also work in government agenCies, public utilities, schools and hospitals. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)" Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications Data Processing DATA-110 Introduction to Computers and Their Use Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)" Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting Economics ECON-1oo Basic Economics"" Office Administration Qo\DM-210 Business Communications

3

3 3 4 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4 3 or 4

4 18 or 19

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social SCiences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-122 Principles of Accounting Business Administration BADM-112 PrinCiples of Management BADM-Elective

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

4 4 3 18

118

FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Marketing MARK-201 Principles of Marketing Business Administration BADM 216 Introduction to Purchasing

FIFTH QUARTER

3

3

4

3 14 Cr. Hrs.

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-213 Business Law BADM-217 Intermediate Purchasing BADM-Elective***

SIX:rH QUARTER

3 3 4 3 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-214 Business Law BADM-218 Purchasing Management BADM-220 Human Relations 路in Business

3 3

4 3 3 16

'English ENG-l0l, ENG-l02 and Speech Convnunication SPClHOO or SPCH-l0l recommended. "Economics ECON-161 (4 cr.) and ECCJN.I62 (4 cr.) may be SIlbstituted. '''Student may select a course from among offerings in Ihe Business Administration area from courses not required in this pr~ram . . .. "PSyC/IOIOgy PSY-l0l and PSY-l02

recommended.

119

Radiography Associate of Applied Science Degree in Radiography

The trained radiographer is able to take diagnostic radiographs that will aid the doctor in treating his/her patient. The radiographer may be employed in a hospital, nursing home, doctor's office, clinic; in a county, state or federal institution or in industry. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the American Registry Examination (A.R.R.T.) and become a registered radiographer. To be considered for admission to the program, the following requirements must be completed by Apri! 15. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Completion of College Application for Admission Form. Completion of Allied Health Application Form . High school graduate or successful completion of G.E.D. equivalency. Submission of official transcripts from high school and any colleges/ universities attended. 5. Evidence of mathematics proficiency demonstrated by either: A. Successful completion of MATH-101 Basic Algebra II placement test administered by the college or B. Completion of MATH-101 Basic Algebra II at Cuyahoga Community College with a C grade or b.etter. 6. Evidence of English proficiency by either: A. Successful completion of ENG-101 College Composition placement test administered by the college or B. Completion of ENG-101 College Composition with a C grade or better.

FIRST QUARTER English ENG-路101 College Composition Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I Biology BI0-110 Anatomy and Physiology for Radiographers Radiography RADT-125 Methods of Patient Care RADT-151 Principles of Radiographic Exposure RADT-155 Radiographic Positioning-A

SECOND QUARTER English ENG-102 College Composition Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Radiography RADT-265 Introductory Radiological Clinical Experience I

Cr. Hrs. 3

3 5 2 5 3 21 Cr. Hrs.

3

6 10

120

THIRD QUARTER English or Speech ENG-103 College Composition or SPCH-100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication or SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Social Science SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science Biology BI0-220 Radiobiology Physics PHY5-115 Physics for Radiographers Radiography RADT-121 Radiologic Pathology RADT-156 Radiographic Positioning-B RADT-241 Intermediate Radiographic Exposure

Cr. Hrs.

3 or 4

3 2

3 3 2 4 20 or 21

FOURTH QUARTER Social Science SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Radiography RADT-266 Introductory Radiological Clinical Experience II

Cr. Hrs.

3

6 10

FIFTH QUARTER Social Science SSCI-105 Introduction to Social Science Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Radiography RADT-267 Intermediate Radiological Clinical Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3

6 10

SIXTH QUARTER Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Data Processing oo.TA-110 Introduction to Computers and Their Use Radiography RADT-201 Specialized Procedures in Radiology RADT-231 Imaging Systems RADT-254 Radiographic Quality Control

SEVENTH QUARTER Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Health Technologies HTEC-251 Ethics for Allied Health Technologies Radiography RADT-268 Advanced Radiological Clinical Experience

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

3 3 4 17 Cr. Hrs.

3

6 10

EIGHTH QUARTER Social Science . (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Radiography RADT-269 Final Radiological Clinical Experience RADT-270 Trends in Diagnostic Radiography

Cr. Hrs.

3 6 1 10

121

Real Estate Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration In Real Estate

This curriculum is designed to fulfill academic requirements ·Ieading to real estate licensure in .the State of Ohio and to prepare students for a professional career in the real estate industry. Graduates of the program are qualified for positions as brokers, sales agents, real estate managers, appraisers, counselors and real estate financiers. FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)· Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Require.ments) Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business Real Estate REAL-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

3 3

3 16

SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)· Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective. Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-100 BasiC Economics·· Real Estate REAL-102 Real Estate Brokerage

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3

3 or 4

3 16 or 17

THIRD QUARTER English or Speech Communication (See Specific Graduation Requirements)· Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirments) Business Administration BADM-112 Principles of Management Real Estate REAL-111 Valuation of Residential Properties

FOURTH QUARTER Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social Sciences or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Office Administration OADM-210 Business Communications Real Estate REAL-121 Real Estate Law REAL-151 Real Estate Management

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4 3 14 Cr. Hrs.

3 3 4

3 3 16

122

FIFTH QUARTER Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Marketing MARK-201 Principles of Marketing Business Administration BADM-241 Office Management Real Estate REAL-171. Real Estate Financing

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

4 3 14

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities, Social Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (see Elective Graduation Requirements) Real Estate REAL-211 Real Estate Sales or REAL-251 Valuation of Income Properties Electives' **

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 12 18

'English ENG-101 , ENG-102 and ~ Communications SPCH-100 or SPCH-101 recommended. "Economics ECON-1S1 may be substl1uted. , ..Mart<eting MARK-225, Data Processing ~TA-110. Real Estate REAL-271 and a basic couroe in ArchHecturai and Construction Engi.-ing Technology are recommended.

123

Respiratory Therapy Technology Associate of Applied Science Degree in Respiratory Therapy Technology .

Respiratory Therapy is a comparatively new field. There are nat enough therapists to meet the demands of the hospitals. Therefore, employment opportunities are excellent and the salary scale is steadily climbing. The respiratory therapy technologist works primarily in hospitals. However, these services are needed in nursing homes, Glinics and other health-related centers. The respiratory therapy technologist works with patients of a" ages under the supervision of a medical doctor. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the National Board for Respiratory Therapy Exams"and become a registered Respiratory Therapist. To be considered for admission to the program, the following requ irements must be completed by April 15. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

7.

8.

9.

Completion of College Application for Admission Form . Completion of Allied Health Application Form. High School graduate or successful completion of G.E.D. equivalency. Submission of official transcripts from high school and all colleges or universities attended. Submission of a pe ~sonal narrative. Submission of Observation Verification Form after completion of a visit to a hospital Department of Respiratory Therapy. Forms and hospital listings available from the Office of Admissions and Records, Western Campus. Evidence of mathematics proficiency' demonstrated by either: A. Successful completion of MATH-101 Basic Algebra II placement test administered by the college or B. Completion of MATH-101 Basic Algebra II at Cuyahoga Community . College with a C grade or better. Evidence of English proficiency by either: A. Successful completion of ENG-101 College Composition placement test administered by the college or B. Completion of ENG-101 College Composition with a C grade or better. An individual counseling session scheduled by the program coordinator may be requested of an applicant.

FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Mathematics MATH-101 Basic Algebra II Biology BI0-121 Principles of Medical Science BI0-128 Anatomy and Physiology Health Technologies HTEC-2S1 Ethics for Allied Health Technologies Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-110 Introduction to Respiratory Therapy

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4 4 .1 2

17

124

SECOND QUARTER-: English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I Biology BI0-129 Anatomy and Physiology Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-117 Physics for Respiratory Therapy Physics for Respiratory Therapy RESP-130 Acid-Base Physiology

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 4 3 2 18

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Biology BI0-221 Microbiology Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-131 Pharmacology for Respiratory Therapy RESP-150 Cardiopulmonary Physiology RESP-210 Basic Respiratory Therapy Equipment

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 3 4 4 18

SUMMER SESSION Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-151 Pathology for Respiratory Therapy RESP-220 Respiratory Therapy Procedures I RESP-230 Respiratory Therapy Application I

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 4 5 15

FOURTH QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Psychology PSY-102 General Psychology Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-240 Respiratory Therapy Procedures II RESP-250 Respiratory Therapy Application II

Cr. Hrs.

3 4

5 13

FIFTH QUARTER . Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-260 Respiratory Therapy Procedures III RESP-270 Respiratory Therapy Application III

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 5 13

SIXTH .QUARTER . Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Social Sciences ' (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Gra(;Juation Requirements) Respiratory Therapy Technology RESp路252 Medical Administration and Record Keeping' RESP-280 Respiratory Therapy Procedures IV RESP-290 Respiratory Therapy Application IY'

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

2 2 5 16

125

-Transportation Associate of Applied Business Degree with Concentration in Transportation

People who help move goods and people through the air and water and over -land account for a sizable segment of the nation's work force. T.his curriculum is designed to prepare students for clerical, supervisory and administrative positions with a carrier or an industrial traffic department. CareeJ possibilities incluse rate analyst, traffic claims agent, terminal office manager, reservations: salesperson, traffic expediter and scheduler. Employment opportunities are available with truck, bus, water, rail and air carriers. FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)" Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Accounting ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business Office Administration ~DM-120 Beginning Typewriting

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 2

15

'SECOND QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Sciences (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Economics ECON-151 Development of the American Economy Business路 Administration BADM-Elective Transportation TRAN-121 Transportation Principles

Cr. Hrs.

3

4

3 3 14

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduation Requirements)' Social Sciences . (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, SOCial Sciences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective GraduatiQn Requirements) Marketing MARK-201 Principles of Marketing

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 4

13

126

FOURTH QUARTER Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduation Requirements) Humanities, Social SCiences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) " Office Administration O\DM-210 Business Communications Business Administration BADM-213 Business Law BADM-220 Human Relations in Business Transportation TRAN-221 Tariffs and Classifications

Cr. Hrs.

3 4 4

3 3 18

FIFTH QUARTER Humanities, Social SCiences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)'" Humanities, Social SCiences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requir.ements)路路路 Business Administration BADM-214 Business Law Accounting ACCT-111 Practical Accounting Transportation TRAN-222 Tariffs and Classifications

Cr. Hrs.

3

3 4 3 3

16

SIXTH QUARTER Humanities, Social SCiences, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements)'" Humanities, Social Sciencas, or Science and Mathematics (See Elective Graduation Requirements) Business Administration BADM-Elective Transportation TRAN-231 Transportation Regulations TRAN-241 Industrial Traffic Management

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 4

16

'English ENG-IOI , ENG-I02 and Speech Communications SPCH-IOO or SPCH-IOI recommended. "Geography GEOG-I03 recommended. "'Psychology PSY-IOI and PSY-I02 recommended.

127

SHORTTERM , PROGRAM COURSE PLANS

129

Electrocardiograph (ECG) Technology Competency Award

The Electrocardiograph (EGG) Technician performs the familiar cardiac (heart) test under the supervision of a physician . The EGG Technician operates the electrocardiograph or EGG machine in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics , family health care centers, medical office buildings and the private offices of selected physicians. The program is six months or two academic quarters in length. Students are formally admitted once annually. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. Health Technology HTEC-102 Integrated Basic Science HTEC-251 Ethics for Allied Health Technologies Medical Assisting MA-100 Introduction to Medical Terminology MA-205 Introduction to Electrocardiography MA-256 Allied Health Seminar

SECOND QUARTER Emergency Medical Technology EMT-131 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Medical Assisting MA-206 Clinical Electrocardiography MA-252 Medical Office Practicum

5 1 3 4 3 16 Cr. Hrs.

3 4

8

130

Laboratory Phlebotomy competency Award

The laboratory phlebotomist is a laboratory worker who collects blood specimens for laboratory' analysis. In addition to the knowledge and technical skills required to collect blood from veins (venipunture) and from capillaries (fingerstick), the job also requires some basic knowledge of asepsis, blood, the use of anticoagulants and the importance of proper handling and identification of the patient and blood specimens. The Laboratory Phlebotomy Program is six months or two academic quarters in length . Students are formally admitted once annually. FIRST QUARTER Cr. Hrs. Medical Assisting . MA-100 Introduction to Medical Terminology MA-256 Allied Health Seminar Medical Laboratory Technology MLT-102 Medical Laboratory Ethics MLT-103 Introduction to Blood Collection Health Technology HTEC-102 Integrated Basic Science

3 3 1 4 5 16

SECOND QUARTER MedicaL Laboratory Technology MLT-104 Clinical Phlebotomy Techniques MLT-215 Medical Laboratory Technology Practicum Emergency Medical Technology EMT-131 Cardiop~lmonary Resuscitation

Cr. Hrs. 2

4

7

131

Medi cal Assis ting compe tency Award

The Medica l Assistant is a health care profess ional who assists a physici an or group of physicia ns in a private office, clinic or other health care facility. Duties of the Medica l Assista nt include routine corresp ondenc e, medical records , billing, collecti ons, typing, making appoint ments and schedu ling of hospital admiss ions and surgery , taking vital signs, perform ing laborat ory screeni ng tests, sterilizi ng instrum ents and orderin g supplies. The Medica l Assisting Compe tency Award program is 12 months or four quarter s in length. Students are admitte d once annuall y, in March, and gradua te the followin g year, in June, FIRST QUARTER (SPRING) Cr. Hrs.

Medical Assisting MA-101 Medical Office Orientation MA-102 Medical Terminology I Health Technolo gy HTEC-102 Integrated Basic Science Office Administration Ql\.OM-122 Intermediate Business Typewriting

1 3 5 3 12

SECOND QUARTER (FALL) Medical Assisting MA-103 Medical Terminology II Medical Laborato ry Technolo gy MLT-203 Medical Laborato ry Procedures MLT-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures Office Administration Ql\.OM-220 Advanced Business Typewriting

Cr. Hrs. 3 4 4 3 14

THIRD QUARTER (WINTER) Medical Assisting MA-248 Medical Office Procedur es MA-249 Clinical Medical Assisting MA-251 Medical Assisting Ethics Medical Record Technolo gy MREC-204 Medical Machine Transcrip tion

Cr. Hrs. 5 5 2 2 14

FOURTH QUARTER (SPRING) Medical Assisting MA-250 Applied Medical Assisting MA-252 Medical Office Practicum MA-256 Allied Health Seminar Emergency Medical Technolo gy EMT-131 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

Cr. Hrs. 2 4 3

10

132

Medical Office Receptionist Achievement .Award

The medical office receptionist is trained to handle basic clerical-receptionist duties in a variety of medical office settings. These front offic::e duties include scheduling appointments, booking arriving patielilts, obtain ing. patient data and making future apPointments; handling mail, the telephone and routine typing . The receptionist may -also be called upon to; provideback-up services such as medical transcription , ·insurance forms and bookkeeping . The Medical Office Receptionist Achievement Award program is a nine-month option in the medical assisting curriculum. Full-time students are admitted each June to the summer session . SUMMER SESSION Health Technologies HTEC· 102 Integrated Basic Science Medical Assisting MA·101 Medical Office Orientation MA·102 Medical Terminology I Office Administration , OADM·122 Intermediate Business Typewriting

Cr. Hrs. 5 1 3 3 12

FALL QUARTER Data Processing OATA-112 Introduction to Microcomputers and Their Use Emergency Medical Technology EMT-131 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Medical Assisting MA-103 Medical Terminology II MA-256 Allied Health Seminar Office Administration OADM-210 Business Communications

Cr. Hrs. 4

3 3 4 15

WINTER QUARTER Medical Assisting MA-248 Medicat Office Procedures MA-251 Medical Assisting Ethics Medical Record Technology MREC-204 Medical Machine Transcription Office Administration OADM-220 -Advanced Business Typewriting OADM-221 Basic Information Processing

Cr. Hrs. 5 2 2 3 3 15

133

Medical Terminology Achievement Award

The Medical Terminology Achievement Award is a written record of achievement granted to students who complete three Medical Terminology courses with minimum "8" grades within one calendar year and who also earn a passing score on the written Achievement Award Examination. Classes begin each quarter. Medical Assisting MA-1OO Introduction to Medical Terminology MA-102 Medical Terminology I MA-103 Medical Terminology II

134

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3 9

Medical Transcription competency Award

The medical transcriber or transcripti'onist transcribes medical, surgical, ancillary reports and other medical documents. Hospitals and physicians' offices offer excellent employment opportunities. In a hospital, transcribers work in the Medical Record Department, Radiology, Pathology, Adm issions or Executive Offices. Public Health Clinics, School Health Facilities, Insurance Agencies, Military Medical Departments and Government Agencies also offer challenging employment opportun ities. Full-time day students are' admitted each September and will complete the program the following August. Part-time day students will be admitted , with the approval of the Program Coordinator. FIRST QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

English ENG-101 College Composition Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I Medical Record Technology MREC-101 Introduction to Medical Record Science Office Administration G6.DM-122 Intermediate Business Typewriting

3

3 3 3 12

SECOND QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Medical Assisting MA-103 Medical Terminology II Medical Record Technology MREC-102 Analysis of the Medical Record MREC-202 Legal Aspects of Medical Records MREC-204 Medical Machine Transcription

3 3 3 2 11

THIRD QUARTER (SPRING)

Cr. Hrs.

English ENG-102 College Composition Health Technologies HTEC-102 Integrated Basic Science ~ Medical Record Technology MREC-205 Medical Machine Transcription Office Administration OADM-221 BasiC Information Processing

3 5 2

3 13

FOURTH QUARTER

Cr. Hrs.

Medical Record Technology MREC-211 Directed Practice

4 4

' Students can substitute 610-128, 129 & 130 Anatomy and Physiology during Fall. Winter and Spring Quarters.

135

Optical Mechanics Certificate of Proficiency in Optical Mechanics

This certifica te program prepare s student s for employ ment as ophtha lmic laborat ory workers with skills in laborat ory techniq ues for surfacin g and finishin g lenses. The curricu lum is the first four quarter s of the Ophtha lmic (Optici an) Dispen sing Techno logy program . FIRST QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Humaniti es or Social Sciences (See Elective Graduatio n Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements)" . Mathema tics MATH-101 Basic Algebra II Ophthalm ic Dispensin g Technolo gy OPT-101 Theoretic al Optics OPT-121 Mechanic al Optics

SECON D QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Mathema tics MATH-102 Intermediate Algebra Physics PHYS-131 Physics of Optical Materials Ophthalm ic Dispensin g Teclmolo gy OPT-102 Theoretic al 'Optics OPT-122 Mechanic al Optics

THIRD QUARTER English (See Specific Graduatio n Requirements) Humaniti es or Social Sciences " (See Elective Graduatio n Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Specific Graduatio n Requirem ents) Physics PHYS-132 Geometri c Optics Ophthalm ic Dispensin g Technolo gy OPT-103 Theoretic al Optics OPT-123 Mechanic al Optics

SUMME R SESSION Biology B10-121 Principles of Medical Science Physics PHYS-133 Geometri c Optics Ophthalm ic Dispensin g Technolo gy OPT-104 Theoretic al Optics OPT-124 Mechanic al Optics

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 3

16 Cr. Hrs.

3

4 4 2 3 17 Cr. Hrs.

3 3

4 2

3 16 Cr. Hrs.

4 4

2 3 13

136

Respiratory Therapy Certificate of Proficiency in Respiratory Therapy

Respiratory Therapy is a comparatively new field. There are not enough technicians to meet the demand of the hospitals. Therefore, employment opportunities are excellent and the salary scale is steadily climbing . These technicians will work primarily in hospitals. However, their services are' needed in nursing homes, 'clinics and other health-related centers. They will work with patients of all ages. The respiratory therapy technician will work under the supervision of a medical doctor. The person completing the certificate program will be able to apply the major portion of credits earned toward the requirements of the Respiratory Therapy Associate Degree program. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the National Board for Respiratory Therapy Exam to become certified as a Respiratory Therapy Technician . FIRST QUARTER Medical Assisting MA-102 Medical Terminology I Biology BI0-121 Principles of Medical Science BI0-128 Anatomy and Physiology Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-110 Introduction to Respiratory Therapy RESP-117 Physics for Respiratory Therapy

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 4

2 3 16

SECOND QUARTER Health Technology HTEC-251 Ethics for Allied Health Technologies Biology BI0-221 Microbiology Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-111 Respiratory Technician Procedures I RESP-112 Respiratory Technician Applications I RESP-130 Acid-Base Physiology

Cr. Hrs.

4 4 3 2 14

THIRD QUARTER . Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-113 Respiratory' Technician Procedures II RESP-114 Respiratory Technician Applications II RESP-131 Pharmacology for Respiratory Therapy

Cr. Hrs.

4 5

3 12

SUMMER SESSION Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-115 Respiratory Technician Procedures III RESP-116 Clinical Specialties (Respiratory)

Cr. Hrs.

3 6

9

137

路 COURSE DESCR路IPTIONS .

139

Course Numbering To simplify the task of maintaining accurate and complete academic records for all students at the College, an -alphabetical numeric code is used to identify all courses. In this code, the first three or four alpha digits indicate the subject area (see course codes listing at the end of this section). The remaining digits are the numbers assigned to that particular courses within the subject area. For example, College Algebra bears the code MATH-115. The letters MATH refer to the subject area, Mathematics. The number 115 has been assigned to a specific course, College Algebra: within that subject area. Courses are listed in numerical order within each subject area. Courses numbered XXX-099 generally are designed to provide stu- . dents with basic skills necessary for freshman studies. ENG-097, for example, is Language Fundamentals I. Cowrses numbered XXX-100 through XXX-199 normally represent freshman- level courses. Courses numbered XXX-200 through XXX-299 ar.e usually sophomore-level courses. Course numbers do not indicate whetl:ler or not a course will be accepted for transfer to other institutions .. Students are advised to-consult with their counselors regarding .transfer of courses and credits to other institutions. See the section-'in this Catalog on Transferring to Other Institutions.

Credit HQurs The number 'o f quarter credits for each 'course described in the catalog is indicated after the course. title. For example, three credits are indicated by 3 CR. The number of c r.edits for a- course does not necessarily equal the number of hours that the eourse meets in one week.

Prerequisites Prerequisites, if any, are listed at the end of each course description . Prerequisites are established to assure that the student has an adequate and sufficient background to enroll in the course. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that he or she has met the prerequisites fer any course "in which he or she enrolls. If the student is unsure, he or she sh'ould consult with the -faculty member who will be teaching the course prior to registration .

140

How to Read .the Course Descriptions

Subject Area Code

Course Number

Course Description

Credit Hours

Number of Hours the Course Meets per Week

Prerequisites

Schedule of Classes Courses described in this Catalog are those approved by the Cuyahoga Community College Board of Trustees at the time of pub~ lication. Inclusion of a course description does not obligate the College to offer the course in any given quarter or academic year. A Schedule of Classes is published each quarter prior to the registration period . The Schedule of Classes contains a list of the classes to be offered , placement test schedules and general registration information. Courses approved by the Board of Trustees after the publication of this Catalog are reflected in the Schedule of Classes.

Subject Groupings and Abbreviations The following subject groupings are listed to assist students in determining appropriate courses to take to complete graduation requirements and electives.

141

Career Occupational ACCT ARCH AVIA BADM CHMT CART CMHT C&CR DATA DENT DLAB DIET ECED ELEC EMT ENGR FIN FIRE . GCMT HTEC HOSP INDT INTD LAB LAWE LIB MARK MECH MA MLT MREC NURS OTAT OADM OPT PTAT

142

Accounting Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology Aviation Technology Business Administration Chemical Technology Commercial Art CommunitY Mental Health Technology Court and Conference Reporting Data Processing Dental Hygiene Dental Laboratory Technology Dietetic Technology Early Childhood Education Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology Emergency Medical Technology Engineering Financial Management Fire Technology Graphic Communications Managment and Technology Health Technologies Hospitality Management Man ufacturing I Industrial Technology Interior Design Technology Labor Studies Law Enforcement Library I instructional Media Technology Marketing Mechanical Engineering Technology Medical Assisting Medical Laboratory Technology Medical Record Technology Nursing Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology Office Administration OphthalmiC Dispensing Technology Physical Therapist Assisting Technology

PA PSA POS RADT REAL RESP TRAN UST

Physician Assisting Physician's Surgical Assistant Plant Operation Services Radiography Real Estate Respiratory Therapy Technology Transportation Urban Studies

Humanities ART DANC ENG FREN GER HEBR HUM ITAL JOUR MUS PHIL SPAN SPCH THEA

Art Dance English (200 I~vel courses only) French German Hebrew Humanities Italian Journalism Music Philosophy Spanish Speech Communication Theatre Arts

. Science and Mathematics BIO CHEM ESCI MATH PSCI PHYS

Biology Chemistry Earth Science Mathematics Physical Science Physics

Social and Behavioral Sciences ANTH ECON EDUC GEOG HIST POL PSY SSCI SOC

Anthropology Economics Education Geography History Political Science Psychology Social Science Sociology

Other General Electives GEN HLTH PE

General Studies Health Physical Education

course Abbreviations ACCT ANTH ARCH ART AVIA BIO BADM CHMT CHEM CART CMHT C&CR DANC DATA DENT DLAB DIET ECED ESCI ECON EDUC ELEC EMT ENG ENGR FIN FIRE FREN GEN GEOG GER GCMT HLTH HTEC HEBR HIST HOSP HUM INDT

Accounting Anthropology Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology Art Aviation Technology Biology Business Administration Chemical Technology Chemistry Commercial Art Community Mental Health Techno.logy Court and Conference Reporting Dance Data Processing Dental Hygiene Dental Laboratory Technology Dietectic Technology Early Childhood Education Earth Science Economics Education Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology Emergency Medical Techno logy English Engineering Financial Management Fire Technology French General Studies Geography German Graphic Communications Management and Technology Health Health Technologies Hebrew History Hospitality Management Humanities Manufacturing / Industrial Technology

INTD ITAL JOUR LAB LAWE LIB MARK MATH MECH MA MLT MREC MUS NURS OTAT OADM OPT PHIL PE PSCI PTAT PA PSA PHYS POS POL PSY RADT REAL RESP SSCI SOC SPAN SPCH THEA TRAN UST

Interior Design Technology Italian Journalism Labor Studies Law Enforcement Library / Instructional Media Technology Marketing Mathematics Mechanical Engineering Technology Medical Assisting Medical Laboratory Technology Medical Record Technology Music Nursing Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology Office Administration Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology Philosophy Physical Education Physical Science Physical Therapist Assisting Technology Physician Assistant Physician's Surgical Assistant Physics Plant Operation !3ervices Political Science Psychology Radiography Real Estate Respiratory Therapy Technology Social Science Sociology Spanish Speech Communication Theatre Arts Transportation Urban Studies

143

Accounting ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications - 3 Cr. - Application of simple mathematical procedures to typical a,ccounting, financial, marketing, economic, and other business problems. Includes study of essentials of simple, periodic and compound interest, present value, payroll taxes, depreciation, bank reconciliations, and inventories. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-091 College Arithmetic or equivalent. ACCT-111 Practical Accounting - 3 Cr. - A course for students in such programs as hospitality management, medical technology, office administration, and / or other programs requiring preparation of business records and reports applicable to professional offices. This course is not recommended for accounting majors . Students with previous bookkeeping knowledge should elect ACCT -121 Principles of Accounting . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting - 4 Cr. - Analytical study of basic accounting theory and procedures for service and merchandising corpqrations. Conventional double-entry procedures . End-of-period summary activities, including preparation of worksheets, adjusting, closing and reversing entries , preparation of financial statements. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ACCT-122 Principles of Accounting - 4 Cr. - Continuation of ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting. In addition, accounting for corporations, analysis of financial statements , funds-flow analysis, accounting for manufacturing operations and proprietorships. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT107 Business: Accounting Applications or departmental approval, ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting, BADM-108 Introduction to Business or departmental approval. ACCT-201 Management Finance and Accounting - 4 Cr. - Development of managerial skills in using financial and accounting information in small ventures. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite:

144

ACCT-121 PrinCiples of Accounting or departmental approval. ACCT-202 Management Finance and Accounting - 4 Cr. - Continuation of ACCT-201 Management Finance and Accounting . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ACCT-201 Management Finance and Accounting. ACCT, 221 Intermediate Accounting - 4 Cr. - Comprehensive study of the accounting theory, procedures and analyses, reports and presentations generally accepted by major authorities. Accrual-basis accounting concepts and accounting control practices conducted at professional levels of presentation . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ACCT-122 PrinCiples of Accounting. ACCT-222 Intermediate Accounting - 4 Cr. - Continuation of ACCT-221 Intermediate Accounting . Accrualbasis and cash-basis accounting, double and single entry formats, historical and replacement cost valuations, funds-flow and common-dollar analyses conducted at professional levels of presentation . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : ACCT-221 Intermediate Accounting. ACCT-231 Cost Accounting - 4 Cr. - Theory and practice of cost accounting as it is applied in industrial management information systems for accountability, product and process cost analysis, price setting and determination of profitability. Cost theories, concepts, assumptions, systems and procedures. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : ACCT-122 Principles of Accounting. ACCT-232 Cost Accounting - 4 Cr. - Planning, implementing, controlling and analytical . processes of management of manufacturing businesses. The budgeting process and standard cost procedures used to analyze productive processes measuring effects for the use of management in decision-making activities. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ACCT-231 Cost Accounting. ACCT-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program. Employment in an approved' training facility under College supervision.

The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program .

primitive cultures, non-Western civilizations and peasant societies. Theories of cultural anthropology will be utilized in an attempt to understand the reasons for differences among humans. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ANTH-101 Cultural Anthropology 'o r SOC-101 Introductory Sociology.

ACCT-266 Taxation I - 4 Cr. - Thorough study of federal individual income tax law and procedures. Topics include gross income, inclusions and exclusions, itemized deductions, exemptions, tax credits, tax planning, and sole proprietorship business income tax. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ACCT -121 Principles of Accounting or departmental approval.

ANTH-203 Archaeological Field Methods - 6 Cr. - Students receive training and experience in surveying , mapping , excavation , and artifact processing at archaeological sites. Course requires 40 hours a week of participation during the summer session . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

ACCT-267 Taxation II - 4 Cr. Thorough study of federal partnership and corporation tax law and procedures . Topics include advanced individual income tax problems, small business corporat ions, and depreciation recapture provisions. Some exposure to busi-{ ness, state and local income tax provisions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: ACCT-266 Taxation I, ACCT-122 Principles of Accounting, or depa r tmental . approval.

Anthropology ANTH-101 Cultural Anthropology - 4 Cr. - Cultural patterns and. dynamics. History, distribution and growth of cultural patterns. Includes social organization and material culture. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ANTH-102 Physical Anthropology 4 Cr. - Study of man as a physical being. Origin and antiquity of man, The relationship of man to animals, paleontological discoveries and racial phenomena. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ANTH-103 Prehistoric ArchaeOlogy4 Cr, - The discovery of man's prehistoric past by the methods of modern archaeology. Presentation of archaeological findings and interpretations in selected parts of the world . Lecture 4 hours'. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ANTH-201 Peoples and Cultures of the World - 4 Cr. - A survey of

Architectural and Construction Eng ineeri ng Technology ARCH-101 Introduction to Managing a Construction Company - 4Cr. An overview of the operations of a construction firm. Types and organization of firms, bidding and types of contracts, scheduling, labor laws, construction legislation , legal regulations and governing agencies, courts and litigations, bonding , insurance safety and financing of construction organizations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ARCH-102 Construction Company Financial Management - 4 Cr. - A review of business records needed to prepare financial reports , pay taxes, obtain bonds, invest earnings and control costs. Contractor accounting , purchases, job cost controls, payments, labor accounting, income, invoicing, facilities, equipment overhead , taxes, permits, and license records. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ARCH-101 Introduction to Managing a Construction Company. ARCH-103 Construction Contract Documents - 4 Cr. - Review of legal documents related to construction . Contractor role in completing project. Contract documents and drawings. Authority pattern on the project. Document integration with drawings, regulations and design

145

standard s. Agents of the contract or, labor contract s, payment standards, insuran ce and bonds, contrac tor claims and rights. Lecture 4 hours. Laborat ory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: ARCH-101 Introduc tion to Managing a Constru ction Company. ARCH-104 Construction Drawings and Quantity Surveys - 4 Cr. - Constructio n drawing s, orthogra phic projectio ns, architec tural drawing s, industrial drawin'g s, shop drawing s, floor-are a, building volume, material take-offs , labor projectio ns. Bid proposals and job cost controls . Lecture 4 hours. Laborato ry 0 hours. Prerequisite: ARCH-101 Introduc tion to Managi ng a Constr uction Compan y. ARCH-121 Architectural Drawing - 3 Cr. - Design and construc tion of domesti c structure s. Scale, detailing, framing systems , dimensi oning , architec tural lettering and modular systems . Contem porary building materials are. surveyed . Lecture 1 hour. Labora tory 4 hours . Prerequ i. site:ENGR-121 Enginee ring Drawing, equival ent or instruc tor approval. ARCH-122 Architectural Drawing - 3 Cr. - A continua tion of ARCH-121 Architec tural Drawing with emphasis on masonry construc tion . Introduc tion to steel construc tion. Lecture 1 hour. Laborato ry 4 hours. Prerequisite: ARCH-1 21 Archite ctural Drawing . ARCH-123 Architectural Drawing - 3 Cr. - A continua tion of ARCH-122 Architec tural Drawing . Steel and Goncrete structure s are emphasized . Practical drawing problem s are introduce d relating to commer cial structure s. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ARCH 122 Architec tural Drawing . ARCH-221 Building Equipment - 3 Cr. - Introduc tion to mechan ical systems as applicab le to bu ilding construc tion . Water supply, sanitation and acoustic al systems . Environmental factors affecting systems design . Lecture 3 hours. Laborato ry o hours. Prerequisite: ARCH-122 Architectu ral Drawing . ARCH-222 Building Equipment - 3 Cr. - Fundam entals of heating , ventilat ing and air conditio ning. Equipme nt and systems will be investigated. Lecture 3 hours. Labora-

146

tory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ARCH122 Architec tural Drawing. ARCH-223 Building Equipment - 3 Cr. - Electrical theory and electrical systems as applicab le to buildings. Fundamentals of commer cial and industrial lighting . Systems of power distribut ion. Lecture 3 hours. Laborat ory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: ARCH-122 Architec tural Drawing . ARCH-231 Contracts and Specifications - 2 Cr. - Legal contract s, constructio n and interpre tation of specifica tions as related to the construction industry . Lecture 2 hours. Laborat ory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: ARCH-122 Architec tural Drawing . ARCH-232 Construction Estimating - 3 Cr. - A basic course for the beginning estimato r, architec t or con路tractor. Comput ing from plans of a construc tion project, includin g cost of labor and materials, lump sum and unit costs, prelimin ary and final estimates. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: ARCH123 Arch itectu ral Drawin g or equivalent. ARCH-241 Principles of Structural Design - 3 Cr. - Introduc tion to the design of structura l members and systems. Stress analysis by graphic method . Fasteners, welded connections, members in tension and compression , rolled beams and girders are topics conside red . Lecture 2 hours. LaboratorY 2 hours. Prerequisite: ENGR-251 Strength of Materials or concurr ent enrollment. ARCH-242 Principles of Structural Design - 3 Cr. - A Continu ation of ARCH-241 Principle s of Structur al Design with emphasis on wood and timber construc tion. Introduc tion to reinforc ed concret e . Lecture 2 hours. Laborato ry 2 hours. Prerequisite: ARCH-241 Principle s of Structural Design . ARCH-243 Principles of Concrete Design - 3 Cr. - Capacities of reinforced concret e. Design of reinforced concret e beams , girders , floor slabs, column and wall footings. Lecture 2 hours. Laborato ry 2 hours. Prerequisite: ARCH-242 Principles of Structur al Design . ARCH-251 Construction Procedures - 3 Cr. - Various constru ction methods and procedu res. Includes an orientati on to contemp orary construction equipme nt and its application to the job schedu le . Site

preparation, scheduling of equipment, men and materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: ARCH-123 Architectural Drawing or ability to interp 'r e t cons t ruction drawings and specifications.

cludes the 19th century schools and some study of the 20th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. . ART...:105 Drawing I - 3 Cr. - An introdllctory course in drawing to develop a student's ability to describe through observation . Location of forms in space, proportion , shape and light. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

ARCH-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program . Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision . The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program .

ART-106 Drawing II - 3 Cr . - Exploration of different media and approaches. The building of solid forms in clearly and totally defined space, using textures and surfaces, linear and tonal qualities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-105 Drawing I or departmental approval.

ARCH-261 Contract Drawing Preparation - 3 Cr. - -Application of previously learned principles and drafting methods to the preparation of final working drawings of a commercial and industrial construction project. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: ARCH-123 Architectural Drawing and ARCH-241 Principles of Structural Design .

ART-107 Drawing III - 3 Cr. - Development of skills in drawing based upon knowledge acquired in ART105 and 106. Exploration of a wide variety of media and techniques. Attention to perspective and composition in drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboraiory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-106 Drawing II or departmental approval.

ART-10S"Fundamentals of Design 13 Cr. - Study of such elements of Art design as line, mass, space, light, shade, texture and color. OrgaoizaART-101 Art Appreciation - 4 Cr. tion to achieve rhythm, balance, Development of an understanding movement and unity. Lecture 2 and interest in creative forms in the . hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequivisual arts. Introduction to painting, site: None. sculpture, and architecture. Simple ART-109 Fundamentals of Design experimental studies in basic design through texts and visual materials. 3 Cr. -Continuation of ART-108 Fundamentals of Design . Lecture 2 Reading required. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite:路 ART-108 Fundamentals of DeNone. sign I or departmental approval. ART-102 Art History - 3 Cr. - A surART-110 Fundamentals of Design vey of the chronological and stylistic 3 Cr. -Continuation of ART-109 development of Western art. InFundamentals of Design. Lecture 2 cludes Egyptian, Mesopotamian, hours. laboratory 4 hours. PrerequiGreek, Roman , Early Christian, Bysite: ART-109 Fundamentals of Dezantine, Gothic schools. Lecture 3 sign I or departmental approval. hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ART-111 Sculpture - 3 Cr. -An introduction to sculRture, through the ART-103 Art History - 3 Cr. - A surmedia of clay, with stress on the vey of the chronological and stylistic procedures of sculpture and modeldevelopment of Western art. Ining. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 cludes Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo schools. Lecture 3 hours. hours. Prerequisite: None. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ART-112 Sculpture - 3 Cr. - A conNone. tinuation of ART-111 Sculpture with ART-104 Art History - 3 Cr. - A suran introduction to plaster casting, vey. of the chronological and stylistiC wood and light metals plus addevelopment of Western art. Invanced techniques in clay. Lecture 2

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hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-111 Sculpture or departmental approval. ART-113 Sculpture - 3 Cr. - A continuation of ART -112 Sculpture with more complex problems in clay and glaze mixing plus advanced problems in wood and metal. Introduction to stone sculpture and plastics. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hou rs. Prereq uisite: ART -112 Sculpture. ART-120 Survey of Non-Western .Art - 3 Cr. - 4 The art of Africa, Persia and the Orient, and its relation to contemporary art. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ART-121 Calligraphy - 3 Cr. Study and execution of letter forms and their history as elements of design in such applications as layout and illustration. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory . 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. ART -131 Commercial/Advertising Art - 3 Cr. - Knowledge of basic equipment and techniques used in the advertising, display and manufacturing fields. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: ART 105 Drawing or ART-121 Calligraphy and departmental approval. ART-132 Commerclal/ Advertising Art - 3 Cr. - Personal application of techniques in advertising design with emphasis on the layout and lettering methods. Knowledge of production . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-131 Commercial/ Advertising Art. ART -133 Commercial/Advertising Art - 3 Cr. - Advanced methods of advertising / commercial display and their demands in the current market. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-132 Commercial / Advertising Art. ART-140 Film Appreciation - 3 Cr. - An introduction to the aspects of the film including script, directing and the elements of cinematography. Includes a survey of film history and criticism. The class sees film masterpieces from a number of countries. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ART-151 Art for Elementary Education - 3 Cr. - Planned to meet the needs of prospective elementary teachers. Creative studio work as

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well as an introduction to art in the elementary school. Fundamentals of using elementary school art materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ART-169 Ceramics 1-3 Cr. - Basic clay-working techniques including handbuilding . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. ART-170 Ceramics II - 3 Cr. Handbuilding and throwing. Introduction to clay and glaze science. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-169 Ceramics I. ART-171 Ceramics III - 3 Cr. Throwing skills for functional and production pottery. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-170 Ceramics II. ART-181 Appreciation of Interior Design and Decoration - 3 Cr. - Basic knowledge of the aesthetic beauty of architecture, interior design, decoration and furniture. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ART-101 Art Appreciation recommended, ART-182 Appreciation of Interior Design and Decoration - 3 Cr. - A knowledge of the principles of con-. temporary exterior and interior architectural designs. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ART -101 Art Appreciation recommended . ART-183 Appreciation of Interior Design and Decoration - 3 Cr. - Study of the elements of pure design , expression of structure, suitability of material to its use, contrast and variety, avoidance of monotony, pleasure of surprise, the establishment of unity and evidence of taste as the foundation stones of good design regardless 'of style or period . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ART=101 Art Appreciation recommended . ART-201 Life Drawing I -, 3 Cr. Drawing from the human figure in various media. Introduction to anatomy for artists. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART -105 Drawing or concurrent enrollment. ART-202 Life Drawing II - 3 Cr. Drawing from the human figure in various media with a development of techniques learned in ART-201. Further development in the use of techniques and styles. Lecture 2 hours.

Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-201 Life Drawing I or departmental approval.

techniques of etching, engraving, dry point and woodcut. Some mUlticolor work. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-221 Printmaking I or departmental approval.

ART-203 Life Drawing III - 3 Cr. Advanced class in drawing the human figure with emphasis on anatomical understan<;ting . High level proficiency with a variety of media. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-202 Life Drawing II or departmental approval.

Aviation_Technology AVIA-101 Private Pilot Theory- 3 Cr. - An overview of the aviation industry, the industry's importance in our economy, career opportunities in aviation, familiarization with aviation terminology, introduction to training for pilots and preliminary study for the private pilot written examination required by the Federal Aviation Administration . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0, hours. Prerequisite: None.

ART-204 Painting I ~ 3 Cr. -Introduction to oil and acrylic painting . Includes landscape, still life and the human form. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART105 Drawing I. ART-20S Painting II - 3 路Cr. - Practice in oil and acrylic painting with attention to the development of skills in color and style. Special attention to portraiture. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART204 Painting I or departmental approval.

AVIA-10S Aviation Communications - 3 Cr. - Radio usage. knowledge of low and medium frequencies, proper phraseologies, A.T.C. procedures, convenience of radio aids in navigation. Emergency procedures, radar vectors. FCC assigned frequencies, high density traffic' communication, approach and departure control , and en route procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

ART-206 Painting III - 3 Cr. - Development of a variety of projects in oils and acrylics with attention to the craftsmanship necessary in painting . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART-205 Painting II or departmental approval. ART-207 Water Color - 3 Cr. - Fundamentals or water color techniques and qualities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ART105 Drawing. ART-208 Portrait.Drawing and Painting - 3 Cr. - Basic exploration and preparation of grounds, panels and canvasses for traditional drawing and painting of the human head . This course gives a strong emphasis on anatomy and construction and in totality the composition of the picture format. This course can be repeated three times for a total of nine credits. tecture 2 .hours. l.:aboratory 4 hours . Prerequisite : ART-105 Drawing or departmental approval based on a portfoliO.

AVIA-121 Commercial Pilot Theory 3 Cr. - Elementar.y aerodynamiCS, weight and balance in aircraft, in. stwmemts and instrument systems, basic meteorology, FAA. regulations, -radio communications and procedures, pre-flight inspection, .safety procedures, navigation, principles leading to the written examination for commercial pilots ' administered by the Federal Aviation Administration . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ~

AVIA-141 Aviation Meteorology - 3 Cr. - Basic concepts of meteorological phenomena, formation of air masses, fronts, thunderstorms, icing, . fQg and clouds, and analysis and use of weather data for safe flight. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

ART-221 Printmaking I - 3 Cr. General introduction to various aspects of printmaking and graphic AVIA-1S1 Primary Flight - 3 Cr. composition. Special emphasis on the woodcut. Some multi-color work. . Actual flight experience in approved aircraft. Designed to train students Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. in aircraft pilot fundamentals which Prerequisite: ART -105 Drawing I or lead to private pilot licensure by the departmental approval. Federal Aviation Administration. -ART-222 .Printmaking 11-3 Cr. - EmFlight experience: 38 hours. Lecture , phasis on further developing the 1 hour .. Laboratory 3 hours. Prereq-

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uisite: None. Costs of actual flight instruction paid by the student to the fixed base operator. AVIA-171 Commercial Pilot - 3 Cr. _ Advanced maneuvers including Chandelles. lazy eights and eightson-pylons, and 720 degree power turns; Gliding spirals; 180 degree side approaches and 360-degree overhead approaches ; accuracy landings. Advanced cross-country flying. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-1Sl Primary Flight or private pilot certificate . Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator. AVIA-172 Commercial Pilot - 3 Cr. - Extensive navigation training including radio navigation utilizing VHF and LF radio navigation aids; air surveillance; radar approaches; night operations including night navigation ; extensive basic instrument training including radar approach procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-171 Commercial Pilot. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fi xed base operator. AVIA-201 Intermediate Flight - 3 Cr. - Review of all precision maneuvers and multi-engine aircraft systems, loading and performances; preflight, take-offs and landings, basic maneuvers; single engine operation ; emergency procedures, flight and fuel consumption , planning VMC Vl and V2 speeds, theories of multi-engine flight. Flight experience: 38 hours. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-172 Commercial Pilot. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fi xed base operator. AVIA-202 Intermediate Flight - 3 Cr. - Instrument flight planning; filing flight plan ; aircraft performance range and fuel requirements ; required instrumentation and equipment and their proper use; emergency procedures; IFR navigation, instrument approach procedures including VOR , ILS, DME and ADF, and radar approach procedures; holding procedures, missed approach procedures; compliance with A.T.C. procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-201 Intermediate Flight. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator.

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AVIA-221 Instrument Pilot - 3 Cr. Advanced course leading to the F.A.A. examination for instrument pilot rating . Covers instruments, charts, advanced meteorology, approach and landing aids, radio navigation, radar, a.u tomatic flight, etc. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-l0l Private Pilot Theory or AVIA-121 Commercial Pilot Theory or departmental approval. AVIA-271 Flight Instructor - 3 Cr. Advanced course leading to F.A.A. written examination for instructor rating. Covers fundamentals of flight instruction, effective flight instruction methods, instructor responsibilities, medical requirements of flying, FAA. regulations and safety. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-221 Instrument Pilot or concurrent enrollment of FAA. Instrument pilot license. AVIA-281 Ground Instructor - 3 Cr. - A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of teaching and learning as they apply to flight instruction , effective teaching methods; instructional management ; instructor responsibilities; aeromedical information for instructors; aerodynamics ; airplane performance; flight training syllabus; federal regulations for instructors. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-221 Instrument Pilot or concurrent enrollment. AVIA-285 Advanced Ground Instructor/Dispatcher - 3 Cr. - An advanced course leading to the F.A.A. written ex amination for the Advanced Ground Instructor as well as the Flight Dispatcher. Covers advanced operating and flight rules , flight operations including : weather services, AIM , lAP, Mach speeds, flight logs, weight and balance, and aircraft performance analysis. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hour. Prerequisites: AVIA-221 Instrument Pilot, AVIA-271 Flight Instructor or AVIA-281 Ground Instructor or departmental approval.

Biology B10-101 Introductory Biology-Reproduction and Development - 3 Cr. Designed primarily for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of reproduction , development, and factors regulating development at cellular and organismal levels with

special emphasis on the significance of these concepts to the individual living in today's world . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Recitation / discussion 1 hour. Prerequisite: None. 810-102 Introductory Biology-Ecology, Evolution and Heredity - 3 Cr. _ Designed primarily for non-science majors. Fundamental .concepts in genetics, population biology, evolution and ecology with special emphasis on the significance of these concepts to the individual living in today's world . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Recitation / discussion 1 hour. Prerequisite: None. 810-103 Introductory BiologyHuman Body In Health and Disease - 3 Cr. - Designed primarily for non-science majors. Ftmdamental concepts of behavioral coordination, nutrition, transport, gas-exchange, and excretory processes with spe~ cial emphasiS on the significance of these concepts to the individual living in today's world . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Recitation/ discussion 1 'hour. Prerequisite: None. B10-110 Anatomy 路 and Physiology for Radiographers - 5 Cr. - A basic understanding of body systems, structures and organs in regard to their functions and relationships to diagnostic radiogr.aphic examinations. Includes topographic anatomy and different radiographic appearances of body structures. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and acceptanc~ into Radiography Program. B10-111 General Biology I - 4 Cr. General introduction to basic biological principles structured around a detailed study of cell morphology and physiology with emphasis on the 'metabolic processes of photosynthesis, respiration, reproduction, and development. Biochemical -principles are 路stressed. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 路hours . . Prerequisite: None. B10-112 General Biology 11- 4 Cr. The metabolism and self-perpetuation of the organism. Emphasis is on homeostatic mechanisms of the organism as they relate to the nervous, hormone , effectors, nutritional, transport, gas exchange, excretory, and reproductive systems. Emphasis

is placed on comparative anatomy and physiology of the organism . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: B10-111 General Biology I or equivalent or departmental approval. B10-113 General Biology III - 4 Cr. - Introduction to genetics, evolutionary adaptations of plants and animals, and ecological concepts . Field trips are included. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: B10-111 General Biology I or equivalent or departmental approval. B10-121 Principles of Medical Science - 4 Cr. - Basic inorganic, organic and bio-chemistry , with emphasis on physiological principles and applications. Includes principles of physics and metric system . Designed principally for Health Technology programs . Study of chemistry, other related subject matter included in laboratory. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology 4 Cr. - Fundamental concepts of cellular structure and physiology. Architectural plan of the body, its skeletal, muscular, digestive and circulatory systems . Emphasis is placed on morphological and physiological concepts and applications. Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physiology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. B10-129 Anatomy and Physiology -

4 Cr. - Hematology, acid-base balance and fluid and electrolyte balance. Structure and function of the respiratory, urinary and nervous systems . Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physiology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology. B10-130 Anatomy and Physiology 3 Cr. -The structure and functions of the reproductive system . Fundamentals of embryology, genetiCS and endocrinology as related to the human body. Laboratory includes experiments, demonstrations and related microscopic study. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: B10 - 129 Anatomy and Physiology. B10-132 Anatomy of the Eye - 2 Cr. - Study of the composition of the eye and its associated structures

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such as orbit, eyelids, lacrima and muscles. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. B10-133 Physiology of the Eye - 2 Cr. - Study of the function of the eye and its associated structures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: B10-132 Anatomy of the Eye. B10-150 Field Botany - 4 Cr. Study of the plant kingdom with emphasis on local vegetation . Field trips included . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. B10-201 Comparative _Anatomy of the Vertebrates - 5 Cr. - Gross anatomy of the organ systems in representative members of the vertebrates. Emphasis on evolution and functional adaptations. Laboratory dissection and direct observation of selected specimens . Emphasis placed on Squalus, Necturus and Felis. Le路c ture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: B10-113 General Biology or equivalent. B10-202 Vertebrate Embryology - 4 Cr. - Studies of the ontogeny of vertebrates, stressing embryological induction and cell differentiation. The lab will include the organogenesis of a frog , chick and pig. Many experiments will involve the use of live embryos. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIO113 General Biology and BI0-201 Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates or equivalent. BI0-205 Field Zoology - 4 Cr. - A study of the animal kingdom with emphasis on animal identification found in local habitats and ecosystems. Field trips are included for direct observations, measurements and collecting of specimens. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. BI0-206 Principles of Genetics - 路3 Cr. - A study of the principles of genetiCS as they relate to inheritance in organisms, particularly humans. Topics will deal with classical Mendelian inheritance, biological basis of-inheritance, facts of modern genetiCS, developments in the molecular nature of hereditary determinants, and the role of environmental effects. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: BI0-101 Introductory Biology-Reproduction and Development or B10-111 General Bi-

152

ology I or B10-130 Anatomy and Physiology. B10-220 Radiobiology - 2 Cr. Theories of, and practical application of the biological effects of ionizing radiation , enhancement factors, quantities and units of measurement, proper protective measures for both patient and personnel, maximum permissable doses, radiation absorption processes and shielding, and exposure monitoring devices. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and / or acceptance into Radiography Program. B10-221 Microbiology - 4 Cr . - A survey of representative types of microorganisms. Emphasis placed on cellular structure and physiology, nutritional and environmental requirements, and methods of reproduction. Introduction to the role of pathogenic organisms in carrying diseases and infections. Principles of immunity and resistance to disease. Laboratory includes methods of sterilization, culture, staining and identification . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Biology Majors - B10-112 General Biology. Allied Health Majors - BIO121 Principles of Medical Science or equivalent and B10-129 Anatomy and Physiology or concurrent enrollment, or departmental approval. BI0-222 Pathophysiology - 3 Cr. Descriptions of abnormal physiology with the processes that bring about these disruptions, and with the various ways in which these diseases manifest themselves as symptoms, signs, physical factors, and laboratory findings leading to diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. An examination of basic pathophysiological processes is followed by a survey of diseases of the various body systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: BI0-1-30 Anatomy and Physiology, MA-103 Medical Terminology.

Business Administration BADM-108 Introduction to Business - 3 Cr. - A comprehensive survey of business principles, problems and procedures. Examination and discussion of the nature of . bUsiness production and distri bution of

goods. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory Prerequisite: None.

hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

BADM-112 Principles of Management - 4 Cr. - Introduction to management principles, concepts, and skills utilized in operating a business organization . A detailed analysis of management functions with emphasis on planning , organizing, decision-making , delineating of authority, leading , and controlling. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: BADM-108 Introduction to Business.

BADM-211 Production Control - 3 Cr. - Principles and techniques of coordinating the routing , scheduling and control of industrial production, including planning , charting, critical path analysis and quality control. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

o hours.

BADM-121 Labor-Management Relations - 3 Cr. - Historical , legal and structural environments which influence labor relations, and an examination of the negotiation and administration of labor contracts. Lecture 3 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. BAD.M-130 Small Business Management I - 3 Cr. - Development of entrepreneurial skills needed by tnose who may want to start their own venture or by those who already run their own venture. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: BADM-108 Introduction to Business or departmental approval. BADM-131 Small Business Management II - 3 Cr. - Development of managerial skills needed by those who may want to start their own venture or by those who already run their own venture. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: BADM-130 Small Business Management I. BADM-170 Principles of Insurance 3 Cr. - Economic, social and historical background of insurance. General considerations of insurance contracts. Types, scope and organization of insurance companies. Regulation of insurance companies. Basic forms of property and liability insurance, life insurance and annuities will be studied. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications or consent of instructor and BADM-108 Introduction to Business. BADM-201 Work Simplification - 3 Cr. - Principles, practices and techniques of the design , measurement and simplification of work, with emphasis on the relationship between man and machine. Lecture 3

BADM-212 Supervisory Techniques - 3 Cr. - Introduction to the duties and responsibilities of the supervisor in an organization. The course deals with the busi ness tools and skills the supervisor utilizes as a manager, interrelationships between the supervisor and other departments, and techniques of dealing with employee problems and groups. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: BADM-112 Principles of Management , or FIN-115 Bank Management, or HOSP-101 Introduction to Hospitality Management, or INDT-122 Introduction to Manufacturing Management, or LAWE-154 Security Administration, or departmental approval. BADM-213 Business Law - 4 Cr. Study of the legal process as it relates to society, government, business, and the individual; the laws governing commercial transactions, such as contracts, personal property, bailments, and sales. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. BADM-214 Business Law - 4 Cr. Study of the legal process as it relates to society, government, business, and the individual and of the laws governing commercial transactions, such as commercial paper, real property, secured transactions, agency, employment, partnerships, and corporations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: BADM-213 Business Law. BADM-216 Introduction to Purchasing - 3 Cr. - Analysis of purchasing organization structure and procedures. Description of quality, specifications and standardization, supplier selection , price theory, COI)tract negotiation, and legal aspect of purchasing . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: BADM108 Introduction to Business or departmental approval. BADM-217 Intermediate PurchaSing - 3 Cr. - Application of principles

153

relating to price policies, speculation, equipment procurement, salvage operations , legal matters , records and budgets. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: BADM-216 Introduction to Industrial Purchasing . BADM-21'S Purchasing Management - 3 Cr. - Procedures and policies relative to contract negotiations. Vendor-buyer relationships, make or buy decisions, inventory control , buyer training , materials handling , records and budgets. Analysis of specific case studies . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : BADM-217 Intermediate Purchasing . BADM-220 Human Relations In Business - 3 Cr. - Basic motives of people in job situations. Company relationships with worker, suppliers and customers. Leadership development, communication and group processes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. BADM-222 Organizational Dynamics - 3 Cr. - The study of the principles and practices of organizational dynamics. The interrelationships of formal, informal and ind ividual subsystems are emphasized . Lecture, discussion, case studies and projects are used or designed to enhance the learning experience. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: BADM-220 Human Relations in Business. BADM-232 Collective Bargaining & Labor Laws - 3 Cr. - Effective collective bargaining today. Management rights, NLRB functions . Representation and elections. Unfair labor practices. Union security and management rights. Strikes. Seniority. Productivity and collective bargaining activities. The future of collective bargaining. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 路hours. Prerequisite: BADM-121 labor-Management Relations. BADM-233 Per-sonnel Management 3 Cr. - Problems, practices and policies in the management of people. Leadership, motivation and direction of employees toward management- employee-oriented goals. Employment practices. Administration of management-union relationships, benefit programs and employee compensation . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

154

BADM-241 Office Management - 4 Cr. - Basic principles of office organization and ~anagement. Emphasizes the Interrelationship among factors affecting the efficient layout of an office. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. BADM-245 New-Business Seminar 4 Cr. - On-the-job analysis of an existing small business creation of a simulated business. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: BADM-131. Small Business Management or departmental approval. BADM-246 New-Business Seminar 4 Cr. - Continuation of BADM-245 New-Bus'i ness Seminar. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 路4 hours. Prerequisite: BADM-245 New- Business Seminar. BADM-260 Cooperativ!! Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program . Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision. The requirement for one -credit is 120 c lock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program.

Chemical Technology CHMT-212 Chemical Engineering 3 Cr. - Beginn ing course for chemistry students, laboratory technicians or non-technical chemical equipment operators. Discussion of the fundamental principles of chemical engineering and the relationships and analysiS of chemical engineering process operations and equipment. Principles of un it operation, such as heat exchange, condensation and evaporation . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: High school chemistry and mathematics or industrial experience.

Chemi'stry CHEM-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry - 5 Cr. - An introductory course with atomic structure and bonding as a basis for understand-

ing valenc\'l, formulas, compounds and chemical reactions. Measurement, stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, ionization , and their applications in daily life are discussed. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent. CHEM-102 Introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry - 5 Cr. - The chemistry of carbon compounds; the structure, physical and chemical properties, and metabolism of biochemical compounds important to physiology and nutrition . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or equivalent. CHEM-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry - SCr. - Atomic structure, chemical bonding, elementary organic chemistry with emphasis on functional groups and reactions. A practical rather than theoretkal course. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent. CHEM-109 Introduction to BiochemIstry - 5 Cr. - Chemical bonding, the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, enzymes and the metabolic process. Emphasis on the practical application to nutrition. (Not designed for pre-medical students.) Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. CHEM-111 General Chemistry I - 4 Cr. - Study of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Emphasis on atomic structure, chemical bonding , equation balancing and stoichiometry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: CHEM-101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry or one year of high school chemistry or equivalent and one year of high school algebra or equivalent. CHEM-112 General Chemistry II - 4 Cr. - Emphasis on states of matter, solutions, chemical kinetics and chemical equilibrium . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM-111 General Chemistry I. CHEM-113 General Chemistry III - 5 Cr. - Emphasis on ionic equilibrium , acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, descriptive inorganic chemistry, nuclear chemistry and semi-micro qualitative analysis. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6

hours. Prerequisite: CHEM-112 General Chemistry II. CHEM-211 Organic Chemistry I - 5 Cr. - Chemistry of carbon compounds including nomenclatu r.e, propert ies, preparation, and · reactions of aliphatic and aromatic groups. Theoretical concepts and reaction mechanisms are introduced . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM-113 General Chemistry III or equivalent. CHEM-212 Organic Chemistry II - 5 Cr. - Chemistry of carbon compounds emphasizing reaction mechanisms , synthetic uses and spectroscopy of hydrocarbons and their derivatives. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM-211 Organic Chemistry I. CHEM-213 OrganiC Chemistry III • 5 Cr. - Advanced topiCS of carbon chemistry including complex syntheses, molecular rearrangements, molecular orbital theory, heterocycles, polymers and biochemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory .6 Hours. Prerequisite: CHEM-212 Organic Chemistry II. CHEM·220 Quantitative Analysis - 6 Cr. - Study of chemical stoichiometry, homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibrium and the theory and techniques of gravimetric and volumetric methods of quantitative analytical chemistry . Instrumental analysis is an integral part of this course. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite CHEM-113 General Chemistry III. CHEM·230 Chemical Analytical In· strumentatlon • 4 Cr. - Techniques and prinCiples of operation of analytical instrumentation and their application in chemistry, absorption and spectrophotometry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry or CHEM-211 Organic Chemistry I or concurrent enrollment. CHEM·231 Chemical Analytical In· strumentation • 4 Cr. - Techniques and prinCiples of operation of chromatography, sorptometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: CHEM-106 Introduction to Organic Chemistry or CHEM-211 Organic Chemistry I or concurrent enrollment.

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Commercial Art CART-111 Typography and Layout. 2 Cr. - An introductory course In advertiSing layout, design and .Iettering to prepare the commercial art student/freshman for the more specialized second year of the program. Emphasis on basic layout design plus type recognition, roughing in of headline, lettering, copy designating , total design approach and terminology understanding . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. CART-112 Typography and Layout 2 Cr. -A continuation of CART-111 Typography and Layout in preparing the student for hand lettering. The speed ball pen, ruling pen, crowquill pen and brush will be utilized. Roman, Gothic and Block-letter styles will be studied as well as format and informal scripts, poster and outline lettering. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 路 hours. Prerequisite: CART-111 Typography and Layout. CART-113 Typography and Layout 2 Cr. - A continuation of CART-112 Typography and Layout in teaching the student the use and application of pressure sensitive type sheets today. The use of type or hand lettering in the design of monograms, trademarks and logotypes and the situations where hand lettering is a must. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: CART-112 Typography and Layout. CART-201 Graphic Drawing - 2 Cr. - This course is designed to help students transfer basic skills to areas of practical usage through asSignments in graphic production and illustration similar to those encountered in the field of Commercial Art. The projects will include drawing the clothed human figure and the parts of the figure most frequently used commercially and constructing drawings of manufacturer's products. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: ART-107 Drawing, ART-109 Fundamentals of Design and ART-202 Life Drawing. CART-202 Graphic Drawing - 2 Cr. - Continuation of CART-201 Graphic Drawing. In addition, the student will concentrate on drawing product packages and containers, fashions, and animals. Lecture 1

hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequi_ site: CART-201 Graphic Drawing. CART -211 Illustration - 3 Cr. _ Course introducing basic professional rendering technique in black and white and color generally used in simple illustrations for advertising design and newspaper advertising. Primary emphasis, however, on black and white renderings. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: CART-1.13 Typography and Layout, ART-107 Drawing, ART-109 Fundamentals of Design and ART202 Life Drawing. CART-212 Illustration - 3 Cr. - A continuation of CART-211 illustration, emphasizing the airbrush and its role in advertising art. The maintenance, care and use of the airbrUSh, friskets and acetate masks. Various textures, obtainable with the airbrush, will be pursued . Complete airbrush renderings will be emphasized. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: CART-211 Illustration . CART-221 Graphic Production - 2 Cr. - A comprehensive course in preparation of art for reproduction (camera-ready art). Editorial preparation and layout for publication. Study of style point system type faces word and character count texture substances and uses of paper printing process photo engraving plate-making offset lithography to acquaint student with practical and economical advantages of different media used in production of publications. Study of professional standards and cost of production in the publishing industry. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: ART-107 Drawing, ART-109 Fundamentals of Design and ART-202 Life Drawing. CART-222 Graphic Production - 2 Cr. - A continuation of Graphic Production in the preparation of artwork for reproduction including the use of crop marks, register marks, bleed, cropping, sizing of artwork and photographs. Also a complete understanding of keyline procedure and paste-up necessary for getting art work ready for the camera. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: CART-221 Graphic Production. CART-262 路Commerclal Art Practicum - 2 Cr. - This course is designed to help the Commercial Art

student who is in the final quarter, prepare a portfolio of professional quality. The portfolio will be critiqued on a professional basis. A work experience, arranged by the College in a professional setting offcampus, will require an average of 14 hours of student participation each week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Final quarter standing in Commercial Art.

Community Mental Health Technology CMHT-121 Introduction to Community Mental Health - 4Cr. - A survey of the history of human services with emphasis on the Mental Health movement. Introduction to the use of scientific method. Overview of how people learn, act, and change within social systems. Consideration of humanism as a guiding philosophical principle. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. CMHT-126 Inquiry, Observation and Assessment - 4 Cr. - Practice in the use of behavioral observation and descriptive terms. In aadition to classroom activities, students will be assigned 10 hours per week in a field experience setting. Emphasis on the use of scientific method of inquiry in data gathering, hypothesis formation and decision making with reference to individuals, groups and social systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: CMHT-121 Introduction to Community Mental Health. CMHT-127 Social Ecology - 4 Cr. Development of strategies for change through group experience. Study of individual and the group in a variety of ecological systems. In addition to classroom activities, students will be assigned 10 hours per week in a field setting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: CMHT-126 Inquiry, Observation and Assessment departmental approval concurrent enrollment in CMHT-128 Community Resources. CMHT-128 Community Resources 3 Cr. - Structure and evaluation of communities and their resources through elementary analysis of mental health systems. Student observes, assesses, and evaluates various mental health systems in the

community. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: CMHT-126 Inquiry, Observation and Assessment and concurrent enrollment in CMHT-127 Social Ecology.

CMHT-200 Service Strategies hi Community Mental Health Technology - 4 Cr. - Study of the Community Mental Health generalist role. Strategies are developed for increasing the usefulness of already existing services for developing roles for Mental Health generalists and for developing new frameworks to deliver community resources. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: CMHT -127 Social Ecology and CMHT-128 Community Resources and concurrent enrollment in CMHT-202 Community Mental Health Technology Principles and Practices I. CMHT-202 Community Health Technology Principles and Practices I - 4 Cr. - The primary learning takes place through field experience in the community. Students learn to apply the Mental Health Generalist concept. Class time is spent in small group discussions of specific theories and their applications. Students will spend 15 hours per week in field work and two hours per week in a scheduled on-campus seminar. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: CMHT -127 Social Ecology and CMHT-128 Community Resources and concurrent enrollment in CMHT-200 Service Strategies in Community Mental Health Technology. CMHT-203 Community Mental Health Technology Principles and Practices" - 4 Cr. - The approach is to develop problem-solving techniques on the part of and for the benefit of groups or individuals identified as the consumers of the service. These skills are enhanced through an exchange of information by students and field site representatives. Students will spend 15 hours per week in field work and two hours per week in a scheduled oncampus seminar. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: CMHT-202 Community Mental Health Technology Principles and Practices I. CMHT -204 Community Mental Health Technology Principles and Practices '" - 4 Cr. - The field experience will focus on the client in

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the context of the broader programs. Seminar portion is designed to teach the student the fundamentals of program development and proposal writing within the conte~<t of the field experience. Students will spend 15 hours per week in the field experience and two hours per week in a scheduled on-campus semlnar.Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: CMHT -203 Community Mental Health Technology Principles and Practices II. CMHT-224 Roles in Community Mental Health - 3 Cr. - A survey of Community Mental Health generalist roles as identified by the National Institute of Mental Health . Familiarization of students with their own behavior and the behavior of others in terms of assertiveness. A development of general and specific methods which one can use to advocate successfully in a variety of situations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. CMHT-22~ Legal Issues in Mental Health - 3 Cr. - Designed to give the student basic knowledge of the legal issues in the Mental Health field. including current Ohio Revised Code Statutes regarding commitment, release, due process, patients' rights, confidentiality, etc., as well as recent court decisions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

CMHT -226 Alternatives to Institutional Care - 3 Cr. - Study of the effects of institutionalization. Current trends toward use of least restrictive setting . Overview of the development of community mental health centers. The Balanced Service System concept as a philosophy of help. Skills in effective community living for service consumers. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. CMHT-227 Prevention of Psychopathology - 3 Cr. - Study ot the process by which communities organize themselves to prevent/solve common problems which affect community mental health. Learn the prevention role of the CMH Technologist and the skills necessary to organize a group of people to effectively analyze, plan, and implement solutions to their own potential mental health problems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

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CMHT-229 Community Mental Health Issues in Chemical Dependency I : 3 Cr. - Examination and exploration of psychological , social and cultural aspects of chemical dependency. An introduction to the current concepts, theories, and research used by practitioners to understand the varied aspects of chemical dependency. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval or concurrent enrollment in CMHT 126 Inquiry, Observation and Asse路ssment. CMHT -230 Community Mental Health Issues in Chemical Dependency II - 3 Cr. - A review of Community Mental Health Issues in Chemical Dependency from an historical , SOCial, cultural and legal perspective. The student will examine the various methods and resources that are used to prevent chemical dependency. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval or concurrent enrollment in CMHT-202 Community Health Technology Principles and Practices I. CMHT -231 Community Mental Health Issues in Chemical Dependency III - 3 Cr. - Review of the SOCial, physical and psychological aspects of chemical dependency, and examination of the various methods and community resources which will assist the chemically dependent person to maintain sobriety. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pre~equisite : Departmental approval or concurrent enrollment in CMHT203 Community Mental Health Technology Principles and Practices II. CMHT -232 Community Mental I:fealth Issues in Chemical Dependency IV- 3 Cr. - An examination of the roles, skills, knowledge and ethics necessary for a career in the field of Chemical Dependency. A personal inventory of one's skills and knowledge will result. Special emphasis will be placed on assertiveness, advocacy, stress management and ethical standards as each pertains to the field. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval or concurrent enrollment in CMHT-204 Community Mental Health Technology PrinCiples and Practices III. CMHT-251 Community Mental Health Seminar - 3 Cr. - The inte-

gration of knowledge and experience, the identifi cation of one's roles and skills, toward the description of self through a written resume . Investigation into service areas of special interest. Students will attend weekly 3-hour on campus seminar. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Fifth quarter standing in the program.

Court and Conference Reporting C&CR-101 Legal Concepts and Communications I - 3 Cr. - Introduction for court and conference reporte r s to the bas i c legal procedures, prinCiples, practices and terminology of the legal profession . Instruction and lab practice to establish and develop the link between theory and its practical lab application . An introduction to communication skills and vocabulary. In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to participate in planned educational experiences in a court or council setting for a minimum of one clock hour per week. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in ENG-101 College Composition and concurrent enrollm~nt in C&CR-113 Machine Reporting I. C&CR-102 Legal Concepts and Communications II - 3 Cr. - Study of legal concepts, legal communication skills, and vocabulary for court and conference reporters .. Practical application of legal concepts and communication skills on court reporting machines and instructional media in a lab setting to strengthen the link between theory and lab practice. In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to participate in planned educational experiences in a court or council setting for a minimum of one clock hour per week. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: C&CR-101 Legal Concepts and Communications I, C&CR-113 Machine Reporting I and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-114 Machine Reporting II. C&CR-113 Machine Reporting I - 3 Cr. - Introduction of stenotype machine theory and technique, with

emphasis on recording, reading and transcribing practice in preparation for more advanced courses in Machine Reporting. In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to partiCipate in planned educational experiences in a cou rt or council setting for a minimum of one clock hour per week . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Eligibil ity to enroll in ENG-101 College Composition and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-101 Legal Concepts and Communications. C&CR-114 Machine Reporting II - 3 Cr. - Mastery of stenotype machine theory and technique. Instruction and practice to develop recording , reading and typewritten transcription skills in preparation for more advanced courses in the Court and Conference Reporting program. In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to' participate in planned educational experiences in a court or council setting for a minimum of one clock hour per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: C&CR-101 Legal Concepts and Communication C&Cr-113 Machine Reporting 1,and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-102 Communication Skills and Legal Concepts. C&CR-115 Machine Reporting III - 3 Cr. - Additional instruction and practice to establish, develop and strengthen the link between theory, dictation , transcription and reporting skill. Emphasis placed on mailability. In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to participate in planned education experience in a court or council setting for a minimum of two clock hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite : C&CR-114 Machine Reporting II and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-116 Machine Reporting IV. C&CR-116 Court Orientation and Transcription - 3 Cr. - Discussions on court etiquette and the duties of the court reporter. Transcription from paper tape with the aim of transcription rate speed building . In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to partiCipate in planned educational experiences in a court or council setting for a mini-

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mum of two clock hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: C&CR-114 Machine Reporting II and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-115 Machine Reporting III.

a court or council setting for a minimum of one clock hour per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: C&CR-213 Machine Reporting IV and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-217 Testimony.

C&CR-212 Court and Conference Reporting Principles and Practices 2 Cr. - Expansion of theoretical principles and legal concepts of court and conference reporting . Practical procedures on the Stenotype machine to develop skill levels established by Board on approved Reporter Training (BART). Knowledge of court and conference reporting theory demonstrated through simulations of question and answer testimony, jury charge, and literary materials. Practical exercises will also be provided to develop professional competency in operating the Stenorette machine through the use of prepared materials which replicate courtroom situations. May be repeated for credit; however, no more than 10 credit hours may be applied toward graduation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: concurrrent enrollment in C&CR-213 Machine Reporting IV, or C&CR-216 Testimony and Depositions, or C&CR-217 Testimony, or C&CR-218 Jury Charge, or departmental approval.

C&CR-215 Machine Reporting VI - 3 Cr. - Additional emphasis on the growth and development of machine competency and expertise in handling jury charge and medical testimony. Further study of medical terminology and medical concepts with practice on medical question and answer testimony. In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to participate in planned educational experiences in a court or council setting for a minimum of one clock hour per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: C&CR-214 Machine Reporting V and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-217 Testimony .

C&CR-213 Machine Reporting IV - 3 Cr. - Emphasis on speed buiJd ing on legal material , straight matter. Emphasis is placed on the development of endurance, and the introduction of typical legal forms. In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to participate in planned educational experiences in a court or council setting for a minimum of two clock hours per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: C&CR-115 Machine Reporting III, C&CR-116 Court Orientation and Transcription and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-216 Testimony and Depositions. / C&CR-214 Machine Reporting V - 3 Cr. - Additional emphasis on the development of machine expertise, involving recording , reading and translation skills. Study of medical terminology and introduction to question and answer testimony. In addition to formalized classroom 路experiences on campus, students will be expected to participate in planned educational experiences in

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C&CR-216 Testimony and Depositions - 3 Cr. - Introduction to jury charge, opening statements, legal opinion, closing arguments and depositions. Introduction to Stenorette project, with emphasis on acceptable English, leadership and communication skills. In additio n to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to participate in planned educational experiences in a court or council setting fo'r a minimum of one clock hour per week . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: C&CR-213 Machine Reporting IV and C&CR-214 Machine Reporting V or or concurrent enrollment. C&CR-217 Testimony - 3 Cr. - Additional study and instruction on jury charge and depositions. Further practice on the Stenorette project, with emphasis on acceptable English, leadership and communication skills. In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to participate in planned educational experiences in a court or council setting for a minimum of one clock hour per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite : C&CR-214 Machine Reporting V and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-216 Testimony an Depositions. C&CR-218 Jury Charge - 3 Cr. Designed to provide the student with practice on actual jury charge and

opinion with selections of legal opinion, solid matter, medical and dental testimony, miscellaneous court material and real estate and land descriptions. In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to participate in planned educational experiences in a court or council路 setting involving a minimum or one clock hour per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: C&CR215 Machine Reporting VI and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-219 Court Orientation and Advanced Transcription. C&CR-219 Court Orientation and Advanced Transcription - 3 Cr. Study and discussion of courtroom procedures, practices and duties of the court reporter both the Official Reporter and the Free-Lance Reporter. Emphasis on transcription accuracy and speed. In addition to formalized classroom experiences on campus, students will be expected to participate in planned educational experiences in a court or council setting for a minimum of one clock hour per week . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: C&CR-217 Testimony and concurrent enrollment in C&CR-215 Machine Reporting IV and C&CR218 Jury Charge.

Dance DANC-101 Introduction to the Art of Dance I - 3 Cr. - Elementary techniques in dance through lectures, films, and discussion. Survey of current trends in dance. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. DANC-102 Introduction to the Art of Dance " - 3 CR. - Secondary techniques of dance. Improvisation , fundamental theory and terminology of dance. Survey of cu rrent trends in dance. LectLire 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: DANC-101 Introduction to the Art of Dance I. DANC-103 Introduction to the Art of Dance III - 3 Cr. - Small compositions of dance. Discussion of dance history. Survey of current trends. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DANC-102 Introduction to the Art of Dance II. DANC-107 Theory and Techniques of Dance I - 2 Cr. -Integration of

physical, intellectual, and aesthetic values of dance. Performance of classical ballet variations. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in DANC-101, Introduction to the Art of Dance I, DANC-102 Introduction to the Art of Dance II or DANC-103 Introduction to the Art of Dance III. DANC-108 Theory and Techniques of Dance" - 2 Cr. - Introduction to elements of theater dance. Fundamentals of elementary choreography. Performance of jazz routines. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: DANC-107 Theory and Techniques of Dance I. DANC-109 Theory and Techniques of Dance III - 2 Cr. - Application of advanced barre and centre techniques. Introduction to established variations of well-known choreographers. Performance of various modern techniques. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: DANC-108 Theory and Techniques of Dance II. DANC-122 Movement: Form and Style I - 2 Cr. - The organization of movement to express emotion and character through the exploration of the elements of space, time and energy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in THEA-150 Fundamentals of Acting or departmental approval. DANC-123 Movement: Form and Style" - 2 Cr. - Advanced application of movement through study and practice of Effort/Shape techniques. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: DANC-122 ' Movement: Form and Style I or departmental approval.

Data Processing DATA-110 Introduction to Computers and Their Use - 4 Cr. - Introduction to the computer, its evolution , terminology and application in data processing . Overview of hardware and software systems. Concepts developed through flow-charting, coding , and the use of a computer. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. DATA-112 Introduction to Microcomputers and Their Use - 4 Cr. - An introduction to the microcomputer which is the home and personal computer and the business world's

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newest tool. The course is both a survey and an application course for those without any or very little prior exposure to microcomputers. It includes an overview of its evolution , terminol ogy, hardware and software systems concept s. The student will learn about, see and use a major product on the market today. The student will learn and use the program language BASIC. The course conclud es with an examination of the high level languages available to the microco mputer. Lecture 3 hours. Laborat ory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. DATA-121 COBOL Programming 1-5 Cr. - Introduc tion to COBOL and structure d programming techniqu es. as used in the busines s environment. A compute r and the COBOL language are used to exemplify file and record descript ions, report design , working storage data items, data validati on and elemen tary COBOL verbs. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: DATA110 Introduc tion to Computers and Their Use or departmental approval. DATA-122 COBOL Programming II 4 Cr. - Interme diate cou.rse in COBOL Programming. COBOL programming skills are expanded to include the use of a compute r to exemplify multiple record types, table processing, modular program ming, nested IF stateme nts, debuggi ng verbs, clumps, basic sequential disk concepts, and utilization of technica l manuals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: DATA-121 COBOL Programming I. DATA-123 COBOL Programming III 4 Cr. - Advanced course in COBOL program ming. COBOL program ming skills are expanded to include the use of a compute r to exemplify file processing. Techniques include creation , update, and retrieval of major types of common ly found file structures (such as sequential indexed , direct. chained, partition ed): Linkage to Data Base Management Systems : sorting of files, record design, typical systems . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: DATA122 COBOL Programming II. DATA-131 RPG Programming I - 4 Cr. - RPG (Report Program Generator) as used in the business environment. The coding and execution of RPG program s to exemplify edit-

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ing of data, computa tion, control breaks, compari ng , and logical relationships among fields, records and files . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: DATA-110 Introduction to Comput ers and Their Use. DATA-132 RPG Programming II - 4 Cr. - A continua tion of DATA 131 . RPG concept s are expanded to include the coding and executio n of RPG program s to exemplify exception reports , array and table processing , matching records, and sequential and indexed sequential file process ing. Lecture 3 hours. Laborat ory 2 hours. Prerequ isite: DATA-131 RPG Programming I. DATA-212 Advanc ed Microco mputers and Their Use - 4 Cr. -Introduct ion to Advanc ed BASIC program ming concept s, the high level language PASCAL and assembler languag e program ming . The course is a program ming applications course for those with a background in microco mputers and the primary program ming language BASIC. The student will have the opportunity to implement a number of the function s in microco mputer graphics . The course will conclud e with a examination of a variety of software packages to include VISICALC and DBMS. Lecture 3 hours. Laborat ory 2 hours. Prerequisite: DATA-112 Introduc tion to Microco mputers and Their Use. DATA-215 Numerical Methods and Computers - 4 Cr. - Introduc es compute r program ming for mathematics, science and enginee ring . Numeri cal method s for solving problems arising in statistics, engineering. physics and chemistry are studied and solution s are obtained via the dig.ital compute r. Major programmin g is with Fortran . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-115 College Algebra. DATA-223 Assembly Language Programming - 4 Cr. - Comput er programmi ng in an assemb ly level language to demonstrate control of memory addressing , register usage. and internal data representation and manipulation . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: DATA122 COBOL Programming II. DATA-232 Systems Analysis - 4 Cr. - 'Introdu ction to Business Systems Analysis . The phases of the systems analysis and design cycle are exam-

ined in a step-by-step approach which provides the student with a practical method for the application of systems techniques in the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation of Business Information Systems. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DATA-122 COBOL Programming II. DATA-241 Information Retrieval - 4 Cr. - Methods and problems involving information retrieval systems. Presentation of theories and approaches to the use of computers in disciplines such as statistics, law, medicine , library SCience , music, languages and the humanities. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DATA-232 Systems Analysis. DATA-245 Tele-Communlcation Processing - 4 Cr. - DiscussioA of various forms of tele-communications and their relation or connection with computers. Non-computer devices such as telephone and telegraph are covered . Computer-oriented subjects covered are direct computer to computer data trans~ mission , message switching facilities, real-time and on-line inquiry stations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DATA-232 Systems Analysis. DATA-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program . Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision . The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program . DATA-270 Special and Current TopIcs In Data Processing - 4 Cr. Comparative studies in the state of the art in programming languages, hardware changes and trends in communication and software. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. DATA-271 Individual Project in Data Processing - 1 Cr. - Under the management of a faculty advisor, the student is responsible for selecting and completing a project which demonstrates the application of attained data processing skills. Lec-

ture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Practicum 8 hours (approximately). Prerequisite: DATA-232 Systems Analysis.

Dental Hygiene DENT-101 Preventive Oral Health Service I - 5 Cr. - Principles of social science related to dental hygiene practice and the professionalization of dental hygiene. Knowledge and understanding of an oral inspection and history prior to the initiation of treatment. Philosophy of preventive oral health and its relevance to dental hygiene. Etiology , pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of all oral accretions. Principles of technique for the oral prophylaxis. Students practice on manikins and then apply the instruments in the mouth . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Progr-am. DENT-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology - 3 Cr. Study . of nomenclature, development, calcification and eruption of permanent and deciduous teeth. Lectures on physiology of the dentition , physiologic tooth form , the periodontium, arrangement of teeth and occlusion . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program. DENT-105 General and Oral Histology - 2 Cr. - Origin and structure of tissues, histology and embryology of teeth , face and oral cavity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Dental Hygiene Program. DENT-112 Head and Neck Anatomy - 3 Cr. - Study of the function of the masticatory apparatus as a unit. Lectures on dentoosseous structures and the tempero-mandibular joint, muscles of facial expression and mastication , suprahyoid muscles and tongue, neurology of the head and neCk, vascular system of the head , viscera of the head and neck. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DENT-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth M'!rphology. DENT-113 Preventive Oral Health Service II - 5 Cr. - Methods and materials utilized to implement pre-

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ventive oral health. Study of diagnostic aids for the use of the dentist in treatment planning. Identification of diagnostic criteria for caries susceptibility used in oral diagnosis. Apply knowledge of plaque control in patient oral physiotherapy instruction. Apply topical anticarogenic agents and understand the mode of action. Study of the clinic manual to apply knowledge to all facets of treatment of patients in the dental hygiene clinic. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: DENT101 Preventive Oral Health Service I. DENT-123 Radiology - 3 Cr. - History and development of the X-ray, its nature and properties. Safety precautions and uses of the X-ray in dentistry. Theory and practice in the fundamentals of oral radiographic technique. Film placement, tube angulation , processing and mounting of films. A specific number of radiodontic examinations and hours in darkroom procedures are required throughout the two-year Dental Hygiene Program. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: DENT-102 Head and Neck Anatomy and Tooth Morphology. DENT-125 General and Oral Pathology - 2 Cr. - Introduction to general pathology. Inflammation, necrosis, retrograde changes, pathological process in diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and other organisms. Clinical pathology of diseases affecting teeth and their supporting structures. Visual differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DENT -101 Preventive Oral Health Service I. DENT-130 Clinical Restorative Dentistry - 5 Cr. - Study of the physical and manipulation of restorative dental materials. Using manikins, students restore prepared ivorene teeth using amalgam and composite restorative materials. Dental cements, rubber dam techniques and impression materials. Exercises in taking, pouring and trimming plaster diagnostic casts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: DENT101 Preventive Oral Health Service I. DENT-131 Preventive Oral Health Service III - 3 Cr. - Students perform oral prophylaxis, expose radiographs, apply topical fluoride to the teeth and give patient education to

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adult and child patients in the clinic. Laboratory hours refer to hours in clinic. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: DENT-113 Preventive Oral Health Service II. DENT-200 Preventive Oral Health Service IV - 3 Cr. - Concentrated clinical experience for three weeks performing oral prophylaxis, exposing radiographs, applying topical fluoride, polishing restorations, and giving patient education to adult and child patients in the clinic. During the third week the students work on typodonts in the clinic placing rubber dam, applying matrices, inserting base and restorative material in anterior and posterior prepared teeth. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: DENT-131 Preventive Oral Health Service III. DENT-201 Preventive Oral Health Service V - 6 Cr. - Etiology and classification of periodontal disease and principles of periodontology. Principles of nutrition applied to dental hygiene through the study of nutritional counseling for dental patients. Study and clinical application of the principles of ultrasonic scaling, nutritional counseling, root planning, subgingival curettage and restorative dentistry on patients in the dental hygiene clinic. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: DENT-200 Preventive: Oral Health Service IV. DENT-203 Pharmacology and Therapeutics - 4 Cr. - Drugs and anesthetiCS, with emphasis on those used in the dental office. Discussion of the origin of drugs and anesthetics, physical and chemical properties, preparation, mode of administration and effects on body systems. Preoperative and postoperative patient care. Study of basic nutrition with emphasis on its relation to dental health . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DENT -200 Preventive Oral Health Services VI. DENT-206 Community Oral Health I

- 2 Cr. - The Dental Hygiene profession and its potential for impact upon community health practices is examined using a student designed research project as a medium. Students are involved in interpretation of journal articles, assessment of dental needs of a selected population group and the development of a program to satisfy those needs. Su-

pervised activity at an off-campus project site involving a survey of the. population group and validation of the prescribed dental health education program will be experienced. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DENT-200 Preventive Oral Health Service IV. DENT-221 Preventive Oral Health Service VI - 4 Cr. - Continuation of DENT-201 Preventive Oral Health Service V. Special assignments in dental departments of county hospitals and city clinics to further acquaint students with diverse mouth conditions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: DENT201 Preventive Oral Health ·Service

V.

DENT-222 Community Oral Health II

- 3 Cr. - Introduction to the principles of public health dentistry, concepts otepidemiology, fundamentals of the assessment of dental needs, r.esources and objectives, fundamentals of planning , organizing delivery and evaluating public health dental care, review of special-needs pwgrams and public health approach to preventive dentistry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. P~erequisite: DENT-206 Community Oral Health I. DENT·225 Dental Hygiene Extended Functions - 3 Cr. - Study of the practice of general dentistry and specialty practices. Application of the principles of extended functions for dental auxiliaries through assignments to specialty practices. lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: DENT-201 Preventive Oral Health Service V. DENT·231 Preventive Oral Health Service VII - 3 Cr. - Continuation of DENT -221 Preventive Oral Health Service VI. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: DENT221 Preventive Oral Health Service

V.

DENT·232 Community Oral Health III - 1 Cr. - Follow-up activities associated with the independent research project are experienced including analysis of survey results and on-site evaluation of progress achieved with respect to changed behavior of the target group. Students will work with dental health subjects in a practical learning environment off-campus and under supervision. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Special Applica-

tions 7 hours (approximately). Prerequisite: DENT-222 Community Oral Health II. DENT-234 Dental Hygiene Practice· 2 Cr. - Future of dentistry and role of the dental hygienist as related to the profession and association ; relationship of dental hygienist to the members of the dental health team ; principles of professional ethics; laws. rules, and regulations regulating the practice of dental hygiene and dentistry. Introduction to administration and management of a dental health team. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DENT -221 Preventive Oral Health Service VI.

Dental Laboratory Technology DLAB·100 Dental Materials - 4 Cr. - Introduction to the properties of crystalline and non-crystalline minerals used in dental 'materials and specific procedures used in their construction. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Program acceptance and / or departmental approval. DLAB·102 Dental Anatomy and Ter· mlnology • 4 Cr. - Introduction to physiological and anatomical characteristics of the oral environment with specific reference to terms used in the dental profession. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Program acceptance and/or departmental approval. DLAB·103 Dental Morphology· 4 Cr. - Study of the form and structure of teeth. Laboratory exercises include preparation of casts and sculpturing of teeth and the use of dental tools and instruments. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Program acceptance and / or departmental approval. DLAB·105 Dental Design· 2. Cr. Study of basic techniques used in the fabrication of cast removable partial dentures. Exercises in survey, design, blockout, relief, master duplication, waxing , finishing , and polishing of cast frameworks in dental gold and chrome-nickle alloys. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: DLAB-100 Dental Materials, DLAB-102 Dental Anat-

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.omy and Terminology and DLAB-103 Dental Morphology. DLAB-150 Fixed Dentures - 5 Cr. Study of fi xed restorative techniques with the emphasis placed on single restorations of the all metal variety. Laboratory manipulations will include inlay, onlay and single crown wax pattern fabrication utilizing stone dies and ideal anatomical waxing practice. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: DLAB-100 Dental Materials, DLAB102 Den tal Anatomy and Terminology and DLAB-103 Dental Morphology. DLAB-155 Fixed Restorations - 5 Cr. - In-depth study of waxing, carving, spruing, investing, casting, finishing and polishing crowns. The laboratory exercises will add mu ltiple restorations, centr ic occlusion, proximal contact and excursive movements to previous crown and bridge underta ki ngs . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: DLAB-1.50 Fixed Dentures. DLAB-160 Removable Dentures - 2 Cr. - A study of the fabrication of removable dentures, both complete and partial , in the clinical and laboratory setting. Laboratory manipulations will in clude bo xing and pouring models, as well as the construction of impression trays, vari, ous baseplates, bite registratio n blocks, and the mounting of casts on articulators. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prereq uisites: DLAB-100 Dental Materials, DLAB102 Dental Anatomy ' and Terminology and DLAB-103 Dental Morphology. DLAB-165 Complete Dentures I - 4 Cr. - Study of the prosthodontic techniques involved in the construction of complete and immediate dentures utilizing various tooth forms, materials, tools and equipment. Laboratory manipulations include waxing of immediate and complete denture prosthesis and an introductory study of overdentures. Lectures 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite : DLAB-160 Removable Dentures.

-

DLAB-250 Fixed Partial Dentures I 4 Cr. - Course will add to the previous study of crown and bridge prosthetics. Laboratory constructions of multiple unit bridges which are combined prior to cementation in both anterior and posterior regions of the

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oral environment. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: DLAB-155 Fixed Restorations or departmental approval. DLAB-255 Fixed Partial Dentures II 3 Cr. - The construction of acrylic jacket crowns and acrylic veneered crowns utilizing plastic resin buildup techniques. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: DLAB250 Fixed Partial Dentures I. DLAB-260 Wrought Prosthesis - 4 Cr, - Fabrication of various types of removable dental appliances using wrought-metal in several specialty areas. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: DLAB-105 Dental Design and l or departmental approval. DLAB-265 Complete Dentures II - 4 Cr. - Advanced study of complete dentu re techniques, repairs and relini ng. Laboratory exercises include processing complete dentures of various design . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: DLAB165 Complete Dentures I. DLAB-267 Removable Partial Dentures - 3 Cr, - The design and fabrication of removable partial dentures as well as the use of internal attachments and advanced clasping techniques with semi-precision attachments. Overdenture coordinating factors are also explored . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite : DLAB-260 Wrought Prosthesis. DLAB-270 Precision Attachments - 5 Cr. - Advanced study and fabrication of removable partial dentures and their design. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: DLAB-267 Removable Partial Dentures. DLAB-280 Dental Ceramics I - 4 Cr. - Physical study and manipulation of porcelain which includes the personalized staining of ceramic crowns . Laboratory exercises include die preparation, platinum matrix adaptation and procelain firing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: DLAB-255 Fixed Partial Dentures II. DLAB-285 Dental Ceramics II - 3 Cr. - Advanced study of various techniques for bonding porcelain to metal substructures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: DLAB-280 Dental Ceramics I.

DLAB-290 Dental Professional Concerns - 4 Cr. - Study of the dental laboratory technician 's role in the 'Dental Health Team Concept.' Recognition of the laws that regulate the dental laboratory technology profession. Lecture 4 路hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and / or DLAB acceptance.

Dietetic Technology DIET-101 Dietetic Orientation and Management Techniques - 3 Cr. Introduction to Allied Health Field of Nutrition and Dietetics. Overview of goals, objectives, organizational structures, personnel policies, prac. tices and functions. Code of ethics and standard of practice studied . Role relationships , channels of communication, human relations and interpersonal skills emphasized as components and prinCiples essential in nutrition care mar:lagement of patients and personnel. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to Dietetic Technology Program . DlET-110 Nutrition for Consumers 3 Cr. - Study of physical , mental and social importance of food to the body during life cycle as affected by environmental factors. Consumer skills involved with labeling , shopping, menu planning and food preparation are stressed . Nutrition concerns are assessed for changing behavior and developing future goals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. DIET-111 Normal Nutrition - 3 Cr. Course designed for nursing students and other non-majors to help develop awareness and knowledge of nutrition prinCiples related to personal and patient care. Nutrient and energy requirements, weight control and stages of the life cycle, discussed . Interview and evaluation techniques applied to food patterns, culture, religion, economics and diet modifications preventive nutrition emphasized . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. DIET-115 Nutrition for Children and Families - 3 Cr. - A nutrition course designed for persons interested in the education of small children and the relationship of nutrition to the total development and health of children. Nutritional requirements and methods of encouraging the devel-

opment of good eating habits will be included in the course content. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. DIET-120 Nutrition Care I - 3 Cr. Introductory course. Overview, study and application of nutrition principles and knowledge of energy- yielding nutrients, digestion, absorption and utilization . Interview and evaluation techniques, cultural food patterns and preventive nutrition emphasized. Food exchange lists and basic four food groups studied . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DIET-101 Dietetic Orientation and Management Techniques. DIET-121 Nutrition Care" - 3 Cr. This course examines non-energy yielding nutrients-vitamins, minerals, and water and introduces the importance of nutrition care and education throughout life cycle . Interviewing, counseling, and evaluation techniques are strengthened and basic menu planning is stressed. Food exchange lists, applied 路applications of nutrition concepts and prinCiples 'and needs of persons throughout life cycle emphasized. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DIET-120 Nutrition Care I. DIET-123 Advanced Diet Therapy and Nutritional Problems - 3 Cr. Application of nutrition prinCiples to problems of diet in disease during life cycle. Policies and procedures for nutritional intervention in the care and management of various modified dietary patterns for all ages and groups. Asses~ment and evaluation of nutrition care plans and the role of health .care team in implementation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: DIET-124 Nutrition and Diet Therapy, DIET160 Normal and Therapeutic Clinical Field Experience. DIET-124 Nutrition and Diet Therapy - 4 Cr. - Introduction to therapeutic dietetic care and diet modifications. Nutritional intervention in health, illness and disease conditions including nutritional assessment, review of etiology and remediation , planning of care with ' regard to interactions and with emphasis on prevention and rehabilitation. Study, review and application of nutrition principles and concepts, considering current research and treatment as applied in

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patient care and education. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hour. Prerequisite: DIET-121 Nutrition Care II and CHEM-109 Introduction to Biochemistry, or concurrrent enrollment. DIET-132 Fundamentals of Dietetic Basic Foods - 4 Cr. - Concepts, theory, scientific principles and application of basic and quantity food preparation for dietetic-nutrition services. Emphasis on microbiological practices, safety and nutritional standards, recipe conversion and use of metric system. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DI ET-101 Dietetic Orientation and Management Techniques. DIET-133 Dietetic Quantity Food Production Management - 3 Cr. Food laboratory sessions with use of weights and measures, application of scientific principles, techniques and methods of food production for normal and therapeutic meals and use of tools and equipment appropriate for different food delivery systems. Evaluation of food products consistent with standards and nutritional criteria appropriate for all ages and diverse ethnic groups. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: DIET-132 Fundamentals of Dietetic Basic Foods. DIET -134 Therapeutic Nutrition Meal Planning Evaluation - 3 Cr. The students will study application of meal planning and management concepts in various food systems. They will analyze functions and the application of therapeutic food service systems. Evaluation will be based on nutritional adequacy throughout the life cycle related to techniques and methods suitable to both basic and therapeutic diet meal planning. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DIET-160 Normal and Therapeutic Nutrition Clinical Field Experience. DIET-160 Normal and Therapeutic Nutrition Clinical Field Experience 2 Cr. - The application of normal and therapeutic nutrition theory under the supervision of a registered dietician. The student will spend 10 hours per week in an off-campus clinical field experience. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DIET-124 Nutrition and Diet Therapy, CHEM-109 Introduction to Biochemistry or concurrent enrollment.

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DIET-161 Dietetic Technician Clinical Field Experience - 4 Cr. Experience in nutrition services under direction of an American Dietetic Association registered dietician. Participates and observes relevant activities in nutrition care and dietetic services, and in diverse job functions and activities that will enhance skills of dietetic technician . Selected supervisory clinical experience on a rotating basis. The student will spend 20 hours per week in an off-campus clinical experience. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DIET -123 Advanced Diet Therapy and Nutritional Problems. DIET-220 Dietetic Technician Employment Trends and Requirements - 2 Cr. - Study of new and relevant trends in dietetic and nutrition services and implications for employment opportunities for dietetic technicians as supportive personnel in nutrition care management. Review of policies, procedures and processes associated with personnel applications resumes and development of placement files for employment and continuing educa路tion purposes. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in DIET-236 Dietetic Organization and Management Procedures. DIET-222 Geriatric Nutrition - 4 Cr. - Study and application of nutrition concepts and prinCiples and nutritional care management associated with needs of elderly. Review of health regulations governing nutritional care management and health services of geriatrics, chronically ill and handicapped groups. Topics to cover physiological and socioeconomic factors affecting quality of nutritional status with emphasis on decreased functional ability, basal metabOlism, dentition, and gastrointestinal and physical constraints which affect food intake. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in DIET223 Geriatric Nutrition Clinical Field Experience. DIET-223 Geriatric Nutrition Clinical Field Experience - 2 Cr. - 'A clinical field experience course. Students receive practical nutrition and human service experiences and exposure in agencies and institutions specializing in delivery of services to geriatric persons of diverse ethnic

backgrounds. Medical team involvement. The student will spend 10 hours per week in an off-campus clinical field experience. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in DIET222 Geriatric Nutrition. DIET-235 Dietetic Quantity Food Procedures for Nutrition Services 3 Cr. - Acquaints students with the principles and techniques of institutional quantity purchasing methods, specifications, legal aspects, portion and cost analysis , purchasing records, receiving and storage procedures. Overview and application of budget development and application appropriate for health care and nutrition services. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DIET-133 Dietetic Quantity Food Pr.oduction Management. DIET-236 Dietetic Organization and Management Procedures - 3 Cr. Course will emphasize essentials in theory, concepts, principles, policies and procedures, of organization and management for dietetic and nutrition services in health care. Roles, relationships, personnel development, human relations, and responsibilities for nutrition and related allied health personnel. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. prerequisite: 01 ET -235 Dietetic Quantity Food Procedures for Nutrition Services and concurrent enrollment in DIET-220 Dietetic Technician Employment Trends and Requirements. DIET-253 Community Nutrition and Public Health - 3 Cr. - Study of concepts and principles of public health and the role of nutrition care in planning and management of community health needs, techniques, methods and approaches of teaching nutrition . Types of nutritional services provided: Categories of public health institutions will be reviewed with emphasis on nutrition and health delivery systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DIET-223 Geriatric Nutrition Clinical Field Experience. DIET-254 Public Health Nutrition Clinical Field Experience - 2 Cr. Concurrent clinical field experience under supervision of a registered dietician. Clinical field experiences in community, public health, institutions, social service agencies, clinics and schools. Nutrition intervention assessed and demon-

strated by students. The student will spend 10 hours per week in an offcampus clinical field experience . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: DIET -220 Dietetic Technician Employment Trends and Requirements.

Early Childhood Education ECED-101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education - 4 Cr. - An introduction to Early Childhood Education and its history and philosophy. Ways of distinguishing a good Early Childhood learning indoor / outdoor environment, equipment, and personnel. Human development and needs of children from conception through five and one-half years. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. ECED-102 Early Childhood Education - 4 Cr. - Study of various types of preschool centers. Emphasis on curriculum and program development, administration and the role of the preschool teacher. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ECED-101 Early Childhood Education. ECED-120 Early Language Development - 3 Cr. - An understanding of language and communication development from birth through age 5-1 / 2. History and research related to language development. The role of the teacher in faCilitating language and communication experiences. Preparation of materials to be used for language stimulation. In addition to the scheduled classroom activities on campus, students will be expected to participate in several offcampus visitations to early childhood learning centers, for the purpose of learning more about interactirtg with young children. Lectu re 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ECED-101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education. ECED-121 Literature for Early Childhood - 3 Cr. - History of children's literature authors and illustrators of outstanding books for early childhood. Evaluating and selecting books to serve needs of individual children and / or groups. Practice in reading picture books and in telling stories. Other experiences include poetry, finger plays, film strips, crea-

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tive dramatics. In addition to the scheduled classroom activities on campus, students will be expected to participate in several off-campus visitations to early childhood learning centers, for the purpose of learning more about interacting with young children. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ECED-1.20 Early Language Development or departmental approval. ECED-122 Art for Early Childhood 3 Cr. - Students in a workshop setting are acquainted with a rich and meaningful variety of curriculum experiences in art for preschool children . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ECED-102 Early Childhood Education . ECED-123 Science for Early Childhood - 3 Cr. - Students in a classroom setting are acquainted with a extensive variety of curriculum experiences in SCience, math, and the social sciences for pre- school children .The role of the teacher in faCilitating Science / Social Science experiences and a scientific attitude is explored . In addition to the scheduled classroom activities on campus, students will be expected to participate in several off-campus visitations to early childhood learning centers, for the purpose of learning more about interacting with young children . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ECED-102 Early Childhood Education or departmental approval. ECED-124 Music For Early Childhood- 3 Cr. - Designed to acquaint and train students to understand and develop the instinctive creativity of young children . Basic music vocabulary and concepts will be stressed . Experiences with sound , rhythms , musical games, instruments and records will be explored. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ECED-101 Early Childhood Education. ECED-125 Music for Early Childhood - 3 Cr. - To further explore the nature of music for young children . Study of notation and elemental theory. To develop skills in the use of various instruments. To continue the building of a repertoire and planning of musical experiences. To develop skills in evaluating music for young children . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite:

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ECED-124 Ch ildhood .

Music

for

Ea r l y

ECED-220 Child Behavior and Guidance - 3 Cr. - Guidance of preschool children with i n an educational program based on interpretation of child growth principles in practice. To help students understand themselves in their roles as teachers of young children . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSY-201 Child Growth and Development and concurrent enrollment in ECED-230 Early Childhood Practicum . ECED-221 Early Childhood Relationships - 2 Cr. - A course designed to enable teachers and parents to work together effectively toward creating a better way of life for the child, with emphasis on factors which promote satisfying relatior:tships . L'ecture 2 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: ECED-230 Early Childhood Practicum and concurrent enrollment in ECED-23 1 Early Childhood Practicum . ECED-230 Early Childhood Practlcum - 5 Cr. - Actual participation in preschool teaching under -Supervision to develop practical skills. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 10 1/ 2 hours . Prerequisites : ECED-121 Literature fo r Early ClJildhood , ECED-123 Science for Early Childhood and ECED-124 Music for Early Childhood . ECED-231 Early Childhood 路Practlcum - 5 Cr. - Additional experience with young children in an organized group. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 10 1/ 2 hours. Prerequisite: ECED230 Early Childhood Practicum . ECED-240 Infant and Toddler Care 3 Cr. - In-depth learning experience relating to child growth and development from birth to age three; studying the methods of healthful and safe environments for infants / toddlers in a variety of child-care settings. Licensing recommendations. Parent involvement. In addition to the scheduled classroom activities on campus, students will be expected to participate in several observations of children under three years old in a variety of child care settings. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PSY-201 Child Growth and Development or departmental approval.

ECED-250 The Special Child - 3 Cr. - A survey course in identification , assessment and mainstreaming of the child with special needs in a normal preschool classroom. Techniques for working with professionals from other disciplines and with parents of hand icapped child ren. In addition to the scheduled classroom activities on campus, students will be expected to participate in several observations of special needs children in a variety of child care settings . Prim a rily designed for Early Childhood Education majors. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PSY201 Child Growth and Development or departmental appmval.

of economics designed to provide an understanding of the structure, organization and operation of our economy and its relation to our social and political welfare and to our standard of living. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Not open to students who have successfully completed ECON-161 PrinCiples of Economics and / or ECON162 Principles of Economics or their equivalent.

Earth Science

ECON-161 Principles of Economics - 4 Cr. - An introduction to the scope and method of economics, scarcity and resource allocation , basic demand-supply analYSiS, the mi xed economy and its basic components, national income analysis and modern employment theory , money and banking, economic growth . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None.

ESCI-101 Physical Geography - 4 Cr. - Introductory study of geography's physical elements, includes earth-sun relationship, maps, elements and controls of cl imate. Landforms , erosion and deposition, water resources, vegetation associations and soil types, world distributions, causal relationships and significance to men are stressed . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None: ESCI-102 Physical Geology - 4 Cr. - Materials and structu res of the earth , processes, and agencies by which the earth 's crust has been and is being changed . Rocks and their mineral composition . The work of rivers, wi nds, and glaciers as agents of erosion . Volcanoes and earthquakes as forces which change the surface of the earth. Regularly scheduled field trips are an integral part of the course. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. ESCI-103 Historical Geology - 4 Cr. - Geologic history of the earth and its inhabitants, with special emphasis on North America. Laboratory study deals with principal fossil life of the various geologic periods. Occasional field work is required. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

ECON-151 Development of the American Economy - 4 Cr. - Evolutionary development of our economic system from medieval times to present. Designed for better understanding of the economic life. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

ECON-162 Principles of Economics

- 4 Cr. - A continuation of ECON161 Principles of Economics. Refi'lements in demand-supply theory s pply and the costs of production , price and output determination by market structure, resource pricing, general equilibrium analysis, labor economics, economics of poverty and inequality, the social imbalance controversy, international trade theory. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ECON-161 PrinCiples of Economics.

Education EDUC-101 Introduction to Education - 3 Cr. - Designed to introduce the student to the broad and complex field of public education. -EmphasiS on personal and professional characteristics required for successful teaching . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

Economics ECON~100

Basic Economics - 3 Cr. - Practical course in the principles

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Electrical-Electronic Engineering Technology ELEC-120 Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits - 3 Cr. Introduction to electric-electronic terms, prefixes, components, symbols, circuits, and schematic diagrams. Use of Ohm 's law, Kirchoff's voltage and current laws to solve simple two resistor series and parallel circuits. Practical laboratory experience with electronic voltmeter, dc ammeters, batteries, electronic power supplies, and the construction of working circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. ELEC-12S Electric Circuits - 3 Cr. Di rect-current circuit fundamentals, emphasis on conventional current flow, electrical quantities and units of measu rement, sources of EMF, Ohm 's law, electrical energy and power relations, series, parallel and series-parallel circuits, voltage dividers. Kirchhoff's laws, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems. Laboratory experience in cohstruction of working circuits and evaluation of their performance . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-120 Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits, or MATH-095 Basic Algebra I, or departmental approval. ELEG-126 Electric Circuits - 3 Cr. Fundamentals of alternating current (AC) circuits with 'emphasis upon capacitance , inductance,time constants, s i nusoid.al voltage and current reactance, vectors and phasors, impedance. Practical laboratory experience with AC instruments i ncluding oscilloscopes , capacit ance testing and the evaluation of reactive circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2路hours. Prerequisites: ELEC-j 25 Electric Circuits and Math-1 08. Technical Mathematics I. ELEC-127 Electric Circuits - 3 Cr. Emphasis on power, resonance , coupled circuits, transformer action and harmonics. Practical laboratory experience with variou'3 combinations of series and parallel reactive circuits and resonant circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: ELEC-126 Electric Circuits and MATH-109 Technical Mathematics II.

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ELEC-140 Direct Current Machines 3 Cr. - Direct current generatormotor prinCiples and construction. Includes single phase A.C. motors. Efficiency, rating and application of dynamos. Voltage, current, excitation , torque, speed and speed regulation, armature reaction and power losses. Rotating amplifiers and D.C. machines for automation. Practical laboratory experience with electrical machines. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites:' ELEC125 Electric Circuits and MATH-108 Technical Mathematics I. ELEC-1S0 Alternating Current Machines - 3 Cr. - Theory of alternating cu rrent machinery. Construction, characteristics and operation of induction , synchronous motors, synchronous generators, converters and transformers , both single and polyphase. Practical laboratory experience with machinery. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: ELEC-127 Electric Circuits and ELEC-140 Direct Current Machines or concurrent enrollment. ' ELEC-160 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits - 3 Cr. - Fundamentals of vacuum tubes and semiconductors. Circuit applications including rectifier and basic power supply circuits as well as filter networks. Vacuum triode characteristics. Practical laboratory experience with circuits involving semiconductors, zener, tunnel and vacuum diodes. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-127 Electric Circuits or concurrent enrollment. ELEC-170 Electrical/Electronic Drafting - 3 Cr. - PrinCiples and practice of electrical / electronic drafting techniques. Specific applications as related to: motor control diagrams (ladder) , electrical / electronic ci rcuits layout of circuit components for chassis and printed circuit applications. Graphic symbols and conventions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: ELEC-160 Semiconductors and Electronic Circuits and ENGR121 Engineering Drawing or equivalent. ELEC-211 Electrical Construction and Application - 2 Cr. - Wiring systems for light, heat and power. TraAsmission and distribution systems switches, contactors, relays and circuit breakers. Wire, cable and

conduit applications. Feeder and branch circuit protection . Safety and grounding practices. Lighting systems .and design . Electric heating design. Demonstrations will be used to familiarize students with equipment. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-1S0 Alternating Current Machines. ELEC-237 Electronic Communication Transmission -3 Cr. - Fundamentals of radio transmission and receiving systems. Emphasis on receiver circuitry, modulation and demodulation circuits for both amplitude and frequency modulated systems. Basic principles of transmission lines and antennas will be introduced . Practical laboratory experience with audio and radio- frequency components as well as with alignment and trouble-shooting of Amplitude Modulated (AM) and Frequency Modulated (FM) receivers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-261 Semiconductor And Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment. ELEC-2S0 Industrial Electronics - 3 Cr. - Operating principles of industrially oriented equipment. Industrial application of semiconductors and tube operated circuits. Rectifiers, thyristors, thyratrons and associated equipment. Includes sensing of time, voltage and light. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment. ELEC-2S1 Industrial Electronics - 3 Cr. - A continuation of ELEC-2S0 Industrial Electronics. TopiCS covered include: magnetic amplifiers, synchro generators and motors, servomechanisms, thyristors and firing controls, automatic motor controls. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-2S0 Industrial Electronics. ELEC-2S2 Logic, Puise and Switching Circuitry - 3 Cr. - Elements of logic, pulse and switching circuitry. Emphasis on number systems and Boolean algebra, clipping and clamping circuits. The transistor as a switch . Bistable, monostable and astable multivibrators, pulse amplifiers and blocking oscillators. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits.

ELEC-2S3 Computer Circuitry - 3 Cr. - Application of logic, pulse and switching circuits to computers. Codes and introduction to machine language. Emphasis on counters and shift registers, timing and control, computer arithmetic operations and memory systems. Input-output equipment, analog to digital and digital to analog conversion. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-2S2 Logic, Pulse and Switching Circuitry. ELEC-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits - 3 Cr. - Transistor characteristics and theory of operation . Transistor biasing and' thermal stabilization . Small signal and low frequency amplifier circuits. Field effect transistors. Practical laboratory exp.erience with transistor and triode amplifier circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-160 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits. ELEC-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits - 3 Cr. - A continuatio ' j of ELEC-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits, with emphasis on amplifiers, feedback amplifiers, untuned sine wave and negative resistance oscillators, large signal amplifiers, integrated circuits and regulated power supplies. Laboratory experience with cascaded transistor amplifiers, power amplifiers, phase inverters, SCR's and amplifier integrated circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits. ELEC-262 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation - 3 Cr. - Principles of electronic measuring and test instruments. Basic meters in D.C. and A.C. measurements. Comparison and bridge type measurements. Electronic meters, oscilloscopes and component testing devices. Practical laboratory experience with instrument circuits , operation, calibration and measurement. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-260 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits or concurrent enrollment. ELEC-263 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation - 3 Cr. - Circuitry, operation and calibration of the more sophisticated electronic instruments. Included are recorders and transducers, signal generators, frequency measuring devices, digital

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instruments and the analog computer. Basic control systems are examined . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: ELEC-2S1 Industrial Electronics, ELEC-2S2 Logic, Pulse an Switching Circuitry and ELEC-262 Electronic Measurement and Instrumentation. EL:EC-270 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program . Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision . The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program. ELEC-272 Integrated Circuit Analysis - 3 Cr. - Introduction to linear integrated circuit components used in industry today. Topics included are: operational amplifiers, voltage comparators, Digital-te-Analog (D / A) and Analog-to Digital (A/ D) converters, active filter circuits, sample and hold circuits, and phase-locked loops. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ELEC-261 Semiconductor and Electronic Circuits.

Emergency Medical Technology EMT-131 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - 1 Cr. - Introduction to respiratory and circulatory emergencies in adults and children . Instruction and t reatment methods to meet American Red Cross and / or the American Heart Association Certification for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitati on Module (C.P.A.) Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. EMT-132 Emergency Medical Technology-Ambulance I - 5 Cr. - Students partiCipate in lecture and practice sessions in emergency victim care required by the Ohio State Department of Education for ambulance and rescue personnel. Emergency Medical Technicians will be trained in the treatment and transportation of the sick ann injured, extrication from vehicles and rescue techniques. Lecture 4 hours. Labpratory 3 hours. Prerequ isites: Stan-

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dard and Advanced First Aid recommended and departmental approval. EMT-133 Skills and Techniques for Determining Vital Signs - 1 Cr. The course will include the techniques and skills necessary for the EMT to accurately measure patient vital signs. Classroom and laboratory simulation will emphasize the inter-relationship between vital signs and total patient care. This course is certified by the Ohio State Department of Education, Technical and Vocational Education Division. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. EMT-134 Emergency Medical Technology-Ambulance II - 1 Cr. - Inhospital based practical session for ambulance and rescue personnel. Trainees will rotate through community hospitals and be supervised by physicians and nurses in the treatment skills necessary to provide emergency medical treatment and the normal procedures in the function of a hospital emergency room. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: EMT-132 Emergency Medical Technology-Ambulance I, EMT-133 Skills and Techniques for Determining Vital Signs and departmental approval. EMT-136 Heavy Rescue - 3 Cr. - At the completion of this course the student will be able to successfully demonstrate the techniques of Heavy Rescue and the equipment management necessary to release an entrapped victim. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Departmental approval, certified EMT-A. EMT-137 Defensive Driving - 1 Cr. - At the completion of this course the student will be able to demonstrate principles and practices of defensive driving related to Emergency Rescue Vehicles including laws, conditions of accidents, and methods of avoiding accidents. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hou rs. Prerequisite: Departmental approval, certified EMT-A, EMT-P, current EMT student or working with safety forces as a driver. Must have a valid Ohio driver's license. EMT-138 Emergency Medical ServIces Communications - 2 Cr. Classroom instruction provides the student with theorectical and technical knowledge required to opera-

tionally perform the functions of an Emergency Medical Communicator. General topics include telementry, telephone techniques, dispatching, triage procedures, equipment, and FCC regulations governing use of VHF, UHF, FM and AM frequencies. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. EMT-156 Emergency Medical Technology-Paramedic Theory I - 7 Cr. - Introduction to the role, responsibilities, and training of the Emergency Medical TechnicianParamedic. Course includes legal , ethical, and occupational responsibilities . Theoretical and practical content covers physical assessment, shock and fluid therapy, general pharmacology, and management of respiratory system emergencies. Upon completion of this course the student will be familiar with equipment, materials, and procedures to do venous cannulation, insert endotrachael / esophageal airways, administer medications, conduct physical examinations, take medical histories, and sort medical emergencies on priority basis. The student will spend 9 hours each week in a laboratory experience, a portion of which will be an assigned off-cam=pus clinical experience. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: Departmental approval, certified EMT-A. EMT-157 Emergency Medical Technology-Paramedic Theo.ry II - 7 Cr. - Anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Patient assessment and management of cardiovascular problems. EKG strip reading, understanding normal electrocardiograms and dysrhythmias. Techniques of management and treatment of cardiac emergencies including monitoring, drugs therapy, cardioversion and mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices. The student will spend 9 hours each week in a laboratory experience, a portion of which will be an assigned off-came pus clinical experience. Lecture路 4 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: Departmental approval , EMT156 Emergen.cy Medical Technology-Paramedic Theory I, certified EMT-A. EMT-158 Emergency Medical TechnOlogy-Paramedic Theory III - 7 Cr. - Anatomy, physiology, and

pathophysiology of the central nervous system , musculoskeletal system , soft tissue, gastrointestinal system, EENT, reproductive, and renal systems. Techniques of management and treatment of injuries and medical emergencies involving these systems. Pediatric, obstetric , and psychiatric emergencies are included . The student will spend 9 hours each week in a laboratory experience, a portion of which will be an assigned off-campus clinical experience. Lecture 4 hours . .Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: EMT-157 Emergency Medical TechnologyParamedic Theory II . EMT-210 The Profession of Emergency Medical Services - 2 Cr. The student upon completion of this course will be able to understand the components of an Emergency Medical System, know the history of the development of Emergency Services on a national, state and local basis, be familiar with current legal aspects and legislation and know the steps necessary to develop an Emergency Medical Service. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Departmental approval, certified EMT-A, EMT-P, administrator or instructor in E.M .S. or Allied Health professionai. EMT-211 Advanced Techniques of Assessment and Triage - 2 Cr. Advanced techniques and theory pertaining to physical assessment. Continuation of Theory I, Theory II, and Theory III. Consideration is given to the diagnosis, the treatment and triage of emergency conditions. The student will spend 3 hours each week in a laboratory experience, a portion of which will be an assigned off-campus clinical experience. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Departmental approval , certified EMT-A or EMT-P. EMT-220 Emergency Medical Technology Supervision - 2 Cr. - At the completion of this course the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge in supplies management, care, maintenance and inventory of equipment, cost factors, distribution budgeting , staffing, personnel management, and in-service training . Lecture 1 hour. LaboJatory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Departmental approval , certified EMT-A, EMT-P, or Allied Health professional working with an Emergency System .

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Eng ineeri ng

EMT-221 Emergency Medical Technology-Paramedic Theory IV - 3 Cr. _ This course will cover the cogntENGR-101 Metallurgy I - 3 Cr. tive and practical aspects of AdPhysical and .mechanical behavior of vanced Cardiac Life Support and the pure metals and alloys. Specific student must be able to complete metal systems are examined to illusthe course with the minimal certifitrate various phenomena. Introduccation of Advanced Cardiac Life tion to metallography and physical Support. To obtain certification at this level the student must meet the . testing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. standards of the American Heart Association and the course will be ENGR-102 Metallurgy II - 3 Cr. - A taught by an ACLS certified instruccontinuation of ENGR-101 Metaltor with the sanction of the AHA, lurgy with special emphasis on Northeast Ohio Affiliate and be phase changes of metals. Heat treatsponsored by a physician who is ment of steel is introduced. Lecture certified as an Advanced Cardiolo2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prereqgist. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 uisite: ENGR-101 Metallurgy I. hours. Prerequisites: Student must be an Ohio Board of Regents certiENGR-103 Metallurgy III - 3 Cr. fied Paramedic, an R.N. who is inStudy of non-ferrous metals and alvolved in providing or teaching loys, effects of high and low temperadvanced life support, or an MD. All ature on metals wear and corrosion . must be certified AHA, CPR instrucExtractive and powder metallurgy. tors and must have approval for adLecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. mission from an Americah Heart Prerequisite: ENGR-101 Metallurgy I. Association certified instructor. All ENGR-110 Engineering Technology applicants must be screened by the Orientation - 2 Cr. - An introducAmerican Heart Association Northeast Ohio Affiliate and they must tion and orientation to the Engineering Technology programs. Designed present required credentials includto acquaint the student with proing a near perfect CPR strip. Regisgram requirements and post graduatration must be six weeks in advance tion opportunities for employment of taking course. and / or continuation of education . EMT-230 Emergency Medical TechCourse includes instruction on some nology Technical Management - 3 basic skills and techniques required Cr. - Upon completion of this for success in these programs and course, the student will be knowlon the various aspects of related caedgeable of diagnostic categories of reer areas. Lecture 2 hours. Laboraemergencies, emergency service tory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. categorization and have understandENGR-112 Engineering Report Coning of hospital care capabilities, pastruction - 3 Cr. - Oral, written and tient transport protocol and transfer graphic methods of communication agreements. The student will also for the engineer and technician. gain uneerstanding of areawide Provides practice in preparation of planning in preparation for disaster technical reports. Lecture 3 hours. as well as procedures for establishLaboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ing a training system for Emergency None. Medical personnel. In addition to oncampus educational activity, the stuENGR-120 Engineering Calculating dent will participate in exploration of Devices - 2 Cr. - An introduction to emergency medical service planning calculating devices used in eng iand operations in a practical workneering including slide rule and full ing environment. Lecture 2 hours. function electronic calculator. EmLaboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: phasis upon application to Departmental approval, EMT-210 problems, method of problem soluThe Profession of Emergency Medi- tion and development of speed in cal Services, certified EMT-A or the manipulation of these instruEMT-P . People. in administrative ments. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory levels of emergency services will be o hours. Prerequisites: MATH-105 considered. Trigonometry or equivalent high school Algebra and Trigonometry. ENGR-121 Engineering Drawing - 3 Cr. - Principles and practice in or-

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thographic and pictorial drawing and sketching. Lettering, applied geometry and use of instruments. Sectional and auxiliary views. Dimensioning systems as applicable to production drawing. Graphic data representation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. ENGR-122 Engineering Drawing - 3 Cr. - Elements of machine drawing, electronic diagrams, piping and welding drawing, intersections and developments. Precision dimensioning as dictated by shop processes. Working drawings, methods of reproduction and control. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ENGR-121 Engineering Drawing. ENGR-123 Engineering Drawing - 3 Cr. - Drafting principles and applications pertinent to working drawings. Includes metric, dual and true position dimensioninQ geometric tolerancing. Tool drawings, design drawing and technical illustratio~ are introduced together with applications of special drafting aids and techniques. Graphical mathematics methods and media are included. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: ENGR-122 Engineering Drawing. ENGR-151 Statics & Strength of Materials - 3 Cr. - A basic study of engineering statics and an introduction to simple stress and stram m deformable bodies. Practical demonstrations include utilization of the universal testing machine in verifying theoretical concepts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. PrereqUisites: MATH-101 Basic Algebra II and MATH-105 Trigonometry. ENGR-211 Introduction to Surveying - 3 Cr. - Application and care of surveying instruments. Techniques and practice in taping. Use of transit and level in horizontal and vertical measurement, differential and profile. Emphasis on accurate recording of field data in note form . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: MATH-105 Trigonometry and ENGR-121 Engineering Drawing or equivalent. ENGR-212 Surveying - 3 Cr. - A continuation of ENGR-211 Introduction to Surveying with emphasis on contour work, drainage and grading, and layout of vertical curves. Topographic stadia and plane table work will be introduced. Lecture 2 hours.

Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ENGR-211 Introduction to Surveying. ENGR-251 Strength of Materials - 3 Cr. - The study of internal stresses and deformation in materials under various external loads . External loads examined include torque, forces applied to beams, combined forces on members and forces applied to columns. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. PrerequIsite: ENGR-151 Statics & Strength of Materials. ENGR-252 Applied Dynamics - 3 Cr. - A basic study of engineering dynamics including plane motion, curvilinear motion, kinetics, work, power, energy, impulse and momentum and vibrations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ENGR-151 Statics & Strength of Materials.

English ENG-097 Language Fundamentals I - 6 Cr. - This course is designed for those students who need to develop the essentials of reading comprehension, word attack Skills, and basic writing skills. Lecture 6 h<;>~rs . Laboratory 0 hours. PrerequIsite: Placement by department. ENG-09S Language Fundamentals II - 6 Cr. - This course is designed for those students who need additional development in the essentials of reading comprehension , vocabulary development, and basic writing skills. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 0 hour. Prerequisite: ENG-097 Language Fundamentals I, or placement by department. ENG-099 Language Fundamentals III - 6 Cr. - Mastery of language fundamentals: reading comprehension' basic essay writing skills; and basic study and test-taking skills. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-098 Language Fundamentals II, or placement by department. ENG-101 College Compositi!Jn - 3 Cr. - Study and practice in the principles of good writing . Lecture ~ hours. Laboratory 0 hours. PrereqUisite: Placement by department. ENG-102 College Composition - 3 Cr. - Study and practice in the principles of good writing , with em-

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phasis on interpretive papers and research papers. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-101 College Composition. ENG-103 College Composition - 3 Cr. - Study and practice in the principles of good writing, with emphasis on critical papers about literature. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. 路 Prerequisite: ENG-102 College Composition.

ENG-126 Reading English as a Second language -3 Cr. - English for non-native speakers. Principles underlying efficient reading with emphasis on surveying , comprehending , notetaking and outlining . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENG-122 English as a Second Language or placement by department.

ENG-201 Creative Writing - 3 Cr. ENG-107 Advanced Reading ImPractice in imaginative writing for provement - 3 Cr. - Emphasis on students who wish to explore their reading comprehension and critical creative potential. Lecture 3 hours. interpretation of college level mateLaboratory 0 hours .. Prerequisite: rial. Some applications to profesENG-103 College Composition or sional and business level reading departmental approval. when adaptable. Some effective ENG-215 Technical Writing I - 4 Cr. speed reading techniques. Group instruction and individualized atten- . - Students will learn about the technical communication process, about tion in the art and skills of efficient their roles in a complex organization reading. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory and how those roles affect the como hours. Prerequisites: Eligibility for munication of technical information. 100 level English courses or placeThe emphasis will' be on writing rement by department. ports which effectively meet the needs of various readers within an ENG-121 English as a Second lanorganization . Lecture 4 hours. Laboguage - 5 Cr. - English for non-naratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENGtive speakers. Intensive written 103 College Composition or departpractice in the Basic English Senmental approval. tence pattern. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite : ENG-216 Technical Writing II - 4 Cr. Placement by department. - This course will help develop the ENG-122 English as a Second language - 5 Cr. - English for non-native speakers. Intensiv.e written practice in modifying and combining the basic English sentence patterns and in constructing paragraphs from topic sentences. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department. ENG-123 English as a Second language - 5 Cr. - English for non-native speakers. Intensive practice in analysis of American writing with emphasis on writing summaries of essays and short stories. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Placement by department. ENG-125 Reading Engllsl:l as a Second language - 3 Cr. - English for non-native speakers. Practice in the use of the dictionary to aid spelling, pronunciation and vocabulary development the study of phonics to increase reading comprehension and to expand' vocabulary. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENG121 English as a Second Language or placement by department.

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students' abilities to distinguish between data, conclusions drawn from data, and recommendations based on the conclusions. Students will learn the principles for the design and use of effective visual aids in technical reports. In addition, students will learn when to use various report formats for effective communication. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-215 Technical Writing I or departmental approval. ENG-221 British Literature:' Early Period - 3 Cr. - Study of major works of British literature from the early period to 1660. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-103 College Composition . ENG-222 British Literature: Middle Period - 3 Cr. - Study of major works of British literature from 16601832. Lecture 3 hours. Labor.atory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-103 College Composition. ENG-223 British Literature: Modern Period - 3 Cr. - Study of major works of British literature from 1832present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory

o hours. Prerequisite: ENG-103 College Composition . ENG-231 American Literature: Early Period - 3 Cr. - Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from the early period to the Civil War. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-103 College Composition . ENG-232 American Literature: Middle Period - 3 Cr. - Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from the Civil War to World War I. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-103 College Composition . ENG-233 American Literature: Modern Period - 3 Cr. - Reading and analysis of notable American literary works from World War I to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-103 College Composition. ENG-241 Introduction to Literature: Poetry - 3 Cr. - An interpretive scrutiny of poetic form, including an examination of mechanical structure, an exploration of emotional thrust, and a search for both the actual and potential sense of the poem . Lecture 3 hours. LaboratorY 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-103 College Composition . ENG-242 Introduction to Literature: Fiction - 3 Cr. - Critical analysis of selected works of fiction designed to develop appreCiation and understanding of the short story and the novel as literary forms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-103 College Composition . ENG-243 Introduction to Literature: Drama - 3 Cr. - Critical analysis of selected dramatic works designed to develop appreciation and understanding of the drama as a literary form . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-103 College Composition. ENG-245 Special Studies in Literature - 3 Cr. - Study of selected literary works which may include fiction , drama, poetry and / or exposition on a specified central theme. Study of literary works is related to specific themes and trends. (See schedule book for themes offered .) The course may be taken for an accrued maximum of nine credit hours. Lec-

tlJre 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites : ENG-103 College Composition or departmental approval. ENG-251 Black American Literature - 3 Cr. - Study of major works of Black Americans from the Post-Reconstruction Era through the Harlem Renaissance. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of ENG - 103 College Composition or concurrent enrollment. ENG-252 Black American Literature - 3 Cr. - Study of major works of Black Americans from 1930 to 1950. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of ENG103 College CompOSition or concurrent enrollment. ENG-253 Black American Literature - 3 Cr. - Study of major works of Black Americans from the fifties to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of ENG-103 College Composition or ...c oncurrent enrollment. ENG-260 Survey of Juvenile Fiction - 3 Cr. - Designed to cover the literature read by the school-age child through adolescence, a fiction study offering a unique mix, from folklore to the ultra-modern , from the traditional to the experimental , where the older learn from the younger. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-103 College Composition. ENG-271 Shakespeare - 4 Cr. - A comprehensive reading course which includes a representative selection of Shakespeare's plays: comedies, .tragedies and histories . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : ENG-103 College Composition. ENG-281 Independent Research in Literature - 1 Cr. - This course may be taken concurrently with any 200level English course. Its specific content is to be . arranged through a contract between the instructor and each student. This course may be repeated for an accrued maximum of nine credits. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG103 College Composition or departmental approval.

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Financial Management FIN-101 Principles of Bank Operations - 3 Cr. - The fundamentais of bank functions. A descriptive survey of various bank operations such as accounting, trust, demand deposits, savings and time deposits,home mortgage lending , credit administration and financing business enterprise. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. FIN-106 Consumer Finance - 3 Cr. - Management of personal finances and study of consumer protection : personal budgeting , buying on credit, planning an insurance program and medical care. Also covers investments, home ownership retirement planning and income taxes. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. FIN-107 Teller Operations - 3 Cr. Introduces the student to the operational, financial , and managerial aspects of the teller function in commercial banks, savings associations, and credit unions. Includes the processing of various negotiable instruments, internal and external documents, and learning about security procedures, record keeping, balancing procedures, product knowledge, cross selling , and behavioral strategies. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. FIN-110 Principles of Finance - 3 Cr. - An introductory course that covers the basic principles of finance, private and government financial institutions , financial instruments, money and credit systems, and current problems in consumer and business financing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT-107 Business: Accounting Applications, BADM-108 Introduction to Business, ACCT-122 Principles of Accounting or concurrent enrollment. FIN-115 Bank Management - 3 Cr. - Trends in philosophy and practice of bank management. Case studies of good and poor bank management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: FIN-101 Principles of Bank Operations. FIN-120 Analysis of Financial Statements - 3 Cr. - A study of the basic

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tools used in analysis, comparisons, trends, and projections of financial information'. Review financial statements discussion of uses of analysis, and application of analytical techniques. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: FIN101 Principles of Bank Operations, ACCT-122, Principles of Accounting. FIN-125 Installment Credit - 3 Cr. A pragmatic approach to the principles of credit evaluation, types of credit, collection procedures and policies, and legal aspects of credit rates, insurance, and management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: FIN-101 Principles of Bank Operations, FIN-110 Principles of Finance. FIN-130 Bank Cards - 3 Cr. - Overview of bank card industry. Types of credit cards, marketing techniques, collection policies, and security. Evolution of credit cards into Electronic Funds Transfer, legal developments, and regulations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: FIN-101 Principles of Bank Operations , FIN-110 Principles of Finance , FIN-142 Credit Administration . FIN-132 Trust Functions and Services - 3 Cr. - Study of services rendered by institutions engaged in trust business, including the history of trust activities, powers of trust i nstitutions, and the legal aspects of trusts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: FIN-101 Principles of Bank Operations, FIN-110 Principles of Finance. FIN-140 International Banking - 3 Cr. - A survey of the fundamentals of international banking, including funds transfer, financing international trade, and the institutions and instruments that facilitate those operations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: FIN-101 Principles of Bank Operations , ACCT-121 Principles of Accounting, FIN-110 Principles of Finance. FIN-141 Investments - 3 Cr. - An introductory course that covers the principles of investment and information needed for a salesman or clerical worker in the securities business. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: BADM-208 Introduction to Business, FIN-110 Principles of Finance.

FIN-142 Credit Administration - 3 Cr. - Study of methods and techniques for credit investigation and analysis. Survey of types of loans available, types of customers supplied, and credit department organization . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequ isites: FIN-101 Principles of Bank Operations, FIN-11 0 Principles of Finance, FIN-120 Analysis of Financial Statements. FIN-145 Negotiable Instruments - 3 Cr. - Introduction to legal framework of banking, legal relationships between bank and depositors, and other bank services. Detailed analysis of commercial paper, check processing , treatment of MICR checks, data processing, and evolving paperless electronic payments mechanisms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: ACCT122 Principles of Accounting., BADM-213 Business Law, FIN-101 Principles Qf Bank Operations, FIN110 Principles of Finance. FIN-146 Home Mortgage Lending - 3 Cr. - Developing a sound mortgage portfolio. Acquisition of mortgage plans, procedures, mortgage loan processing and servicing and overall portfolio management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: FIN-101 Principles of Bank Operations, FIN-110 Principles of Finance. FIN-150 Money and Banking - 3 Cr. - Examination of the banking and financial institutions that provide the economic system with money, evaluation of their effectiveness, and ways in which those institutions might be improved. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: FIN-110 Principles of Finance , ECON-161 Principles of Economics. FIN-161 Introduction to the Savings Association Business - 3 Cr. - Survey of the role of savings associations in the modern business world. Savings associations' historical development, present-day organization, competition , and future directions are presented . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. FIN-162 Savings Association Operations - 3 Cr. - Survey of major operational areas in savings associations, including functions, work processes, and interrelationships among operating areas. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours.

Prerequisite: FIN-161, Introduction to the Savings Association Business or departmental approval.

FIN-260 Financial Management - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program . Employment in an approved trainlng facility under college supervision. The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of 12 credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Cooperative Field Experience 12 hours (approximately). Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program .

Fire Technology FIRE-100 Introduction to Fire Science - 3 Cr. - Organizational procedu res of the fire services. Includes the structure and function of battal. ion and company as components of municipal organizations. Discussion topiCS include personnel management and training , fire equipment and apparatus. Communications, records and reports, insurance rating systems and the law as it pertains to the fire services. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. FIRE-110 Fire Fighting Tactics - 3 Cr. - Techniques and procedures of fire fighting . Emphasis upon the . individual fireman at the fire scene. Methods of extinguishing fires, lifesaving procedures, salvage, prevention of rekindling . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: FIRE-100 Introduction to Fire Science. or departmental approval. FIRE-120 Fire Protection Systems 3 Cr. - Design and operation of fire protection systems, water distribution, detection, alarm and watchman services. Protection systems for special hazards. Carbon dioxide, dry chemical, foam and water spray systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. FIRE-210 Fire-Fighting Command 3 Cr. - Group operations and command strategy. Pre-planning of firefighting operations, size-up at the fire, employment of personnel and equipment. Lecture 3 hours. Labora-

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tory 0 hours. Prerequisite: FIRE-110 Fire-Fig hting Tactics. FIRE-211 Fire-Fighting Command and Administration - 3 Cr. - Analysis of specific tactical problem s from a comman d point of view. Pre-planning of fire-fight ing operatio ns and the evaluation of these plans. Lecture 3 hours. Laborato ry 0 hours. Prerequ isite: FIRE-110 Fire-Fighting Tactics. FIRE-220 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials - 3 Cr. - Analysis of chem ical reaction as the causative agent of fire. Includes redox reactio ns, reaction rates, toxic compounds and hazard ous combina tions of chemica ls. Lecture 3 hours. Laborato ry 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. FIRE-230 Building Construction for the Fire Service - 3 Cr. - Study of building construc tion and materials. Emphasis on fire prevention procedures and practice s as related to building construc tion . Fire ratings of materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: FIRE-120 Fire Protectio n Systems . FIRE-231 Fire Prevention Practices 3 Cr. - Inspecti on practices as they pertain to fire prevention. Storage of explosive flammables, codes and fire ordinan ces, and examina tion of heating systems . Lecture 3 hours. Laborat ory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: FIRE-230 Building Constru ction for the Fire Service. FIRE-235 Fire Investigation Methods - 3 Cr. - Principle s of fire investigation , arson laws, interrog ation of witnesses and applica tions of photogra phy. Preparation of reports and adjustments of losses. Lecture <3 hours. Laborato ry 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. FIRE-236 Fire Investigation Methods - 3 Cr. - Continu ation of FIRE-235 Fire Investigation Methods with emphasis on preparation of reports and collectio n and presentation of reports and collectio n and presentation of arson evidenc e in court. Lecture 3 hours. Laborato ry 0 hours. Prerequisite: FIRE-235 Fire Investigation Methods . FIRE-240 Fire Hydraulics - 3 Cr. Hydraul ic theory. Drafting of water, velocity and discharge, friction loss, engine and nozzle pressure, fire streams , pressure .Iosses, flow and pump testing , and applicat ions in

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fire service. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. FIRE-270 Fire Services Training and Public Relations - 3' Cr. - Methods and techniqu es of instructi on for fire personnel. Organization of training program s and prepara tion of related materials. Study of public relations as pertinen t to municip al fire services includin g process es for building goodwil l and publicity efforts. l-ecture 3 hours. Laborato ry 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. FIRE-280 Managing Fire Services - 3 Cr. - The total management of effective emergen cy fire and med ical services on an immediate need basis. Budget, personnel, labor relations and measur ement and evaluation of productivity as well as training and educatio n of fire service units. Lecture 3 hours. Laborato ry 0 hours. Prerequisite: FIRE-211 Fire Fighting Comman d and Adminis tration or departmental approval.

French FREN-111 Beginning French I - 5 Cr. - Introdu ction to French through multiple approac h with emphasis on speaking . Practice in conversing in French in simple idiomatic sentences on topics of everyday interest. Lecture 5 hours. Laborato ry 0 hours. Prerequ isite: None. FREN-112 Beginning French II - 5 Cr. - Study of the French languag e with emphasis on speaking . Practice in speaking, understa nding, reading and writing . Further develop ment of convers ational skills . Lecture 5 hours. Laborato ry 0 hours. Prerequisite: FREN-111 Beginnin g French I or one year of high school French . FREN-113 Beginning French III - 5 Cr. - Conti nued study of the French languag e. Develop ment of proficien cy in speaking , understa nding, reading and writing . Emphasis on strength ening convers ational skills through discuss ions of selected readings and cultural topics. Lecture 5 hours. Laborato ry 0 hours. Prerequ isite: FREN-112 Beginni ng French II or two years of high school French. FREN-201 Intermediate French - 4 Cr. - Introduc tion to more ad vanced vocabul ary and speech patterns in order to. facilitat e the transition from simple to complex

reading material, acquainting the student with French literature and civilizatien . Systematic review .of grammar. Lecture 4 heurs. Laberatery 0 heurs. Prerequisite: FREN-113 Beginning French Iller twe years .of high scheel French.

FREN-202 Intermediate French - 4 Cr. - Strengthening facility .of .oral and written expressien in the . Ianguage. Building .of mere advanced vecabulary and sentence structure by means .of selectiens from French liter.ature. Lecture 4 heurs. Laberatery 0 hours. Prerequisite: FREN-201 Intermediate French .or twe years .of high scheel French . FREN-203 Intermediate French - 4 Cr. - Oral and written expressien in the fereign language are further develeped . Literary selectiens are te be discussed te gain deeper understanding and appreciatien .of French th.ought and culture. Lecture 4 heurs. Laberatery 0 heurs. Prerequisite: FREN-202 Intermediate French .or three years .of路 high sche.ol French. FREN-241 French Conversation and Composition - 4 Cr. - Discussien .of tepics .of everyday life, c.oll.oquialisms, vecabulary augmentatien, and imprevement .of speech patterns. Practice in writing cempesitiens. Lecture 4 heurs. Laberatery 0 heurs. Prerequisite: FREN-203 Intermediate French .or cencurrent enrellment, .or department appreval, .or three years .of high scheel French . F-REN-242 French Civilization and Literature - 4 Cr. - Intreducti.on te the civilizatien and literature .of France. Emphasis .on the interrelatienship between histery and geegraphy .of France and its culture. Lecture 4 heurs. Laberatery 0 heurs. Prerequisite: FREN-203 Intermediate French .or cencurrent enrellment with censent .of department, 'Or three years .of high scheel French. FREN-243 Readings in French Literature - 4 Cr. - An intreductien te French literature .of the- 19th and 20th centuries. Highlights .of representative authers and their werks. Emphasis .on .oral discussien. Lecture 4 heurs . .Laberat.ory 0 heurs. Prerequisite: FREN-203 Intermediate French .or cencurrent enrellment, .or departmental appreval , .or three years .of high scheel French.

General Studies GEN-101 Personal Development - 3 Cr. - An experience based appreach te help students examine their persenal reseurces, values, and geals as they relate te their persenal develepment. Emphasis will be placed upen the eppertunity te participate in experiences planned te assist in achieving the .objectives .of beceming mere self-directing, selfmetivating, self-cenfident, and emphathetic teward .others. In additien te the fermal classroem activity, students will spend 3 heurs in a less f.ormalized greup sessien each week. Lecture 1 hour. Laberatery 0 heurs. Prerequisite: Nene. GEN-102 Career Exploration - 3 Cr. - A survey .of career develepment theery. Emphasis .on the nature and meaning .of werk, values, interests, functi.onal skills, attitudes and needs as they relate te the career develepment process. Seurces .of .occupatienal infermatien are discussed. A series .of self-assessment inventeries are utilized . Lecture 3 heurs. Laberatery 0 heurs. Prerequisite: Nene. GEN-103 Organizing your Employment Campaign - 3 Cr. - Ceurse is designed fer students whe have made a mature career cheice. Techniques te initiating an empl.oyment campaign which includes eccupatienal infermation , identifying petential empleyers, laber market trends, interviewing techniques and resume preparatien. Criteria fer jeb satisfactien and jeb adjustment are analyzed . Lecture 3 heurs. Laberatery 0 heurs. Prerequisite: Nene.

Geography GEOG-102 World Regional Geography - 4 Cr. - Geegraphical study .of selected werld regiens. Landferms, climate, peeples, preblems .of cultural and pelitical differences. Lecture 4 h.ours. Lab.oratery 0 heurs. Prerequisite: Nene. GEOG-103 World Resources - 4 Cr. - The study .of areal variatien .on the earth 's surface in man 's activities related . te producing , exchanging and censuming wealth . Lecture 4 heurs. Laberatery 0 heurs. Prerequisite: Nene.

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GEOG-151 Geography of the United States and Canada - 4 Cr. - Regional survey of the United States and Canada noting significant characteristics of each region. Includes physical characteristics, resource potentials and important political, economic and social activities. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

German GER-111 Beginning German I - 5 Cr. - Introduction to German through multiple approach with emphasis on speaking. Practice in conversing in German in simple idiomatic sentences on topics of everyday interest. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. GER-112 Beginning German II - 5 Cr. - Study of the German language with emphasis on speaking . Continued practice in speaking, understand ing, reading and writing . Further development of conversational skills. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: GER111 Beginning German I or one year of high school German .

and civilization . Increasing emphaSis on conversation and free compOsition. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: GER-202 Intermediate German or three years of high school German .

GER-241 German Conversation and Composition - 4 Cr. - Discussion of topics of everyday life, colloquialisms, vocabulary, augmentation and improvement of speech patterns. Practice in writing compositions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: GER-203 Intermediate German or concurrent enrollment, or departmental approval, or three years of high school German . GER-242 German Civilization and Literature - 4 Cr. - Introduction to German civilization and literature: interrelationships among German history , geography , literature and culture. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: GER-203 Intermediate German or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high sc-hool German .

GER-243 Readings in German Literature - 4 Cr. - An introduction to German literature from the 18th cenGER-113 Beginning German III - 5 tury to the present. Highlights of representative authors and their Cr. - .Study of the German language with emphasis on speaking . works. Emphasis on oral discussion. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Continued practice in speaking, understanding, reading and writing . - Prerequisite: GER-203 Intermediate German or concurrent enrollment, Emphasis on strengthening converor departmental approval, or three sational skills through discussion of years of high school German. selected readings and cultural topics. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: GER-112 Beginning German II or two years of high school German .

GER-201 Intermediate German - 4 Cr. ...., A study of the major developments of German literature and CUlture. Selected grammar review. Emphasis on oral facility. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: GER-113 Beginning German III or twp years of high school German . GER~202 Intermediate German - 4 Cr. :.... Emphasis on oral and written expression. Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure through more difficult prose. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: GER-201 Intermediate German or two years of high school German.

GER-203 Intermediate German - 4 Cr. - Continued study in literature

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Graphic Communications 路 Management and Technology

GCMT-101 Graphic Arts Orientation - 2 Cr. - An overview of the graphic arts industry: career field, employment trends and typical future technical aSSignments. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. GCMT-105 Science of Graphic Arts - 4 Cr. - Aspects of physics and chemistry which apply to the printing process. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. GCMT-109 Graphic Arts Materials 2 Cr. - A survey of the various

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classes, sizes and weights of printing paper and related ink technology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. GCMT-113 Beginning Photography3 Cr. - Fundamentals of black and white photography. The student will learn the basic skills necessary to understand and operate a camera, develop film , make photographic prints, and develop an appreciation for the photographs of others. Students must provide own camera, film, and printing paper. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite. None. GCMT-114 Intermediate Photography - 3 Cr. - Black and white photographic principles and techniques, with an emphasis on methods for refinement of negative and print quality, mod ification of the straight photograph , and development of visual awareness in the student. Lecture 2 hours Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: GCMT-113 Beginning Photography or departmental approval by submission of portfolio of photographs. GCMT-115 Advanced Photography 3 Cr. - Advanced study in black and white photography with emphasis on nonstandard black and white photographic methods and materials as well as various non-silver photographic processes. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: GCMT-114 Intermediate Photography or departmental approval by submission of portfol i o of photographs. GCMT-117 Copy Preparation - 3 Cr. - Planning, visualizing and preparing black and white, and color copy. Techniques in preparing copy for color separation, including all steps necessary in the preparation of copy for camera. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: ART-108 Fundamentals of Design or ART-121 Calligraphy or departmental approval. GCMT-171 Negative Stripping and Camera - 4 Cr. - The fundamentals of single and multi-color layout and stripping as used in offset lithography, including camera operation , developing , enlarging, printing, copying, scaling , and the reproduction of line and halftone copy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: GCMT-113 Beg inning

Photography approval. ,

or

departmental

GCMT -201 Platemaking and Presswork - 4 Cr. - Methods and procedures used in preparation of plates for the press. The principles of offset presswork setting up and operating the presses trouble shooting simple malntenance and safety precautions. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: GCMT-109 Graphic Arts Materials and GCMT-113 Beginning Photography or departmental approval. GCMT-203 Advanced Offset Press Techniques . - 3 Cr. - Theory and laboratory practice relating to single and multi-color offset presses. Emphasis on state-of-the-art equipment and systems, pres,s operating and adjustment procedures, identifying and correcting common press-related problems, and printing analysis and quality control procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: GCMT-201 Platemaking and Presswork or offset press operating experience. GCMT-211 Finishing and Bindery - 2 Cr. - The use of various equipment: paper cutter, folder, stapler-stitcher, collator and paper-drill for pamphlet, book. adhesive and plastic binding. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. GCMT-213 Color Transparencies - 3 Cr. -Introduction to color photography with emphasis on the color transparency. Film characteristics, lighting characteristics, processing, and the use of slides in audio-visual applications. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: GCMT113 Beginning Photography or departmental approval by submission of portfoliO of photographs. GCMT-214 Color Printing - 3 Cr. Introduction to color printing including processing of film negatives, prints from negatives, and prints from slides. Emphasis will be placed on color print quality and the aesthetics of the color image. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites : GCMT -213 Color Transparencies or departmental approval by submission of portfolio of photographs. GCMT -215 Photographic illustrations - 3 Cr. - Fundamentals of photographic illustration with emphasis on composition lighting , and

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creative solutions to visual problems. Students may work in black and white or in color. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: GCMT-115 Advanced Photography or GCMT-214 Color Printing or departmental approval by submission of portfolio of photographs. GCMT-216 Individual Projects in Photography - 3 Cr. - Individual Projects in black and white or color photography in areas of the student's choice. Progress and grading will be determined on an individual basis according to criteria mutually agreed upon between the student and the instructor. The course may be repeated for up to nine credits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Nine quarter hours in photography or departmental approval by submission of portfolio of photographs. GCMT-220 Graphic Arts Production - 3 Cr. - A laboratory course providing an opportunity to work on practical problems in the production of printed matter. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in Graphic Communications Management and Technology or departmental approval. GCMT-22S Graphic Arts Estimating - 2 Cr. - Estimating printing job costs from original layout to finished product. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: GCMT171 Negative Stripping and Camera, GCMT-201 Platemaking and Presswork, and GCMT-211 Finishing and Bindery or departmental approval. GCMT-237 Cold Type Composition Systems - 3 Cr. - Methods, materials and equipment used in strike-on composition , phototypesetting systems, real-time computer systems and page makeup techniques used for typographic composition. Emphasis on markup, keyboarding, proofing and editing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: GCMT-117 Copy Preparation or departmental approval. GCMT-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program . Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision. The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up

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to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program. GCMT-273 Color Separation - 3 Cr. - An introduction to the various color separation, color correction and color proofing systems. Investigation of color theory, direct separation , indirect separation, electronic scanner, color duplication and masking systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: GCMT-171 Negative Stripping and Camera or departmental approval.

Health HLTH-100 Introduction to Health Technologies - 3 Cr. - Introduction and orientation to the allied health professions, their history, responsibilities, licensure, ethics and liabilities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HLTH-101 Health Education - 4 Cr. - Introduction to the meaning and scope of health as related to the individual, family and community. Focus on an introspective view of physical, emotional and social factors. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HLTH-106 Health and Medical Aspects of Chemical Dependency - 4 Cr. - Health and medical considerations of drug use and chemical dependency are the primary emphasis in this course. Provides an overview valuable for those whose careers bring them in contact with the chemically dependent. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HLTH-223 Standard First Aid and Personal Safety - 2 Cr. - Instruction in immediate care for persons who have been injured or have suddenly b~come ill. Special emphasiS on cause, effect and prevention in relation to emergency care. Students will become eligible for certification in Standard First Aid by the American National Red Cross upon successful completion of this course. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HLTH-224 Advanced First Aid - 2 Cr. - Emergency medical care instruction, with emphasis upon advanced

practical treatments for accidents and sudden illnesses. Students will be participating in the program established .by . the American National Red Cross and therefore become eligible for certification in Advanced First Aid. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: HLTH-223 Standard First Aid and Personal Safety and/or Standard First Aid Certification.

Health Technologies HTEC-102 Integrated Basic Science - 5 Cr. - An introduction to basic sciences and pathology. Concepts of physics, chemistry and life sciences emphasizing application to human structure and function. An integrated approach to the study of the human body in health and as altered by various disease states. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. HTEC-161 Introduction to Pharmacology - 3 Cr. - To acquaint students with the general principles and concepts of pharmacology. A survey of the subject matter will provide an understanding of the indications, uses, doses and contraindications associated with individual drugs as well as the mechanisms of drug administration and therapeutic management of patients with specific disease processes. A review of basic mathematics as related to the correct calculation of drug dosages and preparation of solutions is included . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Acceptance into a Health Career Program, or consent of the department.

BREW H 11-12 AND INTERMEDIATE HEBREW H 13-14 AS EQUIVALENT TO OUR BEGINNING HEBREW HEBR-111, 112 AND 113 AND INTERMEDIATE HEBREW HEBR-201 202 and 203. ' HEBR-lll Beginning Hebrew I - 5 C~. - Study of the Hebrew language with emphasIs on understanding oral communication; reading and writing to produce Simple sentences to convey needs, wishes, or thoughts. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HEBR-112 Beginning Hebrew II - 5 Cr, - Study of the Hebrew language with particular emphasis on production of oral and written communication. The study of written texts to develop reading skills for speed and comprehension . Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: HEBR-111 Beginning Hebrew I or one year of high school Hebrew. HEBR-113 Beginning Hebrew III - 5 Cr. - Study of the Hebrew language with emphasis on conversation , reading with comprehension and on the language's interdependence with historical and contemporary culture. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: HEBR-112 Beginning Hebrew II or two years of high school Hebrew. HEBR-201 Intermediate Hebrew - 4 Cr. - Introduction to more advanced vocabulary and speech patterns, acquainting the student with Hebrew literature, modern and medieval. Systematic review of grammar. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: HEBR-113 Beginning Hebrew III or two years of high school Hebrew.

HTEC-251 Ethics for Allied Health Technologies - 1 Cr. - Definitions and concepts of ethics in health technologies. Confidentiality. Differentiation between ethics and morals. Negligence and breach of duty. Employment and interview procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

HEBR-202 Intermediate Hebrew - 4 Cr. - Strengthening facility of oral and written expression in the language. Building of more advanced vocabulary and sentence structure by means of selections from Hebrew literature. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: HEBR-201 Intermediate Hebrew or two years of high school Hebrew.

Hebrew

HEBR-203 Intermediate Hebrew - 4 Cr. - Oral and written expression in the language are further developed. Literary selections are to be discussed to gain deeper understanding and appreciation of Hebrew thought and culture. Laboratory drill. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour.

CUYAHOGA COMMUNITY COLLEGE WILL ACCEPT CREDIT EARNED BY STUDENTS AT THE CLEVELAND COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES FOR ELEMENTARY HE-

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Prerequisite: HEBR-202 Intermediate Hebrew or three years of high school Hebrew.

History HIST-101 Man and Civilization - 3 Cr. - Major trends in the development of Western and Asiatic civilizations from ancient Eurasian times to the fall of Byzantium (1453). Basic approach : use of documents as well as textual materials . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HIST-102 Man and Civilization - 3 Cr. - Major problems: cultural, political , economic and religious in the development of Western and nonWestern civilizations from the fall of Byzantium to the Congress of Vienna (1453-1'815). Basic approach: use of documents as well as textual .materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: HIST-101 Man and Civilization. HIST-103 Man and Civilization - 3 Cr. - Major problems: cultural , political , economic and religious in the development of Western and nonWestern civilizations since the Congress of Vienna (1815) to the present. Basic approach : use of documents as well as textual materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: HIST-102 Man and Civilization. HIST-151 United States History to 1841 - 3 Cr. - American development from discovery, colonial foundations , movement for independence and early years of the Republic through Jackson's administration . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HIST-152 United States History from 1841 to 1896 - 3 Cr. - Jacksonian Democracy through the Populist Movement with emphasis on domestic, economic and political developments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours . Prerequisite: HIST -151 United States History to 1841 . HIST-153 United States History from 1896 to the Present - 3 Cr. - Populist Movement to the present emphasizing the reform movements, two world wars and the rise of America as a world power. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: HIST-152 United States History from 1841 to 1896.

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HIST-161 American Studies - 3 Cr. - Introduction to American studies. Discussion of approaches to subject matter, utilizing multidisciplinary techniques in which perceptions associated with minorities and minority viewpoints will be explored . A student journal and genealogical record will be maintained. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HIST-162 American Studies - 3 Cr. - A colloquium on selected contemporary issues and institutions employing a multidisciplinary approach . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HIST-164 American Urban History 4 Cr. - Growth of the American city from the early period to the megalopolitan era. Emphasis on the development of the urban economy, the historical functioning of the political system and physical' development. Includes the black man and the city and our ethnic heritage. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: GEOG-103 Economic Geography or instructor's permission . HIST-170 History of Africa - 4 Cr. General survey of African history. Special emphasis on political, economic and social problems of the 19th and 20th centuries. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HIST-171 African-American History to 1877 - 4 Cr. - The role of African-Americans in American culture from origins in Africa, as slaves in the New World, in the making of America, the struggles to improve their status, and contributions to American culture, through Reconstruction. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hour. Prerequisite: None. HIST-172 African-American History from 1877 to the Present - 4 Cr. Studies beginning with late nineteenth century racial intolerance and the birth of NAACP and the Urban League, Black migration , the Harlem Renaissance, and the struggle for civil rights, political power, and important social and cultural trends. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hour. Prerequisite : HIST -171 AfricanAmerican History to 1877. HIST-201 History of Russia - Growth, development and of Kievan State. Evolution Muscovite tsardom and the

- 4 Cr. decline of the expan-

sion of the Russian Empire to 1917. Considers geopolitical, social, cultural and intellectual developments. Emphasis on the theory of tsardom, which led to the emergence of a distinct civilization in Russia. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: HIST-103 Man and Civilization. HIST-266 Women in American History - 4 Cr. - A study of the changing role of women in American life and thought; an introduction to the current research and techniques used in the women's study field; an analysis of the historical development of the American feminist movement the preconditions, leadership, and development characteristics. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: HIST-151 United States History to 1841, or SOC-101 Introductory Sociology, or departmental approval.

Hospitality Management HOSP-101 Introduction to HospitalIty Management - 3 Cr. - Course of orientation in the history, growth and development of the food and lodging industry. Provides basic information fn organization, personnel management, sales promotion, purchasing, production control and accounting, including the study of techniques and procedures of modern management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HOSP-102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and Lodging Establishments 3 Cr. - Sanitation practices, laws, methods and techniques in food handling and in lodging establishments. Elementary bacteriology , food protection, and safety and accident prevention. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HOSP-111 Food Technology - 6 Cr. - Basic food preparation for students who intenq to become assistant managers or supervisors in food service operations. Provides a background in foods necessary for all aspects of Hospitality Management. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: None. HOSP-115 Culinary Theory and Production - 6 Cr. - More advanced

techniques and procedures for professional fo od preparation expi ai n ed, dem on strate-d and produced. Students are assigned to all working stations to gain the widest possible exposure to the professional kitchen. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: HOSP-111 Food Technology. HOSP-116 Baking Principles andProduction - 6 Cr. - Acquainting students with fundamentals , principles and applications of baking . Skills are developed for quality hand-crafted bakery products. Elementary cake-decorating techniques are performed. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: HOSP-111 Food Technology. HOSP-118 Advanced Culinary - 3 Cr. - A more intensified and sophisticated study of elaborate American and Continental dishes. Each student functions as a sous-chef, saucier , rotisseur, tournat, etc., while studying advanced Culinary Management. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisites: HOSP115 Culinary Theory and Production, and HOSP-116 Baking Principles and Production. HOSP-119 Layout and Equipment 3 Cr. - Layout and design of food service facilities. The study, planning and evaluation of actual layouts. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: HOSP-102 Sanitation and Safety in Food and Lodging Establishments. HOSP-125 Quantity Food PurchasIng - 3 Cr. - Technical knowledge concerning governmental grades, purchasing, terms, purchasing processes and waste-yield factors in food preparation related to quantity food buying. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. HOSP-126 Housekeeping Procedures - 3 .Cr. - Introduction to the fundamental procedures in institutional housekeeping providing technical knowledge and exposure to work procedures and opportunity to oeserve others performing in the trade. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. HOSP-128 Fundamentals of Interior Design - 3 Cr. - Selection , purchase, use and care of interior furnishings and materials in the hospitality industry. Covers the basic

189

principles of design. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: HOSP-240 Supervisory Housekeeping. HOSP-201 Summer Field Experience - 4 Cr. - Full-time employment in an approved business or distributive training center under College supervision. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 40 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. HOSP-202 Management Operations - 6 Cr. - A laboratory providing an opportunity to learn management techniques required in many key operating positions in the hospitality industry. Laboratory 5 hours / 5 days per week. Lecture 0 hours Laboratory 25 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. HOSP-203 Internship - 3 Cr. - Students will be required to complete an .internship of 200 hours of supervised work observation in the hospitality industry. The department will assist in arranging, scheduling and coordinating work experiences with local employers. Five weeks/8 hours per day. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 40 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. HOSP-205 Buffet Catering and Decorating - 3 Cr. - Preparation" of more advanced products for the haute cuisine restaurant using decorative centerpieces and culinary show pieces . Developments of French, Russian and American tableside, banquet service and dining room supervision. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: HOSP-118 Advanced Culinary. HOSP-208 Classical Cuisine - 3 Cr. - Introduces the student to the traditional style of food preparation, its history and techniques. A study of dishes originated by great masters such as Escoffier and Careme, and enjoyed with great popularity by gourmets through many decades. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. HOSP-214 Food and Beverage Control - 3 Cr. - The essential principles and procedures of effective food and beverage control. Adaptations to various types of operations are practiced . All steps in the control process are covered with special emphasis on calculating food costs, establishing standards and production planning. Lecture 0 hours. Lab-

190

oratory 6 hours . Prerequisite: Departmental approval. HOSP-224 Hotel-Motel Sales Promotion - 3 Cr. - Sales promotion techniques and ideas. Special emphasis on the organization and functioning of a sales department and the need for sales planning. Sales tools and selling techniques used to secure room , food and beverage, and group business. Advertising, community relations, internal selling, personal selling and telephone seiling. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. HOSP-226 Hotel-Motel Maintenance and Engineering - 3 Cr. - A study of preventive maintenance procedures and the organization of the engineering department. Improvement in ability to diagnose many common mechanical problems and to take steps to correct them. Stud y of electrical systems, acoustics , plumbing, heating, ventilation, refrigeration and air conditioning, elevators. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing . HOSP-227 Hotel-Motel Front Office Procedure - 3 Cr. - Techniques in the vital public relations responsibilities and necessary basics of human relation s for the front office staff. Outlines coordinating ties between front office and management. Outline procedures, accounting principles, employee relations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequ isite: Sophomo~e standing. HOSP-240 Supervisory Housekeeping - 3 Cr. - Fundamentals of housekeeping management stressing employee training , record keeping and executive responsibilities of the housekeeping department. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HOSp路260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. .:... Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program . Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision . The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program .

Humanities HUM-101 Introduction to Humanities: Man as an Individual - 3 Cr. Introduction to works of art and philosophy which define both the limitations and enduring nobility of mankind. Lectures, films, performances, exhibits and field trips. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HUM-102 Introduction to Humanities: .Man and Society - 3 Cr. -Introduction to works of art and philosophy which reflect the struggle of man to maintain his individuality while a member of society. Lectures, films, performances, exhibits and field trips. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. HUM-103 Introduction to Humanities: Man and the Cosmos - 3 Cr. Introduction to works of art and philosophy which reflect man's attempt to resolve his relationship to the cosmos. Lectures, films , performances, exhibits and field trips. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

Manufacturing / Industrial Technology , INDT-122 Introduction to Manufacturing Management - 3 Cr. - Basic planning for manufacturing costs and materials. Management of work force , production and inventory. Personnel and public relations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. INDT-125 Elements of Time Study 3 Cr. - Time study requirements, equipment and elements. Standard time data. Methods-time-measurements application procedure and identified motions, principle of limiting motions. Wage incentive plans. Basic motion times. Work sampling. Method and uses of time standards. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. INDT-126 Principles of Work Simplification in Industry - 3 Cr. - Approach, purpose and procedure of operation analysis. Manufacturing process and working conditions. Material handling and plant layout.

Motion economy. Man and machine process charts. Job analysis and job evaluation. Flow process charts . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. INDT-128 Motion and Job Analysis 3 Cr. - Methods, time and measurements. Application procedures and identified motions. Principles of limiting motions. Wage incentive plans. Basic motion times. Work sampling. Job analysis and job evaluation . Development of base rates. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hows. Prerequisite: INDT-1 25 Elements of Time Study. INDT-134 Employee and Plant Safety - 3 Cr. - Safety and protection of employees and company property. Security personnel and their training . Maintenance of property for safety, fire equipment and its use. Employee protection against unsafe practices. Discussion of Workmen's Compensation and Occupational Safety and Health Act. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. INDT-164 Inventory Management - 3 Cr. - Comprehensive coverage of principles and techniques utilized in managing inventory including: inventory classification, methods of replenishment , safety stock determination , order quantities, lot sizing, stockroom organization, and physical counting . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Pr~requisite: None. INDT-165 Production and Inventory Forecasting - 3 Cr. - Importance of forecasting in successful business operation. Various descriptive techniques of forecasting used in industry are discussed. Responsibility for forecasting and relating the forecast to other operating departments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. INDT-166 Materials Requirements Planning - 3 Cr. - Forecasting materials requirements with bills of material to establish a time phased program of inventory replenishment for assembled products. Roles of a forecast, bills of mater.ial , lead time accura9Y, computer software, and shop capacity planning . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. INDT-167 Shop Floor Control - 3 Cr. - Principles, approaches and tech-

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niques used by ' managers to plan, schedule, control, and evaluate the effectiveness of shop production operations including control of work in process, scheduling dispatching , expediting, determining priorities, and shop paperwork system. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. INDT-168 Shop Capacity Planning 3 Cr. - Converting the sales forecast into a production plan and a master schedule. Input-output control over scheduling of available capacity . Coverage of various techniques for increasing capacity, reducing lead time, and load versus capacity analysis. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. INDT-222 Manufacturing Management - 3 Cr. - Production systems and their development with emphasis on planning, scheduling management and control of various production systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. INDT-260 Cooperative Field Experience. - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Educatioh Program . Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision. The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. INDT-261 Introduction to Statistical Quality Control - 3 Cr. - Application of ~tatistical techniques in the analysis of data for the control of product quality and costs. Control charts, sampling systems and procedures. Correction of product variability . Theory of probability fundamentals. Solution of statistical problems related to specifications, production or inspection. Statistical approach of acceptance sampling. Statistical Quality control as a decision-making tool. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-09S Basic Algebra I or equivalent. INDT-291 Materials Handling and Plant Layout - 3 Cr. - The purpose, scope, transportation of materials,

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selection of equipment, objectives and cost of material handling are integrated with plant layout, materials and product flows, and the effective arrangement of manufacturing and service facilities. Emphasis is also placed on the coordination which is necessary between materials handling, plant layout, production planning and control, methods engineering, process engineering and production techniques. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : Preferably industrial experience. INDT-292 Materials Handling and Plant Layout - 3 Cr. - Continuation of INDT-291 Materials Handling and Plant Layout with emphasis on material handling equipment, materials flow, space allocation and related topics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite : Industrial ' experience.

Interior Design Technology INTD-101 Introduction to Interior Design - 2 Cr. - This course is designed to investigate the profession of Interior Design as a field for employment. Emphasis will be placed on identification, need, and functions of the Interior Designer. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. INTD-201 Introductory Interior Design - 3 Cr. - This course involves students in planning simple interior fl oor plans and elevations with consideration of traffic flow and room functions. Emphasis will be placed on exploring multiple-design solutions and analysis of design problems. Lecture 2 hours. 'Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: ARCH121 Architectural Drawing, ART-107 Drawing and ART-110 Design . INTD-202 Intermediate Interior Design - 3 Cr. - Projects will provide practice in planning traditional and contemporary interiors. Coordination of schemes, styles, and furnishings will be emphasized as related to commercial and residential design. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: INTD-201 Introductory Interior Design, INTD-20S History of Interiors and concurrent enrollment in INTD-211 Interior Design Presentation .

INTD-203 Advanced Interior Design - 3 Cr. - This course will consider advanced problems of commercial and residential interiors, working drawing, specifications, and clientdesigner communication . Emphasis in total design product and presentation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: JNTD-202 Intermediate Interior Design and concurrent enrollment in INTD-212 Intermediate Interior Design Presentation.

drawing techniques (such as felt tip pen and pressure sensitive materials) through presentation of plans, elevations, perspectives and collages as well as quick sketch techniques used in the field of interior design commercial and residential. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: ARCH-121 Architectural Drawing, ART-107 Drawing, ART-110 Fundamentals of Design and concurrent enrollment in INTD~02 Intermediate Interior Design.

INTD-205 History of Interiors - 3 Cr. - This course will review the history of Interior Design from Egyptian to the present time. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary styles and contemporary interpretations of traditional styles. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite:

INTD-220 Professional Practice of Interior Design - 3 Cr. - This course is designed to give the student insight into and familiarity with the professional methods by which a design business is conducted . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in INTD-221 Interior Design Practicum .

None~

INTD-206 Architectural Materials and Methods - 3 Cr. - This course will review basic materials and methods of building construction , emphasizing wood, concrete, unit masonry, and light steel construction. Laboratory projects include working drawings and interpretations, field trips to construction sites and fabricating plants. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite : ARCH-121 Architectural Drawing. INTD-207 Interior Design Materials and Methods - 3 Cr. - This course reviews the various interior furnishings and materials available in tre current market to the interior designer. Emphasis is placed on appropriate use of materials in design and on furniture construction. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: INTD-206 Architectural Materials and Methods. INTD-20B Textiles - 3 Cr. - This course will deal with the various' fibers, both natural and man-made synthetics, how they are manufactured and how they are utilized in Interior Design . This includes floor coverings, drapery, upholstery, and wall coverings. Emphasis will be placed on style familiarity , and appropriate usage. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. INTD-210 Interior Design Presentation - 3 Cr. - Students will be instructed in basic professional rendering techniques, emphasizing water color, casein and reproducible

INTD-221 Interior Design Practiculii - 2 Cr. - Limited to students in the second year of the Interior Design Program . Students will be placed in a practical work environment under College supervision averaging approximately 14 hours per week at which time they will interact with professionals in the field of Interior Design and participate in practical application of the skills and knowledge required of successful practitioners in the field . Lecture 0 hours. - Laboratory 0 hours. Practicum 14 hours (approximately). Prerequ isite: Concurrent enrollment in INTD-220 Professional Practice of Interior Design.

Italian ITAL-111 Beginning Italian I - 5 Cr. - Introduction to Italian through multiple approaches to learning the language with emphasis on speaking. Practice in conversing in Italian in simple idiomatic sentences on topics of everyday interest. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq-. uisite: None. ITAL-112 Beginning Italian II - 5 Cr. - Study of the Italian language with emphasis on speaking. Continued practice in speaking , understanding, reading, and writing. Further develop~ent of conversational skills in Italian. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: ITAL-111 Beginning Italian I or departmental approval.

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ITAL-113 Beginning Italian III - 5 Cr. _ Study of the Italian language and development of proficiency. In speaking. understanding, reading, and writing. EmphasIs on strengthening conversational skills through discussions of selected readings and cultural topics. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ITAL-112 Beginning Italian II, or departmental approval. ITAL-201 Intermediate Italian I - 4 Cr. - Increased vocabulary development and structural review through readings of cultural texts. Emphasis on oral expression and group discussion. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ITAL-113 Beginning Italian III 6r two years of high school Italian or departmental approval. ITAL-202 Intermediate Italian II - 4 Cr. - Strengthening oral and written expression in Italian with emphasis on conversation. Further improvement of written skills. Reading of selected texts in order to deepen the understanding and appreciation of Italian culture. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hour. Prerequisite: ITAL-201 Intermed iate Italian I or two years of high school Italian or departmental approval. ITAL-203 Intermediate Italian III - 4 Cr. - Readings of simple prose texts and review of sentence structure in order to obtain oral and written proficiency in Italian. Emphasis on group discussion. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hour. Prerequisite: ITAL-202 Intermediate Italian II or three years of high school Italian or departmental approval.

Journalism JOUR-101 Introduction to Mass Communications - 4 Cr. - Nature, history and function of the mass media, including newspapers and other print media, radio, television and film . Their impact and influence on men and women in American society. Meaning arid function of the First Amendment guarantee of press freedom . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. JOUR-131 News Writing and Reporting - 4 Cr. - News gathering and writing for the print media. Emphasis on basic structure of the news story and writing against a deadline. Sur-

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vey of career opportunities in print and broadcast journalism . Principal ethical, policy and legal questions confronting reporters and their newspapers. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: ENG101 College Composition or concurrent enrollment. OADM-101 Typewriting or equivalent recommended. JOUR-132 News Writing and Reporting - 4 Cr. - Continuation of JOUR131 News Writing and Reporting. Emphasis on problems of news gathering using the community as a laboratory. Interpretive reporting . Attention to needs of a wide variety of types of newspapers and to journalistic specialties. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: JOUR-131 News Writing and Reporting. JOUR-141 Staff Practice - 1 Cr. Class laboratory experience in assembling, making-up and publishing the College newspaper. Detailed weekly analysis of the effectiveness of the news stories written and published as well as of the overall presentation of the College newspaper. Students are assigned to the staff of the College newspaper. May be repeated for credit. However, not more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. JOUR-151 Broadcast Journalism - 4 Cr. - News reading , news preparation, news reporting on audio tape, video tape, film and live camera for television and radio. Covers Federal Communications -Commission rules and regulations on news, Fundamentals of what makes a story and how to get it. The art of interviewing . Field work, study of radio and television history. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite None. JOUR-161 Survey of the Black Press - 3 Cr. - The nature and function of the Black Press including broadcast with emphasis on the history and function of the Black Press and the impact of the Black Press on minorities in general. Career opportunities for minorities and the problems of the black journalist on the general press are given special attention. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. JOUR-201 News Editing - 4 Cr. Copy desk methods. Copy and proof reading , headline writing, news-

paper make-up and style. Intrcducticn to. newspaper law, including libel, right cf privacy and press privileges . Editcrial writing, prcblems and Rclicy. Examinaticn cf majcr ccntempcraiY American newspa.~ pers. Lecture 4 hcurs. Labcratory 0hours. Prerequisite: JOUR-131 News Writing and Reporting . JOUR-202 News Editing - 4 Cr. Continuation of JOUR-201 News Editing. Copy desk methods. Copy and proof reading. headline writing , newspaper makeup and style. Introduction to newspaper law, including libel, right to privacy and press privileges. Editorial writing, problems and policy. Examination of major contemporary American newspapers. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: JOUR-201 News Editing. JOUR-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Educati on Program . Employment in an approyed train ing facility under College supervision. The requirement for one cred it is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Labo.ratory 0 hours. Cooperative Field Experience 12 hours (appro ximately) Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program .

Labor Studies LAB-101 Introduction to Organized Labor in America - 3 Cr. - An overview of labor studies, designed to involve the student in all aspects of the labor movement. This course will deal with the growth of the working class, the industrial revo lution , and the resultant development of unions. The economics of labor, labor laws, labor's role in politics, the collective bargaining agreement, and labor's civic responsibility to / in the community. Lecture 3 hqurs. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Ncne. LAB-102 The American Labor Movement: Its Heritage and Achievements - 3 Cr. - The attitudes, goals and actions of the present-day American labor movement as influenced by events and developments in its histcry. The conspiracy theory in English and American common

law. The beginnings cf crganized labor, the impact of social Darwinism and the American industrial revolution , the reasons for and the results of late 19th Century radicalism. The rise of industrial unionism, the mitigation of judiciai reaction and the changing' role of government. The problems of confederation and the struggle for political effectiveness and social validity. A lock at the future. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. LAB-103 Structure and Administration of Unions - 3 Cr. - The regulatory statutes, theories, functions and finances. Jurisdictional lines. Allocations of the dues dollars . Local union administrative cfficers. Duties of the executive board. Eligibility requirements, tenure of cffice, standing committees and bylaws. On-thejob representation and administrative levels of the grievance procedure. Stewards, bargaining committees, committee chairmen. International union structure. Regional or council substructure. Election procedures . Constitutional conventicn. Democratic procedures and membership functions . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. LAB-104 Union Leadership Skills - 3 Cr. - Basic leadership skills. The functions of the executive cfficers and executive boards. Human relations, psychology, psychology of leadership, motivaticn, communicaticn skills, membership participaticn, organizational skills, decision-making , problem-sclving, small group leadership, and developing and implementing programs. Reading improvement. Writing techniques and speaking methods. Parliamentary procedure. The union meeting , union newspapers. and communicaticns. Membership attitudes about their unions. Rcle of unicn volunteer ccmmittees. Lecture 3 hcurs. Labcratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. LAB-105 Collective Bargaining I (Negotiations) - 3 Cr. - Collective bargaining defined. Review of the history of ccllective bargaining . Collective bargaining gcals: (1) unions, (2) management. What is covered in a unicn contract. The legal basis for ccllective bargaining . Fair representation. Price and tax source factors, econcmic pressures. Wages, prices, prcfits, productivity. Bargaining proposals. Responsibilities of the par-

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ties in the bargaining process: (1) union leadership, (2) local union membership, (3) management, (4) community. Strike procedures in bargaining . Analysis of the labor contract. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

LAB-105 Coilective Bargaining II (Administration) - 3 Cr. - Study of contract content. Working conditions. Training local union representatives to administer the contract. Human relations at the workplace. The grievance procedure. Fair representation. Fringe benefit areas: insurance, pensions and supplemental unemployment benefits (SUB). Differences in administration of the bargaining agreement and the insurance-pension-SUB agreements. Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSHA). Equal employment opportunities procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAB-105 Collective Bargaining I. LAB-107 Collective Bargaining III (Arbitration) - 3 Cr. - Defining and filing grievances and processing them through the arbitration phase. The grievance procedure as part of collective bargaining. Fair representation. Industrial and craft settings. Skills required in grievance handling: preparing cases for arbitration. Arguing the case at the lower, intermediate and arbitrator levels. Established procedures. Arbitration statutes and important court and arbitration decisions. Evidence, submissions, statements, briefs, research techniques, selecting an arbitrator, rules of contract construction . The hearing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAB-106 Collective Bargaining II. LAB-10B Labor Law - 3 Cr. - A study of decisions interpreting the Constitution and the laws affecting labor. Court decisions relating to powers of corporations. Labor legislation such as the injunction, National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), Railway Labor Act, Norris-LaGuardia Act, .Taft-Hartley Act, Landrum-Griffin Act, Williams-Steiger (OSHA) Act, and fair representation . The effect of law on ~he collective bargaining process, working conditions, job opportunities, job security and fringe benefits. The lawmaking process including the impact of elections and lobbying. The role of dissent. The ef-

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fect of coalitions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

LAB-109 Time Study SysiemlJ from Labor's Viewpoint - 3 Cr. (- This ,.ÂŁourse wi!! deal with the establishment of work standards. Starting with the origination, working through job conditions, method description, motion analysis, element breakdowns, time-study equipment, stopwatch training, efficiency rating, standard allowances and the computation of a work standard. Labor's role in bargaining work standards, negotiating contractual work, standard language, and the progress in the fight against speed-up will be discussed in depth. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. LAB-110 Urban Labor Problems Project - 3 Cr. - Understanding, defining and meeting urban needs. Population composition and distribution patterns of immigration, decline of farm economy from industrialization to automation, changes in labor skills and training , use and misuse of resources growth of transportation and communication . Impact of change on economic and social institutions. Problems of poverty, housing, job training, health care, education, recreation, etc. Relationship of urban to rural needs. Students will be expected to become involved in a selected term project in a local union or labor council. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: Successful completion of any 12 quarter hours of Labor Studies courses, or departmental approval. LAB-111 The American Labor Movement: A Continuing Process - 3 Cr. - Analysis of current problems, organizational forms, and activities of organized labor. The growth of organized labor from early craft unions, through the struggles of the industrial revolution, to the present multi-organizational federations. Emphasis will be placed on the theory, strategy, goals, and achievements of the union movement in the U.S. with comparative examples of other nations' labor organizations and their activities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Student must have successfully completed a minimum of 9 quarter hours of Labor Studies courses, or departmental approval.

LAB-112 Creative Use of Leisure Time - 3 Cr. - Expiore the basic fundamentals of the nature, scope and significance of organized recreation units, major program areas, organizational patterns and the interrelationship of special agencies. Introduce methods and materials for planning , organizing and conducting social and recreational activities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. LAB-113 Contemporary Labor Problems: The Search for Dignity - 3 Cr. - A study of problems currentl9 facing the labor movement including sessions on work, organIzing the unorganized, new priorities in collective bargaining and politics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Requires successful completion of a minimum of 9 quarter hours of Labor Studies courses, or departmental approval. LAB-114 Theories of the Labor Movement - 3 Cr. - Philosophies express.ed by the development of the labor movement and the various social movements that have helped to shape its goals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

Law' Enforcement LAWE-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement - 4 Cr. - A philosophical and historical background of law enforcement including the development and objectives of police services from ancient and feudal backgrounds up to the present time in the United States. Explanation of federal, state, local and private law enforcement agencies. Role of the enforcing officer in government and the processes of justice. Qualities and qualifications of the individual entering law enforcement work. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. LAWE-111 Patrol Administration - 4 Cr. - A cOmprehensive survey of the management by objectives approach to the patrol function of law enforcement from organization to administrative control. Lect ure 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement or in-service personnel.

LAWE-121 Criminal Law Procedure3 Cr. - Exploration of U.S. adversary system of criminal justice beginning with arrest and search, steps which precede trial as well as the trial process itself. Modern approaches to preliminary handling of criminal cases, bail and pre-trial release are reviewed, and the criminal trial process is traced . Current theory discussed on sentencing and corrections, and rules controlling post-trial proceedings : appeals, habeas corpus hearings, and the probation and parole process. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. LAWE-122 Constitutional Law - 3 Cr. - The course deals with the development of the Federal Constitution _and the history of the Bill of Rights. Content includes the substantive components of the first eight Amendments and corresponding state provisions with emphasis on recent court interpretations and trends. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-121 . Criminal Law Procedure. LAWE-123 Laws of Evidence - 3 Cr. - Continuation of LAWE-122 Criminal Law with emphasis on evidence in . criminal prosecutions. Hearsay r\.lle and exceptions, admissions and confessions, rul ing case law and effect on procedures will be emphasized in this course. Lecture 3 hours. L.:aboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-122 Criminal Law. LAWE-141 Police-Community Relations - 3 Cr. - The reCiprocal relationship between the community and the police with emphasis on techniques for developing and improving a favorable relationship. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement or in-service personnel. LAWE-142 Police-Community Relations - 2 Cr. - Relationship with the news media. In-depth diSCUssion and examination of special considerations peculiar to the police-community relations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-141 Police Community Relations. LAWE-144 Probation and Parole - 3 Cr. - This course will review and examine the phi losophy, history and practice of probation and parole as they deal specifically with juvenile

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and adult offenders in federal, state, and local corrections systems. It has been designed to cover all community based aspects of corrections, but particular weight will be placed on probation and parole. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement or departmental approval. LAWE-1S0 Introduction to Security 3 Cr. - A historical perspective on the development of security with a definition of current role and function studies in 'the fundamental principles of risk assessment, physical protection, systems of defense, internal security, fire prevention, emergency planning , safety and insurance protection, and career opportunities in the security field. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. LAWE-1S1 Principles of Loss Prevention - 3 Cr. - An in-depth study of the principles of loss prevention including management's responsibilities, employee functions, physical security factors and shortage control systems. The changing role of security is critically examined with an emphasis on risk management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-150 Introduction to Security or departmental approval. LAWE-1S2 Physical Security - 3 Cr. - A study of those measures necessary to protect a facility against the effects of unauthorized access, theft, fire , sabotage, loss or other intentional crime or damage. It examines the concepts of physical security integrated' with management systems physical security requirements and standards, alarms and surveillance devices, animate security costing, planning and engineering . Principles of safety practices and regulations, property conservation, occupational hazards and personal safeguards. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-150 Introduction to Security or departmental approval.

relations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-150 Introduction to Security or departmental approval. LAWE-1SS Security Investigation - 3 Cr. - All aspects of. the criminal investigation function of security administration are fully covered from the preliminary investigation to the preparation of the case for review to determine further processing . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-150 Introduction to Security or departmental approval. LAWE-1S6 Contemporary Security Problems - 4 Cr. - An analysis of current and special security problems. It provides an opportunity for students to select specific areas of security for individual emphasis and further study, i.e., bank security, retail security, industrial security, hotel / motel security, computer security, cargo security, airline security , hospital security , campus security, etc. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE150 Introduction to Security or departmental approval. LAWE-1S7 Legal Conslderati.ons in Security - 3 Cr. - An overview of federal and state laws and their impact on the decision-making processes of security administration. Lecture 3 hours Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: LAWE-123 Laws of Evidence, LAWE-154 Security Administration or departmental approval. LAWE-201 Delinquency Prevention and Control - 3 Cr. - Problem of juvenile delinquency, police programs and community resources for prevention of juvenile del inquency are presented . Juven ile court organization and procedure, detention , filing and police procedures in enforcement of juvenile code. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : LAWE-121 Criminal Law.

LAWE-211 Criminal Investigation - 3 Cr. - Fundamental principles and techn iques applicable in police investigation from incident to trial. Use of communications systems , LAWE-1S4 Security Administration records, and principles. Specific 4 Cr. - A comprehensive examination of the organization, staffing and procedures in more frequent viblaadministration of the security functions will be individually presented . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory.O hours. tion . The course is concerned with general security management, se- . Prerequisite : LAWE-121 Criminal curity personnel management, operLaw Procedure or in-service ational management and public personnel.

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LAWE-212 Criminalistics - 3 Cr. Continuation of LAWE-211 Criminalistics. Techniques of scientific investigation and assistance of various scientific aids to the police officer or field investigator. Special techniques employed in particular kinds of investigation . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE211 Criminalistics. LAWE-221 Police Administration -3 Cr. - Principles of organization and management, the evaluation of admin istrative devices. Organization according to function with emphasis on application of these principles to line function . Regulation and motivation of personnel, and principles of leadership. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement. LAWE-222 Police Supervision - 3 Cr. - Emphasis on staff functions and concepts of first-line supervision for police. Emphasis on the functions and planning, reporting, improving, directing, and evaluating personnel with the objective to improve both quality and quantity of operations through a subordinate oriented approach. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-221 Police Adm inistration. LAWE-223 Fundamentals of Traffic Law - 3 Cr. - An examination of the origins, development, and standardization of traffic law and other control procedures utilized in the highway transportation system; includes a comprehensive study of traffic law enforcement principles, problems, and procedures. Examination of the need for traffic law enforcement, use of statistics, methods of enforcement and their application. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement or inservice personnel. LAWE-226 Institutional Services - 3 Cr. - This course will examine the contemporary theory and practice in the adm inistration of juvenile and ' adult correctional and custody institutions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-101 Introduction to Law Enforcement or LAWE-144 Probation and Parole. LAWE-227 Community Intervention Resources - 3 Cr. - This course is a survey of community-based resources designed for intervention, prevention and control or rehabilita-

tion of the juvenile or adult offender. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: LAWE-144 Probation and Parole.

LAWE-228 Correctional Case Management - 3 Cr. - This course is an application of counseling-interviewing techniques applicable to the correctional offender. Field and c'l in ical situations are simulated so the student can gain some experience in interviewing, chronological recording, report writing and oral presentation of cases. Lecture 3 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-226 Institutional Services or departmental approval. LAWE-229 Corrections: Principles and Practices - 3 Cr. - The preservice student is placed in a criminal justice agency faci lity under the direction of experienced and qualified corrections personnel. The primary learning takes place through field experience in a corrections environment. Students learn to apply corrections principles. Class time is spent in small group discussions of specific theories and their applications. Students' will spend 15 hours per week in field work and two hours per week in a scheduled oncampus seminar. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Seminar 2 hours. Practicum 15 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of 15 hours in Corrections concentration or departmental approval. . LAWE-230 Criminology - 3 Cr. This survey course deals with the development of criminology, the sociology of criminal law, the legal order and crime control , the patterns of criminal law. It also deals with social reaction to crime and future crime control in American society . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE-144 Probation and Parole or departmental approval. LAWE-232 Accident Investigation - 3 Cr. - A comprehensive survey of accident investigative principles , concepts and procedures. Development of technical skills necessary for field sketching, diagramming, and utilizing formulae for determining minimum speed from skid marks, critical speed on curves and com bined speed . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: LAWE231 Fundamentals of Traffic Control.

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LAWE-256 Contemporary Issues in ,Law Enforcement Seminar - 3 Cr. A review of the contemporary issues in criminal justice and law enforcement. Discussion provides the student with varying viewpoints and aspects of problems faced in these fields. The student is involved in a critical and analytical approach to understal1ding the role and relationships of the criminal justice system to today's society. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. P.rerequisite: Completion of all except final quarter of requirements for graduation or departmental approval. LAWE-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program-:Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision . The requirement for one credit is 120 hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits, Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours, Cooperative Field Experience 12 hours (approximately),

Library Iinstructional Media Technology LIB-101 Introduction to Libraryllnstructional Media Technology - 3 Cr. - A general course in the organization, purposes, and uses of media centers, technical, academic, and public libraries and of instructional media support facilities in business, industry, and in education . Emphasis on the history and impact of media and media management in society. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. LlB-111 Audio-Visual Methods and Materials - 3 Cr. - Uses and applications of audio-visual equipment and materials in the communication process. Basic audio-visual equipment, operation, and production of inexpensive instructional materials. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. LlB-121 Technical Processes I - 3 Cr. - Processes involved in building library/media collections t~rough the study of bibliographic searching , preparing and receiving of orders, inventory and bindery methods as well as a survey of pub-

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lishers and wholesale book jobbers. Lecture 2 hours, Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. LlB-131 Instructional Graphics I - 3 Cr. - Graphic production techniques used in the preparation of instructional materials. Emphasis is given to lettering and illustration techniques used in . the preparation of overhead transp~rency masters, posters and bulletin boards, and graphics for slides and television, Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours, Prerequisite: lIB-111 Audio-Visual Methods and Materials. LlB-132 Instructional Graphics II - 3 Cr. - A continuation of lIB-131 Instructional Graphics I. Emphasis will be given in the use of photographic techniques common to instructional graphics production, including paste-ups, litho materials, and photographic copying. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: lIB-131 Instructional Graphics I and GCMT-113 Beginning Photography. LlB-151 Technical Processes II - 3 Cr. - Systems for organizing print and non-print media, emphasizing the DC and LC classifications, special methods of cataloging , preparation of the unit catalog with practical reference to computerized systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours, Prerequisite: lIB-121 Technical Processes I. LlB-153 Bookcraft - 2 Cr. - An orientation course using practical suggestions for proper book maintenance and repair, combining classroom instruction and laboratory practice in protective measures to preserve books, pamphlets, magazines and newspapers. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None, LlB-211 Motion Picture Production 3 Cr. - Introduction to motion picture photography and the basic principles of film production and editing. Practical experience in the planning, filming and editing of a motion picture production using Super 8 motion picture equipment. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: GCMT-113 Beginning Photography or equivalent. LlB-221 Operation and Maintenance of Audio-Visual Equipment - 3 Cr. - Technical operation and preventative maintenance of media equipment including still and motion

picture projection equipment, audio equipment, television equipment, etc. Test procedures and the use of common electrical tools. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: LlB-111 Audio-Visual Methods and Materials or departmental approval.

LlB-231 Audio Recording and Systems - 3 Cr. - Fundamen tals of sound including basic audio-equipment operation, tape recording microphone types and placement, editing, tape duplication , public-address systems and the care and maintenance of audio materials. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: LlB-111 Audio-Visual Methods and Materials and LlB-221 Operation and Maintenance of Audio-Visual Equipment. LlB-240 Television Production I - 3 Cr. :- Introduction to television production and distribution . Emphasis on single camera systems with practical experience in camera and VTR operation, microphone placement, sound mixing, lighting, editing , equipment maintenance and directing. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None. LlB-241 Television Production II - 3 Cr. - Emphasis on multiple-camera television studio procedures with practical experience in television studio equipment operation and production . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: LlB-240 Television Production I. LlB-242 Television Production III - 3 Cr .. -:-,Emphasis in the planning, SCripting, and directing of studio televIsion productions. Students will plan and produce their own television production . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hou路rs. Prerequisite: LlB-241 Television Production II . LlB-252 Readers' Services - 3 Cr. Basic procedures for working with and assisting in directional and re: ferral services; the use of the public catalog, general reference materials microfilm, and the operation of equipment for its use. Practice in the preparation of bibliographies. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: LlB-101 Introduction to L i brary / Instructional Media Technology. LlB-254 Media Services for the Handicapped - 3 Cr. - A study of tools and equipment that improve

the ability of handicapped persons to use library / media materials and facilities. Attention is given to the specialized needs being met by local, state, regional and national sources. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

LlB-255 Storytelling - 3 Cr. - Methods of presenting literature to children and adults through story telling. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. LlB-260 Introduction to Children's Books - 3 Cr. - A survey of literature for school-age children with emphasis on classic and modern materials. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-101 College Composition . LlB-261 Technical Information Centers - 3 Cr. - An introduction to the purposes, functions, services and orga~izational structure of the special Itbrary through an examination of its characteristics, administration and special bibliographic functions. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: LlB-151 Technical Processes II. LlB-262 Information Centers and Computers - 3 Cr. - Concepts and techniques for the application of data processing principles in the acquisition, cataloguing, circulation and serials control systems. Lecture 2hours. Laboratory 2 hours. PrerequIsite: LlB-121 Technical Processes I. LlB-270 Circulation Control Systems - 3 Cr. - An introduction to methods of circulating library / media materials through a study of manual and mechanical systems of control. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: LlB-101 Introduction to Library / Instructional Media Technology. LlB-281 Library Iinstructional Media Practlcum - 3 Cr. - Practical work experience as a Library / Instructional Media technician in a commercial, industrial, or public employment situation . Students will meet in a seminar setting weekly to discuss work experience and employment possibilities. Students are required to spend 13.5 hours per week in a field experience. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: LlB-101 Introduction to Libraryllnstructional Media Technology, LlB-111 Audio-Visual

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Methods and Materials, LlB-121 Technical Processes I, LlB-1 31 Instructional Graphics I, LlB-270 Circulation Control Systems .

Marketing MARK-201 Principles of Marketing 4 Cr. - Functions, institutio ns and basic problems in the marketing of goods and services from the viewpoint of the manager of a business firm operating within the social, economic and legal environments of today's business world. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite BADM-108 Introduction to Business. MARK-202 Principles of Salesmanship - 4 Cr. - Fundamentals of retail, wholesale, outside and service selling. Customer impact, merchandise and sales presentation. Closing and post-sale service. Principles of self-management, practice on sales preparation and demonstration. The relationship of the sales proeess to promotion and advertising. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: BADM-108 Introduction to Business recommended. MARK-203 Principles of Retailing - 4 Cr. - An Introduction to the retail industry with a management perspective. Study of the structure a!:1d opportunities in retailing, franchising, location and layout, organization, sales promotion and customer services. Review of selected management cases . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: BADM-108 Introduction to Business, MARK-201 Principles of Marketing recommended but not required. MARK-204 Retailing Management 4 Cr. - Continuation of MARK-203 with concentration on merchandise management and retail control. Includes application of buying procedures, markup , pricing , stock turnover, and analysis of current merchandising policies. Review of selected management cases. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MARK-203 Principles of Retailing . MARK-209 Marketing Management -

4 Cr. - The viewpoint of the marketing manager is utilized . Case approach to marketing policies and strategies, buyer behavior, product management, .marketing channels,

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promotion and pricing . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MARK-201 Principles of Marketing.

MARK-211 Introduction to World Trade - 4 Cr. - Current world export/import pattern . International credits, payments and collections. World geography. Transportation modes. Economic environment. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MARK-201 Principles of Marketing or the equivalent. MARK-212 Import/Export-Procedures and Documentation - 4 Cr. Import/export procedures and documentation in world trade. Import! export practices in a variety of raw, semi-finished and finished materials. Import/export companies. Documentation procedures. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MARK-201 Principles of Marketing or the equivalent. MARK-213 International Payments, Credits and Collections - 4 Cr. International payments, credits and collections . International currency exchange. International banking procedures. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MARK201 Principles of Marketing or the equivalent. MARK-225 Principles of Advertising - 4 Cr. - Introduction to the field of advertising, employing the economical, behavioral and practical aspects of campaign strategy, appeal and media selection. Consideration also given to layout, typography and production methods. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite MARK-201 Principles of Marketing. MARK-250 Industrial Marketing - 4 Cr. - Principles and problems involved in marketing materials, equipment and supplies to manufacturers, other business firms and institutions which use the goods in further production. Analysis of the characteristics of the indust r ial market, channels of distribution, industrial selling, promotional practices and marketing policies. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MARK-201 Principles of Marketing. MARK-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program . Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision. The requirement for one

credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program.

Mathematics MATH-09l College Arithmetic - 3 Cr. - Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. Applications that include percent problems: Introduction to SI / Metrics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. MATH-095 Basic Algebra I - 3 Cr. Real numbers, basic algebraic operations and simplification of polynomials, factoring , linear equations, applications. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH091 College Arithmetic or equivalent. MATH-l00 Allied Health Sciences Mathematics - 4 Cr. - Fundamental operations of whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Linear equations , percents, ratios and proportions. The metric system, apothecary system , solutions, applications. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. MATH-l0l Basic Algebra II - 3 Cr. - Solution of linear systems and quadratic equations; rectangular coordinate system, arithmetic operations with algebraic fractions, exponents , application problems . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-095 Basic Algebra I. MATH-l02 Intermediate Algebra - 4 Cr. - Algebraic operations. Introduction to conic sections. Solving equations and inequalities. System of equations. Applications and techniques of problem solving . Logarithms. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: MATH-101 Basic .Algebra II or departmental approval. MATH-l05 Trigonometry - 4 Cr. Properties of the trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions. Trigonometric identities and .equations. Applications. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: MATH-102 Intermediate. Algebra and

MATH-107 Geometry recommended or departmental approval. MATH-l07 Geometry - 5 Cr. - A study of geometry as a mathematical system: reasoning by analogy, induction and deduction; proofs involving congruent triangles, geometric construction; indirect proofs; parallel lines; quadrilaterals; polygons; circles; similarity; non-Euclidean geometrics. Lecture hours: 5 Laboratory Hours: 0 Prerequisite: MATH-101 Basic Algebra II or departmental approval. MATH-lOB Technical Mathematics I - 5 Cr. :.... Fundamental algebraic operations and concepts. Rectangular coordinates and the graph of a function . Right triangle trigonometry and its applications. Systems of linear equations and determinants. Factoring, rational expressions, rational exponents, and radicals. Exponential and logarithmic functions. Ratio, proportion and variation. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-101 Basic Algebra II or departmental approval. MATH-l09 Technical Mathematics" - 5 Cr. - Quadratic equations. Trigonometric functions of any angle. Applications of vectors and oblique triangles. The j-operator . Natural logarithms. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-108 Technical Mathematics I or departmental approval. MATH-ll0 Technical Mathematics III - 4 Cr. - The derivative. Applications of the derivative. Integration. Applications of integration. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-109 Technical Mathematics II or departmental approval. MATH-115 College Algebra - 4 Cr. â&#x20AC;˘ - Exponential and logarithmic functions. Theory of equations, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, mathematical induction, binomial theorem, probability. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-102 Intermediate Algebra or departmental approval. MATH-l17 Mathematical Concepts I - 4 Cr. - Linear equations, linear inequalities, functions, linear systems. Matrix algebra, linear programming techniques as applied to business problems and the simplex method . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-102 Intermediate Algebra or departmental approval.

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MATH-118 Mathematical Concepts II - 4 Cr. - Fundamentals of differential calculus. Solution of exponential and logarithm equations, economic and business applications. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-117 Mathematical Concepts I or departmental approval. MATH-119 Mathematical Concepts III - 4 Cr. - Fundamentals of integral calculus . Basic theory of probability. Applications to business and economics. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-118 Mathematical Concepts II . MATH-121 Elementary Mathematical Analysis I - 4 Cr. - Sets, inequalities, functions, sequence and series, .mathematical induction , theory of equations, determinants and matrices. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-102 Intermediate AI\:Iebra. MATH-122 Elementary Mathematical Analysis II - 4 Cr. - Limits and continuity, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic function , trigonometric functions, algebra of vectors, complex numbers. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-121 Elementary Mathematical Analysis I. MATH-141 Elementary Probability and Statistics - 4 Cr. - Descriptive statistics . Elementary probability. Probability distributions. Normal distribution . Binomial distribution. Sampling concepts. Estimation. Test of hypothesis. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH102 Intermediate Algebra. MATH-142 Elementary Probability and Statistics II - 4 Cr. - Chisquare distribution and F-distribution and their applications; correlation; simple and multiple regression analysis; analysis of variance; use of computer. Lecture 4 hours. 'Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-141 Elementary Probability and Statistics I. MATH-151 Calculus 1- 5 Cr. - Cartesian coordinates. Functions and graphs. Limits and continuity. Differentiation of algebraic functions . Applications . Lec t ure 5 hours . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-122 Elementary Mathematical Analysis" or .departmental approval. MATH-152 Calculus II - 5 Cr. - Differentials and antiderivativ~s . The

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definite integral and its applications. Logarithmic and exponential functions. Trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-152 Calculus II. MATH-153 Calculus III - 5 Cr. Techniques of integration . Poplar coordinates. Conics. Indeterminate forms and improper integrals. Infinite series. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-152 Calculus II. MATH-154 Calculus IV - 5 Cr. Vectors. Parametric equations. Analytic geometry of space. partial differentiation . Multiple integrals . Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-153 Calculus "I. MATH-160 Numerical Methods - 4 Cr. - Using computer programming and iterative methods to solve mathematical problems using FORTRAN language. Topics include solving quadratic equations, solving systems of equations, simulation and statistical problems, numerical methods for finding roots of equations and area under curves, graphing. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-115 College Algebra or equivalent or departmental approval. MATH-201 Introduction to Linear Algebra - 5 Cr. -'Vector spaces. linear transformations and matrices. Determinants. Invariant subspaces. Characteristic values and vectors. Applications. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH154 Calculus IV. MATH-252 Differential Equations - 5 Cr. - Differential equations of first and higher order. Simultaneous, linear and homogeneous differential equations. Solution by power series. Laplace transforms. Applications. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-154 Calculus IV.

Mechanical Engineering Technology MECH-150 Machine Tools - 3 Cr. Fundamentals of metal clJtting theory and factors affecting machinability. Cutting tools, speeds and feeds, cutting fluids , metal cu tti ng and grinding ma.chines, measurement

and gaging. Lecture 2 hours. l,ab'oratory 2 hCLi rs. Prerequisite: Nane.

MECH-151 rf.etal Fabrication Methods - 3 Cr. - Various metal fabrication methods are discussed and experienced . Oxyacetylene, electro arc and tungsten inert gas welding. Brazing, soldering low temperature and resistance welding. Fasteners, adh'e sives and sheet metal joining and forming are covered . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. MECH-152 Manufacturing Processes - 3 Cr. - Theory and application of manufacturing methods, processes, tooling and equipment as related to modern industry. Introduction to process and physical metallurgy. Hot And cold forming of metals and plastics, heat-treating and finishing methods are highlighted. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. MECH-160 Fundamentals of Numerical Control for Machine Tools - 3 Cr. - Fundamental methods and uses of numerical control by digital systems. Practice in manual programming , setup and machining of work pieces. Elements of computer assisted programming. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: MECH-150 Mach ine Tools or departmental approval. MECH-201 Industrial HydrauliCS - 4 Cr. - Oil hydraulics systems with applications to modern industrial uses such as transfer of power and automatic control of machines. Pumps, filters, valves, cylinders and accumulators as components of working circuits. Laboratory experience includes construction and testing of practical hydraulic circuits. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: MATH-095 Basic Algebra I and PHYS-101 Introductory Physics or equivalent.

gears, crh ains, belts, springs, clutches anp brakes. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: ENGR-251 Strength of Materials and ENGR-.252 Applied Dynamics.

MECH-221 Applied Instrumentation Measurement and Control - 3 Cr. Theory and practice applied to industrial measuring and controlling instrumentation. Types of equipment used to measure weight, pressure, flow, temperature and humidity are examined . Automatic control of the measured quantities is investigated. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PHYS-101 Introductory Physics or equivalent. MECH-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Field Experience Program. Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision including an oncampus seminar. The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of nine credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

Medical ASSisting MA-100 Introduction to Medical Terminology - 3 Cr. - Introduction to medical terms used by health professions with emphasis on the basics of word building, defining , spelling, reading practice and pronunciation. Designed to help students who intend to enroll in MA-102 Medical Terminology and / or BIO128 Anatomy and Physiology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

MECH- 211 Mechanisms - 4 Cr. Kinematics of machine elements, gears, gear trains, linkages, cams, belts, chains, power screws, friction drives and ratchet mechanisms are explored. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: ENGR122 Engineering Drawing and ENGR-252 Applied Dynamics.

MA-101 Medical Office Orientation 1 Cr. - Orientation to medical office practice. Acquaints students with a variety of medical office careers. Duties and responsibilities of the medical assistant, receptionist and secretary. Communication and interpersonal skills; personal and professional requirements. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

MECH-212 Machine Design - 3 Cr. - Elements of design and stress analysis as applied to basic machine elements including shafts, bearings,

MA-102 Medical Terminology I - 3 Cr. - Terminology utilized by the medical profession . Emphasis on spelling, definition, pronunciation

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and usage of basic and. complex medical terms appiicabJe to the body as a whole and to the musculoskeletal , digestive, respiratory, and urogenital systems. Concurrent enrollment in B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology is strongly recommended . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. MA-103 Medical Terminology II - 3 Cr. - Emphasis on spelling, definition, pronunciation, and usage of basic and complex medical terms pertaining to circulatory, lymphatic, endocrine, nervous and integumentary systems. Special senses, abbreviations, symbols, and special terms. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MA-102 Medical Terminology I or equivalent. . MA-205 Introduction to ElectrocardIography - 4 Cr. - Acquaints students with duties and responsibilities of ECG technicians. Operation of the electrocardiograph and preparation of the electrocardiogram. Procedure, purpose, significance and limitations of tests . Structure and conduction system of the heart. Patient care prinCiples, electrical safety, records management and telephone techniques. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology and official acceptance into the Medical Assisting program or departmental approval. MA-206 Clinical Electrocardiography - 3 Cr. - Reinforces clinical education. Introductio n to basic principles of stress testing, Holter monitoring, echocardiography and other non- invasive cardiodiagnostic tests. Concurrent enrollment in MA252 Medical Office Practicum is required. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisites: MA-103 Medical Terminology and MA-205 Introduction to Electrocardiography and admission to the Medical Assisting program or departmental approval. MA-248 Medical Office Procedures 5 Cr. - Specific application of administrative duties and responsibilities to the medical office. Mailing, telephone services, appointments, written and oral communications, accounting, fee collection, record maintenance, insurance forms, machine transcription , typing, preparation of physicians' speeches and manuscripts. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: MA-

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101 ~ ecHca! Office Orientation , MLT204 Medical Laboratory proc;;edures, OADJIIi-220 Advance Business Typewriting , official acceptance into the Medical Assisting Program or departmental approval. MA-249 Clinical Medical Assisting 5 Cr. - Examination room , minor surgical and other special assisting techniques physical examination medical emergencies sterilization and asepsis medication, nutrition and diet supplies and inventory the electrocardjogram application of physical therapy and X-ray to medical assisting . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: MA248 Administrative Medical Assisting, concurrent enrollment and departmental approval. MA-250 Applied Medical Assisting -

2 Cr. - PrinCiples, procedures and practical application of administrative, clinical and special medical assisting procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: MA-101 Medical Assisting Orientation , MA-103 Medical Terminology II , MA-249 Clinical Medical Assisting, MLT-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures and departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in MA-252 Medical Assisting Externship. MA-251 Medical Assisting Ethics - 2 Cr. - PrinCiples of medical ethics; legal relationship between physician and patient; creation and termination of contracts, informed consent, professional liability and torts especially negligence; medico legal aspect of medical assisting types of medical practice. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: MA-101 Medical Assisting Orientation, MA-103 Medical Terminology II , MA-249 Clinical Medical Assisting , MLT-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures, MA-250 Medical Assisting Externship or concurrent enrollment. MA-252 Medical Office Practlcum -

4 Cr. - Supervised clinical experience. Thirty-two hours per week, including Saturdays, are spent performing administrative and clinical duties in a physician's office, clinic, hospital or health care center. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Other hours required: 32. Prerequisites: Official acceptance into the Medical Assisting Program or departmental approval, MA-205 Introduction to Electrocardiography or MA-249 Clinical Medical Assisting .

MA-256 Allied Health Seminar - 3 Cr. - The Allied Health Professional, evolving concepts, issues and problems. Interpersonal relations, communication, professional decorum, responsibilities and organizations. Professional development, continuing education , resources, the outline, annotated bibliography and equivalency and proficiency examinations. Certification examination requirements. Employment opportunities, the resume and personal interview. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Eligibility for Graduation and departmental approval.

Medical Laboratory Technology MLT-100 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology - 3 Cr. - Introduction to laboratory medicine. Educational requirements , duties and responsibilities of the Medical Laboratory Technician MLT (ASCP). Professional organizations and certification . Names and purposes of diagnostic tests. Visits to hospitals and other health facilities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Medical 路 Laboratory Technology Program. MLT-102 Medical Laboratory Ethics - 1 Cr. - Principles of medical ethics. Applies concepts to field of medical laboratory science. Emphasizes professional honesty and conduct , and consequences of negligence and invasion of the patients' privacy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MLT100 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology or departmental approval. MLT-103 Introduction to Blood Collection - 4 Cr. - Acquaints students with duties and responsibilities of laboratory phlebotomists. Blood collection for - laboratory analysis by venipuncture, fingerstick and special techniques. Names, purposes, and significance of tests. Precautions and proper handling / identification of patient, specimens, requisitions, records and reports. Asepsis , plasma/ serum separation and blood smears. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

MLT-104 Clinical Phlebotomy Techniques - 2 Cr. - Rei oforces clinical education. Specimen requirements, relationship between diagnostic tests and specimen collection . Special collection techniques, isolation procedl,lres, asepsis and hepatitis precautions. Problem-solving, communication and interpersonal skills. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: MA-100 Introduction to Medical Terminology, MLT-102 Medical Laboratory Ethics, and MLT103 Introduction to Blood Collection or departmental approval. MLT-202 Medical Laboratory Procedures - 4 Cr. - Introduction to Immunology , Blood Banking and Serology. Laboratory tests based on antigen-antibody reactions. Immunoglobulins. Diagnostic uses of serological tests. Genetic principles and antigens of Blood Grouping , Identification of Rh antibodies. CUlture media, identification, pathogenesis and serologic detection of selected infectious agents. Asepsis and sterilization. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into CLA or MLT Program or departmental approval. MLT-203 Medical Laboratory Procedures - 4 Cr. - Introduction to Hematology and Immunohematology. Red and white cell counts. Normal leukocyte differential. Sedimentation rate. Micro-hemoglobin and selected coagulation studies. ABO and Rh typing . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology and MA103 Medical Terminology or departmental approval. MLT-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures - 4 Cr. - Introduction to basic medical laboratory techniques. pH , indicators, buffers and stains. Laboratory safety. Handling and identification of glassware and equipment. Review of urinary system. Routine urini3-lysis and other selected renal function tests. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: MLT203 Medical Laboratory Procedures. MLT-205 Medical Laboratory Procedures - 4 Cr. - Introduction to colorimetry and instrumentation. Application of fundamental chemistry to the medical laboratory. Selected manual tests. Preparation and use of medical laboratory solutions. Tests for thyroid function and routine analyses. Lecture 3 hours. Lab-

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oratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Formal admission to CLA or MLT Program or departmental approval, MLT-204 Medical Laboratory Procedures. MLT-209 Certified Laboratory Assisting Procedures - 3 Cr. - Principles, procedures anQ applications of selected routine diagnostic tests performed by the CLA Category of me.dical laboratory workers. Principles of hematology, clinical chemistry, blood bank, routine analyses, automation and instrumentation and special tests. Presentation by clinical laboratory instructors in a clinical setting. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: All required courses and / or departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in MLT-210 Certified Laboratory Assisting Internship required. MLT-210 Certified Laboratory Assisting Internship - 4 Cr. - Supervised clinical experience. Students rotate through selected departments of clinical laboratories 40 hours per week performing general laboratory duties associated with the CLA Category of the medical laboratory. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: All required courses and/or departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in MLT-209 Certified Laboratory Assisting Procedures is required. MLT-214 Medical Technology Procedures - 5 Cr. - Principles, procedures and applications of complex, advanced diagnostic tests performed by medical laboratory personnel at the MLT level. Principles of advanced hematology, diagnostic microbiology, chemistry, urinalysis and renal function, serology, immunohematology and advanced laboratory techniques. Presentation by clinical laboratory instructors in a clinical setting. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: All-required courses and/or departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in MLT-215 Medical Laboratory Technology Internship is required. MLT-215 Medical Laboratory Technology Practlcum - 4 Cr. - Supervised clinical experience. Students rotate through hemotology, urinalysis, chemistry, microbiology, serol-

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ogy and immunohematology laboratories 32 hours per week meeting performance objectives of medical laboratory personnel at the MLT level. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Practicum 32 hours. Prerequisite: All required courses and / or departmental approval. Concurrent enrollment in MLT-214 Medical Technology Procedures or MLT-104 Clinical Phlebotomy Techniques is required.

Medical Record Technology MREC-101 Introduction to Medical Record Science - 3 Cr. - The history of medicine as related to medical records, uses of the record by the entire medical team; duties of record personnel; filing, numbering, and retention of records and practice of such in the laboratory. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program. MREC-102 Analysis of the Medical Record - 3 Cr. - Analysis of record contents including forms used in acute and long-term care facilities. Medical record functions in quantitatively analyzing the record and medical staff requirements in completing and qualitatively analyzing the record. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: MREC101 Introduction to Medical Record Science or departmental approval. MREC-103 Introduction to Health Statistics - 3 Cr. - The study of vital and public health statistics; in-depth study of hospital statistics; sources, collection, reporting, presentation and analysis of data; sources and uses of health data in the United States. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: MREC-102 Analysis of the Medical Record or departmental approval. College math requirements must be fulfilled prior to taking this course (see graduation requirements). MREC-104 Auxiliary Heatth Facilities - 3 Cr. - An introduction to other types of health related facilities available other than hospitals with emphasis on their record keeping systems. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: MREC-

102 Analysis of the Medical Record or departmental approval. MREC-201-Classlflcatlons, Indices and Registers - 3 Cr. - Purposes of classifying diseases and operations. Systems of nomenclatures and classifications and their differences. The values of indices and registers are emphasized. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: BIO128 Anatomy and Physiology, MA103 Medical Terminology, MREC103 Introduction to Health Statistics, OADM-102 Typewriting or departmental approval. MREC-202 Legal Aspects of Medical Records - 3 Cr. - The medical record as a legal document. The effect of confidential communications laws on the release of information from the medical record . Legal procedures involved in court disclosure of medical records. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MREC-201 Classifications, Indices and Registers or departmental approval. MREC-203 Medical Record Seminar - 2 Cr. - Methods of identifying and arriving at satisfactory solutions to specific types of problems encountered in the administration of medical record services. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MREC-202 Legal Aspects of Medical Records or departmental approval. MREC-204 Medical Machine Transcription - 2 Cr. - Skill in the use of transcription equ ipment and expansion of medical terminology. Practice in transcribing medical reports and correspondence in an institutional setting. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. PrerequisiteS: MA103 Medical Terminology II and OADM-103 Typewriting . MREC-205 Medical Machine Transcription - 2 Cr. - Continuation of MREC-204 Medical Machine Transcription with extended practical use of transcription equipment and expansion of medical terminology and dictation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: MREC-204 Medical Machine Transcription. MREC-206 Tumor Registry - 3 Cr. Description of the group of abnormal neoplasms known as cancer the description of the methods of diagnosis and treatment of the discipline known as oncology and the application of cancer data collected. Analy-

sis and interpretation of end results known as tumor registry will be presented. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisites: B10-130 Anatomy and Physiology, MA-103 Medical Terminology II, and B10-222 Pathophysiology. MREC-211 Directed Practice - 4 Cr. - Supervised learning experience in a medical record department under the supervision of an experienced medical record administrator. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology, MA-103 Medical Terminology II, MREC-103 Introduction to Health Statistics, OADM-102 Typewriting or departmental approval. MREC-212 Directed Practice - 5 Cr. - Supervised learning experience in a medical record department under the supervision of an experienced medical record administrator. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: MREC-201 Classifications, Indices and Registers, MREC211 Directed Practice, OADM-103 Typewriting or departmental approval. MREC-213 Directed Practice - 5 Cr. - Supervised learning experience in a medical record department under the supervision of an experienced medical record administrator. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: MREC~202 Legal Aspects of Medical Records, MREC212 Directed Practice or departmental approval.

Music MUS-100 Fundamentals of Music - 3 Cr. - Preparatory course in the rudiments of music. Includes notation, rhythm , scales, key signatures, intervals, treble and bass clefs. Elementary sight singing and ear training. Introductory keyboard harmony. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. MUS-101 Fundamentals of Music - 3 Cr. - Continuation of MUS-100 Fundamentals of Music. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MUS-100 Fundamentals of Music or departmental approval. MUS-102 Fundamentals of Music - 3 Cr. - Confinuation of MUS-i01 Fundamentals of Music. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequi-

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site: MUS-101 Fundamentals of Music or departmental approval.

MUS-103 Music Appreciation - 4 Cr. - No previous technical knowledge of music required. Study of basic music materials, form and style. Lectures, illustrations, live musical performances and listening to records. Historical survey of music via compositions from the 17th century to the present. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. MUS-104 Jazz Appreciation - 4 Cr. - Students are introduced to the basic elements and techniques of jazz . The function of jazz instrumentation is studied as well as jazz forms, jazz improvisation, and other musical elements and conventions which are indigenous to jazz. Characteristic features of various 'jazz styles and personalities are also studied. The primary purpose of the course is to increase the student's ability to listen to jazz with understanding . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. MUS-105 Introduction to Commercial Music - 3 Cr. - An orientation to the world of the music industry including careers in the recording and performing fields, retail music, publishing , arranging, composing (song writing), and showmanship. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. MUS-107 Harmony - 5 Cr. - Theory and musicianship for music majors. Sig ht singing , ear training, basic harmonic progressions, triads, primary and secondary chords. Root positions, inversions and non-chord tones. Keyboard harmony, rhythmic, melodic and harmonic dictation. Course divided into four general areas. Harmony occupies two sessions ear training and sight singing , two keyboard harmony, one. Practice sessions are on the student's own time. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MUS-102 Fundamentals of Music or departmental appr<;>val. MUS-108 Harmony - 5 Cr. - Continuation of MUS-107 Harmony. Miscellaneous triad usages. Further study of non-harmonic tones, seventh chords and modulations. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MUS-107 Harmony. MUS-109 Harmony - 5 Cr. - Continuation of MUS-108 Harmony. Dimin-

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ished seventh chords, altered chords, advanced modulation and harmonic analysis. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours . Prerequisite: MUS-108 Harmony.

MUS-115 Choral Ensemble - 1 Cr. - Includes music particularly suitable for a small chorus: madrigals, motets, cantatas, opera. Renaissance through contemporary works. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements . i:.ecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: By audition only. MUS-119 Choir - 1 Cr. - Concentration on vocal problems and techniques. Development of standard repertOire for mixed voices. Sacred and secular, accompanied and a cappella. School and public performances are required. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. MUS-123 Elementary Class Voice 2 Cr. - Basic techniques of voice production: breathing, diction , projection, tone-color and interpretation . Progressive vocal exercises and studies. Application of principles to simpler songs in English. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: MUS-103 Music Appreciation and MUS-169 Elementary Class Piano or departmental approval. MUS-151 Music for Elementary Education - 3 Cr. - Designed to orient elementary teachers to the role of music in the child's growth and development. Emphasis on creating a musical environment in the elementary school classroom . The study of the child's voice. Basic theory, including piano keyboard, musical symbols and terms. Use of the autoharp, recorder and rhythm instruments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. MUS-155 Lab Band - 1 Cr. - A course providing opportunity for study and experimentation in the performance of jazz and other popular and contemporary instrume)1tal styles of music. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree re-

quirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. MUS-1S9 Concert Band - 1 Cr. open to all students by audition . May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. MUS-163 Instrumental Ensemble - 1 Cr. - Designed to develop the individual's ability to perform in instrumental ensemble groups. Music selected and determined by needs and capabilities of the class. Public performance is part of the course. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. MUS-169 Elementary Class Piano 2 Cr. - BasiC piano techniques for students who do not intend to major in music. Exercises to develop tech. nical facility. Improvisation of simple accompaniments to given melodies. Sight reading , memorization , repertoire and basic theory. Student should have access to piano for practice. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. MUS-177 Orchestra - 1 Cr. - Open to all students by audition . May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to 'degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Audition only. MUS-180 路Elementary Band and Orchestral Instruments - 1 Cr. Basic techniques in ba'nd and orchestral instruments for students who do not intend to major in music. ,Exercises to develop technical facility. Sight reading , memorization , repertoire and basic theory. Student should have access to an orchestral or band instrument. This includes one of the following : violin, viola, cello, string bass, flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, French horn , trumpet-cornet, trombone, baritone , tuba, percussion, saxophone. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

MUS-183 Applied Music - 1 Cr. Individual instruction in the following : piano, voice, violin, viola, violoncello, string bass, flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon , French horn, trumpet-cornet, trombone, baritone-euphonium, tuba, percussion and organ. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 112 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Costs of private lessons are paid by the student. MUS-191 Music History and literature - 3 Cr. - Designed for students who plan to major in music and others with some musical background . Chronological analysis of major works in the literature from early times through the 16th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours, Prerequisite; Ncne. MUS-192 Music History and literature - 3 Cr. - Study of history and literature from the 17th through the 18th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MUS191 Music History and Literature or departmental approval. MUS-193 Music History and literature - 3 Cr. - Study of history and literature from the 19th through the 20th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: MUS192 Music History and Literature or departmental' approval . MUS-269 Intermediate Class Piano -

2 Cr. - Building a repertoire consisting of compositions by composers from the Baroque period to the 20th century. Emphasis on building of technique. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hou r.s. Prerequisites: MUS169 Elementary Class Piano and departmental approval. MUS-273 Applied Music - 2 "Cr. Individual instruction in the following: piano, voice, violin, viola, violoncello, string bass, flute , clarinet, oboe, bassoon, French horn, trumpet-cornet, trombone, baritone-euphonium, tuba, percussion and organ. May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 12 credits may be applied to degree requirements, Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: Permission by departmental audition. Costs of

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private lessons are paid by the student. MUS-295 Special Studies in Jazz - 1 Cr. - Specially presented educational experiences related to the subject of jazz, attained through the media of television, live performance or jazz clinic will serve as the basis for formalized lectures and discussion on campus that will examine aspects of jazz from the perspective of historical significance and performance techniques. Particular attention will be given to the elements of style, form, harmonic structure, melody and rhythm as related to the theory of jazz and as presented in such special performances. Students may earn up to 2 credits in one quarter. However, no more than 3 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory O路 hours. Prerequisite: MUS104 Jazz Appreciation or departmental approval.

Nursing NURS-125 Nursing Fundamentals 7 Cr. - Introduction to interventions and techniques essential to identifying and solving common nursing problems of clients/ patients of various ages. Must demonstrate beginning ability to give direct nursing care utilizing scientific principles and concepts communication skills in establishing relationships with clients / patients and identifying role and responsibility of the AD nurse within nursing. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nursing Program. NURS-126 Nursing Fundamentals 7 Cr. - Continuation of NURS-125 Nursing Fundamentals which utilizes the nursing process and scientific principles in providing care for clients /patients in various age groups with health conditions related to hospitalization, modification of normal nutrition, modification of fluid and electrolyte balance, wounds, dressilJg, asepsis, instillations and irrigations, drugs, body's response to illness and stress and its adaptations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisites: NURS-125 Nursing Fundamentals, PSY-101 General Psychology, B10-121 Principles of Medical SCience, and BIO128 Anatomy and Physiology.

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NURS-127 Psychiatric Nursing - 7 Cr. - Utilizes the nursing process and scientific: principles to provide nursing care for clients / patients of various age groups with health problems that require nursing interventions in relation to mental health and pathological and psychosocial stresses in both adults and children . Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: NURS-126 Nursing Fundamentals , PSY -102 General Psychology, B10-129 Anatomy and Physiology, and B10-221 Microbiology. PSY-201 Child Growth and Development may be taken concurrently. NURS-212 Nursing Trends 1 Cr, Trends in nursing including the role of major nursing organizations and career opportunities. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Enrollment in any second year Nursing course. NURS-228 Maternal and Child Health Nursing - 10 Cr. - Utilizes the nursing process and scientific principles to provide family-centered nursing care with patients/clients during pregnancy , labor-delivery , postpartum and newborn periods and with children from infancy through adolescence. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: NURS-126 Nursing Fundamentals, PSY-102 General Psychology, B10-1 29 Anatomy and Physiology, and B10-221 Microbiology. PSY-201 Child Growth and Development may be taken concurrently. NURS-229 Nursing of Adults - 11 Cr. - Utilizes the nursing process and scientific prinCiples to provide nurs- ' ing care for adult Clients/ patients with emphasis on cellular growth and proliferation, fluid and electrolyte dynamics, metabolism, inflammation and immunity. Basic concepts of leadership. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: NURS-126 Nursing Fundamentals, PSY-102 General Psychology, B10-130 Anatomy and Physiology, and B10-221 Microbiology. NURS-230 Nursing of Adults - 11 Cr. - Continuation of NURS-229 Nurs'ing of Adults which utilizes the nursing process and scientific prinCiples in providing nursing care for adult clients/patients with emphasis on oxygenation, perception, and coor-

opment of additional media skills and other concepts as listed in Occupational Therapy Media I. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: OTAT-106 Occupational Therapy Media I.

dination . Application of leadership skills. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 15 hours. Prerequisites: NURS-127 psychiatric Nursing, NURS-228 Maternal and Child Health Nursing, NURS-229 Nursing of Adults, PSY201 Child Growth and Development, and 610-130 Anatomy and Physiology.

OTAT-109 'O ccupatlonal Therapy Clinical Conditions I - 4 Cr. Course covers both physical and psychosocial dysfunctions commonly referred to and treated by occupational therapists . These diagnostic entities are ' presented within the framework of human growth . and development with course content covering the life span from infancy through early 路childhood. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: f>SY-202 Human Growth and Development.

Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology OTAT-105 Introduction to Occupational Therapy - 4 Cr. - Course introduces student to 路the profession of occupational therapy, its place in the health care system, and the role and function of the Occupational Therapist Registered and the Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant as members of this profession; introduces the student to current practice of occupational therapy through observations in local occupational therapy departments. Student partiCipation in observational experiences will be required in addi-. tion to the forinal classwork on campus. Such off-campus assignments will include approximately 30 hours of observation over the course of the quarter. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program. OTAT -106 Occupational Therapy Media I - 4 Cr. - Development of skills in the use of selected craft media as a basic approach to occupational therapy practice. Includes concepts of activity analysis and problem solving. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program. OTAT-107 Occupational Therapy Process and Function I - 2 Cr. Course focuses on teaching / learning concepts as applied in the therapeutic process. Student will select familiar media and present teaching demostrations to 路 peers. Simulated patient/client situations will further develop the therapeutic application of occupational therapy activities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: OTAT-105 Introduction to Occupational Therapy, OTAT-106 Occupational Therapy Media I. OTAT-108 Occupati onal Therapy Media II - 4 Cr. - Continued devel-

OTAT-110 Occupational Therapy Therapeutic :rechnlques I - 4 Cr. The course covers the application of occupational therapy skills and techniques in treatment programs planned for the patient/client with diagnoses commonly referred to occupational therapy departments , specifically concerned with infants through early childhood. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: OTAT-108 Occupational Therapy Media II. I

OTAT-114 Occupational 'Therapy Field Practice I - 2 Cr. . - Under supervision of assigned agency personnel students will apply knowledges, skills, and techniques learned in concurrent OTAT courses through observation and participation in the health agency programs. ' Assignment to health agencies will include traditional and non-traditi9nal settings concerned with the life span of infant through early childhood. Such off-campus participation by students at the health agencies will total approximately 45 hours per student over the course of the quarter in addition to the scheduled class work on campus. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory a hours. Prerequisite: OTAT-107 Occupational Therapy Process and Function I. OTAT-120 Occupational Therapy Therapeutic Recreation - 3 Cr. Course focuses on selection and use of recreational activities as a therapeutic modality in occupational therapy practice. Students will research appropriate recreational activities for all age groups in both physical disabilities and psychiatric

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occupational therapy settings which will further develop the therapeutic application of recreation in occupational therapy practice. Students will participate in assigned off-campus experience not more than three hours per quarter, in addition to regular classroom content. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PSY-202 Human Growth and Development and program approval. OTAT-207 Occupational Therapy Process and Function II - 2 Cr. Course integrates knowledge and skills acquired in academic work and the Field Practice placements to clarify the role and function of the certified occupational therapy assistant in the practice of occupational therapy. The focus of cou rse content is to reflect the evolving profession of occupational therapy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites : OTAT-107 Occupational Therapy Process and Function I, OTAT -214 Occupational Therapy Field Practice II. OTAT-209 Occupational Therapy Clinical Conditions II - 4 Cr. Course covers both physical and psychosocial dysfunctions commonly referred to and treated by occupat i onal therapists . These d iagnostic entities are presented within the f ramework of human growth and development with course content covering the life span from adolescence through the young adult. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: OTAT109 Occupational Therapy Clinical Conditions I. OTAT -210 Occupational Therapy Therapeutic Techniques II - 4 Cr. The course covers the application of occupational therapy skills and techniques in treatment programs planned for the patient/ client with diagnoses commonly referred to occupational therapy departments , specifically concerned with adolescents through young adults. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: OTAT -110 Occupational Therapy Therapeutic Techniques I. OTAT -211 Occupational Therapy Clinical Conditions III - 4 Cr. Course covers both physical and psychosocial dysfunctions commonly referred to and treated by occupational therapists . These diagnostic entities are presented within the framework of human

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growth and development with course content covering the life span from middle age through senescence. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: OTAT -209 Occupational Therapy Clinical Conditions II . OTAT-212 Occupational Therapy Therapeutic Techniques III - 4 Cr. The course covers the application of occupational therapy skills and techniques in treatment programs planned for the patient/client with diagnoses commonly referred to occupational therapy departments, specifically concerned with middle age through senescence. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: OTAT-210 Occupational Therapy Therapeutic Techniques II . OTAT-214 Occupational Therapy Field Practice II - 2 Cr. - Under supervision of assigned agency person n e I stu dents w路i II app Iy knowledge, skills, and techniques learned in concurrent OTAT courses through observation and participation in the health agency programs. Assignment to health agencies will include traditional and non-traditional settings concerned with the life span of adolescent through young adult. Such off-caQ1pus participation by students at the health agencies will total approximately 45 hours per student over the course of the quarter in addition 'to the scheduled class work on campus. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: OTAT-114 Occupational Therapy Field Practice I. OTAT -216 Occupational Therapy Field Practice III - 2 Cr. - Under supervision of assigned agency personnel students will apply knowledges , skills , and techniques learned in concurrent OTAT courses through observation and participation in the health agency programs. Assignment to health agencies will include traditional and non-traditional settings concerned with the life span of middle age through senescence. Such off-campus participation by students at the health agencies will total approximately 45 hours per student over the course of the quarter in addition to the scheduled class work on campus. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: OTAT-214 Occupational Therapy Field Practice II.

OTAT -264 Occupational Therapy Field Work Experience I - 4 Cr. Student wil l be assigned to a fulltime fiel d placement under the supervision of a registered Occupational Therapist. This experience will be si x weeks and provide the stu dent opportunities to apply principles and techniques learned in class to the real treatment situation . Lecture 0 hours. 40 hours Practicum. Prerequisite : OTAT-216 Occupational Therapy Field Practice III. OTAT -265 Occupational Therapy Fieid Work Experience II - 4 Cr. Student will be assigned to a second full-time field work placement under the supervision of a registered Occupational Therapist. This experience will run s ix wee ks and complement the first experience. It will provide the student opportunities to apply principles and techniques learned in class t6 the real treatment situation . Lecture 0 hours. 40 hours Practicum . Prerequisite: OTAT-264 Occupational Therapy Field Work Experience I.

Office Administration OADM-104 Machine Calculations - 3 Cr. - Development of the touch system on the 10-key calculator. Instruction and practice in the essential operations of calculators as they are used in solving business-related problems. Lecture 2 hou rs. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: ACCT-107 Business Mathematics or concurrent enrollment. OADM-107 Information and Records Management - 3 Cr. - Fundamentals of records handling from creation to destruction , includes information retrieval , retention and storage, correspondence control , and record inventory. Emphasis is on the management of filing systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: None. OADM-110 Beginning Shorthand I 3 Cr. - Introduction to the principles of pen shorthand. Reading, writing, and transcription in preparation for speed dictation and transcription in more advanced courses in shorthand. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: ENG101 or equivalent; OADM-120 Begin-

ning Typewriting, concurrent enrollment or equivalent. OADM-111 Shorthand II - 3 Cr. - A brief and intensive review of shorthand theory. Instruction in the taking of dictation and the preparation of typed transcripts from shorthand notes. The development of speed and accuracy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hou r s. Prerequis ites: OADM-110 Beginning Shorthand I or equivalent and OADM-120 Beginning Typewriting or equivalent. OADM-112 Shorthand III - 3 Cr. Instruction in the taking of dictation and the transcription of shorthand notes. Continued emphasis on the development of speed and accuracy and the production of mailable letters. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisites: OADM-111 Shorthand II or equi valent and OADM-121 Business Typewriting or equivalent. OADM-120 Beginning Typewriting 2 Cr. - Introduction to the operation of the typewriter and to kE;lyboarding techniques followed with an introducti on to basic communications, tables, and basic report writing . Le c ture 1 hour . Laboratory 3 hou rs. Prerequisite: None. OADM-121 Business Typewriting - 3 Cr. - Introduction to business letter formatting and business problemsolving tasks. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : OADM-120 Beginning Typewriting or equivalent. OADM-122 Intermediate Business Typewriting - 3 Cr. - Introduction to preparing business forms, communications, and reports requiring decision-making tasks. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: OADM-121 Business Typewriting or equivalent. OADM-203 Advanced Shorthand I 3 Cr. - Employment production standards through accurate notetaking in preparation of mailable letters. Office-style dictation' and material with emphasis on technical matters. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: OADM-112 Shorthand III or departmental approval. OADM-204 Advanced Shorthand II 3 Cr. - Employment production standards through accurate notetaking in preparation of mailable letters. Office-style dictation and material

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with emphasis on executive matter. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: OADM-203 Advanced Shorthand I or departmental approval.

OADM-205 Advanced Shorthand III 3 Cr. - Employment production standards through accurate notetaking in preparation of mailable letters. Office-style dictation and material with emphasis on executive matter. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: OADM-204 Advanced Shorthand II or departmental approval. OADM-206 Legal Shorthand - 3 Cr. - Practice in note-taking and transcription for advanced shorthand students. Preparation of legal correspondence, pleadings, testimonies and depositions. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: OADM-221 Basic Information Processing and OADM-204 Advanced Shorthand , or concurrent enrollment. OADM-207 Medical Shorthand - 3 Cr. - Designed to give advanced shorthand students practice in notetaking and transcription of medical reports, diagnoses, case histories and correspondence. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: OADM-221 Basic Information Processing and OADM-204 Advan.c ed Shorthand. MA-103 Medical Terminology II or concurrent enrollment. OADM-210 Business Communications - 4 Cr. - A study of modern business communication theory, with its application to business. Instruction in business letters, research techniques, formal and informal requests. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ENG-101 College Composition or departmental approval. OADM-215 Information Processing Concepts - 3 Cr. - An introduction to information processing concepts that are general to all systems. Discussion of types of jobs and career paths available. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. OADM-220 Advanced Business Typewriting - 3 Cr. - Introduction to transcription as used in information

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processing and production-type problem-solving . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: OADM-122 Intermediate Business Typewriting or equivalent.

OADM-221 Basic Information Processing - 3 Cr. - Introduction to information processing concepts and the use of transcription, magnetic and electronic keyboarding in basic information processing tasks. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: OADM-220 Advanced Business Typewriting , or equivalent. OADM-222 Advanced Information Processing - 3 Cr. - Study of information processing systems used in the administrative management of offices. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: OADM-221 Basic Information Processing or equivalent. OADM-225 Information Processing Management - 3 Cr. - Procedures for determining the feasibility of organizing an information processing center. Guidelin~s for establishing, operating, and supervising an information processing center including persoonel management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: OADM-222 or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval. OADM-251 Office Administration - 4 Cr. - Finishing course for Office Administration majors designed to up-date knowledges in the rapidly changing office environment and prepare them for initial employment as well as promotions to supervisory and administrative positions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or departmental approval. OADM-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program. Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision . The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program.

Ophthalmic (Optician) Dispensing Technology

OPT-124 Mechanical Optics - 3 Cr. - Theory and guide to plastiC lenses with the application of lap selection , tints, and dyes. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 tiours. Prerequisite: OPT123 Mechanical Optics.

OPT-210 Contact Lenses I - 4 Cr. _ PrinCiples of operation and design OPT-101 Theoretical Optics - 3 Cr. of instru,ments applicable to the fit- History of the optical field , history, ting of contact lenses. Optical prinand the manufacture of glass, basic ciples and materials applicable to refraction laws, geometry of prisms the design processes and their relaand spheres, and the introduction to tionship to the physical condition modern lens construction and basis and structure of the eye in its abnorfor design. Lecture 3 hours. Laboramal state. Techniques of contact tory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal . lens fitting are examined and practiadmission into the program . cal application of these techniques in the fitting process are expeOPT-102 Theoretical Optics . 2 Cr. rienced . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory - Study of types of astigmatic re3 hours . Prerequisites: B10-132 fraction errors, geometry and optics Anatomy of the Eye and B10-133 of the cylinder and toric, transposiPhysiology of the Eye. tion , and neutralization. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. PrerequiOPT-211 Lens Design - 3 Cr. - Desite: OPT-101 Theoretical Optics. velopment specifications and applications of the available multifocals, OPT-103 Theoretical Optics - 2 Cr. cataract lenses, and other special - Accommodation, bifocals, the lens forms. Lecture 2 hours. Laboranear field , trifocals, the intermediate tory 3 hours. Prerequisites: OPT-104 field, and multifocal optics. Lecture Theoretical Optics and OPT -124 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq- ' Mechanical Optics. uisite: OPT-102 Theoretical Optics. OPT-213 Contact Lenses II - 5 Cr. 0PT-104 Theoretical Optics - 2 Cr. - Practices in fitting contact lenses. - Advanced theory of light refracUsing the biomicroscope applying tion , physiological refractive errors, such standard methods as staining . ophthalmic lenses, multifocals. ManPharmacology and function of the ufacturer's products. Lecture 2 most common solutions used in hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequicontact lens application . Fitting site: OPT-103 Theoretical Optics. rules, contact lens wearing schedules, and optiCS of contact lenses OPT-121 Mechanical Optics - 3 Cr. will be examined. Bifocal and Apha- Introduction to ophthalmic laborakia contact lens fitting . Principles tory procedures. Abrasive cutting, and practices related to the fitting of lapping, surface inspection, and calsoft lenses will also be covered. Lecculations for prisms and spheres. ture 4 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Care of laboratory equipment. LecPrerequisite : OPT -210 Contact ture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. PreLenses I. requisite: Formal acceptance into OPT-225 Mechanical Optics - 3 Cr. the program. - Ophthalmic prisms, their effects, OPT-122 Mechanical Optics - 3 Cr. and designations. Lens design, Lec- Astigmatic refraction errors. Lens ture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Preaberrations and corrected curve serequisite: OPT -124 Mechanical ries. Introduction to cylindrical surOptiCS. facing . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 OPT-226 Mechanical OptiCS - 3 Cr. hours . Prerequisite: OPT-121 - Lens aberrations. Analysis of the Mechanical Optics. visible spectrum , absorptive lenses and the theory and use of a toughOPT-123 Mechanical Optics - 3 Cr. - Accommodations, visual fields , ened safety lenses. Layout of different multifocal lenses. Emphasis on and multifocal types. Anisometripia all phases of surfacing and finishing and bicentric grinding calculations. procedures for multifocal lenses. Surfacing techniques for various biLecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 bours. focal types. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: OPT-122 Prerequisite: OPT-225 Mechanical Mechanical Optics. Optics.

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OPT-227 Mechanical Optics - 3 Cr. - Formulas and their specific applications. Emphasis on lens identification, rimless and semi-rimless work. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: OPT-226 Mechanical Optics.

PHIL-102 Introduction to Logic - 4 Cr. - Study of fundamental principles of formal logic, with emphasis on modern logic and its applications to reasoning in philosophy and ordinary life. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

OPT-231 Ophthalmic Dispensing I 6 Cr. - Introduction, history and development of modern optician, spectacles, and fitting procedures. Principles of interpersonal relationships. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: OPT-104 Theoretical Optics.

PHIL-201 Comparative World Religion - 4 Cr. - A study of the orig in, nature and meaning of major world religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism and Confucianism . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. .

OPT-234 Ophthalmic Dispensing II 4 Cr. - Clinical practice and individual instruction in fitting, adjusting, and dispensing of eyeglasses. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: OPT -231 Ophthalmic Dispensing I.

PHIL-202 Ethics - 4 Cr. - A study of systems and problems of human conduct and their application to man's moral problems and decisions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Any previous philosophy course or departmental approval.

OPT-23S Ophthalmic Dispensing III - 2 Cr. - Practice in fitting, adjusting and dispensing of eyeglasses, with knowledge of current retail dispensing procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: OPT-234 Ophthalmic Dispensing II. OPT-2S2 Ophthalmic Instruments 1 Cr. - Construction, adjustment, use, and history of ophthalmic instruments. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisites: OPT-124 Mechanical Optics and PHYS-133 Geometric Optics. OPT-2S3 Trends in Opticianry - 1 Cr. - Current topics in the state-ofthe-art in opticianry for students in the Ophthalmic Dispens.ing Technology Program, as well as for professional development of licensed opticians. Course may be repeated for credit provided student holds a valid State of Ohio Opticianry license. Licensed Opticians may elect the S/ U grading option. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours Prerequisite: Enrollment in any second year Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology course, or evidence of Ohio State licensure in Opticianry.

Philosophy PHIL-101 Introduction to Philosophy

- 4 Cr. - Study and analysis of basic problems dealing with man's understanding of himself, society and the univ~rse as viewed by selected philosophers. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

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PHIL-203 Introduction to the Philosophy of Science - 4 Cr. - The study of formation of scientific concepts and examination of the structure of scientific investigation and its methods. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hour. Prerequisite: PHIL-101 Introduction to Philosophy or PHIL-102 Introduction to Logic. PHIL-240 Philosophy of Art - 4 Cr. - An examination of types of aesthetic theories, their implications for art interpretation, art criticism, the creative activity of the artist, and the appreciation of art objects. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PHIL-101 Introduction to Philosophy, or PHIL-202 Ethics, or departmental approval.

Physical Education ALL COURSES IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION ARE COEDUCATIONAL UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED. PE-103 Archery - 1 Cr. - Stresses skill development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-104 Badminton and Volleyball 1 Cr. - Skill development, safety practices, and competitive experience in badminton and volleyball, and their value as lifetime activities. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

PE-105 Basketball (Men) - 1 Cr. Stresses skill development, safety practices, competitive experi ence and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-106 Basketball (Women) - 1 Cr. - Stresses skill development, safety practices, competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None PE-107 Golf - 1 Cr. -Instruction and development of golf skills. Fundamentals of the swing and phases of the game. Includes history, rules and etiquette, with stress on value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-108 Golf - 1 Cr. - Advanced class in golf emphasizing a high level of proficiency in skill performance. Instruction will be on an individual basis directed toward improvement of the golf swing . Includes instruction and practice in the various shots. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-107 Golf or departmental approval. PE-109 Recreational Activities - 1 Cr. - Designed for students desiring participation in physical education activities requiring modified performance levels, including those with physical limitations. Includes a number of low organizational games such as table tennis, shuffleboard, darts, and horseshoes. Participation with a focus on lifetime value. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-110 Beginning Tennis - 1 Cr. Instruction, practice, and skill development in tennis. Rules and etiquette will be stressed. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-111 Intermediate Tennis - 1 Cr. - Instruction, practice, and skill development in tennis. Rules, strategy, and etiquette. Singles and doubles play. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-110 Beginning Tennis or departmental approval. PE-112 Competitive Tennis - 1 Cr. - Advan.ced class stressing a higher level of skill performance. Further development of the serve, defensive and offensive strokes and strategy

involved in singles and doubles matches. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-111 Intermediate Tennis or departmental approval. PE-113 Racquetball - 1 Cr. -Instruction and partiCipation in racquetball including competition. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-115 Adapted Physical Education - 1 Cr. - Designed for students unable to partiCipate in regular physical education because of temporary or permanent limitations. Programs of individual exercises and recreational activities as determined by student limitations and specific remedial conditions. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-116 Jogging - 1 Cr. -Instruction and participation in correct method of jogging. Presentation of procedures that can be used for individual continuation of jogging . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-117 Body Conditioning I - 2 Cr. - This course is designed to bring about, by means of progressive resistance exercise, changes in the body as manifested in increased strength , endurance, and flexibility. Improved cardiovascular efficiency will be accompl ished by planned aerobic activities. Instruction will amplify the students' knowledge and develop attitudes regarding some of the important concomitants of this type of training . Participation in circuit training, calisthenics and aerobic activities constitutes the criterion for an individual fitness profile. Lecture 1 hour. Laborator-y 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-118 Body Conditioning II - 1 Cr. - Progressive resistance exercise and aerobic activity constitute the course content. Cardiorespiratory efficiency, muscular strength and endurance maintenance are emphasized to establish a lifetime exercise routine. Knowledge, understandin.g, and appreciation of the importance of keeping physically fit are stressed. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-117 Body Conditioning I or departmental approval. PE-119 Body Dynamics - 2 Cr. Knowledge, understanding, appreci-

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ation and body skills for efficient movement and total physical fitness. Participation in calisthenics, weight training , cardiorespiratory and other exercise programs geared to individual needs. Analysis of individual posture. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-120 Body Dynamics - 1 Cr. Emphasis on refinement of exercise program and grooming habits as lifetime routines. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-119 Body Dynamics or departmental approval. PE-121 Social Dancing - 1 Cr. Instruction and practice in the fundamental steps of variety of ballroom dances. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-122 Exer-Dance - 1 Cr. - A course designed to provide knowledge of and experience with exercise based upon fundamental movements from such dance forms as ballet, modern dance, modern jazz, square dance, folk, traditional and contemporary social dance. Emphasis will be placed upon performance of exercise routines to music and creation of original exer-dance routines. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-123 Square and Folk Dancing - 1 Cr. - Development of proficiency in folk and square dancing. Includes history and etiquette. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-127 Rhythmic Sportive Gymnastics - 1 Cr. - Introduction, practice and skill development with hand apparatus such as balls, hoops, clubs, Jump ropes, and ribbons, as well as conditioning, basic dance, and flexibility exercises. Lecture 0 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-130 Exer-Swlm - 1 Cr. - A course designed to promote health , physical fitness and recreational activities in the aquatic medium. Activities will be provided to fit the needs of persons of diverse abilities, both swimmers and non-swimmers, with the emphasis upon the role of water exercise and swimming as a media for improving physical fitness. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Blood pressure taken at College Health Services.

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PE-131 Aquatics Beginning SWim. ming • 1 Cr. - Fundamental swimming skills for non-swimmers. Emphasis on elementary forms of . propulsion and introduction to deep water. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-132 Advanced Beginning Swim· mlng • 1 Cr. - Development of deep water swimming skills for advanced beginners. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-131 Beginning swimming or departmental approval. PE-133 Intermediate Swimming - 1 Cr. - Development of form and endurance in the popular strokes. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-132 Advanced Beginning Swimming or departmental approval. PE·134 Aquatics Basic lifesaving . 1 Cr. - Instruction and practice in six basic styles of swimming and in elementary lifesaving skills and poolside first aid . A course basic to the American Red Cross Advanced lifesaving course. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE133 Aquatics Intermediate Swimming or departmental approval. PE·135 Aquatics Advanced Lifesav· Ing - 1 Cr. - Techniques of swimming rescue including approaches, carries, releases, escapes and lifts. Successful completion includes certification as American Red Cross Advanced Lifesaver . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-134 Aquatics Basic lifesaving or consent of instructor. PE·136 Aquatics Synchronized Swimming - 1 Cr. - Fundamental skills of synchronized 'swimming and practice in combining these skills into routines for recreational and competitive purposes. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-133 Aquatics Intermediate Swimming or departmental approval. PE-137 Aquatics Advanced CompetItive Activities - 1 Cr. - Develops proficiency in advanced aquatic activities including competitive swimming , springboard diving and water polo. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-134 Aquatics Lifesaving or departmental approval. PE-138 Aquatics Skin and Scuba Diving - 2 Cr. - Presents the basic skills necessary for safe participation in underwater diving. Instructors

certification received upon successful completion of course requirements. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: American Red Cross Intermediate Card or departmental approval. PE-139 Aquatics Water Safety Instruction - 1 Cr. - Introduction to teaching methods for all levels of swimming skills stressing analysis of individual aquatic techniques. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Possession of a current Red Cross Advanced Lifesaving certificate. PE-140 Aquatics Water Safety Instruction - 1 Cr. - Emphasis on teaching methods for- lifesaving and survival skills. Completion of all requirements for certification as American Red Cross water safety instr.uctor. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-139 Aquatics Water Safety Instruction . PE-141 Wrestling (Men) - 1 Cr. Instruction and participation in wrestling as an individual sport. Emphasis on development of skills, physical condition and knowledge 路 needed in competitive wrestling . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-143 Fencing - 1 Cr. - Instruction and participation in the elements of foil fenc ing . Emphasis placed upon cjevelopment of skills, rules and safety for the beginner. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-144 Fencing - 1 Cr. - Emphasizes skill development, rules, strategy and safety practices in sabre and epee. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-143 Fencing or consent of instructor. PE-145 Fencing - 1 Cr. - Skill development in epee and sabre . Stresses rules , strategy and etiquette in competitive fencing . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: PE-143 Fencing and PE-144 Fencing or consent of instructor. PE-147 Soccer - 1 Cr. - Stresses individual skills, team play, rules and strategy. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-148 Track and Field - 1 Cr. Introduction to techniques of track events. Opportunity for specializa-

tion . Lecture 0 路hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. P~-149 Skiing - 1 Cr. - Stresses skill de~~lopment! safety practices, competl.tlve expenence and its value as a Itfetlme activity. Lecture 0 h.o urs. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

PE-150 Handball - 1 Cr. - Stresses skill development, safety practices competitive experience and its value as a lifetime activity. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-153 Family Camping - 1 Cr. Develops basic knowledge. and skills pertinent to safe family camping. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-154 Self-Defense - 1 Cr. - Basic karate, judo and other self-defense skills. History and philosophy of currently popular schools. Appreciation of fitness and self-discipline. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-155 Self-Defense - 1 Cr. - Refinement of basic skills; movements and practices in defense. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-154 Self-Defense. PE-156 Tumbling and Gymnastics 1 Cr. - Introduction and practice in basic tumbling activities. Emphasis on techniques and development of skills and their combination . Cond itioning, strengthening and flexibility exercises are introduced along with methods of presenting each activity. Lecture 0 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None PE-157 Tumbling - 1 Cr. -Instruction and practice in various floor exercise and tumbling activities through more advanced moves . Proper technique and development of skills and their combination will be emphasized . Conditioning , strengthening and flexibility exercises will be utilized . Lecture 0 hour. Laboratory 2 hou rs. Prerequisite: PE-156, Tumbling and Gymnastics or departmental approval. PE-158 GymnastiC Apparatus - 1 Cr. - Introduction and practice in activities on the gymnastic apparatus (balance beam , uneven parallel bars, vaulting , floor exercise, pommel horse, rings, parallel bars and horizontal bar). Lecture 0 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-

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156 Tumbling an d Gymnastics or departmental approval. PE-159 Trampoline - 1 Cr. - I nstruction and practice in the use of the trampoline. Refinement of skills performed on the trampol ine and development of basic routines. Lec. ture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-156 Tumbling and Gymna s tics o r departmenta l approval. PE-160 Bowling - 1 Cr. -Instruction and participation in bowling . Includes history, rules and etiquette. Practice in score-keeping and tournament competition . Stress on value as a lifetime sport. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : None. PE-161 Bowling - 1 Cr. - Advanced class in bowl ing techniq ues. Ihstruction includes: co rrections of individual faults , various releases, proper lane adjustments, league organ izations, league play and tournament competition . Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: PE-160 Bowling , league bowl ing experience, or departmental approval. PE-163 Softball - 1 Cr. -Instruction and participation in softball slow pitch , fast pitch , 16' play. Ru les, strategy. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-164 Fall Sports - 1 Cr. - Instruction and participation in sports and games of the season which may incl ude activities such as touch football, speed ball and angle ball. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hou rs. Prerequisite: None. PE-165 Spring Sports - 1 Cr. -I nstruction and participation in sports and game activities of the season wh ich may include softball , baseball, paddleball, angling , and new games. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-166 Winter Sports - 1 Cr. -Instruction , participation , and competition in the games of the season such as squash , power volleyball and team handball. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 .Hours. Prerequisite: None. PE-167 Judo - 1 Cr. - Instruction and practice module in the physical education method and sport of Judo, with introduction to skills of throwing , holding, and immobilization techniques. Includes cognitive,

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affective, an d locom otor develop_ ment of the Olympic sport. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hou rs. Prerequisite: None. PE-168 Self-Protection- 1 Cr. -Instruction an d practice in the pre-arranged Self Defense based upon Hapkido Uoint twisting, locking, and countering) and Karate (for personal Self Defense) tech niques. Emphasis on techniques not requiring strength and weight, but balance, leverage and speed. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequ isite: None. PE-169 Cycling - 1Cr. - Emphasis on purchase of a bicycle to fit individual needs and price range, cyc li ng safety, cycle repair and maintenance, conditioning for cyclists and cycling trips in and around the greater Cleveland area. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

Physical Science PSCI-101 Introduction to Physical Science - 3 Cr. - A course for nonscience majors. An introd uction to the physical universe with emphasis on astronomy and applications of physics principles. Presentation of current science topics and trends. PSCI-107 Physical Science Laboratory may be taken concurrently with th is course. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. PSCI-102 Introduction to Physical Science - 3 Cr. - A cou rse for nonscience majors. An introduction to the fundamental concepts of chemistry with emphasis on the environment and t he ro le of sci ence in society. Presentation of c urrent science topics and trends. PSCI-108 Physical Science Laboratory may be taken concu rrently with this course. Lecture 3 hou rs. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. PSCI-103 Introduction to Physical Science - 3 Cr. - A course for nonscience majors. An introduction to earth sciehce with emphasis on the earth 's crust, its oceans, and atmosphere. Physics principles are used in the explanation of physical phenomena. Presentation of current science topics arid trends. PSCI-109 Physical Science Laboratory r:nay be taken concurrently with this course. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

PSCI-107 Physical Science Laboratory - 1 Cr. - Elementary laboratory exercises in physical science that correlate with lectures. Emphasis on the basic scientific principles and concepts and their practical applications to society. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: PSCI-101 Introduction to Physical Science or concurrent enrollment. PSCI-108 Physical Science Laboratory - 1 Cr. - Continuation of PSCI107 Physical Science Laboratory. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: PSCI-102 Introduction to Physical Science or concurrent enrollment. PSCI-109 Physical Science Laboratory - 1 Cr. - Continuation of PSCI108 Physical Science Laboratory. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: PSCI-103 Introduction to Physical Science or concurrent enrollment.

Physical Therapist ASSisting Technology PTAT-100 Health Care Orientation 2 Cr. - Discussion of health service resources their interrelationships, functio ns, activities. Personal and medical team relationships. Legal and ethical responsibilities relating to health care services. Maintenance of environment conducive to patient welfare. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. PTAT-101 Fundamentals of Physical Therapy - 3 Cr. - History and principles of physical therapy. The physical therapy assistant role in relation to the licensed physical therapist. The functions and duties of the physical therapy assistant in health agencies. Survey of physical therapy treatment procedures. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. PTAT-102 Functional Anatomy I - 4 Cr. - Study of the anatomy and function of the human body as related to the lower extremity and trunk. Normal and pathological gait. Study of motion of human body as basic to application of exercise. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology or concurrent enrollment.

PTAT-103 Functional Anatomy II - 4 Cr. - Continuation of PTAT-102 , Functional Anatomy I, with emphasis on the head, neck, shoulder girdle and upper extremity. Study of functional problems for the analysis of body movement. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequ tsite: PTAT-102 Functional Anatomy I. PTAT-120 Introduction to Clinical Conditions - 2 Cr. -Injury and the process of inflammation and repair of tissue. Introduction to medical conditions commonly encountered in the practice of physical therapy which affect the integumentary, cardiovascular, respiratory and endocrine systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PTAT-101 Fundamentals of Physical Therapy and concurrent enrollment in PTAT-151 Physical Therapy Procedures. PTAT-122 Neuro-Musculo-Skeletal Dysfunction - 3 Cr. - Disease and injury and its effect on the human body as it relates to the neuro-musculo-skeletal system . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PTAT-102 Functional Anatomy I. PTAT-151 Physical Therapy Procedures - 3 Cr. - Theory and techniques of treatment procedures. Maintenance of equipment and supplies. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology, PTAT-101 Fundamentals of Physical Therapy, and PHYS-101 Introductory Physics or concurrent enrollment. PTAT-153 Clinical Observation - 2 Cr. - Selected experiences in local physical therapy departments for the observation of application of physical therapy skills. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. PTAT-201 Physical Therapy Procedures - 3 Cr. - Lecture, demonstration and practice in the use of physical agents in physical therapy. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: PTAT-151 Physical Therapy Procedures. Concurrent enrollment in PTAT-102 Functional Anatomy I and PTAT-153 Clinical Observation . PTAT-202 Physical Therapy Procedures - 2 Cr. - Continuation of PTAT-201 Physical Therapy Procedures with greater emphasis on correlating use of equipment with

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treatment procedures and correlating application with dysfunction. Survey of test procedures for evaluation for strength and range of motion. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: PTAT -1 22 Neuro-Musculo-Skeletal Dysfunction and PTAT -201 Physical Therapy Procedures. PTAT-203 Physical Therapy Procedures - 2 Cr. - Continuation of PTAT-202 Physical Therapy Procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: PTAT-202 Physical Therapy Procedures. PTAT-204 Physical Rehabilitation Procedures - 3 Cr. - Principles and techniques of therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation in physical therapy . Practice and application of these techniques in selected disabilities. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: PTAT-203 Physical Therapy Procedures. PTAT-251 Application of Physical Therapy - 6 Cr. - Discussion and practice of physical therapy procedures and techniques in an institutional setting under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite : PTAT -151 Physical Therapy Procedures. PTAT-252 Application of Physical Therapy - 6 Cr. - Continuation of PTAT-251 Application of Physical Therapy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: PTAT251 Application of Physical Therapy. PTAT-253 Application of Physical Therapy - 6 Cr. - Continuation of PTAT-252 Application of Physical Therapy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: PTAT252 Application of Physical Therapy. PTAT-254 Application of Physical Therapy - 4 Cr. - Clinical education in selected physical therapy departments for four weeks on a full-time basis. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 40 hours. Prerequisite: PTAT-253 Application of Physical Therapy. PTAT-261 Stress in Illness - 2 Cr. Discussion of stress, its symptoms and overt behavior in physical therapy. Review of techniques for building patient rapport in stress situations Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PTAT251 Applicatlon of Physical Therapy and PSY -101 General Psychology.

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Physician Assistant PA-104 Clinical Skills I - 3 Cr. _ Instruction and supervised practice in the basics of interviewing , counseling, and taking a medical history from a patient; introduction to systematic recording of medical information. Le'c ture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the program and departmental approval. PA-105 Clinical Skills II - 3 Cr. Instruction and supervised practice in the basics of establishing a health status data base for a patient, elaboration of the medical examination and other diagnostic studies. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of PA-104 Clinical Skills I or departmental approval. PA-106 Clinical Skills III - 3 Cr. Instruction and supervised practice in establishing a health status data base for a patient: elaboration of the medical history and physical examination and other diagnostic techniques interpretation of data collected . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of PA-105 Clinical Skills II or departmental approval. PA-107 Clinical 'Skllls IV - 3 Cr. Instruction and supervised practice in selected diagnostical therapeutic procedures: introduction to electrocardiography, cardiopulmonary resuscitation , and basic surgical techn iques; correlation of medical history and physical examination data and integration of diagnostic skills through simulated case stUdies. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of PA-106 Clinical Skills 111 or departmental approval. PA-120 Pharmacology and Therapeutics I - 2 Cr. - An introduction to pharmacodynamics including drug absorption, distribution, metabolism , and excretion . Discussion of key concepts involved in the intelligent use of pharmacologic agents including proper selection , administration , and observation for desirable as well as undesirable effects. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and departmental approval. PA-121 Pharmacology and Therapeutics II - 2 Cr. - Discussion of

key concepts involved in the intelligent use of pharmacologic agents including proper selection, admin istration, and observation for desirable as well as undesirable effects. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PA-120 Pharmacology and Therapeutics I, departmental approval and admission to the program . PA-~12

Directed Clinical Practice I -

8 Cr. - The first of a three quarter

sequence of supervised clin ical experience designed to emphasize the role of the assistant to the primary care physician as it relates to comprehensive health and medical care. Students are assigned to clinical rotations and under the direct supervision of medical personnel gain exposure to professional practices. Clinical experience of 40 hours per week in rotation areas for 14 weeks. Three comprehensive one-day seminars will be employed to integrate the experiences into a total learning plan and are included in the 40 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Directed Practice 40 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. PA-213 Directed Clinical Practice II - 8 Cr. - The second of a three quarter sequence of supervised clinical experience designed to emphasize the 'role of the assistant to the primary care physician . Students will be expected to demonstrate advancing assessment skills necessary to provide comprehensive health and medical care. Students will assume more individual responsibility as a member of the medical team in the care of patients. Clinical experience of 40 hours per week in rotation areas for 14 weeks. Three comprehensive one-day seminars will be employed to integrate the experiences into a total learning plan and are included in the 40 hours per week . Lecture 0 hours. Directed Practice 40 hours. Prerequisites: PA212 Directed Clinical Practice I and departmental approval. PA-214 Direeted Clinical Practice III - 8 Cr. - The third of the threequarter sequence of supervised clinical experience designed to emphasize the role of the assistant to the primary care physician . Students are expected to perform in an expanded role and assume more responsibility with less supervision from medical personnel. Clinical experience of 40 hours per week in as-

signed rotation areas for 14 weeks Three comprehensive one-day semi~ nars will be employed to integrate the experiences into a total learning plan and are included in the 40 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Directed Practice 40 hours. Prerequisites : PA-213 Directed Clinical Practice II and departmental approval. PA-220 Differential Diagnosis I - 3 Cr. - A presentation and discussion of medical problems and diseases commonly encountered in a primary care practice. Etiology, signs, symptoms, diagnostic data interpretation , clin ical course, including prognosis and potential complications, and methods of management are discussed . A differential diagnosis of related or similar diseases is also included. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisites: Adm ission to the program and departmental approval. PA-230 Differential Diagnosis II - 2 Cr. - Medical problems and diseases commonly encountered in a primary care practice are presented and discussed . Included is a differential diagnosis of related or similar diseases and etiology, signs, and symptoms, diagnostic data interpretation , cli nical course, prognOSiS, includ ing potential complications, and methods of management. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and departmental approval. PA-240 Emergency Medicine And Surgery - 3 Cr. - Presentati on and discussion of the principles of evaluation and management of the emergency patient , including the principles of surgical evaluation and management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and departmental approval. PA-250 ObstetriCS, Gynecology, and Pediatrics - 3 Cr. - An introduction to the evaluation and management of common gynecologic problems including family planning . Obstetrical evaluation and management from diagnosis through six weeks postpartum check is presentated . Approach to evaluation and management of common pediatriC problems and diseases, and preventive medicine is discussed. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequi-

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sites: Admission to the program and departmental approval. PA-260 Primary Care Psychiatric And Social Problems - 2 Cr. - An introduction to the psychiatric illnesses which may be encountered in a primary-care practice. Early recognition and management including appropriate community ~gency referral are discussed. Also Included IS a discussion of health maintenance measures, social problems and -their management. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and departmental approval.

Physician's Surgical Assistant PSA-110 Principles of Surgical Patient Care - 3 Cr. - History of surgery and the operating room. Principles of surgical patient care including: wound healing and the care of wounds, surgical infections and their treatment, systemic response to injury, fluid and electrolyte balance, nutrition in surgery, shock and hemorrhage, management of thermal injury, care of the surgical patient in the pre-, intra-, and postoperative period, recognition and management of post- operative complications. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. PrerequIsite: Admission to the program. PSA-111 Surgical Care Techniques 2 Cr. - Theory and practice in suture material, knot tying , stitches, cutting sutures, application of surgical dressing, prepping, subcutaneous and intramuscular injection, cutdown , gastrointestinal intubation , urethral catherization , cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. PrerequIsites: Admission to the program and Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-112 Electrocardiography - 1 Cr. - Study of electrocardiogram recording technique and interpretation of electrocardiographic abnormalities, including arr.hythmias. Two hours of clinical observation required each week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. PrerequIsites: Admission tq the program and Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-113 Pulmonary Function Test and Inhalation Therapy - 1 Cr. -

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Study of oxygen administration , humidity control breathing exerCises, postural drainage, percussion techniques , intermittent positive pressure breathing, management of ventilators, bedside ventilation measurements. One hour of clinical observation required per week. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-114 Roentgenogram Interpretation - 1 Cr. - A study of roentgenogram interpretation and its use as a diagnostic tool. Diagnosis of gross abnormalities in roentgenograms of the head, neCk, chest, abdomen . pelvis and extremities. Special emphasis on chest roentgenogram, abdominal roentgenogram for signs of obstruction and pneumoperitoneum and roetgenographic evidence of fractures of the long bones. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Admission to the program and Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-115 Operating Room Techniques - 2 Cr. - Sterile technique including scrubbing, gowning and gloving patient pOSitioning and introduction to the operating room. Acquaint students with the name, use and care of surgical instruments. Practice setting up instruments on the back table, prepping and draping techniques. Practice mock surgery. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory. 2 hours. Prerequisites: PSA-110 Principles of Surgical Patient Care And Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-121 Fundamentals of General Surgery I路 - 3 Cr. - Study of the pathophysiology and clinical manifestation and therapeutic management of surgically related disorders of the peritoneum, alimentary tract, biliary tract, liver, spleen, pancreas, head and neCk, endocrine glands, breast, blood vessels, chest and lungs, heart and great vessels; baSIC consideration in benign and malignant tumors; acute conditions in infants and children; fractures and head injuries. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSA110 PrinCiples of Surgical Patient Care and Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-122 Fundamentals of General Surgery II - 3 Cr. - Study of the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic management of surgically related disorders of the

blood vessels, chest and lungs, heart and great vessels, acute con ditions in infants and children fractures and head inju ries. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSA-121 Fundamentals of General Surgery I and Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-131 Surgical Anatomy I - 2 Cr. - Study of surgical anatomy of the nervous, muscular, skeletal, digestive, reproductive, excretory and circulatory systems with special emphasis on vesse ls and nerves. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isites: Admission to the program and Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-132 Surgical Anatomy II - 2 Cr. - Study of surgical anatomy of the human body as it relates to the various surgical specialties, i.e., Pericheral vascu lar , Cardiothoracic , Orthoped ics, Urology and Gynecological Surgery, with special emphasis in locating: nerves , arteries, veins , and special anatomical landmarks which must be identified when performing a specific surgical procedure. Lecture 2 hou rs. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq uisites: PSA-131 Surgical Anatomy I and Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-140 Medical History and Physical Evaluation - 3 Cr. - Study and application of ski lls necessary in developing a comprehensive patient evaluation. Includes content of an organized history, interviewing technique and a systematic physical exam ination. To be p rese nted in classroom lecture with applicati on in a cl inical setting . Lectu re 2 hou r-so Laboratory 2 hou rs. Prerequisites: Admission to th e program and Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-281 Clinical Service I - 3 Cr. Introduction to surgical patient care in a formal operating room setting . Students are assigned to the Department of Surgery to acquire the practical knowledge of surgical anatomy plus, learning the basic procedures and technical skills to assist a surgeon as they rotate through the various surgical specialties . Field experience rotation 20 hours per week for 12 weeks. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSA-122 Fundamentals of General Surgery II and Academi c Unit Leader approval.

PSA-282 Clinical Service II - 3 Cr. - Students are assigned to surgical services for six (6), six-week periods, with responsi.bility for history and physical examination, assisting In su rgery, following the clinical course of surQical patients, carrying out pre-operative and post-operative care procedures assigned by and under the supervision of the surgeon or resident surgical staff. Rotation in emergency room is included . Field experience rotation 40 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSA-281 Clinical Service I and Acade mic Unit Leader approval. PSA-283 Clinical Service III - 3 Cr. - Students are assigned to surgical services for si x (6), six-week periods, with responsibility for history and physical examination , assisting in surgery, following the clin ical course of surgical patients, carrying out pre-operative and post-operative care procedures assigned by and under the supervision of the surgeon or resident surgical staff. Rotation in emergency room is included . Field experience rotation 40 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSA-281 Clinical Service I and Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-284 Clinical Service IV - 3 Cr. - Students are assigned to surg ical services for si x (6), six-week periods, with responsibility for history and physical examination, assisting in surgery, following the clinical course of surgical patients, carryi ng out pre-operative and post-operative care procedures assigned by and under the supervision of the surgeon or resident surgical staff. Rotation in emergen cy room is included . Field experience rotation 40 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hou rs. Prerequ isites: PSA-281 Clinical Service I And Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-285 Clinical Service V- 3 Cr. Students are assigned to surgical services for six (6), six-week ' periods, with responsibility for history and physical examination , assisting in su rgery , follow ing the clin ical course of surgical patients, carrying out pre-operative and post-operative care procedures assigned by and under the supervision of the surgeon or resident surgical staff. Rotation in emergency room is included . Field experience rotation 40 hours

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per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSA-281 Clinical Service I And Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-286 Clinical Service VI - 3 Cr. - Students are assigned to surgical services for six (6), six week periods, with responsibility for history and physical examination, assisting in surgery, following the clinical course of surgical patients, carrying out pre-operative and post-operative care procedures assigned by and under the supervision of the surgeon or resident surgical staff. Rotation in emergency room is included . Field experience rotation 40 hours per week. Lecture 0 路hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSA-281 Clinical Service I And Academic Unit Leader approval. PSA-287 Clinical Service VII - 3 Cr. - Students are assigned to surgical services for six (6), six-week periods, with responsibility for history and physical examination, assisting in surgery, following the clinical course of surgical patients, carrying out pre-operative and post-operative care procedures assigned by and under the supervision of the surgeon or resident surgical staff. Rotation in emergency room is included . Field experience rotation 40 hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSA-281 Clinical Service I and Academic Unit Leader approval.

Physics PHY5-101 Introductory Physics - 4 Cr. - Introduction to elementary classical mechanics with emphasis on behavior of bodies under the influence of equilibrium and non-equilibrium forces . Study of rotational and translational motion. Selected topics from theory of fluids. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-101 Basic Algebrcr II or equivalent or departmental approval. PHY5-102 Introductory Physics - 4 Cr. - Development of oscillatory phenomena with topics from simple harmonic motion, waves on a string and electromagnetic waves. Applications to such areas as direct current and alternating current circuits and optics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-101 Basic Algebra II or equivalent or departmental approval.

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PHYS-103 Introductory Physics - 4 Cr. - The laws of thermodynamics and such central concepts as specific heat. Topics from modern physics such as special relativity, atomic spectra, photoelectric and laser phenomena, atomic and nuclear physics, with emphasis on their influence on modern technology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite:. MATH-101 Basic Algebra II or equivalent or departmental approval. PHY5-111 Physics for Health Technologies - 4 Cr. - Basic physics as applied to Health Technologies encompassing measurement techniques, force- and motion of solids and fluids, pressure, mechanical advantages energy and work, electricity, wave phenomena and heat. LectlJre 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite : MATH-091 College Arithmetic or equivalent. PHYS-115 Physics for Radiographers - 3 Cr. - Basic physics as applied to diagnostic radiology; encompassing units of measurement, mecnanics, structure of matter, electrostatics, electrodynamics, magnetism and electromagnetism. Applications to such areas as rectification of alternating current as it applies to the X-ray circuit and X-ray tube, emphasis on the production and properties of X-radiation. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. PHY5-121 Engineering Physics I - 4 Cr. - Mechanics.Study of basic physical quantities including force, energy, momentum, torque, etc. Primarily for science, mathematics and engineering majors. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-151 Calculus I or concurrent enrollment. High school physics recommended . PHY5-122 Engineering Physics II - 4 Cr. - Rotational dynamics, introduction to special relativity, thermodynamics, and fluid mechanics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: PHYS-121 Engineering Physics I and Math-152 Calculus II or concurrent enrollment. PHY5-131 Physics of Optical Materials - 4 Cr. - Study of the basic structure and properties of materials related to Opticianry. Includes structure, density, conductivity; and effects of mechanical forces on these materials. Lecture 3 hours. Labora-

tory 3 hours. Prerequisite: MATH-101 Basic Algebra II.

Political Science

PHYS-132 Geometric Optics - 4 Cr. - Study of the nature and theory of light. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: PHYS-131 Physics of Optical Materials.

POL-l0l American National Government - 4 Cr. - Nature, purpose and forms of the government of the United States at the national level : Relationship between process, function and structure. Dynamics of political change. Outstanding problems of modern society. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

PHYS-133 Geometric Optics - 4 Cr. - Study of the nature and theory of light and its application to Ophthalmic Optics. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: ' PHYS-132 Geometric Optics. PHYS-221 Engineering Physics III 5 Cr. - Electricity and magnetism . Charges at rest and charges in motion are studied . Electric field and potentials and magnetic fields are discussed. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: PHYS122 Engineering Physics II and Math-153 Calculus III or concurrent enrollment. PHYS-222 Engineering Physics IV 5 Cr. - Oscillations, waves, light and topics in atomic and quantum physics. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours.. Prerequisites: PHYS-221 Engineering Physics III and MATH154 Calculus IV or concurrent enrollment.

Plant Operation Services POS-l0l Steam Plant Operation 1 -

3 Cr. - Theory and practice of steam plant and powerhouse operations. Design, layout, function, operation and maintenance of steam boilers and pumps typically used in steam plant operation . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. POS-l02 Steam Plant Operation II 3 Cr. - Design, layout, function , operation and maintenance of steam engines and turbines, as well as auxiliary steam plant equipment. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. POS-l03 Water Treatment - 3 Cr. Water usage and purification, industrial filtration , design , layout, function, operation and maintenance of water softeners, cooling towers and filters. Theory and practice of filtration systems in industry. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None.

POL-l02 State and Local Government - 4 Cr. - An examination of state and local governments, with special attention to Ohio governments, intergovernmental relations, metropolitan problems, and public policy. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory hours. Prerequisite : POL-101 American National Government.

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POL-l03 Liberal-Democratic Governments - 3 Cr. - A study of liberal-Democratic political systems: Great Britain , France and Germany. Governing political concepts, institutions, processes , problems and prospects. L~cture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: POL-101 American National Government. POL-l04 Communist Governments -

3 Cr. - A study of communist political systems: Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe. Governing political concepts, institution , processes, problems and prospects. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: POL-101 American National Government. POL-l06 Political Systems of Africa

- 4 Cr. - Comparative discussion of selected topiCS on national and international politics in black Africa with particular focus on the interrelationship between internal and external affairs . Examination of colonial policies, party systems, interest groups and modes of development. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 _ hours. Prerequisite: POL-101 American National Government. POL-201 Contemporary World Affairs - 4 Cr. - Problem study of modern international relations and of the forces which confront policymakers. Special emphasis on current areas of crisis . Designed primarily for students who seek an understanding of the United States in a tense and highly competitive political world. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: POL-

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101 American National Government or departmental approval.

Psychology PSY-101 General Psychology - 3 Cr. - Introduction to fundamental psychological concepts and principles derived from a scientific approach to the study of human and animal behavior. Emphasis on methodology, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception , states of consciousness, and learning . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. PSY-102 General Psychology - 3 Cr. - Emphasis on motivation , emotion, personality, behavior disorders and their treatments, and social psychology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PSY-101 General Psychology. PSY -107 Psychology of Human Behavior - 4 Cr. - Introduction to psychological concepts and terminology for non-majors. Emphasis on social living , problem solving, adjustment and the healthy personality. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. PSY-108 Introduction to Aging - 4 Cr. - The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the psychosocial aspects of aging in our society. Emphasis is on the interrelationsh ips between physical and psychological variab les in the life of the aging person as they are influenced by environmental factors. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PSY -102 General Psychology or departmental approval. PSY-201 Child Growth and Development - 4 Cr. - Growth, development and guidance of the child from conception through puberty. Interpretation and significance of creativeness, adjustment abilities and child-adult relationships. Emphasis on both physiological and psychological growth stages of the child . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PSY -102 General Psychology. PSY-202 Human Growth & Development - 5 Cr. - The study of normal human growth and development from infancy through the aged with emphasis on the maturation patterns of human biopsychosocial development. The role of activity as re-

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flected in life-tasks throughout the life cycle is emphasized. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PSY-102 General Psychology. PSY--203 Educational Psychology - 4 Cr. - Introduction to major psychological factors in the school learning-teaching situation. Concepts in human development related to problems in the school situation. Teacher's role in motivation, conceptual learning and problem solving. Development of emotional behavior, attitudes and values . Learning of skills, retention and transfer. Measurement of student abilities and achievement. EDUC101 Introduction to Education recommended . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PSY102 General Psychology. PSY-205 Dynamics of Human Behavior - 4 Cr. - The interpretation of human behavior with special emphasis on motivation, emotion and the adjustment process. The implications of theory and methodology in the study of personality. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSY -102 General Psychology and sophomore standing or special permission of the department. PSY-206 Adolescent Psychology - 4 Cr. - The physical , social , maturational and intellectual development of the personality through the adolescent years in contemporary society. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: PSY -102 General Psychology or departmental approval. PSY-207 Behavior Modification - 4 Cr. - Basic conditioning and learning principles emphasizing conditioned reinforcers, social reinforcement and token economies. Applications to normal and abnormal behaviors in home, school, hospital and correctional settings. Students will conduct individual experiments. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: PSY-102 General Psychology or PSY -10 7 Psychology of Human Behavior and permission of instructor.

Radiography RADT-121 Radiologic Pathology - 3 Cr. - Pathological diseases of the human body. Various pathological conditions which should be known

by the technologist in performing xray examinations. Includes Medical Terminology for the body systems. This is not intended to be a detailed course in pathology . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. RADT-125 Methods of Patient Care 2 Cr. - Introduction to the basic nursing skills required in order to give more compre.hensive and direct care. Emphasis is placed on the role of the Radiologic Technologist in diagnostic, sU'rgical and emergency care. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. RADT -151 Principles of Radiographic Exposure - 5 Cr. - Study of X-radiation relative to their nature, production , interaction with matter and radiographic image formation. 'Student must demonstrate the ability to integrate radiographic principles affecting the visibility and sharpness of radiographic detail. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. RADT-155 Radiographic Positioning-A - 3 Cr. - An introduction to the standard terminology used in body positioning and radiographic projection . The fundamentals of radiographic positioning of the upper and lower extremities, including the chest and pelvis. The use of a contrast media and equipment preparation for a Barium ' Enema examination and an Intravenous Pyelogram. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours . Prerequisite: Departmental approval. RADT -156 Radiographic PositionIng-B - 2 Cr. - The fundamentals of radiographic positioning of the Axial Skeleton, including specific views of the skull , sinuses, mandible, cervical , thoracic, lumbar spine and sacro-iliac joints. The .use of a contrast media and routine views for a gallbladder and upper gastrointestinal examination. Localization pOints and planes of the skull. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: RADT-155 Radiographic Positioning-A or departmental approval. RADT-201 Specialized Procedures in Radiology - 3 Cr. - Introduction to the specialized procedures performed in the department of Radiology. Includes radiographic equipment, contrast agents, nursing procedures, radiologic anatomy and

examination formats. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: RADT-101 Anatomy and Physiology for Radiologic Technologists or departmental approval. RADT-231 Imaging Systems - 3 Cr. - Advanced concepts in physics for X-ray to develop an understanding and operating skill of certain radiographic equipment, and special imaging processes. Includes fluoroscopy, image intensification, cinefluorography, and video-tape recorders. Special imaging processes emphasized are duplication and subtraction, thermography, ultrasound , and xeroradiography. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: RADT-131 Physics for Radiologic Technologists or departmental approval. RADT-241 Intermediate Radiographic Exposure - 4 Cr. - Applicable knowledge of manipulating exposure factors for various radiological exams. Includes basic prinCiples needed to construct technique charts for all situations and all kilovoltage ranges. In addition to scheduled class time, students will be required to participate in practice sessions under supervision, using energized equipment, to satisfy proficiency requirements. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: RADT -151 Principles of Radiographic Exposure or departmental approval. RADT-254 Radiographic Quality Control - 4 Cr. - Development of skill for the control of radiographic film quality through analysis and application . A systematic approach to the methods and techniques of regulating radiographic film consistency through the use of X-ray control devices. In addition to scheduled class time, students will be required to participate in practice sessions under supervision, using energized equipment, to satisfy proficiency requirements. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: RADT241 Intermediate Radiographic Exposure or departmental approval. RADT-265 Introductory Radiological Clinical Experience I - 6 Cr. - Supervised sessions emphasizing the practical application of theory to the positioning of patients for routine diagnostic examinations, the selection of 'a ppropriate radiographic exposures and the methods of radiation

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protection . Also, the student must demonstrate skills related to departmental procedures which are fundamental to the operation of the X-ray department. The clinical experience is 35 hours per week for 13 weeks in a hospital environment. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. RADT-266 Introductory Radiological Clinical Experience II - 6 Cr. - Supervised sessions emphasizing the practical application of theory to the positioning of patients for diagnostic examinations including the operation of mobile equipment. The clinical experience is 35 hours per week for 13 weeks in a hospital environment. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: RADT-265 Introductory Radiological Clinical Experience I or departmental approval. RADT-267 Intermediate Radiological Clinical Experience - 6 Cr. - Supervised clinical practice includes modified views of skeletal X-ray examinations and X-ray examinations utilizing contrast mediums. Clinical experience of 35 hours per week in a hospital based practicum for 13 weeks. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: RADT266 Introductory Radiological Clinical Experience II or departmental approval. RADT-268 Advanced Radiological Clinical Experience - 6 Cr. - Super路 vised sessions emphaSizing special路 ized radiographic procedures. The student must demonstrate mastery of routine and selected X-ray examinations. Also, the student must demonstrate ability in managing an X-ray room . Clinical experience of 35 hours per week in a hospital based practicum for 13 weeks. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: RADT-267 Intermediate Radiological Clinical Experience or departmental approval. RADT -269 Final Radiological Clinical Experience - 6 Cr. - Supervised clinical practice emphasizing surgical procedures and adjunct departmental rotations. Clinical experience of 35 hours per week in a hospital based practicum for 13 weeks. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory o hours Prerequisite: RADT-268 Advanced Radiological Clinical Experience.

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RADT-270 Trends In Diagnostic Radiography - 1 Cr. - Current topics in the state-of-the-art of diagnostic radiography and comprehensive review for the American Registry Examination . Lecture 1 hour . Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in RADT-269 Final Radiological Clinical Experience or departmental approval.

Real Estate REAL-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices - 3 Cr. - A general introduction to real estate as a business and as a profession, designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of subjects necessary to the practice of real estate. Topics include license law, ethics, purchase agreements, escrow and title work, advertising, appraisals, sales, market trends, the role and influence of real estate in the economy, taxes and assessments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 flours. Prerequisite: None. REAL-102 Real Estate Brokerage - 3 Cr. - Study of the factors necessary for the establishment and efficient operation of sales and brokerage office. Salesman-broker relations, terminology, listings, purchase agreements, loans, land contracts, office locations, records and procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: REAL-101 Real Estate PrinCiples and Practices or departmental approval. REAL-111 Valuation of Residential Properties - 3 Cr. - Study of those elements which affect values of residential properties. Emphasis placed on the methods of evaluating property. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: REAL-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices or departmentql approval. REAL-121 Real Estate Law - 3 Cr. The legal phase of realty transactions, from the listing of the property to the closing of the escrow. A review for owners, brokers, salesmen, mortgage and escrow officers. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: REAL-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices or departmental approval. REAL-151 Real Estate Management - 3 Cr. - Basic coverage of real estate management embracing the ar-

eas of leasing, maintenance, budgeting, creative market analysis, public relations, collections, office procedures, zoning and development. Relationship of management to other specialized real estate areas. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: REAL-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices or departmental approval. REAL-171 Real Estate Financing - 3 Cr. - A study of the procedures and techniques requisite to the analysis of risks involved in financing real estate property. The sources of funds, lending institutions, their limits and requirements, types of mortgages including conventional, Federal Housing Administration , Veterans Administration and construction loans. Application forms, credit evaluations, interest rates, loan costs, loan closings and competition in the money market. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: REAL-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices or departmental approval. REAL-211 Real Estate Sales. 3 Cr. - Deals with the current sales techniques. An approach to everyday probiems in selling and sales management with particular emphasis on consumer motivation and reactions. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: REAL-101 Real Estate PrinCiples and Practices or departmental approval. REAL-251 Valuation of Income Properties - 3 Cr. - Factors which influence the value of commercial properties. Demonstrations of the methods which apply to the preparation of the appraisal cost. Analysis of comparative and capitalization approaches. Problems taken from actual appraisals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: REAL-111 Valuation of Residential Properties or consent of instructor. REAL-271 Commercial and Industrial Real Estate - 3 Cr. - All aspects relative to the ownership and operation of shopping centers, industrial complexes, large apartments and related properties: leasing, broker functions, management, taxes, financing and construction methods. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: REAL-101 Real Estate Principles and Practices or departmental approval.

Respiratory Therapy Technology RESP-110 Introduction to Respiratory Therapy - 2 Cr. - To acquaint students with Respirat9ry Therapy as an occupation . The scope of the Respiratory Therapy field, duties, responsibilities, and professional liabilities are discussed. Basic nursing skills are introduced and practiced. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification will be accomplished . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Respiratory Therapy Program . RESP-111 Respiratory Technician Procedures I - 4 Cr. - Theory and application of patient assessment: clinical, laboratory, chest X-rays, electrocardiograms. Function , operation and application of basic respiratory therapy equipment: Medical gas systems and administration devices, humidifiers, nebulizers, oxygen controlling devices, ai rways, manual resuscitators, and incentive spirometers. Theory and application of sterilization techniques, pulmonary hygiene, airway management and positive pressure breathing . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Completion of first quarter sequence or departmental approval. RESP-112 Respiratory Technician Applications I - 3 Cr. - Directed practiCe in a clinical setting utilizing Respiratory Therapy equipment and procedures. Emphasis on patient assessment, high-low flow oxygen administration, endotracheal aspiration, manual ventilation, humidity and aerosol therapy and incentive spirometry. Students will be required to participate in directed practice at a clinical site averaging 15 clock hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Directed Practice 15 hours (Approximately). Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in RESP-111, Respiratory TechniCian Procedures I or departmental approval. RESP-113 Respiratory Technician Procedures II - 4 Cr. - Theory and application of arterial puncture technique. Function, operation and application of arterial blood gas (ABG) machines, mechanical ventilators. Theory and applicaton of hemodynamic monitoring , weaning

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techniques. Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) / Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP), and pulmonary rehabilitation. Introduction to infant anatomy and assessment and mechnical ventilation of infants. Theory and interpretation of Pulmonary Function Testing . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Completion of second quarter sequence or departmental approval. RESP-114 Respiratory Technician Applications II - 5 Cr. - Directed practice in a clinical setting utilizing Respiratory Therapy equipment and procedures. Emphasis on pulmonary hygiene, intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB) treatments, arterial blood gases (ABG) , mechanical ventilation, Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP)/Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) and weaning techniques. Students will be required to participate in directed practice at a clinical site averaging 25 clock hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Directed Practice 25 hours (Approximately). Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in RESP-113 Respiratory Technician Procedures II or departmental approval. RESP-115 Respiratory Technician Procedures III - 3 Cr. - Presentation of theory relating to etiology, pathophysiology, assessment, treatment and prognosis of various disease states th at affect th e respiratory system. JCAH standards, resumes and interviews. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Completion of third quarter sequence or departmental approval. RESP-116 Clinical Specialties (Respiratory) - 6 Cr. - Directed practice through specialty rotations lasting approximately two weeks in Pulmonary Function Testing, Pediatrics, Critical Care and Floor Therapy. Students will be required to participate in directed practice at a clinical site averaging 30 clock hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Directed Practice 30 hours (Approximately) . Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in RESP-115 Respiratory Te.chnician Procedures III or departmental approval. RESP-117 Physics for Respiratory Therapy - 3 Cr. - Basic physics and related mathematics as applied to Respiratory Therapy. States of riiat-

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ter, gas laws, diffusion , gas flow, oxygen storage and analysis , electricity and magnetism, physics related to cardiopulmonary physiology and fluidics . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Math-101 Basic Algebra II and admission to the program or departmental approval. RESP-130 Acid-Base Physiology - 2 Cr. - A review of elementary physical chemistry and a comprehensive study of acid-base physiology emphasizing renal component, respiratory component , body buffer systems, oxygen and carbon dioxide transport. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: B10-121 Principles of Medical Science and admission to the program or departmental approval. RESP-131 Pharmacology for Respiratory Therapy - 3 Cr. - Discussion of pharmacologic principles and agents used in practice of respiratory therapy. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: BIO126 Anatomy and Physiology or departmental approval , and B10-221 Microbiology and RESP-117 Physics for Respiratory Therapy. RESP-150 Cardiopulmonary Physiology - 4 Cr. - Physiology of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, with emphasis on blood flow characteristics, cardiac function, hemodynamics, non systemic circulation lung mechanics and volumes, internal external respiration , gas transport, regulation of respiration and acid-base relationships. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: B10-129 Anatomy and Physiology and admission to the program or departmental approval. RESP-151 Pathology for Respiratory Therapy - 3 Cr. - Types of inflammation. Pathology of respiration and cardiovascular system. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: B10-129 Anatomy and Physiology or departmental approval and B10-221 Microbiology. RESP-210 Basic Respiratory Therapy Equipment - 4 Cr. - Functions and 'operation of basic Respiratory Therapy equipment including medical gas systems, administration devices , humidifiers , nebulizers , oxygen controlling devices, airways and manual resuscitators. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequi-

site: RESP-117 Physics for Respiratory Therapy. â&#x20AC;˘ RESP-220 Respiratory Therapy Procedures I - 4 Cr. - Theory and practice of patient assessment: Clinical, laboratory, and chest xrays, arterial puncture and blood gas analysis. Patient therapy including oxygen administration , aerosol (pneumatic and ultrasonic), oxygen controlling devices and measurements of sp.ontaneous ventilatory parameters, humidity and aerosol therapy. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: RESP-131 Pharmacology for Respiratory Therapy, RESP-150 Cardiopulmonary Physiology, RESP-210 Basic Respiratory Therapy Equipment. RESP-230 Respiratory Therapy Application I - 5 Cr. - 'pirected practice in a clinical setting utilizing Respiratory Therapy equipment and procedures. Emphasis on patient assessment, arteri al blood gas puncture and analysis, high-low oxygen administration, spontaneous ventilatory parameters, humidity and aerosol therapy. Students will be required to participate in directed practice averaging 25 clock hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Labora, tory 0 hours. Prerequisites: RESP131 Pharmacology for Respiratory Therapy. RESP-150 Cardiopulmonary Phy.siology, RESP 210 Basic Respiratory Therapy Equipment. RESP-240 Respiratory Therapy Procedures II - 4 Cr. - Theory and practice of Respiratory Therapy procedures. Emphasis on aerosol therapy, pulmonary hygiene, manual ventilation , airway management, artificial airways, intubation, and suctioning procedures , pulmonary function., intermittent positive pressure breathing, incentive spirometry and rehabilitation . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: RESP-220 Respiratory Therapy Procedures I, RESP-230 Respiratory Therapy Application I, admission to the program. RESP-250 Respiratory Therapy Application II - 5. Cr. - Directed practice in a clinical setting to Respiratory Therapy equipment and procedures, emphasis on aerosol therapy, pulmonary hygiene, manual ventilation , airway care (nasal-oral, intubation and suctioning), clinical activities include proficiencies completed in patient assessment, arterial

puncture and blood gas analysis, oxygen administration. Students will be required to participate in directed clinical practice averaging 25 clock hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: RESP-220 Respiratory Therapy .Procedures I, RESP-230 Respiratory Therapy Application I. RESP-252 Management of the Respiratory Therapy Department - 2 Cr. - An overview of the fiscal , administrative and human resource management practices employed in the daily operations of the Respiratory Therapy Department. Included are presentation of management methodologies utilized in supervi sory management. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hour. Prerequisite: None. RESP-260 Respiratory Therapy Procedures III - 4 Cr. - Theory and practice of Respiratory Therapy procedures with emphasis on pediatric therapy, mechanical ventilation patient management, various methods of supportive ventilation and mechanical ventilators. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: RESP-240 Respiratory Therapy Procedures II, RESP-250 Respiratory Therapy Application II . RESP-270 Respiratory Therapy Application III : 5 Cr. - Directed practice in a clinical setting to Respiratory Therapy procedures and equipment with emphasis on pediatric therapy, incentive spirometry, intermittent positive pressure ventilation , pulmonary hygiene , mechanical ventilators, and airway management. Students will be required to participate in directed clinical practice averaging 25 cloc k hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: RESP-240 Respiratory Therapy Procedures II , RESP-250 Respiratory Therapy Application II . RESP-280 Respiratory Therapy Procedures IV - 2 Cr. - Theory relative to the applications of supportive ventilation techniques, mechanical ventilato ~s, clinical diagnostic testing , intensive care ventilatory evaluations. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisites: RESP-260 Respiratory Therapy Procedures III , RESP-270 Respiratory Therapy Application III. RESP-290 Respiratory Therapy Application IV - 5 Cr. - Directed clinical practice in respiratory ther-

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apy procedures and equipment with emphasis on intensive care therapy, mechanical ventilation , deadspace determinations, weaning techniques, patient care plans for respiratory therapy management, and home care applications. Students will be required to participate in directed practice averaging 25 clock hours per week. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: RESP260 Respiratory Therapy Procedures III, RESP-270 Respiratory Therapy Application III.

Social Science SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science - 3 Cr. - An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences outlining the roles of the separate disciplines as they pertain to anthropological-sociological and psychological behavior of man . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None or departmental approval for students who have earned credit in SOC-101 Introductory Sociology.

cation , religion, the economy, and government, employing principles, concepts, theories, and research methods introduced in the prerequisite course, Introductory Sociology. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Introductory Sociology or SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science. SOC-121 Marriage and Family Life 3 Cr. - An examination of contemporary marriage and family relations from a social-psychological perspective; special emphasis on the manwoman relationship in transition alternative models examined . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prereq'uisite: PSY -102 General Psychology or SOC-101 Introductory Sociology. SOC-201 Social Problems - 4 Cr. Pathology of modern American society, including topics such as juvenile delinquency, adult crime, alcoholism, mental health, rural-urban conflict or other problems of current concern . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SOC-101 Introductory Sociology.

SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science - 3 Cr. - An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences outlining the roles of the separate disciplines as they pertain to the economic and political behavior of man . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SSCI-103 Introduction to Social Science or SOC101 Introductory Sociology.

SOC-20S Introduction to Social Services - 4 Cr. - History of social services with emphasis on the United States from colonial times to the present the emergence of social work as a profession the helping services in perspective. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: SOC-101 Introductory Sociology and sophomore standing.

SSCI-10S Introduction to Social Science - 3 Cr. - An interdisciplinary approach to the social sciences through selected topics and readings on the behavior of man. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SSCI-104 Introduction to Social Science.

SOC-231 Contemporary American Black-White Relations - 4 Cr. - A sociological and psychological analysis of contemporary American black-white relations. A study of minority-majority behavior patterns as they are related to social-historical structure, stratification and power. Consideration of programs, movements and realistic alternatives to present conditions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: SOC-201 Social Problems or SOC101 Introductory Sociology with departmental approval.

Sociology SOC-101 Introductory Sociology - 4 Cr. - Survey of the principles, theory, concepts and research methods used in sociology. Intensive study of such concepts as culture, social organization , norms, status and social stratification. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. SOC-102 Social Institutions - 4 Cr. - Examination of social institutions with special emphasis on the five pivotal institutions: !he family, edu-

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SOC-2S1 Urban Sociology - 4 Cr. The nature and scope of the American urban environment. The urban condition as it relates to politics, technology, bureaucracy, ecology, work and leisure inequality, racism, sexism alternatives to the urban crisis considered . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite:

SOC-102 Social Institutions or SOC201 Social Problems.

Spanish SPAN-111 Beginning Spanish I - 5 Cr. - Introduction to Spanish through multiple approach with emphasis on speaking . Practice in conversing in Spanish in simple idiomatic sentences on topiCS of everyday interest. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. SPAN-112 Beginning Spanish II - 5 Cr. - Study of the Spanish language with emphasis on speaking . Continued practice in speaking, understanding, reading and writing . Further development of conversational skills. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPAN111 Beginning Spanish I, or one year of high school Spanish . SPAN-113 Beginning Spanish III - 5 Cr. - Continued study of the Spanish language. Development of proficiency in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Emphasis on strengthening conversational skills through discussions of selected readings and cultural topics. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPAN-112 Beginning Spanish II, or two years of high school Spanish . SPAN-201 Intermediate Spanish - 4 Cr. - Study of major developments in Spanish literature and civilization from the historic period to the Moorish conquest. Intensive exercises in written and oral expression. Grammar review. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPAN113 Beginning Spanish III, or two years of high school Spanish . SPAN-202 Intermediate Spanish - 4 CR. - Spanish literature and civilization from the ninth century to the end of the 15th century, with stress on EL CID and the ROMAN-CERO. Intensive exercise in written and oral expression . Grammar review. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPAN-201 Intermediate Spanish or two years of high school Spanish . SPAN-203 Intermediate Spanish - 4 Cr. - Study of the works of Spanish authors,from Cervantes to modern times, whose primary interest was critical examination of themselves

and their society. Intensive exercise in written and oral expression . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. PrereqUisite: SPAN-202 Intermediate Spanish or three years of high school Spanish . SPAN-241 Spanish Conversation and Composition - 4 Cr. - Discussion on topics of everyday life, colloquialisms, vocabulary augmentation and improvement of speech pat~ terns. Practice in writing compositions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPAN-203 Intermediate Spanish or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school Spanish . SPAN-242 Civilization and Literature - 4 Cr. - An introduction to Spanish civilization and literature from early beginning to the present day. Special emphasis on the interrelationship betw~en history and geography, and literature of Spain and its culture. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPAN-203 Intermediate Spanish or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school Spanish. SPAN-243 Readings In Spanish Literature - 4 Cr. - An introduction to Spanish Latin American literature from the Golden Age to the 20th century. Highlights of representative authors and their works. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPAN-203 Intermediate Spanish or concurrent enrollment or departmental approval or three years of high school Spanish. SPAN-262 Clvilizacion y Llteratura de Puerto Rico - 4 Cr. - Civilization and literature of Puerto Rico from the Pre-Columbian period to tt.le present. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPAN-203 Intermediate Spanish or concurrent enrollment, or departmental approval or three years of high school Spanish .

Speech Communication SPCH-091 Basic Communication Skills - 4 Cr. - Demonstration of the many ways in which communication can be processed, distorted or shared. The course has special emphasis on personal communication

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growth, processing information, message analysis and verbal expression as basic communication skills necessary for college achievement. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. SPCH-100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication - 4 Cr. Involvement and experience in the purpose and process of verbai and non-verbal communication in order to strengthen one's daily communication needs. Special emphasis is given to perception, self-co.ncept, expressing feelings , empathy, and listening as learned interpersonal skills. The course applies theoretical concepts with experiential learning through lectu re, discussion and simulations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. SPCH-101 Fundamentals Of Speech Communication - 4 Cr. - Effective speech communication . Application of principles of speech content and delivery to a variety of practical speaking and listening situations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. SPCH-105 Voice and Articulation - 4 Cr. - A practical course in the application of both theory and technique to conscious vocal control and the development of articulation and pronunciation standards. Individual and group practice. Performance through exercises and readings. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. SPCH-118 Speaking English as a Second Language - 4 Cr. - Group drill and individual instruction designed to help students achieve adequate proficiency in use of voice and production of speech sounds in English. Designed for international students as well as those with individual problems in speaking or understanding speech. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. SPCH-119 Speaking English as a Second Language - 4 Cr. - Continuation of SPCH-118 Speaking English as a Second Language with emphasis upon achieving carryover of newly altered speech sounds into connected speech. Designed for international students as well as those with individual problems in speaking or understanding speech. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPCH-118 Speaking English as

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a Second Language or placement by department. SPCH-121 Group Discussion - 4 Cr. - Designed to develop more effective participation in small groups through an understanding and practical application of the knowledge, attitudes, and methods of group discussion . Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. SPCH- 201 Advanced Public Speaking- 4 Cr. - Organizing and presenting informative speeches , persuasive speeches, and speeches for special occasions. Emphasis on using evidence and reasoning to support ideas, adapting to the audience, developing effective oral style and improving physical and vocal attributes of dE;llivery. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication or departmental approval. SPCH-205 Oral Interpretation - 4 Cr. - Development of the student's oral ability to communicate various types of written material with understanding and appreciation. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPCH-105 Voice and Articulation or consent of instructor. SPCH-211 Argumentation and Debate - 4 Cr. - Discovering , selecting and evaluating evidence. Its arrangement into orderly, persuasive, oral and written argument. Special emphasis on causes and effects of prejudice, remedies 路 and the influence of language on human behavior. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication or consent of instructor. SPCH-212 Forensics Activity - 1 Cr. - PartiCipation in a variety of forensic activities by assignment including intercollegiate debate, choral reading , readers theater and individual events. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisit.es: SPCH-211 Argumentation and Debate and / or SPCH-205 Oral Interpretation or consent of instructor. SPCH-213 Business and Professional Communication - 4 Cr. The course is designed to familiarize students with the theories and practices of oral communication which occur in the organizational / business

environment in individual and group situations. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: SPCH100 Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication; SPCH-101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication ; SPCH-121 Group Discussion; or consent of instructor. SPCH-215 Introduction to Speech Pathology - 4 Cr. - A survey of the profession of speech pathology and an introduction to the various organic and functional speech disorders including: deviant articulation, delayed speech development and stuttering techniques for diagnosis and treatment are explored. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and SPCH-105 Voice and Articulation or consent of instructor. SPCH-251 Intercultural Communication - 4 Cr. - Theory and application of communication concepts operating between people of different cultures, subcultures and national systems. Examination of communication and culture. Developing cultural extensions; perception, verbal and nonverbal elements, ethnocentrism, conflict, informal and international communication. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

Theatre Arts THEA-101 Theatre Appreciation - 4 Cr. - An examination of the theatre as an art form how playwrights, directors, actors, scenic designers, costumers, makeup artists and technicians approach their crafts. Students are not required to perform. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. THEA-121 Development Of Drama I - 3 Cr. - Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques from classical Greece through the Commedia dell'arte. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite. None. THEA-122 Development of Drama" - 3 Cr. - Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques from the Renaissance through the 18th century. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. THEA-123 Development of Drama '" - 3 Cr. - Survey of dramatic presentations, conventions and techniques

from the 19th century to the present. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite. None. THEA-.130 Fundamentals of Theatrical Makeup - 3 Cr. - Practical application of theory and techniques of make-up for performers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None. THEA-140 Introduction to Scenic Design - 3 Cr. - Theory and practice of set design. Orientation to elements of scenery. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. THEA-141 Introduction to Scenic Design - 3 Cr. - Preparation of floor plans, lighting plots, elevations and color renderings . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: THEA-140 Introduction to Scenic Design. THEA-142 Stage lighting Design - 3 Cr. - Examination of contemporary scenic design and study of stage lighting. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory o hours. Prerequisite: None. THEA-150 Fundamentals of Acting 3 Cr. - Theory and practice of the basic techniques of acting : body movement, voice production and diction. Introduction to scene study. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. THEA-151 Improvisation and Character Study - 3 Cr. - Study of improvisational techniques leading to creation and analysis of character through theatre games, situational problems, developmental techniques and behaviorial motivation . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. THEA-152 Vocal Characterization 3 Cr. - Emphasis on voice training and vocal interpretation applicatile to stage performance and involving techniques necessary for versatility of characterization. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite : None. THEA-153 Stagecrafts- 1 Cr. Workshop in technical theatre. Scenery, lighting, costumes, properties and sound by assignment in campus theatrical productions . â&#x20AC;˘May be repeated for credit. However, no more than 6 credits may be applied to degree requirements. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. PrerequIsite: None.

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THEA-154 Rehearsal and Performance - 2 Cr. - Practi cal experience for students accepted as members of a CCC theatre company as actors, stage managers or in positions created by the needs of the specific production other than technical. May be repeated for no more than 8 credit hours. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequ isite: By audition . TH EA- 171 Radio and Television Production - 2 Cr. - Survey of the broadcasti ng industry , its history and place in our society. Examination of technical areas, advertising , writing, programming and analysis. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THEA-180 Television Performance Techniques - 3 Cr. - A practical course in a stud io si tuation to learn basic techniques and to acquire oncamera experience for use in professional settings or for personal advancement . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite : None. THEA-210 Arts Management I - 3 Cr. - An introduction to the prinCiples and methods of management of non-profit arts and cultural institutions includi ng: funding , financial control, production , facilities, market ing and community relations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. THEA-211 Arts Management " - 3 Cr. - A detailed study of techniques of grant proposals, funding, solicitations , organ izational structures, sales , subscriptions, purchasing , contracts and legal problems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: THEA-210 Arts Management I or departmental approval. THEA-250 through 252 Advanced Acting - 3 Cr. - Scene study, methods of characterization . Consideration of styles of acting . Refinement of acting techniques of the individual student. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: THEA152 Fundamentals of Acting or consent of instructor. THEA-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in the Cooperative Education Program. Employment in an approved training facility under college supervision . The requirement for the credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Stu-

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dents may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumulative maximum of 12 credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Cooperative Field Experience 12 hours (approximately). THEA-281 Advanced TV Performance - 3 Cr. - Video performance training leading to the preparation of sample reels; audition procedures and conduct and financial aspects of the local and national market. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: THEA-180 TV Performance Techniques or departmental approval. THEA-282 Film Performance Techniques - 3 Cr. - A performance course preparing students to adapt their acting / presentation skills to the techn ical demands of cinematic form including direction for camera, focus, movement, interaction and shot composition . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite : THEA-180 TV Performance Tech niques or departmental approval. . THEA-290 Radio Broadcast Performance I - 4 Cr. - Introduction to prinCiples and techniques of performance for the audio broadcast media with background in broadcast conventions and production procedures. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: SPCH-105 Voice and Articulation or departmental approval. THEA-291 Radio Broadcast Performance " - 4 Cr. - PrinCiples of radio broadcast production including various forms of announcement, commercial copy, delivery and interpretation and other forms of radio performance including news reading and interview techniques. Emphasis is placed on preparation of a professional audition tape and how to market one's talents. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: THEA-290 Radio Broadcast I or departmental approval.

Transportation TRAN-121 Transportation Principles - 3 Cr. - Survey of the American transportation systems, tariffs and classification . Traffic regulations and industrial traffic management. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite : EC ON- 100 Basic Economics.

TRAN-210 Freight Loss and Damage Claims - 3 Cr. - This course is related to claims for the loss or damage of cargo transported by common carriers and a guide for the voluntary settlement of such claims. This course can serve as guide for those in industry handling claims. Emphasis is placed on the common carrier's liability with specific phases of carrier liability, measure of damage, freight forwarder claims, and carrier claim regulations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: TRAN-121 Transportation Principles or departmental approval. TRAN-221 Tariffs and Classifications - 3 Cr. - Through routes and rates-in transit privileges. Technical tariffs and various rate interpolations. Over-charges and undercharges, loss and damage, import and export. Emphasis on theoretical considerations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: TRAN-121 Transportation Principles. TRAN-222 Tariffs and Classifications - 3 Cr. - A continuation of TRAN-221 Tariffs and Classifications. Uniform freight classifications, classification committee procedure and their phases of tariff and classification. Emphasis on practical applications . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: TRAN-221 Tariffs and Classifications. TRAN-231 Transportation Regulations - 3 Cr. - Local, state and federal legislative acts regulating the transportation sytems. Includes the Public Utilities Commission Act, Interstate Commerce Act and Civil Aeronautics Board Act. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: TRAN-121 Transportation Principles. TRAN-241 Industrial Traffic Management - 4 Cr. - Basic principles of the transportation function operating within a commercial company. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: TRAN-121 Transportation Principles.

the Cooperative Education Program. Employment in an approved training facility under College supervision. The requirement for one credit is 120 clock hours of approved work. Students may earn up to three credits in one quarter. The course may be repeated to a cumuiative maximum of twelve credits. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: Formal acceptance into the Cooperative Education Program.

Urban Studies UST -101 Introduction to Urban Studies - 4 Cr. - Examination of the background of major urban problems, with an overview of U.S. urban history. EmphaSis on comprehension of the roots of contemporary urban America. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. UST-102 Urban Geography - 4 Cr. - Geographical study of cities and their regions. Emphasizes area aspects of urban centers. The arrangements of cities in space and their internal patterns, including human behavior and the impact of natural resources. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: None. UST-202 Urban Cultures - 4 Cr. An examination of cultural diversity within urban populations. Special emphasis on interaction of groups and value systems. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: ANTH -101 Cultural Anthropology or SOC-101 Introductory Sociology. UST-206 Urban Politics - 4 Cr. - A study of the variety of problems, politics and public policies as related to American cities. Inner cities, suburbs and metropolitan areas are characterized and analyzed. Emphasis is placed upon the endeaver to make cities function more efficiently and to improve the quality of life of their inhabitants. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: POL-101 American National Government.

TRAN-260 Cooperative Field Experience - 1 Cr. - Limited to students in

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GENERAL INFORMATION

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Student Development Services Counseling Professional counselors at each of the campuses help students achieve productive and rewarding experiences at the College. Counseling "services are available for all students regardless of full-time, part-time, day or evening status. Upon admission to the College, students should attend an orientation session and schedule a conference with a counselor to discuss their previous educational background, interests and goals. The counselors offer assistance in choosing an appropriate program of studies from the variety of courses offered. Thereafter, it is recommended that students meet with a counselor on a regular basis to review plans and p.rogress. Counselors can assist students who wish to clarify their educational or career goals through individual and group counseling, career development courses and reference to available career resource materials in the campus libraries. Confidential professional help for personal problems also is provided by. counselors and campus psychologists.

Student-Faculty Conferences Cuyahoga Community College faculty members maintain scheduled office hours to confer with students regarding class work and related matters. Schedules of office hours will be found in the faculty office areas. Students are urged to familiarize themselves with the schedules and to contact their instructors during those hours.

Career Services The Career Services offices at Cuyahoga Community College operate as focal pOints for students and alumni who are exploring careers or seeking employment: Career counseling and advising services help students and alumni to explore career options and find employment opportunities. Potential employers use the offices to interview students for job openings. The Career Services offices also maintain a job listing service,. which provides current data about specific employment opportunities and handles referrals to potential employers. The offices will also establish credentials files for graduating students who wish to have transcripts, resumes and letters of reference available for prospective employers. Students should register at least two quarters prior to graduation to establish credentials files.

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Cooperative Education Cooperative Education is a program for students at Cuyahoga Community College interested in supplementing their formal classroom education with actual on-the-job experience. The Cooperative Education Program integrates classroom education and study in the field with specific planned periods of work experience. While on coop assignments, students work as regular, paid employees of the Cooperative Education employers, receive vocational advising and earn academic credit for learning derived from their experiences. Students may earn ' up to a maximum of 12 credit hours for cooperative work experience which may be applied toward certain degree requirements. Some of the programs offering co-op credit are listed below. Business Technologies

Accounting Business Management Data Processing Financial Management Hospitality Management Marketing Office Administration Transportation Engineering Technologies

Architectural and Construction Engineering Electrical/Electronic Engineering Industrial Engineering Mechanical Engineering Public Service Technologies

Graphic Communications Management Technology Law Enforcement Liberal Arts

Journalism Theatre Arts There are three types of co-op plans available: the Full-Time Alternating Co-op Plan, in which the student alternates quarters of full-time work experience with quarters of full-time on-campus studies; the Parallel Co-op Plan, in which the student works part-time and attends classes part-time and the Extended Day Plan, in wh ich the student works full-time and attends classes part-time. To participate in the Cooperative Education work experience program , students 1) must be working toward an associate degree at Cuyahoga Community College, 2) must complete a co-op application and student agreement and 3) must have a personal interview with and approval of the Cooperative Education student coordinator.

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Learning Resource Centers The Learning Resource Center, or library, at each campus is maintained for the benefit of students and faculty members. Supplemental materials are part of the collection, which is assembled through the cooperative efforts of the faculty and library staff. A computer-produced book catalog on microfiche replaces the traditional card catalog and the complete holdings of all campus libraries are listed in the microfiche catalog in each library. The libraries maintain open stacks to allow direct access to books, periodicals and other materials. Other facilities include playback equipment for audio tapes and other recordings, microfilm readers, photographic devices for reproducing printed matter, video cassette viewing equipment and carrels for individual study.

Health Services Health Services on each campus are staffed by Registered Nurses and are available ,t o all full-time and part-time students on an appointment or walk-in basis. The Health Services emphasize prevention, high level well ness and health counseling. Through counseling, students are assisted in the assessment of health problems and in the utilization of existing health care facilities such 路as clinics, private physicians and dentists. First aid for injuries, emergency treatment and treatment for minor illnesses are provided by the Co!lege nurses under standing orders of consulting physicians. Students with special concerns or disabilities should contact the Health Services or Access Office on their campus. The Health Services, in cooperation with other College departments and community agencies, provide educational and screening programs during the academic year. A student health insurance plan is available to all students enroll ed for six or more credit hours. Information about the plan may be obtained from the Health Services or Student Activities Office on each campus.

Housing Cuyahoga Community College is a commuter institution primarily designed to serve residents of Cuyahoga County and, therefore, - does not provide housing for its students.

Book Centers Book Centers are located at the three campuses to serve students, faculty and staff by providing required textbooks and supplies. In addition , they carry a selection of non-required books and incidental items.

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Athletic, Physical Education and Recreation Facilities The College offers a program of athletics, physical education and recreation designed to develop an understanding and appreciation of physical fitness and to improve the student's recreational skills. Facilities at Eastern Campus include a multipurpose gymnasium suitable for a variety of activities including basketball, volleyball, badminton, tennis, wrestling, activity space for individualized exercise, an indoor jogging track, a weight training room , and locker and shower rooms. Outdoor facilities include a tennis court with a practice wall. The Metropolitan Campus indoor facilities include a gymnasium, a swimming pool, racquetball / handball courts, a weight training room , a wrestling room , multipurpose rooms, dance studios and locker and shower rooms. Outdoor facilities include an all-weather track, a socc~r field, a softball field, a baseball field, and tennis and basketball courts.

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The indoor facilities at the Western Campus include gymnasium , a swimming pool, racquetball / handball courts, a weight training room, a wrestling room, a baseball batting cage, locker and shower rooms and a Medical Care Training Room. Outdoor facilities provided are an all-weather track, soccer fields, a baseball field (complete with dugouts, pressbox and electric scoreboard), softball fields, tennis courts , a tennis volley wall, basketball and volleyball courts and a Parcourse Fitness Circuit of a mile-and-a-half in length.

Intercollegiate Athletics All campuses are members of the National Junior College Athletic Association and participate with other colleges from Ohio, Indiana, West Virginia and Michigan in Region XII NJCAA competition. Independent contests also are scheduled with colleges from New York, Pennsylvania and Illinois. The official colors of Cuyahoga Community College are: Eastern Campus, navy blue and silver; MetropOlitan Campus, brown and gold; Western Campus, blue and gold. The names of the College's athletic teams are the Eastern Campus Highlanders, the Metropolitan Campus Cougars and the Western Campus Chargers.

Student Activities Cuyahoga Community College recognizes the educational, recreational and social "values of a well-integrated program of student activities. It believes that student partiCipation in co-curricular activities contributes to the total development of the individual and to the growth of leadership ability. The College provides a well-balanced program developed in response to student requests and needs. A large measur.e of responsibility for campus affairs is in the

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hands of the students advised by the director of student activities and faculty on each campus. The students essentially plan and present many co-curricular campus activities. They determine social programs and participate in the maintenance of the discipline essential for students in an academic community. Activities may vary from quarter to quarter depending upon student choice. Every student is welcome to participate in a variety of activities rang ing from involvement in the College and campus governance systems, to fine arts and entertainment programming, to membership in student organizations. Governance participation may incl.ude membership on numerous College and campus committees including, but not limited to, College committees on Curriculum , Degree Requirements and Academic Calendar; Affirmative Action ; and Rights and Responsibilities. Programm ing participation includes comm ittees on each campus that select and plan film , lecture, drama, entertainment and various recreational , leisure-time and educational programs. Student organizations covering a wide spectrum of interests exist to meet the needs of students. Further information may be obtained from the Office of Student Activities on each campus. Among the many activities and organizations to be found on one or more of the CCC campuses each quarter are: Bands handball, pool, softball, Choirs jogging, Concerts swimming, table tennis, tennis, Dances and other social track, volleyball, weightlifting) functions Fine arts Lectures Drama Fraternities Newspapers Interclub councils Phi Theta Kappa Interest groups Political clubs Inter-Greek councils Professional organizations Intramural-extramural sports Programming boards (including archery, Sororities badminton , basketball, bowling Student government fencing, flag football , golf, associations paddleball ,

Alumni Association The Alumni Association is a social and service organization designed to develop a stronger bond among former students, the College and the community. Those eligible for membership are all CCC graduates and former stud,ents who have accumulated the equivalent of 45 quarter hours before leaving the College. Contact a campus Student Activities Office for further details.

Registration and Records Students may reg ister by mail, telephone or in person several weeks before the start of each quarter's classes. Specific registra-

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tion information is contained in the Class Schedule Book publ ished before each quarter begins. Students are urged to begin their admission process at the start of the quarter preceding the one in which they wish to enroll. High school students may apply in their senior year. Students should register at the campus where they expect to take the majority of their courses. After selecting a campus, a student is considered to be enrolled there until records are officially transferred to another campus . Students who wish to transfer records from one campus to another should complete a Change of Student Records form in the Office of Admissions and Records at the campus where the records are located. Credentials and permanent academic records will then be transferred.

Withdrawal Withdrawal from a course for academic reasons must be initiated by a student prior to the withdrawal deadlines published in the Class Schedule Book each quarter. Withdrawal must be in writing on specific forms available in the Office of Admissions and Records at each campus. Students who ,officially withdraw from a course prior to the last day of the second week of the quarter will have no notation made on their permanent records; withdrawal thereafter will be noted on permanent records. An instructor may withdraw a student for excessive absence if the student has missed class the equivalent of three hours of instruction unless arrangements satisfactory to the instructor can be made by the student to demonstrate acceptable academic progress. An instructor may initiate a student withdrawal from the first day of the fourth week of the quarter through the last day of the fifth week of the quarter. (NOTE: Students not attending classes for any reason should not expect an instructor to drop them officially from class. It is the student's responsibility to withdraw from class officially by completing a withdrawal form in the Office of Admissions and Records by the deadline date. Failure to do so will result in an F grade.) A student un'able to complete an academic quarter for reasons totally beyond his/ her control, such as an emergency medical condition, may petition in writing the director of admissions and records for permission to withdraw from class beyond the fifth week of the quarter. The first and final dates of withdrawal from courses during the summer session, or any session having more or fewer than eleven weeks, are proportionately prorated to a standard eleven-week academic quarter and are published in the Class Schedule Book.

Student Identification Card Each student is required to have a CCC identification (10) card, which is required for registration activities, for library checkout pur-

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uisite: None. Costs of actual flight instruction paid by the student to the fixed base operator. AVIA-171 Commercial Pilot - 3 Cr. - Advanced maneuvers including Chandelles, lazy eights and eightson-pylons, and 720 degree power turns; Gliding spirals; 180 degree side approaches and 360-degree overhead approaches; accuracy landings. Advanced cross-country flying . Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-1S1 Primary Flight or private piiot certificate . Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator. AVIA-172 Commercial Pilot - 3 Cr. - Extensive navigation training including radio navigation utilizing VHF and LF radio navigation aids; air surveillance; radar approaches; night operations including night navigation ; extensive basic instrument training including radar approach procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-171 Commercial Pilot. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fixed base operator. AVIA-201 Intermediate Flight - 3 Cr. - Review of all precision maneuvers and multi-engine aircraft systems, loading and performances; preflight, take-offs and landings, basic maneuvers; single engine operation ; emergency procedures, flight and fuel consumption , planning VMC V1 and V2 speeds, theories of multi-engine flight. Flight experience: 38 hours. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-172 Commercial Piiot. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fi xed base operator. AVIA-202 Intermediate Flight - 3 Cr. - Instrument flight planning ; filing flight plan; aircraft performance range and fuel requirements; required instrumentation and equipment and their proper use ; emergency procedures; IFR navigation, instrument approach procedures including VOR, ILS, DME and ADF, and radar approach procedures; holding procedures, missed approach procedures; compliance with A.T.C. procedures. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-201 Intermediate Flight. Costs of actual flight instruction are paid by the student to the fi xed base operator.

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AVIA-221 Instrument Pilot - 3 Cr. Advanced course lead ing to the FAA. examination for instrument pilot rating. Covers instruments , charts, advanced meteorology, approach and landing aids, radio navigation , radar, a.u tomatic fl ight, etc. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-101 Private Pilot Theory or AVIA-121 Commercial Pilot Theory or departmental approval. AVIA-271 Flight Instructor - 3 Cr. Advanced course leading to F.A.A. written examination for instructor rating . Covers fundamentals of flight instruction , effective flight instruction methods, instructor responsibiiities, med ical requirements of flying, FAA. regulations and safety. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequisite: AVIA-221 Instrument Pilot or concurrent enrollment of FAA. Instrument pilot license. AVIA-281 Ground Instructor - 3 Cr. - A comprehensive study of the fundamentals of teaching and learning as they apply to flight instruction, effective teaching methods; instructional management ; instructor responsibilities; aeromedical information for instructors; aerodynamics; airplane performance; flight training syllabus; federal regulations for instructors. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hours. Prerequ isite: AVIA-221 Instrument Pilot or concurrent enrollment. AVIA-285 Advanced Ground Instructor/Dispatcher - 3 Cr. - An advanced course leading to the F.A.A. written examination for the Advanced Ground Instructor as well as the Flight Dispatcher. Covers advanced operating and flight rules , flight operations including : weather services, AIM, lAP, Mach speeds, flight logs, weight and balance, and aircraft performance analysis. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 0 hour. Prerequisites : AVIA-221 Instrument Pilot, AVIA-271 Flight Instructor or AVIA-281 Ground Instructor or departmental approval.

Biology B10-101 Introductory Biology-Reproduction and Development - 3 Cr. Designed primarily for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of reproduction , development, and factors regulating development at cellular and organismal levels with

special emphasis on the significance of these concepts to the individual living in today 's world . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Recitation / discussion 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.

is placed on comparative anatomy and physiology of the organism . Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: B10-111 General Biology I or equivalent or departmental approval.

B10-102 Introductory BIology-Ecology, Evolution and Heredity - 3 Cr. - Designed primarily for non-science majors. Fundamental .concepts in genetics , population biology, evolution and ecology with special emphasis on the significance of these concepts to the individual living in today's world . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Recitation / discussion 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.

810-113 General 8iology III - 4 Cr. - Introduction to genetics, evolutionary adaptations of plants and animals , and ecological concepts . Field trips are included. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: B10-111 General Biology I or equivalent or departmental approval.

B10-103 Introductory BiologyHuman Body In Health and Disease - 3 Cr. - Designed primarily for non-science majors. Fundamental concepts of behavioral coordination , nutrition , transport, gas-exchange, and excretory processes with special emphasis on the significance of these concepts to the individual living in today's world . Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Recitation / discussion 1 'hour. Prerequisite: None. 810-110 Anatomy 路 and Physiology for Radiographers - 5 Cr. - A basic understanding of body systems, structures and organs in regard to their functions and relationships to diagnostic radiographic examinations. Includes topographic anatomy and different radiographic appearances of body structures. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and acceptanc~ into Radiography Program . 810-111 General 8iology I - 4 Cr. General introduction to basic biological principles structured around a detailed study of cell morphology and physiology with emphasis on the 'metabolic processes of photosynthesis, respiration, reproduction, and development. Biochemical principles are 路stressed. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 路hours . . Prerequisite: None. 810-112 General 8iology II - 4 Cr. The metabolism and self-perpetuation of the organism. Emphasis is on homeostatic mechanisms of the organism as they relate to the nervous, hormone , effectors , nutritional, transport, gas exchange, excretory, and reproductive systems. Emphasis

810-121 Prlncipies of Medical Science - 4 Cr. - Basic inorganic, organic and bio-chemistry , with emphasis on physiological principles and applications. Includes principles of physics and metric system . Designed principally for Health Technology programs . Study of chemistry, other related subject matter included in laboratory. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. 810-t28 Anatomy and Physiology 4 Cr. - Fundamental concepts of cellular structure and physiology. Architectural plan of the body, its skeletal , muscular, digestive and circulatory systems . Emphasis is placed on morphological and physiological concepts and applications. Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physiology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None. 810-129 Anatomy and Physiology 4 Cr. - Hematology, acid-base balance and fluid and electrolyte balance. Structure and function of the respiratory, urinary and nervous systems . Laboratory includes gross anatomy and experiments in physiology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: B10-128 Anatomy and Physiology. 810-130 Anatomy and Physiology 3 Cr. - The structure and functions of the reproductive system . Fundamentals of embryology, genetics and endocrinology as related to the human body. Laboratory includes experiments, demonstrations and related microscopic study. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequis ite : B10-129 Anatomy and Physiology. 810-132 Anatomy of the Eye - 2 Cr. - Study of the composition of the eye and its associated structures

151

grade point average at Cuyahoga Community College. A student may be awarded a maximum of 45 credits through anyone or a combination of all three methods of evaluation . Academic credit awarded by examination will not be applied to the residency requirement for graduation from the College. Advanced Placement

The College will recognize exceptional academic achievement as measured by the College Entrance Examination Board's Advanced Placement Program. Credit will be awarded in certain subject areas for an advanced placement score of three or higher. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Credit

The College will award academic credit for the successful completion of the College Entrance Examination Board's CLEP general examinations. Credit w[1I be granted for a satisfactory score deSignated for each subject area examination. Course Equivalency Examinations Prepared by D.epartments

Students who demonstrate ability and knowledge about a particular subject comparable to that gained by satisfaetory completion of a course offered by the College will be provided the opportunity to demonstrate their ability and knowledge as measured in the context of defined Collegewide performance objectives. Upon successful completion of an examination comparable to that taken by students in a course offered by the College, the student will be awarded the 路 same academic credit as that designated for the course determined by the College as comparable. A fee will be charged for each examination. These examinations are not available in all courses or in each subject area. Students should confer with a counselor to determine the courses for which equivalency examinations are offered.

Veterans Information ' Students may be eligible for educational benefits from the Veterans Administration (VA) while attending Cuyahoga Community College. The VA has certified Cuyahoga Community College as an institution qualified and equipped to provide education in the arts and sciences and in career program areas under the provisions of the War Orphans Assistance Act and the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966. To receive benefits, students/veterans at Cuyahoga Community College must maintain satisfactory academic progress toward an educational objective, attend classes, maintain an acceptable grade point average, and, of e!=jual importance, notify the campus Admissions and Records Office and the Veterans Affairs Office of their enrollment and any changes in enrollment. The College, in turn, is responsible for notifying the Veterans Administration of academic status changes, students' failure to attend classes and the degree to

252

which veterans are or are not maintaining satisfactory academic progress. CCC will grant three quarter hours of academic credit in Physical E.~ucation t? veterans who have served 365 days on active duty In military service of the United States. After a veteran has been officially admitted to the College, a certified copy of Form 00-214 must be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records in order to receive Physical Education credits for basic physical training during military service. The College also participates in the Veterans Upward Bound program which assists veterans in completing basic educational skills, General Educational Development tests and joining special training programs as well as providing assistance in gaining admission to postsecondary educational / vocational programs and in obtaining other aid when necessary.

Course Auditing Auditing a course means that a student attends classes but is not required to submit assignments or take examinations. An audi- . tor, therefore, receives neither a grade nor course credit. Students should indicate their intention to audit a course on the registration form . The auditing fee, however, is the same as when a student is regularly enrolled for credit. Credit courses cannot be converted to audit status. Currently enrolled CCC students are permitted to audit one or more courses. The audited courses may be added during the program adjustment period, usually during the first week of classes , providing space is available. Careful consideration is advisable before requesting permission to audit a course. When uncertain about whether to audit a course, students should see a counselor. Persons not currently attending CCC may register to audit a course during the first week of classes. Acceptance depends on classroom space being available. Registration by mail is not available for students who wish to audit a course.

Full-Time/Part-Time Status A student must take at least 12 quarter credits to be considered a full-time student. Although the normal course load for a full-time student is 15 quarter credits, a counselor or advisor may recommend a heavier or lighter load depending on ability and / or past performance. A part-time student is one registered for fewer than 12 quarter credits. When job or family commitments restrict the time available for attending classes, careful and realistic planning is necessary to successfully manage one's job and academic studies. Each credit hour taken usually requires a minimum of two hours of outside study each week. A student employed full time should probably not attempt to carry more than two courses per quarter. A student working part time may carry a course load in proportion to the hours of employment. 253

Access to Student Records Cuyahoga Community College, as part of its responsibilities to students, must maintain accurate and confidential student records. The College recognizes the rights of students to have access to their educational records and to limit such access by others in accordance with existing College guidelines and The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, passed by the U.S. Congress in 1974. Student records, with certain exceptions, will not be released without prior consent of the student. Students have the right to review and question the content of their educational records within-..E reasonable time after making a request for such a review. If there are any questions as to the accuracy or appropriateness of the records that cannot be resolved informally, an opportunity for a hearing on the matter is provided. Students wishing to review their educational records may apply to the appropriate Office of Admissions and Records for details regarding College policy and procedure designed to expedite their request.

Student Information The College's programs are designed to fulfill the unique needs of the residents of Cuyahoga County. Information concerning financial assistance, cost of attending the College, refunds, rights and responsibilities of students (including those on financial assistance) academic programs and student retention is available from the Office of the Dean of Student Development on each campus.

Transfer of Credits COllnselors and other members of the College staff will advise and assist any student planning to transfer to a four-year institution. They will help students prepare for and complete the transfer process. It is the student's responsibility to select the institution and to follow its admissions requirements closely. These requirements are indicated in the particular institution 's catalog . Reference copies of various catalogs are available in the campus libraries and counseling offices. Because of the highly specialized nature of courses in career programs, many of the courses are not designed for transfer to a four-year institution. Students also should note that courses with numbers lower than 100 (the last three digits) usually do not transfer. See COURSE NUMBERING in this catalog. Students are strongly advised to see a counselor regularly if they are planning to transfer to a four-year college or unillersity. Representatives from four-year colleges often visit the campuses to help CCC students plan their transfer programs. Acceptance of credit is always at the discretion of the receiving institution.

254

Transcripts of Grades Information on a student's academic performance is available on a quarterly basis via direct grade mailings and transcript records. Students may request official transcripts of grades earned at CCC through the Office of Admissions and Records. Individual requests must bear the student's signature. Students receive one free transcript upon graduation . Other copies may be obtained frQm the Office of Admissions and Records for a nominal fee .

Transient Status If a student wishes to take a course for credit at another institution while attending CCC , he or she can usually avoid having to go through the admissions procedure at the other institution by requesting transient status as follows: 1. Request a TRANSIENT STUDENT FORM from the Office of Admissions and Records or the Counseling Office. 2. Complete the form and return it to the Office of Admissions and Records. 3. The Office of Admissions and Records will confirm the student's status so that credit earned at the other institution can be properly credited to the student's permanent CCC record . This information also will be sent to the institution where the student is seeking transient status.

Cross Registration As a member of the Cleveland Commission on Higher Education , Cuyahoga Community College is a participa.nt in the Cross Registration Program . CCC students may register for one course per term during the regular academic year (on a space available basis) at participating institutions. Area colleges participating in this program are Baldwin-Wallace College , Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland State University, Cuyahoga Community College, Dyke College, Notre Dame College and Ursuline College. These colleges will waive the tuition and general fee charges for CCC students (who are currently enrolled for 12 or more credit hours at CCG) who participate in this program. Participation must be approved by CCC and the availability of the course must be approved by the host institution . Program applications and registration information are available in the Office of Admissions and Records on each campus.

Academic Probation A student will be placed on probation under anyone of the following circumstances : 1. If, after attempting 15 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College, a student has failed to compile a cumulative grade-point average (GPA) to meet the following minimum ' requirements (based on a four-point system): 15-44 inclusive credits attempted / Minimum GPA 1.50 45-74 inclusive credits attempted / Minimum GPA 1.75 255

75 or more credits attempted/Minimum GPA 2.00 2. A student who wishes to enroll for 12 or more quarter credits at while attending or after attending another college Or university that has placed the student on probation will be admitted on first probation and will remain on first probation until 15 or more quarter credits at have been attempted and the student has been either removed from probation or placed on second probation. 3. A student who wishes to enroll for 12 or more quarter credits at after attending another college or university from which he or she has been 路academically dismissed should follow the procedures outlined under Readmission, below. 4. A student academically dismissed from a university or on academic probation who wishes to enroll for 11 or fewer quarter will be admitted on a probationary status. credits at

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A student will be placed on second probation if he or she has not been removed from first probation by the end of the next period of enrollment. Students can remove first or second probation status by raising their cumulative grade-point average to meet the requirements listed above.

Academic Dismissal Students on second probation during any quarter will be dismissed at the end of that quarter unless they have removed themselves from probation or unless their grade-point average for the most recent period of enrollment is 2.00 or higher, in which case they will be permitted to continue on second probation . Students also will be dismissed if they have attempted 15 or more quarter credits at Cuyahoga Community College and have compiled lower than a 0.75 cumu lative grade-point average at the end of any quarter.

Readmission Following Dismissal Students academically dismissed for the first time with a cumulative grade point average of 0.75 or higher must remain out of for at least one full quarter (excluding the Summer Session) before applying for readmission at the Office of Admissions and Records at least 30 days prior to the start of the quarter requested for readmission. If the application for readmission is approved, students will then be readmitted on second probation .

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Students academically dismissed for the first time with a cumulative grade point average of 0.75 or lower and students dismissed for the second time must remain out of for at least one full quarter (excluding the Summer Session) and then petition the Admissions Appeals Board for readmission at least 30 days prior to the start of the quarter requested for readmission. Students readmitted by the Admissions Appeals Board will be placed on second probation and permitted to register under the conditions stipulated in the Board's decision. Students may also elect to apply for a Change of

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256

Degree Objective (described below) to be readmitted in good standing by the Admissions Appeals Board .

Change of Major Field of Study StuQents may change their major field of study any time during their enrollment at Cuyahoga Community College. While there is no formal procedure for changing majors (except if the change involves Health Career programs), it is suggested that students consult with a counselor l advisor and the academic head of their particular program before registering for courses in their new major. The College also has a special procedure for students who change their degree objective. See Change of Degree Objective which follows.

Change of Degree Objective Students who do not make satisfactory progress in associate degree programs or who have been dismissed for academic reasons may petition the Admissions Appeals Board for permission to change the degree they are working toward or to pursue a Certificate of Proficiency. The following procedure s!lould be followed in making such a change: 1. The student should discuss plans with a counselor, who will help initiate the appropriate form . 2. The student should obtain the approval of the academic head of the new program chosen . Following approval by the Admissions Appeals Board, the student's permanent record will indicate a change of degree objective. No grades for courses taken prior to this change will be considered in computing the CCC grade-point average. Students will, therefore, be admitted to the new program in good standing . Credits successfully earned prior to the change will, or course, be applied tow~rd the new program. After the change of degree objective has been approved, the student must earn a minimum of 24 quarter credits and complete all other requirements to be eligible for graduation. Students planning to transfer to another college or university are cautioned that the receiving institution may use all grades earned in computing grade-point averages for admission or other purposes.

Class Standing I

All students will be classified as freshmen or sophomores based upon the number of quarter units of academic credit they have completed . Freshmen are students who have accumulated fewer than 45 academic credits . Sophomores are students who have accumulated 45 or more academic credits.

257

Honors Each quarter, the Dean 's List gives public recognition to those students who achieve outstanding academic success. Students will be included in the Dean's List if they have earned a grade-point average of 3.50 or higher in attempting 12 or more credit hours during the preceding quarter. Students who graduate with a cumulative grade point average of 3.50-3.69 will have the notation "cum laude " placed on their permanent record / transcript and diploma. A GPA of 3.70-3.89 will be denoted by "magna cum laude." A GPA of 3.90-4.00 will be denoted by " summa cum laude." The Eastern and Western campus have a chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the national scholastic honor society for community colleges. Membership is conferred on those students who have established academ ic excellence as judged by the faculty. Consult the Office of Student Activities for admission procedures.

Grading System Final grades are issued at the end of each quarter. Letter and action symbols used by the College are as follows: A (Excellent-4 pts.): A grade of A indicates that a student has demonstrated excellent academic performance; it carries a weight of four quality pOints for every credit hour of the course in which the grade is earned . B (Good-3 pts.): A grade of B indicates that a student has demonstrated good academic performance; it carries a weight of three quality pOints for every hour of the course in which the grade is earned . C (Average-2 pts.): A grade of C indicates that a student has demonstrated average academic performance; it carries a weight of two quality pOints for every credit hour of the cou rse in which the grade is earned.

o (Below Average-1 pt.): A grade of D indicates that the student has demonstrated minimal academic performance ; it carries a weight of one quality point for every credit hour of the course in which the grade is earned . F (Failure-O pts.): A grade of F indicates that a student has failed to demonstrate minimal academic performance; it carries a weight of zero quality pOints for each credit hour of the course in which the grade is earned . S (Satisfactory-O pts.): A grade of S indicates that a student has satisfactorily completed course requirements; it carries a weight of zero quality pOints for each credit hour of the course in which the grade is earned . S represents D or better work . The credit hours earned are awarded , but are not included in the computation of a student's cumulative grade point average . 258

U (Unsatisfactory-O pts.): A grade of U indicates that a student has not satisfactorily completed course requirements; it carries a weight of zero quality pOints for each credit hour of the course in which the grade is earned . U represents F work; however, the U is not included in the computation of a student's cumulative grade point average. -5/U: Use of S/ U is restricted exclusively to cOl::!rses identified and approved by the Board of Trustees. The course descriptions of such courses shall include the information that an S/ U grade is given. AU (Audit-O pts.): A notation of AU indicates that a student was granted permission to register for a credit course and attend that course on an audit basis with no academic credits to be awarded . A student may not convert registration from credit to audit status after classes begin. CBE (Credit by Examination-O pts.): A notation of CBE indicates that credit has been awarded by Cuyahoga Community College as a result of a student's successfully passing a collegewide equivalency, CLEP or advanced placement examination as specified in the College's policy on Credit by Examination . No quality pOints for credits earned through successful completion of appropriate examinations will be awarded and the credits earned will not be included in the computation of a student's qumulative grade point average. CEU (Continuing Education Unit-O pts.): A notation of CEU indicates the award of continuing education units as specified in the College's policy on continuing education units. I (Incomplete-O pts.): A notation of I indicates that a student has not completed all course requirements as a result of circumstances judged by the instructor to be beyond the student's control. A student must complete all course requirements no later than the end of the fifth week of the academic quarter following the quarter in which the I was noted . A student who receives a notation of I in the spring quarter must complete all course requirements by the end of the fifth week of the following fall quarter. Failure to complete such requirements will result in an F (Failing) grade. 0:< and R (Repeated Course symbols-O pts.): An asterisk ( *) will appear adjacent to the grade of lower value in which "an identical course" has been repeated . A repeat symbol "R" will appear next to the grade of higher value. The higher grade will be used to calculate the grade point average. Only identical courses will be calculated in this manner. An identical course is defined as one in which there has been no substantial change in content, no change in course number, and no change in credit hours. Credits for courses will be awarded only once, namely, in the quarter in which credit was first earned, unless the catalog description specifically states that additional credit may be earned .

T (Transfer Credit-O pts.): A notation of T indicates that a student has been awarded credit for course work which has been evaluated and accepted in transfer from another accredited institu-

259

tion of higher education in accordance with the College's policy on transfer credit hours awarded from other institutions. The credit hours awarded shall not be included in the computation of a student's cumulative grade point average. W (Withdrawal-O pts.): A notation of W indicates a student withdrawal from a course in accordance with the College's withdrawal policy.

Grade Point Average A student's grade-point average is computed by dividing the Total Quality Points Earned by the Total Units of Credit Attempted. For example, if a student took five courses worth three credits each , he or she would be attempting 15 total units of credit. Quality points earned are computed by multiplying the number of credits per course by the quality pOints awarded per grade. If the final grades were four B's and one A, the student would have a total of 48 quality pOints. The grade-point average would be 3.20 - 48 divided by 15. Courses in which the letter symbols S, U, or the action symbols AU , CBE, I, IP, * or T are noted are not included in the computation of a student's grade point average. Students who receive official permission to' postpone an examination are assigned an I (incomplete) as the grade for that course. STUDENTS MUST PERSONALLY REQUEST AN INCOMPLETE GRADE FROM THEIR INSTRUCTORS. It is not granted automatically. Incomplete grades can be removed by completing the examination or other requirements no later than the fifth week of the following academic quarter. Failure to do so will result 'in an F (failure) grade.

Repeating a Course Students may repeat courses in which a grade of B, C, D, F or U has been earned . When an identical course is repeated, the highest earned grade (other than S/U) will be used in computing the cumulative grade-point average. Credit for a course will be awarded only once, in the quarter in which the student first registered for the course, unless the course description specifically states that additional credit may be earned. Students planning to transfer to another college or university are cautioned that the receiving institution may use all grades earned in repeated courses to compute grade-point averages for admission or other purposes.

Attendance Regular class attendance is required . An instructor may withdraw a student for excessive absence if the student has missed the equivalent of three hours of instruction unless arrangements satisfactory to the instructor can be made by the student to demonstrate that he or she can make acceptable academic progress. An instruc260

tor may initiate a student withdrawal from the first day of the fourth week of the quarter through the last day of the fifth week of the quarter. If illness 路or emergency should necessitate a brief absence from class, students should confer with instructors upon their return. Students having problems with classwork because of a prolonged absence should confer with the instructor or a counselor.

261

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS ELLISON, NOLEN M . President B.A., Kansas Univ. M.A., Kansas Univ. Ph.D., Michigan State UniY.

1974

BROWN,GRACEC.(R.N.) Executive Vice President

1968

B.S.N ., Western Reserve Univ. M.S,N., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

Ed. D., Nova Univ. 1967

Exec utive Vice President for Human Resources

and Administrative Affairs B.S., Defiance College M.A., Ohio State Univ. M.S., Univ. of Wyoming BURGES, WIUIAM 1979 Vice PreS ident, Development B.A., Colby College M.A., Boston Univ. Ed.D., Bosto n Uni v. HOFFMAN, T. ALAN

1979

Vice President, Facilities and Business Services B.S. Kent State Univ. M.A. Western Reserve Univ. JONES, ALBERT K. (C.P.A.) Treasurer B.A., Ohio Wesleyan Univ.

1966

JONAS, JAN H.

1976

ProyostNice President B.A., Ohio St ate Univ. M.S., Indiana Univ. Ed.D., Indiana Univ. MITCHELL, DAVID C.

1963

Vice President, Educati onal Planning B.B.A., Fenn College M.B.A., Western Reserve Univ. Ph.D."Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. NOLAN, JOSEPH S. Vice President, Personnel B.S., John Carroll Univ. M.A., Ohio State Univ.

1969

WEIDENTHAL, MAURICE D. Vice President for Public Affairs and Information B.S., Univ. of Mi chigan

1981

JEFFERSON, CURTIS F. 1963 ProvosWice President B.S., Pau l Quinn College M.A., Univ. of Denver M.S., Univ. of Notre Dame Ph.D., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. SOBEL, RONALD 1966 ProvosWice President B.A., Fenn College M.A., Western Reserve Univ. PETWAY, JAMESETTA 1982 Assistant Vice President, Personnel/MOD B.S., Indiana Univ. M.S., Boston Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. SIMPSON, LAWRENCE J. Assistant Vice President, Educational Planning and DevelopmenUDirector (cont'd)

ANDERSON, DAVID E. (C.D.P. andC.C.P.) 1967 Prof., Data Processi ng B.s., Capital Unlv. M.S., Cleveland State Univ. M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ.

DEANS

for Academic Affairs

SHUMAKER, PAUL E.

Career Development Institute B.A., Kent State Univ. M.S., Univ. of Pi ttsbu rgh Ph.D., Univ. of Pittsburgh

BRISKER, LAWRENCE 1977 Dean, Student Development B.A., Southern Illinois Univ. M.A., Univ. of New Mexico Ph.D., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. GALANTE, LEWIS E. 1982 Dean, Instruction B.5., Youngstown State Univ. M.Ed., Westminster College Ph.D., Kent State Univ. GARTLAND, BARBARA A. 1977 Dean, Instruction A.A., Cuyahoga Community College B.A., Baldwin路Waliace College M.A., Cleveland State Univ. JEFFERSON, HELEN K. 1967 Dean, Instruction B.S., leMoyne College M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ. MALONE, EUGENE W. Dean, Student Development B.S., Central State Univ. A.B., Central State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. Ed.D., Nova Univ.

1972

McNULTY, JOHN J. 1969 Dean, Student Developmentl Director Counseling and Career Services M.Ed., Kent State Univ. B.A., John Carroll Unlv. HENDERSON, JOHNNIE MAE (R .N.) Associate Dean, Nursing A.S., Cuyahoga Community College B.S.N ., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. B.A, Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. M.S.N., Case Wstrn. Reserve Un iv. Ed. D., Nova Univ.

FACULTY ABADIR , LAlLA Instructor, Mathematics B.Se. Ain Shams Univ. M.SCo Ain Shams Univ. M.S. Cleveland State Univ.

1983

ADAMS, EMILY 1978 Asst . Prof., Office Administration B.A., Ursuline College M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ.

ANDERSON, ISABELLE 1973 Asst. Prof., Dietetic Tech nology B.S., Seton HIli College M.S., Ohio Univ. ANDREAs, BARBARA K. Prof., Biology B.A., Kent State Univ. M.A., Kent State Univ. Ph.D., Kent State Univ.

1974

ARMENIO, Chari.. 1982 Instructor, Dental Laboratory Technology "" A.A. Cuyahoga Community College A.A.S. Cuyahoga Community College ARMSTRONG, JAMES S. Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.A., Kent State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. Ed.S., Ke nt State Univ.

1977

AULT, DARL E. 1967 Asst. Prof., Busin ess Administration B.A., Bowling Green State Univ. M.B.A., Northwestern Univ. M.Ed., Bowling Green State Univ. AXTHELM, DIANE (R.R.A.) Instructor, Medical Record Techno logy B.S., Ohio State Univ.

1981

BAKER, BETTIE J. Assoc. Prof., History and Political Science B.A, Univ. of Michigan M .A., Univ. of Michigan

1964

BAKER, JOAN B. Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.A., Heidelberg College M.A., Kent State Univ. Ph.D., Kent State Univ.

1968

BANKS, MARGARET A.(R.N.) 1974 Assoc. Prof., Nursing Education B.s.N ., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. M.S.N., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. BANKS, JAMES G. Prof., History B.S., Purdue Univ. M.A., Kent State Univ. Ph.p., Kent State Univ.

1966

ALACCHI, ATTILIO E. Assoc. Prof., Bio logy B.S., Long Island Univ. M.A., Co lumbia Univ.

1972

BANKS, ROBERT C. 1967 Asst. Prof., Physical Science B.A., Western Reserve Univ. M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ.

ALEXANDER, JESSIE S. Counselor, Assl. Prof. B.S., FloridaA & M Univ. M.Ed., FloridaA&M Univ.

1971

BARRETT, JAMES L. Asst. Prof., Social Science and Sociology B.S., SI. Louis Univ. AM., Indiana Unlv.

ALLEN-JENKINS, JEAN Co unselor, Asst. Prof. B.S.Ed., Ohio Univ. M.Ed., Univ. of Pittsburgh

1970

1979

1969

BARRON, MARGARET 1969 Librarian, Instructor B.A., Cleveland State Univ. M.S.L.S., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ.

263

BATE, BRIAN R. 1969 Prof., Psychology A.B., Western Reserve Uni v. M .S., Western Reserve Uni .... Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Un;v. BATMAN, ROBERT H.

1973

Clinical Psyc hologis t, Professor A.B., Indiana Uni .... M .A., Western Reserve Uni .... Ph.D., Western Re serve Uni v. BAUGHMAN, LARRY G. Prof., Health and Phys ical

1968

Education B.S., Ohio State Univ. M .A., Un;v. of Maryland Ed.D., Uni .... of Akron BEDNARSKI, JEROME J. 1971 Asst. Prof., English B.A., Cleveland State Uni .... M.A., Case Wstrn . Reserve Uni .... BENDER, LAWRENCE P. (C.P.A.) 1968 Asst. Prof., Busines s

Administration B.S.B.A., John Carroll Univ. M.B.A., Ohio Univ,

BROWN, HARVEY 1967 Assoc. Prof., BUSiness Administration B.B.A., Western Reserve Univ. J,D" Cleveland路Marshail Law School

CACKOWSKI, JAMES J, Assoc. Prof., Bu si ness Administration B,S., Univ. of Cincinnati M.Ed., Univ, of Cincinnati

1968

BROWN, JOHN T. 1974 Instructor, Architectural and Construction Engineering B. A rch ., Kent State Univ.

CAHOON, GENEVIEVE M. Prof., Health Edu cation B.S., Univ. of Pittsburgh M.Ed" Univ, of Piltsburgh Ph,D" Univ, of Toledo

1965

BROWN, KAREN 1975 Asst. Prof., MathE:matics B,S" Grove City College M ,S" Cleveland State Univ, M .Ed., Cleveland State Un;v.

CALO, VINCENT C, Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.S., Kent State Univ. M.S., Kent State Univ.

1968

BROWN, VALERIE (R.N,) 1979 Asst. Prof., Nursing Education B.S.N., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. M .S.N., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. BROWNING, RICHARD J, 1964 Prof., Speech Communication B,S" Ohio State Univ, M ,S" North Dako la State Univ, BRYSON, ROBERT N. 1973 Counselor, Asst. Prof. BA, Muskingum College M.A ., Western Michigan Uni v.

BIDDLE, TERRY A. 1973 In structor, Law Enforce ment B.A., Kent State Uni .... M .S., Uni .... of Akron BILEK, BRUCE B. 1971 Prof., Arl B,A " Baldwin路Waliace College M .A., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. BLUNK, LAURA Asst. Prof" History B,A" Cleveland State Univ. M .A., Univ. of Akron

1976

BOOTH, PETER

1983

BUFORD, LENORE V, 1970 Prof., Foreign Langu ages B.A., Fisk Univ, Diplome d 'Etude s Superieures, Sorbonne, Univ. of Paris, France M.A., Western Reserve Univ. Ph,D, Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. BURGE, MARY JANE 1972 Assoc, Prof" Biology B.S., Baldwin -Wallace College M.S, Cleveland State Univ. Ed,D., Nova Un iv.

Instructor, Mathematics B.S., So uthern Univ. M.S., Univ. of Notr Dame

BURGE, SUSAN 1.976 Assoc. Prof., Health Education B,S., Kent State Univ. M .Ed " Kent State Uni v, Ed.D., Nova Unlv,

BORKOWSKI, PAUL 1982 Instructor, Data Processing A.A., Cuyahoga Community College B.S., Uni .... of Akron M .B.A., Baldwin路Wallace College

BURGER, VERNON K. 1971 Prof., Chemistry and Physics B,S., Ohio State Univ, M .A., Ohio State Univ. Ed.D., NovaUniv.

x

BORSZCZ, JOHN Prof " Health and Phys ical Edu cation B,S" Univ, of Wyoming M .A. , Univ. oflWyoming

1970

BROSKI, CHARLES L. 1970 Prof., Physical Education B.A., Wichita State Univ. M .A. , Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. Ed .D., Nova Univ. BROWN, CHARLES 1982 Instructor, Medical Assisting Technology B.A. Howard Unlv. BROWN, FREDERICK D, 1973 Assoc. Prof., Biology and Allied Health Services Diplome d 'Etudes Superieures, Sorbonne, Univ. of Paris, France M .A., Western Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

264

CAMPBELL, JAMES J. 1969 Asst. Prof., Data Processing B.S., Marquette Univ. M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ. CAMPBELL, SHIRLEY ALEY Assoc. Prof., Art Cleveland Institute of Art Certificate

1971

CANNON, LOWELL N, Assoc. Prof., Mathematics B.S., Kent State Uni v. . M.A., Kent State Univ.

1967

CARBONE, JOHN M, 1968 Counselor, Professor A.A ., Orange County Community College B.S., North Texas State Univ. M.Ed., North Texas State Uni v. Ph.D., Kent State Univ. CARETT!, DONNA M. (R.N ,) 1975 Instructor, Nursing Education B.S.N" 51. John College CHARNIGO, RICHARD J. 1968 Prof., Engli sh B.A. , Marquette Univ. M.A., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Bowling Green State Uni v. CIESLAK, JAMES 1983 Instructor, Accounting B,B,A" Kenl State Univ, M .B.A., Xavier Univ. J.D., Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

BURKE, JAMES 1977 Instructor, Accounting B.B.A ., Cleveland State Univ,

CLAVNER, JERRY 1972 Prof., Sociology and Social Science B.S., Columbia Unlv. M.A., Univ. of Missouri Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Uni v.

BURKE, TERRENCE W, 1966 Prof., English B,S" Loyola Univ, M .A. , Pu rd ue Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

CLOVESKO, JOSEPH F. 1964 Assoc. Prof., Biology B.5" Clarion Slate College M.S., Western Reserve Univ. Ed.D., Nova Univ.

BURNETTE, JIM D. Prof., Health Technologies B,S" Rio Grande College M.A., Marshall Univ.

1968

BUTLER, JOHNNIE E. 1972 Asst. Prof" English B,A" Jackson State College M.A., Purdue Univ, BUZASH, GEORGE 1965 Counselor, Professor B,S., Slippory Ro ck State Teac hers College M.Ed., Pennsylvania State Univ.

CLYDE, IRENE (R,N.) 1969 Asst. Prof., Nursing Education B.S,N., Findlay College M.Ed., Kent State Univ. COHEN, JOEL Asst. Prof" Ophlhalmic Dispensing B.A., Univ. of Akron M.S., Univ. of Akron

1979

COLEMAN, GEORGE M. 1978 Asst. Prof., Business Administration B.B.A., John Carroll Univ. M .B.A., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

COLEMAN, JOHN S. 1966 Prof., Business Administration B.A., Eastern Michigan Unlv. M.A., Univ. of Michigan MAT., Purdue Univ. COLEMAN, MARIAN W. 1970 Asst. Prof., Office Administration B.S., Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial StateUniv. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. COLOVAS, ANTONE C. Prof., Social Science and Sociology B.S., Wayne State Univ. M.Ed., Wayne State Univ. Ed.D., Wayne State Univ.

1989

COLSON, LYDIA C. 1989 Assoc. Prof., German and French B.A., Cleveland College M.A., Western Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. CORSELLO, FRANK Instructor, Ophthalmic Dispensing Registered Optician

1984

COSNER, THURSTON L 1968 Prof., Psychology and Human and Social Services B.S., Pennsylvan ia State Univ. MA, Bowling Green State Unlv. Ph.D., Kent State Unlv. CRANE, JOHN D. 1988 Assl. Prof., Philosophy B.5., Baldwin路Waliace College M.S., Ohio State Unlv. CRATTY, DAVID M. 1987 Prof., English B.A., St. Mary's College M.A., Indiana Unlv. Ph.D., Bowling Green State Unlv. CRAWFORD, GARIE 1973 Assoc. Prof., Graphic Communications B.F.A., State Unlv. of New York at Buffalo M .F.A., State Unlv. of New York at Buffalo CRAWFORD, OSCAR L. 1978 Assoc. Prof., English B. Mus., Youngstown State Unlv. M.A., Kent State Univ. 1978 CROOK, EDWARD Instructor, Dental Technology A.A.S., Cuyahoga Community College CROss, FREDERICK Instructor, Commercial Art B.F.A., Ohio State Univ.

1973

DAILEY, LILLIAN Asst. Prof., English B.A., Northwestern Univ. M .A., Cleveland State Univ.

1978

1988 DAVIDSON, JOSEPH A. Prof., Business Administration路 Marketing B.B.A., Western Reserve Unlv. M.B.A., Western Reserve Unlv.

DAVIES, ROBERT A. Assoc. Prof" Mathematics B.A., Graceland College M.A., Univ. of Illinois Ed.D., Teachers College Columbia Univ. DAVIS, SYLVESTER E. Prof., History B.A., Ohio Univ. M.A., John Carroll Univ. Ed.D., Nova Univ.

1978

1988

DEHN, FRANCES J. 1988 Prof., English B.S., Bowling Green State Univ. MA, Ohio State Unlv. Ph.D., Kent State Univ. DIEGELMAN, BEVERLY Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.S.E., Capital Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ.

1978

DOBER, ROBERT F. Assoc. Prof., Social Science and History B.5., John Carroll Unlv. M.A., John Carroll Unlv.

1967

DODD, STEPHEN 1980 Asst. Prof., Law Enforcement AA , lakeland Community College B.S., Ohio State Unlv. M.S., Unlv. of Akron M .S., Slippery Rock Un iv. DODDS, TIMOTHY M. Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.A, Kent State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Unlv.

1988

DOMOTORFFY, ZSOLT J. Assl. Prof., Mathematics B.5., John Garroll Univ. M.S., John Carroll Univ.

1964

D'ONOFRIO, MARIO L. 1985 Prof., Foreign languages BA, Kenl State Univ. MA, Ohio State Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. DOWDING, NANCY E. 1983 CounseloT, Professor B.A., Western Reserve Unlv. M.A., Columbia Univ. M.A., Western Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Western Reserve Univ. DRAKE, BETTE 1977 Assl. Prof., Art B.FA, Cleveland Institute of Art M.F.A., Tulane Univ. DUINO, RUSSELL A.

1985

librarian, Asst. Prof. BA, Gannon College M.LlI., Unlv. of Pillsburgh M.S.L5., Western Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Univ. of Pillsburgh DUSEK, PETER P. Prof., Physical Education B.S-Ed., Kent State Unlv. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. Ph.D., Unlv. of Utah

1989

EDDY, THERON F. 1988 Assoc. Prof., Law Enforcement A.B., John Carroll Unlv. LLB., Cleveland路 Marshall law SChOOl ~~Lh~Olcleveland.Marshall Law J.D., Cleveland State Univ.

ELISH, RAYMOND D. 1987 PrC?f., Psyc hology and SoCial SCience B.S., Kent State Unlv. M.Ed., Kent State Unlv. Ph.D., Kent State Univ. ELVE, JOHN L. Assl. Prof., En g lish B.A., Hope College M.A., Univ. of Arkansas

1988

EMERUWA, LEATRICE Prof., English B.A., Howard Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. Ed.D., Univ. of Akron

1988

ESTERHAY, JUDITH M. 1974 Asst. Prof., PhySical Educat!on B.5., Cleveland State Univ. M .Ed., Kent State Univ. FAUST, GEORGE H. 1963 Prof., History B.A., Henderson State Teachers College M .A., Univ. of Arkansas Ph.D., Univ. of Chicago LLB., Cleveland路Marshalilaw SchoOl FEDORCHAK, DONALD Asst. Prof., Mathematics B.S., Kent State Univ. M.S., Univ. of Alas ka

1976

FERRARA, JOHN Assl. Prof., Biology A.S , Hiram College 1.1.5., John Carro ll Univ.

1978

FREDMAN, RAYMOND M. Prof., English BA, Augustana College M.A., Wayne State Univ. Ph.D., Univ. of Wisconsin

1967

FREEDMAN, JACQUELINE 1978 Asst. Prof., Commercial Art SF.A., Prall Institute of New York FROST, JAMES A. 1988 Prof., Education B.A., Ohio Northern Univ. M.S., Bowling Green State Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. FRYE, MARILYN L. (R.N.) 1988 Assoc. Prof., Nursing Education B.S.N.Ed., Ohio State Univ. M.A., Western Reserve Univ. FUNG, PHILIP H. C. Asst. Prof., Mathematics B.S., Idaho State Univ. M.S., Case Institute of Technology

1971

GABRIEL, DENNIS R. 1989 Prof., English B.S., Bowling Green State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. Ed.D., NovaUnlv.

265

GAETANO, CARL R. Prof., Psychology A.B. , 8t. Vincent Col lege M.Ed., Rutgers Uni v. Ph.D., Ohio Un!v.

1968

GRIFFIN, SHIRLEY G. Instructor, Mental Healthl Child Care B.A., Cleveland State Univ. M.A. , Kent State Univ.

GALLO, JOSEPH F.

1972

1969 GROSSMAN, DANIEL A. Asst. Prof., Sociology and Anthropology B.A., Western Reserve Vnl v. M.A. , Vnlv. of Michigan

Asst. Prof., Accounting B.B.A., Fenn College J.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. GARDOCKI, HENRY A. Ass!. Prof., English A.B., Loyo la Uni v. M.A., Loyo la Univ. ST. B., Loyola Univ. M.A., Un iv. of Michigan

1971

1976

GUION, HARRY E. 1968 Assoc. Prof., Psychology B.A., Western Reserve Vn iv. M.A., Vn iv. of Detroit J.D., Cleve land State Vniv.

GASKIN, TIM D. 1970 Assoc. Prof., Biology B.S., State Un iv. of New York M.S., State Univ. of New York GERDING, CAROL A. 1975 Ass !. Prof., Bi ology B.S., Bow li ng Green State Univ. M.S., Cleveland State Uni .... GHODOOSHIM, MORAD 1970 Co un se lor, Professor B.S., KansasState Teachers College M .S., Kansas State Teachers College Ed.D., NovaUniv.

GUMINA, SALVATORE J. Assoc. Prof., Mathematics B.S., John Carroll Vniv. M.S., Cleveland State Vni v.

1973

HABERMAN, DAVID A. Assoc. Prof., Art B.A., St. John's Vnlv. M .F.A., Vniv. of Iowa

1967

HAIRSTON, HELEN C. 1971 Asst. Prof., Sociology and Social Sc ien ces B.A., Western Reserve Vniv. M .A., Western Reserve Vn iv.

GHOSE, HIRENDRA M. 1970 Prof., Chemistry B.S., Bihar National Co ll ege, India M.S., PatnaUniv., India Ph.D., Montana State Univ.

HALAREWICZ, MARTA P. 1967 Asst. Prof ., French and German B.S., Kent State Univ. M.A. , Case Wstrn. Reserve Vniv.

GILMOUR, KEITH 1973 Ass t . Prof., Electrical路Electronic Engi neering Tec hn o logy B.S.E.E., Rens se laer Polytechnic

HARBERT, JOHN M. 1969 Assoc. Prof., Biology A. B., Fai rmont State Co ll ege M .S., Weste rn Reserve Vniv.

Institute M. E.E., Rensse laer Polytechnic Institute GOLDOFTAS, ANN S. Ass!. Prof., Early Childhood Education B.A., Michigan State Univ. M.A., Michigan State Uni v.

1972

HARDIMAN, BARBARA 1976 Asst. Prof., Mathematics B.A., Western Reserve Vniv. M.A.T., Indiana Vniv. 1970

GOLOVAN, KENNETH In structo r, Hospitality Management B.S., Ohio State Univ.

1973

HARRINGTON, NANCY R. Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.S., Kent State Vni v. M.ED., Ken t St ate Uni v.

1964

GORDON, CAROLYN E. Asst. Prof., En g li sh B.A., Miami Un iv. M.A., Atlanta Vni v.

1978

HENDERSHOTT, MARCUS D. Assoc. Prof., Biology B.S., Univ. of Michigan M.S., Vniv. of Michigan

GRAM, FREDERICK P. Asst. Prof., Physics B.S., Vniv. of M in nesota M.S., Purdu e Vniv.

1967

HOLIAN , JOHN 1971 Assoc. Prof., Socio logy and Anthropolog y B.A., Bow ling Green State Vni v. M.A., Bowling Green State Univ. Ph.D., Bowling Green State Vni v. HOLLOWAY, JOHN 1983 Instructor, Data Processing B.A., Philander Smith College M ..B.A., Baldwin路Wallace College HOLZWORTH, JEFFREY A. Coun se lo r, Professo r B.A. , Muskingum Col lege M. Ed , Vniv. of Miami Ph .D., Kent State Vniv.

1971

HOMENKO, DONNA 1978 Asst. Prof., Dental Hygiene A.A., Cuyahoga Community College B.S.Ed., Univ. of Akron M.Ed., Cleve land State Vniv. HORNING, THOMAS 1978 Assoc. Prof., Music B.A., Vniv. of Notre Dame M.M .E. Vandercook College Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Unlv. HOWARD, JOSEPH A. 1969 Prof., Music B.A., Western Reserve Vniv. M.A., Kent State Vn iv. Ph.D. , Case Wstrn. Reserve Unlv. HOYT, DONALD L. 1970 Asst. Prof., Mental Healt h Technology A.A., Jamestown Community Co ll ege B.A., Ohio Vn iv. M.A., Kent State Vniv. HUMPHREY, RONALD M. Instructor, Graphic Communications B.S., California State Polytechnic Uni v.

1979

HUMPHREYS, DAVID M. 1969 Prof., En glish A.B. , Buc knell Uni v. M.A., Bucknell Unlv. Ph.D. , Case Ws trn . Reserve Uni v. INKLEY, DALE E. 1983 Instructor, ElectricallElectronic Technol ogy B.S., Iowa Slate College B.S., Iowa State College M .S., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

HERLIHY, WILLIAM",. (C.D.P. 1970 and C.C.P.) Assoc. Prof. , Data Processing B.S., Miami Vniv. B.S., Ohio Un iv. M .Ed ., Ohio Vniv.

JASANY, ROBERT J. 1970 Assoc. Prof., English B.A., XavierUniv. M.A., Case Wstrn. Reserve Vn iv. Ed.D., Nova Vnlv.

HERSMAN, BERNICE Inst ru ctor, Mathematics B.A. , Kent State Vniv. M.A., Kent State Vni v.

1983

JEFFERSON, JACQUELYN L. Counselor, Professor B.A., Wilberforce Unlv. M. Ed ., Kent State Unlv.

1969

HINKO, PAUL M. Counse lo r, Professor B.S., John Carro ll Vniv. M.A. , John Carroll Univ. Ed. D., Vniv. of Akron

1966

JOHNSON, BRIAN R. Asst. Prof. , Bi o logy B.S., Mt. Union College M.S., Ohio State Univ.

1970

1973 GREATHOUSE, TERRY E. Asst. Prof., Bi o logy B.S., Bowling Green State Unlv. M.A., Kent State Unlv. GREENE, DAVID J. W., Jr. 1970 Asst. Prof., Phys ical Education B.S., Univ. of Akron M .S., Univ. of Akron

1973 HOBBS, ELAINE C. Asst. ProL, Office Administration M.S., Utah State Uni v. B.S., Bethune-Cookman Co ll ege

GRAU, ROBERT C. 1970 Prof., Marketing B.B.A., Kent State Vnlv. M.B.A., Kent State Vni v. M .Ed ., Cleveland State Vni v.

266

JOHNSON, EUNICE 1968 Counselor, Professor B.S., Western Rese rve Vniv. M.Ed., Cleveland State Vniv. Ed. D., Nova Vni ver.

JOHNSON, WALTER H. Assoc. Prof., Economi cs B.S., Univ. of Connecticut M.A., Unlv. of Connecticut

1968

KLOSEK, STANLEY J. Prof., English

~~:,~~'~~~i~~~~~y College ~!i~" Gregorion Univ., Rome,

JONES, CAROL A. 1976 Asst. Prof., Business B.S., Bowling Green State Univ. M .Ed., Cleveland State Un iversi ty JULIAN, MARSHA R. Counse lor, Professo r B.A., Westm ini sterCo llege M.S., WestministerCollege Ed. D., NovaUniv.

1966

KAMINSKI, THOMAS

1978

KOE HLER, MARY Asst. Prot, Mathematics B.S., Univ. of Dayto n M .S., Wrigh t State Univ.

B.A., Cleveland State Univ. M. A. , J oh n Caroll Unlv. Ph~ O.. Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

KOSIEWICZ, EDWARD 1965 Asst. Prof., Mathematics B.E.S., Fenn College M.Ed ., Cleve land State Univ.

KARALlUS, KATHE 1976 Asst. Prof., Humanities B.A., Ohio State Un iv. M.A., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ.

KOTNIK, MARGARET M. 1969 Assoc. Prof., Physical Therapy Assisting Technology B.A., Western Reserve Univ. M.A., Western Reserve Uni v. M.N.S., Univ. of Oklahoma P.T., Medical College of Virginia

1966

Prof., Art/Human ities B.A., Stetson Univ. M.A. , Stetson Unlv. M .A. , Case Wstrn . Reserve Unlv. KASSEBAUM, L. HARVEY Prof., English B.A., Beloi! College M.A. , Kent State Univ. Ph.D., Indiana Univ. of Penn sy lvani a

1967

KEKELlK, ROBERT

1970

KRAMER, GERALD U. 1965 Assoc. Prof., Art B.A. , City College of New York M.F.A., Univ. of Iowa KRANZ, THADDEUSS., 1982 Instructor, Mechanical Engineering Technology B.M.E., Cleveland State Univ.

Assoc. Prof., Aviation Technolog ies B.S., Wittenberg Univ. M.A., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

KRAUSS, MARTIN L. Counselor, Professor B.A., Michigan State Uni v. M.A., Mi c higan State Univ. Ed .D., Indiana Univ.

KEMP, GEORGE P. 1966 Prof., English B.A. , Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Ken t State Univ.

KRIZ, JAMES Asst. Prof., Data Processing B.S., John Carroll Univ.

KENNEL, SO OK CHA LEE 1968 Assoc. Prof., English Diploma Ew ha Womans Uni v. B.A., Baldwin路Waliace College M.A., Western Reserve Uni v.

1966

KILLEN, KENNETH H. 19~9 Prof., Business Administration 8 .5 ., Miami Univ. M.B.A., Xavier Univ. Ed.D., Nova Univ. KIRALY, MARGO C. (R.N.) 1968 Instructo r, Emergen cy Medi cal Technology B.S.N.Ed., Univ. of Virginia 1970

1966

KRUSE, ROBERT D. 1966 Assoc. Prof., Health Education B.S., Western Michigan Unlv. M.A., Univ. of Michigan D.P.E., Springfield Co llege

KILBANE, MARILYN C. 1976 Asst. Prof., Office- Administration B.A., Notre Dame College M .A. , Univ. of Detroit

KLEIN, GARY Assoc. Prof., Biology B.S. Ed ., Kent State Univ. M .Ed., Kent State Univ.

1970

KRESL, MARIAN 1968 Prof., Data Processing B.A., Notre Dame College M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ. Ed.D., NovaUniv.

KENDRA, LAWRENCE M. 1967 Asst. Prof., Business B.B.A., Western Reserve Uni v. M.B.A.,路 Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

KILGO RE, JAMES C. Prof., English B.A., Wiley College M .A., Univ. of Missouri

1973

KOLCABA, RAYMOND J. 1972 Asst. Prof., Philosophy and Humanities B.A., Adelbert College Western Reserve Univ. M_A. , Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

Clinical Psycho logist, Instructor

KARBERG, RICHARD E.

1967

I

LAW, GARY D. 1973 Asst. Prof., Busines s Administration B.5., Oklahoma State Un lv. M.B.A. , Baldwin-Wallace College LAWSON, ELDON E. Asst. Prof., Hospi tality Management B.A., Michigan State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ.

1966

LEE, MARNETTE N. 1976 Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.A., Western Reserve Unlv. M.Ed., Case Wstrn. Reserve Uni v. LEONARD, JAMES F. Assoc. Prof., Engli sh A.B., Loyola Uni v. M.A. , Loyo la Unlv.

1967

LEWINE, MARK 1973 Prof., Sociology B.A., Western Reserve Uni v. M.A. , Kent State Univ. Ed .D., Nova Univ. LlEBAL, MARY LOU 1977 Asst. Prof. , Radiol ogic Techno logy B.S., Unlv. of Akron R.T.R., Akron City Hospital M.A. , Unlv. of Akron LIEBAL, WILLIAM J. 1966 Prof., Business Administrati on B.S., Youngstown Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Uni v. Ph.D., Ohio State Univ. LIGHTBODY, T. P. 1972 Asst. Prof., Phi losophy B.A., Harvard Univ. M .A., Western Reserve Univ. M .A., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. LIGUORI, CECILIA Asst. Prof., Office Administration B.S., Indiana State Teachers College M.Ed., Univ. of Pittsburgh LlVAICH , NICHOLAS 1977 Assoc. Prof., Art B.S., Western Reserve Univ. M.A. , Western Reserve Uni v. M.F.A., Univ. of Gu anajuato LLOYD, DEBORAH Assoc. Prof., Soc ial Science B.A., Cleveland State Univ. M.A., Cleveland State Univ.

1977

KUBEK, MARY (R.N.) 1976 Instructor, Emergency Medical Tec hnology

LONG, PATRICIA E. 1976 In structor, Dental Hygiene A.S., Cuyahoga Community College B.S., Garfield Senior College

KURNATH , NORBERTT. 1969 Prof., Chemistry A.B., Adelbert College M.S., Western Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn. Reserve Uni v.

LOPEZ, ABELINO Co~nselor, Asst. Prof. B.A., Kent State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ.

LASSITER, QUINTON L. Asst. Prof., Earl y Childhood Education B.S., Central State Unlv. M.Ed., Boston Uni v.

LORENZO, CAR NITA R. (R.N.) 1966 Prof., Nursing Education B.S., Incarnate Word Co ll ege M.S., State Univ. of New York at Buffalo Ed.D., Akron Uni v.

1975

LAUGHLIN, ETHELREDA 1963 Prof., Chemistry A.B., Western Reserve Univ. M.S., Western Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Western Reserve Univ.

1973

LORION , JAMES E. Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.A., Michigan State Univ. M.A., Univ. of Michigan Ph.D., Ohio State Univ.

267

LOVE, EVELYN 1976 Counselor, Asst Prof. A.A., Cuyahoga Community College B.A., Kent State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. LUCK, LAWRENCE 1967 Assoc. Prof., English B.S., Loyola Univ. ~.., A " Bowling Green State Uni v. LUDWtG, JAMES C. 1972 Ass!. Prof., Radiologic Technology B.B.A., Cleveland State Univ. RT.A. , Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospi t al M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ.

McDOWELL, CHARLES 1966 Prof., History and Geography B.A ., Univ. of Washington M.A., Brandeis Univ. M .Ed., Massachusetts State College (Boston) Ph.D., Brandeis Univ. McFALL, GEORGE H. 1969 Asst. Prof., English B.S., leMoyne College M .A., Tennessee Agricultural and Industrial State Unlv. McGINTY, JAMES R. 1966 Prof., Business Administration B.S., Univ. of Dayton M.A., Western Reserve Unlv.

LUDWIG, MARK L. Prof., Social Science A.B., Valparaiso Univ. B.S., Kent State Univ. M .A., Kent State Univ. Ph.D., Kent State Univ.

1970

LUKACEVIC, EDWARD C. Assoc. Prof., Biology B.S., Oh io Univ. M.S., Ohio Univ.

1966

McNEAL, SIMON 1977 Asst . Prof., Sociology B.A. , Baldwin-Wallace College M .A., Notre Dame Un;v.

MACK, LOIS (R.N., C.M.A.) 1970 Asst. Prof., Medical Assisting

• MEADOWS. RICHARD N. 1967 Prof., Theater Arts B.S., Eastern Illinoi s Univ. M.A. , Western Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

~~:.~~~~e~~~~~~~~serve Univ.

McKEEVER, JEROME M. 1976 Ass!. Prol., English B.A., Univ. of Notre Dame M .A., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

MERCHANT, DOROTHY 1969 Assoc. Prof., English B.S.Ed., Californ ia State College M .A., Case VVstrn . Reserve Univ.

MAJCZENKO, PATRICIA R. Asst. Prof., Mathematics B.A., Vassar College M.S., Cleveland State Univ.

1971

MALONE, JOSEPH R. Counselor, Professor B.S., Univ. of Akron M .S., Univ. of Akron Ed.D., Nova Univ.

1969

MARCHISIO, KEVIN A. Asst. Prof., History B.A ., S!. Michael 's College M .A., Georgetown Unlv.

1966

MIKLIS, EMILY 1965 Prof., Accounting B.B.A., Western Reserve Univ. M.B.A., Western Reserve Univ.

MARLETTE, GERALD W. 1976 Asst. Prot, Mathematics B.S., Wisconsin State College M.S., Cleveland State Univ.

MILKOVIC, MILAN 1966 Librarian, Asso c. Prof. 8.5., John Carroll Univ. M .S.L.S. , Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

MARTIN, ROSEMARIE Instructor, Data Processing B.A., Ohio Univ.

1978

MASTERSON, PATRICK 1976 Prof., Speech Communication B.A., Kent State Univ. M .A., Kent State Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Unlv. MATKIN, MURLINE M. 1969 Prof., Psychology B.S.. Univ. of Houston M,S., Colorado State Univ. Ph.D., Western Reserve Univ. MATTHEWS, RICHARD D. Prof .. English B.A .. Ohio Slate Univ. B.S., Ohio State Univ. M.A .• Ohio State Univ.

1963

McCORT, THOMAS W. Prof., Biology B.S., Salem College M,A., West Virginia Univ.

1970

McDONOUGH, ROBERT E. Assoc. Prof" English B.A .. Boston College M.A ., New York Univ.

1970

268

MIGGINS, EDWARD M. 1972 Assoc. Prof., History and Political Science A.B., Fairfield Univ. M.A, Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

MILLER, JACK D. 1970 Prof., Biology A.B., Oberlin College M.S., Western Reserve Univ. MILLER, SANDRA 1982 Instructor, Dental Hygiene B.S., West Uberty State College MILLER, WHARTON H. librarian, Asst. Prof. B.A., Syracuse Univ. M.S.L.S., Syracuse Univ.

1966

1968 MIRTICH, RAY F. Assoc. Prof., 8iology B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College M .S., John Carroll Univ. MIXON, JOHNETTA (R.N.) Pro f., Nursing Education B.S.N ., Boston Univ. M.S.N .. Wayne State Univ.

1965

MORROW, CHARLES A. 1966 Prof .. English B.S., John Carroll Univ. M .A. , Western Rese rve Univ. Ph.D.. Univ. of A k ron

MOSKAL·BURGES, CHARLENE 1963 Asst. Prof ., Theatre Arts B.A. , Univ. of North Carolina • M .A. , Western Reserve Univ. MURRAY, HAZEL E. 1969 Assoc. Prof., Mathematics B.S., California State College M.Ed., Kent State Univ. MUSOLF, WILLIAM R. Assoc. Prof., Mathematics B.S., Kent State Univ. M.S., Cleveland State Univ.

1970

NAFT, THEODORER. 1966 Prof., Speech A.B. , Western Reserve Univ. M.A., Western Reserve Univ. Ed.D., NovaUniv. NAHAS, RUSSELL Counselor, Professor B.A., Univ. of Akron B.A., Univ. of Akron M.Ed., Univ. of Akron Ph.D., Kent State Univ.

1969

NDYAJUNWOHA, GASTON 1971 Assoc. Prof., Mathamatics A .B., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. M .S., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ. NEEDHAM, JAMES E. 1967 Prof., Business Administration B.S., Univ. of Illinois M.B.A., Western Reserve Univ. NETH, JOAN 1973 Ass!. Prof., Early Children Education B.S.H.E., West Virginia Univ. M .S., Pennsylvania State Unlv. NEWBERRY, ESTUS S. 1970 Prof., Health and Physical Education B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Unlv. of Cincinnati Ph.D., Nova Univ. NICHOLS, WILBERT Assoc. Pro f., History B.S., Kent State Unlv. M.A., John Carroll Unlv.

1969

OAKAR, MARY R. Ass!. Prof., English (Leave of Absence) B.A., Ursuline College M.A., John Carroll Uni v.

1967

OFFEN BERGER, THERESA 1973 (C.M.A.C.-C., M.L.T., A.S.C.P.) Asst. Prof., Medical Laboratory Technology and Medical Assisting B.S., Cleveland State Univ. M.S., Cleveland State Univ. ORLOVE, BETH Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.A., Kent State Univ. 8 .5., Kent State Univ. M .A., John Carroll Univ.

1975 •

OWENS, LOVID 1963 Prof., Office Administration B.S., Ohio State Univ. M.Ed., Massachusetts State College (Boston) Ph.D. , Brandeis Unlv. M.A., Ohio Stale Univ. Ph.D., Ohio State Univ. PARISH, RICHARD J. Prof., Geography BA, Kent State Uni v. M.A. , Kent State Univ. Ph.D., Oh io State Univ.

1965

PARKER, EDWARD E. Asst. Prof., Art B.S., Central State Unlv. M.A., Kent State Univ.

1974

PARSONS, JOYCE C. Asst , Prof., Speech B.A. , Olivet College M.A., Univ. of Akron

1972

RABA, ROGER L. Assoc. Prof., English and Journalism A.B. , Ohio Univ. B.S., Ohio Univ. M .S., Ohio Univ.

PENKO, ALFRED, (P.E.)

1970

RAGAN, DAVID M. 1971 Asst. Prof., Psychology B.A., Univ. of Dayton M.A, Bowling Green State Univ.

Instructor, Engineering Technology B.S.M.E., Ohio Univ. PERRY, JOHN A., JR. Prof., Social Sciences B.A., Wayne State Uoiv. M.Ed., Wayne State Univ.

1968

PISANELLI, MARIO J. 1966 Assoc. Prof., Health and Physical

Education B.S., Kent State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. PLAGENS, DONALD J.

1966

Prof., Office Administration B.S., Central Michigan Univ. M.A., Central Michigan Univ. Ed.D., Oregon State Univ. PLAVAC, GEORGE N.

1965

Prof., Business Administration B.BA, John Carroll Univ. L.L.M., Cleveland·Marshall Law School J.D., Cleveland·Marshall Law School Ed.D. , Nova Univ. POLEN, ARTHUR D. (C.D.P.) 1971 Assoc. Prof., Da!a Processing B.S., Kent State Univ. M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ. POLING, JANICE R. 1971 Instructor, Nursing Education B.S., Alderson-B roaddus College PORTER, JACK O. Prof., Mathematics B.S., Parsons Col lege M.A , State College of Iowa

1963

POTTORFF, H. RONALD 1969 Assoc. Prof., Mathematics B.S., Shippensburg Stale College M.A, Bowling Green State Univ. Ed.D., Nova Univ. PRANGE, NORMAN O. 1968 Asst. Prof., English A.B., San Fernando Valley State College M.A., Univ. of California (Los Angeles) PRESTON, WILLIAM G. Assoc. Prof., Biology B.S., John Carroll Univ. M.S., John Carroll Univ.

1970

PRIEM, KATHLEEN Instructor, Data Proces~ng B.s., Western Reserve Univ. M.S., Univ. of Rochester

1981

PULLENS, KATHERINE E. Assl. Prof., English A.B., Virginia Union Univ. M.A., Howard Univ.

1971

PUTINSKI, NANCY 1982 Instructor, Data Processing A.A.R, Lakeland Community College B.S., Univ. of Akron

1967

RAGLE, ROXANNE M. 1977 Asst. Prof., Radiologic Technology A.A.R.T. (R) Cleveland Clinic Foundation B.A, Wittenberg Univ. M.S., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. RAIMER, EDWARD A. Prof., English and Speech A.B., John Carroll Uni v. M.A, John Carroll Univ. Ph.D., Kent State Univ.

1967

RICHARDS, BETTY J. Instructor, Data Processi ng B.A., Western Rese rve Univ.

1969

RICHEY, JAMES librarian , Asst. Prof. A.B., Morehouse Co llege M.S.L.S., Univ. of Atlanta

1969

RICHTER, WILLIAM H. Ass1. Prof., English B.A, Oakland Univ. M.A., Univ. of Michigan

1972

RIGGLE, GEORGE T. Prof., Mathematics B.S., Purdue Univ. M.S., Univ. of Notre Dame Ed.D., Nova Univ.

1967

RINGLE, BARBARA 1982 Instructor, Dental Hygiene AA .S., Ohio State Univ. B.S., Baldwin·Wallace Coll ege

RAKOWSKY, CHRISTINE H. 1966 Prof., English B.A., Ursuline College M.A., John Carroll Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. RANDALL, CLYDE A. 1968 Assoc. Prof., Data Processing B.A., Michigan State Univ. M.A., Michigan State Univ. RATENO, ROBERT A. 1974 Assoc. Prof., Graphic Communi· cations Management and Technology B.s.Ed., Kent State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. REAM, ELIZABETH M. (R.N.) 1974 Assoc. Prof., Nursing Education B.S.N., Boston Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. REDSTONE, ELIZABETH R. 1966 Prof., Business Administration B.S., Univ. of Colorado M.A., Michigan State Univ. Ph.D., Michigan State Univ. REESE, ALICE M. (R.N.) 1971 Asst. Prof., Nursing Education BA, Baldwin·Waliace College M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ. REESE, ROY V. 1973 Counse lor, Asst. Prof. A.A, Cuyahoga Community College B.A., Cleveland State Univ. M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ. REEVES, GEORGE M. 1970 Assoc. Prof., English A.B. , Bowdoin College M.A., Univ. of New Hampshire Ph.D., New York Univ. REICHHELD, CHARLES A., III 1969 Asst. Prof., Business Administration (Economics) A.B., Muskingum College M.B.A., Michigan State Univ. REYNOLDS, LEON W. Assoc. Prof., Chemistry B.S., Indiana Institute of Technology M.S., Montana State Univ.

1966

RICH, EDNA Instructor, Dental Hygiene B.S., Cleveland State Univ. Certified Dental Hygienist

1979

ROBERSON , PEGGY . 1976 Asst. Prof., Office Administration B.S., Alabama State Univ. M.Ed., AlabamaState Uni v. ROMAN, LAWRENCE (C.P.A.) 1983 Instructor, Accounting RB.A , Cleveland State Uni v. M.B.A., Baldwin·Waliace College ROSS, PETER J. Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.A, Kent State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ.

1977

RUBENSTEIN, CHARLES F. 1975 Asst. Prof., Electrical·Electronic Engineering Technology B.E.E., New York Univ. M .E.E., New York Uni v. RUBINS, ALEX 1966 Prof., Physical Education B.S., Western Reserve Univ. M.A., Western Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn. Reserve Uni v. SALCO, RAYMOND A. Asst. Prof., Real Estate B.S., Ohio State Univ. M.A., Univ. of Utah J.D., Capital Law School

1976

SALEM, DOROTHY C. Prof., Social Science B.A., Cleveland State Univ. M.A., Cleve land State Univ.

1974

SANJIVAMURTHY, PJ". 1975 Prof., Mathematics B.S., Univ. of Mysore, India M.S., Univ. of Mysore, India M.S., Univ. of Saskathewan Ph.D., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. SASAKI, RAYMOND A. 1974 Asst. Prof., Physician's Surgical Assisting A.A., Northeastern Junior College B.A., Colorado State College M.A, Univ. of Northern Colorado SASALA, STEPHEN R. 1970 Ass·oc. Prof., Speech B.S., Bowling Green State Univ. M.A., Bowling Green State Univ. SCHEFFER, CORNELIUS 1965 Prof., Engineering and Electrical Electronic Engineering Technologies B.S., U.S. Naval Academy M.Eng., Pennsylvania State Univ.

269

SCHLICK, ROBERT M. 1968 Assoc. Pref., Speech and English A.B., John Carroll Univ. M.A., Miami Univ. J.D., Cleve land State Univ. 19.68 SCOTT, MARY ANN Asst. Prof., Mathematics B.A., Western Reserve Unlv. M.A., John Carroll Univ. SEGO, AR LENE Prof., Mathematics B.S., Univ. of Pennsylvania M.N .S., Arizona State Univ. ~

1966

SEGO, MICHAEL A. 1965 Assoc. Prof., Political Science B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M .A., Western Res erve Un iv. 1965 SEXTON, ROBERT W. Prof., Business Administration B.S., Boston College M.B.A., Harvard Univ. Ed.D., Nova Unlv. SHAPIRO, RICHARD W. Assoc. Prof., Business

1966

Administration B.s .. Univ. of Pittsburgh M.B.A. . Univ. of Pittsbu rgh 1967 SHERIDAN, JAMES J. Prof., English A.B. , John Carroll Univ. M.A., Western Reserve Univ. Ph .D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Vniv.

SLONAC, DONNA Instructo r, Data Processing B.S., Indiana Univ.

1981

SMITH, JAMES H. 1969 Prof., Social Sciences B.S., Central State Vniv. M.A., Western Reserve Vniv. SNYDER, DANA Asst. Prof., Dance B.A., Eckerd College

1975

SOLIS, RUTH E. ProL, Foreign Languages B.A., College of Wooster M.A., Vniv. of Kansas

1965

SORGE, TIMOTHY W. 1977 Asst. Prof., Health and Physical Education A.A., CuyahogaCommunity College B.S., Cleveland State Univ. M.A., Univ. of Akron SPENCER, JAMES C. 1971 Prof., Philosophy B.A. , California State College M.A., State Vniv. of New York at Buffalo Ph.D., State Uni v. of New Yo rk at Buffalo SPERO, SAMUEL W. 1966 Prof., Mathematics B.S., Case Institute of Technology M.S., Case Institute ofTechnology Ph.D., Kent State Vniv.

SHIPMAN, JAMES K. 1966 Prof., Business Administration B.B.A., Fenn College M.B.A., Western Reserve Univ. • Ph.D., Kent State Vniv.

SPRONZ, LOUIS R. Prot, Dental Hygiene B.S., Ohio Univ. D.D.S., Ohio State Vniv.

1971 SHRIMPLIN, DON N. Counse lor, Asst. Prof. B.A., Muskingum College M.Ed., Pennsylvan ia State Vniv.

STACHOWSKI, KENNETH 1982 Asst. Prof., Law Enforcement A.S., Cuyahoga Community College B.S., Vniv. of Akron M.P.A ., Cleveland State Vniv.

1973 SILGALlS, EUGENE M. Assoc. Prof., Engineering Technolog y B.E.S., Johns Hopkins Vniv. M.S., Case Wstrn. Reserve Univ. Ph.D., Vniv. of Akron

STACKELBERG, CORA 1976 Asst. ProL, Mathematics B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology M.A.T., Duke Vniv.

SILON, RUTH 1978 Asst. Prof., English B.S.Ed., Ohio Univ. M .Ed., Cleveland State Vniv. SIMON, ADELLE (R.N.) 1966 Prof., Nursing Ed ucation B.S.N.Ed., Western Reserve Univ. M.S., Western Reserve Univ. 1973 SIROPOLlS, NICHOLAS C. Asst. Prof., Business Administration B.S., Case Institute of Technology M.B.A., Harvard Univ. SKOWRON, JANE 1975 Asst. Prof., Physical Education B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College M.S., Univ. of Akron SKWIRE, DAVID Asst. Prof., Engli sh B.A., Vniv. of Wisconsin M.A., Cornell Vniv.

1968

SLAGLE, NOEL A. 1965 Ass\. Prof., Health Education B.S., Kent State Vniv. M .A., Kent State Univ.

270

1966

STAGLIANO, RICHARD A. 1970 Prof., Physical Science, Chemistry and Biology A.A.S. , Mohawk Valley Community College B.S., Western Kentucky Univ. M.S., Syracuse Vniv. Ph .D., yniv. of Akron STAKES, DAMON W. Assoc. Prof ., History and Political Science B.S., Ohio Univ. M.A., Ohio Univ. M.A., Kent State Univ.

1970

STROTH, ANN G. (R.N.) 1969 ProL, NurSing Ed ucation B.S.N ., Indiana Univ. M .S.N., Case Wstrn . Reserve Unlv. Ph.D. , Kent State Univ. STUDER, PATRICIA L. (R.N.) 1976 Instructor, Emergency Medi c al Technology STURIK, ROBIN 1980 Asst. Prof., Data Process in g B.A., C leveland State Uni v. M.Ed., Cleveland State Univ. SULLIVAN, MARY A. 1978 Asst. Prof., Hospitality Management B.S., Ursuline College M .S., Case Ws trn . Reserve Un iv. SURACE, PETER C. 1972 Asst. Prof., Engli sh A.A ., Cuyahoga Communi ty Co llege B.A., Kent State Univ. M.A., Kent State Univ. SUTTON, FRED C. 1965 Prof., Engi neering Technology Ph.B., Univ. of Chicago B.A., Un iv. of Iowa M. Ed ., Univ. of Pitt sburgh D.Ed., Wayne State Vniv. TAYLOR , KAREN Instructor, Interior Design B.S., Kent State Univ.

1977

TAYLOR , MARGARET Asst. Prof., English and Jo urnal ism B.A., Du ke Uni v. M .A., John Carroll Unlv.

1974

TERBRAAK, MARILYN R. Ass!. Pro f., Office Administration B.A., Notre Dame College M.A., Vniv. of Detroit

1968

THOMAS, LYNN J. D. Assoc. Prof.. English B.A., Univ. of Miami M.A., Vniv. of Miami

1967

TOTH, CAROL G. librarian, Instructor A.B., Ohio Vni v.

1968

ULRICH, EDMUND V. (Reg. Arch.) 1967 Asst. Prof., Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology B.Arch ., Ohio State Vnl v. VACHA, TERRANCE H. 1967 Assoc. Prof., Physics and Mathematics B.S., Univ. of Dayton M.A. , College of William and Mary

STITH, JACaUELINE L. 1971 Assoc. Prof. , Early Childhood Education B.S., Ohio State Univ. M.A., Case Wstrn . Reserve Unlv.

VAN RAAPHORST, DONNA 1970 Assoc. Prof., History B.S., Eastern Michigan Univ. M.A., Eas tern Michigan Vniv. Ph.D., Kent State Vniv.

1~65 STOCH, EDWIN J. Prof., Health and Physical Education B.A., Baldwin·Waliace College M.A., Western Reserve Univ.

VAN TYNE, BERNICE Assoc. Prof., En glish B.S., Kent State Univ. M.A., Kent State Univ.

STONE, MICHAEL J. Asst. Prof., Theatre Arts B.A., Kent State Univ. M.AT, Kent State Univ.

VENESILE, JOHN A. 1977 Ass!. Prof., Music B.F.A., Ohio Univ. M.A. , Case Wstrn . Reserve Unlv.

1971

1971

VIER ING, ELIZABETH M. 1972 Asst. Prof., Office Admi nis tration B.S., Kent State Univ. M .Ed ., Kent State Univ.

VOGEL , ALAN Asst. Prof., Business Admin istration B.S., Uni v. of Akron M B.A., Kent State Uni v.

1973

WHEELER , DONALD A. 1972 Assoc. ProL, Biology B.S. , Harding COllege M .S., Southern illinOis Unlv. WHITE, DOLORES 1982 Instructor, Music S. M., Oberlin College M.M ., Cleve land Institute of Music

VORELL, VIC KI 1983 Asst. Prof., Accounting B.S., Dyke CO ll ege M.A.F.I.S., Cleveland State Uni v.

WILCOX , LAVERNE Asst. ProL, Speech B.A., Cleveland State Uni v. M .A., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

WAITE, A. CARTER Prof., Physical Edu cation B.S., Ohi o Northern Univ. M .S., West Vi rgini a Un iv. Ed.D.. Nova Univ.

WILDER , SARAH M. (R.D.) 1969 Assoc. Prof. , Dietetic Technology B.S., Tuskegee Institute M .S., Case Wstrn . Reserve Uni v.

1970

WAITKUS, LORIN 1979 Assoc. Praf., Engineering Technology B.S., California State Co llege M .Ed ., Pennsy lvania State Uni v. Ph .D., Ohio State Univ. WALKER , EARL 1976 Asst. Prof., Phys ical Therapy Assisting B.S., Medical Co ll ege of Virginia M.S., Virginia Commonwealth Uni v. WALTON , JOHN 1978 Ass t. Prof., Math emati cs B.S. Ed., California State College M.A., C leveland State Univ. M .Ed., Cleve land State Univ. WARD, CHARLES Asst. Praf., Mathematics B.A. , Berea COllege M .A. , Cleveland State Univ.

1978

WANG, BELLA Prof .. Mathematics

1965

B.S.. National Central Un lv.,

Nanking, China M .S. , Western Reserve Unl v. Ph .D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Un lv.

WATKINS, LOWELL A. 1964 Prof., Bu siness Administration 8.Ed., Illinois State Univ.

WILLIAMS, IRIS 1970 Co un se lor, Assoc. Prof. B.A., Johnson C. Smith Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ. WILSON , ALICE W. Assoc. Prof., Psyc hology A. B., Geneva Col lege M.A., Univ. of Pitt sbu rgh Ph .D., Univ. of Pittsburgh

1971

WOLTERS-CHEW, FLORENCE Assoc. Pro1., C hemi stry B.S., Ursuline College M .S., John Carroll Univ.

1965

WOODRUFF,LORRAINE S.(R.N.)1970 Asst. Prof., Nursing Ed ucation B.S.N., Case Wst rn . Reserve Un iv. M.A., Case Wstrn . Reserve Un iv. WRIGHT, MICHAEL S. Counselor, Asst. Prof. B.A., Ke nt State Univ. M.Ed., Kent State Univ.

1977

ZANDER , CARL A. Asst. Prof. , Data Processing B.S., Ohio State Univ. M .B.A., Univ. of Akron

1967

ZINN, JOAN M. Asst. Prof., Physics B.S., Sie na Height s College M .S., Michigan State Univ.

1973

M.B.A .. Univ. of Denver

WEBSTER, JAMES F. 1970 Asst. Prof .. En glish A.B., Joh n Carroll Unlv. M.A., Case Wstrn. Reserve Unlv.

ZINNER , ELLIOTT 1967 Assoc. Prof., Speech 8.S., State Univ. of New York (Geneseo) M .A., Ohio Univ. Ph.D., Case Wstrn . Reserve Univ.

WEINER, RONALD R. 1965 Assoc. Prof., History B.A., Univ. of the Americas M.A., Northern Illinois Univ. Ph .D., Kent State Univ.

ZUCKER, PHYLLIS Asst. Prof., Occupational Therapy B.S., Ohio State Uni v.

1978

WEINSTEIN , PHYLLIS 1977 Assoc. ProL, Speech Com municat ion ~ B.A., Western Reserve Unl v. M .A., Univ. of Akron . Ph.D., Kent State Unl v. WHANN , BRUCE M. 1965 Prof., Che mistry B.A., Westminster Co ll eg e M.S.. Case Wstrn. Reserve Unl v. WHARTON , RABER R. 1979 Ass!. Prof., Early Childhood Educatio n B.A., Sarah Lawrence College M.S.Ed, Wheelock College

271

INDEX A Academic Dismissal 256 Academic Informat ion 11 Academic Probation 255 Access to Student Records 254 Accounting 144 Accounting , Concentration in 30 Accreditation 4 , Addresses of College Facilities v Admissions Informatio n 5 Admissions and Records Phone Numbers v Advanced Placement 252 Advisory Committees 17 Alumni Association 248 Anthropology 145 Architectural and Construction Engineering Technology 145 Architectural and Ccnstruction Engineering Technology, Concentration in 32 Art 147 Arts and Sciences Program 12 Associate of Applied Business Degree 19 Associate of Applied Science Degree 20 Associate of Arts Degree 13 Associate of Labor Studies Degree 21 Associate of Sc ience Degree 14 Associate of Te chn ical Study Degree 22 Athletics247 Attendance 260 Audio-Visual , Library/Media Emphasis on 66 Auditing a Course 253 Aviation Technology 149 Aviation Technology, Concentration in 34

B

Biology 150 Book Centers 246 Board of Trustees iii Business Administration 152 'Business Management, Concentration in 36 Business Management (Small Business), Concentration in 38

C

Calendar of Instruction vi Career Planning and Placement 224 Career Programs 17, 18 Career Program Quarter Sequences 29-147 Career Resources Institute 4, 24, 26 Career Services 244 Continuing Education Programs, 25 Certificates and Awards 23 Change of Address 250 Change of Campus 5 Change of Degree Objective 257 Change of Residency 231 Chemical Technology 154 Chemistry 154 Class Standing, Definition 257 Codes Used in Listing Course Descriptions 133 College Colors 227 College Foundation 5 Commercial Art 156 Commercial Art, Concentration in 40 Community Mental Health Techn ology 157 Community Mental Health Technology, Conentration in 42 Cooperative Education 245 Correction, Law Enforcement Emphasis on 82 Counseling 244 Course Descriptions 139-241

273

Cou rse Load 253 Course Numbering 140 Court and Conference Reporting 159 Court and Conference Reporting, Concentration in 44 Credit by Examination 251 Credit Hours 140 Credit in Escrow 6 Cross Registrat ion 255 Curric ulum 11

o

Dance 161 Data Processi ng 161 Data Processi ng, Concentration in 46 Deans, Academic 262 Dean's List 258 Dental Hygiene 163 Dental Hygiene, Concentration in 48 Dental Laborat ory Technol ogy 165 Dental Laboratory Technology, Concentratio n in 50 Developmental Education Programs 27 Di etet ic Technolog y 167 Dietetic Technology, Concentration in 52 Di splaced Homemakers 25

E

Early Childhood Education 169 Early Chi ldhood Edu cation , Concentration in 54 Earth Science 171 Eastern Campus 3 Economics 171 Educ ation 171 Educational Objectives 2 El ders Program 25 Elect rical-Electron ic Engineering Technology 172 Electrical-El ec t ronic Engineering Technology, Concentration in 56 Emergency Medical Tec hnology 174 Emergency Medical Te chnology-Paramed ic 58 Employmen t, Guide for Combining College Attendance with 253 Engineering 176 English 177 Executive Officers iv, 262

F

Facu lty Li st in g, 262 Fees6 Financial Aid 8 Financial Management 180 Financial Management (Banki ng Option), Concentration in 60 Fire Te ch nology 181 Fire Technology, Concentration in 62 French 182

G

General Studies 183 Geography 183 German 184 Grad ing System 258 Graduation Requirements 13, 14, 16, 19, 20, 21, 22 Grants 8 Graphic Com mun icat ions Management and Technology 184 Graphic Communications Management and Technology, Concen t ration in 64

H

Health 186 Health Services 246 Health Tec hnologies 187 Hebrew 187 Hi story 186

274

Hospitality Management 189 Hospitality Management , Emphasis on Culinary Art 66 Hospitality Management, Emphasis on Food Service Management 68 Hospitality Management, Emphaiss on Hotel Restaurant 70 Hospitality Management, Emphasison Housekeeping Management 72 Humanities 191 â&#x20AC;˘

Identification Cards 249 Industrial Management, Concentration in 74 Industrial Technology (See Manufacturingllndustrial Technology) 191 Industrial Technology, Concentration in (See Manufacturingllndustrial Technology) 90 Institutional Memberships 4 Intercollegiate Competition 247 Interior Design 192 Interior Design , Concentration in 76

International Students 250 Intramural Sports 247 italian 193

J

Journalism 194

L

Labor Studies 195 Labor Studies, Concentration in 78 Law Enforcement 197 Lalli Enforcement, Concentration in 80

Law Enforcement (Corrections) Concentration in 82 Law Enforcement (Security Administration), Concentration in 84 Learning Resource Centers 246 Libraries 216 Libraryllnstructional Media Technology 200 Librarylnstructional Media(Audio Visual) 86 Libraryllnstruct ional Media (Library/Media) 88 Loans3,4

M

Manufacturingllndustrial Technology 191 Manufacturingllndustrial Technology, Concentration in 90 M arkeii n g 202 Marketing, Concentration in 92 Mathematics 203 Mechanical Engineering Technology 204 Mechanical Engineering Te,chnology, Concentration in 94 Medical Assisting 205 Medical Assisting, Concentration in 96 Medical LaboratoryTechnology 207 Medical Laboratory Technology, Concentration in 98 Medical Record Technology 208 Medical Record Technology, Concentration in 100 Mental Health Technology 157 Mental Health Technology, Concentration in 42 Metropolitan Campus 3 Music 209

N

Non-High School Graduates 5 North Central Association of Colleges and Schools 4 Nursing 212 Nursing, Concentration in 102

o

Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology 213 Occupational Therapy Assisting Technology, Concentration in 104 Office Administration 215 Office Administration, Concentration in 106

275

Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology 217 Ophthalmic Dispensing Technology, Concentration in 108 Optical Mechanics Certificate Program 136

p Parking 250 Philosophy 218 Philosophy of the College 1 Physical Education Facilities 247 Physical Education Courses 218 Physical Science 222 Physical Therapist Assisting Technology 223 Physical Therapist Assisting Technology, Concentration in 106 Physican Assistant 224 Physician Assistant , Concentration in 112 Physician's Surgical Assistant 226 Physician's Surgical Assistant, Concentration in 114 Physics 228 Placement, Student 244 Plant Operations Services 229 Political Science 229 Prerequisite!, 140 Probation 255 Production and Inventory Management, Concentration in 116 Program Changes 7 Project Search 25 Psychology 230 Public Transportation 3, 4 Purchasing Management, Concentration in 118 Purpose of the College 1

a

Quarter Sequences, Career Programs 11-137

R

Radiography 230 Radiograp t{y, Concentration in 120 Readmission 256 Real Estate 232 Real Estate, Concentration in 122 Refund of Fees 7 Registration Information 140 Repeating a Course 260 Residency Requirements 250 Respiratory Therapy Certificate Program 137 Respiratory Therapy Technology 233 RespiratoryTherapy Technology, Concentration in 124 Rights and Responsibilities 3

S

Schedule of Classes 141 Scholarships 8 Security Administration, Law Enforcement Emphasis on 84 Small-Business Management , Emphasis on 38 â&#x20AC;˘ Social Science 236 Sociology 236 Spanish 237 Speech Communication 237 Student Activities and Organizations 247 Student Identification Cards 249 Student Services 244 Subject Groupings List 142

T

Team Names 247 Telephone Numbers, Admissions and Records v Television Courses 27 Theatre Arts 239 Transcripts of Grades 255

276

Transfer to CCC 251 Transfer Guides 15, 16 Transfer Students 251 Transfer to Other Institutions 254 Transient Status at Other Institutions 255 Transportation 240 Transportation , Concentration in 126 Tuition 6

U

Undecided TransferGuide 16 Urban Studies 241 University Parallel 15

V

Varsity Sports 247 Veterans Information 252

W

Western Campus 4 Withdrawing from a Class 249 Women Focus 25

277

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• WEST

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~••••~ Cuyahoga Community College

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