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L Langley l CIT Y & TOWNSHIP OF

2012 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

L Langley l CIT Y & TOWNSHIP

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20 12 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Table of Contents

Langley

welcome

The combined communities of Langley City and Township constitute a successful mix of heritage and modern enterprise.

Langley City: Mayor's Note . . . 5

There are two Langleys – Langley City and Langley Township. That’s a political reality. But along with that political multiple personality comes a multitude of City Infrastructure . . . . . . . . . 8 opportunities. Township of Langley The level of cooperation that exists between the two political entities enhances the Mayor's Note . . . . . . . . . . 11 economic opportunities shared – and sometimes divided – between them. The level of cooperation between the two municipalities is epitomized by their Green Biz . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 sharing of the Langley Regional Town Centre – the largest retail and commercial area Township Communities . . . . 15 in the Lower Mainland outside of Vancouver – which straddles the border between Mormon Temple . . . . . . . . 17 the Langleys around 200th Street. Indeed, it’s often hard to separate the two entities – so much so that many of the Transportation . . . . . . . . . 18 people who live here never have cause to consider the duality. Cruise-In. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 On the other hand, Langley is also a diverse mixture of communities – from Aldergrove to Walnut Grove, from Fort Langley to Langley City – that readily Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 recognize and share with each other. Maps of Langley . . . . 24, 25 From the bandshell in Langley City that draws a wide variety of entertainment options, to the elite Langley Events Centre that attracts regional, national, and School District #35 . . . . . . 27 international teams and sporting events, Langley is the kind of place that is capable Independent Schools . . . . . 28 of hosting events of nearly any size – like the Langley Labour Day Tournament which involves thousands of children and hundreds of soccer teams – and any scope An Array of Degrees . . . . . 29 – like the popular Langley Good Times Cruise-In, one of North America’s largest car City Shopping . . . . . . . . . . 30 shows, filling downtown streets with upwards of 100,000 spectators. Langley Township is on the eastern edge of Metro Vancouver – truly where Agri-Business . . . . . . . . . . 31 city and country meet. Burgeoning urban growth is evident in sub-communities Horses, the Arts, like Murrayville and Walnut Grove and Willoughby, where continuing housing Classic Cars, Wine... . . . . . 34 developments are attracting thousands of new residents from all over the Lower Movie Magnet . . . . . . . . . . 35 Mainland, the rest of British Columbia, and elsewhere. Industrial space is offered at Gloucester Estates north of Aldergrove, in Northwest Sports Tourism . . . . . . . . . 37 Langley, and in Langley City. Langley Events Centre . . . . 38 Meanwhile, a large portion of Langley Township remains in the Agricultural Land Reserve, serving the farming needs of the Lower Mainland – and indeed, in some Airport. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 cases the world – with a strong agricultural base. From poultry farms to strawberry Golden Ears Bridge . . . . . . 43 crops, from its strong agri-tourism components to its strengthening wine industry, from its state-of-technology greenhouse operations to hi-tech agri-business, Langley Chambler 80 Years . . . . . . 45 still has a lot of its heart firmly entrenched in its farming heritage. Chamber Basic . . . . . . . . . 46 Speaking of heritage, B.C. was born here, with the reading of the Proclamation of British Columbia as a Crown Colony on November 19, 1858, in Fort Langley. That heritage pervades the Langleys, and has offered economic opportunities that complement the progressive technological and forwardthinking industry and commerce that thrive throughout the communities which, taken in Published by Langley Advance #112 6375 202nd Street, Langley B.C. V2Y 1N1 combination, constitute Langley in the 21st century. Publisher Ryan McAdams edm Welcome to the Langleys! Editor Bob Groeneveld Langley City . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Sales Manager Graphic Design

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welcome

place

langley

the

to be!

city.langley.bc.ca

The Place to Be!

Peter Fassbender Mayor of the City of Langley

A note from the Mayor of the City of Langley, Peter Fassbender

The City of Langley is a thriving and growing community of 26,000 people nestled within a space of 10 square kilometres, surrounded by some of the fastest growing areas in all of Canada. We are fortunate to be able to enjoy a relaxed, smalltown lifestyle and a strong community spirit, yet with access to all the amenities of a major urban centre. As our City is fully developed, we look to redevelopment and revitalization as the keys to growth and densification in the community. As such, we continue to aggressively promote and build upon our Downtown Master Plan which encourages redevelopment, revitalization and a focus on our environment. The year 2010 saw a significant number of new development applications, and the results are now taking shape with the building of higher density projects such as the Muse, Blustone, Serenade, and Suede. These projects are steadily bringing new residents to the community who will live, work and raise their families in the City of Langley. In addition an exciting luxury car collection spearheaded by Open Road Auto group including BMW/Mini Langley, Infinity and Audi dealerships, with more to come, will attract a wide customer base to the community. Also, on that same site, Anthem Properties is planning an office retail complex for the near future. The City is also staying connected with current property owners along the Fraser Highway one-way and surrounding areas to encourage investment in the revitalization of existing buildings. Many opportunities still exist to work with others to improve various strategic areas such as the core bus loop,

and the redevelopment of the vacated Coast Capital Savings on the Fraser Highway. This area is critical to the future vision for the Downtown core. Phase 3 of the City’s Downtown Master Plan, introduced in 2010, focuses on the move “from grey to green” on all publicly accessible land, creating an inviting downtown area through a sustainable, thriving, pedestrian-oriented mixed-use compact design. The Public Realm plan envisions a number of improvements to the streets and public open spaces. Some of these initiatives include enhancements to Douglas Park, including the new Cenotaph which will be installed shortly. We are also looking forward to exciting upgrades in McBurney Lane and will be implementing a wayfinding strategy utilizing better signage throughout the City. We are proud of our community and excited about the renewal that we see all around us. We believe that, through ongoing cooperation and engagement with the business community and all our residents, the City of Langley will continue to be “The Place to Be”! – Mayor Peter Fassbender Langley Economic Development Magazine

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

The City’s small core area serves a massive retail trade area with 231,000 people

langley

within a short drive.

overview

The Place to Be!

Langley City doesn’t cover a lot of geographic area, but it packs an over-sized economic punch in the region.

In a Lower Mainland filled with big, sprawling communities, Langley City stands out. A town that calls itself a “complete, compact community,” Langley City is just 10 square kilometres with an estimated population of just over 25,000 people in a primarily urban area. Surrounded by Surrey’s and Langley Township’s their large rural expanses, the City began its life as a crossroads for fur traders, then as a village that served the local farming community. It slowly grew and changed, adding more businesses and surpassing other hamlets within Langley in size. The City – then known as Langley Prairie, developed its own identity in the 1930s, 40s and 50s, and in 1955 it seceded from the larger Langley Township. The City still functions as one of the core business areas for the surrounding communities. It is the home base of the Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce, has a thriving downtown centred around Fraser Highway and Douglas Crescent, and includes part of the Willowbrook Shopping Centre. Its industrial properties and many car, motorcycle, and ATV dealerships use their access to Highway 10 and Fraser Highway to serve wide areas of the Fraser Valley. It has the Coast Hotel and Convention Centre to draw special events and concerts, and a bandshell in Douglas Park for outdoor dancing, music, and plays. Langley City has steadily expanded the number of businesses operating here, from fewer than 1,600 business licenses issued or renewed in 2001 to about 1,900 by 2008. In the Langley Regional City Centre, an area that includes part of the City and Township, there are more than 5,334,000 square feet of retail space and 634,000 square feet of office space.

city

Because it’s at the centre of growing developments in Surrey and the Township, the City’s small core area serves a massive retail trade area with 231,000 people within a short drive. Because of the City’s small size, it actually has more jobs than it has local residents in the work force to fill them. According to Statistics Canada’s 2006 census, there were 12,800 people working in the City, with retail, manufacturing, construction, and health care and social assistance the top job categories. While the City’s recent past has been prosperous, it has been working on a new downtown master plan that would see more changes. The plan calls for a completely revitalized transportation hub at Glover Road and Logan Avenue, where the current bus loop sits. To the south of that would be an entertainment district including the casino and convention centre. To the northwest, an industrial arts area. > Langley Economic Development Magazine

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government gover

In recent years, Langley City has worked with other levels of governments for various projects.

city infrastructure A key to Langley City’s economic strength is in its f orward-thinking policy towards infrastructure and development. Families have been flocking to the Al Anderson Memorial Pool for years. And it was starting to show its age. Langley City was able to partner with the federal and provincial governments to obtain funds from the Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC) program as part of Canada’s Economic Action Plan

to not only give the pool a facelift but also an expansion. “This new and improved venue will serve our citizens for years to come,” said Mayor Peter Fassbender. The $2.13 million project was done over winter 2010/11 and opened this spring with an upgraded entrance area, roof and electrical system, as well as a new family changing area, multipurpose room, outdoor viewing deck, canopy structure for the outdoor bleachers and enhanced security fencing. The project is one of the efforts in Langley City to not only maintain existing infrastructure but enhance what’s here. In recent years, Langley City has worked with other levels of governments for various projects, including the replacement and widening of the Fraser Highway bridge over the Nicomekl River, repaving of the Langley Bypass near Fraser Highway, and the creation of the Douglas Park Spirit Square and bandshell and the Penzer Bike Park. >

continued from previous page

Eventually, more than 30,000 people will call the City home

city

The Place to Be!

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

A core area flanking Fraser Highway will remain shoppingoriented, with pedestrian links to parks, entertainment, and the civic centre. Backstopping all of this would be a change that’s already underway: bringing more people into the downtown core as residents. Developments such as Paddington Square have already added several hundred new residences to the core areas of the City already.

Eventually, more than 30,000 people will call the City home, with many of the new arrivals living in mixed-use areas downtown, taking advantage of the walkable community that was originally laid out in the horse and buggy era. Meanwhile, the City will remain a hub of local festivals and activities, from the annual Good Times CruiseIn car show which draws up to 100,000 visitors, to the Community Day parade and festivities, to an annual Christmas parade. edm

Langley is about to undergo a revitalization project for McBurney Lane, a popular downtown pedestrian area and is planning to construct a new Timms Recreation Centre in the coming years. The municipality hasn’t ignored the stuff people never see but certainly rely upon – servicing and infrastructure. The City is like many Canadian municipalities, striving to upgrade aging water and sewer pipes and other servicing, but is the envy of other communities because Langley City judiciously spends tax revenue from the Cascades Casino on capital work so that the City is debt free. The City has created a Downtown Master Plan which will help guide future development in the community for decades to come. With its designations of different core areas such as for arts and culture, industry, retail and more, the plan will help Langley City ensure it has the mix of amenities and businesses the community needs. The plan embodies the latest design and development principles. The City’s vision is to concentrate mixed-use commercial, residential, and cultural development, and connect the downtown area with the surrounding community through a network

of pedestrian, bicycle, and transit routes while continuing to complement the existing ambiance of the downtown core. The plan’s unveiling in 2008 received a warm reception from the development community. The Downtown Master Plan calls for redevelopment of three key downtown commercial/residential areas (the core, the Langley Mall area, and the area around Park Avenue). While retaining their unique charms, the plan envisions a future with high-density mixed development for the areas that allow commercial space at street level with residential space on the floors above. A section of downtown Langley is home to industry. The City plan is to redevelop an industrial arts district, further enhancing the downtown arts and culture theme which is the central focus of the entertainment district. The area around the Coast Hotel and Convention Centre and Cascades Casino would be the downtown home of all things entertaining. The area around City hall would be enhanced with an arts centre, while the west gateway district around 201-204th Street would be a trendy, mixed-use area. Tying together the downtown would be the transit hub (Glover Road and Logan Avenue). edm

Mary Polak, M.L.A. Langley

Constituency Office: Unit 102 – 20611 Fraser Hwy. Langley, B.C. V3A 4G4 Phone: 604 514-8206 Fax: 604 514-0195

Rich Coleman, M.L.A. Fort Langley, Aldergrove including Willoughby & Walnut Grove #130-7888 200th St., Langley, B.C. V2Y 3J4 Phone: 604-882-3151 Fax: 604-882-3154 www.rich-coleman.com

e-mail: mary.polak.mla@leg.bc.ca website: www.marypolakmla.bc.ca Follow me on Twitter: twitter.com/marypolakmla Langley Economic Development Magazine

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The Place to Be!

...the mix of amenities ti and businesses the e community needs.

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

township welcome

a

place unlike any

other

A Place unlike any other!

Rick Green Mayor of the Township of Langley

A note from the Mayor of the Township of Langley, Rick Green The Township of Langley is a place unlike any other. With its unique mix of urban and rural landscapes and lifestyles, it is a community of opportunity and growth. This is a place where people want to live and work, where they choose to shop and play, where they come to buy their homes, raise their children, and make a living. Today, the Township of Langley is home to over 106,000 residents. According to the Regional Growth Strategy, one million people are anticipated to come to the Lower Mainland within the next 30 years. Of those, it is projected a majority will move into four municipalities, in particular, including the Township of Langley. Metro Vancouver’s forecast calls for a population increase of 100,000 people for our community within the next 30 years, meaning we could effectively double our current population by the year 2040. This is an exciting and challenging prospect for the Township, as we strive to sustain a balance between growth and the lifestyle our residents enjoy so much, and ensure our infrastructure, transportation, housing, recreation, and employment needs are met. There are currently 6,900 businesses operating in the Township of Langley, in hundreds of different sectors, ranging from home-based businesses and retail ventures, to agricultural operations and large-scale industries. With a thriving commercial climate and an ideal location in the centre of the Lower Mainland, our community offers businesses advantages that are hard to find elsewhere.

Direct access to the Trans-Canada Highway, USA/ Canada border, and areas north of the Fraser River via the new Golden Ears Bridge, as well as proximity to airports and ports, offer easy transportation options, and an abundance of available, affordable land provides opportunities for both developers and those looking to create or expand their businesses. A number of post-secondary facilities in the area contribute to the Township’s strong, skilled workforce and provide opportunities for education and research. With the future construction of the Rapid Bus Exchange in Walnut Grove, a new vision for Aldergrove’s downtown core, and the opening up of the 200th Street corridor, the Township of Langley is pleased to welcome businesses to this community and actively encourages companies from all industries to come see all we have to offer. – Mayor Rick Green Langley Economic Development Magazine

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

When it comes to making money in Langley, a lot of companies go after the green both in terms of cash and of the environment.

green biz

There’s

room

for the

environment in Langley’s strong and growing industrial

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“If we don’t do it ourselves, how do we expect our clients to do it?” said Paul Tabuchi, co-owner of Tamlin with Chris Lynn. The firm will be able to offer advice with a firm understanding of the pros and cons of the systems that they’ve built. The design centre gets much of its heating and cooling energy from a geothermal pipe buried nearby. In addition to that, it is heavily insulated with a soy-based spray foam material. “You could eat it,” Tabuchi jokes. While the insulation may not quite be a tasty treat, it is natural and extremely high-density, to keep the building at an even temperature. Then there’s the 40 per cent recycled floor tiles, and the repurposed wood beams used in other areas for flooring. All of this costs more going in, but pays off in the long run in lower energy bills. “We’re looking at maybe six to eight years of pay off,” Tabuchi said. Tamlin is not the only firm that builds green homes. Langley-based modular builder Britco has built nine consecutive PNE Prize Homes, sometimes working with Viessmann Manufacturing, which also happens to have its HQ here. Together, the two firms have crafted homes that save energy through design and their heating and cooling systems. Langley Township staff aren’t unfamiliar with such exotic systems. The Township hall has its own geoexchange system to save on heating bills, and a local area geo-exchange system is under study for part of the Murrayville neighbourhood. edm

B FA

EA WE SU RE

community.

More and more local firms are jumping into sustainability projects, finding it is good for both their bottom line and their public image. Take Freybe Gourmet Foods, a local producer of meats that first built their latest Aldergrove plant nine years ago. For both environmental and cost reasons, the company was looking to save on its heating bill. So the company installed the first closed-loop smokehouse in North America. “We basically take the smoke and recycle it,” said Keith Smith, the sustainability manager for Freybe. By recirculating the smoke, they need to burn less wood chips, and they create far less odour to bother their neighbours. On the opposite end of the spectrum, the company is also very careful about its water. A lot of water is used in the cooking processes on the site, and a lot of contaminated water is produced. Rather than dumping it into the sewers and letting Metro Vancouver clean it – and paying fees for that – the company bought a Corix water treatment unit to remove the vast majority of oils, meat solids, and other waste on-site. The $1 million facility, tweaked by wastewater manager Ken East, has reduced the amount of waste so sharply that Freybe dropped from paying about $10,000 to around $2,500 in monthly fees. Not far down the road from Freybe is Tamlin International Homes, a company that builds houses, cabins, and the occasional golf course clubhouse. They recently opened their new design headquarters, a building stuffed with the same green innovations they offer their clients.

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

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langley township

growing

economic development

communities Opportunities for economic development are wide open in Langley Township, an amalgam of growing communities that range from residential through industrial through agricultural.

When it comes to Langley Township, there’s no single driver for local economic growth. That’s the community’s strength, said the Township’s economic development officer, Gary MacKinnon. There are 536 different types of economic activities taking place in the Township, MacKinnon noted. MacKinnon used to work in Oshawa, Ont., a town based around the auto industry, and when that industry hurt, it hurt the whole town. But Langley’s industries are hugely varied. There is a large agricultural sector, which includes everything from century-old family dairy farms to greenhouses. There are manufacturing and warehouse complexes. There are a huge number of construction firms, and homebuilding continues to be a big local industry. There are clusters of

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businesses in health care, in aviation around the Langley Regional Airport, in tourism from hotels to B&Bs. That wide diversity has made the Township strong, MacKinnon said. When new companies talk to him about locating in the Township, he can often point to other, established firms that could be potential customers or suppliers, right here. “I don’t think that we suffered as much from the recession as other municipalities did,” MacKinnon said. In 2001, the Township issued 4,736 business licenses. By 2010, that number had grown to 6,942, with increases every year for a decade. In Metro Vancouver, only Port Moody and the tiny community of Anmore saw a larger increase in the percentage of business licenses issued than the Township did. >

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

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downtown projected for a major expansion, and the possible highrises to be allowed in Willoughby. Combined with Langley City, that growth will give the Langleys a population larger than Burnaby today. Demographic changes ... by 2040, G will also place Langley R 200,000 Township alongside the are expected largest community in O Metro Vancouver. Surrey, to call the to the west, is expected W community to surpass Vancouver’s T home. population by the year 2041. H Being the next door neighbour of the largest community will give Langley a lot of opportunities, MacKinnon said. With education opportunities at Kwantlen Polytechnic University and Trinity Western University, and more industrial land available than in most communities, MacKinnon said a positive outlook is entirely justified. “We’re just so well situated for the future,” he said. edm

double the population

The construction industry dominates the number of business licenses issued, as every firm that puts up a house or lays down some blacktop needs a local license. They’re followed by retail businesses, then professional, scientific, and technical services. Manufacturing, wholesaling, and finance and insurance all make prominent contributions to the list. MacKinnon points to good signs for the near future, such as dropping vacancy rates for commercial and industrial sites. One of the biggest indicators that Langley businesses will keep growing is the fact that the Township is expected to double in size. There are currently about 100,000 people living in the Township, and by 2040, 200,000 are expected to call the community home. The Township is becoming a much denser community, and most of its population will live in a 2.5 mile wide strip between 196th Street – the border with Surrey – and 216th Street, where the Agricultural Land Reserve begins. Even smaller villages within the Township are expected to be denser, with Aldergrove’s

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

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mormontemple religion

B.C.’s first temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormon faith) towers in Willoughby. Located at 20370 82nd Ave., the temple is a first for B.C., and the seventh temple of the LDS church in Canada. It opened in the spring of 2010. Construction plans were announced on May 25, 2006, and ground broke in August 2007. The 28,165-square-foot temple sits on 11.6 acres. The structure has a vertical height above ground of 140 feet, crowned with a gilded Angel Moroni statue. The temple serves an estimated 22,000 Latter-day Saints in 91 congregations throughout B.C. and northern Washington State. LDS temples differ from the meetinghouses or chapels, where members meet for Sunday worship services. Temples are considered “houses of the Lord” and are reserved for special ceremonies and covenants such as marriage, baptism, and other ordinances that, the church explains, “unite families for eternity.”

Elder William R. Walker, the LDS church’s executive director of the Temple Department, said “it’s wonderful” to have a temple built in B.C. “There is an LDS temple in Seattle, so members of our church in Vancouver didn’t have to go clear across Canada to go to a temple, but they did have to go to Seattle,” Walker said. “Many would say it’s long overdue to have a temple in Vancouver.” While the temple is in Langley Township, it has been named the “Vancouver” temple. Walker said that’s because Latter-day Saints have a practice of naming temples after the metropolitan area in which they are situated. “So when the president of the church decided to build a temple in Vancouver, the decision was made to call it the Vancouver temple,” he explained. “Whether the temple was built in Surrey, or Burnaby, or Langley, it still would have been called ‘Vancouver’ temple.” There are approximately 180,000 members of the Church across Canada, with the largest concentration in Southern Alberta. edm

first in British Columbia

The Mormon temple in Langley has a vertical height above ground of 140 feet.

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Highways

Transportation Getting from here to there is easier in Langley than in many o ther Lower Mainland communities.

Business needs mobility. Workers, supplies, and products need to be moved quickly and efficiently. As Gary MacKinnon, the Township of Langley’s economic development officer notes, Langley is very well positioned. Getting here from points west or east can be accomplished by several major highways – the TransCanada Highway slices through town with three major interchanges, and a fourth planned for the next decade. Fraser Highway and Highway 10 arrive from Surrey. To the south, the Aldergrove border crossing gives access to the United States, and larger crossings in Abbotsford and Surrey are just a short drive away.

Getting here from points west or east can be accomplished by several major highways

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

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• Visitor Attractions

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EXPANSION

One major new transportation element will fall into place in 2012 On the north, the new Golden Ears Bridge gives access to Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows in minutes. The bridge replaced the Albion Ferry, which had been subject to long lineups for about 50 years. Within Langley, major routes are being widened, such as Fraser Highway, upgraded, as at the recently expanded Nicomekl River Bridge, or resurfaced, as parts of Highway 10 and 208th Street were.

One major new transportation element will fall into place in 2012. A $54.6 million park and ride, tunnel, and highway on ramp system is under construction at 202 Street and 86th Avenue. It will allow buses to travel from Langley directly down the TransCanada, over the Port Mann Bridge, and into Coquitlam for the first time in more than two decades. The new system will also allow buses to travel across the highway faster to reach the Golden Ears Bridge. It’s expected to be a major new way for people to get to and from Langley without relying on their cars. Another method of getting out from behind the wheel is Langley Township’s expanded plan for cyclists. A new cycling network plan was approved in 2010, as a 30year plan that will expand bike lanes and encourage two-wheeled transportation. The Langley Regional Airport is a hub for those who prefer to fly by small aircraft, or Abbotsford’s international airport is just down the road. edm

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19

One of North America’s biggest car shows and Langley’s single biggest annual event is back, bringing with it huge benefits to the local economy – and charities.

cruise in

2011

events

The Langley Good Times Cruise-In numbers paint a pretty picture for the local economy. After a year’s hiatus, the community’s single largest event returned for 2011, much to the delight of car enthusiasts, charities, and businesses alike, said president Riccardo Sestito. Just looking at it from a numbers perspective, the

annual car show has become a major tourist attraction that infuses a lot of good will and money into Langley each year. Start with the numbers 1-9-9-7. They represent the beginning, the year when just a handful of merchants in Langley City came together to host 430 cars in the first annual car show. A couple of thousand people attended.

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

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tourist attraction

Now, 14 years/13 shows later, registration numbers And again, despite the one-year break, Cruise-In have risen to around 1,700 vehicles, and the Cruise-In organizers expect to return to those numbers, as the main has become one of the largest mixed car shows in North Saturday show and the associated Sunday automotive America. swap meet bring in car enthusiasts from around the Admittedly, president Riccardo Sestito said, this is first globe. year for mandatory pre-registration, So how does that translate to an economic so those numbers might drop spin-off for the community? I "...the slightly in 2011 – as custom and “How can it not?” responded Sestito. Cruise-In has classic car owners acclimatize to the That’s a lot of people coming to Langley for M become one of new requirement. But recognizing a weekend – sometimes longer – and staying that every cent of the $25 in motels, hotels, or campsites, eating in local P the largest registration fee goes to charity, he’s restaurants, shopping in local stores, and A mixed car confident participants will quickly exploring other aspects of the community. shows in adapt. “I’ve personally spoken to people from all C North Back to basic facts and figures: over the world who come here to see the cars,” with the number of participants Sestito said. T America. climbing dramatically over the The direct economic benefits are great, agreed years, so too has the volume of Deborah Kulchiski, executive director of Tourism spectators who fill the downtown Langley. Langley streets to catch a glimpse at She noted that Cruise-In is one of the all the different vehicles during the community’s largest single tourism events, and without one-day show every September. question, it makes it the busiest weekend of the year in Sestito tosses out another figure: 120,000. Langley. That’s an estimate for the largest number of folks who Any major event, such as Cruise-In, not only draws came out to admire the cars, during each of the most local and regional tourism, but attracts visitors from other recent 2008 and 2009 shows. parts of B.C. and other provinces, and consequently

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21

local charities

events

bolsters the local economy, she said. It’s distinctive, unique events like this, as well as BBQ on the Bypass, the Labour Day soccer tournament, Arts Alive, and Cranberry Festival that seem to attract huge numbers of tourists to Langley year after year, she said. While Sestito said he and the small organizing board are proud that the event attracts such large numbers of people to Langley, it’s the charity aspect of the show that excites him most. That’s where he dragged out some other impressive figures: over the course of the car show’s history, it has raised close to $1 million for local charities – between $80,000 and $120,000 a year, he estimated. Not only are all proceeds from the car show registrations and souvenir sales (T-shirts, licence plates, and posters) donated to charities, but a portion of the sponsorship dollars (over and above operating costs), as well as any money generated by participating service clubs and non-profits go back to the community through organizations.

cruise

2011

in

“The CruiseIn is run by volunteers, who do not make one cent off of the event. We do it because we love it,” Sestito said. “It was never about [numbers or] personal gain for me, the directors, the subcommittees, or any of the volunteers. It was about the cars and the community. Putting on a quality car show and helping out some great charities in our community.” edm

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

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Lang Langley ngle CIT Y & TOWNSHIP

OF

Langley

city

P O P U L AT I O N (estimate) Census . . Census . . Census . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

.25,000 .23,831 .23,643 .22,523

NUMBERS T H AT M E A N B U S I N E S S AS OF 2009:

2,100 business licences Industrial space: 2.5 million sq. feet Commercial space: 4.3 million sq. feet Average household income: $75,000 $40,000-plus income in more than 72% of households

The Place to Be!

2006 L ABOUR FORCE BY INDUSTRY

Total Labour Force (Age 15+) . . . . . . . . . Retail Trade . . . . . . . Manufacturing . . . . . . Construction . . . . . . . Health Care & Social Assistance . . . . Wholesale Trade. . . . . Accommodation & Food Services . . . . Other Services . . . . . Professional Scientific & Technical . . . . . . . . Educational Services . . Transportation & Warehousing . . . . . . . Administrative, Support, etc. . . . . . . Finance & Insurance . . Public Administration . Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation . . . . . . . Information & Cultural industries . . . . . . . . . Real Estate & Rental & Leasing . . . . . . . . . Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing, etc. . . . . . . . Utilities. . . . . . . . . . . Mining & Oil & Gas Extraction . . . . . . . . .

.12,800 . 1,720 . 1,600 . 1,205 . 1,170 . . . 920 . . . 880 . . . 745 . . . 740 . . . 710 . . . 580

Langleys

together

Langley Township and Langley City are located in the Fraser Valley, bordered on the north by the Fraser River and on the south by the United States, less than 45 minutes from downtown Vancouver. The Langley area is served by its own regional airport, rail lines run through the community, and a border crossing links with Lynden, Washington. Incorporated in 1873, Langley Township is a 316-square-kilometre (122 square miles) community of communities that include Aldergrove, Brookswood, Fort Langley, Murrayville, Walnut Grove, Willowbrook, and Willoughby, with a total population of about 106,000. About three-quarters of the Township is comprised of agricultural land. It is home to two significant industrial developments, one in Northwest Langley and the other in the Gloucester area, north of Aldergrove. Langley City is a separate municipality, which came into being through secession from the larger Langley district in 1955. It occupies 10 square kilometres (four square miles) and has a population of approximately 26,000. Its revitalized downtown core is home to the Cascades Casino and Coast Hotel convention complex. Langley Regional Town Centre, shared by the City and Township, provides the Lower Mainland with one of its largest and most comprehensive shopping destinations.

Commercial Retail/ Office/Other Industrial/Institutional

. . . . 15

Numbers may not add up, due to rounding. Demographic information provided by Statistics Canada. Estimates and business information provided by City of Langley website: www.city.langley.bc.ca

P O P U L AT I O N 2011 2006 2001 1996

(estimate) Census . . Census . . Census . .

. . . .

. . . .

. . . .

.106,332 . .93,725 . .86,720 .80,5353

NUMBERS T H AT M E A N B U S I N E S S 6,942 business licences (2010) Average household income: $83,419 (2006)

2006 L ABOUR FORCE BY INDUSTRY

Total Labour Force (Age 15+) . . . . . . . . . .52,665 Agriculture & Resource-based . . . . . . 2,715 Construction & Industries . 5,100 Manufacturing . . . . . . . 4,145 Wholesale Trade. . . . . . 3,295 Retail Trade . . . . . . . . 6,240 Finance & Real Estate . 2,885 Heath Care & Social Services . . . . . . 4,480 Educational Services . . . 3,805 Business Services . . . . 9,495 Other Services . . . . . . 9,490

2010

D W E L L I N G U N I T S C R E AT E D :

. . . 360

. . . 180 . . . . 30

township

2011 (Jan.-June)

Single Family Dwellings Multi-Family Dwellings

. . . 195

Langley

D E V E L O P M E N T S TAT I S T I C S

. . . 430 . . . 425 . . . 365

. . . 340

S TAT I S T I C S

453 159

547 400

A Place Unlike Any Other!

2011 2006 2001 1996

20 12 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

2009

422 512

COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL FLOOR A R E A C R E AT E D ( S Q U A R E M E T R E S ) :

13,119 21,891

18,153 21,461

VA L U E O F C O N S T R U C T I O N PERMITS ISSUED:

Single Family Dwellings Temporary Dwellings Multi-Family Dwellings Miscellaneous Residential Commercial Institutional Industrial Agricultural Total Value

$71,150,759 $957,740 $33,490,045 $7,786,332 $16,398,254 $3,899,200 $18,853,928 $12,837,103 $165,373,362

$98,578,505 $2,142,246 $106,483,639 $16,490,213 $34,574,373 $11,100,500 $14,759,330 $13,161,550 $297,290,355

20,281 58,438

$71,328,746 $1,604,303 $100,860,983 $17,200,221 $22,493,086 $6,819,763 $47,860,650 $5,438,273 $273,606,024

Numbers may not add up, due to rounding. Demographic information provided by Statistics Canada. Estimates and development information provided by Township of Langley website: www.tol.ca edm

Langley Economic Development Magazine

23

208 ST

N

K

YO RK SO

212 ST

216 ST

264 ST

CR

48B

J11 J11 J11 J11 J10 H11 J11 J11 J9 M7 N9 M7

272 ST 264 ST

267 ST

ROAD INDEX E2

EDAL ST............................

M7

A2

M7 C10

B ARTLETT ST.................. BEDFORD TRAIL.............. BENZ CR........................... BILLY BROWN RD............. BRUNEAU......................... BRYDON CR......................

M6

FALLARDEAU................. FERNRIDGE CR.............. FRANCIS AVE.................. FRASER HWY FRENICE CR....................

GAY ST............................ GLOUCESTER WAY........ GLOVER RD..................... GRADE CR....................... GREER ST........................

M7

LANGLEY BYPASS......... LINWOOD DR................... LOCKE RD........................ LOGAN AVE..................... LOUIE CR..........................

NASH ST.......................... NEWLANDS DR................ NICHOLAS CR..................

M7

H10

H10 P9

OLD YALE RD...................

F7

M6

PARK AVE......................... PRODUCTION WAY.........

G10 H11

Q UEEN ST........................

M6

R AWLISON CR................. REES LAKE RD................. RENNIE AVE...................... RIVER RD.......................... ROBERTSON CR.............. ROYAL ST..........................

L7 D10

SADDLEHORN CR........... SAILES AVE...................... ST. ANDREWS AVE........... SALT LANE........................ SCHOOL RD..................... SENEY PL......................... SINGH ST......................... SMITH CR......................... SMITH PL..........................

F5

H10 G10

F9

SOUTHRIDGE DR............. SPRINGFIELD DR...............

F9

T ELEGRAPH TRAIL........... TRATTLE ST.......................

L8

This map is made possible by the Township of Langley Geomatics Department.

C ASAMIR ST.....................

CHURCH ST...................... CLOVERMEADOW DR...... COULTER CRT.................. COPPERBEECH AVE........ COTTONWOOD LANE...... CRICKMER CT................. CRUSH CR........................

P8 L5

M7

F8

M6 D1

G11

M7 M6 G6

M7 M7 J6

H ADDEN ST.................... HITCHINGPOST CR......... HOUSTON CR.................. HUDSON BAY ST.............

M6 M7 G2 K8

F10 M7 M7 F5

M7

M6

IMPERIAL RD................... INDUSTRIAL AVE.............

H10

J ENNY LEWIS AVE..........

M7

G10 M7

KING ST........................... KANAKA ST......................

M7

H10

L ABONTE AVE................. LANDMARK WAY.............

M7 J9

H10

M cALLISTER ST............. McBRIDE ST.................... McKINNON CR................. MACKIE LANE.................. MACKIE ST....................... MAJOR ST........................ MARR ST.......................... MARTINGALE CR............. MARY AVE........................ MAVIS AVE....................... MAXWELL CR................... MAYSFIELD CR................ MICHAUD CR.................... MIONAHAN CRT............... MORRISON CR................. MOWAT ST....................... MUENSCH TRAIL............. MUFFORD CR................... MURCHIE RD.................... MURRAY CR.....................

M6 N8

M7 M7 M7 F5

M6 M6 J8 F9

G10 G10

D1

M7 M5 F5 M6

M7 M7

UPLANDS DR.....................

W AGONWHEEL CR.......... WAKEFIELD DR & CT........ WALNUT GROVE DR......... WARREN PL....................... WASKA ST.......................... WAYBURNE CR................. WIGGONS PL..................... WILDING CR & CT............. WILDWOOD DR................. WILLOUGHBY WAY & CT.. WILLOWBROOK CONN..... WILLOWBROOK DR.......... WINSTON CT..................... WOODLAND DR & CT........ WORRELL CR.................... WRIGHT ST........................

For more maps and information visit: www.tol.ca/FindaPlace/Maps.aspx

DAVIS CR......................... DOUGLAS CR................... DOUGLAS ST................... DUNCAN WAY..................

D1

E ASTLEIGH CR................

H10

Langley Economic Development Magazine

M6

K8

H11

K9

M6 M7

H10 A6 F8

275 ST

276 ST

D C RE AN

276 ST

CITY OF ABBOTSFORD

272 ST

ST

262B

261 ST

CANADA CUSTOMS

G10 M7 M7

M7 J8

M7

Y EOMANS CR...................

YOUNG AVE.......................

D1

M7 F9

LEGEND commercial

industrial

G6 J11 M9 J11 M7 J11 J11 J11 J11 J11 J10

This map is made possible by the Township of Langley Geomatics Department Disclaimer: The data provided has been compiled from various sources and is not warranted as to its accuracy or sufficiency by the Township of Langley. The user of this information is responsible for confirming its accuracy and sufficiency. 0

0.25

0.5

1

H11

Kilometres Kilometers

J11 J11 J9 M7 N9 M7

0

0.15

0.3

0.6 Miles

version date: 08/2010 Source: n:\Maps\CustomMaps\Geo\Geo_20090001_Langleys_Map

3

ALDERGROVE BORDER CROSSING

2

SCHOOLS urban

A

Aldergrove Lake Regional Park

1 27200

24800

24000

4

26400

5

B

27600

0 AVE

25600

6

22400

21600

7 23200

8

20800

19600

20000

9

B 272 ST

260 ST

254 ST ST 0 AVE

244 ST

CANADA

US CUSTOMS

A LDER DR........................ ALD-BELLM HWY............. ALLARD CR...................... ARMSTRONG RD.............

TR R

256 ST

252 ST

268 ST

264 ST

260 ST

248 ST

252

4 AVE

2 AVE

0 AVE

10

271 ST 269A

252 ST

250 ST

246 ST 244 ST

242 ST 237A ST

RD

MU R

CH 2 AVE

USA 11

272 ST

272 ST

252 ST

250 ST 242 ST

240 ST 236 ST

235 ST ST

PB

C

224 ST

AM

23 5

212 ST 212 ST

210 ST

208 ST

204 ST

1 AVE

E

236 ST 232 ST 228A

231 ST

216 ST

208 ST 204 ST

202 ST

200 ST 199

227 ST

197A ST

198A 196A ST

CITY OF SURREY

198 ST

5A AVE

Y

M9 J11 M7 J11

4 AVE

HW

J11

Municipal Natural Park 4 AVE

6 AVE

M HA

G6

6 AVE

NG

W AGONWHEEL CR.......... WAKEFIELD DR & CT........ WALNUT GROVE DR......... WARREN PL....................... WASKA ST.......................... WAYBURNE CR................. WIGGONS PL..................... WILDING CR & CT............. WILDWOOD DR................. WILLOUGHBY WAY & CT.. WILLOWBROOK CONN..... WILLOWBROOK DR.......... WINSTON CT..................... WOODLAND DR & CT........ WORRELL CR.................... WRIGHT ST........................

1 AVE 1 AVE

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12B AVE

8 AVE

8 AVE

6 AVE

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F9

3 AVE

10 AVE

10 AVE

3 AVE

2 AVE

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13

12 AVE

-

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3A AVE

0

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3 AV E

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M7

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T ELEGRAPH TRAIL...........

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14 AVE

12 AVE

8 AVE

8 AVE

14 AVE

C

16 AVE 16 AVE

14A AVE

AN

800

J8

20 AVE 20 AVE

R

M7

SEE DETAIL MAP

21B AVE

Otter Park

D

25 AVE

18 AVE

Lochiel U-Connect

Campbell Valley Regional Park

21B AVE

16 AVE

12 AVE

12 AVE

Creekside Park

24 AVE

RT

G10

25 AVE

E

B

M7

28 AVE

19 AVE

F5 M7

Aldergrove Community Arena

Aldergrove Athletic Park

26 AVE

WixBrown

20 AVE

16 AVE

16 AVE

FRASER HWY

Aldergrove Kinsmen Community Centre

28 AVE

18 AVE

18 AVE

1600

270 ST 32 AVE

30A

EK

248 ST

28 AVE

228 ST

EK

212 ST

E

268 ST 268 ST

31B

E Philip Jackman Park

33 AVE

262B

261A

260B

262 ST

Y

260 ST

224 ST

207 ST

210 ST

R

26 7

264 ST 256 ST

254 ST

ALDERGROVE

260 ST

HW

24 AVE

220 ST

204 ST

206 ST

CR

FE RN

FERNRIDGE 196 ST

M5

C

20 AVE

20 AVE

273A ST

24 7 A

246A

247 248 ST

ER

26 AVE

22 AVE

N

M7

M7 M7

27600

267 ST

260 ST 256 ST

40 AVE

29 AVE

SO

20 AVE

272 ST

264 ST 256 ST

252 ST 252

249B

244

245A 246

244 ST

246A ST 244 ST SADDLEHO RN

244 ST

CR

29B AVE

24 AVE

R ID

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22

AVE

C

CITY OF ABBOTSFORD

256 ST

258 ST

254 253 ST 248 ST

250

247A

246B

246 ST

244B ST

244 240 ST

236

N

30 AVE

26 AVE

Glenwood

206 ST

198 ST

25 AVE

204A ST

202 ST

200 ST

196 ST

P

A

24 AVE

43 AVE

36 AVE

AS

32 AVE

32 AVE

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21

D10

F5 M6

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46 AVE

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38 AVE

Poppy Estates Golf Course

230 ST

228 ST

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40 AVE

36 AVE

28 AVE

AN

L7

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VE

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27 AVE

RI

N

Coghlan

FR

236 ST

210 ST

212 ST

202 ST

RD

201 ST

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48 AVE

13

35 AVE

34A AVE

32 AVE

LA

28 AVE

32B AVE 32A

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Rees-Callard Natural Park

20 9

D1

30 AVE

207A

202 ST

Noel Booth Community Park

32 AVE

3200

208 ST

205 ST

34 AVE

F8

206 ST

A6

50 ST

O

46 AVE

ROBERTSON CR

Apex 36A AVE

SEE DETAIL MAP

51 AVE

48 AVE

Fraser Valley Adventist

44 AVE

Aldergrove Christian Academy

37A AVE

35 AVE

MARTINGALE

40 AVE

38 AVE

36 AVE

36 AVE

245A ST

242 ST 242 242

241

242A ST

241 ST

239 ST

238 ST

232 ST

224 ST

228 ST

216 ST

40 AVE

CR

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52 AVE

Greater Vancouver Zoo

SALMON RIVER UPLANDS

G

GLOUCESTER WAY

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52 AVE

50 AVE

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55 AVE

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1

53 AVE

51 AVE

50 AVE

UC

SA

46B

54 AVE

52 AVE

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AS

North Otter

48 AVE

Peterson Road

FR

242 DR

240B

236 ST

237 ST

235 ST

236 ST

Brown Park

44 AVE

RD

51 AVE

D.W. Poppy

53

GLO

EXIT 73

OST GP

K

212 ST

243 ST

PL 58A

239 ST

238 ST

T 4S 23

52A

Steele Park

IN

228 ST

53 AVE 52 AVE

57 AVE

55A

H

EE

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57B

58

56 AVE

245A

WH

53A AVE

H

60 AVE

58 AVE

56A 55B

54 AVE

N

60 AVE

60 AVE

58 AVE

55 AVE

CR OL D

Operations Centre

MURRAYVILLE

58

DD SA

AY

200 ST

GLOUCESTER 59 AVE

57

54A

47 AVE

46 AVE

BROOKSWOOD E

S

E

58A AVE

C IT

233 ST

210A

23 7A

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Langley Christian 48 AVE School

RCMP Denny Ross Memorial Park

208 ST

A 58

55A AVE

50 AVE

W.C. Blair Recreation Centre

RR

208 ST

237A PL

224 ST

LANGLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

38 AVE

M7

B AV

County Line

60

56 AVE

RD

40 AVE

64

64 AVE

CR 62 AVE

59

CLOVERMEADOW

52 AVE

George Preston Recreation Centre

J

AV E

250

63 A 63

62A CR

67

64 AVE 64 AVE

238A 236A

230 ST

228 ST

65 AVE

56 AVE

56 AVE

49A

C RE E K

62 AVE

Tall Timbers Golf Course

57A AVE

Y

68 AVE

LAN

61 AVE

58 AVE

213A

RD VE R GL O

200 ST

211 ST

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HW

GH

258 ST

D

64 AVE

226 ST

240 ST

Williams Park

L

OO

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W

OM

ER

CO

1

TT ON

IV

25 2A

252 238 ST

68 AVE

66 AVE

CO

K

64 AVE

U

4000

248 ST

240 ST

22 7

229 ST

232 ST

68 AVE

K

72 AVE

AV E

70 AVE

229

68 AVE

L

73 AVE

72

HW Y #1

R

IC

74

72 AVE

70A

224 ST C

R AV E

Langley Golf Centre

K9 M6

256 ST

240 ST

228B R

231 A

76 AVE

70A AVE

O BR O W LO ST

20 4

205 ST

203 ST

71

N

M

G10 G10

229 ST

C BY PA SS

CR

M AX W EL L

EXIT 66

H

CR

F

F9

257A ST

T ST

223A ST 224 ST

72 AVE

Y

AV E

D R R VE

HW

74A AVE

73 AVE

72

216 ST 216 ST

R TO EC

NN

G LO

210 ST 208 ST

207 ST CO

Milner Park

48 AVE

DE

M6 J8

GLOVER RD

217A ST 214A ST

211 ST 211B

211B

211A

211A

211B

212 ST

212

R C 21 3

209A ST

203B

206A 206 ST

205

204 ST

205

202B ST

222A

N DA Y

MU 208 ST

208A

209 ST 209A ST

209 ST

203B

200 ST 199A 200 ST

201 ST 201 ST

202

WRIGH

212 ST

C RE

EK

216 ST

204 ST

206

200 ST

204 ST

206 ST

204 ST

206 ST

202A ST

198 197 197 ST

208B

196A ST 196 ST

198A

199 ST

197 ST

198A ST

CITY OF SURREY

198B ST

197B ST 198

197 196

McMillan Park 10

Ponder Park

75 AVE

W IL

ER

Newlands Golf & Country Club

48 AVE

GRA

252 ST

222 ST

ST

FRAS

OL D

F5 M6

240 ST

0 21

208 ST

203 ST

199A ST

198B

197B

196A ST

198 ST

Douglas Park

City Park

N AT H A N C R E E K

CO

CREE K

NO

76A AVE

74 AVE

10 IT H

LANGLEY REGIONAL AIRPORT

CR

80 AVE

IL

CR

Langley Twin Rinks

53 AVE

NI

84 AVE

GLEN VALLEY

80 AVE

A TR

ST

CR

SM

EL L

80 AVE

77A

CR

76A

CR

McLeod Athletic Park

R I VE R

KL ME

84 AVE

82 AVE

78 AVE

76 B

Trinity Western University

21 6 IT H

AV E

AV E

61 AVE

AN CR

LA S

WE S T

78

NT E

76B AVE

CR

G

DOUG

84 AVE

H AP

RR

L

Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce

N AT H A N S L OU G H

GR LE TE

AV E

88 AVE

RD

RD

NG RO MST

FO

62 AVE

Casino & Convention Centre

CITY OF LANGLEY

4800

M7

LA BO

Kwantlen University

53 AVE

M7

FORT LANGLEY RAWLISON CR

79 AVE

79 AVE

76 AVE

SM

US H

64

M UF

RD

86 AVE

M

91 AVE

Glen Valley Regional Park

87 AVE

SEE DETAIL MAP

60

GA N

City Hall

G

88 AVE

Belmont Golf Course

RI VE R

F R A S E R RIV ER

0

LO

56 AVE

L

23

Y

Y WA

ON

MORRI

MILNER

O

C TI DU

HW

McMILLAN ISLAND

NE

LANGLEY BY PASS

10

SE R

AIL

80 AVE

CR W O

69

65 AVE

WILLOWBROOK

WILLOWBROOK DR

FR A

H O PR

Township of Langley Civic Facility

H TR

AN

LM RI ON VE R

HW Y #1

68 AVE 67 AVE

CH

Fort Langley National Historic Site

AV E

78 AVE

72 AVE

71B

70 AVE

RD

AR

73B

71A 70A

64 AVE

M7

80A

76 AVE

72B 71A 71

82

King's School

73A AVE

O

82 AVE

74B AVE

6400

5600

83A

82A

77A AVE

76 AVE

DF

N

DISTRICT OF MAPLE RIDGE

81B

78 AVE

67

M6 N8

R AWLISON CR................. REES LAKE RD................. RENNIE AVE...................... RIVER RD.......................... ROBERTSON CR.............. ROYAL ST..........................

27200

26400

25600

24800

24000

23200

22400

21600

20800

20000 199B

197 ST 196B

201 ST

E AV

Willoughby Community Park

75A

73A

BE

SA

83B

Willoughby

R.E. Mountain

66 AVE

N N

83B 83A

TELE GRAP

83 AVE

80 AVE

76 AVE

88 AVE

86A AVE

SEE DETAIL MAP

81A

Tourism Information

The Redwoods Golf Course

Walnut Grove Community Centre

84B

80A

72 AVE

M6

M6

24

84 AVE

Yorkson Community Park

J

H10 P9

H11

YOUNG AVE.......................

96 AVE

WALNUT GROVE

HW Y #1

WILLOUGHBY

70 AVE

M7

PRODUCTION WAY.........

Y EOMANS CR...................

97

96 AVE

7

Brae Island Regional Park

Fort Langley Golf Course 96

84 AVE 83 AVE

H10

Q UEEN ST........................

SAILES AVE...................... ST. ANDREWS AVE........... SALT LANE........................ SCHOOL RD..................... SENEY PL......................... SINGH ST......................... SMITH CR......................... SMITH PL..........................

85 AVE

Langley Events Centre

7200

M7

G10

SADDLEHORN CR...........

CREEK

88 AVE

82 AVE

71

PARK AVE.........................

CR

M7 M6

F7

city.langley.bc.ca

CR

K

M7

OLD YALE RD...................

RD ALLA

M7

F9

tol.ca

ON

8000

F10

M7

P

CR

RD LA AL

CR

Walnut Grove Community Park

LATIMER

88 AVE

84 AVE

L

K8

H10

NS

West Langley Park

86 AVE

G2

H10

1

Township of Langley

INN

8800

M7

G10

YE OM A

97B 97

1 20

EXIT 58

M7

H10

102 AVE

100 AVE

96 AVE

1

M6

H11

NEWLANDS DR................ NICHOLAS CR..................

M

M7

LANGLEY BYPASS......... LINWOOD DR................... LOCKE RD........................ LOGAN AVE..................... LOUIE CR..........................

NASH ST..........................

H TR

M7

LANDMARK WAY.............

2

City of Langley

104 AVE

102B AVE

92A AVE

C10

M6

McBRIDE ST.................... McKINNON CR................. MACKIE LANE.................. MACKIE ST....................... MAJOR ST........................ MARR ST.......................... MARTINGALE CR............. MARY AVE........................ MAVIS AVE....................... MAXWELL CR................... MAYSFIELD CR................ MICHAUD CR.................... MIONAHAN CRT............... MORRISON CR................. MOWAT ST....................... MUENSCH TRAIL............. MUFFORD CR................... MURCHIE RD.................... MURRAY CR.....................

AP

94A AVE

H10

K8

M cALLISTER ST.............

LE G

9600

M7

L ABONTE AVE.................

3

THE LANGLEYS

CR

RD ALLA

100A

98 AVE

G10

KING ST........................... KANAKA ST......................

4

Derby Reach Regional Park

CR

CR

INDUSTRIAL AVE.............

TE

J9

H10

LO

UIE

99A

98A

M7

IMPERIAL RD...................

J ENNY LEWIS AVE..........

N

J6

F5

5

101 AVE

M7

HITCHINGPOST CR......... HOUSTON CR.................. HUDSON BAY ST.............

6

ALLARD CR

N SO

H ADDEN ST....................

R

S E

20 8A

GLOUCESTER WAY........ GLOVER RD..................... GRADE CR....................... GREER ST........................

10400

M7

H10

GAY ST............................

A F R

E R I V

R

G6

E ASTLEIGH CR................

7

K MC

M7 M6

D1

EDAL ST............................

P

G11

DAVIS CR......................... DOUGLAS CR................... DOUGLAS ST................... DUNCAN WAY..................

FALLARDEAU................. FERNRIDGE CR.............. FRANCIS AVE.................. FRASER HWY FRENICE CR....................

G

R

C ASAMIR ST..................... CHURCH ST...................... CLOVERMEADOW DR...... COULTER CRT.................. COPPERBEECH AVE........ COTTONWOOD LANE...... CRICKMER CT................. CRUSH CR........................

11200

D1

8

Q

M7 F8 M6

9

CR EE

M6

10

Q

P8 L5

GE S BRID

B ARTLETT ST.................. BEDFORD TRAIL.............. BENZ CR........................... BILLY BROWN RD............. BRUNEAU......................... BRYDON CR......................

11

A2

N EA R

E2

E GOLD

A LDER DR........................ ALD-BELLM HWY............. ALLARD CR...................... ARMSTRONG RD.............

19600

ROAD INDEX

ROADS

university/college

highway

secondary

major

middle

overpass

elementary

arterial

alternate

collector

private

local trails

27600

272 ST

273 ST

IT

275 ST 275

A

F

E

O

SURREY

DELTA

R

G

MAPLE RIDGE MISSION

RICHMOND

G

276 ST

27600

BRITISH COLUMBIA

VANCOUVER

O

276

275A

TR

27200

1

NORTH VANCOUVER

A

NANAIMO

J

A N D C REE K

274A

272 ST

224 ST

PA SS

274A

273B

272B ST

273A

272A ST

273

271A 270B

R

BRUNEAU

271 ST

270B 270B

270A 269A

T

275A ST

273 ST

273 ST

274

273A

272A 272B

271B

271A

273B ST

272B

271B

270A 270A

269A 268B 269 ST

274A

271

270 ST

267A 267B ST

267A ST

266B 266A

267 ST

271A

266A 265B

265A

266A

265B ST

265A

26400

RD VE R G LO

270B ST

268 ST 264A

264A ST

264 ST

215B

21600

268 ST

215

216 ST

269

216A

216 ST

216A ST 216A ST

217A ST

215B

T

214

214 B ST

21600

ABBOTSFORD

LANGLEY

IA

VANCOUVER ISLAND

BLAINE

WASHINGTON STATE

GULF ISLANDS

BELLINGHAM SYDNEY

CR

USA

JUAN DE FUCA STRAIT

6400

224 ST 224 ST

223A ST

40 AVE

ST

SIN GH

E

MC BR ID E

Langley Centennial Museum

EL

BC Farm Machinery & Agricultural Museum

RD

Marina Park

MA VI S

ar y

M

ST

MA RY

AV E

Fort Langley National Historic Site

BA YS T

Fort Langley

ST RO YA LS T

ST FR AN CIS

HU DS ON

ST

RD

GL OV ER

AN DR EW S

MO WA TS BA T RT LE TT MC ST AL LIS TE R ST

ST

CH UR CH

Cemetery

MA JO R

NA SH ST

MACKIE LANE

88 AVE

BR OW N

QU EE N

MA RR

ED AL

Lib r

NN

KIN G

C

FR E

Outdoor Pool SC HO OL RD

HOUS TON

CH A BIL LY

MA CK IE

YOUNG

8800

8800

SA

LM RI ON VE R

4000

THE HOUSE NUMBERING SYSTEM

L

37A AVE

36 AVE

WA OUL SK TER A CT KA NA KA CA SIM IR

H GR EE R

SM IT

F

TR AIL

Fort Langley Community Park TRATTL E ST

44A

The numbered grid around the border of these maps refer to the Valley Coordinate and House Numbering System. This is an imaginary grid covering the Lower Mainland of British Columbia and refers to the first two digits of a four digit house number or the first three digits of a five digit house number. Even numbered houses are normally located on the south or east side of the road. Odd numbered houses are normally located on the north or west side of the road. Avenues normally run east-west, streets run north-south.

Brookswood

COPPER BEECH

RENNIE

224 ST

213 ST

Langley Fundamental Middle & High

MURRAYVILLE

Langley Fine Arts

GAY ST

45

M

46A

SA ILE SA ST VE AN DR EW S

ARDE AU

RD

NIC

223B

224

223

46

Operations Centre Langley Golf Centre

FALL

Belmont Golf Course

GLOVER RD

CR

James Hill

46A

HT ST

BE NZ

96 AV E

4800

9600

FO

BE DF OR D

JE Salmon River NNY LE WIS Natural Area

HADDEN ST

46A

AV E

45 44A

Y

BE D

WRIG

46

D

223A ST

R

45A

223A

CR

E

ER HW

224

YA L

222A ST

LD

23200

Fort Langley Golf Course

E A 47 AV 221

222A ST

46A

Murrayville Outdoor Activity Park

222 ST

221 O

219

G

RCMP

Library

46 AVE

44A

222 School Board

AS

N Brae Island Regional Park

49A

FR

6

CR

223B

223A

222 ST

223 ST

223 ST

221A ST

219 ST

219A ST

219 ST

Langley Demonstration Garden

220 ST

217B

217A

218A ST

45

N ARD

9600

BENZ

217

45A

219 ST

217

44A AVE

44 AVE

217B ST

O M

E I DG

46A

7

50 AVE

221A ST

217B 217A

216A

SO U

49 AVE

CT Memorial Park HAN NA CR AY

45

CR

T HR

215 ST E

215B

215A ST

46B

46A

East Brookswood Park

REV: 07/2010

City of Langley Township of Langley, including: Aldergrove, Fort Langley, Walnut Grove

51

Elementary

Denny Ross

47A

47

MU RR

214A

48A AVE

48A

H

W.C. Blair Recreation Centre

49A

BROOKSWOOD 37A AVE

Langley

50 AVE Fundamental

Porter Park

212 ST 42A

50A

51

Arthur Rose Park

218A

50A

49B

Murrayville Cemetery

52 AVE

218

217A ST 215A

50B

216 ST

210A

51A

50

43 AVE

42 AVE

52A

216A

214A

RD

SOUTHR ID G

209A

209B

210A ST

209A

215 ST

E

214 ST

YA L

213A ST

208 ST

214A

210 A

20 9

43A AVE

209 ST

208A

44 AVE

THE LANGLEYS

5600

LANGLEY MEMORIAL Credo HOSPITAL Elementary

Credo High

38 AVE 207B ST

TO SEATTLE

LANGLEY REGION MAP

56 AVE

218A

213A

210A 209A

51B AVE

45

40 AVE

38

37

Y

M

MA YS FI E

Iris Mooney 46 Park

George Preston Recreation Centre

204

203

203A

36B AVE

202A

201A

37B

Bell Park 206A ST

37

36A AVE

268A

217B 218 217

BY

57A AVE

Canadian Museum of Flight and Technology

47B

46A AVE

DR

209

209 209

208A

207A ST

43A

39 AVE

207 ST

37B AVE

S

2400

R BE

DUNCAN

EL L

58 AVE Langley Education Centre

47 AVE

DS

209

208A

208 ST

47 AV E

208B

207B

LA N

45A AVE

38A AVE

38A 38

37A AVE

24A AVE

Grandstand

Sportsbox

HW

Newlands Golf & Country Club

46 AVE

Langley Lawn Cemetery

205B ST

38A

205A ST

204A ST

203B

203A ST

202A ST

202 ST

39

LANGLEY BYPASS

208 ST 20 8

209 208A

209

209 ST

208A ST

207A

NE W

44A AVE

207A ST

206A ST

205B ST

40A AVE

211 ST

RD ER 207 ST

207A

20 7B

207 ST 20 6A

207 44A

204A

40 AVE

25A AVE

2

72

211A

211B

B

A N DR

IV

E

TIO LL EC CO 20 6A

OV 206

206 ST

49 AVE

57A

48 AVE

44 AVE

207 ST

203

204B ST

40B

205A ST

201A 41A

202A

202 ST

201A ST

41A

41 AVE

26B

D

CR

Creekside Park

25 AVE

22400

213 ST

215 S

213 ST

212 ST

213 ST

214 ST

214 A ST

211 ST 211B

210 ST

O BR W

IL LO 206 ST

20 5A

20 6A

GL

SALT LANE

206

AVE

205

205A

206

206A

206 ST

206B

205A

204A

45A AVE

Uplands

204

49A AVE

48A

CR

46B

45

50 AVE

49B

SER

O LD

50A AVE

50

BMX Track & Skateboard Park

41B

40A AVE

28 AVE

Shortreed

SAN JUAN ISLANDS

LANGLEY REGIONAL AIRPORT

FRA

51

Nicholas Park

50A

GRA DE

Dog Off Leash Park

Belmont

27200

26400

21600

217A

215B 215A

214B ST

PL

212B

214B

213 ST

217 ST

212B

2 214 14

212A ST

212 ST 211B ST

210 ST

215A

214A

212B

213 ST

212B ST

214 ST

212

211A

209B

212A 212 ST

211A

212A

210

209B

211 ST

WA L

N DA Y

MU 208A

209 ST 209A ST

208B 20800 20800

208A

208 ST

R

W

27

O K

CO

20 7

NN

EC TO

205A 205

Y

CR

M AX

27A

26A AVE

SPRINGFIELD

Aldergrove DRIVE Community Arena

W

205 ST

205B

51

50B

46 AVE

45A AVE

52A

51B AVE

51A

47A

Langley Secondary

Derek Doubleday Arboretum

52 AVE

Langley Community Music School

205

CR

204A

Nicomekl Park

46A AVE

204 ST

203A

CR

Senior Resource Centre

46 AVE

205

202

203 ST

DE

Rotary Centennial Park 209

ST

48B

206

202A

53 A

204 ST

204

205

203 ST

203A

202A

20 3

202 S T

2 02A S T

206

203 ST

203 ST

201A ST

201A

201 201 ST 201 20 1

201 ST

200A ST

201A ST

199A ST

FORT LANGLEY

L

RAWLISON CR

E

9

8

7

23200

10

22400

20000

35A AVE

21600

Noel Booth 20800

198

198A

198 ST 198 ST

IT H

30 AVE

28 AVE

7200

64 AVE

McLeod Athletic Park

Langley Twin Rinks

57 AVE

39A AVE

37 AVE

ST

211

209A

208B

208B

209 ST

EK

CRE

207B ST TR

208 ST

207 ST

205 204A

ST

20 4

203 ST

202 201A ST

202 ST

201A ST

201 ST

201 ST 200A 200A ST 200B

200A ST 200 ST

200A ST

199A ST

200 ST

208B

206 ST

205

204 ST

202B ST

201B

201A

201 ST 201 ST 200A

198C

200A ST

199A

199 198B ST

197A

211A ST

207 207 207

206

206A

202 200B

WILDWOOD

CT

200 ST

199 ST 19 8A

199A ST

199A

199 ST

198B

199

199 198C ST

199A

199A

199

198A ST 198A

198 ST

198B ST

197A ST 197B

20 3

198

198 ST 198 ST

198

198 ST

197B ST

19 8B

199A

196

197

197A

196B

197A ST

196A 196

197

196A 196 ST 196A

196B ST 196A 196 ST 197 ST

197A ST

196A ST 19600

HW

Kwantlen University

Legion Memorial Gardens

Al Anderson 49A Pool

Linda Carlson Park

41A AVE

37A AVE

11

10

3200

31 AVE

29A AVE

27B AVE

26 AVE

32B 32A

31A

31A

28B AVE

E AV 96

E

43A AVE

38 AVE

36 AVE

NO

B 46

38B

38A AVE

8

32A

FRASER HWY

27 AVE

33A

33

32A

31B

Kinsmen Heritage Park & Telephone Museum

D

28A AVE

Community Secondary Betty Gilbert

Aldergrove Athletic Park

32B

33

H

EK

ST

44 AVE

30 AVE

33A

VICTORIA

RE

38B

35A AVE

GR A

E

34 AVE

33B 33A

33B

33A

Outdoor Pool

Library

61 AVE

C

20 3

44A AVE

LAS

City Park

50

AV 49A

42A AVE

41 AVE

39A

CR

CR

AY

45

H CR 56 AVE

Downtown BIA Office

Blacklock

48 AVE

46A 46 AV E

Dumais Park

IG

53A AVE

5A 20

50A

H.D. Stafford 48A

43 AVE

199A

38A

E

AN

AV E

A 51

49

47

46 AA VE

51 B

RI V E R

50

47A AVE

TL E

Douglas Park School

53 AVE

48 AVE

45A

40A AVE

ST

SM

L

Douglas Park

50

49A

G

Recreation Centre

Portage Park

50 AVE

Simonds

Library

IT H

32 AVE YA LE OLD R

33B

Philip Jackman Park

32A AVE

2400

8

21 6

34 AVE

Parkside Centennial

30A AVE

30 AV

34A AVE

PORT ANGELES

42 AVE

Brookswood Park

AV E

CR

RR

40A

PARK

KL

ME

EA S

LO

DOU G

54 AVE

43A AVE

CR

Wiser Natural Park 4000

SH

29B

8800

IL

L

U

197A

52 AVE

Sendall Gardens

McB Lane urney

City Hall

CR UD 54A AVE

CO NI

42 AVE

41A AVE

TR A

CR

L D CR

42A

82

9

EL L

RD

43 AVE

HA

53A AVE

43A AVE

AY

Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce

54 AVE

Alice Brown

NW

Casino & Convention Centre Inn Library

50A AVE

44B AVE

FO RD

E

196A

MIC

52

45

CA

Corn es ers

Nicomekl

44 AVE

APH

33B

32 AVE

83B

SM

B 50

44B

62 AVE

L YA

Zazulak Park

Hunter 45B Park 45A AVE

84 AVE

34

DR

Aldergrove Kinsmen Community Centre Aldergrove

D

82 AVE

OR R

LD

45A

46A AVE 46 AVE

M UF

20 7A

7 19

46A

AV E

56 AVE

53A

47A

EG R

64 AV E

O

T 9S 19

46A

DU N

AN

49

Penzer Park

47 AVE

47 AVE

45B

47A

Langley Skateboard Park

LA VE

49A AVE

49 AVE

208A

20000 20000

200 ST 199A

198

WILLOUGHBY CT

WAYBURNE

CR

CR

7 19

Conder Park ST

Buckley Park

F

52A 52

50A AVE

48A AVE

46A

Muriel Arnason Library

53 AVE

48 AVE

4800

ST RIA

Linwood Park

53B

53A

TEL

MILNER

CR

N DO

199A

BRY

53A

197B

65 AVE

Timms Community Centre

54 AVE

Brydon Lagoon

50 AVE

DU

55A AVE

CITY OF LANGLEY 49B

66A 66

N

Y WA 54A AVE

Brydon Park

84B

82A

CR U W

A

ION

Langley Montessori

G

200A

199

198

197B ST

198A

197A

CT

IN

55A AVE

53 AVE

LO G

57A

86A AVE

81B

69A

G

CT

56 AVE

66B

30 AVE

86 CRT

83A

T

99 ST

A ST

19

197B

196B PL

197 196 196 ST

196 A ST

Y

57A AVE

85B

87 AV E

ER

32A AVE

30A

LANGLEY BY PASS

Y WA

N

AV E

83B

69B

O

IO CT DU

HW

87 PL 86A CR

Milner Park

67 AVE 66A

Township of Langley Civic Facility

10

R

M 88 AVE

67B

66 AVE

CR

D

67A

67

3200

E

35 AVE

AL D

33 AVE

The Redwoods Golf Course

68 AVE 67B

Y WA

RK MA

71B 71A

9600

29 AVE

9

69

204B

198 197 ST 19600

196A

196B

197 196B

197

IN

N LA

SE

DU

5600

68A

88B

72 AVE

71B

70 AVE

WILLOWBROOK

O PR

O PR

69

WILLOWBROOK DR

FR A

S

69A

Pass Program / Route 32

Langley Meadows

64 AVE

S PA BY

AY W

WILLOUGHB Y

6400

N LA

70A 70

WAKEFIELD CT Meadows Edge Park

D

CT

WINSTON CRT

EY GL

R.C. Garnett

70 AVE

WILDW OOD

WIL

Willowbrook Park

60

71A

WARREN WOODLAND DR WIGGINS PL

WA KEFIELD

65B PL

H

10 72 AVE

71A

69B

G

WAKEFIELDDR

19 CT 6 A

83B

89A AVE 89 AVE

87B Forest Hills Park 87A

85 CRT

Alex Hope

81A

71

69A

69

68B

68A

J

206 ST

204 ST

198A

196 ST

71

69B

69A

196A

11

90A AVE

87B AVE

86

85 AVE

83A

90B AVE

89

5A 21

71

AVE

91 AVE

83 AVE

10

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84B

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71

86

92B AVE 92 AVE

90

B 85

72B 72A

84 AVE

WILLOUGHBY

82 AVE

11

7200

HW

89A

E

88 AVE

86A AVE

Yorkson Community Park

83 AVE

89B

ALDERGROVE

Natural Area

93 AVE

A 85 T CR

L

James Kennedy

Hope

95A Redwoods

WALNUT GROVE

L

Topham

90A

Walnut Grove Community Centre 88A

Library

P 93

91 AVE

PL

84 AVE

PL

GROVE DR

87 AVE

86A

Topham Park

91B

212A

A 85

84 AVE

8800

APH

T NU

Skateboard

86 AVE 85 AVE

209A ST

207A ST 207A

207

206A

206

207

207 R G

Walnut Grove

92A

94A

93B

93B 93A 93 AVE Holmstead Park 92 B 92 B

92 AVE

91B

94

94B 94A

1

DA V IS

Discovery Town Park

ST

209A

208 ST

206B

206A

206A ST

207 ST

205B 20 5A

204A

T E LE

88 AVE

92A 92 AVE

94B

93B AVE

93 AVE

91 A AVE

95A 95 AVE

94B

ST

204B

TR

88A

206B

203A

203B

206B

204A

204 ST

203 ST

202B ST

207

205

204A

204B

205A

205B

202A 202B 203

ST

198 ST

200 ST

203B 88B

88 AVE 20 1

90 AV E 89A

TELE GR AP H

89

CR

Walnut Grove Community Park

90A AVE

94A

92B AVE

B

Dog Off Leash Park

4B 21

203A ST

89A

R

ST

C 90

90

20 2

B 89

CREEK

90A

91B

91 AVE

McClughan Park

93B Telegraph Trail Park

93A

94B

T

Dorothy Peacock

93 AVE

95 AVE

S 215

LATIMER

91A

94 93B PL

9A 20

Gordon Greenwood

20 9

West Langley

94B

20 9

92A AVE

91B AVE 91A

West Langley Park

95A

209

2

N

96

ST

196A ST

94

93A AVE

8 95B

6B 21

0A 20

ST

93A AVE

95A

94B

94B AVE

91A AVE

1 196A ST

95A AVE

93B AVE

93A

A 93

92A AVE

EXIT 58

M

94A AVE

94 93B

2 20

92A AVE

94B AVE

9 96 AVE

BCR

94B

1 20

94A AVE

9600

96A AVE

209 ST

10

96 AVE

R

205

HT

20000

AP

N

2020800

Navigating the Langleys 11

6

Source:N:\Maps\CustomMaps\Geo\Geo_20090001_Langleys_Map_The_Langleys_Map\langleys_map_details.mxd

Langley Economic Development Magazine

25

City of Langley

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MCBURNEY LANE: PEDESTRIAN ONLY SQUARE OFFERING SHOPPING AND DINING DOWNTOWN LANGLEY: PROVIDES MORE THAN 600 SPECIALTY SHOPS AND RESTAURANTS

KWANTLEN POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY: 135 PROGRAMS INCLUDING BACHELORS DEGREES & TRADE CERTIFICATES

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EXPLORE BUSINESS AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN THE CITY OF LANGLEY With a trading population of 231,000, providing $3.38 billion in expenditures, the City of Langley enjoys a strong and prosperous economy. With low land costs and plans for further growth and redevelopment, the area is expected to be among the region’s top economic performers. Resident businesses enjoy a central location, easy access to markets, a higher disposable dollar, and a supportive business community. Come discover our business and investment opportunities today! LANGLEY CITY HALL 20399 Douglas Crescent Langley, BC V3A 4B3

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call

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“The City of Langley is a great place to open a business. Council and staff are extremely helpful and supportive. I would strongly recommend the City of Langley as the place to be ... for business and for living.” — ERIC CARLSON, PRESIDENT ANTHEM PROPERTIES

Langley Economic Development Magazine

# school 35 district

Langley has a school that will fit the needs of most children and their familes

education

Langley’s 42 public schools offer a complete education package for children and adults. Langley offers choices in education, at every age. In addition to the Langley School District’s public education, this community is home to faith-based schools, two universities, and various private schools. Langley’s school district is the seventh largest in the province, with its 40 school sites in almost every neighbourhood in the City and Township. Out of a combined population of about 125,000, the district serves more than 18,000 students and almost 600 international students. And with Langley City’s and Langley Township’s numerous specialty elementary and secondary schools and programs, this community is no exception to educational trends. Whether it’s a flair for art, a desire to gain a plumbing apprenticeship, a penchant for hockey, a love of bilingualism, or a partiality to religious education, Langley has a school that will fit the needs of most children and their families. Students who are searching for the ability to take classes on their own time and at their own pace have a number of options, too, with home-schooling programs at Lochiel UConnect Centre, and continuing education at the Langley Education Centre. The school district also has alternative programs to help young people graduate from high school. Apprenticeship programs in areas such as welding,

horticulture, culinary arts, and hairdressing allow high school students to focus their education on more immediate goals. Langley School District formed a partnership with Kwantlen Polytechnic University to form the Career Technical Consortium, allows students to spend part of their school year working in trades, acquiring experience, and gaining credentials toward certification, also building post-secondary credit, while filling requirements for secondary graduation. Agreements between the school district and the Kwantlen First Nation, as well as input from other groups through the community, help to build a strong and healthy cross-cultural educational environment. Direct and indirect involvement of business and postsecondary institutions is encouraged, so that their needs, as well as students’, are addressed. Indeed, as the district website at www.sd35.bc.ca notes, “There are hundreds of programs in Langley designed to meet the diverse needs of more than 18,000 learners at all age levels. There is also a broad range of services to help students who may have special needs.” The website offers information about the wide array of choice programs offered in Langley’s public schools – some provided on a district level, others school-based, and still others offered through the Career Education Department – as well as about general programs and services, and further information can be obtained from any of the district’s 42 schools. edm Langley Economic Development Magazine

27

education

independent

schools

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

Various local churches also offer prescho preschools

Civil & Structural Engineering and Project Management Services

Langley offers a wide array of opportunities for those who wish to seek education for their children outside of the public school system. Langley’s faith-based community has offered private Christian schools for more than half a century. Langley Christian School has both elementary and middle/high campuses. Established in 1955, Langley Christian School is an interdenominational Christian institute that works in partnership with parents to instill in students basic Christian values and provide for full educational needs. Between its two campuses, Langley Christian School works with nearly a thousand students, from pre-school through Grade 12. Credo Christian High School began as William of Orange Christian School in 1955, first catering to primary grades, but increasing its scope from 1973 on, so that it now also takes students right through Grade 12. More independent education opportunities are offered in the Langley area through Aldergrove Christian Academy, Fraser Valley Adventist Academy, St. Catherine’s School, The King’s School, Fraser Valley Elementary School. Various local churches also offer preschools. There are a number of Montessori schools, daycares, and programs available throughout the Langley area. Adults can find ways to get into their first career, upgrade to a new career or even just enjoy learning for fun through local post-secondary institutions such as Kwantlen Polytechnic University and Trinity Western University, which both offer a range of courses and programs that attract people from throughout the region and beyond. They, along with Langley Continuing Education, the Langley School District, Langley City, and the Township of Langley, offer a variety of programs for those who embrace lifelong learning. edm

an

array of

degrees

For those seeking post seconda secondary education, Langley is home to a regional university campus, as well as a renowned privately funded university that draws student from around the world. Langley is home to Kwantlen Polytechnic University and Trinity Western University

Langley and Fraser Valley residents have more and more opportunity to live at home and study at a nearby post secondary school. That’s because Langley is home to Kwantlen Polytechnic University and Trinity Western University. Both offer an array of programs at a variety of post secondary levels, up to and including degrees. Kwantlen is part of a four campus university (Langley, Cloverdale, Richmond and Surrey) that has made the transition from college to university as it strives to increase its post-secondary opportunities. Just recently the Langley Kwantlen campus announced that it has received approval to offer a bachelor of music in musical arts program, a strong augmentation to an already strong program. Since Kwantlen first opened its doors more than 30 years ago, it has taught more than 200,000 people. It offers an evolving array of programs including business, liberal arts and science, design, health, trades and technology, apprenticeships, horticulture, and academic and career advancement. Over 17,000 students annually have a choice from over 135 programs including bachelor’s degrees, associate degrees, diplomas, certificates and citations. Interestingly, Langley students don’t even have to leave home to meet people from around the world. They can do so at local postsecondary campuses. Trinity Western University is attracting students from around the globe who want to study at the private Christian school. TWU belives that a Christ-centred higher education helps prepare it students to take on the world. “Since 1962, we have been training leaders of character, capable of addressing the challenges of our changing world,” said university president Dr. Jonathan Raymond. TWU, which has about 4,000 students, offers 42 undergraduate majors, ranging from biotechnology, education, theatre and music, to psychology, communications and biblical studies. TWU’s 16 graduate degree programs include nursing, counseling psychology, marriage and family therapy, business, theology, linguistics, and leadership, and interdisciplinary degrees in English, philosophy and history. TWU holds Canada Research Chairs in Dead Sea Scroll Studies, Developmental Genetics and Disease, and Interpretation, Religion and Culture. TWU doesn’t only focus on academics. Its sports teams are gaining reputations as tough competitors but TWU asks more of its athletes than striving to win. It has brought in the Complete Champion Approach that calls on students to devote themselves to development in five areas: academics, athletics, leadership, personal and spiritual. That’s why it’s not uncommon to learn about TWU students off in other parts of the world on missions trips offering not only sports clinics in impoverished areas but also community development projects to help others. edm

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29

things to do

cityshopping activities

Serious shopaholic or bargain browser – no matter what kind of shopper you are, Langley City has the array of businesses you want.

Some people might be looking for a relaxing place to have a coffee or a tea or even a bubble tea. Langley’s downtown has it. Others may want the latest in fashion or vintage duds that were the height of fashion when grandma was young. Langley has that. There are art galleries, restaurants of all kinds including many offering cuisines of the world, thrift stores, boutiques, spas, hardware, grocery stores, department stores and so much more. And best of all, Langley has free downtown parking, making it easy for shoppers. As well, the community has deliberately positioned itself to be pedestrian friendly. The businesses of Langley City have joined forces to help consumers find what they need and enjoy shopping and visiting in the community.

Their Downtown Langley Business Association is a driving force behind community events such as the Arts Alive! festival each August, Community Day in June, the Country Christmas celebrations and more. Fresh on the scene is the association’s Buskers Festival, with free, live entertainment downtown every Saturday until Sept. 2, there is free live entertainment downtown. As many as 30 performers – offering magic, music and more – will be showcased. The association also tries to make it easy for people to visit Langley City. The Ambassadors Program has run for many years. Each spring and summer, volunteers fan out over the downtown core to offer information, directions, and a friendly smile. Watch for them in their blue ambassador shirts. More information about all that downtown Langley has to offer check out www. downtownlangley.com. The association has a list of businesses as well as maps, community events, and even information about ATM locations. edm

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

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economy

Business is growing in Langley – literally.

Agriculture remains an important part of Langley’s economy, but it is no longer just about growing vegetables and milking cows.

Diera Ulmer and Sarah Trommel enjoyed a family outing to Krause Berry Farm

agri-business Over the past 38 years, Krause Berry Farms has seen a steady growth in agricultural tourism, a business they started before there was really a term for it. “It was all about learning what to do, learning to draw people out here,” Alf Krause explained. Agritourism is about getting people out onto the farm. Many outfits start with farmgate sales or U-pick operations. Krause has expanded to include a bakery and store that use products off the farm, a petting park, a playground and soon a train that will take people around the grounds. As well, they host events throughout the year, including at Christmas, weddings and corporate events. As well, they host events throughout the year, including at Christmas, weddings and corporate events.

It’s a far cry from the farm’s humbler origins. “We started by selling out of the back of a van,” Alf said. Now Krause Berry Farms has 200 acres of mostly berries, as well as some corn and green beans, under cultivation. And the farm has about 120 employees at the peak of the season. That workforce includes many local youth and adults who gain from the economic spin-off of the growing farm. Alf noted that the farm also works with other local agritourism businesses and businesses to encourage people to come out, including the nearby Bonetti Meats, J.D. Turkey Farm, the area wineries, the Christmas tree farms and more. >

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

31

Using family recipes, Krause Berry Farm turns out its popular pies in its own kitchens.

agri-business

economy

Agritourism is about creating an experience

continued

If people want food, they can head to a grocery store or restaurant. Agritourism is about creating an experience. Sandee Krause explained agritourism also helps people understand where their food comes from and shows them what can be done with local produce. She said she often gets feedback from people who have tried items at Krause then went home and experiemented with food. In the past visitors came from Langley and communities west of Langley. Now more and more people from east of this community are making trips here to agricultural operations. “We encompass the [Fraser] Valley now,” Alf said. The farm welcomes 50,000 to 80,000 people annually. Krause experiences about a 10 to 12 per cent growth in business annually, an amount that would make most businesses green. But Krause works to control growth so that it can still provide customers with not only fresh berries and produce but also worthwhile experiences. Langley is also home to operations such as Aldor Acres and the Aldor Dairy Centre, Dave’s Orchard (specializing in

apples), Driediger Farms Market and Berry Farm, Flowers From A Country Garden (U-pick), Full Bloom Farm garden, shop and spa, JD Turkey Farm and Bistro, Langford Foods Fields and Flowers Farm Store, Select Roses, Tuscan Farm Gardens and apothacary, and TwoBie Creek Organic Farm. Agritourism-based wineries include Domaine de Chaberton Estate Winery and Bacchus Bistro, the Fort Wine Co., Neck of the Woods Winery, Township 7 Vineyard & Winery and Vista D’Oro Farms and Winery. (Information about the various agritourism operations in Langley is available through Tourism Langley.) edm

Josh Trommel was happy to pick the fat, juicy raspberries at Langley’s Krause Berry Farm

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

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tourism

horses,

arts,

Langley has more horses per capita than any community in Canada.

the

34

As the only outdoor movie theatre in metro Vancouver, the Twilight Drive-In in Aldergrove draws film buffs from afar. The Twilight is one of only three drive-ins in B.C. The other two are in Enderby and just outside of Prince George.

cars ...

classic

... wine, a national historic site, and Metro Vancouver’s last remaining drive-in are just a few of the reasons why tourists come to Langley.

Langley has more horses per capita than any community in Canada. And while its known as the “Horse Capital of B.C.” Langley’s abundant equine population is just one of features that draws visitors to the region. “We keep using our expression ‘endless choices’ because we really, truly believe that there is a diverse mix of choices here in Langley,” said Tourism Langley executive director Deborah Kulchiski. “Everything from agri-tourism products, to the history of the community, to the urban amenities we have to offer.” Langley is an increasingly desirable option for people who live outside the community to eat and shop, Kulchiski said. North of Highway One, a huge draw for tourists through the years is the village of Fort Langley, an enclave rich with history and home to the Langley Centennial Museum, B.C. Farm Machinery and Agricultural Museum, and Fort Langley National Historic Site. “That’s a huge draw,” Kulchiski “It’s a real growing trend in travellers’ expectations today. People want to learn about the history and culture of the city or country they are visiting and have a hands-on experience. There is a more educated traveller today.” Langley’s reputation as a hot-spot for agri-tourism continues to grow, Kulchiski said: “You don’t have to travel to the Okanagan to have a great wine-tasting experience.”

Langley Economic Development Magazine

Local wineries listed on the Tourism Langley website include Blackwood Lane Vineyards & Winery; Domaine de Chaberton Estate Winery and Bacchus Bistro; Fort Wine Co.; Neck of the Woods Winery; Township 7 Vineyard & Winery, and; Vista D’oro Farms & Winery. Drawing hundreds of thousands of visitors each year are the annual festivals, sports tournaments, and festivals that take place in the two Langleys. Just a few of the annual events in the community include: • Langley Good Times Cruise-In, which has been resurrected this September after a one-year hiatus. Each year, about 100,000 people gather in downtown Langley City to take in this free event that showcases upwards of 1,700 custom and classic vehicles. • Langley Arts Alive in August, when the one-way section of Fraser Highway is cordoned off from traffic for a day, to make way for artists, musicians, sculptors, and vendors; • The May Day Parade and celebration in downtown Fort Langley during the Victoria Day long weekend; • Brigade Days, which celebrates the fur brigade route that the voyageurs of the 19th century would take. The route follows rivers from the forts in the Interior to the banks of the Fraser River at Fort Langley, and; • show jumping tournaments at Thunderbird Show Park, an 85-acre equestrian facility at 248th Street and 72nd Avenue. Built in 1999 and opened in the summer of 2000, Thunderbird offers six major show jumping tournaments annually. • and the annual Langley Labour Day youth soccer tournament. Last year’s tournament, the 12th annual, drew 128 teams of boys and girls ranging in ages from U11 to U18 to 30 fields throughout Langley.

langley tourism,

statistically speaking These statistics provided by Tourism Langley executive director Deborah Kulchiski are a reflection of the number of visitors served in the Langley Visitor Centre. • In 2010, approximately 6,200 visitors were greeted in the Langley Visitor’s Centre • More than 70 per cent of those visitors were local and from within B.C. • Visitors from European origins made up the second strongest category in 2010, and may have been the result of visitors travelling to our region due to the 2010 Olympic Games. • The average length of stay for overnight visitors in our communities was 3.87 days – most often one day, three days, or two weeks. (This may be attributed to our communities hosting many successful events last year.) Also to note: • Despite the weather, we are experiencing a strong start to the peak of visitor season and are confident it will be a successful season for Langley. Our Visitor Centre Counsellors have already welcomed many visitors from many parts of the world, including Argentina, Mexico, Spain, and China. • The most commonly requested information from visitors is for attractions, transportation, accommodation, and directions. edm

filming

Fort Langley has historically drawn folks to its history – and is also one of Langley’s powerful movie industry magnets.

movie

magnet

When scouts are hunting for that idyllic small town American hamlet or the pristine Christmas village, Fort Langley seems to be top of mind for moviemakers. But they’re not the only film crews drawn to this community. Producers of feature movies, TV shows, and even commercials are gravitating to Langley in large numbers anxious to use this diverse community as the backdrop for their productions, said Township of Langley spokesperson Val Gafka. “In general, we’ve seen some fairly steady interest in the Township over the years,” she said, pointing to the varied scenery and provincial tax incentives as the primary lures for people in the filming industry. Over the past three years, for instance, filming crews have been shooting an average of 300 days out of the year in Langley. That represents about 50 different productions a year coming to Langley for their filmmaking needs, she said, noting that’s everything from student filmmakers through to huge U.S. production companies. >

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

Canadian productions such as the Dr. Doolittle movie sequels, the TV show Supernatural, the horror flick The Fog, the doggie-filled Buddies movies. Other television shows have included Taken, Smallville, Whistler, Eureka, Virtuality, Alice, I Think, The Vampire Diaries, as well as the mini-series called Dragonsteel. And other feature films made – in part – in Langley include Stan Helsing, The Thaw, Are We There Yet, Hope Springs, The Butterfly Effect, and Scooby Doo 3: Unleashed. There’s always something in the works, Gafka said, pointing out that crews were currently in production for the TV series Haunting Hour, and a recent deal was reached with Force Four Entertainment for a new reality TV show. Crews are going to spend the better part of four months filming 10 episodes of a show called The Million Dollar Neighbourhood in Aldergrove, while Preacher Road Productions spent a few days during summer 2011 shooting a TV movie called Pastor’s Wife in a few Langley locations, including the historic St. Andrew’s United Church in Fort Langley. Beautiful scenery is not the only reason Langley is so popular with filmmakers – it is also a fiscally desirable place for the movie business to shoot.

Ideal location for filming

“Fort Langley has a picturesque setting, and excellent production capabilities,” the Township’s economic development officer Gary MacKinnon said. “It’s an ideal location for filming. It’s a bustling little community full of shops and cafes, parks and trails, and it’s only 45 minutes away from the City of Vancouver. It is also full of historic landmarks, and surrounded by mountain, trees, and fields. There is some breathtaking scenery in Fort Langley, and the village itself is known in the film industry for its ‘small town’ feel.” But it’s not just the village of Fort Langley that’s catching the eye of scouts, said Gafka, who indicated there’s been a lot more scouts combing the community recently. “We can be rural America. If you need a farm or horses in your film, this is the place to come. We have a number of landmarks that look appealing and are versatile enough to be made into everything from a town hall to a sheriff’s office,” MacKinnon said. They’re looking at the horse farms in South Langley, the more suburban multi-family homes of Walnut Grove, the retail centre of Downtown Langley City and Willowbrook, the late 21st century neighbourhoods represented by Brookswood or Aldergrove that are peeking their interested. It’s Langley’s unique neighbourhoods, streetscapes, buildings, and green spaces that are being featured in many U.S. and

A film crew with Preacher Road Productions moved a cof fin inside the historic St. Andrew’s United Church in For t Langley. The team was in town filming a television movie called Pastor’s W ife.

An extra provincial tax credit is given to film companies that work east of 197th Street, and the result is more than $40 million is injected into the local economy by moviemakers each year, MacKinnon previously estimated. If scenery and cost savings aren’t motivation enough, Gafka said the Township is sending a very clear message to the filmmaking and arts communities that Langley is open for business. Municipal staff were recently invited to a voluntary workshop where representatives from all aspects of the arts community – especially the film business – were invited to talk about their needs and what could be done to make Langley even more alluring to their industry. With initiatives like this, Gafka said Langley and the surrounding region will undoubtedly continue to be part of the magic of make believe for many years to come. edm

Sports

Recreation is big business, and Langley is scooping up a bigger and bigger portion of that business

Hosting major level tournaments

every year.

sportstourism One of Langley’s biggest economic strengths can be found on its playing fields.

Positioned at the interface between the urban and rural parts of the Lower Mainland, Langley boasts more than its share of sports fields and recreation facilities. The biggest facility is the Langley Events Centre, a 5,500 seat arena that hosts the local junior hockey team, as well as university basketball and volleyball squads from Trinity Western, and young local gymnasts. It’s hosted some major sporting events – the Vancouver Giants relocated to the LEC during the 2010 Winter Olympics, the BC Summer Games included events there, and the BC Boys AAA Basketball championships are held there – and it will be hosting more in the near future. Upcoming are the World Junior A Challenge hockey tourney, which will see two Canadian entries be joined by four international teams. “A bit part of what we’re trying to accomplish is trying to bring in events that will be of interest to the community,” said Jared Harman, director of business development for the LEC. Beyond the LEC, there are ice rinks in Langley City, in Aldergrove, Walnut Grove, and Brookswood. There is McLeod Athletic Park, which boasts a full sized track complex, soccer and baseball fields. More sports fields for soccer, beach volleyball, lacrosse, and baseball surround the LEC, or are located in neighbourhoods such as Aldergrove. Philip Jackman Park in that community is one of the most recent additions to Langley’s collection of sporting venues. All those fields and arenas draw events, from charity matches to beer

league and youth play, to major regional, provincial, and even national level tournaments. In the world of competitive cycling, Langley is also one of the key destinations for the region. Lower Mainland road cycling clubs often bring their weekend races to the community, drawn by its wide-open rural roads and friendly relations with the Township staff. A single day of road racing can draw hundreds of riders, along with family members and supporters, from around the Lower Mainland. A single race this spring drew riders from as far afield as the Yukon, Alberta, Montana, and Washington State as well as from around the province. Going off road is also possible in Langley. A few years ago, riders of mountain bikes would have had to leave town to practice, but there are now three separate mountain bike parks, with dirt ramps and wooden technical obstacles, one in Willoughby near the LEC, one in Langley City, and a large facility near Philip Jackman Park that opened in the fall of 2010. A BMX bike track in Brookswood rounds out the racing and stunting opportunities. The rural splendour of Langley has drawn many people who prefer to ride on horseback, rather than on bikes. Langley is known as the horse capital of B.C., with an estimated 6,000 horses. It boasts the Thunderbird Show Park, a sprawling complex of stables and riding rings that hosts high-level competitive events. Milner Downs Equestrian Centre also hosts hunter/jumper shows. For the non-competitive rider, dozens of kilometres of horse trails in parks such as Campbell Valley Regional Park provide quieter recreation opportunities. Finally, one of Langley’s natural features allows another major sporting challenge. Rowing, canoeing, and dragonboat clubs practice on the Bedford Channel of the Fraser River, along Fort Langley’s waterfront. The Fort Langley Rowing and Paddling Centre hosts numerous teams, from youth to seniors, who enjoy getting out on the water. The channel is also one of the only venues for competitive regattas in the Lower Mainland, competing with Delta and Burnaby. edm Langley Economic Development Magazine

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sports

langley centre

events

The Langley Events Centre is home to numerous sports teams and businesses.

Multi-use facility

The Langley Events Centre, home to hockey, lacrosse, volleyball, and basketball teams, opened its doors in April, 2009.

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The Langley Events Centre is the centre of the community’s sports and recreation universe. Plans were unveiled on Dec. 18, 2006, for the $56 million, multi-use facility, which opened its doors, officially, on April 17, 2009. Located at 7888 200th Street, the LEC was built through a P3 partnership involving the Township of Langley, Langley Development Group, and the provincial government. Recreation Excellence and Tiara Foods are the current operating partners of the 260,483 sq. foot LEC. The very first event at the LEC was the B.C. Gymnastics Championships, held in mid-April, 2009. The LEC features: • an arena bowl with seating for up to 5,500 fans. • a triple gymnasium with a seating capacity of 2,200; • an exhibition and banquet centre; • the Willoughby Community Centre including a fitness centre and multi-purpose rooms; • the 20,000 sq. foot home of the Langley Gymnastics Foundation, the largest gymnastics centre in Western Canada; • six meeting rooms, and; • a visitor information centre and Tourism Langley offices. It is also home to a number of sports teams including the Langley Rivermen junior A hockey club, Trinity Western University Spartans men’s and women’s varsity basketball and volleyball teams, as well as TWU’s men’s hockey team, and the Langley Thunder junior A and senior A lacrosse teams. The events centre offered ice, temporarily, to the Vancouver Giants Western Hockey League franchise, which relocated from the Pacific Coliseum prior to, and during, the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver/Whistler.

Langley Economic Development Magazine

Each March, the LEC is the site of the B.C. boys Triple A basketball championships, the most prestigious high school hoops tournament in the province. The building includes 24 corporate suites, six dressing rooms, a social lounge and an in-house ticketing system. People welcomed the arrival of the Olympic Flame to the LEC on Feb. 8, 2010. At least 10,000 patriotic Canadians took in the cauldron-lighting ceremony, and a related afternoon-long festival drew about 500 people, but double that many stuck around to enjoy the festivities. Later that evening, a pre-Olympic women’s hockey game involving Russia and Slovakia drew a total of 4,497 boisterous fans – many of whom waving either Slovakian or Russian flags and dressed in their countries’ colours – who watched Russia edge Slovakia 3-1 in the arena bowl. In July, 2010 LEC hosted the closing ceremonies for the BC Summer Games, hosted by Langley Township. More international events are on the horizon at the LEC, including: • the 2012 World Financial Group Continental Cup curling competition from Jan. 12-15, 2012; • the World Junior A Challenge hockey tournament Nov. 7-13, 2011, which will involve two Canadian entries and four international teams; • and an exhibition National Lacrosse League game between the Toronto Rock and Washington Stealth on Dec. 10, 2011. Businesses located at the LEC include the Langley Sports Medicine Clinic, Kidsport, and Tourism Langley. Fort Langley-Aldergrove MLA Rich Coleman’s office is located inside the LEC. edm

Employability is kEy These days a career is just as important as an education for many young people. With the fall semester right around the corner, many >;9"C%;> 2AC :% ;<C !A#$C>> #B '25:%? >#'C #B ;<C:A .A>; 1:? 4:BC decisions. Choosing a university can have a profound impact on a student’s future career. A wrong choice could leave one unem!4#&C" 2%" >2""4C" (:;< ;C%> #B ;<#9>2%"> #B "#442A> #B "C1;) /:;< %# #17:#9> 27C%9C :%;# ;<C:A $<#>C% $2ACCA+ >;9"C%;> $2% #B;C% BCC4 trapped and frustrated. While learning to think is important, a head full of concepts ><#94"%,; 1C ;<C #%4& ;<:%? &#9 ;25C (:;< &#9 (<C% &#9 (245 away with your degree. Recognizing this demand for employment-related education, Kwantlen Polytechnic University has "C7C4#!C" 2 A2%?C #B :%%#72;:7C !A#?A2'>+ (<:$< 14C%" >5:44 development, theoretical education and real-world experience B#A :'!AC>>:7C C'!4#&21:4:;& AC>94;>) @B ;<#>C 0(2%;4C% >;9"C%;> surveyed last year,

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day skills needed to execute projects. Added to this mix is an en?2?C" $#*#! !A#?A2' "C>:?%C" ;# 1#;< <C4! >;9"C%;> >C44 ;<C'selves on paper and to connect them directly with employers 4##5:%? ;# <:AC :% ;<C 19>:%C>> (#A4") 3;,> 244 !2A; 2%" !2A$C4 #B a real-world education, which connects the industry leaders with grads who understand their needs and have the skills to get the 8#1 "#%C) Langley Economic Development Magazine

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

transportation

Largest helicopter airport in Canada

Langley is an international destination for helicopter specialty work because of the expertise based here

airport

From flight education to unsurpassed h e l i c o p t e r - r e l a t e d i n d u s t r y, L a n g l e y ’ s a i r p o r t continues to fly high.

Recently, the Langley Regional Airport manager sat downtown to pen a letter to Canada’s High Commissioner for India. George Miller was writing about the difficulty Indian residents are having obtaining visas to come and study aviation in Langley. The lobbying is one of the many tasks for staff at the local airport as it continually works to position itself as an important centre of aviation. Langley’s 120-acre airport has six flying schools among the some 48 businesses located there. “That’s what you want, when you get the high-end jobs,” he said about the reasoning for wanting aviation businesses based at the airport. A study about two years ago showed the airport and its tenant businesses generate about $75 million in economic activity annually. Langley has worked to entice helicopter-related industries and it’s paying off. “We have the largest helicopter airport in Canada, by far,” Miller noted. Of its 48 businesses at the airport, 31 are in the helicopter sector. Miller noted that Langley is an international destination for helicopter specialty work because of the expertise based here. When U.S. President George W. Bush ordered that Iraq be searched for weapons of mass destruction, the helicopters used were cocooned here, receiving overhauls and paint jobs before being deployed. “There’s a huge international market here,” Miller explained. The airport is well positioned to continue being a major economic engine for the future, having weathered the international economic downtown. Airport staff also work to increase the profile of the facility and encourage more businesses to locate

here. Langley recently hosted the Canadian Owners and Pilots’ Association national meeting, the first time in many years it had been held in the West. More than 60 per cent of the attendees were from east of the Rocky Mountains, further increasing this communities profile. Langley Township has owned the airport since 1946. Langley Regional Airport is one of few that is owned and operated by a municipality. Many communities farm out their facilities to outside operators. Miller reports directly to the Township’s mayor and council, meaning the airport is more responsive to local government and residents. It also means the community has direct say in how the airport grows and evolves as Langley grows and evolves. The airport stays connected to the community Langley’s airport by hosting by the numbers: the Canadian Museum of • $18 million annually in wages Flight, a showcase • $9 million annually in total purchases of rare airplanes. • about 280 people working full time at The museum’s the airport and its tenant businesses volunteers have • an 120 additional workers during lovingly restored peak periods Second World • 95,000 movements (take-offs and War era bombers, landings) annually. Airport manager bush planes and George Miller said he’d like to even a Snowbird see about 120,000 annually. The jet. highest number in the past was about The airport 210,000 back before Langley had draws no tax aviation businesses based at the facilit revenue from the and before facilities such as Boundary municipality, and Bay existed. in fact generates • about 350 small planes based at the revenue from airfield leases and property taxes. edm

Langley Economic Development Magazine

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Highways

golden ears bridge

It’s about building a better province,

A two-year -old bridge brings the Langleys toge ther with Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows, and great oppor tunities.

it’s bridging from the past

Bridging the Gap

to the future

For the past couple of years, a long-awaited crossing has connected the business communities of Langley and Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows. Construction of the $880-million Golden Ears Bridge began in 2006, and the bridge celebrated its grand opening on June 14, 2009, attracting between 40,000 and 60,000 people to the ceremonies. The mayors, councils, and First Nations leaders from both sides of the bridge met in the middle of the span at during the celebration, to shake hands and exchange pins with the names of their respective communities. Langley Township Mayor Rick Green, City Mayor Peter Fassbender, and Surrey Mayor Dianne Watts walked in from the south, to meet Maple Ridge Mayor Ernie Daykin and Pitt Meadows Mayor Don MacLean. Also present were Kwantlen First Nation Chief Marilyn Gabriel, and former Katzie First Nation Chief Mike Leon. At 1:30 p.m., former B.C. Premier Gordon Campbell officially opened the bridge. “This is about connecting communities, it’s about building a better province, it’s bridging from the past to the future,” Campell said. Green spoke to the crowd and invited those north of the Fraser to come and visit Langley, mentioning the just-opened (at the time) Langley Events Centre.

The six-lane tolled bridge opened to traffic two days later, on June 16, 2009. Tolls collected from drivers using the bridge pay for building, operating, and maintaining the crossing. Drivers in cars without transponders pay $4.10, while small truck tolls are $6.95. Drivers of large trucks will pay $9.55, while motorcyclists pay $2.65. In its first week, the Golden Ears Bridge offered passage over the Fraser River to 330,000 vehicles. The bridge essentially replaced the Albion Ferry, which, on July 31, 2009, shut down after 52 years of service. edm

Langley Economic Development Magazine

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

1931- 2011 history

chamber Greater Langley Chamber

From a small group of local merchants, the chamber has changed.

When Langley merchants and tradesmen came together in the spring of 1931, it’s doubtful that they guessed they were creating an institution that would live on for 80 years. In March, two years into the Great Depression, 63 Langley residents signed the papers to form what was then known at the Langley Board of Trade. It would later transform into the Langley Chamber of Commerce, eventually absorbing several regional chambers and becoming the Greater Langley Chamber. Those early founders would have their names attached to roads, streets, parks and schools around the community in the coming generations. Near the top of the list is Dr. Benjamin Marr, a First World War veteran, and Langley’s first resident physician after he arrived in 1907. Noel Booth, the longtime Township councillor and reeve (mayor), signed, listing his job as merchant. P.Y. Porter, whose general store still stands at Murrayville’s Five Corners, added his name. The professions listed include quite a few merchants and storekeepers, along with a real estate broker, some hotel keepers, engineers, carpenters, farmers, a veterinarian, and one man who listed himself as unemployed. Other jobs on the list are long gone or have been

80

years

transformed by time. A.G. Fulton is listed as a station agent for the long-gone B.C. Electric Railroad, which ran the length of the community. There are also tailors and shoemakers, a miller, a tinsmith, and one man who listed his occupation as “cafe jack.” The documents mention the most current census at the time, 1929, which put Langley’s population at just 5,012 people. There was also just one Langley, as the split between Township and City was almost 25 years in the future. Lynn Whitehouse, the current executive director of the chamber, said that, despite all that has changed, much has remained the same. Some of the earliest records, from the 1930s, were lost, apparently in the great flood of 1948. “Records were kept in people’s place of business, or in a storeroom,” she said. But when the first hand-written minutes, taken in the early 1940s during the Second World War, emerge, they show that local business owners have always had the same concerns. Flip through a few of the yellowing pages and decipher the spidery handwriting, and issues of transportation, taxes, and parking jump out. “Transportation has been a concern in the Langleys since the day the first wagon came into town,” Whitehouse said. > Langley Economic Development Magazine

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commerce

chamber

basic

chamber

80

Early minutes also contain references to the board of trade opposing the introduction of parking meters in Langley City. They won that battle – the board suggested a parking bylaw instead, and parking time limits remain in place in the City to this day. Also in 1944, one of the first items discussed at one meeting was tolls on bridges. In that case, it was the Patullo Bridge, then the only fixed link between the north and south sides of the Fraser River, that local merchants were worried about. They wanted those tolls removed. Changes in technology and institution have erased other concerns. Minutes from a 1945 meeting contain a suggestion to the volunteer firefighters. When they are out at a call, one man should remain at the nearest phone, in case a second fire begins in another part of the town. In an era of cellphones and professional firefighters, that recommendation seems to have been met. The popularity and strength of the Board of Trade, later the Chamber, waxed and waned over the years. In the early 1960s, the old board of trade re-named itself the chamber of commerce, a trend that was sweeping Canada at the time, transforming many other boards into chambers. Whitehouse noted that the 500 people who attended an annual general meeting in 1959 is actually a few more than turn out for modern AGMs. But by the early 1970s, the chamber almost vanished. A motion was actually put in place to dissolve the entire organization, after a few years of low attendance at meetings and limited participation. Fortunately, Whitehouse said the shock motivated more The members to return, and within Advance has profiled a few years the chamber had Langley returned to fighting strength. and its For most of its history, business community the chamber operated out many times of businesses, holding all its over the past 80 meetings in restaurants and years. halls. In some cases, meetings were held as far afield as White Rock. In the 1970s, the monthly meetings were held in a long-vanished Chinese restaurant called the Golden Pagoda, while meetings of the board were held in the Prairie House, a converted home at the corner of Glover Road and the Langley Bypass. While the chamber had an office by the 1980s, it moved into its current location in 1996, when it designed and bought its own offices. The mortgage for the building was burned in 2006, just a decade later. The chamber has continued to innovate, recently adding a new video-conferencing centre to its Glover Road location. It allows chamber members to attend conferences in Vancouver, the Interior, or halfway across Canada without leaving their home town. edm

years

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Langley Economic Development Magazine

Langley is home to one of British Columbia’s strongest and most vibrant Chambers of Commerce. Lynn Whitehouse, executive director of the Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce for a quarter century, read one of the Langley Advance’s special supplements created for the chamber. This one dated to the 1990s.

The Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce is celebrating having been around since 1931. The organization, made up of a volunteer board from its membership, remains agile in responding to the every-changing business environment and the needs of its members. The chamber is closing in on 1,100 members – business based in Langley, as well as some based on other communities but doing business here. Those members receive many of the standard chamber benefits, such as business resources and information, insurance and gas deals, networking, and more. But Langley’s chamber strives to be more for its members. To promote the local democratic process – and to ensure the all-important business community’s voice is heard, the chamber organizes all-candidates meetings for municipal elections, as well as for provincial and federal general elections. Recently, it launched video-conferencing to expedite communications and networking. Local businesses can use the amenities of the chamber office to host meetings, or to attend meetings at a distance. Chamber executive director Lynn Whitehouse added that the organization is also doing a significant amount of advocacy work on behalf of members and the larger community. “We are trying to advocate for a regional business licence,” she explained. That would allow businesses here to be licenced to work in neighbouring communities without having to obtain a licence from each municipality. The chamber continues to be vocal about the Aldergrove border crossing. Whitehouse said the chamber is calling on the federal government to keep the crossing open to commercial traffic. In fact many of the key issues the chamber advocates about are about transportation and improving area transportation. Among the Greater Langley chamber’s initiative related to efficiently moving people and goods is a transportation summit organized for communities from throughout the region south of the Fraser River, hosting chambers of commerce, elected officials, and representatives from transportation interests (transit, rail, etc.) to discuss key issues. edm

Langley Economic Development Magazine

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Langley 2012 Economic Development