Issuu on Google+

9 6 4

-1

9 6

"0,

'r

BULLETIN CUYAHOCA COMMUNITY COLLECE CATALOGUE

ISSUE

2214 EAST 14TH STREET CLEVELAND, OHIO 44115

5

c Ohio's First Public Community College

Serving

Chartered by the State of Ohio Approved by the Veterans Administration Member of the North Central Junior College Association

CATALOGUE

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1964 - 1965

..,1./.1._-,,"'_ COMMUNI!I!I COLLEGE

CALENDAR OF INSTRUCTION-1964-1965 NOTE: The Calendar is designed for full-time students. Part-time students should consult the bulletin of evening classes for dates of registration and classes.

SUMMER SESSION-1964 MAY 11 - JUNE 10

Early registration

JUNE 12

Last day to pay fees for early registration

JUNE 16

Regular registration

JUNE 22

Classes begin

JUNE 22 - JUNE 23

Drop-and-Add period

JULY 3

Last day to drop courses without record

JULY 17

Last day to drop courses with a

JULY 18

AUGUST 7

Courses dropped receive

"w"

"w"

grade

or "F" grades

AUGUST 8

Courses dropped from this date on recetive "F" grades

AUGUST 14

End of Summer Session

FALL SEMESTER-1964 JULY 13 - SEPTEMBER 11

Early registration

SEPTEMBER 14

Last day to file intent for graduation

SEPTEMBER 14

Last day to pay fees for early registration

SEPTEMBER 14

SEPTEMBER 17 Faculty meetings and seminars

SEPTEMBER 16

SEPTEMBER 17 Regular registration and new student orientation

SEPTEMBER 21

Instruction begins

SEPTEMBER 21 - SEPTEMBER 25 Drop-and-Add period OCTOBER 16

Last day to drop without record

OCTOBER 30

Last day to remove "I" grades (incomplete)

NOVEMBER 13

Mid-semester grades due 5 p.m.

NOVEMBER 13

Last day to drop courses with a "'W" grade

NOVEMBER 14

DECEMBER 24 Courses dropped receive "W" or "F" grades

NOVEMBER 26

NOVEMBER 27 Thanksgiving recess

DECEMBER 26

Courses dropped from this date on receive "F" grades

DECEMBER 23 - JANUARY 3

Christmas recess

JANUARY 4

Classes resume

JANUARY 22

JANUARY 28

JANUARY 29

Final examination period End of first semester - final grades due 12 noon

SPRING SEMESTER-1965 NOVEMBER 30 - JANUARY 22

Early registration

JANUARY 25

Last day to file intent for graduation

JANUARY 26

Last day to pay fees for early registration

FEBRUARY

- FEBRUARY 2

Regular registration

FEBRUARY 8

Second semester instruction begins

FEBRUARY 8 - FEBRUARY 12

Drop-and-.'~dd

MARCH 5

Last day to drop classes without record

MARCH 19

Last day to remov:e "I" grades (incomplete)

APRIL 2

Mid-semester grades due 5 p.m.

APRIL 2

Last day to drop courses with a "W" grade

APRIL 3 - MAY 21

C<Yurses dropped receive "W" or "F" grades

APRIL 12 - APRIL 16

Spring recess

APRIL 19

Classes resume

MAY 22

Courses dropped from this date on receive "F" grades

MA~

31

period

Memorial Day - no classes

JUNE 4 - JUNE 10

Final examination period

JUNE 11

End of semester 12 noon

final grades due

BOARD OF TRUSTEES MR. DAVID R. FORREST~

MRS. T. H. HAM~

MR. FRANK

L.

MR. ROBERT

Chairman

Vice-Chairman

KELKER

L.

LEWIS

MR. THOMAS O. MATIA

MR. PATRICK

J.

DR. WEBSTER

G.

O'MALLEY

SIMON

COLLEGE OFFICERS DR. CHARLES E. CHAPMAN~ MR. JOHN C. CORFIAS~ DR. ELLIS M. BENSON~

President Assistant to the President

Dean of Instruction

DR. MORTON S. SHANBERG~ DR. FRED C. SUTTON~ DR. DONALD SWANK~ MR.

JAMES

E.

Assistant Dean of Instruction

Director of Technical Education Dean of Student Personnel

LORION~

Assistant Dean) Admissions and

Records MR. CARL

L.

HALL~

Business Manager

MR. CLARK E. BIGGINS~

Purchasing Agent

History Cuyahoga Community College is a public two year communityjunior college which serves Cuyahoga County, Ohio, and its immediate environs-usually termed "Greater Cleveland." This densely populated area, comprised of approximately 2,000,000 residents, obtained its first public institution of higher learning on December 5, 1962, when Cuyahoga Communty College was granted a charter by the State of Ohio. The college thus became the first public college established in Ohio since Kent State and Bowling Green Universities were chartered in 191'0. On 'September 23, 1963, the college opened its doors to 1,004 fulltime and 2,035 part-time students, the largest initial communityjunior college enrollment in the history of the movement. Day classes were held in a completely refurbished building previously operated as a junior high school by the Cleveland Board of Education and accepted as an initial facility by the College Trustees on a lease basis. Over $300,000 was raised by the College Trustees from private sources to refurbish the existing facility for college classes. The generous response by individual donors, several foundations, and representatives of business, labor, and industry during the building fund campaign was further evidence of the compelling need for the College. A survey of the county by a team of consultants engaged in 1962 by the Trustees to determine the potential of a communityjunior college had pointed to the need for immediate expansion of existing higher education opportunities in Cuyahoga County. The consultants' report, "Education for Opportunity," established further that instruction in technical courses would be a definite asset to industry and the community. Their findings formed a part of the Official Plan which became the basis for the request for a charter awarded to the College. Arrangemen ts were made with two suburban school districtsone east, one west-to use high school classrooms for evening college instruction, thereby making classes more accessible for working adults and others who would desire to attend part time. On November 5, 1963, voters of Cuyahoga County approved an operating levy by an overwhelming 3-2 majority, thus adding local support to existing State aid and student tuition. A state-wide $250,000,000 bond issue-also passed in November, 1963-includes provisions for disbursement of a portion of the proceeds for construction of campus facilities as part of a state-wide higher education building program. 9

10

CUjlahoga Community College

Authority to expand into additional downtown facilities was obtained by the College Trustees from the Ohio Board of Regents in January, 1964. It is anticipated that these facilities and some classrooms, a gymnasium, swimming pool, and auxiliary facilities within walking distance at a nearby YWCA will make it possible to accommodate 6000 full- and part-time students (twice the number who enrolled in September, 1963) in September, 1964. Cuyahoga Community College is fulfilling the expectation of advocates who predicted its need here as long ago as 1953. The nucleus of a faculty of highly qualified instructors is present, thousands of students are inquiring about future admission, and the community has generously endorsed the college with their support of a building campaign, approval of an operating levy, and many loan and scholarship donations. Consistent with the recommendations of its consultants, the Board of Trustees is now engaged in the development of programs to meet the continuing and long-range educational needs of the community. In addition to extending course offerings in the traditional areas of the arts and sciences, special efforts are being expended in the development of technical and business courses for both youth and adults. Construction of a fully developed campus designed to include a comprehensive community college program is anticipated. Plans call for the facilities to be completely occupied during the school year 1966-67. It is hoped that the first increment will be available for occupancy in 1965.

Educational Objectives Cuyahoga Community College, a two year public institution of higher education, is dedicated to the concept that individual talent and integrity constitute the nation's most valuable resources and should therefore be developed and protected to the fullest possible extent. Accordingly, the College has established the goal of providing full educational opportunity for youth and adults of its community and has instituted the corollary requirement of high standards of performance on the part of all who participate in its benefits. Toward the end of realizing its objectives, the College strives for a well-conceived curriculum; superior instructors, capable of outstanding teaching; an environment conducive to learning, including library resources and laboratory equipment to facilitate study; emphasis upon independence of thought and action as essential ingredients of a functioning democracy; and the development of value judgments and self-discipline. It is expected of all students that they develop competence in the fundamental processes of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and computation; an appreciation of the scientific method in the solution of proble~s; an awareness of the unique values of our American heritage including our democratic way of life and the privacy of moral and spiritual concerns; a sense of the inherent responsibilities of citizenship; and a consistent desire to become and to remain vocationally competent.

It shall further be incumbent upon all students to manifest their respect for educational opportunity by reciprocal behavior in the form of regular attendance, exemplary conduct, and diligent application of effort to the end that each may improve his competence and therefore his opportunity to contribute to society in a degree commensurate with his capacity. Planning and policy-making by the Trustees of the College have been consistent with the purposes and objectives of the two year college. Specifically the Official Plan for Cuyahoga Community College adopted by the Board of Trustees November 28, 1962, sets forth the following student objectives: 1. To see his cultural heritage in its historical perspective.

2. To live effectively in accordance with the conditions of his biological and physical environment. 11

12

Cuyahoga Community College

3. To recogmze and guard the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in a free society. 4. To guide his life by sound moral and spiritual values. 5. To appreciate and participate in creative activities. 6. To achieve satisfactory personal, social, and community relationships. 7. To apply critical and discriminating thought to the solutions of problems. 8. To accept responsibility for his decisions. 9. To develop the basic skills of communication. 10. To enjoy the benefits of a rewarding and productive vocation. 11. To acquire a posItIve attitude toward and a strengthened foundation for lifelong learning.

Accredita tion On December 5, 1962, the State of Ohio granted Cuyahoga Community College a charter to operate a public community college consistent with the provisions of chapter 3354, Ohio Revised Code. The programs and functions of Cuyahoga Community College, like those of other public institutions of higher learning in Ohio, are coordinated by the Ohio Board of Regents. The College is a member of the North Central Junior College Association and is approved by the Veterans Administration to provide training under Public Laws 550 (Korean Veterans) and 634 (War Orphans). When the first class has graduated an application for accreditation by the North Central Association of Colleges will be made. An application is not available until that time. To assure that satisfactory credits earned at Cuyahoga Community College will be transferable to senior institutions in the interim period, documents indicating acceptance of Cuyahoga Community College credits have been obtained from many colleges and universities. Following are representative excerpts from an engineering college, a state university, and a private university: "We at Case will consider transfer students from Cuyahoga Community College on exactly the same basis as we do from other colleges." Frank S. Badger, Director of Admissions Case Institute of Technology "You are assured that a student completing one or two years of work at Cuyahoga Community College will be accepted at Kent State University . . . after completion of three quarters of work with a cumulative point-average of 'C ' or better (at Kent State) . . . . All of the work taken at Cuyahoga Community College 'will be accepted for full credit where grades of 'C ' or better are earned." Robert 1. White, President Kent State University "All university parallel transfer credits in which grades of 'C ' or higher have been earned will be accepted unconditionally after the student has successfully completed one academic year of study with a 'C' average in either a full or part time program at John Carroll University." William J. Millor, Executive Dean John Carroll University A student is advised to consult with his counselor regarding the transferability of his credits to the college of his choice.

13

Programs and Purposes Cuyahoga Community College offers a comprehensive day and evening class schedule which runs from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. daily. The instructional programs are unified and administered, supervised, and implemented in such a way that all classes contribute to the purposes of the college as stated below.

PURPOSES OF THE COLLEGE Recognizing that students differ greatly in experiences, needs, capacities, aspirations, and interests, the College operates in terms of the following major purposes:

1. Academic preparation for advanced formal study to provide the first two years of the traditional four-year liberal arts program leading to the bachelor's degree. Students who enroll in this program may transfer as juniors to the four-year colleges or universities.

2. Technical-Occupational trazmng to provide one and two year technical-vocational and semi-professional programs which will permit students to acquire specific skills leading to employment or advancement if currently employed.

3. A program of community services-adult education to provide representative cultural and vocational subjects as determined by public interest and support to meet the changing needs of individuals and the community. Community services will be provided in cooperation with other educational institutions, business, and labor. 4. General Education to provide that part of education which is concerned with the common knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by each individual to be effective as a person, a member of a family, a worker, and a citizen in a free society. 5. Educational counseling to assist the student, through professional counseling, in the selection and pursuit of a life work compatible with his interests, aptitudes, and values.

14

Programs and Purposes

15

PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION AT THE COLLEGE Within the scope of its purposes and objectives and consistent with Ohio law, Cuyahoga Community College offers two major programs of instruction. The ';University Parallel" program emphasizes the arts and sciences and offers the first two years of a conventional college curriculum as described below. The "Technical-Occupational" program is designed to meet the unique employment requirements of the community and the occupational needs of its citizens.

UNIVERSITY PARALLEL PROGRAM A major academic offering available to students is designed for persons who desire individual courses in the arts and sciences or who wish to take their first two years' work at Cuyahoga Community College and then transfer as juniors to the senior institutions of their choice. This is usually referred to as "transfer" or "university parallel" because courses in it parallel those of four year schools, and credits earned may be transferred to senior institutions and applied toward a bachelor's degree. Cuyahoga Community College offers Freshman and Sophomore courses leading to baccalaureate degrees in Business Administration, Dentistry, Engineering, La\v, Humanities, Medicine, Nursing, the various fields of Science and Social Science, and Teaching. TECHNICAL-OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAM Another major objective of Cuyahoga Community College is to develop a comprehensive series of courses in technology and business designed to meet the needs of employers and individuals in the community. These courses are of two types: 1) single and multiple course offerings designed for individuals who wish to improve or upgrade skills or to prepare for initial employment, and 2) two-year programs, leading to the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree, designed to prepare individuals for employment at the technician or semi-professional level. Each year technicians represent a larger proportion of employment in business, industry, health and governmental agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). There is, therefore, an increasing need each year for these highly skilled, well-paid personnel. In order to plan its courses so they meet the needs of the community, the College has appointed advisory committees made up of representatives from business, govem.ment, health agencies, and labor. These committees and other special groups assist the College in identifying needs and developing new programs.

16

Cuyahoga Community College

The two year degree programs which have most frequently been recommended to the College Trustees to date are listed below. Some will be started this year, the others will be offered to both full- and part-time students as needs are confirmed. Persons interested in participating in these programs may contact the office of the Director of Technical Education. The technical-occupational program is being developed in four broad areas: Business, Technology, Health, and Special. The two year degree curriculums for these areas are listed below:

BUSINESS

Accounting. These courses prepare students for positions as accounting clerks and related accounting activity in business and industry. Data Processing. These courses prepare students for positions as data processing supervisors, data processing technicians, computer programmers, data processing servicemen, equipment salesmen, and systems and procedures analysts. Business l'danagement. These courses prepare students for positions as office or clerical supervisors where standard office and accounting procedures are important. A knowledge of office procedures, business machines, accounting processes, as well as the supervising of office personnel, are basic to this program. Retailing. These courses prepare students' for positions in retailing, merchandising, marketing, and purchasing in the retail sales business. Secretarial Science. These courses prepare students for secretarial administration and positions as secretaries and executive secretaries. TECHNOLOGY

Building Construction Technology. These courses will provide preparation for careers as Architectural Draftsmen, Architectural Engineering Aides, Construction Supervisors, Building Materials Salesmen, Building Expeditors, Contractors, and Building Construction Technicians. These courses are designed to train students to work in the building construction industry with all types of buildings. Electricity-Electronics Technology_ These courses prepare students for positions in electrical power and electrical equipment companies as well as other positions in industry having electrical testing and measurement activity. Students will also study basic electrical and electronic theory.

Programs and Purposes

17

Industrial Supervision. These courses provide preparation for careers as Industrial Foremen, Supervisors, Staff Supervisors; or Managers and for related positions where supervision and direction of people in industry or business is the basic responsibility. Mechanical Technology. These courses will provide preparation for work as an Engineering Aides, Draftsmen, Production Planners, Mechanical DeSIgners, Detailers, Materials Testers, and in the areas of Mechanical Maintenance and Sales. Persons trained in this field will often work as members of engineering or scientific teams in research and development work in applied science activity. Production Technology. These courses prepare students for positions in industry that require both knowledge of and skills in the technical manufacturing processes in industry as well as material handling, work standards, and other typical production methods.

HEALTH

Dental Hygiene. These courses will provide preparation for work as dental hygienists in hospitals, dental hygiene clinics, and the offices of dentists and dental surgeons. Public school systems and public health agencies also employ dental hygienists. Medical Assistant. These courses will provide preparation for work as assistants to physicians in medical examinations and patient care as well as general office activity. Medical Records Technology. These courses prepare students for positions as librarian technicians in hospital clinics and other medical centers. Modern hospitals and other health agencies, especially those doing complex and unusual medical care, require an extensive library and library classification system. These libraries require library technicians who can classify as well as research medical histories and development. Registered Nursing. These courses will provide preparation for careers in nursing as general duty nurses in hospitals and doctors' offices and in the area of public health. Students, upon completion of prescribed courses, will be eligible to take' the Ohio State Board Examination for Registered Nursing Licensure. SPECIAL

Certified Laboratory Assistant. This is a one year program that entails training for employment in hospitals and private medical laboratories in the performance of general hospital laboratory procedures.

18

Cuyahoga Community College

Law Enforcement. These courses provide preparation for career services in Law Enforcement and Public Safety. In combination with a liberal arts education, training is given to develop professional competence in the specific fields of law enforcement, administration, police science, and in the prevention and control of delinquency and crime, correctional administration, highway traffic administration, and industrial security administration. Nursery School Teaching. These courses provide for careers in school teaching or in pre-school child education and super-

n~:sery VISIon.

PROGRAM FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS In addition to offerings for those who wish to attend full-time, the College provides a variety of educational opportunities to meet the needs of those who desire to attend part-time. Persons who attend college part-time come from many walks of life and have many different purposes. Many want to learn, relearn, or improve a vocational skill. Others wish to earn a college degree. There are also those who wish to acquaint themselves with their cultural heritage, their government, world politics, or knowledge about themselves or others. Both youth, who wish to go directly from high school to college, and adults, who desire to resume their education after a short or extended interruption, are served by the College. Adults who can profit from attendance at college have varying educational backgrounds - some have had prior college experience while others have not. It is not unusual for a community college to have twice as many part-time students as it has full-time day students. Generally, courses offered in the part-time program carry college credit. These may be applied toward an associate degree at Cuyahoga Community College. Students may also transfer credits earned in "university transfer" courses to senior institutions where they may be applied toward a four year university degree. Guidance services will be available nightly to assist part-time students in their educational planning. Students intending to complete a degree program should investigate requirements by discussing their objectives with a counselor. Registration procedures are simple; however, evening classes, offered from 5:45 to 10: 15 p.m. Monday through Thursday, differ in no essential regard from those in the day program. They parallel day courses in title and number, prerequisites, course content, outside work required, and in examinations. Persons interested in learning more about the: program are invited to request a copy of the bulletin for part-time students available in the Admissions Office.

Present Facilities LOCATION AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION The main campus is located in downtown Cleveland just south of Playhouse Square on East 14th Street near Carnegie Avenue. It is served by the Brecksville, Maple Heights, and Cleveland Transit Systems. Both the Cleveland and Shaker Heights Rapid Transits are within 10 minutes of the Campus. Parking facilities are available at the municipal parking lots at Memorial Shore Drive and at the East 22nd Street and Cedar Avenue lots at a cost of 25c per day. Loop busses provide service at frequent intervals from the parking lots to the College. No student parking is available on the campus grounds. Two hour parking is permitted along Sumner Avenue between East 9th and 14th Streets.

PHYSICAL FACILITIES The present main campus is composed of three connected buildings between Sumner and Bronson Courts on East 14th Street. They contain classrooms, science laboratories, administrative offices, the library, a cafeteria, a lounge, production room, and maintenancecustodial areas. More classrooms, the gymnasium, a swimming pool, and a little theater are within walking distance at the YWCA on Prospect Avenue. Additional facilities in downtown Cleveland will more than double present floor area. Plans for a complete new campus near downtown Cleveland are being readied for consideration by the Ohio Board of Regents.

The Library. As the information center of the College, the Library serves as a service division of the instructional area. It is maintained for the benefit of students and faculty members. All printed materials either for supplemental study or recreational reading are part of the Library collection which has been and is being acquired through the cooperative efforts of the faculty and administration. To facilitate the use of the Library, open stacks are maintained in order that students may have direct access to the books. Library hours are from 8: 30 a.m. to 9: 00 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and from 8: 30 a.m. to 5: 00 p.m. on Friday. During these hours the Library staff is available to give any needed assistance. 19

20

Cuyahoga Community College

The Audio-Visual Center. Located in the Library, the AudioVisual Center is rapidly increasing the number and amount of audiovisual materials available to instructors and students. Through this office may be secured files, slides, film strips, records, etc. for all instructional needs. The Center operates a listening room. Instructors use their own prepared recordings and tapes as well as commercially prepared materials. Portable tape recorders, record players, and film projectors are used in class to enhance the teaching-learning situation.

Physical Education. To achieve the goal of a healthy mind in a healthy body the College offers a program of physical education designed to promote organic vigor, neuro-muscular training, bodily and mental poise, and such desirable moral and social qualities as may derive from physical education. Facilities include a gymnasium and an Olympic-size swimming pool. Locker and shower rooms adjoin the gymnasium and pool.

Food Services. In the Cafeteria hot meals are served daily between 11: 00 a.m. and 1: 30 p.m. Snack bar items are also sold during the same period. Vending machines dispense beverages, sandwiches, and lunch items throughout the college day.

Student Services COUNSELING SERVICE Counseling service is provided to help students plan their vocational and educational programs and to assist them in making the best possible adjustment to college. Each day student has an appointment with a counselor prior to registration each semester. Counselors are also available in the Student Personnel Office throughout the semester to discuss personal, vocational, or educational problems with students.

PLACEMENT TESTS Entering students are requested to have the results of the ACT (American College Testing Program) or SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board) forwarded to the College. The results are used for counseling purposes only in the placement of students in appropriate courses and curriculums. Other placement tests may be administered on campus to assure proper placement.

REGISTRATION Early registration is offered each semester and ends approximately two weeks before the semester begins. Students who register early have the advantages of wider selection of courses and a more desirable time schedule. Regular registration for those who do not take advantage of early registration takes place just prior to the beginning of the semester. Additional information concerning registration can be found in the Schedule of Classes issued each semester.

VETERANS EDUCATION The Veterans Administration has approved the College as an institution qualified and equipped to provide education in Arts and Sciences under the provisions of Public Laws 550 (Korean Veterans) and 634 (War Orphans). For further information contact the Student Personnel Office.

23

24

Cuyahoga Community College

HEALTH SERVICES The Health Service offers emergency care, first aid, and treatment of common minor ailments. The College nurse is available daily for discussion of personal health problems. The College physician is available for emergencies and consultation. Students are expected to have general medical needs met by their personal physicians and dentists or clinics.

CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES The educational development of students requires many activities in addition to classroom instruction. An objective of the College is to assist students to more effectively achieve satisfactory personal, social, and community relationships. To accomplish this objective the College provides co-curricular activities to meet student cultural, social, physical, and intellectual needs. These include participation in student government, inter-collegiate debate, the newspaper and other publications, choir, drama, various clubs, social functions, intramural activities, and inter-collegiate athletics.

ASSISTANCE TO THE HANDICAPPED The Office of Student Personnel renders services to the handicapped. Further information concerning these services may be obtained by contacting this office.

SCHOLARSHIPS A number of scholarships are available and are awarded on the basis of high scholastic standing and financial need. Any prospective or currently enrolled student who feels he meets the above qualifications should contact the Office of Student Personnel for additional information.

LOANS College loan funds are established for students who need shortterm loans to enable them to register. These are interest free. Typically, loans are made for路 a period of from two to four months and usually do not exceed half the student's tuition. Information and applications may be obtained from the Office of Student Personnel.

EMPLOYMENT The College maintains an employment service for full- and parttime students. Information concerning availability of employment may be obtained from the Office of Student Personnel.

Admissions ADMISSION PROCEDURE Admission to the College is open to all high school graduates. Candidates for enrollment in the day program are to follow this stepby-step procedure: 1. Complete the Application for Admission and submit it to the Admissions Office. 2. Complete the Health Record and submit it to the Admissions Office. 3. Request the high school last attended to send the College a transcript. 4. Request all other colleges or universities previously attended to send CCC an official transcript. 5. Have the score of the ACT or SAT sent to the College by the testing agency. Test scores are used for counseling purposes only.

SCHEDULE OF FEES Cuyahoga Community College is a public college, and, as such, the cost to the student has been reduced by public funds. Tuition costs are as follows: STUDENT RATES PER SEMESTER HOUR (3) (1) (2) Out of Cuyahoga Other State County Ohio Residents Residents Residents If enrolled in 1 through 6 hours: $22 $13 $11 If enrolled in 7 through 14 hours: $20 $10 $12 For 15 hours or more the maximum total cost per semester is:

$150 $175 $300 Note: Residency status for purposes of fee assessment shall be interpreted by the staff of the College based upon certification by the student. Laboratory DejJosit. A $5.00 breakage deposit is required for all courses in which a laboratory period is required. A deposit card should be purchased at the bookstore. A complete refund is made at the end of the semester if no breakage has occurred. 27

28

Cuyahoga Community College

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION Applicants for admission to day classes who have reached the age of 21 and have not completed high school may qualify for admission by completing successfully an examination administered by the Office of Admissions. Further information regarding this special admission procedure may be obtained by calling or writing the Director of Admissions.

ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS Admission is open to all high school graduates. Non high school graduates who are 21 years or older and who can profit from college level instruction may also attend. Further registration information can be found in the bulletin for part-time students.

FOREIGN STUDENTS Foreign students are required to demonstrate an adequate proficiency in the English language as a part of the Admissions process. An examination may be administered to determine this proficiency. Previous academic achievement in other educational institutions will also be considered by the Director of Admissions in determining a student's admissibility to the College.

TRANSFER STUDENTS 1. Students transferring to Cuyahoga Community College are to comply with the established admission procedure and also to meet certain academic requirements. Students who do not meet the following requirements will be placed on probation.

Semester Hours Attempted 10-20 Inclusive 21-40 Inclusive 41- and above

Cumulative Grade Point Average (based on a four-point system) 1.25 1.50 1.75

Academic Regulations

29

2. If a student has been dismissed from another college or university for academic or disciplinary reasons, he: must petition the Dean of Student Personnel for admission. If his petition is approved and admission is granted, he will be admitted on probation. 3. Transfer credits for courses in which less than a "C" grade has been earned are not accepted. 4. Transfer credits accepted from previous collegiate institutions are entered on the permanent record forms of the College. Grades earned are not indicated. 5. Only course grades earned at this institution will be used in computing grade-point averages.

RE-ADMISSION Students who have discontinued their attendance at Cuyahoga Community College may apply for re-admission through the Office of Admissions and Records. Students who attend another college or university during the interim must file an official transcript from that school.

PROGRAM CHANGES Changes in a student's class schedule may be made during the Drop-and-Add period which takes place during the first week of classes each semester. Students may drop a class and/or add another class, providing the change has been approved by a counselor.

WITHDRAWAL FROM CLASSES Students who wish to withdraw from a class must complete: the appropriate forms in the Office of Admissions and Records. Unofficial withdrawal from a class may result in a failing grade. Students are advised to confer with instructors or a counselor prior to withdrawal from classes.

REFUND OF FEES Fees will be refunded in full if the College cancels a course or if a student is inducted into military service during the refund period, but not if a student enlists for military service.

Note: Refunds will be made within 30 days after student withdrawal or cancellation of class by the College.

30

Cuyahoga Community College

Refunds will be made according to the following schedule:

Regular Semester First Week of Classes Second through the Fourth Week Fifth Week and Thereafter

100% refund 50% refund no refund

Summer Session First Week of Classes Second Week Third Week and Thereafter

100% refund 50% refund no refund

No refund will be granted when a student pended from the College for disciplinary reasons.

IS

dismissed or sus-

Academic Regulations PROBATION A student will be placed on probation under the following conditions: 1. if his cumulative grade-point average after he has attempted 10 or more semester hours at Cuyahoga Community College is less than that shown below:

Semester Hours Attempted

Cumulative Grade Point Average (based on a four-point system)

10-20 Inclusive

1.25

21-40 Inclusive

1.50

41- and above

1.75

2. if, in transferring to Cuyahoga Community College, his cumulative G.P.A. at all colleges and universities does not meet the requirements listed above. (If he has been dismissed for academic or disciplinary reasons, he must petition the Dean of Student Personnel for admission. If his petition is approved and admission granted he will be admitted on probation.) 3. lack of attendance and conduct unbecoming a college student. A student will be removed from probation if he earns a cumulative G.P.A. not less than the tabular requirements given above for the appropriate number of hours attempted.

Academic Regulations

31

DISMISSAL A student who remains on probation two consecutive semesters will be dismissed, except that he may be permitted to continue on probation if his G.P.A. for the most recent semester is 2.0 or higher. A student who has been dismissed from Cuyahoga Community College because of poor scholarship may apply to the Admissions Committee for re-admission to the College after an absence of at least one semester. If such a student is readmitted, it will be in a probationary status.

AUDITORS Properly qualified persons may apply to the Assistant Dean, Admissions and Records for permission to attend classes as auditors. Auditors pay the full fee paid by students in credit status. Usually auditors are not admitted until the close of enrollment in a class. Transfer from audit to credit status or the reverse is not permitted. Grades or credit are not granted to auditors.

ATTENDANCE A student is expected to attend every meeting of each class for which he is registered, except in cases involving illness or emergency. Whenever a student's absences exceed the number of hours the class meets per week the instructor may drop him fron1 class if in his judgment the student cannot benefit from further instruction in the class. Generally regular attendance and consistent study habits constitute the two most significant factors which promote success in college work.

FINAL EXAl\1INATIONS A final examination is required in all courses. The examination schedule is published one month prior to the final examination period. Instructors give examinations at regularly scheduled times only, and students may not be excused from examinations except under extenuating circumstances.

32

Cuyahoga Community College

It is the student's responsibility to inform an instructor prior to scheduled examination times if he will be unable to appear for the examination. Postponed final examinations are cause for a student to be assigned an "I" (Incomplete) as the grade in a course. Incomplete grades must be removed by completing the examination no later than the end of the sixth week of the following semester. Failure to do so will result in an "F" grade.

RECORDS-GRADES AND QUALITY POINTS Reports of scholastic standing are mailed at mid-semester, and final grades are issued officially at the end of each semester. Letter grades are assigned quality points according to the following system: A-Excellent B-Good C-Average D-Below Average F-Failed W-Withdrawal I-Incomplete S-Audit

4 3

2 1 0 0 0 0

Grade Point Average is computed by the following formula: Total Quality Points Earned Grade Point Average Total Semester Hours Attempted Courses with grades of "W" and "S" are not considered as part of total semester hours attempted.

REPEATING

COURSE

A course may be repeated; however, all courses attempted will be used to determine the cumulative grade-point average. Before repeating a course, the student is advised to confer with a counselor.

Academic Regulations

33

TRANSFER TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS When transfer to another institution is planned, the student should follow closely the requirements of the institution to which he intends to transfer. These requirements are described in the catalogue of each college. Catalogues are available in the Library and in the counselors' offices. Official transcripts of grades may be requested through the Office of Admissions and Records. Each student is entitled to one free transcript, and all additional transcripts are issued at a cost of one dollar each.

Graduation Requirements NOTICE OF INTENT Students who plan to graduate at the close of any semester are to file an Intent to Graduate form before registering for their final semester. This forn1 may be obtained in the Office of Admissions and Records.

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS )J:

If in good standing a student is eligible for graduation from Cuyahoga Community College with the degree of Associate in Arts or Associate in Science. An Associate degree will be granted to the student completing the requirements stated below: A.

SEMESTER HOURS OF WORK

The satisfactory completion of not less than 62 semester hours. The final 6 semester hours of the degree requirements must be earned at Cuyahoga Community College.

B.

ENROLLMENT REQUIREMENTS

Not less than 15 semester hours must be earned at Cuyahoga Community College.

C.

SCHOLARSHIP REQUIREMENTS

A student is required to attain a "C" (2.00) average for all work at Cuyahoga Community College. 1. Minimum competency in English is required as verified by any of the following course patterns:

34

Cuyahoga Community College

English 091 and English 092; English 091 and English 101; or English 101. A grade of "C" must be attained in the final course of the pattern undertaken. 2. Minimum competency in mathematics is required as verified by one of the following: Any mathematics course satisfactorily completed at Cuyahoga Community College or achievement of a satisfactory score on a standardized mathematics test approved by the College or a satisfactory score on the mathematics portion of the ACT or SAT.

D.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

1. Major-The completion of a systematic sequence of courses consisting of a minimum of 24 semester hours leading to a well-defined objective. 2. The completion of specified courses required of all students: Not less than 6 semester hours of English and/or speech, not less than 6 semester hours of United States history and/or American government and/ or western civilization, not less than 3 semester hours in health education. 3. The completion of the minimum requirements from three of the following groupings which shall be outside the student's major field of study. Courses taken to fulfill requirement D-2 may not be applied to fulfill the requirements of this section. a. Applied Arts-Not less than 4 semester hours selected from business, engineering, technology, physical education. b. Fine Arts-Not less than 3 semester hours in fine artsmusic, art, theater arts. c. Literature and Language-Not less than 6 semester hours selected from literature, foreign language, speech, or journalism. d. Science-Not less than 5 semester hours selected from life or physical sciences or mathematics. e. Social Sciences-Not less than 6 semester hours selected from the area of social sciences. Students intending to transfer to junior and senior work may substitute the Freshman and Sophomore requirements of their selected institutions providing that those requirements are not less than the above.

Miscellaneous Information DEFINITION OF CLASS STANDING A freshman or first year student at Cuyahoga Community College is one who has earned 29 or fewer semester hours. This includes any semester hours transferred from other colleges and universities. A sophomore or second year student is one who has earned 30 or more semester hours (45 quarter hours). This includes any semester hours transferred from other colleges or universities.

COLLEGE SEMESTER AND THE SCHOOL YEAR The regular school year is divided into two semesters. The school year begins in September, normally on the second Monday following Labor Day, and closes at the end of forty weeks with the graduation ceremony in June. The calendar for this school year appears in the early portion of the catalogue.

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES Prior to the registration period for each semester a Schedule of Classes is published containing the classes offered, general registration procedures, and placement test schedules.

STUDENT AND FACULTY CONFERENCE The faculty members of Cuyahoga Community College maintain scheduled office hours to consult with students concerning class assignments, methods of study on particular courses, and review of test results and other measures of academic achievement. Schedules of hours will be posted in the office areas, and students are urged to familiarize themselves with them and to contact instructors during these hours. It is the responsibility of each student to consult his instructor and make arrangements to complete class work missed while absent.

37

38

Cuyahoga Community College

HONORS Each semester, those students t whose scholastic achievement is outstanding are given public recognition by means of the Dean's List. This list is prepared by the Dean of Instruction and includes the names of all students who have earned a grade point average of 3.5 in 12 or more credit hours undertaken during the preceding semester. The names will be displayed on a special bulletin board in the Library.

STUDENT LOAD The normal course load for full-time students is 15 semester hours; however, a counselor may recommend a heavier or lighter load because of past performance and other factors.

P-UBLICATIONS The Commuter) the college newspaper, is written and edited by students in journalism classes under the supervision of the journalism advisor. Other college publications are being planned by students with the guidance of members of the faculty. These publications will be announced as they are planned and prepared.

HOUSING Cuyahoga Community College provides no residential housing for students; however, the YMCA and YWCA are in close proximity to the College and have rooms available for rent. Some additional housing accommodations have been made available and are listed with the Office of the Dean of Student Personnel. Information regarding these accommodations is provided by the College as a service to students and does not imply that the housing has been inspected and recommended.

SUMMER TERM A summer tern1 has been planned to satisfy the demand as it develops. It will extend over a period of eight weeks during which students may complete up to six semester hours of studies. Students interested in enrolling for summer classes should contact the Office of Admissions and Records in I'vfay when a Schedule of Classes will be available.

Descriptions of Courses COURSE NUMBERING Courses are listed in numerical order within each area of instruction. Some courses extend over one semester; others continue for two or more semesters. Courses with the same title, possessing consecutive numbers, indicate that the courses are of more than one semester duration. Courses preceded by 020-089 are designed to meet requirements in technical-occupational curriculums. Credits earned may be applied toward the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degrees. Acceptance of these courses for transfer varies among the four-year colleges. Courses preceded by 090-099 are designed to provide students with foundations in essential subject matter areas which are necessary for advanced studies in such fields as communications and mathematics. Courses numbered 100-299 may be transferred to senior colleges and universities, and credits earned therein may also be applied toward the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degrees.

CREDIT HOURS The credit for each course is indicated for each semester opposite the title of the course, e.g., (3) credits. The number of credits granted for a course does not always equal the number of hours of classroom instruction.

PREREQUISITES The prerequisites listed for specific courses and specific curriculums should be closely observed to insure qualification for subsequent courses and to gain maximum benefit from instruction.

SCHEDULING OF CLASSES Courses listed in this catalogue are those which the Cuyahoga Community College plans to offer. Inclusion of a course description in this catalogue does not obligate the College to offer the course in any particular semester. For courses being offered currently students are referred to the Schedule of Classes. The asterisk (*) denotes courses which are scheduled to be offered only in the evening program during this college year.'

41

42

Cuyahoga Community College

ART 101

ART ApPRECIATION

3 Cr.

Developing an understanding and interest in creative forms within the visual art field for those without an art background. The history of art (painting, sculpture, and architecture) is explored through texts and simple experimental studies in basic design. This chronological survey 'Of art is aided by slides and prints. Prerequisite: None.

102

ART HISTORY

3 Cr.

A general survey of the chronological and stylistic development of Western art including Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, Gothic, the Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo, and the 19th Century as well as touching the 20th Century postimpressionistic schools. Prerequisite: None.

103

ART HISTORY

3 Cr.

A continuation of Art History 102 Prerequisi-te: Art 102.

104

DRAWING AND SKETCHING

2 Cr.

A beginning course in representational drawing- that will include the fundamental elements of perspective and their application to still life, landscape, and interiors. Prerequisite: None.

105

DESIGN

3 Cr.

Experience using the fundamental elements of design-line, mass, and space, light and shade, texture and color-and their organization to achieve the various qualities of design; rhythm, balance, movement, and unity. Prerequisite: None.

106

DESIGN

3 Cr.

Problems concerning the functional and visual elements of design as well as learning -to select and organize those things that will assist in expressing visual ideas. Prerequisite: Art 105.

107

ART FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

3 Cr.

Planned to meet the needs of prospective elementary teachers. There will be opportunity for creative studio work and an introduction to art in the elementary schoo-I with some experience using elementary school art materials. Prerequisite: None.

201

LIFE DRAWING

2 Cr.

A beginning course concerning proportion and action of the figure with costumed and nude models. Various drawing media will be used. Prereq uisi te : Art 104.

Biology

202

43

2 Cr.

LIFE DRAWING

A continuation of Life Drawing 201 Prerequisite: Art 201.

203

2 Cr.

PAINTING

An introductory course using oil and opaque water color to give experience with the qualities of color-hue, value and intensity-and its use in the rendering of fonns and in compositions. Prerequisites: Art 104 and 105.

204

2 Cr.

PAINTING

Landscape, still life, and the figure interpreted in oil. Emphasis will be on the use of the medium and on composition. Prerequisite: Art 203.

205

2 Cr.

VVATER COLOR

A fundamental course to give the student experience with the qualities and techniques of wat~r.cGlor. Prerequisites: Art 104 and lOS. l

BIOLOGY 101

INTRODUCTORY

BIOLOGY

3 Cr.

A systematic survey of the various animal phyla and the physiologic mechanisms which they have in common, such as respiration, locomotion, digestion and metabolism. Also included are the fundamentals of biology with emphasis on the comparative and evolutionary aspects of the subject. A course for non-science majors. Lecture 2 hours, Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite : None.

102

INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY

3 Cr.

A continuation of Biology 101, with particular emphasis on the systems of the human body. Principles of genetics and heredity are included. The plant groups are surveyed, and structure, classification, and physiology compared. A course for non-science majors. Lecture 2 'hours, Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101.

111

GENERAL BIOLOGY

(Invertebrate Zoology)

4 Cr.

A general introduction to basic biological concepts structured around a detailed study of the invertebrate phyla. Emphasis is placed on the phylogenic relationships among the groups. Elementary biochemical principles are introduced as a basis for the study of physiology, ecology, evolution, and genetics. Functional adaptations and taxonomy of animal groups are included. A knowledge of basic chemistry is essential. This course is designed for biology majors. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

44

112

Cuyahoga Community College

GENERAL BIOLOGY (Vertebrate

Zoology)

4

Cr.

A continuation of Biology 111 with emphasis placed on the vertebrates. It would include the principles of morphological development and concepts of human heredity and population genetics. This course is designed for biology majors. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 h0'urs. Prerequisite: Biology 111.

121

MICROBIOLOGY

4

Cr.

A study of the morphology and physiology of bacteria and other related groups of microorganisms. Emphasis is placed on pathogenic agents. Methods of sterilization, culture, staining, and identification are included in the laboratory. Lecture 2 hours, Laboratory 4 hours. Prerequisite: None.

122

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

4

Cr.

A study of the functional anatomy of the organ systems in humans. Basic physiological principles will be correlated with the descripti0'n of anat0'my. This course is designed f0'r nursing, dental hygiene and other health programs. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 h0'urs. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101.

201

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE VERTEBRATES

5

Cr.

A study of the gross anatomy of the organ systems in representative membeI's of the vertebrates. Evolution and functional adaptations are emphasized. The laboratory lays heavy stress upon dissection and direct observation of selected specimens. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 111 and 112 or equivalent.

202

GENERAL

BOTANY

4

Cr.

A survey of the plant kingdom which includes classification, physiology, structure, life cycles, and interrelationships between plants and animals. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: None.

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 0200

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION DRAWING

3

Cr.

A study of the dwelling house and its design; discussion of modern trends; scale detailing, framing, and blueprint reading; the application of building codes to such construction. Course includes the study of dimensions and spacing members; modular framing and modern practices; also a study of heating, insulation, acoustics and soundproofing, and wiring orientation. Prerequisite: None; employment in a related field recommended.

021

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION DRAWING

3

Cr.

The interaction of the parts of the small structure. The relation of the structure to the site. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 020.

Business

022

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION DRAWING

45

3

Cr.

Building construction design of the more complex structure. Integration and expression of materials in design. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 021.

023

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION DRAWING

3

Cr.

Design of the complex building. Emphasis on the functional and spatial concepts appropriate to steel and concrete buildings. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 022.

025

MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT

2

Cr.

Buildings, mechanical equipment of water supply, sanitation, heating, air conditioning, electrical equipment, and acoustics in modern construction. Extensive investigation of state and local building codes. Prerequisite: None.

030

STRUCTURAL DESIGN

3

Cr.

Analysis of the forces determining equilibrium by graphical and analytical methods. Prerequisite: None.

0'31

STRUCTURAL DESIGN

3

Cr.

Analysis of the forces acting within building materials. Shear and moment diagrams. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 030.

035

Cr.

SPECIFICATION WRITING

Problems in writing specifications. Contracts. The legal role and liability of the architect. Prerequisite: Building Construction Technology 020.

BUSINESS 030

ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING

3

Cr.

A basic introduction to electronic data processing. The histDry of data processing, features of data prDcessing equipment, numbering systems, computer prDgramming, principles, and systems analyses. Prerequisite: None.

031

ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING EQUIPMENT

3

Cr.

This course is an orientation tD all of the typical electronic data processing equipment-keypunchers, verifiers, tabulators, sorters, etc., as well as the computer itself. Most of the sessions Df the class will be spent viewing this equipment in use. Prerequisite: None.

*0'32

DATA SYSTEMS

3

Cr.

The systems and procedures function, including the analysis, design, and cDntrol of management infDrmation and data systems; the economics of manual, electro-mechanical, and electronic data processing; the: advantages. and disadvantages of computer, communication, and information retrieval systems for information evaluatiDn. Prerequisite: Business 030 or 031.

46

040

Cuyahoga Community College

3 Cr.

INVESTMENTS

A course designed to acquaint the students with sources of capital, types of securities, and the operation of brokerage and investment banking houses. Objectives of the course are the 'Understanding of investment principles and the acquisition of skills needed for a salesman or clerical worker to succeed in the securities business. Prerequisite : None.

050

INDUSTRIAL PURCHASING

3 Cr.

Fundamental factors that make for effective distribution of merchandise. Methods of marketing, channels of distribution, costs of marketing, and market research. Application of various marketing fundamentals to actual case problems. Description of specific situations or circumstances encountered in the effort to move goods and services from seller to buyer. Prerequisite: None.

060

PRACTICAL ACCOUNTING

3 Cr.

An introductory course in bookkeeping including study of the accounting equation, the theory of debit and credit, accounting devices, working papers and business forms, and the preparation of balance sheets and profit and loss statements. Prerequisite: None.

070

3 Cr.

ADVERTISING

Introduction to the field of retail advertising; its purpose, institutions, and functions. Some areas included are: how to plan an advertising program and budget, merchandising with advertising, local media and types of retail advertising. Prerequisite: None.

075

ADVERTISING ART

3 Cr.

Introduction to advertising design; roughs, layouts, comprehensives, to finished work. Lectures on typography and methods of reproduction. Problems; adapting lettering to packaging, posters. Prerequisite: Previous instruction in basic design or related work experience.

080

OFFICE MANAGEMENT

3 Cr.

The basic principles of office organization and management with emphasis on relationships among physical, personnel, and procedural factors which affect the efficiency of the office. Prerequisite: None.

101

BEGINNING

TYPING

2 Cr.

Instruction and practice in fundamentals of keyboard technique and operation of the typewriter. Special emphasis on placement and correct usage of punctuation marks, numbers, and special characters. Controlled typing practice and beginning letter writing. Prerequisite: None

102

INTERMEDIATE

TYPING

2 Cr.

Development of speed and skill in the operation of the typewriter and in the handling of typing work. Advanced letter writing, tabulation, and manuscript typing are emphasized. Prerequisite: Business 101 or consent of the instructor.

Business

103

BEGINNING SHORTHAND

47

3 Cr.

Mastery of the theory of Gregg shQrthand. Beginning dictation to a speed Qf sixty wQrds a minute by the end of the session. Prerequisite: None.

104

INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND

3 Cr.

Detailed study Qf the most cQmmQnly used wQrd and phrase forms; training in the taking of dictatiQn and in the transcribing of shorthand nQtes on the typewriter; stress Qn the development Qf speed and accuracy. Dictation begins at abQut sixty wQrds a minute and progresses to Qne hundred wQrds a minute. Federal Civil Service Certificates will be issued to students whO' satisfactQrily cQmplete this CQurse. Prerequisite: Business 103 Qr CQnsen t of the instructor.

106

BUSINESS

MATHEMATICS

3 Cr.

Mathematics is applied to' typical accounting, financial, and Qther business problems, including percentage, cash and trade discQunts, merchandise turnover, depreciation, simple and cQmpQund interest, bank discounts, small IQans and installment purchases, partial payments, banking practices, and pricing merchandise. Also included is the application of business graphs, insurance and investment calculations, annuities, weights and measures. Prerequisite: NQne.

108

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS

3 Cr.

An introductQry CQurse presenting a survey of business principles, prQblems, and procedures. DiscussiQns Qf the nature Qf business, ownership, recruitment, and training Qf personnel, labor-management relatiQns, prQductiQn and distributiQn of gOQds, competition, prQfi-ts, transPQrtatiQn, finance, managerial controls, gQvernment and business relations. Prerequisite: None.

109

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

3 Cr.

A functiQnal apprQach is emphasized in the study of the institutions invQlved in the mQvement Qf industrial, CQnsumer, farm goods, and servioes frQm producers to CQnsumers and users. Prerequisite: Business 106 and 108.

110

PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE

3 Cr.

A study Qf money, banking, corporate QrganizatiQn, stock, bonds, the marketing of securities, financial PQlicies Qf corpQrations, insurance, real estate, and the Federal Reserve System. Prerequisite: Business 106 and 108.

112

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

3 Cr.

IntrQductQry CQurse in cQncepts of management and business. Detailed analysis of management functiQns: Planning--.:including objectives and PQlicies, methQds, and prQcedures; Qrganizing-including authQrity, responsibility, and QrganizatiQnal charts; controlling-including standards, contrQI of sales, prQductiQn, and CQst. Prerequisite: Business 108.

48

113

Cuyahoga Community College

BUSINESS

LAW

3 Cr.

A practical course in ,the principles of law that affect business relations including historical background, judicial and administrative procedures, contracts, agency, real property, personal property (sales and bailments), negotiable instruments, business organizations, security devices, insurance and trade regulations (business torts and restraint of trade). Prerequisite: None.

114

BUSINESS

LAW

3 Cr.

Includes the study of transportation, insurance, suretyship and guarantee, partnerships, corporations, real property, trusts, wills, bankruptcy, and torts. Cases stressing the application of the principles of law in the above named fields are discussed in order to apply the rules of law to everyday business activities. Prerequisite: Business 113.

116

SALESMANSHIP

3 Cr.

Fundamentals of retail, wholesale, outside and service selling, customer impact, merchandise and sales presentation, closing, and postsale service. Principles of self-management, practice on sales preparation and demonstration. Prerequisite: Business 108 or 109 recommended.

121

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING

3 Cr.

Covers the fundamental principles of double entry accounting, periodic adjustments, the accounting cycles, and financial statements. Prerequisite: None.

122

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING

3 Cr.

A continuation of Business 121. The course covers accounting for payrolls and taxes, departmental and branch accounting, manufacturing and cost accounting, analysis and interpretation of accounting statements. Prerequisite: Business 121.

151

BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE

3 Cr.

The fundamentals of good letter writing applied to orders, acknowledgements, claims, adjustments, credit, collections, sales, applications, and reports. Prerequisite: English 091, 092, or 101.

152

ORAL BUSINESS COMMUNICATION

3 Cr.

Communication techniques in conferences, sales, tables, and business addresses. Mastery of subject material. Organization for effective use and presentation. Prerequisite: Business 108.

201

ADVANCED TYPING

2 Cr.

Statistical typing, legal forms, miscellaneous office forms, typing from voice-writing machines, stencil cutting, operation of a stencil duplicator, and additional drill in speed and accuracy. Prerequisite: Business 102 or consent of the instructor.

Chemistry

203

ADVANCED

SHORTHAND

49

3 Cr.

Brief and intensive review of the principles of Gregg shorthand, eXtensive practice in advanced phrase-writing, and mastery of technical and vocational terms in use in modern business. For those who wish to continue their study of shorthand and to increase dictation and transcription speed. Prerequisite: Business 104 or two years of high school shorthand.

221

COST ACCOUNTING

3 Cr.

Theory and practice of cost accounting and cost procedures in industry; job orders, process and standard cost methods. Prerequisite : Business 122.

251

MERCHANDISING

3 Cr.

Problems considered in this course are of concern to the store manager, a department store buyer, or the person who wishes to organize and operate a small store. The course covers plans for financing, selection of location, choice of partnership or corporation, seleotion and training of employees, turnover, stock control, inventory methods, layout, advertising and display. Outside speakers from local stores will be scheduled. Prerequisi,te: Business 106 and 108.

CHEMISTRY 030

CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY

3 Cr.

Discussion of processes and equipment 'in basic Cuyahoga County industries such as rubber, tires, petroleum derivatives, paints and varnishes, synthetic fibers, chemicals, metals, alloys, and their economic aspects in domestic and foreign markets. Also basic principles of evaporation, distillations, and filtration. Prerequisite: None.

101

INTRODUCTORY

CHEMISTRY

4 Cr.

An introduction to chemistry with emphasis on atomic and molecular structure as a basis for understanding valence, formulas, and chemical reactions. States of matter, solutions, compounds, elementary biochemistry, ionization, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry are studied and their application in daily life noted. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: One year high school algebra or equivalent.

111

GENERAL CHEMISTRY

4 Cr.

Chemical principles emphasized are atomic and molecular structure, periodic law, chemical equations and calculations, chemical bonding, ionization, energy and chemical change, and oxidation-reduction. Important non-metals and their compounds, states of matter, acids and basis, solutions, and organic chemistry are studied. Lecture 4 hours, Lahora tory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101 or one year of high school chemistry or equivalent.

50

112

Cuyahoga Community College

4

GENERAL CHEMISTRY

Cr.

A continuation of Chemistry 111, with emphasis on chemical equilibrium, the structure of matter and periodic system. The laboratory deals with semi-micro qualitative analysis illustrative of the principles developed in the lecture. Lecture 2 hours, Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111.

211-212

ORGANIC

4-4

CHEMISTRY

Cr.

The chemistry of carbon compounds. A study of the preparation, properties, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic groupings. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisites: Chemistry 111 and 112.

221

4

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

Cr.

The theory and laboratory practice of volumetric and gravimetric analyses. Lecture 1 hour, Laboratory 8 hours. Prerequisites: Chemistry 111 and 112.

DENTAL HYGIENE (Other courses are being developed 021

In

this curriculum.)

DENTAL ANATOMY

3

Cr.

Basic knowledge of the apatomy and morphology of the teeth and nomenclature--the development of the teeth and their structural formation. Laboratory techniques with claycene modeling of typical teeth are taught. Prerequisite: NOlle.

025

ORAL PROPHYLAXIS

3

Cr.

Study of the care of the teeth and the supporting structure. Manikin and clinical practice. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 021.

030

RADIOGRAPHY

2

Cr.

Lectures and demonstrations covering elementary techniques in taking and processing bitewing films. Prerequisite: Dental Hygiene 021.

ECONOMICS 151

DEVELOPMENT OF AMERICAN ECONOMY

3

Cr.

Study of the evolutionary development of our economic system from medieval times to present. The course is designed for better understanding of the economic life and as an introduction to macro- and micro-economic analysis. Prerequisite: None.

Electrical Technology

201

51

3 Cr.

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS

A study of basic economic principles. The determination and fluctuation of national income, the composition and pricing of national output and current economic issues and problems. Designed to provide a basis for understanding both the evolutionary nature of society and the role of capitalism in society and the role of capitalism in social development. Prerequisite: None.

202

3 Ct.

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS

A con,tinuation of the introductory course in the principles of economics. Topics considered include: the national income, business fluctuations, the financial system, public finance, international economics, application of economic principles to contemporary economic developments. Prerequisite: Economics 201.

EDUCATION 101

3 Cr.

INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION

Designed to introduce the student to the broad and complex field of public education. Special emphasis upon ,the personal and professional characteristics required for successful teaching. Prerequisite: None.

121

NURSERY SCHOOL

2 Cr.

MATERIALS

This course deals with the selection and arrangement of equipment and materials for路 groups of young children. Planning of experiences which encourage physical, mental, social, and emotional development during the nursery years is emphasized. Practice is given in the preparation of nature, language, and play materials for young children. Prerequisite: Education 101 recommended.

151

CHILDREN'S

3 Cr.

LITERATURE

Provides wide acquaintance with children's books; emphasis on their use in all subject areas. History of children's literature and study of objective standards for evaluation together with children's interests; experience in story-telling and in reading widely in children's books, including folk literature, modern fanciful and realistic stories, non-fiction, and poetry. Prerequisite: None.

ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY (Other courses are being developed

020

EMPLOYMENT ORIENTATION

III

this curriculum.)

1 Cr.

A series of lectures and plant visits to orient the student to industrial electrical and electronics work activity. Prerequisite: None.

52

025

Cuyahoga Community College

PRINCIPLES OF ELECTRICTY

3 Cr.

Basic theory; units of measurement; Ohm's Law applied to series; parallel and series-parallel circuits; voltage dividers, batteries, inductance, capacitance, resistance, and wire calculations. Prerequisite: None.

030

A. C.

MACHINES

3 Cr.

Introduction to A. C. machines and their functions, construction and operation. AlternatJing circuits and measurements, inductance, capacitance, resistance circuits, power factors, electromagnetic induction transformer action and transformers, alternating current generators and motors are discussed. Prerequisite: Electrical Technology 025.

035

D.

C.

MACHINES

3 Cr.

Introduction to D. C. machines, their operation, construction and function. Conductors, insulators, circuits, Ohm's Law, power, energy, Kirchoff's Law, Thevenino's Theorem, magnetism, and measuring instruments. Prerequisite: Electrical Technology 025.

040

ELECTRICAL POWER BLUEPRINTS AND DRAFTING

3 Cr.

Use of drawing instruments, lettering, orthographic projection, geometric construction, dimensioning and notation, blueprinting, and auxiliary projections. Prerequisite: Electrical Technology 025.

ENG INEERING *020

BASIC METALLURGY

3 Cr.

A course for- persons employed in the engineering profession or the metal trades. Includes the chemical and physical aspects of the science of metallurgy as applied to the preparing of metals from their ores for commercial uses, and the effects of the metallic alloying elements and non-metallic elements in the alloying of ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Practical application of the physical properties of metals as applied to modern industry and manufacturing is made. Prerequisite: None.

*021

PROPERTIES OF METALS

3 Cr.

The basic properties of metals with fundamentals of physical testing in plain carbon steels, function of alloying, elements in steel low-alloy and special purpose in high-alloy steel, cast irons and metallurgy of casting and mechanical working. Prerequisite: Engineering 020.

025

PRINCIPLES OF REFRIGERATION

3 Cr.

This course covers the basic fundamentals of air conditioning and refrigeration including a study of gases, liquids, solids, pressures, temperatures, heats, control devices and refrigeration systems. Prerequisite: None.

English

100

53

1 Cr.

SLIDE RULE

Lectures and instruction in the use of the slide rwe. Mannheim and log-log trigonometric slide rules will be explained and used in computation. Estimating, checking, and solving problems in computation will be required of the student. Prerequisite: None.

111

DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY

3 Cr.

Practice and theory of graphic projection and study of measurements in space. Emphasis on ability to visualize and analyze threedimensional structures. Problems covering geometrical relationships of points, lines, planes, and surfaces with applications to various fields of engineering. Prerequisite: One year of high school meohanical drawing or concurrent enrollment in Engineering 121.

121

ENGINEERING DRAWING

3 Cr.

Principles and practice in orthographic and pictorial sketching and drawing. Practice in freehand lettering and use of instruments. Emphasis is placed on auxiliary views, sections, conventions, and dimensioning. Prerequisite: None.

122

ENGINEERING

DRAWING

3 Cr.

Advanced [engineering drawing theory and practice. Emphasis is placed on jig, fixture, welding, piping, structural, electrical, and machine drawing. Covers allowances, tolerance, fits, symbols, standards, and references. Recent developments and commercial practices in the field are discussed. Prerequisite: Engineering 121.

131

ENGINEERING MATERIALS

3 Cr.

A study of the manufacturing and properties of materials used by engineers-alloys, metals, cement, clay products, fuels, etc.,-and also where each material is used in industry. Prerequisites: High school chemistry or Chemistry 101; bigh school physics or Physics 101 ; Mathematics 101 recommended.

ENGLISH 091

READING AND COMPOSITION

3 Cr.

Intensive practice in written expression, under careful superVISIon, with individual assistance from the instructor. This course gives training in all phases of English composition-grammar, spelling, sentence construction, diction, and organization of ideas. Prerequisite: None.

092

READING AND COMPOSITION

3 Cr.

Continuation of English 091 with more emphasis on diction and paragraph unity. Prerequisite: None.

54

095

Cuyahoga Community College

READING IMPROVEMENT

3 Cr.

Principles underlying efficient reading applied in daily practice; group instruction in the skills involved in comprehension, vocabulary, study techniques, and rate of purposeful reading on the college level. Prerequisite: None.

101

COLLEGE

COMPOSITION

3 Cr.

An 'introduction to provocative essays and to expository writing assignments developed from the readings. For students who have achieved satisfactorily in high school. Prerequisite: Placement by counselor.

102

COLLEGE

COMPOSITION

3 Cr.

A continuation of English 101. Emphasis will be placed on analytical writing, the research paper, and the reading and interpretation of selected literary works. Prerequisite: English 101.

221

BRITISH

LITERATURE

3 Cr.

Study of major works of British literature through the 17th century. The course will include selections by Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton. Prerequisite: English 102.

222

BRITISH

LITERATURE

3 Cr.

Study of major works of British literature from the 18th century to the present. Among the major authors included are Swift, Pope, Wordsworth, Keats, Carlyle, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Shaw. Prerequisite: English 102.

231

AMERICAN LITERATURE

3 Cr.

Reading and analysis of ma.jor literary works of Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson, and Whitman. Prerequisite: English 102.

232

AMERICAN LITERATURE

3 Cr.

Reading and analysis of major literary works of Melville, Dreiser, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Frost and others. Prerequisite: English 102.

251

WORLD LITERATURE

3 Cr.

Reading and discussion of the major literary works from the time of ancient Greece to the present, including Homer, Sophocles, Lucretius, Dante, and Cervantes. Prerequisite: English 102.

252

WORLD LITERATURE

3 Cr.

Reading and discussion of major literary works from the 17th century to the present. The course includes Moliere, Rousseau, Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Gide, Mann, and Sartre. Prerequisite: English 102.

Foreign Languages

55

FOREIGN LANGlJAGES FRENCH 101

FRENCH

Instruction in beginning French with emphasis on oral-aural composition, grammar, and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in English 101.

102

FRENCH

4 Cr. practic~',

4 Cr.

Students continue their study of the structure of French through the memorization of dialogues and through reading of excerpts from French literature. Although the audio-lingual approa~h is stressed, the main objective is facility in written French. Prerequisite: French 101 or two years of high school French.

201

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH

4 Cr.

Introduction to more advanced vocabulary, idiomatic phrases, and sentence structure as a preparation for understanding and appreciation of original French writings: continued drill with audio~lingual materials fol' comprehension and improvement or speed patterns. Prerequisite: French 102 or three yeats of high school French.

202

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH

4 Cr.

Further review of the grammar and syntactical patterns of the language. Intensive and extensive reading of modern French literature. Development of speaking and writing skills by means of oral and written discussion of readings. Some coverage of high points of literary history. Prerequisite: French 201 or four years of high school French.

GERMAN 101

GERMAN

4 Cr.

Instruction in beginning German emphasizing reading, speaking, writing, grammar, and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in English 101.

102

GERMAN

4 Cr.

~his

course completes the study of elementary grammar. It includes readings consisting of selections dealing with contributions in various areas of knowledge. Further study of German civilization and modern developments in Germany. It continues the learning of folk songs and poetry. Additional emphasis is given to oral facility. Prerequisite: German 101, or two years of high school German.

201

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN

4 Cr.

An introduction to German thought through cultural readings in addition to selected grammar review. Opportunity to increase ability to read and express oneself orally in German. Oral and written resumes, free compositions, and conversations. Prerequisite: German 102 or three years of high school German.

56

202

Cuyahoga Community College

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN

4 Cr.

CDntinuation of German 201. Reading interpretation of more difficul,t prose. Increasing stress on conversation and free cDmposition. Prerequisite: German 201 Dr four years Df high school German.

RUSSIAN

101

RUSSIAN

4 Cr.

An introduction to modern Russian. Study of a new simplified alphabet and practice Df writing in Russian. The basic principles of grammar are studied in logical sequence with emphasis on pronunciation and translation from Russian into English. Students read a variety of selections dealing with certain aspects of Russian culture and civilization. Prerequisite: Eligible to enrDll in English 101.

102

RUSSIAN

4 Cr.

This course continues the study of elementary Russian. It provides additiDnal training in Dral and written compositiDn and continues the reading of elementary Russian texts. Further study of Russian civilization is alsD included. Prerequisi te: Russian 101, Dr two years of high school Russian.

201

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN

4 Cr.

Reading Df stories in Driginal Russian by well-knDwn 19th and 20th century writers; excerpts on Russian histDry, civilization, and thought; written and oral discussion of material in Russian; review Df grammar, vocabulary, and idioms; oral reports and cDnversatiDns in Russian Dn subject of student's choice. Prerequisite: Russian 102 or three years Df high schoDI Russian.

202

INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN

4 Cr.

OpPDrtunity to increase ability tD read and express oneself in Russian. Further reading in Driginal Russian of literary masterpieces. Review Df grammar; Dral reports in Russian Dn a bDDk of student's choice, by an Dutstanding Russian writer. Prerequisite: Russian 201 or four years of high school Russian.

SPANISH

101

SPANISH

4 Cr.

The essentials of the language fDr understanding, speaking, reading, and writing; designed primarily for beginners. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in English 101.

102

SPANISH

4 Cr.

This CDurse is based upon the reading and interpretation of idiomatic Spanish prose, with a further study of pronunciatiDn and review Df the fundamentals of Spanish grammar. Additional emphasis is given tD Dral facility. Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or two years of high school Spanish.

History 201

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH

57 4 Cr.

Essentials of grammar are reviewed and extended. Reading materials are selected from the writings of 'Spanish and Spanish-A1Jlerican authors. The student is introduced to the fundamentals of formal composition. Reading selections furnish a point of departure for extensive conversation in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or three years of high school Spanish.

202

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH

4 Cr.

Continuation of Spanish 201. Greater emphasis on more advanced, representative Spanish and Spanish-American literature. Further development of conversational ability and original writings based on selected topics. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or four years of high school Spanish.

GEOGRAPHY 101

GEOGRAPHY

3 Cr.

An introductory study of the physical elements of geography including earth-sun relationships, maps, elements and controls of climate, landforms and the agents, erosion and deposition, water resourc:es, vegetation, associations, and soil types. World distribution, causal relationships, and significance to men are stressed. Prerequisite: None.

102

WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY

3 Cr.

R.egions and nations of the world: geographical environment (landforms, climates, soils, vegetation, minerals, peoples), human activities, land-use patterns, resource appraisal, and problems of cultural and political differences. Prerequisite: None.

HEALTH 101

HEALTH

EDUCATION

3 Cr.

An 'introductory course in which the meaning and scope of health is considered with regard to personal, family, and community health. Primary focus is given to physical, emotional, and social factors. Prerequisite: None.

HISTORY 101

MAN AND CIVILIZATION

3 Cr.

Designed to provide students with knowledge of the sequence of historic events and the nature of the world's cultural heritage from ancient Eurasian times to the present. The course stresses the legacies of medieval times, the Reformation, the Enlightenment and French Revolution, cultural developments of the course for literature, the arts, and the social sciences. Prerequisite: None.

58

102

Cuyahoga Community College

3 Cr.

MAN AND CIVILIZATION

The cultural, social, and political development of Western Europe from 1648 and its expansion throughout the world. Primary emphasis is on the conflict of cultures of the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisi te: History 101.

103

3 Cr.

HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA

A study of the political, social, and economic development of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the development of Nationalism. Prerequisite: None.

104

3 Cr.

HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA

A survey of the development of the various national states with special consideration of the social and political affairs of the 20th century. Prerequisite: History 103.

151

UNITED STATES HISTORY TO

1865

3 Cr.

Covers American developm:mt from discovery, colonial foundations, movement for independence, and early years of the Republic to the end of the Civil War. Prerequisite: None.

152

UNITED STATES HISTORY,

1865

Covers 'the period from the Civil on the economic, social, cultural, ment. Considers the impact of two on international relations, leading power. Prerequisite: History 151.

201

TO PRESENT

3 Cr.

War to the present with emphasis intellectual, and political developworld wars on national affairs and to America's position as a global

HISTORY OF RUSSIA

3 Cr.

Discusses the growth, development, and decline of the Kievan State; the evolution of the Muscovite tsardom and the expansion of the Russian Empire to 1917. Considers geo-political, social, cultural and intellectual developments, emphasizing the theory of tsardom, which led to the emergence of a distinct civilization in Russia. Prerequisite: History 101.

202

INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN HISTORY

3 Cr.

A general survey of African History with special emphasis on political, economic, and social problems of the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: History 101.

251

ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

3 Cr.

A study of economic factors in American History and their impact on social, economic, and political life. Prerequisi te : None.

Industrial Supervision

59

HOME ECONOMICS 121

NUTRITION

2 Cr.

An introduction to the basic principles of nutntIOn and common nutritional factors underlying good health, weight control, and the understanding of a balanced diet. Good composition and the nutritional aspects of good preparation will be explored. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101 recommended.

151

HOME

MANAGEMENT

3 Cr.

A study of household practices and organization of resources for the achievement of a successful family life. Prerequisite: None.

INDUSTRIAL SUPERVISION (Other courses are being developed in this curriculum.) 021

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

3 Cr.

Responsibilities of supervision in industry, such as organization, duties, human relations, grievances, training, rating, promotion, qualityquantity control, and management-employee relations. Prerequisite: None.

*025

BASIC PSYCHOLOGY FOR SUPERVISORS

3 Cr.

A study of modern concepts for human relations aspeots of supervision as interpreted by basic psychological principles of behavior. Employee attitudes, morale and the supervisor-employee inter-relationship will be discussed. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 021.

*026

INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 Cr.

An introduction to the faotors of motivation, frustration, conflict, monotony, fatigue, morale, attitude formation and change of workers in a work environment. Prerequisite: Industrial Supervision 025.

060

PRODUCTION CONTROL

3 Cr.

Planning for production, forecasting, estimating, manufacturing and tool planning, materials handling, scheduling, controlling production, inven tory, dispatching, reporting progress and completion of work. Prerequisite: None.

065

QUALITY CONTROL

3 Cr.

Principles underlying various types of control charts and sampling tables. Why these methods work, how to interpret their results and how to decide which method is applicable in any particular case. Prerequisite: None.

60

Cuyahoga Community College

JOURNALISM 121

3 Cr.

NEWS WRITING AND REPORTING

Nature and function of the mass media-career opportunities. Journalistic principles, gathering materials, and writing news stories. Principal ideas confronting journalists and their newspapers. Special attention devoted to the large and contemporary papers. Foundation for further study in Journalism. Prerequisite: English 101 or concurrent enrollment in English 101.

122

3 Cr.

NE'WS WRITING AND REPORTING

A continuation of Journalism 121 with greater emphasis upon writing for the various forms of news media. Prerequisite: Journalism 121.

123-124-125-126

STAFF PRACTICE

1-1-1-1 Cr.

Class laboratory experience in assembling, making-up, and publishing the college newspaper, The Commuter. Detailed analysis of the effectiveness of the news stories written and published and the over-all presentation of the college newspaper is made weekly. Students enrolled are assigned to the Commuter student newspaper staff. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Journalism 121, 122, 201, or 202.

201

3 Cr.

NEWS EDITING

Copy desk methods are continued, and copy and proof reading, headline writing, newspaper make-up, and newspaper style are studied. Newspaper law, including libel, right of privacy, and press privilege, is introduced. Editorial writing, problems and policy are discussed, and major contemporary American newspapers are examined. Prerequisites: Journalism 121 and 122.

202

FEATURE WRITING

3 Cr.

The study, planning, and writing of factual articles for newspaper and magazine publication. Study is made of current markets for popular, trade, specialized, and other types of publications. Articles are submitted to markets. Personalities in the field of publication are introduced to the class. Prerequisites : Journalism 121 and 122.

LAW ENFORCEMENT (Other courses are being developed in this curriculum.) *020

PRINCIPLES

OF

LAW ENFORCEMENT

3 Cr.

History of law enforcement; includes the development and objectives of American police systems, special services, and jurisdiction of federal, state, and local enforcement agencies; qualifications necessary for becoming a peace officer; opportunities in law enforcement work; personnel selection, training. Prerequisite: None.

Mathematics

*024

'EVIDENCE AND CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

61

S Cr.

Rules of evidence of particular importance at the operational level in law enforcement, and criminal procedures in areas such as arrest, force, search, and seizure. Supreme Court decisions affecting law enforcement will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 020.

*044

ADMINISTRATIVE CONCEPTS IN LAW ENFORCEMENT

3 Cr.

Principles of organization and management in law enforcement agencies with emphasis on evaluation techniques of administrative devices. Prerequisite: Law Enforcement 020.

MATHEMATICS 091

COLLEGE ARITHMETIC

3 Cr.

Th~e

principles of arithmetic, including fundamental operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals; percentage and its applications in the world of business;路 rational numbers, exponents, and powers. Prerequisite: None.

095

BASIC ALGEBRA

3 Cr.

The techniques and reasoning of algebra. Emphasis on a study of the fundamental operations, solution of equations, and the development, learning, and using of formulas in the solution of problems; introduction of the quadratic equation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 091 or equivalent.

101

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA

3 Cr.

The linear equations and linear functions, quadratic equations and quadratic functions, exponents and radicals, mathematical induction, the binomial theorem, complex numbers, theory of equations, and introduction to series. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or Mathematics 095.

103

TRIGONOMETRY

3 Cr.

The trigonometric functions with emphasis on theory and application. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or Mathematics 095. One year plane geometry is recommended.

115

COLLEGE ALGEBRA

3 Cr.

Sets, functions, inequalities, theory of equations, curve tracing, determinants, permutations, combinations, binomial theorem, sequences, mathematical induction, complex numbers, and probability. Prer:equisite: One and a half years of high school algebra or Mathematics 101. One year of plane geometry is recommended.

121

ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS

3 Cr.

Review of exponents, radicals, quadratic equations; theory of equations, absolute value and inequalities. Binomial theorem, mathematical induction; infinite series and introduction to limits; trigonometric functions, identities and equations; complex numbers, cartesian and polar coordinates; introduction to conic sections. Prerequisite: Mathematics 115, or four years of high school mathematics.

62

151

Cuyahoga Community College

5 Cr.

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS

Functions and limits, differentiation and integration of algebraic functions, and analytic geometry (including cones) applications. Prerequisite: One and a half years high school algebra, one year plane geometry, and half year trigonometry.

152

5 Cr.

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS

Continuation of Mathematics 151. Transcendental functions, methods of integration, hyperbolic functions, vector topics in analytic geometry, improper integrals, polar coordinates, and infinite series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 151.

221

ELEMENTARY PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

3

Cr.

A study of probability with statistical applications. Empirical study of varibility. Permutations, combinations, and the binomial theorem. Sets and sample spaces. Theory of probability for finite sample spaces. Random varibles. Joint and continuous distributions. Binomial and normal distributions. Measures of central tendency and variability. Sampling, hypothesis testing, curve fitting, correlation to the regression equation. Practical applications, the collection and analyzing of original data in terms of the above concepts. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101.

251

5 Cr.

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS

Continuation of Mathematics 152. Vectors and solid analytic geometry, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 152.

252

3 Cr.

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS

Continuation of Mathematics 251. Multiple integrals, ordinary differential equations, infinite series including Fourier series, introduction to functions of a complex variable. Prerequisite: Mathematics 251.

MECHANICAL TECHNOLOGY (Other courses are being developed 020

EMPLOYMENT ORIENTATION

III

this curriculum.) 1

Cr.

A series of lectures and plant visits to orient the students to mechanical technician work activity. Prerequisite: None.

025

MACHINE TOOLS

3

Cr.

An introduction to the application of tools and machines and their basic functions and purposes. Consideration is given to types of machine tools, construction, operation and adaptability. Prerequisite: None.

Music

030

MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

63

3 Cr.

The fundamental processes in ore reduction and steel making, heat treating methods and the effect of alloys, ferrous and non-ferrous casting processes; foundry practices, forging of metals, ceramics, glass and plastics production. Protective coating, welding, and plastic bondings are discussed. Prerequisite: None.

035

ApPLIED MECHANICS

3 Cr.

Composition, resolution, and equilibrium of coplanar force systems, simple stress calculations, frames, continuously distributed loads, movements of areas, beam stresses. Algebraic and graphic methods are employed. Prerequisite: Mechanical Technology 025.

MEDICAL ASSISTANT (Other courses are being developed in this curriculum.) 020

MEDICAL TECHOLOGY

2 Cr.

An introduction to medical terms and their usage with emphasis on correct spelling and pronunciation. Prerequisite: None.

025

INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL LABORATORY MEDICINE

3 Cr.

General principles of clinical laboratory practice. Detailed consideration of the methods used to analyze urine and blood and the importance of these analyses to the physician. Prerequisite: None.

040

CLINICAL LABORATORY

6 Cr.

Training and practice in the use of the microscope and the routine analysis of urine. Emphasis is placed on accuracy and efficiency in this analysis. Prerequisite: Medical Assistant 025.

MUSIC 101

MUSIC FOR ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

3 Cr.

A study of music 'in the elementary school curriculum. Emphasis is placed on creating a musical environment in the classroom; the child voice; study of basic theory (the piano keyboard, notation, musical symbols and terms, major and minor scales, simple and compound meter, intervals, etc.); use of the autoharp, fiutop'hone, and rhythm instruments; baton technique; presentation of lessons in singing, rhythms, notation and listening. Designed to orient future elementary teachers to the role of music in the growth and development of children. Prerequisite: None.

64

103

Cuyahoga Community College

MUSIC ApPRECIATION

3 Cr.

Designed especially for non-music majors. A study of basic materials of music, form, and style. Lectures, illustrations, live musical performances and extensive listening to recordings are used. The historical development of music is shown through a study of the works of composers from the 17th century to the present day. The course also assists the student in a better understanding of music literature. Prerequisite: None.

105

MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE

3 Cr.

A chronological survey of the main progressive ideas of music from primitive stages to the Baroque period. The basic characteris't'ics of primitive, oriental, Greek, early Christian Church, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque cultures will be studied in general and in their specific musical manifestations. Historic compositions will be analyzed from the page and from recorded examples. Principles of sound musicological research will be stressed. Prerequisite: Some technical background in music.

106

MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE

3 Cr.

A chronological survey of music trends, composers, and works from the Classic period through the Romantic, Nationalistic, Impressionistic, and Expressionistic periods to contemporary styles. Prerequisite: Music 105.

107

3 Cr.

HARMONY

Beginning theory and musicianship for music majors: basic terminology, major and minor scales, intervals, triads, primary and secondary chords, root positions and inversions, dominant sevenths, non-chord tones, secondary dominants, rythmic reading, and notation. Theory and application. Prerequisite: None.

108

3 Cr.

HARMONY

Review of Music 103. Modulations, diminished-seventh chords, augmented-sixth chords, neapolitan sixth chords, raised supertonic and submediant chords, ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords. Theory and application .. Prerequisite: Music 107.

111-112-211-212

CHOIR

1-1-1-1 Cr.

Concentration on vocal problems and techniques; development of standard repertoire for mixed voices, both sacred and secular, accompanied and unaccompanied. School and public performances are required. This course may be repeated for a total of four semesters of credit. Prerequisite: Admission by audition.

151-152

BEGINNING PIANO

2-2 Cr.

Basic techniques consisting of exercises to develop technical facility, transposition,improvisation of simple accompaniments to given melodies, sight reading, memorization, repertoire, and basic theory. Prerequisite: Students should have access to a piano for practicing.

Philosophy

251-252

65

2-2 Cr.

INTERMEDIATE PIANO

Building of a repertoire consisting of smaller compositions by composers from the Baroque period to the 20th Century. Attention is given to good tone and the building of technique through finger exercises, scales and arpeggios. Students should have access to a piano for practicing. Prerequisite: Music 152 or permission of the instructor.

NURSING (Other courses are being developed

021

FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING

In

this curriculum.)

4 Cr.

This course is to orient the student to the what, why, and how of nursing and to develop a basic knowledge of normal health n:eeds, basic skills and procedures necessary to good nursing care. Prerequisite: None.

025

MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING

15 Cr.

This course includes classroom theory and clinical practice using the patient centered problem solving approach to meet the total nursing needs of patients with medical-surgical conditions. Prerequisite: Nursing 021.

030

MATERNITY NURSING

6 Cr.

This course helps the student to develop a workable knowledge and skills in family centered maternity nursing. Prerequisi te : Nursing 021.

PHILOSOPHY 101

INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

3 Cr.

Introduction to the subject of philosophy through the study and discussion of the contributions of great thinkers. Prerequisite: None.

*201

COMPARATIVE WORLD RELIGION

3 Cr.

A comparative study of the salient ideas of the world's major religions including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shintoism, and others. Prerequisite: None.

203

INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC

3 Cr.

The basic rules and systems of formal logic with particular attention given to syllogisms and the elements of modern symbolic logic concepts of mathematics, scientific reasoning, and language usage are stressed. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101.

66

Cuyahoga Community College

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 101-102-201-202

1-1-1-1 Cr.

SPORTS SKILLS

An active course designed to develop basic skills and knowledge of seasonal sports, basketball, volleyball, hockey, softball, etc. Prerequisite : None.

111-112

1-1 Cr.

BEGINNING SWIMMING

Instruction and practice in the fundamental swimming strokes with emphasis on over-all knowledge of strokes and deep water safety. Prerequisite: None.

113

SENIOR LIFE SAVING

(Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Review of standard strokes and simple diving. Preparation for and completion of tests for American Red Cross Life Saving Certificate. Prerequisite: Ability to dive from edge of pool and swim 440 yards using a variety of strokes.

115

1 Cr.

ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION

For students unable to participate in regular physical education activities because of temporary or permanent limitations. The programs of individual exercises or recreational games are determined by student limitations and specific remedial conditions. Prerequisite: None.

121-122

SOCIAL DANCING

(Coeducational)

1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in the fundamental steps of the fox trot, cha eha cha, waltz, and other popular dances. Prerequisite: None.

151

GAMES AND RHYTHMS FOR THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

2 Cr.

A course covering the physical, social, and psychological characteristics of the elementary school child. Classification, organization, and study of games and rhythms as they apply to ,the school situation. Students are given practice in teaching games and rhythms suitable for playground and elementary schools. This course is also appropriate for students planning to teach mentally retarded and pre-school children. Prerequisite: None.

153-154

RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP

1-1 Cr.

A basic course for playground directors and recreation leaders. The organization and administration of community school recreation programs are s,tudied. Stress is placed on training in leadership techniques and the development of programs of recreation. Opportunities for observing on-going programs are provided. Prerequisite: None.

211-212

INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING

(Men and Women)

1-1 Cr.

Instruction and practice in swimming strokes with emphasis on development of form and endurance. Prerequisite: Ability to swim in deep water.

Physics

67

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 101

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

3 Cr.

A unified, elementary, non-mathematical description of the physical universe. Emphasis is placed on scientific methods and the history, development, and contribution of our culture of scientific concepts related to energy, matter, space, and time; includes study of manifestations of energy, changes in and structure of matter, the Earth and the Universe. Prerequisite: None.

102

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

3 Cr.

Basic concepts of astronomy, meteorology, and geology. A continuation of the general course for the nonscience major designed to improve understanding of his physical surroundings. Prerequisite: Physical Science 101.

PHYSICS 101-102

INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS

4-4 Cr.

An introduction to physics which includes mechanics of forces and motion, heat, electricity and magnetism, sound, wave motion geometric optics, and atomic and nuclear structure. The development of physics and analytical thinking and methods of measurement are emphasized. This course is designed for the non-science major, pre-programmed students, and as preparation for Physics 121. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 2 hours. Prerequisite: Two years of high school mathematics including algebra and geometry. Physics 101 is a prerequisite for Physics 102.

121

ENGINEERING

PHYSICS

4 Cr.

First semester of a three semester sequence, beginning with the study of mechanics. Lecture 3 hours, problem section 2 hours. This sequence is designed primarily for engineering and other majors requiring a thorough physics background. Prerequisite: Mathematics 151 or taken concurrently. High school physics is recommended.

221

ENGINEERING

PHYSICS

4 Cr.

A continuation of Physics 121. Heat, thermodynamics, electricity, and magnetism are treated in lecture. The first semester of laboratory is given. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 121, 'Mathematics 152, or taken concurrently.

222

ENGINEERING

PHYSICS

4 Cr.

A continuation of Physics 221. Optics, atomic and nuclear physics are treated in the lectures. A second semester of laboratory is given. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 221, Mathematics 251, or taken concurrently.

68

Cuyahoga Community College

POLITICAL SCIENCE 101

INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT

3 Cr.

The nature, purpose, and forms of the American government; the relationship between function and structure; the dynamics of political change and the outstanding governmental problems of modern society. Prerequisite: None.

102

INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT

3 Cr.

A comparative study of the major governments of the modern world in terms of their institutions, ideologies, political habits, and foreign policies. Prerequisite: Political Science 101.

201

CONTEMPORARY WORLD AFFAIRS

3 Cr.

A problem study of modern international relations and of the forces which confront policy makers. Special emphasis is placed upon current areas of crisis. This course is designed primarily for those students who need a basic understanding of the United States in a tense and highly competitive political world. Prerequisite: History 101 and 102 recommended.

PSYCHOLOGY 101

GENERAL

PSYCHOLOGY

3 Cr.

Introduction to fundamental psychological concepts derived from a scientific approach to the study of human adjustment and behavior. Prerequisite: None.

201

CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

3 Cr.

The growth, development, and guidance of the child from conception through puberty. Interpretation and significance of creativeness, adjustment abilities, and child-adult relationships. Emphasis is on both the physiological and psychological growth stages of the child. Prerequisite : Psychology 101.

203

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 Cr.

An introduction to the major psychological factors in the school learning-teaching situation. The concepts in human development related to problems in the school situation are treated. The following topics are also dealt with: the teacher's role in motivation, conceptual learning, problem solving; the development of emotional behavior, attitudes and values; learning of skills, retention and transfer; and measurement of student abilities and achievement. Prerequisite: Psychology 101. Education 101 is recommended.

Speech

69

SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY SOCIOLOGY

101

PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY

3

Cr.

Behavior of human groups; the concept of culture, folk and urban community structure, social organization and control, race, population, and deviant behavior. Prerequisite: None.

102

3

SOCIAL PROBLEMS

Cr.

The pathological approach to the study of modern American society including such specific topics as Juvenile Delinquency, Adult Crime, Alcoholism, Mental Health, 'Rural-Urban Conflict, Integration, Religions, and Racial Minority Conflicts, including the general topics of Individual and Community Disorganization, and Family. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.

121

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIFE

3

Cr.

The student investigates preparation for marr~age factors in mate selection, and personality adjustments in marnage and family life. Analysis is made of history, functions, and organization of the family; dating, courtship, engagement, marital adjustments; parent-child relations; family disorganization and programs of improvement. Prerequisite: None.

ANTHROPOLOGY

101

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

3

Cr.

Cultural patterns and dynamics. History, distributions, and growth of cultural patterns including social organization, material culture, and other topics. Prerequisite: None.

102

PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY

3

Cr.

The study of man as a physical being. The OrIgm and antiquity of man, the relationship of man to animals, paleontological discoveries, and racial phenomena. Prerequisite: None.

SPEECH 101

PRINCIPLES

OF

PUBLIC

SPEAKING

3

Cr.

Public speaking, principles oÂŁ effective oral communication, and application of these principles in a variety of practical speaking situations. Prerequisite: None.

102

ORAL INTERPRETATION

3

Cr.

Development of the student's ability to communicate prose and poetry orally with understanding and appreciation. Special emphasis is placed on the selection and cutting of worthwhile literary material, on reading aloud effectively and on good voice production and articulation. Prerequisite: Speech 101.

70

211

Cuyahoga Community College

ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE

3 Cr.

Discovering, selecting, and evaluating evidence and arranging it into orderly, persuasive, oral, and written argument. Special emphasis on causes, effects, and remedies of prejudice and the influence of language on human behavior. ' Prerequisite: None.

THEATER ARTS 101

FUNDAMENTALS OF ACTING

3 Cr.

A course planned to introduce the student to the theory and basic mechanics of vocal control and interpretation necessary for the successful study of acting. Attention is also focused on the development of bodily control and interpretation and the integration of a controlled voice and body. Pverequisite: None.

102

FUNDAMENTALS OF ACTING

3 Cr.

Stage techniques based on selected dramatic materials. Individual assignments to encourage and challenge each student within the range of his ability. Recommended for prospective drama teachers and students wishing to gain professional improvement. Prerequisite: Theater Arts 101.

103-104-203-204

REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE

1-1-1-1 Cr.

Students enrolled in this course 'Nill be organized in the form of a company for the Cuyahoga Community College drama productions. Each student will be assigned to work in accordance with his interests, talents, and the training will be comparable to an internship or apprenticeship. The following phases of a producing theater are involved: acting, directing, playwriting, business administration, and publicity. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Theater Arts 101-102 or consent of instructor.

121

HISTORY OF THEATER ARTS

3 Cr.

The history of the development of the theater. The relationship of the theater to the various cultures of the world from ancient Greece to the present day is traced. Prerequisite: None.

151

RADIO AND TV PRODUCTION

2 Cr.

Includes a survey of the broadcasting industry, its history and place in our present society; study of the areas of announcing, writing, programming, technical and advertising techniques, and audience analysis. Prerequisite: Pernlission of the instructor.

Transportation

71

TRANSPORTATION (Other courses are being developed in this curriculum.)

*021

TRANSPORTATION

3 Cr.

An introductory course in transportation and traffic management covering the American transportation system, the historical development leading to legislative supervision of the railroads and other carriers, freight traffic territories, traffic flow, freight classification, freight rates, and freight claims. Prerequisite: None.

*025

TRANSPORTATION

3 Cr.

This course covers traffic circulars, the construction and filing of tariffs, freight rates, terminal facilities, storage, weights, routing, warehousing, and material handling. Prerequisite: Transportation 021.

*030

TRANSPORTATION

3 Cr.

This course covers through-routes and rates, milling in transit, technical tariff and rate interpretation, overcharges and undercharges, loss and damage, import and export traffic, classification committee procedure, rate committee procedure. Prerequisite: Transportation 025.

The Faculty and Adminis tra ti ve Staff AGAPOS, ANGELO MIKE ..................................... Economics B.S., Miami University M.B.A., Miami University ALPERN, GERTRUDE .................................. . Political Science B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Columbia University ASAMOTO, KEN ........................................... EnRineerinR B.S. E., Fenn College BARKLEY, BILL .T •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •PsycholoRY B.S., The University of Akron Ph.D., Western Reserve University BAUMGARTNER, ROBERT L. . ................................ EnRineerinR B.S.Ed., Kent State University *BELTON, JAMES E. . ................. Chairman, Humanities Department B.S., University of Illinois A.M., University of Illinois *BENSON, ELLIS M ............................... . Dean of Instruction B.A., University of California (Berkeley) M.A., Harvard University Ed.D., University of California at Los Angeles BENTLEY, HARRIET P. . ....................................... English B.S., W.estern Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University BERKO, Roy M .............................................. . Speech B.A., Kent State University M.S., University of Michigan *BIGGINS, CLARK E .................................. . Purchasing Agent B.S.C., Ohio University BLANCO, CICELY W. . ........................................ Business B.A., University of Chicago M.A., Western Reserve University Ph.D., Netherlands School of Economics BLANCO, GALO W. . ....................................... Chemistry B.S., University of Michigan M.S., University of Michigan Ph.D., University of Wisconsin BONUTTI, KARL ............................................ Economics Diploma, Lyceum of Gorizia, Italy M.A., University of Fribourgs, Switzerland M.A., Western Reserve University BOTNICK, BERNICE ........................................... EnRlish B.A., University of Pittsburgh * full-time

75

76

Cuyahoga Community College

O ................................. . Political Science A.B., University of Nebraska A.M., University of Michigan

BRASHARES, EDITH

BRASHEAR, BARBARA ].

••••• ~ •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• English

A.B., Stetson Uni.versity M.A., Western Reserve University BROMELMEIER, JOHN H .•..•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Engineering

B.S., Case Institute of Technology M.S., Case Institute of Technology BROWN, NANCY

E .••.••••••••.•••••••••••••••••.•••••••••••••••• • Art

B.F.A., Ohio University M.A., Western Reserve University BUCKENMEYER,

MABEL

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • Business

A.B., Capital University A.M., University of Michigan M .................................. . English & SPeech A.B., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

*BUDIN, JOSEPH

*BURNSIDE, HELEN HUTCHINSON

••••••••••••

Coordinator, Health Services

B.S., Simmons College M.A., Columbia University CALIGUIRE, AUGUSTINE

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••• • History

B.S.S., John Carroll University A.M., John Carroll University L. JR. • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Psychology A.B., Cornell University M.S., Syracuse University Ph.D., University of Nebraska

CANDEE, BEN J AMIN

M ............................... . Philosophy B.S., John Carroll University L.L.B., Georgetown University Law School

CATERINO, BARTHOLOMEW

R .......................................... . Biology B.S., BowIing Green State University M.S., Wayne State University

CAUFFIEL, JAMES

CHARLES E. ................................... . President B.S., Billings Polytechnic Institute M.A., State University of Iowa Ed.D., University of California (Berkeley)

*CHAPMAN,

CHITWOOD, FRANCES

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• English

B.S.E., Arkansas State Teachers College M.A., University of Arkansas CLARK, CHARLES

A. . ......................................... Biology

B.S., Hampton InstituteM. Sc., Ohio State University D.D.S. Howard University M.S., University of Pittsburgh CLEMENS, REECE

T ......................................... . Business

A.B., B.rown University M.B.A., Western Reserve University

*

full-time

Faculty and Staff

77

CONLIN, MARY LOUISE ....................................... . Enf!.lish B.A., Western Reserve University CONQUEST, ROBERT A. . .................................. . Psychology B.S., Pennsylvania State University M.S., Western Reserve University Ph.D., Western Reserve University COOK, CULBRETH B. ..................................... . Psychology A.B., University of 'Cincinnati M.A., Western Reserve University Ed.D., Western Reserve University COPELAND, WILLIAM E. . .................................... . Business B.S. Ed., University of Akron M.S.Ed., University of Akron *CORFIAS, JOHN C ............................. Assistant to the President A.B., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University

.r. ......................... .Sociolof!.y

CORRIGAN, JOHN B.S.S., John Carroll University M.A., Kent State University

& Anthropolof!.y

COUGHANOWR, EFFIE .......................................... English B.A., University of Thesaloniki M.A., University of Illinois Ph.D., University of Illinois *DANKO, CHARLENE M. . ..................... Theater Arts & Speech B.A., University of North Carolina M.A., Western Reserve University DAVIS, SYLVESTER E .......................................... History A.B., Ohio University M.A., John Carroll University DA Y, MARGARET ............................................. Business A.B., Mount Union College M.A., Western Reserve University DODGE, JAMES K. (CAPT.) ........................... . Law Enforcement A.B., Ohio State University L.L.B., Western Reserve University DONATO, WILLIAM R ..................................... Mathematics B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., John Carroll University *DOWDING, NANCY E. . ...................................... Counselor B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Columbia University M.A., Western Reserve University Ph.D., Western Reserve University *EGERMAN, THOMAS ............................................ . Art B.A., St. John's University M.F.A., State University of Iowa EpSTEIN, MARION M. . ..................................... Fine Arts B.S., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University * full-time

78

Cuyahoga Community College

'*FAUST, GEORGE H ........................................... History A.B., Henderson State Teachers College M.A., University of Arkansas Ph.D., University of Chicago LL.B., Cleveland-Marshall School of Law FERSKY, ALLAN E. . .................................... . Mathematics B.S., Ohio State University FINKELSTEIN, SUZETTE ...................................... . English B.S., Columbia University M.A., Ohio State University FISHMAN, IRWIN S. . ......................................... Business B.S., 'Ohio State University L.L.B., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University FORDING, MARY .............................................. English B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University FRIEND, FRED W. . ................................... '........ Business B.Sc., University of Notre Dame L.L.B., Cleveland-Marshall Law School GABLE, GEORGE A. . ........................ . SociolOf[Y & Anthropology B.S.S., John Carroll University M.A., Univ:ersity of Chicago *GAINES, HAROLD L. ......................... . Sociology & Anthropology B.S., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University GASKER, HARRY R. . ......................................... English B.S.Ed., Ashland College M.A., Western Reserve University GIESEL, RICHARD T. . ..................................... . Psychology B.A., Fenn College B.D., Oberlin College M.S.T., 'Oberlin College GILLIS, RICHARD H ........................................... Business B.A., Kent State University M.A., Western Rese'rve University GINEVRA, ANNAROSA ........................................ . Business B.S.Ed., Kent State University GOCKEL, LAWRENCE J. .................................. . Mathematics B.A., Oberlin College GOKAY, MARGARET W. . ...................................... . Enf[lish B.A., College of Mt. St. Joseph M.A., Marquette University GOLD, RONALD ALLEN ........................................ English B.A., Dartmouth College L.L.B., Western Reserve University '* full-time

Faculty and Staff

79

GONZE, VICTOR JR ........................................... Business B.S., Youngstown University Ed.M., Kent State University GRAVES, FREDERICK D ........................................ Business B.S., Bluefield State College M.S., University of Michigan Ed.D., Western Reserve University GROSSMAN, DANIEL A ........................ . Sociology & Anthropology B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., University of Michigan GRUMBLING, BOYD C. . .................................. . Mathematics B.A., Ohio University B.S., Ohio Universi!ty M.A., Bowling Green State University HAKOJARVI, AILI ................................... . Home Economics B.Sc., Ohio State University M.Sc., Western Reserve University *HALL, CARL L ..................................... . Business Manager B.S., Ohio State University HAMLET, DOROTHY .......................................... Business B.S., Alabama State College M.A., Fisk University L.L.B., Cleveland-Marshall Law School L.L.M., Cleveland-Marshall Law School HARRIS, HERBERT L. . .................................... . EngineerinR B.S., Bowling Green State University M.Ed.,Bowling Green State University *HENDERSHOTT, MARCUS .................................... . Biology B.S., University of Michigan M.S., University of Michigan HEWITT, JAMES H. JR. . ..................................... Business B.B.A., Western Reserve University M.B.A., Western Reserve University HEWITT, WILLIAM H ................................ . Law Enforcement B.S., Michigan State University *HILLILA, RUTH-EsTHER ...................................... . Music B.S., Lowell State M.A., Boston University Ph.D., Boston University HOLMGREN, DANIEL Moo ...................................... . History A.B., Chico State College M.A., W,estern Reserve University Ph.D., Western Reserve University HOPPER, ALLEN T. . ............................................ Math B.S., Allegheny College M.S., West Virginia University * full-time

80

Cuyahoga Community College

HURLEY, JOHN A .............................. . Education & Psychology B.A., Marshall College M.A., Marshall College *JEFFERSON, CURTIS F. . ................................ . Mathematics B.S., Paul Quinn College M.A., Denver University M.S., Notre Dame University JEFFERY, TOBA .............................................. English B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University *JOHNSON, EUGENE B....................................... Cou,nselor B.A., University of Iowa M.A., University of Iowa JULIUS, ANTHONY 'L. JR .................................. . Mathematics A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University B.S., Massachuset<ts Institute of Technology M.S., Ohio State University Ph.D., St. Louis University *KALE, LESTER W. . ...................................... Engineering B.M.E., Ohio State University B.LE., Ohio State University KALL, JOSEPH E. . ........................................... History B.F.A., Ohio University B.Sc., Ohio University M.A., Ohio University *KARCH, RICHARD P. . ...................................... Counselor B.S., George Williams College M.A., Michigan S'tate University KINSLER, DAVID M ........................................ . Economics B.S., University of Chicago M.A., University of Chicago KLOOS, LEO J. ................................... .Business & Sociology B.A., Duquesne University M.A., Catholic University of America *KUECHLE, RICHARD T .................................. . Mathematics B.S., Ohio State University M.A., Ohio State University KOHL, JAMES A ............................................. . English A.B., Western Reserve University M.A., University of Delaware KOOYMAN, H. W ........................................... . Business A.B., Ohio State University *KORAL, JOHN J. ............................................. Biology B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University *KOSTER, SHIELA M ......................................... . E,nglish B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., University of Denver

*

full-time

Faculty and Staff

81

KUHAR, ELIZABETH G. . ....................................... English A.B., 'Notre Dame College M.A., Western Reserve University LANGE, FREDERICK B. . ........................................ English A.B., University of Pittsburgh M.A., University of Pittsburgh D.Ed., University of Pittsburgh *LAUGHLIN, ETHELREDA .................................... Chemistry A.B., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University Ph.D., Western Reserve University LAWSON, JOHN L ....................................... . Mathematics B.S., University of Chicago M.S., 'Massachusetts Institute of Technology LEVINE, DAVID ........................................... . Philosophy B.A., Western Reserve University LEWANDOWSKI, JOSEPH M. JR ............................. Mathematics B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., Western Reserve University M.S., Western Reserve University LEWIS, RONALD ALLAN ..................................... . Business B.A., Ohio Wesleyan B.S., Kent State University M.Ed., Kent State University LISOWSKI, RAYMOND ...................................... Engine,ering B.S., Eastern Michigan University M.Ed., Kent State University LOESCHEN, BERNHARD A ............................. Foreign Languages A.B., University of Illinois B.B., University of Illinois B.D., Wartburg Theological Seminary LOEWE, RALPH E. . ............................................ English B.A., Ohio University M.A., Columbia University *LORION, JAMES E. . ............... Assista,nt Dean, Admissions & Records B.A., Michigan State University M.A., University of Michigan MACKERT, FRANKLIN M ...................................... . Business B.S., Bloomsburg State College M.A., Western Reserve University MARKS, BISSELL E. . ....................................... Psychology B.A., Ashland College B.S., Ashland College M.Ed., Kent State University *MATTHEWS, RICHARD D. . ............................... '.... English B.A., Ohio State University M.A., Ohio State University McINTYRE, WILLIAM F. . ..................................... Business B.B.A., John Carroll University

*

full-time

82

Cuyahoga Community College

McLELLAN, JOHN M ....................................... Philosophy B.S., Western Reserve University *MCWHINNEY, W. RUSSELL ................................. Librarian B.A., University of Pittsburgh M.A., University of Pittsburgh M.S., Western Reserve University MENDELSON, MARY ADELAIDE ................................. . History A.B., Radcliffe College M.A., University of Michigan METZ, HARVEY V. . .......................................... Business B.S., Ohio State University MICHNYAK, NESTOR A ....................................... . English B.S., Ferris State College M.A., University of Michigan MIKLIS, EMILY .............................................. Business B.B.A., Western Reserve University MILLER, DAVID M. . .......................................... English B.Ph., University of Chicago L.L.B., Western Reserve University MITCHELL, DAVID C. . ....................................... Business B.B.A., Fenn College M.B.A., Western Reserve University MOLLS, FRANK B........................................ . Mathematics B.S., Kent State University M.S., Case Insti,tute of Technology MONASTRO, CARL JOSEPH .................................... . Business B.S., John Carroll University B.A., John Carroll University M.B.A., Western Reserve University MONTGOMERY, JAMES W. JR .................................... Physics A.B., Kenyon College M.S., Western Reserve University MORGENSTERN, JUNE R ................. Psychology & Physical Education B.S., WeSitern Reserve University M.S., "Western Reserve University NAUTH, GEORGE D .......................................... Metallurgy B.Ch.E., Pratt Institute NEWTON, L.ESLEY ........................................... Education B.S., 'Western Reserve University *NIXON, HESTOR H .......................................... Business A.B., Simpson College M.S., New York University O'MALLEY, PATRICK J. (CAPT.) ....................... . Law Enforcement Cert., Northwestern University (Police Administration) Cert., Keeler Polygraph Institute (Polygraph Examiner) * full-time

Faculty and Staff

83

OWEN S, LOVID ............................................... Business B.S., Ohio State University M.A., Ohio State University *PALMER, JOHN W. H ......................................... Business B.S., Kent State! University M.S., Kent State University PAPSIDERO, JOSEPH A .......................................... Health Ed.B., University of Buffalo Ed.M., University of Buffalo M.P.H., University of North Carolina PARILLA, ROBERT E .......................................... Chemistry B.S., Kent State University PARKER, BEN ............................................... . Business B.A., Western Reserve University M.B.A., Western Reserve University PAVEY, ELEANOR ............................................. Business B.B.A., Western Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University PECK, CORDA ................................................. English A.B., Mount Union College M.A., Western Reserve University *PICKUP, ANDREW T ........................................ Psychology B.A., Bowling Green State University M.A., Bowling Green State University PI-SUNYER, MARY JANE R ................................ . A.nthropology A.B., Radcliffe College A.M., Radcliffe College PLAVAC, GEORGE N ............................................ Business B.B.A., John Carroll University L.L.B., Cleveland-Marshall School of Law L.L.M., Cleveland-Marshall School of Law POMERANTZ, SHERWIN B. ................................... Engineering B.Ind.E., New York University M.S., University of Illinois POORE, RICHARD J ............................................. English A.A., Armstrong Junior College B.A., Monmouth College M.S., University of Wisconsin *PORTER, JACK O ........................................ . Mathematics B.S., Parsons College M.A., State College of Iowa POSNER, JOSEPH ............................................. Business Cert., Pace College of Shorthand Reporting RAPHAEL, ALAN .......................................... Engi.neering B.A., University of Chicago B.Arch., Western Reserve University * full-time

84

Cuyahoga Community College

*READER, HARRY G. . ........................... . History & Geography B.A., San Francisco State College M.A., University of California (Berkeley) RICHARD, HAROLD V .......................................... . History B.S.S., John Carroll University M.A., John Carroll University *ROBENSTINE, JAMES D ....................................... . Business B.S., Kent State University M.B.A., Kent State University ROGOFF, ANITA S ................................................ . Art B.S., Western Reserve University M.A., Western &elServe University RUDY, GRANVILLE B .......................................... . Biology B.S., Fairmount State College M.S., West Virginia University *RUSK, EVELYN H .............................. Administrative Assistant B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University SACKS, SUSAN J .............................................. . English B.A., Northwestern University M.A., Western Reserve Uniy,ersity SASLAW, ROBERT L .......................................... Electricity B.S., Case Institute of Technology M.S., Case Institute of Technology SAVA, ELEANOR M ......................................... Mathematics B.S., City College of NeW' York M.S., Case Institute of Technology -l('SCHADED, DIANE T .......................................... . English A.B., LOl1etto Heights College M.A., John Carroll University SCHMELZER, JEROME H ............................. Journalism & English B.A., Columbia College M.S., Columbia College SCHREGARDUS, FORREST P ........................ Electricity & Metallurgy B.S., Case Insti,tute of Technology *SCOTT, JAMES A ............................................. English B.A., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University SCOTT, JOHN B.......................................... . Mathematics B.A., Hiram College SCRUGGS, CHARLES E ................................... Political Science A.B., University of Akron A.M., Kent State University A.M., Western Reserve University Ph.D., Western Reserve University SELMAN, ELMER J ............................................ . Business A.B., Western Reserve University L.L.B., Western Reserve University

*

full-time

Facuity and Staff

85

SELZMAN, ROBERT M .................................. . Political Science B.A., Ohio State University M.A., Western Reserve University *SHANBERG, MORTON S ...................... . Assistant Dean, Instruction B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College M.A., State University of Iowa Ed.D., Western Reserve University *SIMON, LINDA R. . ....................................... '..... Nurse B.S., Western Reserve University R.N., Western Reserve University *SIMON, MAY K ..................................... Foreign Languages B.A., Hunter College M.A., Western Reserve University SOBEL, RONALD M ............................................. History B.A., Fenn College M.A., Western Reserve University *SPETSERIS, DOROTHY E ...................................... . English B.A., Mount Union College M.A., Western Reserve Universiry SPOTTS, L,EON H. . ....................................... Mathematics A.B., University of Pennsylvania B.H.L., The Gratz College Ph.D., The Dropsie College STEVENS, DANIEL S .................................... Physical Science B.S., University of Rochester M.S., University of Chicago Ph,D., University of Chicago STOTTER, RUTH .............................................. . English B.S., Western Reserve Univer~ity *SUTTON, FRED C ....................... D,rector of Technical Education Ph.B., University of Chicago B.A., State University of Iowa M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh Ed.D., Wayne State University SWACK, HARVEY .............................................. Business B.S., Ohio State University M.A." Ohio State University *SWANK, DONALD ............................ . Dean, Student Perso,nnel A.B., Wabash College M.S., Purdue University Ph.D., Purdue University SWANSON, EDWARD J .......................................... Business Fenn College, Technical Institute *TSOLAINOS, JOHN N ........................................ Counselor B.S., Western 'Reserve University M.A., Western Reserve University * full-time

86

Cuyahoga Community College

VACHA, FREDERICK B •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • Speech

B.S., Kent State University M.A., Western Reserve University M.F.A., Western Reserve University *W ALCZUK,

LEO

S .•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•••• Physical

Education

B.S., Seton Hall University M.A., Western Reserve University

H. M .................................. . Mathematics B.A., Abilene Christian College M.A., Texas Christian University

WHITFIELD, JOHN

M ........................................ Physics B.S., Kent State University M.A., Kent State University

WILLIAMS, RICHARD

A. . ................................. Foreign Languages Diploma Examination, University of Zagreb Graduate Studies, University of Graz M.A., Western Reserve University

YIRKA, BRANKO

YORKA, SANDRA J .•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • Physics

B.S., Mary Manse College M.S., John Carroll University *ZUBAL, JOHN

T ............................................. . History

B.S., Fordham Univ,ersity M.A., John Carroll University

*

full-time

Index Absence 31 Accounting 46 Accreditation 13 Acting, fundamentals of 70 Administration, offices of 75 Admissions & Records, offices of 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33 Adults 28 Advanced Starting (Transfers) 28 Application for 27 Medical Examination 27 Non-Graduates from H.S. 28 Residence Requirements 27 Summer Sessions 38 Transcripts 27 Advertising 46 Advertising Art 46 Africa, History of 58 Air-Conditioning 52 Algebra 61 American Government 68 Americas, History of 58 Analytical Geometry and Calculus 62 Anatomy 50 Anthropology 69 Arithmetic 61 Art 42 Associate in Arts Degree 33 Associate in Science Degree 33 Athletics 24 Attendance 31 Audio-Visual Center 20 Bacteriology (See Microbiology) 44 Badminton 66 Bi'Ology 43 Blueprint Reading 52 Board of Trustees 4 Botany 44 Building Construction 44 Business Administration 16, 46, 47, 48, 49 Business Courses 16 Business Law 48 Business Management 47 Business Mathematics 47 Cafeteria (Food Services) Calculus 62 Calendar 2 Changes of Program 29 Chemistry Courses 49 Child Development 68 Choir 64

Civilization, History of 58 Club Organizations 24 Class Schedule 41 Commuter, The 38 Comparative Government 68 Composition, College' and Literature 54 Computer Courses 45 Costs 'Of Attending College 27 Counseling 23 Counselor 23 Course Numbering 41 Courses Section 42-71 Adding 29 Auditing 31 Credit 41 Dropping 29 Repeated, Grades for 32 Withdrawal 29 Credit, Transfer 29 Criminal Law 61 Cultural Activities 24 Dance 66 Dean's List 38 Debate 70 Dental Hygiene 17 Description of Courses 41 Descriptive Geometry 53 Design 42 Dismissal from Class or C'Ollege 31 Dispensary 24 Division of the College 37 Drama Courses 70 Drawing and Painting Courses 42 Drawing, Engineering 53 Economics 50 Economics, History of 50 Education, Introduction to 51 Electricity Courses 52 Elementary Teaching Art 42 Music 63 Games and Rhythms 63 Employment (Placement) 24 Engineering Technology 51 Engineering Courses 52 Engineering Physics 67 English, Business 48 English, Courses 53 English, Division Chairman 75 English Requirements for Degree Entrance Examinations 28 Entrance Requirements 27

20

89

34

90

Cuyahoga Community College

Examinations Expenses 27

31

Logic, Fundamentals of

Machines, Business 45 Major, Divisional 34 Management 46 Marketing Courses 47 Marriage and The Family 69 Materials 44 Engineering 53 Construction 53 Math-Business 47 Mathematics Courses 61 Math Requirements for Degree 34 Maximum Load (Study) 38 Mechanical Technology 17 Medical Assisting 17 Merchandising 49 Metallurgy 52 Microbiology 44 Minimum Load (Study) 38 Minimum Scholastic Requirements 30, 31 Modern Languages (See Foreign Languages) 55 Music Courses 63

Faculty 75 Feature Writing 60 Fees 27 Food Services 20 First Aid 24 Foreign Language Courses 55 Forensics (See Debate) 70 French Courses 55 Freshman 37 General Education 51 Geography Courses 57 German Courses 55 Government 68 Grades and Grade Points 32 Grade Level Classification 37 Graduation, Notice of Intent 33 Guidance 23 Harmony 64 Health Center 24 Health Education 57 Health and Physical Education, Division of 66 High School Diploma 27 History Courses 57 History of CCC 9 Home and Family Courses 59 Home Economics 59 Housing 38 Humanities, Division of 53 Hygiene (See Health Education) Industrial 'Organization and Management 16 Industrial Supervision Courses Intercollegiate Athletics 24

.J ournalism

Courses

60

Laboratory Deposit 27 Law Business 48 Law Enforcement Courses 18 Languages (See Foreign Languages) 55 Leaderships (See Recreational Leadership) 66 Library 19 Life Drawing 42 Life Saving 66 Literature 54 American 54 British 54 World 54 Listening Rooms 20 Living Facilities (Housing) 38 Loan Funds 24 Location 19

57

17

65

Newspaper, College (Commuter) News Reporting 60 Notice, Intent to Graduate 33 Numbering of Courses 41 Nursery School Materials 51 Nursing 17 Nursing, Associate Degree Programs 17 Nutrition 59 Objectives of the College 11 Oral Interpretation 69 Organizations, Student 24 Painting 43 Parking and Transportation 71 Part Time Students 28 Part Time Work Placement 24 Peace Officer (See Law Enforcement) 60 Philosophy Courses 65 Physical Education Courses 66 Physical Geography 57 Physical Anthropology 69 Physical Service 67 Physics 67 Physiology 44 Piano Courses 64 Placement (Employment) 24 Police Science (See Law Enforcement) 60 Political Science 68 Prerequisites 41 Probation (Academic) 30 Production Control 59 Program Changes 29

38

Index

Properties of Materials 53 Psychology 68 Public Transportation 71 Publications 38 Qualitative Analysis 50 Quantitative Analysis 50 Reading Improvement 54 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 52 Registration, Procedures 27 Regulations and Requirements (Section II) 33 Rehearsals and Performances 70 Religion, Comparative 65 Residence Requirements 27 Removal, Incomplete Grade 32 Repeating Courses 32 Requirements Admissions 27 Attendance 31 Graduation 33 Russia, History of 58 Russian Courses 58 Salesmanship 48 Schedule of Classes 41 Scholarships and Awards 24 Scholastic Requirements (Minimum) 30, 31 Science Requirements for Degree 34 Secretarial Courses 16 Shorthand Courses 47 Slide Rule 53 Social Science Requirements for Degree 34

91

Sociology Courses 69 Spanish Courses 56 Speech Courses 69 Statistics, Elementary Probability and 62 Sports 66 Student-Faculty Conferences 37 Student Government 24 Student Activities and Organizations 24 Summer Terms 38 Supervision, Elements of 59 Swimming Courses 66 Technical Education 15, 16, 17, 18 Technician, Engineering (See Mech. Technology) 17 Testing-Prior to Enrollment 23 Theater Arts Courses 70 Transcipts of Records 27 Transfer to other Colleges and Universities 33 Transportation 71 Trigonometry 61 Trustees, Board of 4 Tuition 27 Typing 46 United States, History of Withdrawal Class 29 College 31 World Literature, Survey Writing, Feature 60 Zoology Courses

43

58

54


1964-1965