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HORI Z ON S LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESERVATION, RESTOR ATION , EDUCATION AN D RECRE ATION

QUARTERLY

winter 2012 VOLUME 22, ISSUE 1

2

5

14

13

On the cover: Lake Michigan, Fort Sheridan Forest Preserve more than

29,400 acres are

LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

protected

by the lake county forest preserves .

A MESSAGE from

BOARD of COMMISSIONERS

ANN B. MAINE PRESIDENT LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

PRESIDENT

Ann B. Maine, Lincolnshire VICE PRESIDENT

Linda Pedersen, Antioch

As the weather turns brisk, winter is a prime time to take advantage of an indoor activity in your Forest Preserves. One such destination is the new exhibition Dickens: 200 Years of Celebrity, now open at the Lake County Discovery Museum in Lakewood Forest Preserve, Wauconda. This year, the world marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Dickens, one of the most enduring creative geniuses of the modern age. In celebration of this event, there are exhibits, readings, publications and other activities throughout the world. The Lake County Forest Preserve is proud to be a part of these festivities with Dickens: 200 Years of Celebrity. The exhibition showcases the never-before-seen private collection of Highland Park resident Michael A. Weinberg, paired with rare first editions of some of Dickens’ most beloved books, from the library of the University of St. Mary of the Lake in Mundelein. While the kids are home for winter break, or for something nearby to entertain out-of-town guests, don’t miss A Dickens Christmas, a special exhibit opening November 17 just for the holidays. A Dickens Christmas is entirely based on his classic 1843 tale “A Christmas Carol,” transporting visitors to 19th century London to explore the enduring celebrity of characters from the original Ebenezer Scrooge, to the more recent Scrooge McDuck. This exhibit runs through January 6, 2013. Dickens: 200 Years of Celebrity and last year’s Ansel Adams blockbuster are examples of the Museum’s commitment to providing high caliber exhibitions for the Lake County community. Our plans for the new Museum in Libertyville provide twice the space for special exhibitions, as well as space for exhibiting many more objects and documents from the Museum’s distinguished historic collections, some not seen by the public for decades. To learn more about the Museum’s planned relocation and reinvention, visit LCFPD.org/Museum. While the Museum protects and provides access to irreplaceable artifacts, telling the rich natural and cultural history of Lake County, your Lake County Forest Preserves are working hard to preserve and restore precious natural places. This issue of Horizons details a broad reaching, long-term restoration project aimed at rebuilding sustainable woodlands, including the majestic oaks that are an iconic part of the Lake County landscape. Our trails, waterways, educational and cultural facilities and open spaces are inspiring places to recharge the mind and body—and they belong to you. Savor the season, and enjoy!

TREASURER

Anne Flanigan Bassi, Highland Park ASSISTANT TREASURER

Carol Calabresa, Libertyville Melinda Bush, Grayslake Pat Carey, Grayslake Steve Carlson, Gurnee Bonnie Thomson Carter, Ingleside Mary Ross Cunningham, Waukegan Bill Durkin, Waukegan Michelle Feldman, Deerfield Susan Loving Gravenhorst, Lake Bluff Diane Hewitt, Waukegan Angelo D. Kyle, Waukegan Aaron Lawlor, Vernon Hills Stevenson Mountsier, Lake Barrington Jim Newton, Lindenhurst Audrey H. Nixon, North Chicago Diana O’Kelly, Mundelein Brent Paxton, Zion David B. Stolman, Buffalo Grove Craig Taylor, Lake Zurich Terry Wilke, Round Lake Beach EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Tom Hahn

HORIZONS VOLUME 22, ISSUE 1

Winter 2012

EDITOR

Kara Martin kmartin@LCFPD.org CONTRIBUTING

Allison Frederick PHOTOGRAPHY

Bob Callebert, Steven Diver, Kim Karpeles, Mark B. Kinsman, Andrew Roberts, Mark Widhalm, Chip Williams SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES HOTLINE: 847–968–3335

Photo and videos are periodically taken of people participating in Forest Preserve District programs and activities. All persons registering for Forest Preserve District programs/activities or using Forest Preserve property thereby agree that any photo or video taken by the Forest Preserve District may be used by the District for promotional purposes including its website, promotional videos, brochures, fliers and other publications without additional, prior notice or permission and without compensation to the participant.

Ensuring healthy oak woodlands for future generations of Lake County residents

R E STORING OU R

WOODLAND HABITATS At first glance, the woodlands along the Des Plaines River in southern Lake County appear healthy. However, extensive research shows that most of the oaks are very old and very few young oaks are growing in the understory to replace them. This is having a domino effect on native animals such as songbirds and butterflies, and the native shrubs and wildflowers they require. Beautiful oak woodlands define the unique natural landscape of Lake County that we all enjoy. Oak trees create an environment that maintains critical ecosystem processes and species diversity. Unfortunately, oak woodlands are in trouble across the eastern United States, particularly so in our area.

We need to return the amount of light that reaches the ground to healthier levels. This will allow for the regeneration of oaks and other native trees, shrubs and wildflowers. Without action, our oak woodlands will not survive. They will be replaced by denser, darker forests that lack the rich and colorful variety of songbirds, butterflies, wildflowers, shrubs and other abundant forms of life we value as a community. This winter, we will begin removing trees and thinning the understory in three particularly vulnerable preserves to allow enough sunlight to reach oak seedlings and saplings. The project areas include Grainger Woods, MacArthur Woods and the section of Captain Daniel Wright Woods adjacent to Elm Road. Our efforts to improve oak woodlands are supported by the Illinois Nature Preserves Commission, Morton Arboretum, Chicago Wilderness, U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

MANY SPECIES KNOWN TO OCCUR WITHIN LAKE COUNTY ARE FOUND IN PRESERVES ALONG THE DES PLAINES RIVER IN SOUTHERN LAKE COUNTY: GREAT-HORNED OWL WITH OWLETS NESTING IN A DEAD TREE, OR “SNAG.”

» 85% of salamander and frog species » 75% of turtle and snake species

» 18 state threatened and endangered plant species » 138 out of 200 birds have been observed nesting or foraging

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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RESTORING OUR WOODLAND HABITATS

Woodlands are under intense, combined pressure from a number of threats, including habitat fragmentation, invasive species and changes in the pattern, frequency and intensity of fires. The woodlands have grown too dense and dark, preventing seedlings and saplings of sun-loving oaks, walnuts and native shrubs from growing. Most oaks are very old and very few young oaks are growing in

Dense shade causes problems beyond the lack of oak regeneration. Loss of tree, shrub and ground layer diversity has reduced the size of wildlife populations and has caused complete loss of some rare species. Less habitat and fewer openings are available for woodland wildlife that need these features for foraging and nesting. Additionally, the alteration

of surface and ground water flow has caused a decline in many wildlife species that require seasonally wet areas for breeding. A 2009 study of vegetation patterns in the preserves along the Des Plaines River in southeast Lake County indicates a need for restoration focused specifically on increasing light availability. Increased light levels would allow for the regeneration of oaks and other desirable species that prefer open canopy, in turn increasing biodiversity.

the understory to replace them. Shadetolerant species, such as sugar maple and elm, are crowding out the oaks and reducing the overall diversity of our woodlands.

REBUILDING SUSTAINABLE HABITAT Restoration of light conditions that allow for oak regeneration will require selective removal of canopy and subcanopy trees and carefully timed controlled burns to facilitate growth of healthy oak saplings. Methods used to restore woodland canopy structure and tree composition will include

mechanical equipment will be used for this project. Trained and licensed personnel will herbicide the cut stumps to prevent regrowth. Once oak regeneration has been reestablished, additional tree thinning and controlled burns will be required to release those saplings into the canopy. This project will create a mosaic of habitats, improving conditions for rare plants and wildlife while maintaining conditions for common native species. Expert partners will help monitor plants, animals and environmental conditions in the Woodland Habitat Restoration Project areas. Project partners include the Morton Arboretum, Illinois Nature Preserves Commission, Illinois Department of Natural

heavy, moderate and light thinning and creation of partial gaps and full gaps within the canopy. Actions will be dependent upon habitat type and site-specific conditions. These restoration efforts are being implemented in winter to reduce

Resources, Chicago Botanic Garden, Lincoln Park Zoo, and the Illinois Natural History Survey.

disturbance to other plants and the soil. Hand tools and large

The goals of this project are broad reaching and long-term, adding to the scientific understanding of woodland restoration in Lake County, the Chicago region and beyond.

75% of Illinois' native wildlife species require woodland habitat for at least a portion of their lifecycle.

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W IN T E R 2 01 2

HISTORIC WOODL AND CONDITIONS

ID it! Check out the nature identification feature in our mobile app. Explore a new

In 2010–12, District ecologists, in partnership with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, mapped

subject each season—winter features tree

existing oak communities in Lake County and compared them with records reaching back

ID. Available for free in the Apple App

to the 1800s. Since 1830, 88% of the oak-dominated communities in Lake County have been

Store or Android Play Store.

lost. Studies show that a key to restoring and protecting our few remaining oak woodlands is to increase the amount of sunlight reaching oak seedlings and saplings.

L AKE COU NT Y OAK COMM U NIT Y DISTRIBUTION

OAK COMMUNITIES

1830 // 187,018 ACRES

2010 // 23,124 ACRES

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Oak saplings are lacking, only two of 1,000

saplings are oaks.

2

WOODLAND HABITAT RESTORATION PROJECT

ST MARYS RD

t PHOTO KEY Oaks and other open

60

MACARTHUR WOODS

growth beyond the seedling stage into saplings.

GRAINGER WOODS CONSERVATION PRESERVE

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CAPTAIN DANIEL WRIGHT WOODS

PROJECT AREAS

DES PLAINES RIVER

DES PLAINES RIVER TRAIL

Current average light transmission to ground

level within wooded communities is 15.6% in

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Remote infrared

cameras are used for wildlife monitoring.

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phoebes and other flycatchers to hunt for insects.

6 & 7

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Located in southeast Lake County, along ST MARYS RD

Open canopy allows birds such as eastern

AV E

southesast Lake County.

EVERETT RD

EE

the preserves along the Des Plaines River in

UK WA MIL

canopy species require 30–50% full sun for

22

Fisheye lens photos of the

the Des Plaines River, MacArthur Woods, Grainger Woods, and Wright Woods

canopy are plugged into a special computer

represent some of the highest quality natural

program that assesses canopy cover and light availability.

8 & 9

Following a 500-acre RI

and spotted salamanders were reintroduced

10 & 11

Some dead trees will be

hazard) to increase openness while providing important habitat for cavity nesting birds and many other wildlife species.

O

DS

» To schedule an educational

presentation for groups of 10 or more, RD

DEERFIELD RD

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left standing (when they don’t pose a safety

LEARN MORE O

contact Allison Frederick at 847–968–3261 or

afrederick@LCFPD.org.

AV E

has indicated that successful breeding has

RW

EVERETT

EE

to MacArthur Woods. Follow-up monitoring

VE

UK WA MIL

restoration project, spring peepers, wood frogs

occurred.

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areas within Lake County.

For more details, visit LCFPD.org/woodlands.

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45

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LAKE COOK RD

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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PRESERVENEWS HISTORIC FLAG DONATION

David and Millie Ramsay of Colorado donated a rare historic flag to the Lake County Discovery Museum this fall. The stars and stripes flag was made in 1862 by Millie’s third-great grandmother Agnes Murray of Newport Township, on the occasion of her son, Edward Murray’s (1828–1900) enlistment with the 96th Illinois Volunteer Regiment. The flag joins related Lake County historic items in the Museum’s collections including Civil War correspondence and tintypes from Murray and other members of the 96th Regiment. Read more about Museum collections, and Lake County natural and cultural history at the Lake County history blog: lakecountyhistory.blogspot.com. NEW LANDS PRESERVED

SUMMER CAMP REGISTRATION BEGINS

Additions to Lake Carina and Independence Grove preserves are among the most recent land acquisitions approved by the Board of Commissioners.

Sneak some learning into your child’s summer adventures. Choose from outdoor recreation, nature exploration and history programs for ages 4–16. Browse available programs and register online at LCFPD.org/camps.

The 9.5-acre addition to Lake Carina consists of wooded wetlands and includes segments of the Des Plaines River and Trail, increasing the 53-acre site by nearly 18 percent. The 18-acre addition to Independence Grove is on the north end of the preserve, near Route 120 and River Road. It will protect a floodplain, providing a buffer for trails and improving public access. Additions to Grant Woods in Lake Villa were also approved by the Board. The properties are located on the north side of Grand Avenue, east of Route 59. The purchase protects wetland, prairie and forest wildlife habitats, and holds 100-year old oak trees. When finalized, the additions will create a more than four-mile greenway from Grant Woods north to Bluebird Meadow. This greenway would eventually allow a trail connection between the two preserves. Funds from the voter-approved 2008 referendum support these land buys with no increase in taxes to residents. 6 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY

W IN T E R 2 01 2

NATIONAL SKI PATROL

The Des Plaines River Nordic Patrol of the National Ski Patrol (NSP) organization seeks candidates for their next certification class to start this winter. Training consists of crosscountry ski skills and first aid. Up to the challenge? Contact NSP representative Julie Timmons at julieski2@gmail.com.

NEW FOREST PRESERVE BOARD

A new Forest Preserve Board of Commissioners will take office December 1. Their first action will be to elect officers. For a new list, please visit LCFPD.org, or contact the General Offices at 847-367-6640.

FEEDERS ARE FOR THE BIRDS

More than 100 North American bird species supplement their natural diets with food from feeders. Winter is the best time to feed birds, since their natural food supplies are scarce. Three key elements are required for a successful bird haven: a variety of seed and suet, fresh water for drinking and bathing, and ample cover—preferably with native plants.

GREEN GIFTS AND MEMORIALS

This holiday season, honor your loved ones with a gift to the Preservation Foundation of the Lake County Forest Preserves. Your charitable gift will help the Forest Preserves protect critical natural lands and provide educational and cultural programs for learners of all ages each year. Your loved one will receive a card letting them know a donation has been made in their name. For details, call 847-9683110 or visit ThePreservationFoundation.org.

Regularly cleaning your feeders and water will reduce exposure to disease and keep unwanted visitors like coyotes away. Place hawk silhouettes (LCFPD.org/hawkshadow) in nearby windows to deter birds from colliding with the reflective glass. For more tips about making your yard a successful bird habitat in all seasons, visit LCFPD.org.

MUSEUM STORE STOCKING STUFFERS

Discover a selection of unique gifts, with holiday discounts on many items. Stuff your stockings with a bit of history: choose from toys, handmade crafts, jewelry, books, postcard related gifts, and merchandise from our exhibits. Visit LCFPD.org/discovery for hours and location. GIVE THE GIFT OF GOLF

Stress-free holiday giving: golf gift cards are good for greens fees and pro shop items at any Lake County Forest Preserves golf club: Brae Loch in Grayslake, Countryside in Mundelein or ThunderHawk in Beach Park. The gift cards never expire and are packaged in an envelope suitable for giving. Purchase online at LCFPD.org/givegolf, by phone at 847-968-3100, or in person at our General Offices, 1899 West Winchester Road, Libertyville, 8 am-4:30 pm, Monday-Friday.

ID IT! WINTER TREES AND TRACKS

Learn to read the stories nature writes in winter with the help of our mobile app. The nature identification feature “ID it!” will feature trees and animals tracks for winter. Available for free in the Apple App Store or Android Play Store— search for “Lake County Forest Preserves.” Get started: Except during mating season, coyotes are shy and nocturnal, and therefore unlikely to be seen, particularly during the day. Coyote activity can be identified in the snow or mud by looking for the “perfect step” tracks: a coyote’s front and back paws land in the same spot when travelling in stride. The general outline of a coyote trail is a long, straight line; while a domestic dog’s trail will zigzag, wandering left and right as it curiously investigates everything in its path. LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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FLOODPLAIN BENEFITS

Forest preserves in Lake County include almost 7,000 acres within the Des Plaines River Valley. In the spring, when the river is prone to flooding, damage to homes and businesses are reduced. Floodwaters collect on much of this land and are slowly released back into the river as its level subsides. WINTER CONSERVATION

GRANT FUNDING SUPPORTS RESTORATION AT SPRING BLUFF

Our dedicated conservation volunteers work year round to improve the preserves. Winter restoration activities primarily consist of buckthorn control. Restoration workdays happen every weekend at forest preserve locations throughout the county. No prior experience is necessary; all ages are invited.

The Great Lakes are considered some of the most important natural resources in the world. They provide drinking water for tens of millions of people and support a huge diversity of plants and wildlife, including hundreds of globally rare species. This immense network of unique habitat types provides vital ecological services, such as flood control, carbon storage and water filtration.

Winter is also the time we process the seed collected in fall to prepare for planting in spring. Indoor seed processing happens at the facility on Washington Street in Grayslake. For details, dates and locations, visit LCFPD.org/restoration.

Restoration of important coastal habitat at Spring Bluff in Winthrop Harbor will proceed thanks to $1,875,000 in grant funds received from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Sustain Our Great Lakes Stewardship Program. This grant will allow Lake County Forest Preserves and local partners to enhance wildlife habitat by controlling invasive plants across 690 acres of wetland and prairie at Spring Bluff, and nearby Chiwaukee Prairie and Illinois Beach State Park. Additionally, the grant will fund controlled burn training for local partners and municipalities to increase available personnel for burn management. The grant also provides tools and equipment for volunteer stewardship groups, and educational signage to highlight these interconnected coastal areas.

WETLANDS RESEARCH PROJECT COMPLETE

Wetlands Research was formed in 1983 as a joint venture between the Lake County Forest Preserves and Chicagobased Openlands Project to restore, and manage construction and research of the wetlands at Sedge Meadow Forest Preserve along the Des Plaines River Trail in Wadsworth. Before restoration began, the land had been drained for farmland, mined for sand and gravel and then abandoned. Most of the original wetlands had been destroyed. Today, the river, once obscured by weedy overgrowth, is visible through a rehabilitated oak grove. The prairies have been restored, and the wetlands are again functioning to provide flood control and improve water quality in the river and the watershed. As a result of the work, wetland-dependent flora and fauna are now present, including the sedges for which this preserve is named. Research showed that wetlands such as these trap more than 80 percent of the sediments and nutrients contained in the incoming river water, delivering clean, clear water back to the Des Plaines River. The Wetlands Research Project officially ends December 31, 2012. 8 HORI ZONS QUARTERLY

W IN T E R 2 01 2

OUTDOOR FUN IN A BEAUTIFUL SETTING

Explore winter’s wonder! When snow is on the ground, our preserves are an ideal setting for activities such as ice skating, ice fishing, sledding, snowmobiling, cross-country skiing and hiking. A 4.5-inch ice layer is required for ice skating and fishing, and a 4-inch snow base is required for snowmobiling. For current winter sports conditions, check LCFPD.org or call our 24-hour automated winter sports hotline at 847-968-3235 for updated info. The Lakewood Winter Sports Area and an adjacent section of the Millennium Trail in Wauconda, and a trail loop at Old School in Libertyville are lighted, allowing for winter fun until 9 pm, daily. For a complete list of activities and locations, visit LCFPD.org/activities. SENIOR PROGRAM OFFERINGS

ANNUAL PERMITS

2013 annual permits go on sale December 3. Find permit information and purchase online at LCFPD.org/permits, or by phone: 847-367-6640.

Our educators offer a variety of fun and informative programs for seniors, including nature or history themed presentations and guided preserve cart tours. In addition, senior groups can assemble for guided tours at special facilities of interest including Fort Sheridan Forest Preserve, the Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home and Ryerson Woods. At the Lake County Discovery Museum in Wauconda, daily admission for seniors is just $3. If you belong to a senior group and would like to learn more, please contact Melissa Alderson at 847-968-3326 or malderson@LCFPD.org.

A DICKENS CHRISTMAS

Celebrate the holidays with A Dickens Christmas, a special exhibit open in conjunction with Dickens: 200 Years of Celebrity at the Lake County Discovery Museum in Wauconda. Stroll through a mid-1800s street to learn how Dickens influenced the look and feel of the holiday season. View a private collection of vintage cards, calendars, figurines and more inspired by “A Christmas Carol,” “The Pickwick Papers” and other stories. LCFPD.org/Dickens FACEBOOK FUN

Find us on Facebook for impromptu programs, nature blog updates, fun photos and videos, events and more. New: check our page on “No Way! Thursday” each week for an amazing factoid adventure. Right: On the upper right of this flower is a camouflaged looper. This caterpillar chews off pieces of the plant it is on, sticking the plant material to itself as camouflage. It wears the plant until it molts, repeating the camouflage process after every molt. Let’s hear it: No Way! facebook.com/LCFPD LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRES E RVES

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WINTER CALENDAR Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

DECEMBER 1 Snowmobile Safety Class and Certification Exam Passing the written exam at the end of the class allows youth ages 12–16 to operate a snowmobile on their own.

Saturday, 8 am–5 pm, Operations and Public Safety Facility. Adults, families with children ages 10 and up. FREE. Registration required: 847–968–3411.

1 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents.

1 A Dickensian Christmas Lecturer John Danza discusses how Dickens’ depiction of Christmas created iconic characters in literature.

Saturday, 1–2 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults. $7 residents, $9 nonresidents.

5 Homeschool Companion—A Victorian Christmas Join other homeschoolers in celebrating the holidays with Charles Dickens. Learn about Victorian Christmas traditions.

Wednesday, 10 am–12 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 5–12. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

5 Playdate with Nature Unstructured play in nature is proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages. Join in for winter play ideas.

Wednesday, 1 pm, Lakewood—Winter Sports Area. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event. Dress for the weather.

9 Christmas Merrymaking at the Museum Enjoy a Victorian-themed Christmas with strolling carolers, crafts, hands-on activities, story time, shopping and more.

Sunday, 1–4:30 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. All ages. FREE with Museum admission. No registration required.

9 Water in Winter Discover what happens to water in winter through hands-on experiments and crafts.

Sunday, 2–4 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Adults, families with children ages 4 and up. FREE with Museum admission. No registration required.

11 Hikin’ Tykes—Conifer Trees Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

12 Small Discoveries—An Old-Fashioned Christmas Celebrate an old-fashioned Victorian Christmas with stories, music, crafts and more.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

13 For the Love of Nature...& Healthy Children Experience how multi-sensory nature connections help young children develop healthy, happy brains and bodies.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Preschoolers, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event. Dress for the weather.

14 Turtle Tales—Winter’s Gifts Join us for story time with movement, songs and surprises.

Friday, 10–10:30 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

14 Skokie Valley Astronomers—Mysteries of the Cosmos Learn about today’s most intriguing cosmological questions from a NASA Solar System Ambassador.

Friday, 8–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. FREE. No registration required.

21 Winter Solstice Campfire Welcome the arrival of winter, join in folklore activities while enjoying wassail around the warmth of a campfire.

Friday, 6–7:30 pm, Ryerson Woods. Dress for the weather. All ages. $3.

Þ Impromptu Programs Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @LCFPD to receive notice of impromptu programs. 10

HORI ZONS QUARTERLY WIN T E R 2 01 2

Snowy owls depend closely on lemmings to feed themselves and their young in the Arctic. Occasionally when lemming populations decline, these birds fly farther south in search of food. Last winter, numerous snowy owls were spotted in the region.

DECEMBER (continued) 27 & 28 Ring in the New Year Learn how the New Year is celebrated around the world and make party favors to take home.

Thursday & Friday, 11 am–1 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 3–12. FREE with Museum admission. No registration required.

27 Nature Speak—Playing in Spanish Introduce your child to nature in a new way­. We will sing songs and do activities that combine basic Spanish and English at a pace appropriate for young children.

Thursday, 9:30–10:45 am, Ryerson Woods— Welcome Center. Children ages 3–5, with an adult. $5 adult/$1 child residents, $7 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

30 Coyote Howl Learn about your wild canine neighbors as you traverse a forest preserve under a twilight sky.

Sunday, 4:30–6 pm, Middlefork Savanna. Adults, families with children ages 7 and up. $6 adult/$3 child residents, $8 adult/$4 child nonresidents.

JANUARY 5 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Van Patten Woods. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents.

6 Outdoor Skills—Winter Survival Learn winter survival techniques. We’ll start indoors and then venture outside to practice. Dress for the weather.

Sunday, 10 am–12 pm, Independence Grove—Visitors Center. Adults, children ages 8 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

6 Opening Reception: SKY/PLACE Painters Richard Deutsch and Susan Kraut use the medium of paint to express their experiences in the landscape.

Sunday, 1–3 pm, Ryerson Woods—Brushwood. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

8 Hikin’ Tykes­—Insects in Winter Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$2 child residents, $7 adult/$3 child nonresidents.

9 Small Discoveries—Winter Wonderland Stay cozy and warm in the Museum as we celebrate winter with stories and crafts.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

9 Volunteer Open House Learn about different volunteer opportunities and meet with staff to find the ideal fit for you.

Wednesday, 5–7:30 pm, General Offices. Adults, youth ages 15 and up. FREE. No registration required.

10 For the Love of Nature...& Healthy Children Experience how multi-sensory nature connections help young children develop healthy, happy brains and bodies. Dress for the weather.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Preschoolers, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

11 Skokie Valley Astronomers—Skies of 2013 Discover the observing opportunities that await you in the skies of 2013. Stargaze afterward, weather permitting.

Friday, 8–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. FREE. No registration required.

12 Snowmobile Safety Class and Certification Exam Passing the written exam at the end of the class allows youth ages 12–16 to operate a snowmobile on their own.

Saturday, 8 am–5 pm, Operations and Public Safety Facility. Adults, families with children ages 10 and up. FREE. Registration required: 847–968–3411.

LAK E COUNTY FOR E ST PRE S E RVES

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

JANUARY (continued) 13 Wildlife Tracking for Families Become a nature detective—search for wildlife clues and make your own animal track cast.

Sunday, 10–11:30 am, Ryerson Woods—Borland Cabin. Adults, families with children ages 3 and up. $10/family residents, $15/family nonresidents.

13 Little Hikers—Winter Adaptations Explore the wonders of nature with your kids and make lifetime memories. Activities may include a craft and story.

Sunday, 2–3:30 pm, Cuba Marsh. Program entirely outdoors. Dress for the weather. Ages 5–7, with an adult. $5 adult/$2 child residents, $7 adult/$3 child nonresidents.

13 Evening Exploration Explore a forest preserve after hours with a naturalist. Get tips for observing nature in the dark so keep your flashlight at home.

Sunday, 4:30–6 pm, Wright Woods. Adults, families with children ages 6 and up. $6 adult/$3 child residents, $8 adult/$4 child nonresidents.

16 Ryerson Reads: All the Strange Hours by Loren Eiseley Discuss the autobiography of Loren Eiseley, one of the 20th century’s greatest interpreters of the natural world.

Wednesday, 7:30–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Brushwood. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. $15, $10 Friends of Ryerson Woods Members.

18 Turtle Tales—Snow Stories Join us for story time with movement, songs and surprises.

Friday, 10–10:30 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

21 Scout Monday­—Webelos Join the Lake County Forest Preserves to fulfill the Geologists Badge requirements on this day off school.

Monday, 11 am–12 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Webelos. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

21 Playdate with Nature Unstructured play in nature is proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages. Join in for winter play ideas.

Monday, 1 pm, Fort Sheridan—parking lot. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event. Dress for the weather.

23 Small Discoveries—Play with Clay Work with clay to make fun and useful objects to play with and enjoy.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

23 Families Exploring—Winter Ecology Spend quality time as a family connecting to nature. An environmental educator will guide you in hands-on learning and exploration. Dress for the weather.

Wednesday, 6:30–8 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. $6 adult/$1 child residents, $8 adult/$2 child nonresidents.

24 Teacher Training—Charles Dickens’ Victorian London Learn about Victorian London, Dickens’ thoughts on this society, and multidisciplinary lesson plans that will help students understand this time period. CPDUs available. 26 Coyote Howl Learn about your wild canine neighbors as you traverse a forest preserve under a twilight sky. 26, 29 Family TIme in Nature: A Workshop for Adults Interactive workshop highlighting the research and benefits of connecting kids and families to nature. Learn where to go, participate in hands-on activities and receive easy tools to help get you and your family outdoors.

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Thursday, 6–8 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. Educators. $9 residents, $11 nonresidents. Saturday, 5–6:30 pm, Rollins Savanna—Washington St. entrance. Adults. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents. 26: Saturday, 9:30 am–12 pm, Ryerson Woods; 29: Tuesday, 6–8 pm, Waukegan Library. Adults. FREE. Registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event.

Lake County is aptly named as home to 170 lakes, over 400 miles of streams and thousands of acres of wetlands. These invaluable resources provide important wildlife habitat, and many benefits to human health and the economy. Join us in 2013 as we celebrate water with educational and recreational programs on the theme. Watch upcoming issues of Horizons for details.

JANUARY (continued) 27 Learn to Cross-Country Ski Weather permitting, gain skills and learn the history of crosscountry skiing. Must bring your own equipment.

Sunday, 10 am–12 pm, Raven Glen—East. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

30 Homeschool Companion—Nocturnal Animals Find out what critters come out at night and then take a walk to see if we can find them.

Wednesday, 5–7 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Ages 4–15. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

FEBRUARY 2 Snowmobile Safety Class and Certification Exam Passing the written exam at the end of the class allows youth ages 12–16 to operate a snowmobile on their own.

Saturday, 8 am–5 pm, Operations and Public Safety Facility. Adults, families with children ages 10 and up. FREE. Registration required: 847–968–3411.

2 Walk with a Naturalist One-hour guided nature hike. Explore a new preserve each month.

Saturday, 9–10 am, Grassy Lake. Adults. $1 residents, $2 nonresidents.

3 Profiles in Excellence­­—Honoring Our Educators 30th annual celebration highlighting the contributions of Lake County’s African American teachers. Guest speakers, local choirs, refreshments and more.

Sunday, 3–5 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

6 Small Discoveries—Be My Valentine Explore Valentine traditions. Make your own valentine to give to someone special, then make a sweet treat to take home.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

8 Owl Prowl with Steve Bailey Join Steve Bailey, ornithologist with the Illinois Natural History Survey, for a captivating night exploring the mystery of owls at Ryerson Woods.

Friday, 7–9 pm, Ryerson Woods. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. $37, $29 Friends of Ryerson Woods Members and Chicago Botanic Garden Members. To register, call 847-835-5440 or visit chicagobotanic.org.

8 Skokie Valley Astronomers—Solar Flares Learn about a new area of scientific research that may lead to the prediction of solar flares.

Friday, 8–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Welcome Center. Adults, families with children ages 12 and up. FREE. No registration required.

9 Phenology & Photography Outdoor workshop combines a staff naturalist’s insight with technical tips from a professional photographer.

Saturday, 1–4 pm, Lyons Woods. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. $20 residents, $28 nonresidents.

10 Adlai E. Stevenson II Day Celebrate this Illinois holiday by visiting Stevenson’s cherished family home.

Sunday, 11 am–12 pm & 2:30–3:30 pm, Adlai E. Stevenson Historic Home. Adults, families with children ages 8 and up. FREE. Registration required.

10 Mysteries in the Snow Discover who’s active in winter by observing clues in the snow and surrounding natural community.

Sunday, 1:30–3 pm, Buffalo Creek. Adults, families with children ages 6 and up. $5 adult/$2 child residents, $7 adult/$3 child nonresidents.

12 Hikin’ Tykes­—Beavers Nature-based story, craft and outdoor exploration (weather permitting) for you and your preschool child.

Tuesday, 9:30–10:45 am, Ryerson Woods— Welcome Center. Children ages 2–4, with an adult. $5 adult/$2 child residents, $7 adult/ $3 child nonresidents.

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Registration required for all programs unless otherwise indicated. For detailed program descriptions, specific meeting locations, directions and registration visit LCFPD.org or call 847–968–3321. For updates outside of normal business hours, call 847-968-3113.

Deer antlers are the fastest growing living tissue on earth. Antlers grow from spring to fall. In late winter or early spring, the antlers are shed.

FEBRUARY (continued) 14 For the Love of Nature...& Healthy Children Experience how multi-sensory nature connections help young children develop healthy, happy brains and bodies.

Thursday, 10:30–11:45 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Preschoolers, with an adult. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event. Dress for the weather.

14 Romantic Night Hike Learn wildlife courtship behaviors in a guided hike or selfguided ski/hike, then warm up with hot chocolate and s’mores.

Thursday, 7:30–9 pm, Ryerson Woods—Borland Cabin. Adults, youth ages 16 and up. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

15 Turtle Tales—A Wintery Valentine Join us for story time with movement, songs and surprises.

Friday, 10–10:30 am, Greenbelt Cultural Center. All ages. FREE. No registration required.

17 Learn to Cross-Country Ski Weather permitting, gain skills and learn the history of crosscountry skiing. Must bring your own equipment.

Sunday, 10 am–12 pm, Singing Hills. Adults, children ages 12 and up. $5 residents, $7 nonresidents.

17 Owl Prowl Learn about an owl’s nocturnal adaptations and their role in the natural community.

Sunday, 4–5:30 pm, Lyons Woods. Adults, families with children ages 7 and up. $6 adult/$3 child residents, $8 adult/$4 child nonresidents.

18 Playdate with Nature Unstructured play in nature is proven to be healthy and beneficial to children of all ages. Join in for winter play ideas.

Monday, 1 pm, Greenbelt Cultural Center. Children of all ages, caregivers. FREE. No registration required. A Leave No Child Inside event. Dress for the weather.

18 Presidents Day Activities Spend your day off school at the Museum for a variety of hands-on activities, crafts, stories and more.

Monday, 10 am–4 pm, Lake County Discovery Museum. All ages. FREE with Museum admission. No registration required.

18 Scout Monday­—Cadettes Join the Lake County Forest Preserves to fulfill the Night Owl Badge requirements on this day off school.

Monday, 5:30–6:30 pm, Independence Grove—North Bay. Cadettes. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

20 Small Discoveries—Livin’ Like Lincoln Through a variety of hands-on activities, kids learn about the life and times of young Abraham Lincoln.

Wednesday, 10–11 am, Lake County Discovery Museum. Children ages 2–5, with an adult. $6 adult/$2.50 child, includes Museum admission.

20 Homeschool Companion—Stewardship in Winter Join other homeschoolers to discover how invasive exotics can throw nature off-balance. Learn how to properly use tools to help restore the balance of nature.

Wednesday, 10 am–12 pm, Half Day—Shelter A. Children ages 7 and up. $3 residents, $5 nonresidents.

23 Owl Prowl Learn about an owl’s nocturnal adaptations and their role in the natural community.

Saturday, 4:30–6 pm, Nippersink. Program entirely outdoors. Dress for the weather. Adults. $6 residents, $8 nonresidents.

MARCH 2–3, 9–10, 16–17 Maple Syrup Hikes Learn how trees work and about the sweet sap of sugar maples. Everyone gets a taste. Program is also available as a school or scout field trip, call 847-968-3321 for details.

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First three weekends in March. Hikes every half-hour from 12:30–2:30 pm. Ryerson Woods. All ages. $6. Children 3 and under, FREE.

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS

Through February 24, 2013

Dickens: 200 Years of Celebrity The legendary Charles Dickens created some of the world’s most memorable characters with Ebenezer Scrooge, Oliver Twist, Tiny Tim and scores of others. This exhibition introduces Dickens as the first international celebrity of the modern age. Over 100 objects and documents from an exclusive private collection, together with a rare collection of first editions of his most famous works, tell the story of how Charles Dickens and his characters became enduring cultural icons. For more info, visit: LCFPD.org/Dickens. Lake County Discovery Museum

Through March 15, 2013

Through January 6, 2013

The Blues: From the Heart & Soul

A Dickens Christmas

View a piece of music history with this collection of original playbills from blues clubs featuring some of the biggest names in Chicago blues music. From the private collection of internationally known Chicago blues pianist “Barrelhouse” Chuck Goering.

Celebrate the holidays with Charles Dickens. Stroll through a mid-1800s street to learn how Dickens influenced the look and feel of the holiday season. View a private collection of vintage cards, calendars, figurines and more inspired by “A Christmas Carol,” “The Pickwick Papers” and other stories.

Greenbelt Cultural Center

Through April 2013

Lake County Discovery Museum

The Hidden World of Infrared

This stunning collection of infrared photographs looks into a beautiful and often eerie world invisible to the naked eye. Using a modified digital camera, photographer Rob Kuehnle challenges viewers to see familiar subjects in new ways. Independence Grove Visitors Center

January 6–February 28 SKY / PLACE

January 26–August 25

Mucha: Expanding Art Nouveau

Kristina Paabus examines everyday constructions, such as architecture, language, and time, that allow us to interact with, and attempt to gain control over, our surroundings.

Alphonse Mucha brought the elegance of the Art Nouveau movement to everyday and commercial objects through his designs for posters, magazines, jewelry and much more. Featuring objects from the Museum’s John High Collection, one of the world’s leading collections of Mucha postcards.

Ryerson Woods—Brushwood

Lake County Discovery Museum

Through December 21 Daily Strategies

Richard Deutsch and Susan Kraut, long-time teachers at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, are painters interested in the natural world. They use the medium of paint to express the visual experience they have in the landscape. Among the works exhibited are paintings of Irish skies and landscapes from a study trip in Western Ireland. Artist Reception January 6, 1–3 pm Ryerson Woods—Brushwood

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Featured Preserve

FORT SHERIDAN

R

olling terrain, majestic bluffs, bold ravines and the crashing waves of Lake Michigan’s shoreline make Fort Sheridan Forest Preserve in southeast Lake County a stirring destination for outdoor enthusiasts. Trails wind through the preserve to the sandy shores of Lake Michigan, providing the first official public access to this section of the Lake since the Fort’s military operations began in 1887.

D ELM RD

FORT SHERIDAN FOREST PRESERVE 250 ACRES | LAKE FOREST/HIGHLAND PARK

PRESERVE AREA

WOODED AREA

BEACH WATER

PRESERVE TRAILS

NORTH SHORE BIKE PATH

H MAIN ENTRANCE H CEMETERY ENTRANCE P

PARKING

RED-TAILED HAWK’S NEST

COASTAL ARTILLERY & BIRD WATCHING STATION

LAKEFRONT OVERLOOK

ACTIVITIES & AMENITIES BICYCLING CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING HIKING SELF-GUIDED TRAILS & EXHIBITS

Fort Sheridan is situated on the Valparaiso glacial moraine. The origins of Lake Michigan and all of the Great Lakes started in the Pleistocene Epoch—the most recent Ice Age—which ended 10,000 years ago. As glaciers began to melt and move northward, the broad basins of the lakes formed. Runoff from the glaciers combined with rainwater to carve out large ravines near the shoreline. Glacial relics of rocks, boulders, clay and sand—sometimes referred to as “moraines”—support diverse ecosystems.

A History of

GLACIERS, PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM

LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES Several interpretive exhibits along the trails explore the

TOP RIGHT: WOODED RAVINE, RED FOX NEAR THE BASE OF A

Fort’s unique natural resources and rich military history. An

BLUFF, SANDY BLUFF, SUMMER

oversized red-tailed hawk’s nest educates visitors about

BEACH FRONT, WINTER BEACH

this raptor’s unique characteristics and allows them to see through the “eyes” of a hawk at an adjustable viewing station. Further down the Lake Michigan trail is the coastal artillery exhibit and an exhibit on bird migration.

FRONT, SPRING TRAILSIDE TRILLIUM BLOOMS

Fort Sheridan’s bluffs, ravines and shoreline are an important natural resource unique to Illinois. Ravines are sheltered from the wind, protected from prairie fires and shaded from sunlight. Typically, the temperature in a ravine is noticeably lower and slower to change than the surrounding area. This relatively cool and moist habitat provides protection for plants that are usually only found much farther north in Wisconsin, Michigan and Canada, including several endangered and threatened species. The bluffs bordering the shore provide a rare example of the type of open prairie that used to thrive along

16

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ROCKS & RARITIES Lake Michigan—the only untouched bluffs for 60 miles in either direction. Similarly, the oak savanna at Fort Sheridan is a rare find in the area. Located between prairie and forest, it’s characterized by small groves of oaks that tower above grassy fields and wildflowers. The cool air from Lake Michigan creates a micro-climate allowing plants like witchhazel, paper birch and American arborvitae to thrive. These same plants wouldn’t survive 20 miles to the west in the Illinois prairie. Fort Sheridan is located along the Mississippi Flyway, one of the busiest migratory bird flyways. In addi-

tion to the nearly 60 species of birds that live here year-round, warblers, waterfowl, shorebirds, sparrows, hawks and falcons are a few of the approximately 140 birds that migrate through Fort Sheridan each year. These birds take advantage of the lake’s nutrient-rich aquatic plants filled with insects and other invertebrates, and rest along the beachfront or in surrounding trees. Restoration work completed at Fort Sheridan includes planting trees and vegetation along the tops of the ravines, creating natural buffers that prevent erosion. Controlled burns and removal of invasive species are

also conducted. A healthy future is encouraged by replacing invasives such as buckthorn with native species. A total of 3.7 miles of asphalt, woodchip and mowed trails wind through the preserve. Visitors can enjoy trailside interpretive exhibits that highlight the site’s military history and illustrate the Preserve’s unique natural resources. Interactive environments like the larger-thanlife red-tailed hawk nest observatory perched high above the ravines and a life-sized reproduction of a fortified firing position let you explore like never before. Swimming, wading and boating are not allowed.

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SPECIAL FACILITIES Directory GENERAL OFFICES

1899 West Winchester Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048 847-367-6640 tel 847-367-6649 fax 847-968-3155 TDD

911 emergency 847–549–5200 non-emergency public safety issues

LCFPD.org 8 am –4:30 pm, Monday–Friday

OUTDOOR RECREATION

EDUCATION & CULTURE

GOLF

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB

16400 West Buckley Road Libertyville, Illinois 60048

21950 North Riverwoods Road Riverwoods, Illinois 60015

A Robert Trent Jones Jr. championship golf course

847–968–3499 Main 847–247–1111 Banquets, Meetings

847–968–3320

39700 North Lewis Avenue Beach Park, Illinois 60099

IndependenceGrove.org

LCFPD.org/Ryerson Welcome Center Hours

Visitors Center Hours 9 AM–4:30 PM, unless otherwise posted For beach, marina and café seasonal hours and fees visit our website Parking Fee Lake County residents FREE Nonresidents $5 per car Monday–Thursday $10 per car Friday–Sunday and holidays Vehicle window stickers allow entry without stopping to verify residency. Fee is $5, available at the Visitors Center.

9 AM–5 PM, Tuesday–Saturday 11 AM–4 PM, Sundays Restroom only, Mondays

10 AM–2 PM, Tuesday–Friday 1–3 PM Sundays GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER 1215 Green Bay Road North Chicago, Illinois 60064

847–381–0669

Prairie & Traditional Courses 20800 West Hawley Street Mundelein, Illinois 60060

CountrysideGolfClub.org

LAKE COUNTY DISCOVERY MUSEUM

Boat Launch & Marina Hours

27277 North Forest Preserve Road Wauconda, Illinois 60084 847–968–3400 Main 847–968–3381 Archives, Research LakeCountyDiscoveryMuseum.org Museum Gallery Hours 10 AM–4:30 PM, Monday–Saturday 1–4:30 PM, Sunday Adults $6, Youth 4–17 $2.50, 3 years and under FREE Discount Tuesdays: Adults $3, Youth 17 and under FREE

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COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB

847–968–3477

FoxRiverMarina.org

HORI ZONS QUARTERLY

ThunderHawkGolfClub.org

GreenbeltCulturalCenter.org

Lake County History Archives Curt Teich Postcard Archives

7 AM–sunset, daily, in season

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

847–968–3100 Tee Times 847–968–3441 Golf Gift Cards 847–489–1931 Golf Outings

11 AM–5 PM, Tuesday–Friday

26034 Roberts Road Port Barrington, Illinois 60010

Brushwood Hours

Gallery & Office Hours FOX RIVER MARINA

847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–968–3450

BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB 33600 North US Highway 45 Grayslake, Illinois 60030 847–968–3100 847–968–3441 847–489–1931 847–247–1119

Tee Times Golf Gift Cards Golf Outings Banquets

BraeLochGolfClub.org

LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES

LCFPD.ORG

FOREST PRESERVE Entrance/Parking

DES PLAINES RIVER TRAIL Planned section

FOREST PRESERVE EASEMENTS

More than 29,400 acres make up your Lake County Forest Preserves.

CANOE LAUNCH

GENERAL OFFICES

Friday, October 12, 2012

FORT HILL TRAIL Planned (Lake County Dept. of Transportation)

MIDDLEFORK GREENWAY Planned section

DOG AREA

MAP CURRENT AS OF

GRAND ILLINOIS TRAIL Planned (Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

M CCLORY TRAIL / NORTH SHORE PATH (managed by Lake County Dept. of Transportation)

STATE PARK (managed by the Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources)

Most preserves are open 6:30 AM –sunset, daily.

MILLENNIUM TRAIL Planned section

CASEY TRAIL Planned section

PRAIRIE CROSSING TRAIL

OPERATIONS AND PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITY

2013 SUMMER CAMPS

Red Wing Slough State Natural Area

GANDER MOUNTAIN

SPRING BLUFF

VAN PATTEN WOODS

DUTCH GAP PINE DUNES

PRAIRIE STREAM

OAK-HICKORY

Hunt Club Rd

SEQUOIT CREEK RAVEN GLEN

Chain O'Lakes State Park

ETHEL'S WOODS

SUN LAKE

BLUEBIRD MEADOW

THUNDERHAWK GOLF CLUB

Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park

HASTINGS LAKE Gelden Rd

MCDONALD WOODS

Cedar Lake State Bog

Milburn Rd

WAUKEGAN SAVANNA DOG SLED AREA

DUCK FARM

BONNER HERITAGE FARM

Cedar Lake Rd

GRANT WOODS

WADSWORTH SAVANNA

Stear

MILL CREEK

ns Sch

FOURTH LAKE

TANAGER KAMES

LYONS WOODS

SEDGE MEADOW

ool R

d

ROLLINS SAVANNA

Volo Bog State Natural Area

Washington St

LAKE CARINA BRAE LOCH GOLF CLUB

NIPPERSINK

Waukegan Rd

KESTREL RIDGE

ALMOND MARSH

MARL FLAT KETTLE GROVE

GREENBELT GREENBELT CULTURAL CENTER

Lake Michigan

INDEPENDENCE GROVE

SINGING HILLS

VISITORS CENTER

! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

BLACK CROWN CROWN

WILMOT WOODS

Winchester Road

RAY LAKE

ATKINSON STORMWATER FACILITY

Bonner Road

OLD SCHOOL Milwau

Middlefork Dr

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e lm

kee Ave

COUNTRYSIDE GOLF CLUB

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LAKE COUNTY DISCOVERY MUSEUM

ORIOLE GROVE

MIDDLEFORK SAVANNA

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LAKEWOOD

MACARTHUR WOODS

Fai ld rfie

FOX RIVER

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GRAINGER WOODS CONSERVATION PRESERVE

MARINA Rand Rd

ADLAI E. STEVENSON HISTORIC HOME

FORT SHERIDAN

CAPTAIN DANIEL WRIGHT WOODS

HALF DAY GRASSY LAKE

PRAIRIE WOLF

Half Day Rd

EGRET MARSH

ry

en

EDWARD L. RYERSON CONSERVATION AREA

DUFFY STORMWATER BERKELEY FACILITY PRAIRIE

WELCOME CENTER

CAHOKIA FLATWOODS

Saunders Rd

Rd

BUFFALO CREEK

cH

Rd

M

nd

Arlington Hts Rd

Ra

CUBA MARSH

HERON CREEK

SKOKIE RIVER WOODS

LAKE COUNTY FOREST PRESERVES GENERAL OFFICES 1899 WEST WINCHESTER ROAD LIBERTYVILLE ILLINOIS 60048

PLEASE DELIVER PROMPTLY—

t

TIME- SENSITIVE MATERIAL

HORI Z ON S

q

THIS PUBLICATION IS PRODUCED USING 100% RECYCLED PAPER, ALLOWING US TO SAVE 93 MATURE TREES, 29,691 LBS GREENHOUSE GASES, 11,422 LBS SOLID WASTE

Summer camp Sneak some learning into your child’s summer adventures. Lake County Forest Preserves’ summer camps and day programs meet the summer wishes of kids and parents alike. Choose a topic and age group that suits your child. We offer programs for ages four through 15. Choose from nature exploration, fun on the farm, fishing, canoeing and kayaking, history, theatre, or arts and crafts. Camps are led by professional educators and trained staff experienced in supervision, safety techniques and activity development. Financial assistance is available. Early bird sign-up discounts through February 15. See insert for details, or browse available programs and register online at LCFPD.org/camps.

Winter Sports Conditions Need to know snow depth, ice conditions or hours and locations of sled hills or ski trails? Look online at LCFPD.org or call our 24-hour automated hotline at 847–968–3235 for updated info.

HOLIDAY TREE RECYCLING Donate your holiday tree to us and we’ll recycle it into wood chips for trails and landscaping at forest preserves throughout Lake County. Drop-off spots are located at Greenbelt, Half Day, Old School, Ryerson Woods, Lakewood and Van Patten Woods.

◄ FLICKR PICK “Fire and Ice”—the otherworldly beauty of ice sculptures created by winter wind and waves is spectacularly lit by the sunrise at Fort Sheridan. Photo by mastodont via Flickr. Connect with us! Find us on Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, or YouTube @LCFPD. Download our mobile app in the Apple App Store or Android Play Store—search for “Lake County Forest Preserves.”


Horizons quarterly // winter 2012