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CATALOGUE FOR THE 1966-67 ACADEMIC YEAR Published in April, 1966

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Ohio's First Public Community College

SERVING GREATER CLEVELAND METROPOLITAN CAMPUS Huron Building 626 Huron Rd. Cleveland, Ohio 44115

WESTERN CAMPUS (Opening in Fall, 1966) 7300 York Rd. Parma-Parma Heights, Ohio 44130

Brownell Science and Technology Building 2214 E. 14 St. Cleveland, Ohio 44115

EASTERN (Evening Only) East .Junior High School Broadway and Lee Rds. Maple Heights, Ohio 44137

Gallo Building 1012 Sumner Ave. Cleveland, Ohio 44115 PHONE 241-1556

Charles F. Brush High School Mayfield and Evanston Rds. Lyndhurst, Ohio 44124

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THE COLLEGE SEAL The Cuyahoga Community College seal incorporates symbols which represent the concept of "lifelong learning" as well as the political and economic segments \'Vhich the College serves. The upper portion depicts the Cleveland skyline, visible from many points of Cuyahoga County. The lower portion embodies particulars from the Great Seal of the State of Ohio. The Torch of Learning, circumscribed by the symbol of nuclear energy, represents utilization of research and modern instructional techniques. The communications satellite, Telstar, stresses the importance of communication as an essential of all learning activity at Cuyahoga Community College. 9

CALENDAR

OF

INSTRUCTION

1966-1967 This calendar is designed primarily for day students. Late afternoon and evening students should also consult the bulletin, Program for PartTime Students) to fi~d registration dates, class schedules and course outlines.

SUMMER SESSION 1966 May June June June June July

9-June 3 8 16 20 21-22 1

July 4 July 22 July 23-Aug. 5 Aug. 5 Aug. 12

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IZegular registration Last day to pay fees for regular registration Late registration Classes begin Progran1 adjustlnent period Last day for course withdrawal without official record Independence Day, a holiday Last day for course withdrawal with automatic W grade Students withdrawing frolll courses will be assigned W or F grades Students n1ay not withdraw fron1 courses after this date End of Sun1n1er session

FALL SElVIESTER 1966 May 16-Aug. 31

Regular registration

Aug. 26

Last day to sub1l1it application for attendance as a full-tilne student during the Fall sen1ester 1966

Sept. 2

Last day to pay fees for regular registration

Sept. 6,7,8,9

Late registration for day students

Sept. 10,12,13,14,15

Late registration for evening students

Sept. 19

Classes begin

Sept. 20-23

Progran1 ad j ustrnen t period

Oct. 14

Last day for course withdravyal without official record

Oct. 28

Last day to re1110ve I (il1coI11plete) grades fro111 Spring sernester 1966 and SU111n1er seSSIOn 1966

Nov. 14

Mid-sen1ester grades due at 5 p.n1.

Nov. 23

Last day for course withdrawal with auton1atic W grade

Nov. 23

Thanksgiving recess begins after last class

Nov. 28

Classes resun1e

Nov. 24-Dec. 21

Students withdrawing fro111 courses will be assigned W or F grades

Dec. 21

Students may not withdraw fro111 courses after this date

Dec. 21

Christn1as recess begins after last class

Jan. 2

Classes resun1e

Jan. 14

Final exan1ination period begins

Jan. 20

Last day of final examination period

Jan. 23

End of Fall sen1ester --- final grades due at 12 noon

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SPRING SEMESTER

1967 Nov. 16-Jan. 18

Regular registration

Jan. 13

Last day to subn1it application for attendance as a full-tirne student during the Fall sen1ester 1967

Jan. 20

Last day to pay fees for regular registration

Jan. 26,27,30,31

Late registration for day students

Jan. 28,30,31Feb. 1,2

Late registration for evening students

Feb. 6

Classes begin

Feb. 7-10

Progran1 adjustrl1ent

Feb. 10

Last day to file intent for graduation in June 1967

Mar. 3

Last day for course withdrawal without official record

Mar. 17

Last day to rerl10ve I (incornplete) grades fron1 Fall sen1ester 1966

Apr. 1

Spring recess begins after last class

Apr. 3

Mid-semester grades due at 5 p.m.

Apr. 10

Classes resume

Apr. 14

Last day for course withdrawal with automatic W grade

Apr. 15-May 12

Students withdrawing fron1 courses will be assigned W or F grades

May 12

Students n1ay not withdraw fron1 courses after this date

May 30 May 31 June 6 June 9

Memorial Day, a holiday Final exan1ination period begins Last day of final examination period End of Spring sen1ester --- final grades due at 12 noon Ann ual F acul ty Luncheon Commencement

June 10 June 13

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Standing (1. to r.): Mr. Forrest, Dr. Simon, Mr. O'Meara and Mr. Lewis. Seated (1. to r.): Mr. Matia, Mrs. Ham and Mr. Kelker.

BOARD

OF

TRUSTEES

Mr. Thon1as O. Matia, Chairman Mr. Frank L. Kelker, Vice Chairman Mr. David R. Forrest Mrs. Thon1as H. Han1 Mr. Robert L. Lewis Mr. Jan1es E. O'Meara Dr. Webster G. Simon

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ADMINISTRATIVE

STAFF

Dr. Charles E. Chapn1an, President Dr. Alfred M. Livingston, Vice President . Mr. Dante N. Biello, Business Manager Mr. Robert G. Cannan, Director of Public Affairs Dr. J. Philip Dalby, Dean of DevelojJ1nent and Planning . Dr. Charles N. Pappas, Dean of Business Administration and Acting Dean of Liberal Arts Dr. Morton S. Shanberg, Dean of the Prograrn for Part-Tirne Students Dr. Fred C. Sutton, Dean of Technical-Occupational Education Dr. Donald Swank, Dean of Student Peno'nnel

Charles N. Pappas Dean of Business Administration and Acting Dean of Liberal Arts

Donald Swank Dean of Student Personnel

Fred C. Sutton Dean of TechnicalOccupational Education

Morton S. Shanberg Dean of the Program for Part-Time Students

J. Philip Dalby Dean of Development and Planning

Dante N. BieHo Business Manager

Robert G. Carman Director of Public Affairs

Cleveland --- symbolized by its Terminal Tower, the tallest building west of the Hudson River --- has been characterized as "The Best Location in the Nation". Cleveland's visage is undergoing a remarkable transformation from Winton Place on the west to Horizon House on the east. These and other high-rise apartments are adding new dimensions to the city's silhouette. Downtown Cleveland is in the throes of a multi-million-dollar Renaissance --- fanning out in all directions from the Public Square --proceeding up famed Euclid Ave., stamping tomorrow's bright impress upon yesterday's "Millionaires' Row".

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A new Convention Center, the largest in the country, is attracting millions of visitors to trade shows and public events. New hotel and motel facilities have risen and others are being planned in the near future.

The 40-story Erieview Tower --- soaring over a vast plaza with reflecting pool and ice-skating rink --- is the keystone of the burgeoning Erieview area. It has been joined by the Cuyahoga Savings Building, General Electric Computer Center and other companions in symmetry. The lucent exterior of the 32-story Federal Building is nearing completion. The growing steel patterns of the Chesterfield apartment building are striating the sky. In the words of French Banker Baron Guy Rothschild, "Cleveland seems to be the center of everything --- the Erieview rebuilding is fantastic." The development of the downtown St. Vincent area is equally dramatic. New public housing has been constructed. The Boy Scouts of America headquarters is in operation. A large municipal parking area has been opened. The Salvation Army and Cleveland Guidance Center

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are in new quarters. St. Vincent Charity Hospital occupies a new wing. St. Joseph Franciscan School and a medical arts building have been completed. In the Summer of 1966, Cuyahoga Community College will break ground in this area of dynamic change for its Metropolitan Campus. The $22-;;2-million center of learning will cover 40 acres. It will accommodate 15,000 full- and part-time students. Target date for completion of the nine-unit, neoclassic complex is September of 1968. The campus of the new Cleveland State University is being designed to extend from this St. Vincent area, joining Erieview on the north. Cleveland, world port, is first in tonnage on the Seaway as a handler of general cargo. A city of many "firsts", Cleveland has long been a pacesetter in social work, medicine and health. It has long been the center of an inland empire of manufacturing, business, agriculture, graphic arts, transportation, finance, distribution, wholesaling and warehousing. Cleveland, the nation's eighth largest city, has America's fourth largest concentration of industrial, scientific and medical research. Cleveland is studded with jewels --- from a unique "Emerald N ecklace" of surrounding woodland parks to many splendid residential areas. Its University Circle is one of the nation's most magnificent concentra.:.. tions of cultural institutions. Here is a rich array of museums, colleges, concert halls, hospitals and churches. The Cleveland Orchestra, Cleveland Museum of Art, Public Library, Cleveland Zoo, Cleveland Browns, Cleveland Indians, Cleveland Play House, Great Lakes Shakespeare Festival and Karamu Theatre --- all have attracted national as well as international attention and acclaim. Selected by Gen. Moses Cleaveland in 1796 as an ideal site for a fur-trading center, the toddling frontier settlement at the mouth of the Cuyahoga (Iroquoian for "crooked") River has grown into a giant. Today --- 170 years later --- Greater Cleveland's 2,000,000 people have spilled over from the central city into Euclid, Shaker Heights, East Cleveland, North Olmsted, Maple Heights, Chagrin Falls, Brecksville, ,Parma, Lakewood and scores of other thriving suburbs. The "Forest City" has become an urban center embracing all of Cuyahoga County. As the face of Cleveland changes, its citizens look with confidence to an even greater future.

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History Cuyahoga Community College, Ohio's first public community college, is a two-year institution serving Greater Cleveland and environs. The College was chartered by the State of Ohio on Dec. 5, 1962, following the creation of a Community College District by the Cuyahoga County Commissioners. Tri-C became both the first public institution of higher learning in this densely populated area, and the first public college established in this state since Kent and Bowling Green State Universities were chartered in 1910.

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On Sept. 23, 1963, Cuyahoga Community College opened its doors to an influx of more than 3,000 full- and part-time students. It was the largest new institution in the history of the flourishing junior college movement --- a movement now numbering some 800 two-year colleges across the nation. Tri-C's instructional program got underway at BrO'wnell, a building which had seen long service as a Cleveland elementary school and, later, as a junior high school. The College Board of Trustees leased Brownell from the Cleveland Board of Education for $1 per year rent. To renO'vate and equip Brownell for its new role, a countywide fund drive was successfully cO'mpleted. More than $300,000 was raised through the generous support of individual donors, foundations, representatives of business, labor and industry. Acceptance of the College'S Program for Part-Time Students necessitated the acquisition of additional space. Arrangernents were made with two suburban schoO'I districts --- South Euclid-Lyndhurst and Parma --to' utilize classroO'ms for evening instruction at Brush and Valley Forge High Schools. In September of 1964, a third suburban campus was added, East Junior High School in Maple Heights --- a further expansion of academic opportunities for working adults and others wishing to broaden their educations on a part-time basis. On Nov. 5, 1963, the voters of Cuyahoga County apprO'ved an operating levy by a substantial majority, adding local support to existing state aid and student tuition.

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When a taxpayer's suit filed against the State of Ohio made it essential to place an emergency levy for necessary capital funds on the May, 1964, ballot, the voters responded and approved the issue by an overwhelming majority.

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Thus, Tri-C was able to greatly expand its facilities and services. Additional space then was leased in the Huron Building, which formerly housed the Internal Revenue Service at 626 Huron Rd. Seven floors and an annex have provided space for additional classrooms, increased library services, administrative offices, cafeteria, student activities and bookstore. In September of 1964, Cuyahoga Community College more than doubled its size with an enrollment of 6,500 youths and adults from every comn1unity in Greater Cleveland. By the following Fall, the total student body numbered 9,967. To accommodate everyone seeking higher education, Tri-C had leased additional facilities --- the Gallo Building and Huron Building Annex. Projections for the future indicate that the College will continue to grow at this swift pace. To fulfill the vital need for postsecondary educational facilities in Cuyahoga County, the College will soon take two dramatic forward strides. Groundbreaking for an ultramodern downtown learning center, the 40-acre Metropolitan Campus in the St. Vincent area, will take place in the early Summer of 1966. In September of 1966, Tri-C will open a Western Campus, utilizing the buildings and grounds of the former Crile Veterans Administration Hospital in Parma and Parma Heights. The 129-acre Crile site recently was assigned to the College by the federal government.

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A total of $12-million is available from state appropnatlons and federal grants for construction of the Metropolitan Campus. Combined with the revenue derived from a 6/10ths of one mill levy, approved by county voters in May of 1965, the College has a $22.6-million capital budget for the Metropolitan Campus. Cuyahoga Community College has more than fulfilled the expectation of advocates who foresaw its need here as long ago as 1953. A faculty of highly qualified and competent instructors continues to enlarge, and thousands of students are inquiring about future admission. The community to date has warmly endorsed the College with support of the building campaign, approval at the polls, and many generous donations to the Cuyahoga Community College Loan and Scholarship Funds. With the advent of the new Cleveland State University as well, Greater Cleveland is taking giant strides toward the development of a post-high school educational program without peer in the United States.

College Facilities DOWNTOWN The present Metropolitan Campus buildings in downtown Cleveland are leased quarters until permanent facilities are constructed. Buildings are within walking distance of each other. The Brownell Science and Technology Building is located at 2214 Eo 14 St., between Sumner Ave. and Bronson Ct. Brownell contains classrooms, science and technology laboratories, a little theatre and the Technical-Occupational administrative offices.

The Gallo Building, 1012 Sumner Ave., contains ten classrooms, nursing laboratory, art studio, student lounge and faculty offices. The Huron Building, 626 Huron Rd., encompasses seven floors. The basement houses the Educational Media and Mail Centers. The first floor contains the cafeteria, student activities area, health services and bookstore. A student lounge is on the first floor of the annex. The library is on the second floor of the Huron Building and annex. The Repro-Graphic Center is on the third floor. Floors three, four and six contain classrooms and lounges. Administrative offices, Admissions and Records, and Student Personnel are on five. Faculty offices and lounge, additional administrative offices and the Computation Center are located on the seventh floor.

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PARKING AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Student parking is not available on the campus grounds. Metered on-street parking is permitted near the downtown facilities at times designated by the City of Cleveland. Space is available at the municipallyowned Lakefront and St. Vincent lots for a nominal fee of 25c per day. Loop busses provide service from these areas. Additional downtown parking is available near the College at several private parking garages and lots. The downtown buildings of Cuyahoga ,Community College are convenient to public transportation as well as the freeway system.

LIBRARY The information center of the College, the library, acts as a service division of the instructional area. It is maintained for the benefit of students and faculty members. Printed materials for supplemental study are part of a rapidly growing collection assembled through the cooperative efforts of the faculty and library staff.

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To accommodate students working on both individual and assigned projects, open stacks are maintained to allow direct access to the books. Library hours are from 8: 30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 8: 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday; and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. During these hours, the library staff is available to give any needed assistance.

The library operates a listening room for the playing of recordings and tapes prepared by the instructors as well as commercially prepared materials.

EDUCATIONAL MEDIA CENTER The Educational Media Center produces and distributes audio and visual materials for classroom and general College use --- e.g., audio tapes, motion picture film strips, slides, overhead transparencies, photographs, drawings, charts and mock-ups. Original materials and copies are provided to instructors as requested. Copyrighted instructional materials are rented or purchased, if necessary. In addition, the staff advises faculty in the selection and design of appropriate aids to improve the instructional process.

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REPRO-GRAPHIC CENTER The College Repro-Graphic Center provides a wide variety of graphic arts services --- e.g., reports, posters, programs, press releases, folders and instructional materials --- as requested by the faculty and staff. It also performs related functions such as layout, stapling, punching and maintenance of the College mailing list.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION To achieve the goal of a healthy mind in a healthy body, the College offers a program of physical education designed to develop an understand~ ing and appreciation of bodily fitness, to improve and increase the student's recreational skills, and to advance his social competency and poise. Facilities utilized by the College in downtown Cleveland include gymnasiums, an Olympic-size swimming pool, lockers and showers.

FOOD SERVICES Hot meals are served daily in the Huron Building cafeteria. Snack bar items also are sold. Vending machines dispense beverages, sandwiches and snacks at the Huron, Brownell Science and Technology, and Gallo Buildings. Note: Facilities for physical education, and library and food services are being planned for the Western Campus, opening in September of 1966. Repro-graphic and educational media services also will be available.

Metropolitan Campus Forty cleared acres of prime land in downtown Cleveland, where aging commercial buildings and tenements once stood, will in the near future be transformed into a resplendent ten-block-long institution of higher learning. Groundbreaking for this Metropolitan Campus in the St. Vincent area is scheduled for early Summer of 1966. Target date for completion is September of 1968.

The $22-Y2-million learning complex will extend from E. 24 to E. 33 Sts. and from Woodland to Scovill Aves., near the municipal parking lot and adjacent to the Willow Freeway. This neoclassic, space-age campus is being designed to accommodate 15,000 students, and is being conceived as a facility that will enrich the entire community. It will be a center where clinics, public meetings, symposiums, lectures, orchestral and choral concerts, recitals, films, plays, operas, art shows, varsity and scholastic athletic contests, and other events can be scheduled. The Science-Technology Center will be the largest building in gross area with 164,500 square feet. Science display areas are envisioned in this facility. Ultramodern and proven electronic teaching and learning equipment will be utilized. An Educational Materials Center will have closed circuit television and a motion picture studio. Facilities for production of photographic, graphic and audio materials also are planned. Buildings will rise on platforms with parking areas. underneath. The central and dominant structure will be the six-story Library and Computation Center. Students will traverse the "all-weather" campus via underground corridors or open-air passageways through the spacious inner courts.

The maIn units are: College Administration and Student Personnel Center Humanities Center Science-Technology Center Music and Arts Center Health and Physical Education Center Drama and Educational Media Center Student Center and Commons Maintenance-Operation Center Library and Computation Center

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Western Campus In September of 1966, Cuyahoga Community College will offer a comprehensive educational program for the 400,000 residents of the western and southwestern sectors of the county when it opens the Western Campus in Parma and Parma Heights. Day and evening courses are being planned for an estimated initial enrollment of more than 4,000 full- and part-time students. Two-year degree programs will be offered in the Technical-Occupational and University Parallel-Liberal .Arts areas. As is the case at Tri-C's present downtown facilities, classes will be held from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m.

The Western Campus will be located on the site of the former Crile Veterans Administration Hospital on York Rd. This property was declared surplus by the federal government. A total of 129 acres and the buildings thereon were assigned to the College in the forepart of 1966 at no cost to the citizens of Cuyahoga County. Approximately one-third of the 95 buildings will be razed during the Summer of 1966 to create a campus atmosphere, to provide parking facilities and to open an expanse for construction of permanent structures in the future. The remaining buildings will be renovated for the Fall semester of 1966. Projections for the entire Cuyahoga Community College District indicate that Tri-C can expect a total enrollment of approximately 23,000 by the Fall of 1970. To meet the needs of this exploding student population, the College in 1965 began detailing its 1962 plan for development of a multi-campus operation. It is now considering the establishment of a third permanent campus to serve the populous eastern segment of the community.

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Educational Objectives Cuyahoga Community College is dedicated to the concept that the individual talent and integrity of America's citizenry constitute the nation's most valuable resources. The College, therefore, endeavors to extend broad educational opportunities to the youths and adults of its community. The College has established the corollary requirement of high performance standards for all who participate in its programs. In pursuit of these objectives, the College offers a diverse and wellconceived curriculum. It maintains a staff of superior instructors whose prime duties revolve around their teaching assignments. The College endeavors to provide an environment conducive to learning, with special emphasis upon library and laboratory resources. The College encourages independence of thought and action as essential ingredients of a functioning democracy, stressing the development of value judgments and self-discipline. Cuyahoga Community College expects all students to develop competence in the fundamental processes of reading, writing, speaking, listening and computation. All students are expected to develop an appreciation of the scientific method in the solution of problems. Another prime concern of the College is that students develop an awareness of the unique values that are our natural heritage, including the primacy of moral and spiritual concerns. Corollary development of a sense of an American citizen's inherent responsibilities is expected. The College strives to imbue all students with a consistent desire to become and remain vocationally proficient. Cuyahoga Community College further expects all students to manifest their respect for educational opportunity by reciprocal behavior. Students are to maintain regular attendance, and to display exemplary conduct and diligent application in quest of opportunities to make societal contributions in degrees commensurate with their abilities. Planning and policy-making by the Trustees of the College have been consistent with the purposes and objectives of the two-year college. Specifically, the Official Plan for Cuyahoga CommunÂŁty College, adopted by

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the Board of Trustees, Nov. 28, 1962, sets forth the following student objectives: 1. To see his cultural-heritage in its historical perspective. 2. To live effectively in accordance with the conditions of his biological and physical environment. 3. To recognize and guard the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a free society. 4. To guide his life by sound moral and spiritual values. 5. To appreciate and participate in creative activities. 6. To achieve satisfactory personal, social and community relationships. 7. To apply critical and discriminating thought to the solutions of problems. 8. To accept responsibility for his decisions. 9. To develop the basic skills of communications. 10. To enjoy the benefits of a rewarding and productive vocation. 11. To acquire a positive attitude toward, and strengthened foundation for, lifelong learning.

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Philosophy of the College Cuyahoga Community College commits itself to the following philosophy: As our culture becomes increasingly complex, we must provide educational opportunities beyond those afforded by the secondary schools --opportunities that are easily available, geographically and financially, to any citizen who can profit from them. This premise has particular significance in a free society such as ours because we feel that the preservation and development of any culture depends upon the enlightenment and the participation of its members --- upon their ability to make choices and accept responsibilities. Consistent with this belief, the College is unique in that --- while it is sensitive to the peculiar natural and social forces affecting members of this community, and to the differing interests and needs of these people --it is aware also of the elements of learning common to them all. The College then welcomes those who wish to develop abilities and prepare for responsibilities beyond their present experiences; whether such students plan to continue in senior colleges, pursue vocational or professional programs, or undertake studies to broaden their vision. In addition to furthering the students' objectives, we will undertake to excite their intellectual curiosity; give them a better understanding and appreciation of themselves and of their environment; help them evaluate objectively new ideas and concepts; and, finally, encourage them to develop their reasoning, to cultivate self-discipline, and to respect themselves and others. Inasmuch as learning extends beyond the scope of the classroom and the campus, the College strives to promote the intellectual activities of the community and to exert its every energy to enrich the culture of the area which it serves. This philosophy will be implemented by a continuing pursuit of academic and teaching excellence.

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Accredi ta tion On Dec. 5, 1962, the State of Ohio granted Cuyahoga Community College a charter to operate a public community college consistent with the provisions of chapter 3354, Ohio Revised Code. The programs and functions of Cuyahoga Community College, like those of other public institutions of higher learning in the state, are coordinated by the Ohio Board of Regents. Cuyahoga Community College is a candidate for membership in the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and is approved by the Veterans Administration. The College holds membership in the following organizations: American Association of Junior Colleges Council of North Central Junior Colleges Council of Ohio Community-Junior Colleges American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers Cleveland Commission on Higher Education Ohio Colleges Association (associate member)

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Purposes and Programs Cuyahoga Community College offers a comprehensive day, late afternoon and evening class schedule which runs from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., Monday through Thursday; 8 to 5 on Friday; and 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday. The instructional programs are unified, administered, supervised and implemented in such a way that all classes contribute to the purposes of the College.

PURPOSES OF THE COLLEGE Cuyahoga Community College, which exists through the support of the county and state in which it resides, views itself as an associate of the people it serves. As a locally controlled and locally administered institution, Tri-C is especially attuned to its own community --- Cuyahoga County. A close identification with its home area is one of the unique advantages and strengths of the comprehensive community college. This community-college coalescence leads to a diversity of educational, occupational and cultural programs which reflect the needs of the area's people. These offerings may be traditional or conventional in nature --or they may represent an unaccustomed or neoteric approach to learning. Recognizing that students differ greatly in experience, needs, capacities, aspirations and interests --- the College pursues the following major purposes:

1. Academic Preparation tor Advanced Formal Study. This University Parallel Program provides the first two years of the traditional four-year Liberal Arts Program leading to the Bachelor's degree. Students who enroll in this program attend a year or two and then transfer as sophomores or juniors to four-year collegiate institutions. 2. Technical-Occupational. A broad range of technological, business and other occupational programs are available. Students who plan to pursue careers as technicians or as para-professionals may enter one- and two-year programs in fields where increasingly critical manpower shortages exist. Courses also are offered in the TechnicalOccupational Program for those who seek to learn new skills or to improve upon present proficiencies. 3. Community Services --- Adult Education. Tri-C, closely identified with the needs of the community, provides representative cultural, educational and occupational offerings as determined by public interest. Community services are offered in cooperation with other educational institutions, business, government, nealth agencies, individuals, community groups and labor.

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4. General Education. A prime concern is the imparting of the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed by each individual to be effective as a person, a member of a family, a worker and a citizen in a free society. 5. Educational and Occupational Counseling. Comprehensive counseling service is stressed to assist full- and part-time students in the selection and pursuit of a life work compatible with their interests, aptitudes and values.

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION AT THE COLLEGE Cuyahoga Community College --- within the scope of its purposes and objectives, and consistent with Ohio law --- offers two major programs of instruction. The University Parallel Program emphasizes the Arts and Sciences, and offers the first two years of a conventional college curriculum. The Technical-Occupational Program is designed to fulfill the unique employment requirements of this community and to meet its citizens' need for occupational education.

UNIVERSITY PARALLEL PROGRAM Major academic offerings are available to students who desire individual courses. The College also offers a two-year program leading to the Associate in Arts degree. Many students attend Cuyahoga Community College for one or two years and then transfer as sophomores or juniors to the senior institutions of their choice. This is usually referred to as a Transfer or University Parallel Program because courses parallel those of four-year schools. Earned credits may be transferred to senior institutions and applied toward a Bachelor's degree. Cuyahoga Community College offers freshman and sophomore courses leading to a Bachelor's degree in such fields as business, education and engineering; and pre-professional work leading to degrees in dentistry, medicine, law and other professions.

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TECHNICAL-OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM The second major objective of Cuyahoga Community College is to develop a comprehensive series of technological and business courses designed to fulfill the occupational needs of the community's citizens and employers. Individuals who wish to learn, relearn or improve their vocational skills, may choose from a wide variety of course offerings. Individuals who seek to pursue a career as a technician, or at the para-professional level, may enroll in a two-year program leading to the Associate in Science degree.

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Today, the accelerating pace of technological development demands manpower with new and ever improving qualifications. Trained and skilled personnel are vitally needed in many fields. By 1970, it is estimated that one-fourth of the United States labor force will be working in para-professional, technical positions which did not even exist in 1930. In the near future, some 50 per cent of all the nation's workmen will be employed at levels requiring a minimum of 14 years of education. Advisory Committees help Cuyahoga Community College create programs and courses designed to prepare today's youth and adults for tomorrow's work world. Civic-minded representatives of business, industry, government, health agencies, public service and labor serve on these advisory groups. They assist the College in the identification of needs and the development of all Technical-Occupational Programs.

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PROGRAM FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS Cuyahoga Community College's Program for Part-Time Students provides a broad spectrum of day and evening courses for those who wish to acquire or upgrade a vocational skill, widen their educational vista or earn a degree. The program serves students in all age groups. It includes teenagers, who come to Tri-C directly from high school, as well as senior citizens, resuming their educations after short or extended interruptions. Adults who are profiting from college attendance have varying academic backgrounds and vocational experience. Some have had prior college education, others have not. It is not unusual for a community college to have twice as many part-time students as it has full-time day students. Generally, courses offered in the Program for Part-Time Students carry college credit. These may be applied toward an Associate degree at Cuyahoga Community College. Students also may transfer credits earned in University Parallel courses to senior institutions. These credits may be applied toward a four-year university degree. Counseling services are available to assist all part-time students. Part-time students desiring to register for more than two courses should consult with a member of the counseling staff. Late afternoon and evening classes are offered from 5: 45 to. 10 p.m., Monday through Thursday. Courses differ in no essential degree from those in the day program. They parallel day courses in title and number, prerequisites, content, outside work required and in examinations. Persons desiring complete information are invited to. request a copy of the bulletin, Program for Part-Time Students) available in the Office of Admissions and Records, Cuyahoga Community College, 626 Huron Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44115.

COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM Representative cultural, educational and vocational offerings are provided by the Community Service Program as determined by public interest. Credit or non-credit courses and programs are conducted onand off-campus in locations most conducive to quality instruction.

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Community services generally are offered in cooperation with other educational institutions, labor, business, government, health agencIes, industry, service organizations and individuals. One typical community service is a non-credit, one-year Certified Laboratory Assistant Program, presented in conjunction with the Cleveland Hospital Council, the Cleveland Society of Medical Technologists and the Cleveland Society of Pathologists. Another example is "Project Eve" (Education Volunteer Employment) established in the Spring of 1966. Included will be part-time courses, evening programs and a series of sessions designed primarily for the continuing education of women. It will examine opportunities for volunteer work with social agencies, cultural institutions and other community organizations. It also is being fashioned to serve increasing numbers of married women who wish to prepare themselves for skilled and para-professional employment. The College also conducts a number of non-credit courses in special areas of interest, including Creative Writing, Studies in Jazz, and Broadcast Journalism. See the bulletin, Program for Part-Time Students, for complete information. Individuals and enterprises within Cuyahoga County are invited to communicate with College officials to explore ways in which this institution can provide additional community services.

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ALL [ WAIT IN I

CAFET[f

Admissions FULL-TIME STUDENTS All high school graduates are eligible to enroll at Cuyahoga Community College in University Parallel or Technical-OcGupational curriculums leading to two-year degrees. Students will be accepted in the order of their applications.

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PART-TIME STUDENTS Admission is open to all high school graduates as well as nongraduates over 21 years of age who can profit from college-level instruction. You may attend the College in the daytime, late afternoon or evening --- credit or non-credit --- at the hours most convenient to you. Further information can be found in the College bulletin, Program tor Part-Time Students. Candidates planning to enroll for fewer than nine hours per semester should submit the following: 1. College Application tor Admission form to the Office of Admissions and Records. 2. High school transcript. Candidates under 21 years of age should request the high school last attended to forward a transcript to the College. It is recommended that candidates over 21 years of age, who have been graduated from high school, also request that a transcript be forwarded. 3. Official college transcript (s). Candidates who have attended a school or schools of college rank elsewhere should request that the registrar of each school attended forward a transcript to Cuyahoga Community College.

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RESIDENCY There is a fee differential between residents of Cuyahoga County, other Ohioans and out-of-state residents. A student's residency will be determined at the time of registration according to the residency policy of the State of Ohio, Ohio Board of Regents and Cuyahoga Community College Board of Trustees. A general residency statement can be found in the Mail Registration form. All changes in address should be reported to the Office of Admissions and Records.

SCHEDULE OF FEES Cuyahoga Community College, because it is a public institution, charges only a modest general and instructional fee.

STUDENT RATES PER SEMESTER HOUR FOR FULL- AND PART-TIME STUDENTS

Cuyahoga County Residents

Other Ohio Residents

Out-ot-State Residents

If enrolled in 1 through 6 hours: u

$ 11

$ 16

$ 24

If enrolled in 7 through 14 hours:

$ 10

$ 15

$ 23

For 15 hours or more the maximum total cost per semester is:

$150

$225

$350

Laboratory Deposit: A. $5 breakage deposit is required for certain courses in which a laboratory period is required. A deposit card should be purchased at the bookstore. A complete refund is made at the end of the semester if no breakage has occurred.

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INTERNATIONAL STUDENl'S International students are required to demonstrate a competency in usage of the English language as part of the admissions procedure. An examination may be administered to determine such adequacy. Previous academic achievement in other educational institutions also will be considered. Further information may be obtained by contacting the Office of Admissions and Records.

TRANSFER STUDENTS 1. Students transferring from another college to Cuyahoga Community College should comply with the established admissions procedure and maintain certain academic standards. Students who do not meet the following requirements will be placed on probation: Semester Hours Attempted At Other Collegiate Institutions

9-29 inclusive 30-50 inclusive 51 and above

Cumulative Grade-Point Average (based on a four-point system) 1.50 1.75 2.00

1. If a student has been dismissed from another college or unIversity for academic or disciplinary reasons, he should petition the Director of Admissions and Records for admission. Students whose petitions are approved will be admitted on probation. These students will have one semester to meet the academic tabular requirements established for the College. Failure to meet these requirements will result in dismissal. 2. Transfer credits will not be accepted for courses in which less than a C grade has been earned. 3. Transfer credits accepted from other collegiate institutions attended are entered on the permanent record forms of the College. Grades earned are not indicated. 4. Only course grades earned at Cuyahoga Community College will be used in computing grade-point averages.

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PROGRAM CHANGES A change in a student's course schedule may be made during the program adjustment period. These changes are to be approved by a counselor. Choice of courses during this period is limited. Therefore, students are encouraged to select their courses with care in order to avoid the necessity of an adjustment.

WITHDRAWAL FROM CLASSES Students who wish to withdraw from a class are to complete the appropriate forms in the Office of Admissions and Records. Full-time students are to confer with a counselor as part of the official withdrawal procedure. Part-time students also are encouraged to confer with the instructor or counselor prior to withdrawal. Unofficial withdrawal from a class may result in a failing grade. See the "Calendar of Instruction" in the forepart of this Catalogue for the official withdrawal periods. Fees will be refunded as specified in the next section.

REFUND OF路 FEES 1. Fees will be refunded In full if the College cancels a course. Enlisting into the military service of the United States is not cause for refund. 2. A student who has no obligation to the bookstore, library or other department of the College at the time he withdraws, may have a refund based upon the following schedule: Regular Semester

First week of classes Second through fourth week Fifth week and thereafter

90% refund 50% refund no refund

Summer Session

First week of classes Second week Third week and thereafter

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90% refund 50% refund no refund

3. No refund will be granted when a student is dismissed or susIded from the College for disciplinary reasons. 4. Anything herein in paragraphs 1, 2, 3 hereof to the contrary :withstanding, a veteran who is enrolled in Cuyahoga Community llege under one of the federally assisted programs shall, upon withdrawal m the College, be refunded a fraction of the fees previously paid by 1, the numerator of which shall be the number of weeks which have psed in the current semester and the denominator of which shall be the 11 number of weeks of such semester. Students who are drafted into itary service will be granted refunds on the same basis. Note: Refunds will be made by mail within 30 days after student

withdrawal or cancellation of class by the College.

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READMISSION Students who have discontinued their attendance at Cuyahoga Community College may apply for readmission through the Office of Admissions and Records. Students who have attended another college or university during the interim should submit an official transcript from that school.

COMMUNIT'i

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Academic Regulations ACADEMIC PROBATION A student will be placed on probation under the following conditions: 1. If his cumulative grade-point average, after he has attempted nine or more semester hours at Cuyahoga Community College, is less than the following: Semester f10urs Attempted

9-29 inclusive 30-50 inclusive 51 and above

Cumulative Grade-Point Average (based on a four-point system)

1.50 1.75 2.00

2. If, in transferring to Cuyahoga Community College, his cumulative G.P.A. (grade-point average) at all colleges and universities does not meet the requirements listed above. If a student has been dismissed for academic or disciplinary reasons, he should petition the Director of Admissions and Records for admission. If the petition is approved, the student will be admitted on probation. He is to maintain at least a C (2.00) average each semester while on probation, or meet the necessary tabular requirements to be removed from probation. 3. A student on probation may not enroll for more than 12 semester hours in a regular semester or for more than six semester hours in a Summer session, with one exception: if he has earned a 2.50 grade-point average or higher in the most recent semester of full-time attendance, he may enroll for 15 semester hours in a regular semester.

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REMOVAL FROM PROBArrION A student will be removed from probation if he earns a cumulative G.P.A. not less than the preceding tabular requirements. Hours attempted at all colleges attended, including Tri-C, determine the tabular requirements necessary for removal from probation.

DISMISSAL A student who remains on probation for two consecutive semesters will be dismissed, with one exception: if his G.P.A. for the most recent period of enrollment is 2.00 or higher, he will be permitted to continue on probation. The Summer session is considered a period of enrollment. A student who has attempted nine or more semester hours and has less than a 1.00 cumulative grade-point average at the end of any period of enrollment will be dismissed. A student who has been dismissed from Cuyahoga Community College because of poor scholarship will not be permitted to enroll for the semester following his dismissal. A student dismissed at the end of the Spring semester may not enroll for the Summer session or the Fall semester. A student who has been dismissed from Cuyahoga Community College may apply to the Director of Admissions and Records for readmission. If readmitted, he will be on probation and is to achieve a C (2.00) average each semester while on probation, or meet -the necessary tabular requirements to be removed from probation.

AUDITORS At the time of registration or during the first week of classes, a student may request to audit courses. A Request to Audit form must be completed for each course audited. The fee for auditing is the same as for enrollment for credit. Transfer from audit to credit status or from credit to audit status is not permitted after the first week of classes. Students considering the auditing of courses should confer with a counselor.

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TRANSIENT STUDENTS A student who is matriculated at another collegiate institution may be admitted to Tri-C as a transient student. He should fill out an Application for Admission form and submit a letter of permission from the dean or registrar of his institution. The letter also should indicate that the student is in good standing and list courses in which he may enroll.

ATTENDANCE Regular and prompt attendance is expected at all classes, except in cases involving illness or emergency ..A. student may be dropped from class by his instructor whenever total absences exceed the total number of hours the class meets per week --- if, in the instructor's judgment, the student cannot benefit from further class instruction. Adherence to a schedule of regular, prompt attendance and consistent study habits constitutes one of the prime factors for success in college.

FINAL EXAMINATIONS A final exalnination is required in all courses. Instructors give examinations at regularly scheduled times only. Students may not be excused from examinations, except under extenuating circumstances. If a student will be unable to appear, it is his responsibility to inform an instructor prior to the scheduled examination time. Officially postponed final examinations are cause for a student to be assigned an I (Incomplete) as the grade in a course. Incomplete grades should be removed by completing the examination no later than the end of the sixth week of the following semester. Failure to do so will result in an F grade.

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION A student who feels he can demonstrate ability and knowledge in a particular subject may petition the appropriate academic dean for the privilege of taking a special examination and/or performing a special assignment for credit.

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Credit by examination requires both academic area and College approval. An examination fee of $5 per course is assessed. A student is not permitted to receive more than 12 hours of credit by examination. A standard symbol notation indicating "Credit by Examination" will be posted on the student's permanent record. Letter grades or quality points will not be recorded.

RECORDS --- GRADES AND QUALITY POINTS Reports of scholastic standing are mailed at mid-semester. Final grades are issued officially at the end of each semester. Letter grades are assigned quality points according to the following system:

Excellent 4 Good 3 Average 2 D - Below Average 1 F Failed 0 W Withdrawal 0 I Incomplete 0 S - Audit 0 Grade-Point Average is computed by the following formula: A B C

Grade-Point A. verage Courses with grades of semester hours attempted.

,AI

Total Quality Points Earned Total Semester Hours Attempted and S are not considered part of total

REPEATING A COURSE A co.urse may be repeated. All courses attempted, however, will be used to determine the cumulative grade-point average. Before repeating a course, the student is advised to confer with a counselor.

TRANSFER TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS Counselors and other members of the College staff will advise. and assist each student who contemplates transfer to a four-year college or university. They offer counsel to the student in planning for and completion of the transfer process. It remains; however, the responsibility of the student to. select his transfer institution and to closely follow the requirements for transfer to that institution. Such requirements are prescribed in the catalogue of each college and university. Reference copies of these catalogues are available in the College library and in the Office o.f Admissions and Records. Because of the specialized nature of the curriculums, many of the courses in the College's Technical-Occupational Program are not designed for transfer to four-year institutions. Official transcripts of grades may be requested through the Office of Admissions and Records .. Each student is entitled to one free transcript. Additional copies will be issued for a fee of $1 each.

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Graduation Requirements ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE Good standing is a requisite to candidacy for graduation from Cuyahoga Community College. An Associate in Arts degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements:

A.

GENERAL REOUIREMENTS

----

1. The satisfactory completion of no fewer than 62 semester hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 20 of the above 62 semester hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Community College. A student is to attain a C (2.00) average for all work at the College.

B.

SPECIFIC REOUIREMENTS

---

1. Minimum competency in communication as verified by one of the following patterns: English 091, English 092 and English 101, or English 091 and English 101, or English 101 and English 102.

2. The completion of no fewer than six semester hours selected from the following: History 101 and History 102, or History 151 and History 152, or Political Science 101 and Political Science 102, or Social Science 101 and Social Science 102.

3. The completion of Health Education 101 or no fewer than two semester hours of physical education.

4. Minimum C0111petency In mathematics as verified by one of the following: Any l11athe111atics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College, or achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test approved by the College, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SA.T.

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C.

ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS Six semester hours of electives are to be selected from three of the following areas: (Courses taken to fulfill specific requirements may not be applied toward an elective requirement.) Humanities, Science and Mathematics, Social Sciences and Technical-Occupational.

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE Good standing is a requisite to candidacy for graduation from Cuyahoga Community College. An Associate in Science degree will be granted to the student completing the following requirements:

66

A.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

1. The satisfactory conlpletion of no fewer than 62 semester hours. 2. The completion of no fewer than 20 of the above 62 semester hours while in attendance at Cuyahoga Comn1unity College. student is to attain a C ( 2.00) average for all work at the College.

B.

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS

1. Minimum competency in conlmunication as verified by one of the following patterns: English 091 and English 092, or English 091 and English 101, or English 101 and English 102, or English 091 and Speech 101, or English 101 and Speech 101.

2. The completion of no fewer than six semester hours selected from the following: History 101 and History 102, or History 151 and History 152, or Political Science 101 and Political Science 102, or Social Science 101 and Social Science 102.

3. The conlpletion of Health Education 101 or no fewer than two semester hours of physical education.

4. Minimum competency in mathematics as verified by one of the following: Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College, or achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test approved by the College, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT.

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C.

ELECTIVE REQUIREMENTS Six semester hours of electives are to be selected from two of the following areas: (Courses taken to fulfill specific requirements may not be applied toward an elective requirement.) Humanities, Science and Mathematics, and Social Sciences.

In addition to the preceding requirements, a student is to fulfill the curricular requirements for the particular program as listed in the Suggested Semester Sequences. (See index. )

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Student

ersonnel Services

1

t

ces

SERVICES staff of professional counselors is available to help all students achieve a productive and rewarding experience at the College. Students are encouraged to explore their educational and vocational goals with counselors. Careful consideration is given to interests, motivations, aptitudes, past achievements and realistic opportunities. Counselors also are available at any time to discuss a student's educational or personal problems. Although all full-time students are assigned to a particular counselor, counseling services by appointment are available throughout the year to all Tri-C students. Counseling services begin prior to registration. At that time, each new full-time student discusses choice of program and course plan with his counselor. The student is encouraged to schedule regular conferences regarding his progress. Prior to each subsequent registration, the student sees his counselor for further assistance in the clarification of goals and in planning a course of study. Any part-time student desiring to enroll for more than two courses is to discuss his goals and plans with a counselor prior to registration. Special advisory sessions are scheduled for this purpose. The administration, faculty and counselors join in a concerted effort to guide and counsel students enrolled at Cuyahoga COlumunity College.

TESTS Entering students are requested to have the results of the ACT (American College Testing Program) or SAT (Scholastic i\ptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board) forwarded to Cuyahoga Conlmunity College. The results are used for counseling purposes only, to place students in appropriate courses and curriculums. Psychological tests assessing mental ability, interests and aptitudes also are administered on campus as the need arises. Students may make arrangements with a counselor for such testing.

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REGISTRATION Regular registration on either a full- or part-time basis is open to any person who has completed admission requirements. The regular registration period is offered for more than two months each semester and ends approximately two weeks before the semester begins. Students who register during this period have the advantage of a wider selection of courses and more desirable time schedules. Late registration for those who cannot avail themselves of regular registration takes place just prior to the beginning of the semester. Additional information concerning registration can be found in the Class Schedule issued each semester. To insure an advantageous class schedule, and to realize the full benefits of the College's orientation and counseling services, prospecti\'c students are urged to initiate the admission process as early as possible.

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VETERANS' EDUCATION The Veterans Administration has approved Cuyahoga Community College as an institution qualified and equipped to provide education in the Arts and Sciences, and in the Technical-Occupational area, under the provisions of the War Orphans Assistance Act and the Veterans Readjustment Act of 1966. Please contact the Office of Admissions and Records for further information.

SELECTIVE SERVICE Information regarding Selective Service may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records.

HEALTH SERVICES The Health Service offers emergency care, first aid and treatment of common minor ailments. The College nurse is available daily for discussion of personal health problems. The College physician is available for emergencies and consultation. Students are expected to have general medical needs met by their personal physicians and dentists or clinics.

FINANCIAL AID PROGRAM Despite Cuyahoga Community College's low tUItion fee, there are many capable and deserving students who need financial assistance. The Financial grants-in-aid, loans this program is to such aid, would be

Aid Program of the College consists of scholarships, and part-time employment. The primary purpose of provide financial assistance to students who, without unable to attend college.

The family of a student is expected to make a maximum effort to assist the student with College expenses. Resources of the family are complemented by financial assistance from the College and other sources. In the selection of students who are to receive financial assistance, primary consideration is placed upon financial need, academic achievement, character and future promise.

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SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS-IN-AJD Cuyahoga Community College is fortunate to have the support of civic-minded individuals and groups who believe in the College's purposes, programs, and objectives. Their contributions created, and their continuous support helps to maintain, the General Scholarship I,'und.

ELIGIBILITY AND APPLICA.TION PROCEDURE Full-time students --- those carrying a semester load of 12 or more hours --- are eligible to apply for scholarships and grants-in-aid. Application forms may be secured by contacting the Coordinator of Student Financial Assistance. Applications are to be returned, along with all admission credentials, according to the following schedule: Semester Fall 1966 Spring 1967 Fall 1967

Deadline Date May 2, 1966 Nov. 18, 1966 Apr. 7, 1967

LOANS There are several different loan programs available at Cuyahoga Community College. A general description of each follows. It is assumed that a student will apply for the program best suited to his individual needs. In all cases, applications should be submitted and cleared through the Coordinator of Student Financial .A.ssistance before the close of the semester preceding that for which the loan is desired.

STUDENT LOANS Students are permitted to borrow up fees at no interest. A parent or guardian if the applicant is under 21 years of age. cording to the repayment schedule set up proved.

to 50 per cent of their assessed must co-sign the cognovit note All loans are to be repaid acwhen the cognovit note is ap-

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THE BERTRAND C. STYLES STUDENT AID LOAN FUND This fund is available for eligible full- or part-time students in need of financial assistance on a long-term basis. The loan is interest free, repayable after the student terminates his education according to the repayment schedule set up when the cognovit note is approved.

LOANS FOR SOPHOMORES There are two $150 loans specifically for sophomores. The loans are non-interest bearing, repayable at the end of the student's year according to the repayment schedule set up when the cognovit note is approved.

LOANS FOR STUDENTS MAJORING IN BUSINESS The Cleveland Chapter of the National Association of Accountants has provided loans for students who are majoring in Business. The repayment of these non-interest loans is according to the arrangements made when the cognovit note is approved.

NATIONAL DEFENSE STUDENT LOANS Students are eligible to apply, provided they register for eight or more semester hours and maintain no less than eight semester hours. Applicants are to have a minimum 2.00 grade-point average in order to apply and/or re-apply. The College will grant these loans to students who are capable of maintaining good academic standing and who have a verified financial need. Loans from this fund shall be made on such terms and conditions as the College may determine; subject, however, to such conditions, limitations and requirements as specified in the National Defense Education Act of 1958, Title II, as amended. These loans normally have a maximum of $1,000 per year with a total maximum of $5,000. However, due to the limited funds available to Cuyahoga Community College, the maximum is currently $200 per student for each of the Fall and Spring semesters. An additional $100 is available for the Summer session.

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Application forms for these loans may be secured from the Coordinator of Student Financial Assistance. Applications are to be returned, along with all admission credentials, according to the following schedule: Semester

Deadline Date

Fall 1966

May 2, 1966

Spring 1967

Nov. 18, 1966

Fall 1967

Apr. 7, 1967

STUDENT Oif/lltH••II:

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND PLACEMENT The Office of Student Placement coordinates all student employment for the College. All currently enrolled students and graduates may a vail themselves of these services. Part-time employment is available on the campus for students enrolled in 12 or more hours. On-campus employment is limited to 15 hours per week. The College conducts a work-study program under the Economic Opportunity Act and also assists students in obtaining full-time employment outside the College.

75

al are Facto rs consid ered in determ ining eligibility for work referr t is ena counselor's recom menda tion, the numb er of hours that a studen rolled, grades, financ ial needs, skills and work experience. s with Stude nts are encou raged to discuss emplo ymen t oppor tunitie the Coord inator of Stude nt Place ment or with their counselor. service Stude nts who wish to avail thelTIselves of career placem ent gradu ation. are urged to make applic ation several month s in advan ce of tional Specia l effort is made to help gradu ates of the Techn ical-O ccupa conta ct Progr am find emplo ymen t in their field. These studen ts also lTIay and assistthe Techn ical-O ccupa tional Office for placem ent inform ation ance.

ASSI STAN CE TO THE PHY SICA LLY HAN DICA PPED to the The Office of Stude nt Person nel rende rs a variet y of services ed by conphysically handi cappe d. Furth er inforn 1ation nlay be obtain tactin g this office.

STU DEN T ACT IVIT IES tional Cuyah oga Comm unity College recognizes the educa tional , recrea ies. It and social values of a well-i ntegra ted progr am of studen t activit to the believes that partic ipatio n in co-cu rricul ar activities contri butes leader ship wholesome develo pment of the indivi dual and to the growt h of

Theo dore C. Soren son at Stude nt Conv ocati on Serie s

ability. A well-balanced progranl has been developed In response to student interests and needs. A large measure of responsibility for campus affairs is in the hands of the students themselves, under the guidance of the Director of Student Activities, Coordinator of Student Activities or a faculty member. The students essentially establish and administer most of the non-academic campus activities. They determine the College's social program and participate in the maintenance of discipline essential to an academic community. The' program of activities may vary from senlester to semester, depending upon student choice. Every student is welcome to partICIpate in these programs and may secure further information fron1 officers of each organization or from the Director of Student Activities. A general list of student actIVItIes and events to be found on the calendar each semester includes: Student Cabinet

Choir

Interclub Council

Dramatics

Inter-Greek Council

Band

Interest groups

Intercollegiate debate

Professional organizations

Weekly (The Comrnuter) and

Convocations

daily (Tri-C Grapevine)

Religious groups

publications

Political clubs

Yearbook (T he Metropolitan)

Local fraternities

Literary magazine (Everyman)

Local sororities

Dances and other social

Intramural sports

functions

(Badminton, basketball,

Varsity sports

bowling, chess, free throw

(Track and field, basketball,

contest, golf, swimming

golf and base ball )

table tennis, volleyball and wrestling)

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1

1\11 to ) thet now...

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81

83

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COLORS The official colors of Cuyahoga Community College are Brown and Gold.

TEAM NICKNAME The College's athletic teams are nicknamed the Cougars.

ATHLETIC AFFILIATION Tri-C is a member of the National Junior College Athletic Association and engages in intercollegiate competition with teams from Virginia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and New York.

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Miscellaneous Infortnation DEFINITION OF CLASS STANDING A freshman or first-year student at Cuyahoga Community College is one who has earned 29 or fewer semester hours. This includes any semester hours transferred from other colleges and universities. A sophomore or second-year student is one who has earned 30 or more semester hours (45 quarter hours). This includes any semester hours transferred from other colleges or universities.

COLLEGE SEMESTER AND THE SCHOOL YEAR The regular school year is divided into two semesters. The school year begins in September, normally on the second Monday following Labor Day, and closes at the end of 40 weeks with the graduation ceremony in June. The calendar for this school year appears near the beginning of this Catalogue.

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES Prior to the registration period for each semester, a Class Schedule is published. It contains the classes offered, general registration procedures and placement test schedules.

STUDENT AND FACULTY CONFERENCES The faculty members of Cuyahoga Community College maintain scheduled office hours to confer with students concerning class assignments and methods of study for particular courses. Consultations also are held to review test results and other measures of academic achievement. Schedules of hours will be posted in the faculty office areas. Students are urged to familiarize themselves with the schedules and to contact instructors during these hours.

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It is the responsibility of each student to consult his instructor and to make arrangements for the completion of class work missed while absent.

HONORS Each semester, those students whose scholastic achievement is outstanding are given public recognition by inclusion on the Dean's List. This list honors all students who have earned a grade-point average of 3.5 in 12 or more credit hours undertaken during the preceding semester. The names are displayed on a special bulletin board in the library.

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STUDENT LOAD The normal course load for full-time students is 15 semester hours. However, a counselor may recomluend a heavier or lighter load because of past performance and other factors. New students, who ranked in the lowest quarter of their high school graduating class, may not enroll for more than 12 credit hours. Previously enrolled students who have attempted less than a total of nine hours, and who ranked in the lowest

90

quarter of their graduating class, also may not enroll for more than 12 credit hours. Students on probation may not enroll in more than 12 credit hours unless their G.P.A. for the most recent semester was 2.5 or higher.

COMBINING COLLEGE ATTENDANCE WITH OUTSIDE EMPLOYMENT Many students find it necessary to work while attending college. By careful and realistic planning, work and study may be successfully combined. Each semester hour in which the student is enrolled generally requires a minimum of two hours of outside study. Therefore, the following guide is strongly recommended: Students employed full time should attempt to carry no more than two courses (five to eight credit hours). Those employed part time should carry a course load proportionate to their hours of employment.

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PUBLICATIONS The Commuter) the weekly College newspaper, is written and edited by journalism students under the supervision of a journalism instructor. In 1965, The Commuter earned four awards at the Ohio College Newspaper Association convention. The Tri-C Grapevine is a daily bulletin of campus events and student announcements. It is printed Monday through Friday when classes are in session during the Fall and Spring semesters. T he Metropolitan) the College Yearbook, reflects various aspects of College life and general activities. The staff is selected by the student editor and the faculty advisor. T he Student Directory is published annually by the C. B. l\llen Chapter of the Student National Education Association under the supervision of the group's faculty advisor. It includes a complete list of student names, addresses and phone numbers. Everyman) the Literary Magazine, is published annually. It contains student short stories, plays, poetry and essays.

PUBLIC AFFAIRS Public events --- e.g., "Meet the Faculty" Lecture Series, art exhibits and film series --- are coordinated, organized and administered through the Office of Public Affairs.

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All releases of public information from the College to the press, TV or radio are ~o be channeled through this office. Students are requested not to contact representatives of the mass communications media regarding College news without express permission to do so. Faculty and staff members of the College Speakers Bureau are available for appearances at meetings of the community's church, school, service, political and other groups or organizations. The Catalogue, Annual Report, Progress Report and other official College publications are produced by the Office of Public Affairs.

HOUSING Cuyahoga Comnlunity College, because it is an urban institution primarily designed to serve its own community, provides no residential housing for students. However, the YMCA and YWCA are in proximity to the Metropolitan Campus and have rooms available for rent.

SUMMER SESSION Summer sessions extend over a period of eight weeks. Students may enroll in two courses not to exceed eight semester hours of credit. Students interested in enrolling for Summer classes should contact the Office of .A.dmissions and Records.

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Description of Courses

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COURSE NUMBERING Courses, are listed in numerical order within each area of instruction. Some courses extend over one semester, others for two or more semesters. Courses with the saIne title, possessing consecutive numbers, indicate that the courses are of more than one semester duration. In most instances, courses preceded by 080-099 are designed to provide students with foundations in essential subject matter areas necessary for advanced studies in such fields as communications and mathematics. Courses numbered 100-199 normally represent freshman courses. Courses numbered 200-299 usually represent sophomore-level courses. Course numbers do not indicate whether or not a course will be accepted for transfer to other institutions. Students are advised to consult with their counselors regarding transfer of courses and credits to other institutions. (See Transfer to Other Institutions in index.)

CREDIT HOURS The semester credit for each course is indicated opposite the course title. Three credits; e.g., is 3 Cr. The number of credits granted for a course does not always equal the number of hours of classroom instruction. Semester credit hour is, generally, the amount of time spent per week in regular classroom sessions. English 101; e.g., meets three hours per week. Therefore, it carries three semester hours of credit.

PREREQUISITES The prerequisites listed for specific courses and specific curriculums should be closely observed to insure qualification for subsequent courses, and to gain maximum benefit from instruction.

SCHEDULING OF CLASSES Courses listed in this Catalogue are those which Cuyahoga Community College plans to offer. Inclusion of a course description does not obligate the College to offer the course in any particular semester. Students are referred to the Class Schedule each semester for more specific and recent listing of courses offered at Tri-C's Metropolitan and Western Campuses.

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96

97

98

99

100

Description of Courses

103

ACCOUNTING 111

Practical Accounting

3 Cr.

Introductory course in bookkeeping. Includes accounting equation, theory of debit and credit, accounting devices, working papers and business forms, preparation of balance sheets and profit-loss statements. Prerequisite: None.

121

Principles of Accounting

3 Cr.

Fundan1ental principles of double-entry accounting, periodic adjustments, accounting cycles and financial staten1ents. Prerequisi te: None.

122

Principles of Acco'unting

3 Cr.

Continuation of Accounting 121. Accounting for payrolls and taxes, departn1ental and branch accounting, rnanufacturing and cost accounting, analysis and interpretation of accounting staten1ents. Prerequisi te: Accounting 121.

221

I ntermediate Accounting

3 Cr.

Detailed study of specialized phases of accounting. Treatn1ent of cash and ten1porary investn1ents, receivables, inventories, plant and equipment. Intangibles, deferred charges, liabilities, capital stock and surplus, financial staten1ents with en1phasis on theory. Prerequisite: Accounting 122.

222

Intermediate Accounting

3 Cr.

Analysis and interpretation of accounting statements with en1phasis on n1anagerial use of accounting reports. Estin1ated costs, standard costs, budgets and profit planning are introduced to clarify the rnanagerial uses of accounting. Prerequisite: Accounting 221.

231

Cost Accounting

3 Cr.

Theory and practice of cost accounting and cost procedures in industry. Job orders, process and standard cost n1ethods. Prerequisite: Accounting 122.

104

265

Taxation

3 Cr.

Current incon1e tax regulations related to business and individual incon1e tax reporting. Incon1e inclusions and exclusions, exen1ptions, capital gains and losses~ business and individual deductions. Federal incon1e~ inheritance~ gift and social security tax la\vs and procedures. State and local tax laws and procedures. Prerequisite: Accounting 122.

ART 101

Art Appreciation

3 Cr.

D'evelopn1ent of an understanding and interest in creative forms, within the visual art field, for those without an art background. History of art --- painting, sculpture and architecture --- explored through texts, slides and prints. Simple experimental studies in basic design. Prerequisite: May not be taken for credit by students who have completed Art 102 or 103.

105

102

Art History

3 Cr.

General survey of the chronological and stylistic developn1ent of Western art. Includes Egyptian, Mesopotan1ian, Greek, Ron1an, Early Christian, Byzantine, Gothic, the Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo, and the 19th century schools. Also looks at 20th century post-impressionism. Prerequisite: None.

103

Art History

3 Cr.

Continuation of Art 102. Prerequisite: Art 102.

104-105

Beginning Drawing

2-2 Cr.

Introduction to con1n1unication with non-verbal visual syn1bols. Students use various drawing n1aterials and en1ploy naturalistic representation of objects emphasizing structure, value and texture. Theory of aerial and converging perspective is practiced by extensive application to various subjects. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

106

Fundamentals of Design

3 Cr.

Usage of fundamental elements in design --- line, mass, space, light, shade, texture and color. Organization of these elen1ents to achieve rhythm, balance, movement and unity. Prerequisi te : None.

107

Fundamentals of Design

3 Cr.

Problems concerning the functional and visual elements of design. Selection and organization in expression of visual ideas. Prerequisite: Art 106.

121

Calligraphy

3 Cr.

Basic styles --- Roman, Gothic, script and italic --- using pen and brush, with attention to the placement of letters. Some application of lettering to problems. Prerequisi tes: Art 105 and Art 107.

106

151

Art for Elementary Education

3 Cr.

Planned to meet the needs of prospective elen1entary teachers. Creative studio work as well as an introduction to art in the elen1entary school. Fundamentals of using elementary school art n1aterials. Prerequisite: None.

201

Life Drawing

2 Cr.

Introduction to proportion and action of the figure, with costumed and nude models. Various drawing media employed. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Art 104.

107

202

Life Drawing

2 Cr.

Continuation of Art 201. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Art 201.

203

Painting

2 Cr.

Introduction to oil and opaque water color. Qualities of color --- hue, value and intensity --- and their use in con1position and the rendering of forms. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Art 105.

204

Painting

2 Cr.

Landscape, still life and the figure interpreted in oil. Emphasis on use of the n1ediuIl1 and con1position. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Art 203.

205

Water Color

2 Cr.

Fundamentals of water color qualities and techniques. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisi tes: Art 104 and 105.

221

Printmaking

2 Cr.

General introduction to various aspects of printmaking and graphic composition. Special emphasis on the woodcut. Some multi-block color work. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Art 104.

BIOLOGY 101

Introductory Biology

3 Cr.

Systen1atic survey of the various anin1al phyla and the physiologic n1echanisn1s which they have in con1n10n, such as respiration, locornotion, digestion and metabolism. Includes fundamentals of biology. En1phasis on the comparative and evolutionary aspects of the subject. For non-science n1ajors. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

108

102

Introducto,ry Biology

3 Cr.

Continuation of Biology 101. Particular emphasis on the systen1s of the human body. Principles of genetics and heredity. Plant groups are surveyed --- structure, classification and physiology compared. For nonscience n1ajors. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101.

111

General Biology (Invertebrate Zoology)

4 Cr.

General introduction to basic biological concepts structured around a detailed study of the invertebrate phyla. En1phasis on the phylogenie relationships arl10ng the groups. Elen1entary biochen1ical principles introduced as a basis for the study of physiology, ecology, evolution and genetics. Includes functional adaptations and taxonon1Y of anin1al groups. For biology n1ajors. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Knowledge of basic chen1istry is essential.

112

General Biology (Vertebrate Zoology)

4 Cr.

Continuation of Biology 111, with en1phasis on the vertebrates. Includes principles of morphological developn1ent, concepts of hun1an heredity and population genetics. For biology n1ajors. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 111.

109

121

Anatomy and Physiology

4 Cr.

Functional anatomy of the organ systems in humans. Correlates basic inorganic and organic chemistry, with emphasis on physiological principles. Designed principally for the health technology programs. Laboratory includes demonstrations, dissection of the cat, chemical and physiological experiments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

122

Anatomy and Physiology 4 Cr. Continuation of Biology 121. Correlates further basic biochen1ical and physiological principles, with detailed study of cat anatomy as related to the human organ systen1s. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 121.

201

Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates

5 Cr.

Gross anatomy of the organ systems in representative members of the vertebrates. Emphasis on evolution and functional adaptations. Laboratory emphasis on dissection and direct observation of selected specin1ens. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 112 or equivalent.

202

General Botany

4 Cr.

Survey of the plant kingdon1. Includes classification, physiology, structure, life cycles, interrelationships between plants and animals. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 112.

221

Microbiology

4 Cr.

Morphology and physiology of bacteria and other related groups of microorganisms. Emphasis on pathogenic agents. Methods of sterilization, culture, staining and identification included in laboratory. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 122.

110

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 100

Building Construction Orientation

1 Cr.

Designed to acquaint the student with his specific technical curriculun1, and potential en1ployn1ent opportunities and trends. Industrial visits n1ade as part of the orientation. Includes slide rule instruction. Prerequisite: None.

121

Architectural Drawing

3 Cr.

Design and construction of dornestic structures. Scale, detailing, framing systen1s, din1ensioning, n10dular systen1s, architectural lettering and relation of structure to site. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 121 or equivalent.

111

112

122

Archi tectur al Draw ing

3 Cr.

201

Introd uction to Concrete Design

3 Cr.

221

Buildi ng Equip ment

3 Cr.

222

Buildi ng Equip ment

3 Cr.

231

Contracts) Specifications and Estim ating

3 Cr.

expres sion Design of Inore cOlnplex structu res. Includ es integr ation and priate of Inateri als and design. Functi onal and specia l concep ts appro hours. to steel and concre te buildin gs. Lectu re 1 hour. Labor atory 4 Prereq uisite: Buildi ng Const ructio n Techn ology 121.

reinfo rced Concr ete n1ixes, their compo sition and contro l. Capac ities of slabs, colconcre te, design of reinfo rced concre te bean1s, girders, floor un1n and wall footings. Lectur e 2 hours. Labor atory 2 hours. Prereq uisite: Buildi ng Const ructio n Techn ology 241. (Form er Prereq uisite: Buildi ng Const ructio n Techn ology 121.)

constr ucInvest igatio n of mecha nical systems as applic able to buildi ng ioning tion. Water supply , sanita tion, heatin g, ventil ating and air condit design. equipn 1ent. Enviro nment al factors as they influe nce systems Prereq uisite: Buildi ng Const ructio n Techn ology 122.

ent as Electr ical systems, lightin g equip ment and acoust ical treatm theory as applic able to buildi ng constr uction . Introd uction to electri cal yed In well as contem porary electri cal equipn 1ent. Mater ials emplo power distrib ution within buildin gs. Prereq uisi te: Buildi ng Const ructio n Techn ology 122. (Form er Prereq uisite: Buildi ng Const ructio n Techn ology 221.)

s. Legal Basic course for estin1ators, archit ects and specif.ication writer uting contra cts, constr uction and interp retatio n of specifications. Comp and mafrom plans of a constr uction projec t, includ ing costs of labor tes. terials, lump sun1 and unit costs, prelim inary and final estima Prereq uisite: Buildi ng Const ructio n Techn ology 122.

241

Principles of Structural Design

3 Cr.

Introduction to the design of structural members and systems. Includes, bean1s, girders, floor systen1s, columns and compression members. Fran1es, trusses, welded members, connections and fasteners, base and bearing plates. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 122. Engineering 201 may be taken concurrently. (Fonner Prerequisites: Building Construction Technology 122 and Engineering 201.)

251

Construction Procedures and Building Codes

3 Cr.

Various construction n1ethods and procedures. Includes an orientation' to conten1porary construction equipn1ent and application to the job schedule. Various local building codes considered as they apply to construction practices. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 221 recomn1ended.

BUSINESS 107

Business Mathematics

3 Cr.

Typical accounting, financial and other business problems. Includes percen tage, cash and trade discounts, merchandise turnover, depreciation' sin1ple and compound interest, bank discounts, small loans and installment purchases. Partial payments, banking practices and pricing n1erchandise. Application of business graphs, insurance and investment calculations, annuities, weights and n1easures. Prerequisite: None.

108

I ntroduction to Business

3 Cr.

Survey of business principles, problems and procedures. Discussions of the nature of business, ownership, recruitment, training of personnel, labor-n1anagen1ent relations, production and distribution of goods. Con1petition, profits, transportation, finance, managerial controls, government and business relations. Prerequisite: None.

113

110

Principles

of

Finance

3 Cr.

Money, banking, corporate organization, stocks, bonds and the marketing of securities. Financial policies of corporations, insurance, real estate and the Federal Reserve Systen1. Prerequisites: Business 107 and 108.

111

Industrial Purchasing

3 Cr.

Fundarnentals of effective n1erchandise distribution. Methods of marketing, channels of distribution, costs of n1arketing and Inarket research. Application of various n1arketing fundan1entals to actual case problen1s. 'Description of specific situations or circumstances encountered in the effort to rnove goods and services frOIn seller to buyer. Prerequisite: None.

112

Business Management

3 Cr.

Introduction to concepts of rnanagement and business. Detailed analysis of n1anagen1ent functions. Includes planning objectives, policies, methods and procedures. Delineating authority, responsibilities and preparing organization charts. Controlling standards, production and costs. Prerequisite: Business 108.

116

Salesmanship (Originally 211 Salesmanship)

3 Cr.

Fundan1entals of retail, wholesale, outside and service selling. Custon1er ilnpact, merchandise and sales presentation. Closing and postsale service. Principles of self-rnanagelnent, practice on sales preparation and demonstration. Prerequisite: Business 108 recon11nended.

141

Investments

3 Cr.

Sources of capital, types of secuntIes, the operation of brokerage and investn1ent banking houses. Objectives are an understanding of investment principles and the acquisition of skills needed for success as a salesn1an or clerical worker in the securities business. Prerequisite: None.

114

155

Principles of Retailing

3 Cr.

An exploration of retailing organization and Inanagement in historical perspective. Includes store location and layout, buying and pricing, sales promotion, inventory control and store management. Prerequisites: Business 107 and 108.

201

Principles of Marketing

3 Cr.

Functional approach is emphasized in the study of institutions involved in n10ving industrial, consun1er, farn1 goods and services froln producer to consumer. Prerequisites: Business 107 and 108.

213

Business Law (Originally 113 Business Law)

3 Cr.

Practical course in the principles of law that affect business relations. Includes historical background, judicial and administrative procedures. Contracts, real property, personal property and negotiable instrun1ents. Business organizations, security devices, insurance, trade regulations such as business torts and restraint of trade. Prerequisite: Sophon10re standing. (Former Prerequisite: None.)

214

Business Law (Originally 114 Business Law)

3 Cr.

Transportation, insurance, suretyship and guarantee. Partnership, corporations, real property, trusts, wills, bankruptcy and torts. Cases stressing application of the principles of law in these fields are discussed, thereby applying the rules of law to everyday business activities. Prerequisite: Business 213. (Former Prerequisite: Business 113.)

220

Human Relations in Business (Originally 220 Human Relations for Secretaries)

2 Cr.

Basic motives of people. Skills relating to people and working with them. Business etiquette and its practice in office situations. Prerequisite: None.

115

225

Advertising

3 Cr.

(Originally 125 Advertising) Introduction to the field of retail advertising. Its purposes, institutions and functions. Includes planning an advertising progran1 and budget, merchandising with advertising, local n1edia and types of retail advertising. Prerequisite: Business 20l. (Former Prerequisite: None.)

?41

Office Management

3 Cr.

Basic principles of office organization and n1anagement. En1phasizes interrelationship between physical, personnel and procedural factors which affect the efficiency of an office. Prerequisite: None.

252

Sales Management

3 Cr.

Principles and concepts underlying the organization, operation and control of a sales force. Topics such as selection of personnel, recruiting, con1pensation plans, supervision, evaluation and stimulation of sales progran1s are covered. Prerequisites: Business 108 and 211.

253

Wholesaling

3 Cr.

Survey of the wholesaling structure past and present. Analysis of planning, operation and n1anagement of the various types of wholesaling institutions in our economy. Prerequisite: Business 201.

256

Retail Buying and Merchandising

3 Cr.

Techniques of computation and control essential for profitable n1erchandising. Includes mark-up, re-pricing, stock turnover, retail method of inventory, analysis of operating statements, unit and dollar control, open-to-buy con1putation. Review and analysis of current merchandising policies. Application of buying procedures. Prerequisites: Business 107 and 155.

116

CHEMISTRY 101-102

Introductory Chemistry

4-4 Cr.

Emphasis on aton1ic and molecular structure as a basis for understanding valence, fonnulas and chen1ical reactions. States of matter, solutions, compounds~ elementary bio-chen1istry, ionization, nuclear chen1istry and organic chen1istry as well as their application in daily life. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or equivalent. Chen1istry 101 is prerequisite to Chelnistry 102.

111

112

General Chemistry 4 Cr. Chen1ical principles en1phasized are aton1ic and molecular structure, periodic la"w, chemical equations and calculations, oxidation-reduction, chemical bonding, ionization, energy and chemical change. Important non-metals and their compounds, states of matter, solutions, acids and their bases. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Chemistry 101, or one year of high school chemistry or equivalent, and one year of high school algebra or equivalent. (Former Prerequisite: Chemistry 101, or one year of high school chemistry or equivalent.)

General Chemistry

4 Cr.

Continuation of Chen1istry 111. Emphasis on chemical equilibrium, the structure of 111atter and periodic system. Laboratory deals with semimicro qualitative analysis illustrative of principles developed in lecture. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111.

211-212

4-4 Cr. Chen1istry of carbon compounds. Preparation, properties, reactions of aliphatic and aromatic groupings. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite for Chen1istry 211: Chen1istry 112. Prerequisite for Chemistry 212: Chen1istry 211.

221

Organic Chemistry

Quantitative Analysis

4 Cr.

Theory and laboratory practice of volun1etric and gravimetric analyses. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 112.

118

DATA PROCESSING 101

Electronic Data Processing

3 Cr.

Introduction to electronic data processing. History of data processing. Features of data processing unit record equipment and number systen1s. Computer concepts, programming and system analysis principles. Prerequisite: None.

111

Data Processing Applications Laboratory

1 Cr.

Functional problems of manipulations, logic, calculation and reporting. Typical data processing equipment --- e.g., keypunches, sorters and tabulators --- used directly as applicable to problem solution. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Data Processing 101.

201

Computer Programming

3 Cr.

Binary coded decimal and hexadecin1al nun1ber code systen1s defined. Absolute machine language and assembly language computer coding methods are used to introduce progran1n1ing features of a specific computer system. Advantages and limitations of specific con1puter are compared with other computers in the field. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. . Prerequisite: Data Processing 101.

202

Computer Programming

3 Cr.

Continuation of Data Processing 201. Advanced techniques of assembly language coding applied to problems involving decision tables. Symbol manipulation and file organization. Magnetic tape and/or disk storage file handling methods as used in business processing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Data Processing 201.

211

Applied Data Mathematics

3 Cr.

Logic, sets and boolean expressions, interpolation, exact and approxin1ate solutions to simultaneous linear systems. Statistical n1ethods applications, numerical use of concepts of differential and integral calculus. Overview of management science techniques. Prerequisites: Mathen1atics 101 and 121.

120

221

Programming Systems

3 Cr.

Stresses farniliarity with the differences an10ng assen1bly systen1s, macrosysten1s, report generators, tabular language and problen1-oriented languages. Applications, advantages and disadvantages. Operating systems, total systen1s and integration of progran1mlng effort. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Data Processing 202.

231

Systems Analysis

3 Cr.

Systems and procedures function. Includes analysis, design, control of managen1ent information and data systen1s. Economics of n1anual, electro-mechanical and electronic data processing. Advantages and disadvantages of computer, communication and information retrieval systems for information evaluation. Prerequisite: Data Processing 201.

251

Data Processing Field Project

2 Cr.

Each student selects a project to con1plete. He develops an inforn1ation systen1, docun1ents and programs it for the c'On1puter. All projects to include hands-on assen1bly, testing, debugging and processing. A written report is required, giving a con1plete explanation of the progran1n1ing n1ethod used, the assen1bly and processing techniques, the diagnostic and debugging procedures used. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Data Processing 221.

DENTAL HYGIENE 101

Introductory Dental Hygiene

6 Cr.

History of dentistry and developn1ent of dental hygiene. Introduction to medico-dental tern1inology. Exan1ines oral prophylaxis, fluoride application and sterilization technique in clinical practice. Oral hygiene, forn1ation of calculus and stains, principles of preventive dentistry. Role of dental hygienist in patient education for prevention 'Of periodontal problen1s. Laboratory practice on n1anikins and extracted teeth to develop operative techniques. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Prerequisite: Open only to dental hygiene students.

121

102

Dental Anatomy

3 Cr.

Detailed study of deciduous and pern1anent dentition. Lectures on non1enclature, n10rphology, structure and function of the teeth as well as surrounding tissues. Laboratory consists of identification, drawing and carving of teeth. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Open only to dental hygiene students.

121

Clinical Dental Hygiene

3 Cr.

Clinic duty performing oral prophylaxes, radiographs and fluoride treatn1ents on specified number of adult and child patients. Conferences used for individual problen1s and student evaluation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory (in clinic) 9 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 102.

122

Oral and General Histo-Pathology

4 Cr.

Cornbined course beginning with the ongIn and structures of tissues, histology and en1bryology of teeth, face and oral cavity. Introduction to general pathology. Inflan1111ation, necrosis, retrograde changes, pathological process in diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and other organisIns. Clinical pathology of diseases affecting teeth and their supporting structures. Visual differentiation between norn1al and abnor111al tissues. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 102.

123

Radiography

2 Cr.

History and developn1ent of the X-ray, its nature and properties. Safety precautions and uses of the X-ray in dentistry. Theory and practice in the fundan1entals of oral radiographic technique. Filn1 placen1ent, tube angulation, processing and 1110unting of filn1s. A specific number of radiodontic exan1inations and hours in darkroon1 procedures are required throughout the two-year dental hygiene program. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 102.

122

201

Clinical Dental Hygiene (5 weeks路-August to SeptembeT)

3 CT.

Concentrated clinic duty perfoflning oral prophylaxes, radiodontic examinations and fluoride treatments on specified number of child and adult patients. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory (in clinic) 6 hours a day, 5 days per week. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 121.

202

Clinical Dental Hygiene

3 CT.

Continuation of Dental Hygiene 201 plus rotating dental assisting in departn1ents of periodontics, orthodontics, endodontics, pedodontics, surgery and cleft palate, operative, prosthetics and research. Lecture o hours. Laboratory (in clinic) 9 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 201.

221

Dental MateTials and Dental Assisting

4 CT.

Physical properties of dental nlaterials and basic principles of their preparation. Chairside assisting and laboratory procedures. Clinical application by assisting Western Reserve University School of Dentistry students and dentists in private practice. Introduction to office administration and cOlnlnunication. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 201.

123

222

Dental SjJecialties

3 Cr.

Lectures by dental specialists in the fields of endodontics, periodontics, pedodontics, orthodontics, operative dentistry, surgery, prosthetics and research. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 201.

231

Clinical Dental Hygiene

3 Cr.

Continuation of Dental Hygiene 202. Special assignlnents in dental offices as well as in dental departnlCnts of institutions where the ill, retarded, aged and handicapped are treated. ])iverse 1110uth conditions. Methods and techniques for patients with special needs. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory (in clinic) 9 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 202.

232

Dental 1-1 ealth EducatÂŁon and PublÂŁc II ealth

3 Cr.

Hygiene procedures in school work. Includes setting up a school dental health progra1l1, working with parents, school personnel, neighborhood dentists and connnunity health personnel. Discussion of concepts, 111ethods, visual aids used to further dental health education in private dental practices and school systen1s. Relationship of dental hygiene to public health. Opportunities in public health dentistry. Roles of the dental hygienist and dentist in organization of con1111unity health progra111s. Students participate as teachers in the school syste1l1s' dental health education progrmTIs. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 202.

233

Pharmacology) Anesthesiology and First Aid

2 Cr.

Drugs and anesthetics, with en1phasis on those used in the dental office. Discussion of the origin of drugs and anesthetics, physical and chen1ical properties, preparation, n10de of adn1inistration and effects on body systen1s. Preoperative and postoperative patient care. General first aid instruction, treat1l1ent, required equip1l1ent and lTIaterials. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 202.

124

234

Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence

1 Cr.

I)iscussion of dentistry's future and the dental hygienist's role. l<.elationship of the dental hygienist to other lnernbers of the dental health teanl, including application of ethical principles and Inethods of professional cooperation. Self-evaluation, with special lectures by visiting dentists on choice of location and selecting a phase of dental hygiene practice. Laws governing dental hygiene practice as well as the bond between the professional person and patient. Rights, duties, privileges and rnoral obligations of the dental hygienist to the patient and the elnployer. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: IJental Hygiene 202.

EARTH SCIENCE 101

Physical Geology

4 Cr.

Materials and structures of the earth, processes and agencies by which the earth's crust has been and is being changed. Rocks and their lnineral cOlnposition. The vvork of rivers, vvinds and glaciers as agents of erosion. Volcanoes and earthquakes as forces which change the surface of the earth. R.egularly scheduled field trips are an integral part of course. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

102

Historical Geology

4 Cr.

Geologic history of the earth and its inhabitants, with special reference to North Anlerica. Laboratory study deals with principal fossil life of the various geologic periods. Occasional field work is required. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

125

ECONOMICS 100

Economics for Business and Industry

3 Cr.

Principles of economics. Designed to provide an understanding of the structure, organization and operation of our economy. Its relationship to our standard of living, social and political welfare. Prerequisite: None.

151

Development of American Economy

3 Cr.

Evolutionary developn1ent of our econornic systen1 fron1 n1edieval times to present. Designed for better understanding of the economic life. Introduction to macroeconon1ic and n1icroeconon1ic analyses. Prerequisite: None.

201

Principles of Economics

3 Cr.

Basic economic principles. Detern1ination and fluctuation of national income. Con1position and pricing of national output. Current econornic issues and problen1s. Designed to provide a basis for understanding the evolutionary nature of society, the role of capitalisrn in society and in social developn1ent. Prerequisite: None.

202

Principles of Economics

3 Cr.

Continuation of Economics 201. Topics include the national income, business fluctuations, the financial systen1, public finance and international economics. Application of economic principles to contemporary economic developments. Prerequisi te : Econo1l1ics 201.

126

EDUCATION 101

Introduction to Education

3 Cr.

Designed to introduce the student to the broad and complex field of public education. En1phasis on personal and professional characteristics required for successful teaching. Prerequisite : None.

251

Children)s Literature

3 Cr.

Provides wide acquaintance with children's books, with en1phasis on their use in all subject areas. History of children's literature. Study of objective standards for evaluation and of children's interests. Experience in story-telling. Wide reading in children's books, including folk literature, modern fanciful and realistic stories, non-fiction and poetry. Prerequisite: English 091 or 101.

127

ELE CTR ICA L-EL ECT RON IC TEC HNO LOG Y 100

140

128

Electr ical-E lectro nic Orien tation

1 Cr.

Direc t Curre nt Mach ines

3 Cr.

ulum, Design ed to acqua int the studen t with his specific techni cal curric made as potent ial en1ployn1ent oppor tunitie s and trends . Indust rial visits part of the orient ation. Slide rule instruc tion. Prereq uisite: None.

Efficie ncy, Direct curren t genera tor-mo tor princip les and constr uction . arn1arating and applic ation of dynam os, torque , speed, speed regula tion, 2 hours. ture reactio n and power losses. Lectu re 2 hours. Labor atory Prereq uisite: Engin eering 125.

160

Basic Electronics

3 Cr.

Electronic C0111pOnents as related to electron theory. Examination and application of two- and three-element electronic devices, multi-grid tubes and transistors. Construction and application of rectifiers, amplifiers and oscillators. A.C. circuits in electronics. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 130 or taken concurrently.

201

Alternating Current Machines

3 Cr.

Construction, characteristics and operation of alternating current machinery. Includes polyphase induction 111otors, synchronous motors, single phase motors, converters, transfoflners and alternators. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 130.

211

Electrical Construction and Application

3 Cr.

Wiring for light, heat and power. Signal wiring, relays, distribution systems, safety practice, wire, cable and conduit application, switches and controls. Feeder and branch circuit protection, short circuits and grounding practices. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 201 or per111ission of instructor.

221

I ndustrial Electronics

3 Cr.

Power supply and control, switching systems, control systems, counters, photoelectrics, data display and recording. Electronic heaters, welders, lnagnetics and ultrasonics. Introduction to radiation inspection and detection. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Physics 101 and Electrical-Electronic Technology 160. (Former Prerequisite: Physics 101.)

129

231

Semi-Conductors

3 Cr.

Crystal structure and properties, donors, acceptors, holes, diodes, double base diodes, zener diodes, thermistors and photodiodes. Transistor circuitry and amplification, biasing, leakage circuits, hybrid parameters, oscillators, multivibrators and bias stabilization. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 160.

235

Communication Transmission

3 Cr.

Fundamental principles of radio transn11SSlon and receiving. Includes application of tuned circuits and circuit n1odifications. AM and FM circuits, short wave, multiband, communication receivers and line con1munications. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 231 or taken concurrently. (Former Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 231.)

241

Electrical Power Blueprints and Drafting

2 Cr.

Specific application of drafting techniques to describe electrical circuits and systems, motor control diagrams and electrical construction. Graphic syn1bols and conventions ernployed in initiating block, elen1entary and wiring diagran1s. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineeririg 121. (F orn1er Prerequisites: Engineering 121 and 130.)

251

Computer Circuitry

3 Cr.

Boolean algebra, digital, binary and octal systelTIs. Includes translation between systelTIs. Mechanical and electron1echanical cornponents, vacuum tube, diode and transistorized circuits, cornponents. Machine language and input-output systelns. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 231 or taken concurrently. (Former Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 231.)

130

261

Electrical Measurement and Instrumentation

3 Cr.

Methods and devices of electrical and nlagnetic Il1eaSUreIl1ent. Includes basic rneter and recorder I110VeIl1ents, counting instrunlentation, current, voltage, power, inlpedance, inductance and capacitance rneasuring devices. Introduction to COIl1puters and sirnulators. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 221.

265

Automation and Electronic Controls

3 Cr.

Introduction to the various autolnatic control systell1S and their conlponents. Elllphasis on servolnechanisnls and other feedback control systellls. Electrical, electronic, rnechanical, hydraulic and pneUlllatic COIl1pOnents as they relate to control systelYls. Basics of control CIrcuitry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Electrical-Electronic Technology 201 and 221.

131

271

Solid State Circuit Analysis

3 Cr.

Introduction to network terrninology. Geornetry and equilibriun1 equations, Inethodology of solution. Circuit elen1ents and sources, circuit response to step functions and review of sen1i-conductor theory. Switching circuit design. Functions and characteristics of transistors and n10de circuits. Prerequisites: Mathen1atics 152 and Electrical-Electronic Technology 231, or the equivalent with pennission of the instructor.

275

I ntroduction to Microcircuits

3 Cr.

Developing science of 111icron1iniature electronic circuits and con1ponents. Characteristics, fabrication and applications. Prerequisite: Electrical-Electronic Technology 231 or its equivalent with pern1ission of the instructor.

ENGINEERING 100

1 Cr. Mannheilll and log-log trigonon1etric slide rules. Estin1ating, checking and solving problerns in con1putation. Prerequisite: None.

101

Basic A1etallurgy

Slide Rule

3 Cr.

Physical and lnechanical behavior of pure lYletals and alloys. Specific Inetal systen1s are exalllined to illustrate various phenOlllena. Introduction to 11letallography. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

102

Physical Metallurgy

3 Cr.

Continuation of Engineering 101. Practical application based upon prior understanding. Elnphasis on ferrous rnetallurgy. Includes heat treatll1ent as well as non-ferrous and powdered lnetallurgy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 101.

111

Principles of Refrigeration

3 Cr.

Fundan1entals of air conditioning and refrigeration. Includes gases, liquids, solids, pressures, telnperatures, heats, control devices and refrigeration systenls. Prerequisite: None.

112

Engineering Report Construction

2 Cr.

Oral, written and graphic 111ethods of COlllll1Unication for the engineer and technician. Provides practice in preparation of technical reports. Prerequisite: None.

121

Engineering Drawing

3 Cr.

Principles and practice in orthographic and pictorial sketching and drawing. Practice in freehand lettering and use of instrulnents. Covers iso111etric drawing and sketching, oblique drawing and sketching. Auxiliary views, sections, conventions, din1ensioning, threaded fasteners, detail and assell1bly drawings. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

133

122

Engineering Drawing

3 Cr.

Theory and practice of advanced engineering drawing. Emphasis on jig, fixture, welding, piping, structural, electrical and machine drawing. Covers allowances, tolerances, fits, symbols, standards and references. Recent developlnents and con1n1ercial practices in the field. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Engineering 121.

125

Principles of Electricity-D. C. Circuits

3 Cr.

Electron theory, units of measurement. Ohm's Law applied to series, parallel and series-parallel circuits. Voltage dividers, batteries, inductance, capacitance, resistance and vvire calculations. Practical laboratory experience involving building D.C. circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours .. Prerequisite: None.

130

Principles of Electricity-A. C. Circuits

3 Cr.

Sinusoidal voltages and currents. Resistance, resonance, inductance and capacitance circuits. Resonance, theorems and principles of network laws, coupled circuits and n1utual induction. Polyphase circuits. Laboratory experience in construction and testing of A.C. circuitry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 and Engineering 125.

151

Applied Mechanics

3 Cr.

Basic engineering mechanics. Deals fundamentally with the principles of statics. Includes coplaner-parallel force systems, coplaner-concurrent force systems, coplaner-non-concurrent force systems and non-coplaner-parallel force systems. Moments of inertia, friction, centroids and centers of gravity. Prerequisites: Mathematics 101 and 103. Mathematics 103 may be taken concurrently. (Former Prerequisite: Mathematics 101.)

134

201

Strength ot Materials

3 Cr.

Study of the physical properties of engineering n1aterials. Includes the interrelations of load, stress and strain. Torsion, tension impact, yield strength, ultin1ate strength and factor of safety. Laboratory experience in use of various physical testing machines and interpretation. Prerequisi te: Engineering 151.

211

I ntroduction to Surveying

3 Cr.

Applications and care of surveying instrun1ents. Techniques and practice in taping. Use of transit and level in horizontal and vertical n1easurelnent, differential and profile. En1phasis on accurate recording of field data in note form. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Mathematics 103 and Building Construction Technology 121.

ENGLISH 091

Reading and Composition

3 Cr.

Intensive practice in written expression, under careful supervision, with individual assistance from the instructor. Training in all phases of English composition. Gran1mar, spelling, sentence construction, diction and organization of ideas. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.

092

Reading and Composition

3 Cr.

Continuation of English 091. Emphasis on diction and paragraph unity. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: None.

095

Reading Improvement

3 Cr.

Principles underlying efficient reading applied in daily practice. Group instruction in comprehension, vocabulary, study techniques and rate of purposeful reading on the college level. Prerequisite: None.

135

Readi ng Impro vemen t

3 Cr.

101

College Comp ositio n

3 Cr.

102

College Comp ositio n

3 Cr.

British Litera ture

3 Cr.

096

221

136

readin g Design ed to meet the needs of the studen t who possesses basic y skills skills but who must becom e profic ient in techni cal and literar rehens ion necessary for colleg iate success. Elnph asis on speed of con1p and critica l readin g. ent on a Prereq uisite: Grade of C or better in Englis h 095 or placem standa rdized readin g test at the 50th percen tile.

g assignIntrod uction to provo cative essays and to exposi tory wntln ctory high lnents develo ped fron1 the readin gs. For studen ts with satisfa school achiev ement . Prereq uisite: Placem ent by counse lor.

g, the reContin uation of Englis h 101. Emph asis on analyt ical writin y works. literar d search paper, the readin g and interp retatio n of selecte Prereq uisite: Englis h 101.

y. InStudy of British literat ure's major works throug h the 17th centur cludes selections by Chauc er, Shake speare and Milton . Prereq uisite: Englis h 102.

222

British Literature

3 Cr.

Study of British literature's important works fronl the 18th century to the present. Authors include Swift, Pope, Wordsworth, Keats, Carlyle, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold and Shaw. Prerequisite: English 102.

231

American Literature

3 Cr.

Reading and analysis of great American literary works by Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson and Whi tnlan. Prerequisite: English 102.

232

American Literature

3 Cr.

Reading and analysis of notable American literary works by Melville, Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Frost and others. Prerequisite: English 102.

251

World Literature

3 Cr.

Reading and discussion of the world's outstanding literature fronl the time of ancient Greece to the present. Includes Homer, Sophocles, Lucretius, Dante and Cervantes. Prerequisite: English 102.

252

World Literature

3 Cr.

Reading and discussion of the world's pronlinent literary works fronl the 17th century to the present. Includes Moliere, Rousseau, Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Gide, Mann and Sartre. Prerequisite: English 102.

271

Shakespeare

3 Cr.

Comprehensive reading course. Includes about 15 of Shakespeare's plays. Lectures on the background of Elizabethan drama. Class discussions follow assigned reading. Designed to provide a basic familiarity with the works of Shakespeare. Prerequisite: English 102.

137

FIRE TECHNOLOGY

138

100

Organization for Fire Protection 2 Cr. Organizational procedures of the fire serVlces. Includes the structure and function of battalion and con1pany as con1ponents of n1unicipal organizations. Discussion topics include personnel n1anagen1ent and training, fire equipn1ent and apparatus. Comn1unications, records and reports, insurance rating systen1s and the law as it pertains to the fire serVIces. Prerequisite: None.

110

Fire-Fighting Tactics 3 Cr. Techniques and procedures of fire fighting. En1phasis upon the individual fireman's role at the fire scene. Methods of extinguishing fires, lifesaving procedures and special fire-fighting equipment. Salvage, prevention of rekindling and overhauling. Prerequisite: Fire Technology 100.

120

Fire Protection Systerns 3 Cr. Design and operation of fire protection systen1s. Includes water distribution, detection, alarn1 and watchn1an services, and protection systems for special hazards. Detailed exan1ination of carbon dioxide, dry chemical, foan1 and water spray systen1s. Prerequisite: None.

210

Fire-Fighting Tactics and Command 3 Cr. Group operations and command strategy. Pre-planning of fire-fighting operations, size-up at the fire, en1ployment of personnel and equipment. Analysis of specific tactical problems. Prerequisite: Fire Technology 110.

220

Chemistry of Hazardous Materials 4 Cr. Analysis of chen1ical reaction as the causative agent of fire. Includes , redox reactions, reaction rates, toxic compounds and hazardous combinations of chen1icals. Hazards of radioactive n1aterials, poison gases and LP gases. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year of high school chen1istry or Chemistry 101.

230

Fire Prevention Practices

2 Cr.

Study of buildings and other structures. Elnphasis on fire prevention procedures and practices. Fire ratings of Inaterials. Prerequisite: Fire Technology 120.

231

Fire Prevention Practices

2 Ct.

Inspection practices as they pertain to fire preventlon. Storage of explosive flamnlables, codes and fire ordinances, and exaIl1ination of heating systenls. Prerequisite: Fire Technology 230.

235

Fire I nvestigation Methods

2 Cr.

Principles of fire investigation. Collection and presentation of arson evidence in court. Arson laws, interrogation of witnesses and applications of photography. Preparation of reports and adjustnlents of insured losses. Prerequisite: None.

240

Fire Hydraulics

3 Cr.

Introduction to' hydraulic theory. Drafting of water, velocity and discharge, friction loss, engine and nozzle pressure, fire streanlS and pressure losses in flowing hydrants. Practice in application of hydraulic principles. Flow and pUInp testing. Water distribution systenls. Lecture 2 hO'urs. Labaratary 2 hours. Prerequisite: Mathelnatics 095 ar ane year af high schoal algebra.

250

A1unicipal Public Relations

2 Cr.

Aspects of public relatians as pertinent to' Inunicipal services. Building goodwill, handling canlplaints and fallaw-up. Persanal contacts, publicity and prO'lnatianal effarts. Prerequisite: Nane.

139

260

Personnel Training AI ethods

3 Cr. Introduction to rllethods of instruction and applications of audio-visual equiprl1ent. Testing and evaluation, and preparation of n1aterials. Special en1phasis on planning an organizational training progran1. Prerequisite: None.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES FRENCH

101

Beginning French

4 Cr.

En1phasis on oral-aural practice, con1position, grarl1rl1ar and vocabulary. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in English 101.

102

Beginning French

4 Cr.

Continuation of French 101. Language structure studied through the n1en10rization of dialogues and the reading of excerpts frorn French literature. Although the audio-lingual approach is stressed, the main objective is facility in written French. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 101 or two years of high school French.

201

Intermediate French

4 Cr.

Introduction to n10re advanced vocabulary and idiornatic phrases. Sentence structure as a preparation for understanding and appreciating original French writings. Continued drill with audio-lingual materials for con1prehension and in1proven1ent of speed patterns. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 102 or three years of high school French.

140

202

Intermediate French

4 Cr.

Further review of the gran1n1ar and syntactical patterns of the language. Intensive and extensive reading of n10dern French literature. Developn1en t of' speaking and writing skills via oral and written discussion of readings. Some coverage of high points in literary history. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 201 or four years of high school French.

251

French Conversation and Composition

4 Cr.

Discussion on topics of everyday life, colloquialisms, vocabulary distinctions, improven1ent of speech patterns. Practice in writing con1positions. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 202.

252

French Civilization and Literature

4 Cr.

Introduction to the civilization and literature of France fron1 the early days to the present tin1e. Special emphasis on the interrelationship between history and geography of France and its culture. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: French 202.

GERMAN 101

Be ginning German

4 Cr.

Instruction in beginning Gern1an. En1phasis on reading, speaking, writing, gran1n1ar and vocabulary. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in English 101.

102

Beginning German

4 Cr.

Con1pletes the study of elen1entary gran1n1ar. Includes reading of selections dealing with contributions in various areas of knowledge. Further study of Gern1an civilization and n10dern developn1ents in Gen11any. Continues the learning of folk songs and poetry. Additional emphasis on oral facility. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Gerrnan 101 or two years of high school Gern1an.

141

201

I ntermediate German

4 Cr.

Introduction to German thought via cultural readings and selected grammar review. Designed to increase reading ability and oral expression. Oral and written resumes, free compositions and conversations. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Gennan 102 or three years of high school German.

202

I ntermediate German

4 Cr.

Continuation of German 201. Reading interpretation of n10re difficult prose. Increasing emphasis on conversation and free composition. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Gennan 201 or four years of high school German.

142

RUSSIAN

101

Beginning Russian

4 Cr.

Introduction to n10dern R_ussian. New sin1plified alphabet and practice of writing. Basic principles of gran1111ar in logical sequence. Emphasis on pronunciation and translation fro111 lZussian into English. Varied reading on certain aspects of Russian culture and civilization. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in English 101.

102

Beginning Russian

4 Cr.

Continuation of Russian 101. Additional traInIng in oral and written C0111position. Further reading of elen1el1tary texts and study of Russian civilization. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Russian 101 or two years of high school Russian.

201

I ntermediate Russian

4 Cr.

Reading of stories by outstanding 19th and 20th century writers in the original Russian. Excerpts on Russian history, civilization and thought. Written and oral discussion of 111aterial in I<..ussian. Review of gra111111ar, vocabulary and idioms. Oral reports and conversations in Russian on subject of own choosing. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: I<..ussian 102 or three years of high school Russian.

:202

I ntermediate Russian

4 Cr.

Opportunity to increase reading ability and oral expression. Further reading of literary n1asterpieces in Russian. Review of gran1lnar. Oral reports in Russian on a book of own choosing by an outstanding Russian writer. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Russian 201 or four years of high school Russian.

143

SPANISH

101

Beginning Spanish

4 Cr.

Essen tials of the language for understanding, speaking, reading and writing. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in English 101.

102

Beginning Spanish

4 Cr.

Based upon reading and interpretation of idion1atic Spanish prose. Further study of pronunciation and review of Spanish gramn1ar fundan1entals. Additional eIl1phasis on oral facility. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or two years of high school Spanish.

201

I ntermediate Spanish

4 Cr.

Essen tials of grammar are reviewed and extended. Reading materials selected froIl1 the writings of Spanish and Spanish-American authors. Introduction to the fundamentals of forIl1al cOIl1position. Reading selections furnish a point of departure for extensive conversation in Spanish. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or three years路 of high school Spanish.

202

I ntermediate Spanish

4 Cr.

Continuation of Spanish 201. Greater emphasis on n10re advanced, representative Spanish and Spanish-American literature. Further developn1ent of conversational ability and original writings based on selected topics. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 1 hour. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or four years of high school Spanish.

144

GEOGRAPHY 101

Elements of Physical Geography

3 Cr.

Introductory study of geography's physical elen1ents. Includes earth-sun relationships, maps, elements and controls of climate. Landforms, erosion and deposition, water resources, vegetation associations and soil types. World distributions, causal relationships and significance to men are stressed. Prerequisite: None.

102

World Regional Geography

3 Cr.

Geographical environment of the world's regions and nations. Landforms, climates, soils, vegetation, minerals and peoples. Human activities, land-use patterns, resource appraisal, problems of cultural and political differences. Prerequisite: None.

145

HEALTH 101

Health Education

3 Cr.

Introduction to the n1eaning and scope of health as related to the individual, family and comn1unity. Prin1ary focus on physical, emotional and social factors. Prerequisite: None.

121

First Aid and Safety

2 Cr.

Theoretical and practical analysis of first aid and safety education in the hon1e, school and conlmunity. Prerequisite: None.

151

Health Education

2 Cr.

Examines specific individual and public health problems. Includes comn1unicable diseases, chronic illness, n1ental' health and school health problen1s. Explores educational n1ethods to help individuals and groups cope with these health problems. Designed essentially for nurses, teachers and social workers. Prerequisite: None.

HISTORY 101

ivian and Civilization

3 Cr.

Sequence of historic events and nature of the world's cultural heritage from ancient Eurasian times to the present. Stresses the legacies of n1edieval times, the Reforn1ation, the Enlightenment and French Revolution. Cultural aspects include literature, the arts and the social SCIences. Prerequisi te : None.

146

102

M an and Civilization

3 Cr.

Cultural, social and political developnlent of Western Europe fr0'nl 1648, and its expansion throughout the world. Prinlary en1phasis on the conflict of 19th and 20th century cultures. Prerequisite: History 101.

151

United States flistory to 1865

3 Cr.

Arnerican developrnent fron1 discovery, col0'nial foundations, movement for independence and early years of the H.epublic to the end of the Civil War. Prerequisi te : None.

152

United States History, 1865 to Present

3 Cr.

Civil War to the present with en1phasis on econon1ic, social, cultural, intellectual and political developn1ents. Considers the inlpact of two world wars on national affairs and on international relations, leading to An1erica's POSItIon as a global power. Prerequisite: History 151.

201

History of Russia

3 Cr.

Growth, developn1ent and decline of the Kievan State. EV0'lution of the Muscovite tsardorl1 and the expansion of the Russian Empire to 1917. Considers ge0'poli tical, social, cultural and intellectual develop111ents. En1phasis on the theory of tsardoll1, which led to the emergence of a distinct civilization in Russia. Prerequisite: History 101.

202

History of Africa

3 Cr.

General survey of African history. Special emphasis on political, econon1ic and social problems of the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: History 101.

251

Economic History of the United States

3 Cr.

Econon1ic factors in Anlerican history and their in1pact on social, economic and political life. Prerequisite: None.

147

HOME ECONOMICS 121

Foods and Nutrition

3 Cr.

Introduction to the basic principles of nutntIon. Common nutritional factors underlying good health, weight control and the understanding of a balanced diet. Explores good cOlnposition and the nutritional aspects of careful preparation. Prerequisite: 'Chen1istry 101 recornlnended.

INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION 111

Practical Psychology for Supervisors

3 Cr.

Managen1ent and en1ployee Inotivation. Analysis of human needs and employee n10rale. Selecting supervisors. Training en1ployees. Working conditions, worker efficiency and job performance. Industrial leadership, organizational behavior and hun1an relations. Prerequisite: None.

121

Elements of Supervision

3 Cr.

Supervisory techniques in everyday foremanship. Effective communication. Instructing en1ployees. Significance of leadership, production functions, cornpetitive quality control and cost reduction on con1pany profitability. Prerequisite: None.

122

AIen, Machinery and Materials

3 Cr.

Interrelation of manpower to machines and materials. Layouts, work flow and productivity. Systems, procedures and computers. Material handling and specifications. Managen1ent of work force, production and inventory. Autolnation, labor peace~ profits, overtime and fringe benefi ts. Retirement. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 121 or equivalent.

148

124

Work Simplification, Time Study and Incentives

3 Cr.

Manual motions, work place layouts, job analysis and evaluation. Time study and work simplification. Establishing work loads and a fair day's work. Presenting work standards as well as changes in job content and work loads to employees. Piece work rates, bonuses and other incentives. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 122 or equivalent.

131

Basic Management Techniques

3 Cr.

Practical supervisory training. Patterns of good management. Selection, placement and training of employees. Attitudes for increased efficiency and productivity. Machinery, n1aterials and maintenance. Trends in auton1ation. Labor contracts and settling grievances. Cost reduction and quali ty in1proven1en t. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 122 or equivalent.

134

Employee and Plant .Safety

2 Cr.

Safety and protection of employees and company property. First aid and disaster training. Selection and training of guards. Maintenance of fences, roads, fire equipment, emergency exits and sewage disposal. Safeguarding of mechanical and electrical equipment, water supplies, utilities and buildings. Individual protection against unsafe practices, explosions, fumes, chemicals, fires and other emergencies. Workmen's compensation. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 122 or equivalent.

140

I ndustrial Organization and Management

3 Cr.

Industrial organization, n1anagement functions and communications. Business expansion, financing, n1anufacturing, n1arket structure, sales and service. Selection, recruitment, placen1ent and training of executive personnel. Policies, personnel administration of the organization, compensation, benefits and other personal activities. Broad scope of industrial and labor relations. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 121 or equivalent.

149

201

150

Produ ct Sales and Devel opmen t

2 Cr.

tition, Marke t resear ch, produ ction capaci ty, quality contro l, compe is, analys prestig e and new produc ts. Distri bution metho ds. Sales orders trainforeca sting, promo tion and services. Work force analysis and sales ting. Voling. Produ ct impro vemen t. Comp etition in prices and marke analysis. t Marke ume sales. New produc ts, n1ethods and machi nery. rating s Patent s and copyri ghts. Obsol escenc e and creativ ity. Comp any cts. produ accord ing to sales, net incom e and catego ry of manuf acture d Prereq uisite: Indust rial Superv ision 122 or equiva lent.

211

Pre-Retirement Planning

1 Cr.

Retirement counseling. Seniority rights and retIrIng in stages. Helping en1ployees to face retiren1ent problen1s. Pensions, Social Security and other benefits. Farnily health, housing and budgets for older en1ployees. Recreation and leisure time. Prerequisite: None.

221

Communications in Industry

2 Cr.

Preparation of reports and n1enlorandun1s for recording data and reaching decisions. En1ployer-employee con1n1unication. Preparation and use of graphs and tables. Effective oral comnlunication. and group thinking. How decisions are n1ade and con1n1unicated by management. Understanding technical reports. Prerequisite: English 092 or equivalent.

231

Labor-Management Relations

3 Cr.

Trade unions, labor force recruitn1ent and labor laws. Essentials of contract negotiations) interpretations and arbitration. En1ployee relations applied to welfare, safety, con1pensations, benefits, grievances and con1munity relations. Application of job evaluation, tin1e studies and incentives. Introduction of job in1proven1ents, changes in work loads and rates. Employee behavior and discipline. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 122, 131 or equivalent.

241

Personnel Management

3 Cr.

Problems, practices and policies in the p1anagement of people. Lead~~r足 ship, motivation and direction of employees towards n1anagen1ent-en1ployee-oriented goals. Employn1ent practices. Administration of n1anagen1ent-union relationships, benefit progran1s and en1ployee COInpensations. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 121 or equivalent.

251

I ndustrial Corporate Finance

2 Cr.

Corporate financial behavior and patterns. Sources and uses of funds. Capital structure. Capital budgeting. Return fron1 investn1ent. Corporate annual reports. Balance sheet and incon1c staten1ent. Management of cash and cash flow. Prerequisi te: Economics 201, 202 or financial Il1anagernen t experience.

151

261

Statistical Quality Control

2 Cr.

Application of statistical techniques in the analysis of data for the control of product quality and costs. Control charts, san1pling systems and procedures. Correction of product variability. Theory of probability fundamentals. Solution of statistical problems related to specifications, production or inspection. Statistical approach of acceptance sampling. Statistical quality control as a decision-making tool. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 115.

271

Production) Quality and Cost Control

3 Cr.

Explanation and application of the control n1ethods used in the various stages of the manufacturing process. Includes control of raw materials, product control, equipment design and operation. Procedures for control of budgeting, production planning, inventory, product quality and operating costs. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 124 or equivalent.

281

Program Evaluation and Research Technique (PERT)

2 Cr.

Application of PERT and methodology for con1plete project planning, scheduling and control. Usable understanding of PERT. Net work system design as a project planning and analysis device for progress evaluation and completion dates. Establishn1ent and operation of the "Critical Path Method" (CPM). Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 131 or management experience.

JOURNALISM 121

News Writing and Reporting

3 Cr.

Nature and function of the mass media. Career opportunities. Journalistic principles, newsgathering and writing stories. Principal problems confronting journalists and their newspapers. Special attention to the large and conten1porary papers. Foundation for further study in joumalisH;t. Prerequisite: English 101 or concurrent enrollment in English 101.

152

This Head to Draw Reader

u;;ÂŤSt~;;me;;#i~r Special Events; (boose and Word Carefully

U;; St;;~;;;erf'I;;' Special Events: (bDDse 11f1t1 Wo'" (Itrefll//y ii~~ 'St'~~amers for Special Events; Word Carefully

Streamers Announce Important Events Ch'oose and Write Heads Wisely

122

News Writing and Reporting 3 Cr. Continuation of Joumalisn1 121. Greater emphasis upon wrItIng for the various fom1s of news n1edia, including radio and television. Prerequisite: J ournalislll 121.

123-124-125-126

Staff Practice

1-1-1-1 Cr.

Class laboratory experience in assen1bling, making-up and publishing the college newspaper, The Cornmuter. Detailed weekly analysis of the effectiveness of the news stories written and published as well as of the overall presentation of the College newspaper. Students are assigned to The Commuter staff. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrolln1ent in Journalism 121, 122,201 or 202 --- or pern1ission of the instructor.

153

151

Broadcast .Journalism

3 Cr.

News reading, news preparation, news reporting on audio tape, video tape, fihn and live carnera for television and radio. Covers Federal COlnlnunications COllunission rules and regulations on news. Fundalllentais of what lnakes a story and how to get it. The art of interviewing. Field work, study of radio and television history. Prerequisite: None.

20 1

News Editing

3 Cr.

Copy desk lnethods. Copy and proof reading, headline writing, newspaper lnake-up and style. Introduction to newspaper law, including libel, right of privacy and press privileges. Editorial writing, problems and policy. Exalnination of Ina jor contelllporary American newspapers. Prerequisite: Journalis1l1 121.

202

Feature Writing

3 Cr.

Study, planning, writing of factual articles for newspaper and n1agazine publication. Exalnination of current rnarkets for popular, trade, specialized and other types of publications. Articles are submitted to Inarkets. Personalities in the field of publication are introduced to the class. Prerequisite: JournalisD1 122 or pen11ission of the instructor.

LAW ENFORCEMENT 101

I ntroduction to Law Enforcement

3 Cr.

Philosophical and historical background of law enforcen1ent. Includes developlnent and objectives of police services froIlI ancient and feudal backgrounds to the present tilne in the United States. Exarnination of federal, state, local and private law enforcernent agencies. Role of the enforcing officer in governn1ent and the processes of justice. Qualities of and qualifications for the individual entering law enforcel11ent work. Prerequisite: None.

154

111

Patrol Procedures

3 Cr.

Objectives, n1ethods, advantages and disadvantages of patrol. Activities of the patrol officer. Preparation for and observation on patrol. Note-taking and narrative type of report. How to handle incidents of high frequency, with en1phasis on public and race relations in patrol operations. Prerequisite: Law Enforcen1ent 101 or pern1ission of the instructor.

121

Criminal and Related Laws

3 Cr.

Crillles of frequent incidence in law enforcen1ent discussed. Eillphasis on Ohio statutes and decisions. Irnportance of criminal law at the enforcen1ent level examined fron1 crin1e prevention to courtroom appearance. Ternls and definitions, sources of criminal laws, related laws of procedure and crilllinal liability. Prerequisite: Law Enforcen1ent 101 or perrnission of the instructor.

155

131

I ndustrial Security

3 Cr.

Organization and nlanagelnent of industrial security units. Protection of facilities and installations. Manpower, planning for emergencies and riot control. Technical and legal problenls. Police power of personnel, detection and prevention of thefts. Security clearances, wartime nleasures, sabotage and espionage in plant. Prerequisite: None.

141

Criminal Evidence and Procedure

3 Cr.

Rules of evidence particularly inlportant in law enforcenlent at the operational level. Elnphasis on crinlinal procedures in such areas as arrest, force, search and seizure. Discussion of recent Supreme Court decisions affecting law enforcelnent. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 121 or pennission of the instructor.

201

Juvenile Procedure and Crime Prevention

3 Cr.

Juvenile Court organization and procedure. Juvenile code and its application to crinles. Detention, filing, farnily contacts and police functions in juvenile cases. The policewonlan's function in juvenile work. Concepts of crime prevention as waged by social agencies and police. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 121 or permission of the instructor.

211

Investigation and Interrogation

3 Cr.

Fundamental principles and techniques applicable in police investigation from incidence to trial. Use of comlnunication systems, records and scientific principles. Procedures in determining truth of reports by witnesses and principals. Specific procedures in more frequent violations. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 141 or permission of the instructor.

221

Police Administration

3 Cr.

(Originally 221 Administrative Concepts in Law Enforcenlent) Principles of organization and management in law enforcement. Evaluation of administrative devices, pay and other inducements. Organization according to function, personnel recruitlnent, regulation and motivation. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 101 or permission of the instructor.

156

231

Traffic Control and Investigation

3 Cr.

General orientation to highway traffic adrninistration. History of traffic developrnent and duties of agencies responsible for highway traffic administration. Causes of accidents and traffic congestion. Basic principles of traffic law enforcen1ent, accident investigation and direction of traffic. Prerequisite: Law Enforcen1ent 101 or perrnission of the instructor.

241

Advanced Traffic Studies

3 Cr.

Accident investigation procedures en1phasizing hit-and-run manslaughter reports. Traffic statistics studies and relationship to selective enforcement. Traffic personnel supervision and adrninistration. Traffic engineering principles. Prerequisite: Law Enforcen1ent 231 or perrnission of the instructor.

251

Crime Laboratory Techniques

3 Cr.

Discussion of and practice in disciplines often used in crime laboratory procedures, especially those involving the use of microscopes. Latent fingerprint search and some chen1ical tests. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Major in law enforcen1ent. Also open to in-service personnel.

LIBRARY TECHNOLOGY 101

Introduction to Library Organization

3 Cr.

General course in the purposes and uses of the library. Introduction to referencing, cataloguing, circulation, acquisition and all other activities of the library. Library terminology. Use of audio-visual equipment. Planning and display of exhibits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

157

121

Library Acquisition Procedures

3 Cr.

Various methods of ordering and processing books. Processing of periodicals, pan1phlets, records, picture collections and their inventory. Introduction to rnaking order lists for purchases, checking shipments and invoices. Keeping bindery records. Con1putation of costs with a survey of elen1entary bookkeeping techniques. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Library Technology 101.

151

Basic Cataloguing and Classifications

3 Cr.

Cataloguing and classification systems for books and other publications. Preparation of catalogue cards. Dewey Decimal Classification System. Procedures and uses of several filing systen1s. Typing cards. Bibliographic searching procedures. Practice in filing in the various library catalogues --- dictionary catalogue, subject authority file and shelf list. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Library Technology 121.

201

Audio-Visual Equipment

2 Cr.

Review of varied audio-visual equipment typically used in libraries. Its operation, n1aintenance and varied uses. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

251

I nformation Sources and Circulation

4 Cr.

Use of encyclopedias, year books, dictionaries, directories and other reference works. The Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature and other indexes. Procedure and forn1at with practice in the preparation of sin1ple book lists and bibliographies. Practice in information searches on sin1ple reference questions. Preparation, charging and discharging, and circulation of books and other materials. Circulation reports. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Library Technology 101.

158

MATHEMATICS 091

College Arithmetic

3 Cr.

Principles of arithllletic. Includes fundan1ental operations with whole nUlllbers, fractions and decilnals. Percentages and application in the world of business. Rational nUlnbers, exponents and powers. Prerequisite: None.

159

095

3 Cr.

Basic Algebra

Techniques and reasoning of algebra. Ell1phasis on the fundamental operations and solution of equations. Developlnent and use of formulas in the solution of problell1s. Introduction of the quadratic equation. Prerequisite: Mathell1atics 091 or equivalent.

101

intermediate Algebra

3 Cr.

Linear equations and linear functions. Quadratic equations and quadratic functions. Exponents and radicals. Mathen1atical induction, binornial theorem, cOlnplex nUll1bers, theory of equations and introduction to series. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or Mathematics 095.

103

3 Cr.

Trigonometry

Trigonoll1etric functions. En1phasis on theory and applicatioll. Prereqliisite: One year of high school algebra or Mathen1atics 095. One year of plane geOIl1etry is recoIl1n1ended.

111

Fundamentals of Mathematics

3 Cr.

Sets and logic. Axion1s of the field of reals and their consequences. Equations and inequations. Relations, functions and graphs. Distance fonnula. Conics. Trigonometric functions and their properties. Prerequisite: Two years of high school mathen1atics including algebra and geolnetry, or the equivalent.

112

Fundamentals of Mathematics

3 Cr.

,nd

Logarithmic and exponential functions. Algebra of n1atrices. Probability. Polynomial calculus applications of the calculus. Prerequisite: Ma;gen1a tics 111 . ./

115

College Algebra

3 Cr.

Sets, functions, inequalities and theory of equations. Curve tracing, determinants, pern1utations~ combinations, binolnial theoren1 and sequences. Mathematical induction, complex nun1bers and probability. Prerequisite: One and one-half years of high school algebra or Mathematics 101. One year of plane geometry is recommended.

160

121

Elementary J.t!athematical Analysis

5 Cr.

Review of exponents, radicals and quadratic equations. Theory of equations, absolute value and inequalities. Binomial theorem and n1athen1atical induction. Infinite series and introduction to limits. Trigonornetric functions, identities and equations. Complex numbers. Introduction to conic sections. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or two and one-half years of high school n1athematics, including algebra and geometry.

151

Analytic Geometry and Calculus

5 Cr.

Functions and lin1its, differentiation and integration of algebraic functions. Analytic geornetry, including conics applications. Prerequisites: One and one-half years of high school algebra, one year of plane geon1etry and one-half year of trigonon1etry --- or Mathematics 121 --- or Mathen1atics 103 and 115.

152

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 5 Cr. Continuation of Mathen1atics 151. Transcendental functions, methods of integration and hyperbolic functions. Vector topics in analytic geon1etry, in1proper integrals, polar coordinates and infinite series. Prerequisite: Mathen1atics 151.

221

Elementary Probability and Statistics

3 Cr.

Probability. with statistical applications. Empirical study of variability. Perrnutations, cornbinations and the binomial theorem. Sets and san1ple spaces. Theory of probability for finite sample spaces. Randon1 variables. Joint and continuous distributions. Binomial and normal distributions. Measures of central tendency and variability. Sampling, hypothesis testing, curve fitting and correlation to the regression equation. Practical applications, the collection and analysis of original data in terms of the preceding concepts. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101.

251

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 5 Cr. Continuation of Mathematics 152. Vectors and solid analytic geometry, partial differentiation, n1ultiple integrals and differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathernatics 152.

161

252

Differential Equations

3 Cr.

Differential equations of first, second and higher order. Simultaneous, linear and hon10geneous equations. Solution by power series. Laplace transform. Applications. Prerequisite: Mathernatics 251.

MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY 100

Mechanical Technology Orientation

1 Cr.

Designed to acquaint the student with his specific technical curriculurn as well as potential en1ployrnent opportunities and trends. Industrial visits rnade as part of the orientation. Slide rule instruction. Prerequisite: None.

162

150

Manufacturing Processes

3 Cr.

Theory and application of n1anufacturing methods, processes, tooling and equipment as related to modern industry. Discussion of industrial rnaterials utilized in the various processes. Forging, die casting, foundry practice, welding, press work and production machining. Introduction to physical metallurgy. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

160

Machine Tools and Fabrication

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of metal-cutting theory, fabrication practices and factors affecting n1achinability. Cutting tools, work piece, speeds, feed, cutting forces, n1achine limitations and capacities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

201

I ndustrial Hydraulics

3 Cr.

Oil hydraulics systen1s with applications to modern industrial uses such as transfer of power and auton1atic control of machines. Pumps, valves and boosters as con1ponents of various hydraulic circuits. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Mathen1atics 095 and Physics 101 or their equivalents. (Former Prerequisite: None.)

211

Mechanical Design

3 Cr.

Mechanisms, including design and stress analysis, straight line and circular bearings, ball and roller bearings, shafts, couplings, power screws, flywheels, gears and can1S. Practical application of design principIes in graphic form. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisites: Engineering 122 and Engineering 201.

221

Applied Instrumentation

3 Cr.

Theory and practice applicable to installation, maintenance, alteration or interpretation of industrial instruments. Pressure, flow, temperature, humidity and liquid level as they apply to measuring, recording and control devices. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisi te: Physics 101.

163

MEDICAL ASSISTING

164

101

Medical Assisting Orientation 1 Cr. (Originally part of 101 Introductory Medical Assisting) Designed to acquaint the student with n1edical assisting as an occupation. Duties, responsibilities, professional liabilities and rnedical ethics. Negligence and breach of duty. Con1rnunity health facilities will be visited. Prerequisite: None.

102

Medical Terminology 2 Cr. (Originally part of 101 Introductory Medical Assisting) Vocabulary and terms used by rnedical personnel. Usage and spelling of n1edical terms. Prerequisite: None.

201

Medical Assisting Office Procedures 3 Cr. (Originally 201 Medical Records, Supplies and Responsibilities) Medical histories, records, insurance fonns, rnedical tern1S and vocabulary. Responsibilities of assisting in the exan1ining roon1. Observati~n of rnedical assistant work activity in doctors' offices and comrnunity health facilities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Medical Assisting 102.

202

Medical Assisting Laboratory Procedures 4 Cr. (Originally 202 Medical Assisting Procedures) Medical supplies and instrun1ents. Drug prescription and categories. Asepsis and radioactivity. Practical lab tests such as blood analysis, X-ray, urinalysis, and skin testing. Preparing the patient for examination. Observation of lab procedures in doctors' offices. Record keeping responsibilities in relation to lab and exarn procedures. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Medical Assisting 201.

MUSIC 100

Fundamentals of Music

3 Cr.

Preparatory course in the rudin1ents of music. Includes notation, rhythm, scales, key signatures, intervals, chords, treble and bass clefs. Elementary sight singing and ear training. Introductory keyboard harmony. Prerequisite: None.

103

Music Appreciation

3 Cr.

Designed especially for those with no previous technical knowledge of music. Study of music's basic n1aterials, forn1 and style. Lectures, illustrations, live musical perforn1ances and extensive listening to recordings. Historical developn1ent of 'll1usic via con1positions fron1 the 17th cen tury to the present. Prerequisite: None.

165

105-10 6

Music History and Literature

3-3 Cr.

musica l Design ed for 111usic 111ajors or non-m usic n1aJors with son1e the literabackg round . Chron ologic al analysis of the major works in n and ture. Fonn, harn10 nic and contra puntal devices. Orche stratio c, histori of other stylistic featur es invest igated agains t a backg round Renais artistic and cultur al developn1ents. First sen1ester: Middl e Ages, and Consance and Baroq ue. Secon d sen1ester: Classical, Ron1a ntic telnpo rary. Prereq uisite for Music 105: None. Prereq uisite for Music 106: Music 105.

107

108

3 Cr.

Harm ony

singing, Begin ning theory and n1usicianship for music 111ajors. Sight second ary ear trainin g, basic harn10nic progressions, triads, prin1ary and nonand hs chords . Root positio ns and inversions, don1in ant sevent harn10nic chord tones. Keybo ard hanno ny, rhythm ic, rnelod ic and 0ny ocdictati on. Cours e divide d into four genera l areas. Harn1 ard harcupies two sessions. Ear trainin g and sight singing, two. Keybo mony, one. Practi ce sessions are on the studen t's own time. Prereq uisite: Music 100 or equiva lent.

3 Cr.

Harm ony

lations, Contin uation of Music 107. Review of first se1l1ester, n10du is. Condirnin ished sevent h chords , altered chords and harmo nic analys tinuat ion of cornpa rtrnen ted study sessions. Prereq uisite: Music 107.

111-112-211-212

Choir

1-1-1-1 Cr.

t of Conce ntratio n on vocal problen1s and techni ques. Devel opmen panied standa rd repert oire for lnixed voices. Sacred and secula r, accorn Cours e and a cappe lla. Schoo l and public perfor n1ance s are requir ed. n1ay be repeat ed for a total of four sen1esters' credit. Prereq uisite: Adrnission by auditi on.

166

113-114

Elementary Voice

2-2 Cr.

Principles of correct vocal projection. Application to the sin1pler songs and ballads in English. En1phasis on good breathing habits, poise, diction, tone-color and interpretation. Designed to develop an appreciation of the vocal art. Prerequisite: Music 103, 151 or pern1ission of instructor.

151

Music tor Elementary Education

3 Cr.

En1phasis on creating a rnusical environn1ent in the elenlentary school classroom. The child voice. Basic theory, including the piano keyboard, notation, n1usical syn1bols and tenns, nlajor and minor scales, simple and conlpound rneter and intervals. Use of the autoharp, flutophone and rhythnl instrun1ents. Baton techniques. Singing, rhythm, notation and listening. Designed to orient future elementary teachers to the role of music in the child's growth and developn1ent. Prerequisite: None.

153-154-253-254

I nstrumental Ensemble

1-1-1-1 Cr.

Designed to develop the individual's ability to perforn1 in instrumental ensemble groups. Music selected will be detennined by needs and capabilities of class. Ensenlbles, varying in size and detennined by student response, will be forn1ed. Public perfornlances included as part of course. Prerequisite: Ability to' perforn1 rnusic of n10derate difficulty on a standard orchestral instrurnent. Some high school instrumental experience desirable.

171-172

Beginning Piano

2-2 Cr.

Basic techniques consisting of exercises to develop technical facility and transposition. Improvisation of sin1ple accornpaninlents to given rnelodies, sight reading, n1enl0rization, repertoire and basic theory. Prerequisite: Students should have access to a piano for practicing.

167

221-222

Conducting

1-1 Cr.

Rudiments of conducting. Includes history, baton techniques, preparation of scores, rehearsal fundamentals, interpretation, instrumental and choral conducting techniques. Assigned reading, critical observance of conductors, supervised practice in conducting. Prerequisite: Music 108. Prior experience in a performing group recomn1ended.

271-272

I ntermediate Piano

2-2 Cr.

Building a repertoire consisting of short con1positions by composers from the Baroque period to the 20th century. Emphasis on good tone and the building of technique through finger exercises, scales and arpeggios. Students should have access to a piano for practicing. Prerequisite: Music 172 or permission of the instructor.

NURSERY SCHOOL ASSISTING 101

Introduction to Nursery Education

3 Cr.

(Originally 101 Nursery School Principles and Experience) Purposes and functions of the nursery school. Organization, progran1s, equipIl1ent, needs of the preschool child and teaching techniques. Supervised observation and lin1ited participation in preschool centers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

121

Preschool Literature and Language

3 Cr.

(Originally 121 Nursery School Curricul un1) Language skills and the importance of con1munication in the developIl1ent of a preschool child. An interpretative and critical study of all forms of literature as a basis for selection of stories for children two to six. Practice in the art of reading and story telling. Prerequisite: None.

168

169

122

Preschool Art, Science and Music (Originally 122 Nursery School Curricululn)

4 Cr.

Students in a vvorkshop setting are acquainted with a rich and Ineaningful variety of curriculun1 experiences in art, science and n1usic for preschool children. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Nursery School Assisting 101 or 121. (F ormer Prereq uisi te : Nursery School Assisting 121.)

220

Music for Nursery Education (Originally 220 Music for Nursery School)

2 Cr.

Music for preschool children with elnphasis on songs and instruments. Includes the fundamentals of music to enable the student to plan simple accon1paniments. Skill in use of instrun1ents emphasized. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Nursery School Assisting 101 and Music 17l. (Forn1er Prerequisite: Nursery School Assisting 122.)

221

C hild Management

2 Cr.路

(Originally 221 Preschool Child Developlnent) Guidance and n1anagen1ent of preschool children within an educational program based on interpretation of child growth principles in practice. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrolln1ent with Nursery School Assisting 23l. (F ormer Prerequisite: Psychology 201.)

231

Nursery School Participation (Originally 231 Nursery Practice Teaching)

6 Cr.

Actual participation in preschool teaching under supervision to develop practical skills. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisites: Nursery School Assisting 101, 122 and 220. (Former Prerequisite: Nursery School Assisting 221.)

170

NURSING 101

Fundamentals of Nursing

5 Cr.

Basic areas of nursing explored through lectures, discussion, clinical experience and observation. Enables the student to utilize fundamental principles of nursing care in meeting the patient's needs. Includes motor skills, equipment and procedures embodied in all professional nursing care. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: None.

102

Fundamentals of Nursing

5 Cr.

Introduces new material basic to nursing. Further develops the skills, knowledge and concepts presented in Nursing 101. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisites: Nursing 101 and Biology 121 or equivalent.

171

201

Nursing of Infants, Children and Adults

10 Cr.

Nonnal aspects of maternal and infant health, with actual experience obtained in a n1aternity setting. Includes study of seven major health problen1s --- infectious processes, cardio-vascular illness, accidents, neoplastic diseases, emotional and n1etabolic disorders, in1pairment of rnobility. These health conditions are considered for all age groups. Lecture 6 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisites: Nursing 102 and Biology 122.

202

Nursing of Infants, Children and Adults

12 Cr.

Considers rnajor health problen1s not explored in Nursing 201. 'Exarnines career opportunities, nursing organizations and present trends in nursing. Includes ethical, legal and occupational responsibilities of the nurse. Lecture 8 hours. Laboratory 12 hours. Prerequisite: Nursing 20'1.

PHILOSOPHY 101

Introduction to Philosophy

3 Cr.

Study and discussion of the great thinkers' contributions to the science which investigates the facts and principles of reality, human nature and conduct. Prerequisite: None.

102

Introduction to Logic

3 Cr.

Basic rules and systems of formal logic. Examines syllogisn1s and the elements of modem symbolic logic concepts of mathematics. Explores scien rific reasoning and language usage. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101.

172

201

Comparative World Religion

3 Cr.

Comparative study of the salient ideas from the world's major religions. Includes Judaism, Christianity, Islanl, Hinduisnl, Buddhisnl, Taoisnl, Confucianism and Shintoisnl. Prerequisite: None.

202

Ethics

3 Cr.

Introductory analysis of the principal ethical theories. Their practical application to nlan's nloral problems and decisions. Prereq uisi te : Philosophy 101.

203

Introduction to Scientific Method

3 Cr.

Exanlines science and its nlethodology. Emphasis on the nature and role of rneasurenlent, probability, concept fornlation and theories In the various sciences. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101. Philosophy 102 recommended.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 101

Physical Education Activities (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Fundamentals of. angling. Bait, spin and fly casting. Instruction in 'archery and horseback riding. Prerequisite: None.

101

Physical Education Activities (Men)

1 Cr.

Fundarnentals of physical fitness and participation In volleyball. Discussions of cross-country runs, football and basketball. Prerequisite: None.

101

Physical Education Activities (Women)

1 Cr.

Fundanlentals of physical fitness. Participation in volleyball and basketball. Discussions of football fundanlen tals. Prerequisite: None.

173

102

1 Cr.

Physical Education Activities (Coeducational) Participation in skiing and tennis. Fundamentals for beginners. Prerequisite: None.

102

1 Cr.

Physical Education Activities (Men) Participation in skiing and golf. Includes ice hockey and soccer. Prerequisite: None.

102

Physical Education Activities (Women)

1 Cr.

Participation in skiing, golf, badminton and archery. Prerequisite: None.

111-112

Beginning Swimming (Coeducational)

1-1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the fundamental swimming strokes. Emphasis on over-all knowledge of' strokes and de~p-water safety. Prerequisite: None.

113

Senior Lifesaving (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Review of standard strokes and sin1ple diving. Preparation for and completion of tests for American Red Cross Lifesaving Certificate. Prerequisite: Ability to dive fron1 edge of pool and swim 440 yards using a variety of strokes.

174

114

Water Safety Instruction (Coeducational)

2 Cr.

Practical and theoretical analysis of personal water safety, snlall craft safety, ,swilnming skills and lifesaving techniques. Students are to demonstrate methods of class organization, instruction, supervision and exalnination. Prerequisite: Eighteen years of age or older and possession of a current Lifesaving Certificate.

115

Adapted Physical Education (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Designed for students unable to participate in regular physical education activities because of temporary or pennanent lin1itations. Progran1s of individual exercises or recreational games are determined by student limitations and specific rell1edial conditions. Prerequisite: None.

121-122

Social Dancing (Coeducational)

1-1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the fundanlental steps of the fox trot, cha cha, waltz and other popular dances. Prerequisite: None.

151

Physical Education for the Elementary School (Coeducational)

2 Cr.

Physical, social and psychological characteristics of the elementary s.chool child. Classification, organization, gan1es and rhythms as they apply to the school situation. Practice teaching gan1es and rhythms suitable for playgrounds and elen1entary schools. Course also appropriate for students planning to teach lnentally retarded and preschool children. Prerequisite: None.

153-154

Recreational Leadership ( Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Basics for playground directors and recreation leaders. Organization and adn1inistration of con1munity-school recreation progran1s. En1phasis on training in leadership techniques and the development of recreation progran1s. Opportunities for observing on-going programs. Prerequisite: None.

175

201

Physical Education Activities (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Participation in badminton, bowling and billiards. For beginners who would like to develop their skills. Prerequisite: None.

201

Physical Education Activities (Men)

1 Cr.

Participation in weight-lifting and gyn1nastics. Includes competltlve self-defense techniques, such as wrestling, boxing, judo and fencing. Prerequisite: None.

201

Physical Education Activities (Women)

1 Cr.

Participation in gyn1nastics, fencing, table tennis. Discussions of ice hockey. Prerequisite: None.

202

Physical Education Activities (Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Participation in a variety of leisuretillle activities. Includes horseshoes, shuffleboard, table tennis and darts. Prerequisite: None.

202

Physical Education Activities (Men)

1 Cr.

Participation in the Spring sports of softball, indoor track and field. Discussions in the fundan1entals of baseball, lacrosse, handball and squash. Prerequisite: None.

202

Physical Education Activities (Women)

1 Cr.

Participation in tennis, softball, track and field. Discussion of baseball. Prerequisite: None.

211-212

I ntermediate Swimming (Coeducational)

1-1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in SWilll111ing strokes. Ernphasis on developn1ent of forn1 and endurance. Prerequisite: Ability to swin1 in deep water.

176

251

Officiating (Men)

2 Cr.

Rules and officiating techniques of selected seasonal sports. Lectures, reading and class discussions. Field experience in the officiating of school and college contests. Organization and management of intramural sports program. Football, basketball, wrestling, baseball, softball and swimming. Upon completion, students will be eligible for certification examination to officiate sports in Ohio schools. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisites: Physical Education 101 and 102.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 101

Introduction to Physical Science

3 Cr.

Unified, elementary, non-mathematical description of the physical universe. Emphasis on scientific methods, their history and development. Contribution of our spectrum of scientific concepts to energy, matter, space and time. Includes n1anifestations of energy, changes in and structure of matter, the earth and universe. Prerequisite: None.

102

Introduction to Physical Science

3 Cr.

Basic concepts of astronomy, meteorology and geology. Continuation of a general course for the non-science major. Designed to improve understanding of the student's physical surroundings. Prerequisite: Physical Science 101.

177

PHYSICS 101-102

Introductory Physics

4-4 C,.

Includes mechanics of forces and motion, heat, electricity and magnetism. Sound, wave motion geometric optics, atomic and nuclear structure. En1phasizes development of physics, analytical thinking and methods of measurement. Designed for the non-science major, preprogrammed students and as preparation for Physics 121. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite for 101: One year of high school algebra. Prerequisi te for 102: Physics 101,

121

Engineering Physics

4 Cr.

First sen1ester of a three-semester sequence, beginning with the study of mechanics. Sequence designed primarily for engineering majors and others requiring a thorough physics background. Lecture 3 hours. Problem section 2 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 151 or taken concurrently. High school physics recomn1ended.

178

221

Engineering Physics

4 Cr.

Continuation of Physics 121. Lectures on heat, thennodynan1ics, electricity and Inagnetisln. First selnester of laboratory. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Physics 121 and Mathell1atics 152. The latter ll1ay be taken concurrently.

222

Engineering Physics

4 Cr.

Continuation of Physics 221. Lectures on optics, aton1ic and nuclear physics. Second sen1ester of laboratory. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Physics 221 and Mathematics 251. The latter may be taken concurrently.

PLANT OPERATION SERVICES 101

Boiler) Turbine and Compressor Operations

2 Cr.

Generation of steam and electric power. Theory and practice of power house operations. Design, layout function, operation and nlaintenance of boilers, compressors, turbines, heating and ventilating equipment. Prerequisite: None.

111

Softeners) Cooling Towers and Filters

2 Cr.

Water usage and purification. Industrial filtration. Design, layout, function, operation and maintenance of water softeners, cooling towers and filters. Theory and practice of filtration systell1s in industry. Prerequisi te: None.

179

POLITICAL SCIENCE

180

101

American National Government 3 Cr. (Originally 101 Introduction to Government) Nature, purpose and forms of the An1erican government. Relationship between function and structure. Dynamics of political change. Outstanding governn1ental problems of modern society. Prerequisite: None.

102

Comparative Government 3 Cr. (Originally 102 Introduction to Government) Con1parative study of the modern world's major governments. Their institutions, ideologies, political habits and foreign poliCies. Prerequisite: Political Science 101.

103

State and Local,\ Government 3 Gr. Designed to pgi~t7f~generaL: u!lper;stallding of the structure and functions of American governmen1Ab~oW-~al路't, national level, and their relationships to each O'ther and the federal governn1ent. Special attention to Ohio state and local government. Prerequisite: Political Science 101.

201

Contemporary World Affairs 3 Cr. Problem study of modern international relations and of the forces which confront pO'licymakers. Special emphasis on current areas of crisis. Designed primarily for students whO' seek an understanding of the United States in a tense and highly con1petitive political world. Prerequisites: History 101 and 102 recomn1ended.

PSYCHOLOGY 101

General Psychology

3 Cr.

Introduction to fundamental psychological concepts derived from a scientific approach to the study of hun1an adjustment and behavior. Prerequisite: None.

201

Child Growth and Development

3 Cr.

Growth, development and guidance of the child from conception through puberty. Interpretation and significance of creativeness, adjustment abilities and child-adult relationships. Emphasis on both physiological and psychological growth stages of the child. Prerequisite: Psychology 101.

203

Educational Psychology

3 Cr.

Introduction to the n1ajor psychological factors in the school learningteaching situation. Concepts in hun1an developn1ent related to problen1s in the school situation. Teacher's role in n10tivation, conceptual learning and problen1 solving. Development of eI11otional behavior, attitudes and values. Learning of skills, retention and transfer. MeaSUrel11ent of student abilities and achievement. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Education 101 recoI11111ended.

181

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 101

Beginning Typing

2 Cr.

Fundanlentals of keyboard technique and operation of the typewriter. Special enlphasis on placement and correct usage of punctuation marks, nunlbers and special characters. ContrO'lled typing practice and beginning letter writing. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

102

Intermediate 1'yping

2 Cr.

Developluent of speed and skill in operation of the typewriter, handling of typing work. Advanced letter writing, tabulation and manuscript typing. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 101 or consent of the instructor.

103

Beginning Shorthand

3 Cr.

Mastery of Gregg shorthand theory. Beginning dictation to' a goal of 60 words per nlinute by the end of the senlester. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

104

I ntennediate Shorthand

3 Cr.

Focuses on the nl0st conlnl0nly used word and phrase fornls. Training in taking dictation and transcribing shorthand notes on the typewriter. Stresses developnlent of speed and accuracy. Dictation begins at about 60 words per nlinute and progresses to 100 words per minute. Federal Civil Service Certificates issued to students who satisfactorily complete this course. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisi te : Secretarial Science 103 or consent of the instructor.

105

Introduction to Business Machines

3 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the essential operations of the ten-key and full keyboard adding-listing luachines, rotary and key-driven calculators. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Business 107 or taken concurrently.

182

106

Filing and Records Control

2 Cr.

(Originally 106 Introduction to Business Machines) Instruction and practice in the preparation of office records for temporary and pern1anent storage. Includes alphabetic,. geographic, numeric and subject filing systems. Detailed study of both mechanical and n1anual filing methods. Emphasis on classification systems and the retrieval of filed inforn1ation. Retention and disposition of all kinds of office records. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 101 or the equivalent.

200

Business Comrnunication

3 Cr.

Extensive and detailed examination of oral and written communicative techniques used in business. Letters, n1emorandun1s and reports. Analysis of conference and meeting techniques, and business addresses and talks. Prerequisites: English 101, Speech 101 and Business 108.

201

Advanced Typing

2 Cr.

Statistical typing, legal fODns, miscellaneous office forms and typing from voice-writing machines. Stencil cutting, operation of a stencil duplicator, additional drill in speed and accuracy. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 102 or consent of the instructor.

202

Advanced Typing

2 Cr.

Planning, editing, production of cornplicated business and technical reports from the rough draft. Typing from voice-writing n1achines. Prepares the student for in1mediate placernent in a typing position. Lecture o hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 201 or consent of the instructor.

203

Advanced Shorthand

3 Cr.

Brief and intensive review of the Gregg shorthand principles. Extensive practice in advanced phrase-writing as well as technical and vocational tenns used in n10dern business. Designed to increase dictation and transcription speed. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 104 or two years of high school shorthand.

204

Advanced Shorthand

3 Cr.

Terminal course in shorthand. Prepares the student for a position involving heavy dictation. Dual en1phasis on speed dictation and transcription. Preparation of letters involving technical n1atter and also office-style business dictation. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 203 or consent of the instructor.

205

Legal Shorthand

3 Cr.

Designed for the developn1ent of speed in taking dictation of legal tern1inology. Correct handling of legal forms. Preparation of legal correspondence, pleadings, testimony and depositions from dictation. Goal is a dictation speed of 100 to 120 words a rninute. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 203 or consent of the instructor.

206

Medical Shorthand

3 Cr.

Designed for the development of speed in taking dictation of n1edical terminology. Preparation of n1edical reports, diagnoses, case histories and correspondence fron1 dictation. Goal is a dictation speed of 100 to 120 words a n1inute. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 203 or consent of the instructor.

184

250

Office Methods and Procedures 3 Cr. (Originally 100 Office Methods and Procedures) Theory and practice of office procedures. Indexing, filing, receptionist duties, handling of mail and business forn1s. Layout and use of office furniture and equipment. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 20l. (Former Prerequisite: None.)

251

Machine Transcription 2 Cr. Instruction and practice in transcribing letters, manuscripts and business reports from recorded dictation. Representative dictating and transcribing equipment is available for classroom use. Emphasis on accuracy of transcript as well as production speed. Lecture 0 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: Secretarial Science 201 or n1ay be taken concurrently.

SOCIAL SCIENCE 101

3 Cr. Introduction to Social Science Interrelationship of the social sciences. Application to the problems of group living in the latter part of the 20th century. Developed through a survey of the principal facts and concepts of sociology, economics and political science. Considered in relationship to the historical development of the United States. Analysis of historical and contemporary problems leads the student toward a view of the total scene. Prerequisite: None. Note: Students who have completed Political Science 101 or History 151 may not take Social Science 101 for credit.

185

102

Introd uction to Social Science

3 Cr.

proble ms Contin uation of Social Scienc e 101. Consid ers additi onal of society. and relatio nships . Ell1phasis on the econo mic and social -order Prereq uisite: Social Science 101. ogy 102 Note: Studen ts who have compl eted Econo lnics 151 or Sociol may not take Social Science 102 for credit.

SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY SOCI OLOG Y 101

Introd uctory Sociology (Origi nally 101 Princi ples of Sociology)

3 Cr.

Social Institu tions

3 Cr.

Marri age and Famil y Lite

3 Cr.

ds used Surve y of the princip les, theory , concep ts and resear ch metho e, social in sociology. "In-de pth" study of such concep ts as cultur organi zation , norms , status and social stratif ication . Prereq uisi te: None.

102

121

course as Exam inatio n of the concep ts develo ped in the introd uctory unity and they relate to the family, religio n, educa tion, urban comm other such insti tu tions. Prereq uisite: Sociology 101.

adjust Prepa ration for marria ge factors in mate selection. Person ality zation ments in marria ge and fan1ily life. Histor y, functi ons and organi ments . of the family. Dating , courts hip, engag ement and marita l adjust impro veParen t-child relatio ns. Fan1ily disorg anizat ion and progra ms of ment. Prereq uisi te : None.

186

201

Social Problems

3 Cr.

(Originally 102 Social Problen1s) Pathological approach to problerns of n10dern An1erican society. Includes such specific topics as juvenile delinquency, adult crime, alcoholisrn, n1ental health, rural-urban conflict, integration, religion and racial-minority conflicts. Includes the general topics of individual and community disorganization, and family. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.

ANTHROPOLOGY 101

Cultural Anthropology

3 Cr.

Cultural patterns and dynan1ics. History, distribution and growth of cultural patterns. Includes social organization, material culture and other topics. Prerequisite : None

102

Physical Anthropology

3 Cr.

Study of man as a physical being. Origin and antiquity of n1an, the relationship of man to anin1als, paleontological discoveries and racial phenomena. Pre"requisite: None.

SPEECH 091

Basic Oral Communication

3 Cr.

Practice in oral communication. Discovery, selection and organization of valid information pertinent to a specific speech purpose. Its preparation for oral delivery. Special en1phasis on the areas of carry-over from oral to written discourse. Daily practice before the class. Prerequisite: None.

187

101

Principles of Public Speaking

3 Cr.

Effective oral con1n1unication. Application of principles to a variety of practical speaking situations. Prerequisite: None.

102

Oral Interpretation

3 Cr.

Developn1ent of the student's ability to understand, articulate and appreciate prose and poetry. Special emphasis on the selection and cutting of worthwhile literary n1aterial, on good voice projection and articulation. Prerequisite: Speech 101.

121

Beginning Interviewing Techniques

2 Cr.

Designed to in1prove the skills of interviewing. Practical experience interviewing in classroon1 and con1n1unity situations. Major emphasis on the one-to-one interview. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: None.

122

Advanced I nterviewing Techniques

2 Cr.

Continuation of Speech 121. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Speech 121.

211

Argumentation and Debate

3 Cr.

Discovering, selecting and evaluating evidence. Its arrangement into orderly, persuasive oral and written argument. Special emphasis on causes and effects of prejudice, remedies and the influence of language on human behavior. Prerequisi te : None.

THEATRE ARTS 101

I ntroduction to the Theatre

3 Cr.

Introduction to the basic elements of theatrical production. Includes scenery, lighting, costuming and managing. Prerequisite: None.

188

121

History of l'heatre Arts

3 Cr.

I-Iistory of the theatre's developll1ent. Relationship of the theatre to the various cultures of the world from ancient Greece to the present day. Prerequisite: None.

151

Fundamentals of Acting

3 Cr.

Introduction to the theory and basic mechanics of vocal control and interpretation. Attention also focused on the development of bodily control as well as integration of a controlled voice and body. Prerequisite: None.

189

152

Fundamentals of Acting

3 Cr.

Stage techniques based on selected dramatic materials. Individual assignn1ents to encourage and challenge each student within the range of his ability. Recon1lnended for prospective dran1a teachers and students wishing to achieve professional in1provement. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 151.

153-154-253-254

Rehearsal and Performance

1-1-1-1 Cr.

Students enrolled become members of the Cuyahoga Cornmunity College drama company. Work is assigned in accordance with each student's interests and talents. Training con1parable to an internship or apprenticeship. Includes acting, directing, playwriting, business adIninistration and publicity. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrolln1ent in Theatre Arts 151, 152 or consent of the instructor.

171

Radio and TV Production

2 Cr.

Surveys the broadcasting industry, its history and place in our present society. Examines technical area, advertising techniques, announcing, writing, progran1ming and audience analysis. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

251

Advanced Acting

3 Cr.

Advanced acting class of lilnited enrollment, ten to 15 students. Emphasis on challenging the individual actor's ability by presenting him with a variety of characterizations taken from selections varying in presentation style. Make-up and costun1ing analyzed and, in some cases, executed. Prerequisite: Theatre Arts 152.

252

Advanced Acting

3 Cr.

Continuation of Theatre Arts 251. Employs the use of more complex and difficult materials. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in Theatre Arts 251.

190

TRANSPORTATION 121

Transportation Principles

3 Cr.

Survey of the Arnerican transportation systen1s, tariffs and classification. Traffic regulations and industrial traffic 111anagernent. Prerequisite: None.

122

Transportation Principles

3 Cr.

Continuation of Transportation 121. Ell1phasis on 1110des of transportation and their interrelation. Transport via 1110tor~ rail, water and air. How they cOll1bine to Il1ake the total transportation picture. Prerequisite: Transportation 121 or per111ission of instructor.

221

Tariffs and Classifications

3 Cr.

Through routes and rates in transit privileges. Technical tariff and rate interpretation. Over-charges and under-charges, loss and damage, ill1port and export traffic. Unifonl1 freight classification, classification com111ittee procedure, and their phases of tariff and classification. Prerequisite: Transportation 122.

231

Transportation Regulations

3 Cr.

Local, state and federal legislative acts regulating the transportation systerrls. Includes the Public Utilities C0111111ission Act, Interstate COIl1merce Act and Civil Aeronautics Board Act. Prerequisite: Transportation 122.

241

I ndustrial Traffic Management

3 Cr.

Basic principles of 111aterial handling and production control. Traffic and transportation procedures within industrial plants. Prerequisite: Transportation 122.

191

Transfer or

U iversity Parallel Program Transfer or University Parallel curriculums in Business Administration, Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts, Nursing and other professional fields are planned in consultation with the student's counselor. The courses parallel the curriculums of the four-year college or university to which the student plans to transfer. It is the responsibility of the student to acquaint himself with, and to follow the requirements of, the institution to which he intends to transfer. In general, transfer students specialize at the senior institution during the junior and senior year. This University Parallel Program typically involves course work in the following subject areas during the freshman and sophomore years: College Composition British or American Literature An1erican or W orId History Science Mathematics Social Sciences Hun1anities Students intending to major in Liberal Arts usually complete two years of a foreign language, or the equivalent, at the college level. Students in Business Administration need at least a year of college-level mathematics (including algebra) as preparation for later courses involving statistics and other quantitative n1ethods. Engineering students take a concentration of courses in theoretical mathematics. The College offers preparatory or refresher courses in English composition, reading con1prehension and mathematics for students who are deficient in basic skills areas. Such courses are not directly designed for transfer but intended to provide students with an opportunity to improve their skills.

194

Technical- Occupational Two-Year Degree Program

Listed on the following pages are suggested semester sequences for each of the 19 two-year Associate degree programs in the TechnicalOccupational area. 'They are intended to be a guide in the scheduling of the student's course work. Each student should confer with a counselor on course selection prior to, or at the tin1e of, registration. The Business and Technical-Occupational Offices' staff and faculty will be happy to explain and discuss any phase of these progran1s. The program is divided into four broad categories: Business, Engineering, Health and Public Service Technologies. Students, with the approval of the dean in charge of a progralll, rnay Inake substitutions for courses not required for graduation and courses outside the area of concentration.

195

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN BUSINESS WITH CONCENTRATION IN ACCOUNTING Designed to provide practical and theoretical preparation for clerical, supervisory and administrative assignn1ents. Preparation for careers in business and industrial accounting departments as accounting clerks, junior accountants, cost accountants or cost estimators. SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE FIRST SEMESTER English (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Busi路ness 108 Introduction to Business Business 107 Business Mathematics Accounting 121 Principles of Accounting

Cr. Hrs. 3 1

3 3

3

SECOND SEMESTER SPeech (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Accounting 122 Principles of Accounting Data Processing 101 Electronic Data Processing Elective

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3 3

3 16" 16

THIRD SEMESTER Business 213 Business Law Accounting 221 Intermediate Accounting Economics 100 Economics for Business and Industry* Hurnanities, Social Science, or Science and Mathematics (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3

FOURTH SEMESTER Secretarial Science 200 Business Communication Accounting 222 Intermediate Accounting Accounting 231 Cost Accounting Humanities, Social Science, or Science and !v! athematics (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3

6

6

15 15 *201 Principles of Economics may be substituted.

196

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN BUSINESS WITH CONCENTRATION IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT Provides a practical and路 theoretical understanding of assignments where a working knowledge of varied procedures is necessary. A program especially appropriate for a person who intends to manage his own business or enter a small business venture. Curriculum being reviewed for further refinement. SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE FIRST SEMESTER English (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Business 108 Introduction to Business Business 107 Business Mathematics Data Processing 101 Electronic Data Processing

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3 3

SECOND SEMESTER Speech (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Business 112 Business Management Business 241 Office Management H umanities Social Science or Science and M athematics* (See Graduation Requirements) J

3

Cr. Hrs. 3

3 3 3

J

3

16 16 * Psychology 101 Recommended

THIRD SEMESTER Economics 100 Economics for Business and Industry** Secretarial Science 200 Business Communication Accounting 121 Principles of Accounting Humanities, Social Science, or Science and Mathematics (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 3

FOURTH SEMESTER Business 111 Industrial Purchasing Business 213 Business Law Humanities, Social Science, or Science and Mathematics (See Graduation Requirements) Elective

6

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

6 3

15

15 **201 Principles of Economics may be substituted.

197

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN BUSINESS WITH CONCENTRATION IN DATA PROCESSING Furnishes students with a practical and theoretical understanding of data processing applications in business and industry. Emphasis on the use of machines and equipment to expedite and n10re accurately process business data. Job opportunities are available in business data processing installations as trainees, operators, programmers and junior analysts --- to list a few. SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE FIRST SEMESTER

Cr. Hrs.

English

101 College Composition

3 3

Mathematics

* 101 Intermediate Algebra

3

Data Processing

101 Electronic Data Processing

101 Principles of Public Speaking

3

Social Science

Business

108 Introduction to Business

Cr. Hrs.

Speech

3

Social Science

101 Introduction to Social Science

SECOND SEMESTER

3

Health or Phys. Ed.

(See Graduation Requirements)

16

102 Introduction to Social Science

3

Accounting

121 Principles of Accounting .A1 athematics 221 Elementary Probability and Statistics Data Processing 201 Computer Programming' Data Processing 111 Data Processing Applications Laboratory

3

3 3

16 *Students may begin the mathematics sequence at higher level, depending upon prior . accomplishment in this area.

198

THIRD SEMESTER Accounting 122 Principles of Accounting Data Processing** Elective Data Processing 202 Computer Programming Elective Humanities, Social Science, or Science and Mathematics (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3 3

3 15

Cr. FOURTH SEMESTER Hrs. Econornics 100 Economics for Business and Industry 3 Data Processing 221 Programming Systems 3 Data Processing 231 Systems Analysis 3 Data Processing 251 Data Processing Field Project 2 Humanities, Social Science, or Science and Mathematics (See Graduation Requirements) 3 Health or Physical Education (See Graduation Requirements) 15

**Courses being planned in this area include the following possible offerings: Tele-Communications Processing Computer Languages Information Retrieval Numerical Methods and Computers

199

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN BUSINESS WITH CONCENTRATION IN RETAILING Planned to furnish a practical and theoretical understanding for assignments in merchandising. Examines distribution methods of large department stores and other retail outlets. Preparation for employment as clerical personnel, management trainees, buyers, purchasing agents and other positions with retail establishments. Curriculum being reviewed for further refinement. SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE Cr. Cr. FIRST SEMESTER Hrs. SECOND SEMESTER Hrs. English Speech (See Graduation Requirements) 3 (See Graduation Requirements) 3 Social Science Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) 3 (See Graduation Requirements) 3 Health or Phys. Ed. Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) 1 (See Graduation Requirements) Business Business 155 Principles of Retailing 3 108 Introduction to Business 3 Business Humanities, Social Science, or 116 Salesmanship 3 Science and M athematics* Humanities, Social Science, or (See Graduation Requirements) 3 Business Science and M athematics** (See Graduation Requirements) 3 107 Business Mathematics 3 16

16 * 101 General Psychology Recommended ** 101 Principles of Sociology Recommended

Cr. THIRD SEMESTER Business 256 Retail Buying and Merchandising Secretarial Science 200 Business Communication Economics 100 Economics for Business and Industry*** Accounting 121 Principles of Accounting Humanities, Social Science, or Science and Mathematics (See Graduation Requirements)

Hrs.

3 3

3 3

FOURTH SEMESTER Business 201 Principles of Marketing Business 213 Business Law Business 225 Advertising Business 220 Human Relations III Business Elective

3 3

3

3 3

15 3

15 ***201 Principles of Economics may be substituted.

200

Cr. Hrs.

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN BUSINESS WITH CONCENTRA.TION IN SALES1fANSHIP Provides practical and theoretical preparation for sales positions that require customer contact and advanced sales techniques --- especially in specialized or technical sales. Many selling areas are open to graduates, including industrial, insurance, real estate and related retail, wholesale, outside and service selling. Curriculum being reviewed for further refinement. SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE FIRST SEMESTER English (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Business 107 Business Mathematics Business 108 Introduction to Business Humanities) Social Science) or Science and M athematics* (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3 3

3

SECOND SEMESTER Speech (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Business 116 Salesmanship Accounting 111 Practical Accounting** Humanities) Social Science) or Science and M athematics*** (See Graduation Requirements)

16

* 10 1 ** 121 *** 101

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3 3

3 16

General Psychology Recommended Principles of Accounting may be substituted. Principles of Sociology Recommended.

201

THIRD SEMESTER

Cr. Hrs.

Economics

100 Economics for Business and Industryt

Business

252 Sales Management 3

Business

3

Business

Bu\'iness

111 Industrial Purchasing

3

Business

225 Advertising

220 Human Relations Business

3

213 Business Law Elective

3 15

t201 Principles of Economics may be substituted.

202

3

111

3

Business

Humanities) .Social Science) or Science and AJ athematics

(See Graduation Requirements)

3

201 Principles of Marketing

Secretarial Science

200 Business Communication

FOURTH SEMESTER

Cr. Hrs.

3 3 15

.ASSOCIA1'E DEC;REE PROC;R/\IVI IN WITH CONCENTR~I\TION IN SECRETARli\L Devised to provide practical and theoretical preparation for career secretaries in business and industry. Persons in this field 111 a y qualify for positions as clerk-typists, stenographers and secretaries with law finns, rnedical and insurance offices, industrial plants, business concerns and public agenCIes. SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE FIRST SEMESTER English (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Physical Education (See Graduation Req uiremen ts ) Secretarial Science 101 Beginning Typing* Secretarial Science 103 Beginning Shorthand* Secretarial Science 105 Introduction to Business Machines Secretarial Science 106 Filing and Records Control

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

2 3

SECOND SEMESTER SPeech (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Ph),s. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Secretarial Science 102 In termedia te Typing* Secretarial Science 104 Intermediate Shorthand* Business 107 Business Mathematics

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

2 3 3

3 15

2 17

*Substitute electives if completed in high school or elsewhere.

203

THIRD SEMESTER Secretarial Science 200 Business Communication Accounting 111 Practical Accounting Secretarial Science 201 Advanced Typing Secretarial Science 203 Advanced Shorthand Humanities) Social Science) or Science and Mathematics (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

2 3

6

FOURTH SEMESTER Secretarial Science 250 Office Methods and Procedures Secretarial Science 204 Advanced Shorthand** Business 220 Human Relations in Business Humanities) Social Science) or Science and Mathematics (See Graduation Requirements)

17 **Students specializing in legal training will take 205 Legal Shorthand. **Students specializing in medical training will take 206 Medical Shorthand.

204

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3

6 15

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN BUSINESS WITH CONCENTRATION IN TRANSPORTATION Conceived to provide practical and theoretical preparation for clerical, supervisory, and administrative assignments in business and industrial traffic departments. Employment opportunities for graduates are available with truck, water, rail and air carriers. Positions include traffic expediter and scheduler, freight rate clerk and tariff claims examiner.

SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE

Cr. FIRST SEMESTER English (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Business 108 Introduction to Business Transportation 121 Transportation Principles Business 107 Business Mathematics

Hrs. 3 3

3

3 3

Cr. SECOND SEMESTER

Hrs.

English or Speech (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Grad ua tion Req uiremen ts ) Secretarial Science 101 Beginning Typing Transportation 122 Transportation Principles Business 200 Business Communication

3

3

2 3 3

16

15

Cr. THIRD SEMESTER Economics 151 Development of American Economy Transportation 221 Tariffs and Classifications Business 201 Principles of Marketing Humanities~ Social Science, or Science and Mathematics (See Graduation Requirements)

Hrs.

3 3

3

6

FOURTH SEMESTER

Cr. Hrs.

Transportation 231 Transportation Regulations Transportation 241 Industrial Traffic Management Humanities, Social Science, or Science and Mathematics (See Graduation Requirements) Elective

3 3

6 4 16

15

205

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES

,ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY Provides the basic knowledge and skills necessary to semi-professional personnel in the construction industry. Possible careers include architectural draftsman, field engineer, materials and job estimator, construction supervisor, specifications writer, building materials salesman, contractor or building inspector. The building construction technician often serves as a liaison between the architect or engIneer and the skilled craftsman.

SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE FIRST SEMESTER Building Construction Tech. 100 Building Construction Orientation Building Construction Tech. 121 Architectural Drawing English (See Graduation Requirements) Mathematics * 101 Intermediate Algebra Physics 101 Introductory Physics Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs.

SECOND SEMESTER Building Construction Tech. 122 Architectural Dnnving

Cr. Hrs. 3

English (See Graduation Requirements)

3

Engineering 151 Applied Mechanics

3

Mathematics 103 Trigonometry

3

4

Social Science (See Graduation Requirements)

3

2

Humanities or Social Science (See Graduation Requirements)

3

3 3 3

16

18

*Students may begin the mathematics sequence at a higher level, depending upon prior accomplishment in this area.

206

Cr. THIRD SEMESTER Hrs. Engineering 211 Introduction to Surveying 3 Building Construction Tech. 221 Building Equipment 3 Building Construction Tech. 241 Principles of Structural Design 3 Engineering :!01 Strength of Materials 3 Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) 3 15

Cr. Hrs. FOURTH SEMESTER Building C onstruction Tech. 201 Introduction to Concrete Design 3 Building Construction Tech. 222 Building Equipment 3 Building Construction Tech. 231 Contracts~ Specifications and Estimating 3 Building Construction Tech. 251 Construction Procedures and Building Codes 3 Industrial Supervision 231 Labor Management Relations 3 Hurnanities 0'1' Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) 3 18

Electrical-Electronic Technology Designed for specialization in either electricity or electronics within the framework of this technological area. Potential career opportunities are to be found in cOlumunications, electrical power and equipment industries, in application to automatic machine control or aero-space research activity. Courses provide both theory and practical application of electrical and electronic principles necessary for eluployment as an electrical or electronic engineering aide, motor test technician, instrument calibrator, technical writer, communications specialist or electrical power conlpany representative.

207

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE FIRST SEMESTER Electrical-Electronic Tech. 100 Electrical-Electronic Orientation English (See Graduation Requirements) Engineering 121 Engineering Drawing Engineering 125 Principles of ElectricityD. C. Circuits Mathematics *101 Intermediate Algebra Physics 101 Introductory Physics

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3

SECOND SEMESTER Electrical-Electronic Tech. 140 Direct Current Machines Electrical-Electronic Tech. 160 Basic Electronics Engineering 130 Principles of ElectricityA. C. Circuits English (See Graduation Requirements) Mathematics 103 Trigonometry Health or Phys. 'Ed. (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3 3 3 2

4 17 17

*Students may begin the mathematics sequence at a higher level, depending upon prior accomplishment in this area.

THIRD SEMESTER Electrical-Electronic Tech. 201 Alternating Current Machines Electrical-Electronic Tech. 221 Industrial Electronics Electrical-Electronic Tech. 241 Electrical Power Blueprints and Drafting Mathematics 115 College Algebra Humanities or Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

2 3 3 3 17

Cr. FOURTH SEMESTER Hrs. Electrical-Electronic Tech. 211 Electrical Construction and Application 3 Electrical-Electronic Tech. 261 Electrical Measurement and Instrumentation 3 Engineering 112 Engineering Report Construction 2 Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) 3 Humanities or Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) 3 Economics 151 Development of American Economy 3 17

208

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE

FIRST SEMESTER Electrical-Electronic Tech. 100 Electrical-Electronic Orientation English (See Graduation Requirements) Engineering 121 Engineering Drawing Engineering 125 Principles of ElectricityD. C. Circuits Mathematics *101 Intermediate Algebra Physics 101 Introductory Physics

Cr. Hrs.

3 3

3 3

SECOND SEMESTER Electrical-Electronic Tech. 140 Direct Current Machines Electrical-Electro,nic Tech. 160 Basic Electronics English (See Graduation Requirements) Engineering 130 Principles of ElectricityA. C. Circuits Mathematics 103 Trigonometry Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3

3 3

2

4 17 17

*Students may begin the mathematics sequence at a higher level, depending upon prior accomplishment in this area.

THIRD SEMESTER Electrical-Electronic Tech. 221 Industrial Electronics Electrical-Electronic Tech. 231 Semi-Conductors Humanities or Social Science (See Grad ua tion Requirements) Mathematics 115 College Algebra Engineering 112 Engineering Report Construction Social Science (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 3

2 3

Cr. Hrs. FOURTH SEMESTER Electrical-Electronic Tech. 235 Communication Transmission 3 Electrical-Electronic Tech. 3 251 Computer Circuitry Electrical-Electronic Tech. 261 Electrical Measurement and 3 Instrumentation Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) 3 Humanities or Social Science 3 (See Graduation Requirements) 15

17

209

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY Conceived for students interested in work as members of engineering or scientific teams in mechanical engineering research and development. Job classifications related to this series of courses include mechanicallaboratory aide, materials tester, quality control technician, draftsman, mechanical design technician, technical writer and technical salesman. SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE FIRST SEMESTER Mechanical Tech. 100 Mechanical Technology Orientation English (See Graduation Requirements) Engineering 121 Engineering Drawing Mathematics *101 Intermediate Algebra Mechanical Tech. 160 Machine Tools and Fabrication Physics 101 Introductory Physics

Cr. Hrs.

1 3 3 3

3

SECOND SEMESTER Mechanical Tech. 150 Manufacturing Processes English (See Graduation Requirements) Engineering 122 Engineering Drawing Engineering 151 Applied Mechanics Engineering 125 Principles of ElectricityD. C. Circuits Mathematics 103 Trigonometry

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 3

3 3

4 18

17 *Students may begin the mathematics sequence at a higher level, depending upon prior accomplishment in this area. THIRD SEMESTER Mechanical Tech. 201 Industrial Hydraulics Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Engineering 201 Strength of Materials Mathematics 115 College Algebra Humanities or Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3 3 3

FOURTH SEMESTER Mechanical Tech. 211 Mechanical Design Mechanical Tech. 221 Applied Instrumentation Engineering 112 Engineering Report Construction Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Social Science (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

2 3 3

2 14

210

17

HEALTH TECHNOLOGIES

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN DENTAL HYGIENE Upon successful completion of this curriculum, the student will be eligible to take a licensing examination in dental hygiene prescribed by the board of dental exan1iners of the state in which she chooses to practice. After the graduate has passed the licensing examination, she is qualified for employn1ent as a dental hygienist in a private dental office under the supervision of a licensed dentist. Schools of dental hygiene and local, state or federal public health departments also employ dental hygienists.

SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE

FIRST SEMESTER

Cr. Hrs. 3

Health or Phys. Ed.

(Sec Graduation Requirements)

(See Graduation Requirements) 4

101 General Psychology

3

Dental Hygiene

6

Dental Hygiene

102 Dental Anatorny

4

Psycholog)1

Dental Hygiene

101 Introductory Dental Hygiene

122 Anatomy and Physiology Health or Phys. Ed.

Biology

121 Anatomy and Physiology

Cr. Hrs.

Biology

English

(See Graduation Requirements)

SECOND SEMESTER

121 Clinical Dental .Hygiene

3

Dental Hygiene

3

17

122 Oral and General HistoPathology

4

Dental Hygiene

123 Radiography

2

17

211

SUMMER SESSION Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Sociology 101 Principles of Sociology Dental Hygiene 201 Clinical Dental Hygiene (5-week clinic)

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3 9

THIRD SEMESTER Biology 221 Microbiology Home Economics 121 Foods and Nutrition Dental Hygiene 202 Clinical Dental Hygiene Dental Hygiene 221 Dental Materials and Dental Assisting Dental Hygiene 222 Dental Specialties

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3

4 3 16

FOURTH SEMESTER SPeech (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science ~ See Grad ua tion Requirements) Dental Hygiene 231 Clinical Den tal Hygiene Dental Hygiene 232 Dental Health Education and Public Health Dental Hygiene 233 Pharmacology, Anesthesiology and First Aid Dental Hygiene 234 Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 3

3

2

15

212

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN MEDICAL ASSISTING Preparation for work as an assistant in a physician's office, clinic or hospital; also for work in offices of some pharmaceutical and surgical supply companies. Other agencies that offer opportunities to the medical assistant are prepaid medical care plans, public health agencies and medical publishing compames. SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE Cr. FIRST SEMESTER Hrs. SECOND SEMESTER English English or Speech (See Graduation Requirements) 3 (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) 3 (See Graduation Requirements) Biology Biology 121 Anatomy and Physiology 4 122 Anatomy and Physiology Secretarial Science Secretarial Science ~ 101 Beginning Typing or ~ 102 Intermediate Typing or Business Elective 2 Business Elective Medical Assisting Medical Assisting 101 Medical Assisting 10.2 Medical Terminology Orientation 1 Health or Phys. Ed. Secretarial Science (See Graduation Requirements) 106 Filing and Records Control 2

Cr. Hrs. 3 3 4

2

2 2

16 15 tTyping test to be administered, If test result to be chosen.

Cr. THIRD SEMESTER Biology 221 Microbiology Secretarial Science 103 Beginning Shorthand or 206 Medical Shorthand Medical Assisting 20.1 Medical Assisting Office Procedures Humanities or Social Science 101 General Psychology (Recommended) Accounting 111 Practical Accounting

Hrs.

3

3

3

3 3

IS

satisfactory, a business elective is

Cr. Hrs. FOURTH SEMESTER Secretarial Science 104 Intermediate Shorthand or 105 Introduction to Business 3 Machines Medical Assisting 202 Medical Assisting Laboratory 4 Procedures Humanities or Social Science 101 Introductory Sociology (Recommended) 3 Secretarial Science 220 Human Relations for 3 Secretaries 3 Elective

15 16

213

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN NURSING Offered for men and women interested in combining general education and basic nursing education in a two-year course of study. Each semester includes clinical experience in local hospitals and health agencies. Upon passing the Ohio State licensing examination, the graduate becomes a registered nurse (R.N.), qualified for a position as a general staff duty nurse working under supervision.

SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE

FIRST SEMESTER English (See Graduation Requirements) Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Biology 121 Anatomy and Physiology Psychology 101 General Psychology Nursing 101 Fundamentals of Nursing

Cr. Hrs. 3

4 3

5

SECOND SEMESTER or Speech Graduation Requirements) or Phys. Ed. Graduation Requirements)

English (See Health (See Biology 122 Anatomy and Physiology Psychology 201 Child Growth and Development Nursing 102 Fundamentals of Nursing

Cr. Hrs. 3

4

3

5

16 16

THIRD SEMESTER Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Biology 221 Microbiology Nursing 201 Nursing of Infants, Children and Adults

Cr. Hrs. 3 4

10

17

214

FOURTH SEMESTER Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Nursing 202 Nursing of Infants, Children and Adults

Cr. Hrs. 3

12

15

PUBLIC SERVICE TECHNOLOGIES ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN FIRE TECHNOLOGY Preparation for a career in fire technology. The curriculum offers a balanced and broad education to students who plan to enter fire service as a career. The program also makes available excellent opportunities to practicing firemen for upgrading and advancement within the service. Includes such specialized areas of instruction as fire prevention, investigation, fire protection systems and supervision. SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE Cr. FIRST SEMESTER Hrs. SECOND SEMESTER Fire Technology Fire Technology 1DO' Organization for Fire 11 0' Fire Fighting Tactics Speech Protection 2 English 10'1 Principles of Public (See Graduation Requirements) 3 Speaking Mathematics Chemistry 10'1 Introductory Chemistry 10'1 Intermediate Algebra 3 Social Science Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) 3 (See Graduation Requirements) Physics Fire Technology 10'1 Introductory Physics 4 120' Fire Protection Systems Industrial Supervision 111 Practical Psychology for Supervisors 3

Cr. Hrs. 3

3 4 3

3 16

18

THIRD SEMESTER Fire Technology 210' Fire Fighting Tactics and Command Fire Technology 220' Chemistry of Hazardous Ma~riab

Fire Technology 230' Fire Prevention Practices Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Humanities or Social Science (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs.

3

4 2 2 3

14

Cr. FOURTH SEMESTER Hrs. Fire Technology 231 Fire Prevention Practices 2 Fire Technology 235 Fire Investigation Methods 2 Fire Technology 240' Fire Hydraulics 3 Fire Technology 250' Municipal Public Relations 2 Fire Technology 260' Personnel Training Methods 3 Humanities or Social Science 3 (See Graduation Requirements) 15

215

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION Preparation for a career in industrial management. The curriculum also provides excellent opportunities for practicing supervisors at various levels of management to advance their positions in government, industry or business.

SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE

FIRST SEMESTER English (See Graduation Requirements) Science and Mathematics 101 Introductory Physics or 101 Introductory Chemistry (Recommended) Mathematics 101 Intermediate Algebra (Recommended) Industrial Supervision 121 Elements of Supervision Industrial Supervision 122 Men, Machinery and Materials Mechanical Technology 100 Mechanical Technology Orientation

Cr. Hrs. 3

4

3 3

3

1

17

216

Cr. SECOND SEMESTER Hrs. English or Speech (See Graduation Requirements) 3 Industrial Supervision 140 Industrial Organization and Management or 241 Personnel Management 3 Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) 3 Accounting 121 Principles of Accounting 3 Humanities or Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) 3

15

Cr. THIRD SEMESTER Hrs. Health or Phys. Ed. (See Gradua'"tion Requirements) 2 I ndustrial Supervision 131 Basic Managemen t Techniques 3 I ndustrial Supervision 231 Labor-Management Relations 3 I ndustrial Supervision 221 Communications in Industry 2 Transportation 121 Transportation Principles 3 Building Co,nstruction Technology 221 Building Equipment 3

FOURTH SEMESTER Humanities or Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Data Processing 101 Electronic Data Processing I ndustrial Supervision 124 Work Simplification, Time Study and Incentives Industrial Supervision 134 Employee and Plant Safety Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Industrial Supervision 271 Production, Quality and Cost Control

Cr. Hrs. 3 3

3 2 3

3

16 17

217

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN LAW ENFORCEMENT Preparation for career services in law enforcement, on a two-year Associate degree basis, or the first two years transferable to a four-year program at another institution. The two-year Associate degree is highly desirable --- although not essential --- in municipal, state and private agencies. The Bachelor of Arts degree is essential in most federal agencies. Associate degree candidates must complete 101 Introduction to Law Enforcement, 111 Patrol Procedures, 121 Criminal and Related Laws, 141 Criminal Evidence and Procedure, and 221 Police Administration; plus other courses in the major to total at least 24 semester hours. Transfer students should limit law enforcement courses to those which they know will transfer to the college of their choice.

SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE

FIRST SEMESTER English (See Graduation Requirements) Science and Mathematics 101 Introductory Physics or 101 Introductory Chemistry (Recommended) Health or Phys. Ed. 111 Beginning Swimming, 211 Intermediate Swimming or 118 Senior Lifesaving (Recommended) Secretarial Science 101 Beginning Typing or 102 Intermediate Typing Law Enforcement 101 Introduction to Law Enforcement Humanities or Social Science 101 Principles of Sociology (Recommended)

Cr. Hrs. 3

4

1

2

English (See Graduation Requirements) Political Science 101 Introduction to Government (Recommended) Science' and Mathematics 102 Introductory Physics or 111 General Chemistry (Recommended) Law Enforcement 111 Patrol Procedures Secretarial Science 102 Intermediate Typing or Elective

Cr. Hrs. 3

3

4 3

2

15 3

3

16

218

SECOND SEMESTER

Cr. Hrs.

THIRD SEMESTER Law Enforcement

FOURTH SEMESTER

Cr. Hrs.

Law Enforcement

121 Criminal and Related Laws

3

Law Enforcelnent

221 Police Administration

3

141 Criminal Evidence and Procedure

3

Law Enforcement

211 Investigation and Interrogation 3

Law Enforcement

231 Traffic Control and Investiga tion

Law Enforcement

3

Humanities or Social Science

102 Social Problems (Recommended)

201 Juvenile Procedure and Crime Prevention

3

Psychology 3

Health or Phys. Ed.

101 General Psychology

3

Secretarial Science

121 First Aid and Safety or 113 Senior Life Saving

1 or 2

103 Beginning Shorthand or Elective

3

Social Science

102 Introduction to Government (Recommended)

15 3

16 or 17

219

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN LIBRARY TECHNOLOGY Preparation for a career in a public, technical, industrial or school library. A library technician works under the supervision of a professional librarian. Students are trained in the acquisition and cataloguing of books, in typing and filing of catalog cards. Technicians also are prepared to assist in circulation activity with the public, and to perform related clerical and office duties.

SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE

FIRST SEMESTER English (See Graduation Requirements) Secretarial Science * 101 Beginning Typing Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Library Technology 101 Introduction to Library Organization Elective 095 Reading Improvement or 101 Sociology

Cr. Hrs. 3

2 2 3

3

3

SECOND SEMESTER English or Speech (See Graduation Requirements) Secretarial Science 102 Intermediate Typing Secretarial Science 220 Human Relations for Secretaries Library Technology 121 Library Acquisition Procedures Secretarial Science 100 Office Methods and Procedures Social Science (See Graduation Requirements)

Cr. Hrs. 3

2

2

3

3 3

16 16 *Typing test to be administered. If test result be chosen.

220

IS

satisfactory, a business elective is to

THIRD SEMESTER Library Technology 151 Basic Cataloguing and Classification Secretarial Science 105 Introduction to Business Machines Social Science Elective Education or English 251 Children's Literature or 221 British Literature or 231 American Literature Art or Music 101 Art Appreciation or 103 Music Appreciation

Cr. Hrs.

3

3

3

3

3

FOURTH SEMESTER Library Technology 20 1 Audio-Visual Equipment Library Technology 251 Information Sources and Circulation Social Science 101 General Psychology (Recommended) Secretarial Science or Data Processing 241 Office Management or 101 Electronic Data Processing Economics 151 Development of American Economy

Cr. Hrs. 2

4

3

3

3

15 15

221

.ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM IN NURSERY SCHOOL ASSISTING Provides education and training for those wishing to teach preschool children in nursery schools and day-care centers. The curriculum is designed to provide a basic understanding of the principles of nursery education, planning and conducting of activities, and child development. Students are trained to take charge of preschool groups, working under the supervision of preschool educational directors. This program is not intended to train students for state teacher certification as elementary school teachers. It has been developed to meet the need for highly competent nursery school personnel in Cuyahoga County.

SUGGESTED SEMESTER SEQUENCE

Cr.

Cr. FIRST SEMESTER English (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Nursery School Assisting 101 Introduction to Nursery Education Social Science 101 Psychology (Recommended) Social Science 101 Sociology (Recommended)

Hrs. 3 3

3 3 3

15

SECOND SEMESTER English or Speech (See Graduation Requirements) Social Science (See Graduation Requirements) Psychology 201 Child Growth and Development Health or Phys. Ed. (See Graduation Requirements) Nursery School Assisting 121 Preschool Literature and Language Science 101 Introductory Biology (Recommended)

Hrs. 3 3

3 2

3

3

17

222

Cr. THIRD SEMESTER Hrs. Science and Mathematics 101 Introduction to Physical Science or 102 Introductory Biology (Recommended) 3 Nursery School Assisting 122 Preschool Art, Science and Music 4 Sociology 201 Social Problems 3 Nursery School Assisting 220 Music for Nursery Education 2 Home Economics 121 Foods and Nutrition 3

FOURTH SEMESTER Nursery School Assisting 23 1 Nursery School Participation Sociology 121 Marriage and Family Life Nursery School Assisting 221 Child Management Elective

Cr. Hrs.

6 3

2 4 15

15

223

Full-Time

acuIty

225

Full- Till1e Faculty and Adminis tra ti ve Staff

E., JR. 1965 B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute M: Ed., Ohio University

AGNOR, HERBERT

ALPERN~ GERTRUDE

(MRS.) 1964 B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Columbia University

J. 1964 B.A., University of Michigan M.A., University of Michigan

BAKER, BETTIE

Counselor

Instructor of History

Associate Professor of History

BELL~ LYNN

S. 1964 Division Chair.man of Engineering Technologies B.S., Miami University M.A., Western Reserve University

BELTON~ JAMES

E. 1963 B.S., University of Illinois M.A., University of Southern California R. 1964 B.A., San Fernando Valley State College M.S., Syracuse University

BETHE, DONALD

Instructor of Physical Education

N. 1965 B.B.A., Western Reserve University M.B.A., Harvard University

Business Manager

E. 1963 B.S.C., Ohio University

Purchasing Agent

BIELLO, DANTE

BIGGINS, CLARK

BLANCO~ GALO

W. 1964 B.S., University of Michigan M.S., University of Michigan Ph. D., University of Wisconsin

C. 1965 B.A., Wayne State College M.A., Omaha University

BLOOMFIELD~ MITCHELL B.

B.A., Ohio University M.A., Ohio University

Coordinator of Industrial Supervision

Counselor

BLASER, DONALD

226

Associate Professor of English

1965

Instructor of English

BONNER, JOHNETTA (R.N.) 1965 B.S.N., Boston University M.S.N., Wayne State University

Assistant Professor of Nursing

BOYER~

Assistant Professor of Business

ELIZABETH M. (Mrs.) 1966 B.S., Bowling Green State University L.L.B., Cleveland-Marshall Law School L.L.M., Western Reserve University

BRASHARES, EDITH O. (MRS.) B.A., University of Nebraska M.A., University of Michigan

1963

Assistant Professor of Political Science

BRITTAIN, KARYL L. (MRS.) 1965 R.H.D., Eastman School of Dental Hygiene

I nstructor of Dental Hygiene

BROWNING, RICHARD J. 1964 B.S., Ohio State University M.S., North Dakota State University

Assistant Professor of Speech

BRUSK, DONALD R. 1966 B.B.A., Fenn College

Instructor of Data Processing

BRZYTWA, VIRGINIA 1965 B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.S., Western Reserve University

Instructor of Psychology

BUDIN, JOSEPH M. 1963 B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

Instructor of Speech

BUFALINI, ALVIN G. 1964 B.A., Hiram College M.A., Western Reserve University

Assistant Professor of English

1964

Division Chairman 路of Nursing Education

BUZASH, GEORGE 1965 B.S., Slippery Rock State Teachers College M. Ed., Pennsylvania State University

Counselor

BURNSIDE, HELEN H. (MRs.-R.N.) B.S., Simmons College M.A., Columbia University

CAHOON, GENEVIEVE M. (MRS.) B.S., University of Pittsburgh M. Ed., University of Pittsburgh

1965

CANDON, MARIAN W. (R.N.) 1964 B.S., Ohio State University M.S., Western Reserve University CARMAN, ROBERT G. 1964 B.A., Western Reserve University CHAPMAN, CHARLES E. 1963 B.S., Billings Polytechnic Institute M.A., State University of Iowa Ed. D., University of California (Berkeley)

Assistant Professor of Health Education

Assistant Professor of Nursing

Director of Public Affairs

President

227

CHITWOOD~ FRANCES

I nstructor of English

CISE~ JOHN P.

Instructor of Physics

CLOVESKO~ JOSEPH F.

I nstructor of Biology

CONLIN ~ MARY

I nstructor of English

(MRS.) 1964 B.S.E., Arkansas State Teachers College M.A., University of Arkansas

1965 B.S., Xavier University M.S., John Carroll University

1964 B.S., Clarion State College M.S., Western Reserve University L. (MRs.) 1964 B.A., Western Reserve University

COOK~ CULBRETH

B. 1964 B.A., University of Cincinnati M.A., Western Reserve University Ed. D., Western Reserve University

CORFIAS~ JOHN C.

1963 B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

Assistant to the President

COSGROVE~ ROBERT E.

1965 B.A., Brooklyn College M.A., Columbia University

Associate Professor of English

COSNER~ THURSTON

1966 B.S., Pennsylvania State University M.S., Bowling Green State University

Instructor of Psychology

CRANDALL~ SUSAN

I nstructor of English

CRAWLEY~ EDWARD F.

I nstructor of English

1966 B.A., University of Michigan M.A., Michigan State University

1965 B.A., John Carroll University M.A., University of Wisconsin

CUNNINGHAM~ JANET

K. (R.N.) B. S., W es tern Reserve U ni versi ty

1965

CURTIS~ RICHARD C.

1964 B.A., Hiram College M. Ed., Kent State University

CURTISS~ ADELAIDE

1966 B.A., Notre Dame ColJege M.S.]., Northwestern University

J. PHILIP 1964 B.A., San Diego State College M.S., University of Utah Ed. D., University of Oregon

DALBY~

DASHIELD~ P. JOAN

(R.N.) 1965 B.S.N., Western Reserve University M.S.N., Western Reserve University

228

Counselor

Nurse Counselor

Instructor of English

Dean of Development and Planning

Assistant Professor of Nursing

DAVIDSON) JOSEPH A. 1966 B.B.A., Western Reserve University M.B.A., Western Reserve University

Instructor of Business

DECKER, RICHARD C. 1965 Coordinator of Educational Media Center B. Music Ed., Baldwin-Wallace College M. Music Ed., Kent State University M. Audio-Visual, Kent State University DODGE, JAMES K. (CAPT.) 1964 B.A., Ohio State University L.L.B., Cleveland Law School

Coordinator of Law Enforcement

D'ONOFRIO) MARIO L. 1965 B.A., Kent State University M.A., Ohio State University

I nstructor of Foreign Languages

DUNKLE) SIDNEY 1966 B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College M.S., University of Wyoming

Instructor of Biology

DUINO, RUSSELL A. 1965 B.A., Gannon College M. Lit., University of Pittsburgh M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University EBERLY, LINDA J. (MRs.-R.N.) B.S., University of Rochester M.S., University of Rochester

1965

EGERMAN, THOMAS 1964 B.A., St. j ohn's University M.F.A., State University of Iowa

Assistant Librarian

Instructor of Nursing

Instructor of Art

FABRY, MARGARET (MRS.) 1966 Assistant Professor of Mathematics M.A. equivalent, Pazmany Peter, Tvdomany Egyetem, Budapest, Hungary

1965

FARRINGTON, ELEANOR F. (MRS.) B.A., Ohio State University M.A., Ohio State University

FAUST) GEORGE H. 1963 B.A., Henderson State Teachers College M.A., University of Arkansas Ph. D., University of Chicago L.L.B., Cleveland-Marshall Law School FORDING, MARY J. (MRS.) 1963 B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University Fox, LAWRENCE E. 1965 B.A., Syracuse University M. Ed., Boston University FROMER, ELEANOR N. (MRS.) B.A., Ohio State University M.A., Ohio State University

Instructor of English and SPeech

Associate Professor of History

Instructor of English

Director of Institutional Research

1965

Assistant Professor of Nursery School Assisting

229

L. 1963 B.S., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

Associate Professor of Sociology

GAINES, HAROLD

1966 B.S., Notre Dame College M.S., Wayne State University

Instructor of Chemistry

GAILIUSIS, JURA

1964 B. Ed., Ashland College M.A., Western Reserve University

I nstructor of Business

GASKER, HARRY R.

1965 B.S., University of Detroit M.S., University of Illinois

I nstructor of Mathematics

GILVYDIS, ANTANAS A.

1964 B.A., University of Hamburg, Germany M.A., Western Reserve University

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages

M. (MRS.) 1965 B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

Assistant Professor of Physical Education

GOLDSTAUB, WERNER A.

GORMAN, PATRICIA

1965 B. Arch., Texas A.&M. College

I nstructor of Building Construction and Engineering Technologies

1965 B.A., Western Reserve University M. Ed., University of Toledo

Counselor

GRIFFIN, DARRELL E., JR.

GWAREK, RICHARD P.

B. (MRs.-R.N.) B.S.N.E., Mercy Hospital M.S.N., Western Reserve University

HEINLEIN, DOLORES

1965

1964

HENDERSHOTT, MARCUS D.

Assistant Professor of Nursing

Instructor of Biology

B.S., University of Michigan M.S., University of Michigan D. (MRS.) B.S., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

HERGENROEDER, ANGELA

(P.E.) 1966 B.S.M.E., Fenn College M.A., Western Reserve University

HICKOK, ERVIN

HOFFMAN-PINTHER, PETER

1966

1964

Associate Professor of Business

Director of Physical Plant and Grounds

Instructor of Physics

B.S., St. Mary's University M.S., Indiana University

1963 B.A., Chico State College M.A., Western Reserve University Ph.D., Western Reserve University

Assistant Professor of History

1963 B.A., Marshall University M.A., Marshall University Ph.D., Western Reserve University

Associate Professor of Education

HOLMGREN, DANIEL M.

HURLEY, JOHN A.

230

E. 1966 B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.B.A., Ohio State University

I nstructor of Business

INMAN) JAMES

1963 B.S., Paul Quinn College M.A., Denver University M.S., University of Notre Dame

JEFFERSON) CURTIS

B. (MRS.) B.A., Ohio University M.A., Columbia University

JENKINS) MIRIAM

1965

B. 1963 B.A., State University of Iowa M.A., State University of Iowa

,JOHNSON) EUGENE

(C.P.A.) 1966 B.A.; Ohio Wesleyan University

JONES) ALBERT K.

Associate Professor of Mathematics

Instructor of English

Coordinator of Student Placement

Director of Accounting and Budgeting

W. 1964 B.M.E., Ohio State University B.I.E., Ohio State University

Assistant Professor of Engineering

P. 1964 B.S., George Williams College M.S., Michigan State College

Director of Student Activities

1964 B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Kent State University

Instructor of English

KALE) LESTER

KARCH) RICHARD

KEMP) GEORGE

1965 B.A., University of Akron B.S.L.S., Western Reserve University

KLAHRE) ETHEL S.

1965 B.A., University of North Carolina M.A., University of North Carolina Ph.D., Ohio State University

KOEHNLINE) WILLIAM A.

Assistant Librarian

Division Chairman of Language Arts

J. 1963 Assistant Dean of Program for Part-Time Students B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University

KORAL, JOHN

KOSIEWICZ, EDWARD L.

1965

Instructor of Data Processing

B.E.S., Fenn College LOUIS J. 1964 B.S., Case Institute of Technology M.S., Case Institute of Technology Ph.D., Case Institute of Technology

KOTNIK,

KOWAL, SHEILA

(MRS.)

B.A., Wellesley College M.A., Boston University

1964

Associate Professor of Chemistry

Instructor of English

231

1965 B.A., City College of New York M.A., State University of Iowa

KRAMER, GERALD

Instructor of Art

1965 of Technology M.S., Case InstiLlte of Technology

Instructor of Physics

1965 B.E., Moorhead State College M.A., Northwestern University

Instructor of Speech

KRINSKY, BARNET B.S., Case Institut~

LANG, ELIZABETH

1963 Division Chairman of Science and Mathematics B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University Ph.D., Western Reserve University

LAUGHLrN, ETHELREDA

1963 B.S., University of Chicago M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

LAWSON) JOHN L.

1965 B.A., Yale University M.A., Ohio State University

LEE) JOHN

1964 B.S., Rio Grande College M. Ed., Ohio University 1965 B.A., Chico State College M.A., University of California (Berkeley) Ed. D., University of California (Berkeley)

LIVINGSTON, ALFRED M.

1963 B.A., Ohio University M.A., Columbia University

LOEWE) RALPH E.

S. 1964 B.A., Western Reserve University Ph.D., Western Reserve University

LONG, ERNEST

P. 1963 B.A., Michigan State University M.A., University of Michigan

LORION, JAMES

1965 B.A., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

LOTZ, RONALD

H. 1964 B.A., University of Michigan M.A., University of Michigan

MANHEIM) LEONARD

232

B.A., Parsons College M.S., Syracuse University

Instructor of English

Counselor

LEEDY, EMILY L.

MARTIN, MARGARET R.

Associate Professor of Mathematics

1964

Vice President

Assistant Professor of English

Counselor-Psychologist

Director of Admissions and Records

Instructor of Sociology

Assistant Professor of English

Instructor of English

MATTHEWS) RICHARD D. 1963 B.A., Ohio State University B.S., Ohio State University M.A., Ohio State University

Associate Professor of English and Education

MCCARTHY, WILLIAM R. (P.E.) 1965 B.S.M.E., Johns Hopkins University M.S.M.E., Wichita University McLELLAN) JOHN M. 1964 B.S., Western Reserve University

Assistant Professor of Engineering and Mechanical Technologies

Associate Professor of Philosophy

MCWHINNEY) W. RUSSELL 1964 B.A., University of Pittsburgh M.A., University of Pittsburgh M.S.L.S., Western Reserve University MIKLIS) EMILY (MRS.) 1965 B.B.A., Western Reserve University

Librarian

I nstructor of Business

MILES) KEITH E. 1965 B.B.A., Fenn College

Recorder

MILLER) CARL K. 1965 B.S., Pennsylvania State University M.S., Pennsylvania State University

I nstructor of Business

MILLER) JACK D. 1964 B.A., Oberlin College M.S., Western Reserve University

Associate Professor of Biology

MILLER) TERESA 1966 B.A., University of Akron M.A., Western Reserve University

I nstructor of Biology

MITCHELL) DAVID C. 1963 B.B.A., Fenn College M.B.A., Western Reserve University MORAN) JOSEPH S. 1964 B:S., Columbia University M.A., Columbia University MORGENSTERN) JUNE R. (MRS.) B.S., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University MORROW) ELEANOR P. 1965 B.S., Ohio University M.A., Western Reserve University

Assistant Professor of Business

Instructor of English

1964

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Counselor

MOSKAL) CHARLENE 1963 B.A., University of North Carolina M.A., Western Reserve University

Instructor of Theatre Arts

MURRAY) RUTH 1965 B.A., Kent State University M.S., Kent State University

Instructor of Mathematics

233

NIXON, HESTER G. 1963 B.A., Simpson College M.S., New York University

Associate Professor of Business

NORTON, FAY-TYLER M. (MRS.) B.A., Louisiana State University Ph.D., Florida State University

1964

O'BRIEN, THOMAS P. 1964 B.S. Ed., Kent State University M. Ed., Kent State University

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Technologies

OWENS, LovID 1963 B.S., Ohio State University M.A., Ohio State University

Coordinator of Secretarial Science

PALMER, JOHN W. H. 1963 B.S., Kent State University M.Ed., Kent State University PAPPAS, CHARLES N. 1965 B.S., Central Michigan University M.A., University of Michigan Ph.D., Ohio State University PARILLA, ROBERT E. 1964 B.S., Kent State University M.S., University of New Hampshire PARISH, RICHARD .J. 1965 B.A., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

Coordinator of Retailing and Sales

Dean of Business Administration and Acting Dean of Liberal Arts

Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Assistant Professor of Geography

PERKO, JOANNE E. (R.N.) 1965 B.S.N., St. John College M.N. Ed., University of Pittsburgh PICKUP, ANDREW T. 1963 B.A., Bowling Green State University M.A., Bowling Green State University PLAVAC, GEORGE N. 1963 B.B.A., John Carroll University L.L.B., Cleveland-Marshall Law School L.L.M., Cleveland-Marshall Law School

Instructor of Nursing

Associate Professor of Psychology

I nstructor of Business

POLLEY, PEGGY A. 1965 B.S., Ohio University M.A., Ohio State University

Coordinator of Student Activities

PORTER, JACK O. 1963 B.S., Parsons College M.A., State College of Iowa

Associate Professor of Mathematics

PRATHER, JANE E. (MRS.) B.A., University of Kansas M.A., University of Kansas

234

Assistant Professor of Psychology

1965

Instructor of Sociology and Anthropology

PROSEN, ROSEMARY 1965 B.S., Kent State University M.A., John Carroll University

Assistant Professor of English

1966

RAKOWSKY, CHRISTINE (MRS.) B.A., Ursuline College M.A., .John Carroll University

Instructor of English

READER, HARRY G. 1964 B.A., San Francisco State College M.A., University of California

Instructor of History

REEVES, PAMELA W. 1965 B.A., Smith College M.A., Western Reserve University

Assistant Librarian

RICHARDS, BETTY JANE 1966 B.A., Western Reserve University

I nstructor of Data Processing

1964

RIGGAR, WILANNA S. (MRs.-R.N.) B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College RILEY, THOMAS L. 1964 B.B.A., Ohio University

Instructor of Nursing

Bookstore Manager

ROBENSTINE, JAMES D. 1963 B.S., Kent State University M.B.A., Kent State University

Assistant Professor of Business

RUDY, GRANVILLE B. 1965 B.S., Fairmont State College M.S., West Virginia University

Associate Professor of Biology

RUSK, EVELYN H. 1963 B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University

Counselor

Assistant Professor of Electrical-Electronic SCHEFFER, CORNELIUS 1965 and Engineering Technologies B.S., U.S. Naval Academy M. Eng., Pennsylvania State University

SCHMELZER, .JEROME H. 1963 B.A., Columbia University M.S., Columbia University SCHMIDT, ANITA M. (R.N.) B.S., University of Dayton M.S., Marquette University

1965

SCHNURR, BARBARA J. 1964 B.A., Ursuline College R.D.H., Ohio State University

I nstructor of Journalism

Assistant Professor of Nursing

Coordinator of Dental Hygiene

SCHWARTZ, BARBARA L. 1965 G.D.H., Ohio State University B.S. Ed., Ohio State University

Instructor of Dental Hygiene

SCOTT, JAMES A. 1964 B.A., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

Associate Professor of English

235

SEGO, MICHAEL A. 1965 B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Western Reserve University SEXTON, ROBERT W. 1965 B.S., Boston College M.B.A., Harvard University SHANBERG, MORTON S. 1963 B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., State University of Iowa Ed. D., Western Reserve University

Instructor of Business

Dean of Program for Part-Time Students

SHAPIRO, RICHARD W. 1966 B.S., University of Pittsburgh M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh

Instructor of Business

SHEAR, MURIEL (MRS.) 1965 B.B.A., City College of New York M.S.E., City College of New York

Instructor of Business

SHRIVER, DAVID 1966 B.A., College of Wooster M.A., Western Reserve University

Instructor of History

SILK, BERNARD J. 1964 B.S., Kent State University M. Ed., Kent State University D. Ed., Western Reserve University SIMON, MAY K. (MRS.) 1963 B.A., Hunter College M.A., Western Reserve University SLAGLE, NOEL A. 1965 B.S., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University SOLINSKI, EDWARD M. 1965 B.E.S., Fenn College M.S.E.A., Case Institute of Technology SOLIS, RUTH E. (MRS.) 1964 B.A., College of Wooster M.A., University of Kansas SPANGLER, DONALD R. 1965 B.A., Duquesne University M.A., University of Pittsburgh SPERO, SAMUEL 1964 B.S., Case Institute of Technology M.S., Case Institute of Technology STOCH, EDWIN J. 1965 B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Western Reserve University

236

Instructor of Political Science

Division Chairman of Social Science

Associate Professor of Foreign Languages

Instructor of Health Education

Director of Computation Center

Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages

Assistant Professor of English

Instructor of Mathematics

Counselor

STRAUSS~

DEBORAH (MRS.) 1965 B.A., University of Chicago M.A., University of Chicago

Instructor of English

SUTTON~

FRED C. 1963 Ph.B., University of Chicago B.A., State University of Iowa M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh D. Ed., Wayne State University

Dean of Technical-Occupational Education

SWANK~

DONALD 1963 B.A., Wabash College M.S., Purdue University Ph.D., Purdue University

TABER~

MARGARET R. (MRS.-P.E.) B.E.E., Fenn College B.E.S., Fenn College

Dean of Student Personnel

1964

THOMAS~

WILLIAM A. (P.E.) 1964 B.S., Case Institute of Technology M.S., Case Institute of Technology Ph.D., Yale University

Associate Professor of Electrical-Electronic and Engineering Technologies

ALICE J. 1965 B.A., Denison University M.A., Northwestern University Ph.D., George Washington University

THURSTON~

TSOLAINOS, JOHN N. 1964 B.S., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

Instructor of Electrical-Electronic and Engineering Technologies

Director of Counseling

Coordinator of Student Financial Assistance

NANCY J. (R.N.) 1965 B.S.N., Western Reserve University M.S.N., Western Reserve University

VOELKER~

WALCZUK~

LEO S. 1964 B.S., Seton Hall University M.A., Western Reserve University

Assistant Professor of Nursing

Associate Professor of Physical Education

WANG~

BELLA (MRS.) 1965 Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.S., National Central University, Nanking, China M.S., Western Reserve University

WATKINS, LOWELL A. 1964 B. Ed., Illinois State Normal University M.B.A., University of Denver WATZULIK~

RICHARD M. 1964 B.S. Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University Ph.D., Ohio State University

WEINER~

RONALD R. 1965 B.A., University of the Americas M.A., Northern Illinois University

Coordinator of General Business

Associate Professor of Music

I nstructor of History

237

WHANN~ BRUCE

M.

Assistant Professor of Chemistry

1965

B.A., Westminster College M.S., Western Reserve University WOLFF~ ERWIN

1965 Associate Professor of Foreign Languages Teach. Diploma, Berlin Teachers College, Germany M.A., Western Reserve University

WOLTERS~ FLORENCE

M.

1965

Instructor of Chemistry

B.S., Ursuline College M.S., John Carroll University ZUBAL, JOHN

T.

Instructor of History

1963

B.S., Fordham University M.A., John Carroll University ZUBRICKY) VERNE

D. (R.N.)

1965

Assistant Professor of Nursing

B.S., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University

C:OMMUNIT~

238

Index A

Associate in Science Degree 66-68

59-63

Academic Regulations Accounting

Athletic Affiliation

104-105

Accounting) Concentration in

Audio-Visual Equipment

196

Auditors

Addresses of College Facilities Administrative Staff 226-237

Adult Education Advertising

60

B Biology

108-110

25, 28

Board of Trustees

49-51

Boiler) Turbine and Compressor Operations 179

28, 49-56

Admissions Procedures

Bookstore

41

Botany

116

13, 37, 52

25, 28 110

Broadcast Journalism

Advisory Committees Algebra

44

Anatomy and Physiology

Art

110

187

Argumentation and Debate 105-108

Associa te in Arts Degree 64-66

154

Building Construction Technology 111-113

160

Anthropology

158

5

14-18,

Administrative Offices Admissions

61

Attendance

39

Accreditation

87

188

Building Construction Technology) Concentration in 206-207 Business

113-116

Business Management Concentration in 197

Business Technologies

195-205

241

C

Contracts, Specifications and Estimating 112

Cafeteria

25, 28

Calculus

161

Counseling

Course Descriptions

Calendar of Instruction

Chemistry

10-12

117-118

Course Numbering

103-191 95

Credit by Examination

Chemistry of Hazardous Materials 138

Credit Hours

Child Growth and Development 181

Criminal and Related Laws 155

Children's Literature Choir

61-62

95

Cultural Activities 77, 92-93

127

166

Class Schedule

88, 95

Class Standing, Definition of

88

Cleveland, Growth of

D

19-21 77

Clubs and Organizations Co-Curricular Activities College Colors College Seal

76-87

Dancing, Social

175

Data Processing

119-121

Data Processing, Concentration in Dean's List

87

College, History of

22-26

Community Services

Dental Hygiene

121-125 211-212

Descriptions of Courses 41, 45-46

Commuter, The, Weekly Newspaper 77, 92, 153 Computation Center

28

Computer Circuitry

130

Conferences, StudentFaculty 88-89

198-199

89

Dental Hygiene, Concentration in

9

College Semester and School Year 88

242

42, 70

Differential Equations Dismissal

103-191

162

60

Drawing, Architectural Drawing, Be ginning Drawing, Engineering Drawing, Life

107

111-112

106

133-134

F

E Earth Science

Facilities

125

22-28, 32-36

Economic History of the United States 147

Faculty

Economics

126

Fees, Refund of

Education

127

Finance, Principles of

Fees

36, 224-238

52 54-55 114

Educational Media Center 28, 30

Financial Aid Program

Electrical-Electronic Technology 128-132

Fire Technology,

Electrical-Electronic Technology,

First Aid and Safety

146

Foods and Nutrition

148'

Fire Technology

Concentration in

Electrical Technology,

Concentration in

Food Services.

207 -208

Electricity-A. C. Circuits,

Principles of

134

Electricity--D. C. Circuits,

Principles of

138-140

Concentration in

207 -209

134

215

31

Foreign Languages French

72

140-144

140-141

Full-Time Faculty and Administrative Staff Listing 226-238

Electronic Technology,

Concentration in

207, 209

Employment, Student

75-76

Employment, Guide for Combining College Attendance with 91 Engineering

Geology

133-135

German

23, 25

Examinations, Final

161 141-142

61-62

63

62

Graduation Requirements

61

Examination, Credit by

145

Grade-Point Average Grades

42

125

Geometry

135-137

Enrollment

General Education Geography

Engineering Technologies 195, 206-210 English

G

Grants-in-Aid

64-68 73

243

H

J

Health

Journalism

146-147

Health Services

28, 72

Health Technologies 195, 211-214 I-listory

152-154

L

Laboratory Deposit

146

History of Tri-C

22-26

Law Enforcement

Home Economics

148

Law Enforcement,

Honors Housing

52 154-157

Concentration in

89

184

Legal Shorthand

93

Library

218-219

25, 28, 29-30 157-158

Library Technology

I

Library Technology,

Concentration in

I ndustrial Corporate Finance 151

Listening Room

30 137

I ndustrial Electronics

129

Literature, American

Industrial Hydraulics

163

Literature, British

136-137

Industrial Purchasing

114-

Literature, World

137

Industrial Security

Little Theatre

156 148-152

Industrial Supervision

Concentration in

27 -28

M

167

I ndustrial Ensemble

I nstrumentation, A p'plied

Investments

73-75

216-217

I ndustrial Traffic Management 191

Intramural Sports

Loans

27

Location, College

Industrial Sup'ervision,

.J."v1ac hine Tools and

163

77

Interviewing Techniques

163

Fabrication

Mail Center

114

International Students

244

220-221

28

Man and Civilization

53

146-147

Manufacturing Processes

188

Marketing

115

163

Numbering of Courses

Marriage and Family Life 186

Nursery School Assisting

Materials) Strength of

Alathematics M~chanical

168-170

135

120, 159-162

Nursery School Assisting)

Concentration in

Technology

Nursing

162-163

171-172

134

o

164

Aledical Assisting, Concentration in

213

Objectives of the College 36-37

Medical Shorthand

184

Office Management

Memberships, College Metallurgy

133

Metropolitan, College Music

116

39

Metropolitan Campus 25, 27-28, 32-33 Yearbook

214

210

Mechanics) Applied Medical Assisting

222-223

Nursing) Concentration in

Mechanical Technology)

Concentration in

95

77, 92

165-168

Music for Elementary Education 167 Music for Nursery Education 170

P Parking 29 Part-Time Students, Program for 23, 44 Personnel Afanagement

Personnel Training Methods

140 Pharmacology) Anesthesiology and First Aid 124 Philosophy

N

151

172-173

Philosophy of the College

38

Physical Education

31, 173-177

National Defense Student Loans 74-75

Physical Science

N on-High School Graduates 50

Physically Handicapped, Assistance to 76

177

245

Physics

Public Relations) Municipal

178-179

Placement, Student

139

75-76

Public Service Technologies 195, 215-223

Placement Tests (ACT or SAT) 70 Plant Operation Services Political Science

Prerequisites

179

Purposes of the College 40-42

180

Q

95

Pre-Retirement Planning

151

Preschool Art) Science and Music 170

Quality Points

62-63

R

Preschool Literature and Language 168

Radio and TV Production

Probation

Radiography

59

Probation, Removal from

60

Production) Quality and Cost Control 152

135-136

Refrigeration

Program Changes

122

Reading Improvement

Readmission

Product Sales and Development 150

56 133

Refund of Fees Registration

54

Program Evaluation and Research Technique 152

54-55

71

Religion) Comparative World 173

Residency Requirements Programs of Instruction Psychology

181

Psychology) Practical) for Supervisors 148

Public Affairs Publications

246

92-93 92

42-46

190

52

Removal, Incomplete Grade Removal, Probation Repeating Courses

60 63

Repro-Graphic Center

28, 31

Requirements, Graduation 64-68

61

Retail ing

Retail ing, Conce ntrati on In

200

Speec h

187-188 152

Statis tical Quali ty Contr ol

143

Russia n

93

Speakers Burea u

115-116

Stude nt Activities and Organ izatio ns 25, 28, 76-87

S

Stude nt-Fac ulty Conferences 88-路89

Sales

114, 116, 150

Stude nt Load

Salesm anship , Conce ntrati on

in

201-202 88, 95

Schedule of Classes

72-73

Scholarships

Stude nt Personnel

28, 77-87

Subur ban Classes

5, 23, 45

Suggested Semester Sequences 195-223

52

Sched ule of Fees

90-91

93

Summ er Session

88

School Year, College

Surve ying, Introd uction to

135

182-185

Secret arial Scienc e Secret arial Scienc e,

203-204

Conce ntrati on in

72

Selective Service Semester, College

88

Semester Sequences, Techn icalOccup ationa l 195-223

137

Shake speare Slide Rule

133

Social Scienc e

185-186

Sociol ogy and Anthr opolo gy

186-187 Soften ers) Coolin g 7'owe rs and Filters 179 Spani sh

144

T Taxat ion

105

Team Nickn ame

87

Techn ical-O ccupa tional Offices 27 Techn ical-O ccupa tional Progr am 41-44, 195-223 Techn ical-O ccupa tional Semester Sequences 195-223 Telep hone Numb er Theat re Arts

5

188-190

Trans cripts of Records

63

247

Transfer Students

53, 194

Transfer to Other Institutions 63, 194 Transient Students Transportation

61

v Varsity Sports 205

Transportation, Public Trigonometry

University Parallel Program 41-42, 194

191

Transportation, Concentration in

u

77

Veterans' Education

72

29

160

W

Tri-C Grapevine, Daily Bulletin 77, 92

Western Campus

Trustees, Board of

Wholesaling

13, 37, 52

25, 34-35

116

~

Tuition

52

Wi thdrawal from Classes

54

248 THE LAWHEAD PRESS. IHC. ATHENS. OHIO


1966-1967