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Class Schedule Spring 2012

Simple steps to becoming a student page 2

Online courses page 14

Expanded offering of Saturday classes page 15

Workforce Training Institute page 23-24

Spring classes begin January 17

As Easy As 1,2,3,4 Simple Steps to Becoming a LMC Student You’ve thought about it. Going to college to earn an associate’s degree or to begin work on the first two years of a bachelor’s degree. Going to college to learn skills for a new career. Going to college to finish the degree you started years ago. Assistance with these important first steps is available by meeting with a LMC Admissions representative.

1. Do this first!

Complete the LMC Application for Admission, and apply for financial aid. Apply online by visiting www.lakemichigancollege.edu and choose “Apply to LMC Online.” Students who do not have a US address, Social Security number, or who have circumstances preventing online application may submit the paper application. If you are applying for financial aid or scholarships, this is also the time to begin those steps. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Many students who think they do not qualify for financial aid actually are eligible. To see if you are, complete the FAFSA online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Complete the LMC Scholarship Application LMC scholarships are available based on academic achievement, financial need, and program of study. The LMC Scholarship A p p l i c a t i o n i s a v a i l a b l e a t w w w. lakemichigancollege.edu/scholarships and at all LMC campuses.

2. Do this second! Take the assessment test.

We want you to be successful and that means signing up for the right classes. To help us help you make the right choices, the first thing you’ll do is take the LMC assessment. It will measure your reading, writing, and mathematics skills levels. You can take the assessment on the computer or with paper and pencil in about two hours. You will need to present a photo ID and obtain a college ID number to take the assessment. You may not need to take the assessment if you hold an associate’s degree or higher, have taken certain types of college-level courses, have taken the ACT or SAT within the last five years and have an appropriate score, or are taking courses with no prerequisites. An LMC advisor or admissions representitive can tell you more. See page 5 under the Assessment heading for times and locations.

3. Do this third!

4. Do this fourth!

Register and pay for classes.

Once you develop your plan, you can sign up for class. Returning students can register online. New students can register at any of the four campuses. All students are required to register for Flex Pay unless they pay in full by cash, check, or credit card at the time of registration.

Meet with an advisor.

For more information on paying for classes, contact the Financial Aid Office and the Cashiers Office.

Then build a personal educational plan based on your program of study, the careerbuilding skills you want to acquire, and your overall educational goals.

See page 5 for office times and locations.

Review your assessment results with an LMC advisor or admissions representitive.

Schedule a College and Career Success course (CLS 100) for your first semester to gain a strong foundation for your LMC college experience.

For more information about becoming an LMC student, call 1-800-252-1562 ext. 8626.

See page 5 under the Advising heading for times and locations to schedule your advising appointment.

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Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

2012 Spring Academic Calendar 2012 Spring Semester October 17              Registration begins January 10         Last day of regular registration January 11      Late registration begins - $20 fee assessed January 17       Classes begin January 17-23    Only classes that have not yet met for first time may be added January 23 Last day to drop first 5- or 7-week courses with 100% refund January 30 Last day to drop 14-week courses with 100% refund March 5-11 Spring break – no classes, College open April 6-8 Spring recess - College closed, no classes May 5 Semester ends

Go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/events for a complete listing of start/end and add/drop/withdraw dates for the term. Calendars are subject to change.  Dates are added or changed as information becomes available.  Visit the website for the most up-to-date information.

***ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS*** Changes to Registration Dates for Spring 2012 Semester Register by January 10 to avoid registration late fees. October 17 - January 10 – Regular registration. January 11 - January 16 – Late registration; a $20 late registration fee will be charged to students who are registering initially or adding classes to an existing schedule. January 17 - 23 – Students must have instructor permission to register for or add classes that have met at least once. Late registration fees apply.

Table of Contents How to Become a Student ........................... 2 2012 Spring Academic Calendar ................ 3 Board of Trustees ....................................... 4 Bookstore .................................................. 4 Where to Find It .................................... 5 - 6 Tuition, Fees, & Residency ...................... 7 - 8 Ways to Help You Pay ......................... 9 - 13 Flexible Courses................................ 14 - 15 Services ............................................. 16-22 Admission Policy and Admission Status ... 16 Advising.............................................. 17 AlertNow ............................................ 17 Assessment .......................................... 17 Blackboard .......................................... 18 Career and Transfer Center .................. 18 Class Registration ................................. 18 Diversity .............................................. 19 Grades ............................................... 19 Honors Program ................................... 19 Library ................................................ 19 LMC Transcripts.................................... 20 Mission Statement................................. 20 Open Entry/Open Exit ......................... 20 Sex Offender Registration ...................... 21 Student Email ....................................... 21 Student ID cards ................................... 21 Student Resource Center ........................ 21 Supplemental Instruction Courses ............ 22 Tutoring ............................................... 22 Wavelink ............................................. 22 Workforce Training Institute ................ 23 - 24 Course Schedule ...................................... 25 Napier Avenue Campus ................ 26 - 42 Bertrand Crossing Campus ............. 43 - 48 South Haven Campus .................... 49 - 54 M-TECSM at Lake Michigan College .. 55 - 56 Off-campus .......................................... 57 Course Descriptions........................... 58 - 82 Campus Maps .................................. 83 - 86 Programs of Study .................................... 87

Special note: Internet courses - must be registered by 11:59 p.m., January 16 Hybrid courses - must be registered by 11:59 p.m., January 16 Telecourses - must be registered by 11:59 p.m., January 18

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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Lake Michigan College Bookstores Spring 2012 Semester Hours

Lake Michigan College

Ways to purchase textbooks – all campuses Order online at http://lake-michigan.bncollege.com Email your order to bkslakemichigan@bncollege.com Visit or call the Napier Avenue or South Haven Campus bookstores Fax your order to Napier Avenue or South Haven Campus bookstores

Napier Avenue Campus Bookstore

Phone: (269) 927-6713 • Fax: (269) 927-6586 Regular Hours: Mon - Thurs Closed

Dr. Robert Harrison President

Board of Trustees

Ms. Judy Truesdell Chair Niles, Michigan

8:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.; Friday 8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Saturday & Sunday

Extended Spring Rush Hours Mon., Jan. 9 – Thurs., Jan. 12 ................9:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13 .......................................9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14 ...................................8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15.............................................................CLOSED Monday, Jan. 16 – Thursday, Jan. 19 ......8:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20 .......................................8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 21 ...................................8:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 22.............................................................CLOSED Monday, Jan. 23 - Thurs., Jan. 26 ...........8:00 a.m. – 8:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27 .......................................8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Saturday - Sunday, Jan. 28 - 29, ....................................CLOSED

South Haven Campus Bookstore

Dr. David Maysick Vice-Chair Benton Center, Michigan

Ms. Renee Williams Secretary Benton Harbor, Michigan

Phone: (269) 637-7500 ext. 7116 • Fax: (269) 637-7521 Regular Hours: Mon - Thurs Closed

9 a.m. – 6:30 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Saturday & Sunday

Ms. Mary Jo Tomasini Treasurer St. Joseph, Michigan

South Haven Campus Spring Rush Hours Mon., Jan. 9 – Thurs., Jan. 12 ................9:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13 .......................................9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14 ..........................................................CLOSED Sunday, Jan. 15.............................................................CLOSED Monday, Jan. 16 – Thursday, Jan. 19 ......9:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20 .......................................8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 21 ...................................9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 22.............................................................CLOSED Monday, Jan. 23 - Thurs., Jan. 26 ...........9:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27 .......................................9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Saturday - Sunday, Jan. 28 - 29, ....................................CLOSED

Bertrand Crossing Campus Students may order books online for pickup at the Bertrand Crossing Campus.  Go to the bookstore’s website, click on the TEXTBOOK tab, put in your course information, and then place your order.  On the shipping page, select “in-store pickup,” then select “Bertrand Crossing” as your location.  Spring semester books must be ordered by midnight on Sunday, January 8.  The order will then be available for pickup at the Bertrand Crossing Campus starting on Wednesday, January 11, from 7:45 - 10 a.m. and 4:30 - 6:30 p.m.

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Mr. Paul Bergan

Trustee Eau Claire, Michigan

Dr. Michael Lindley Trustee St. Joseph, Michigan

Mr. Pat Moody

Trustee St. Joseph, Michigan

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Where to Find It Admissions

Napier Avenue Campus……. .................................................... 269-927-8626 Location: Room D202, Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sat/Sun Closed South Haven Campus ............................................................... 269-637-7500 Hours: M - Th 8 a.m. - 7 p.m., F 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Advising

Career and academic advising, scheduling, transfer advising, personal advising as it relates to educational goals and objectives Napier Avenue Campus For an appointment call ............................................................ 269-927-8128 For general advising questions call ............................................. 269-927-6162 Location: Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center Hours by appointment: M - Th 9 a.m. - 7 p.m., F 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Bertrand Crossing Campus ........................................................ 269-695-1391 Location: Student Services Hours by appointment: M - Th 9 a.m. - 7 p.m., F 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. South Haven Campus ............................................................... 269-637-7500 Location: Student Services Hours by appointment: M - Th, 8 a.m. - 7 p.m., F 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

Assessment

Assessment scheduling; reading, writing, math assessment; and English as a Second Language. Must bring photo ID Napier Avenue Campus............................................................ 269-927-6173 Location: Room B200 Hours: M 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 5 – 8 p.m., T 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., W 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. & 5 – 8 p.m., Th 1 – 8 p.m., F 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Bertrand Crossing Campus ........................................................ 269-695-1391 Location: Student Services Hours: Computerized assessment testing M-Th 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., F 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Paper & pencil assessment testing and Health Science testing during testing hours - please call. South Haven Campus ............................................................... 269-637-7500 Location: Student Services area Hours: M-Th 8 a.m. - 7 p.m., F 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Bookstore

Napier Avenue Campus Walk-in Store Hours Monday-Thursday ....................................................... 8:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Friday ....................................................................... 8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday ............................................................................ CLOSED Ph. (269) 927-6713• Fax (269) 927-6586 http://lake-michigan.bncollege.com South Haven Campus Store Hours Monday-Thursday ............................................................ 9 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. Friday ................................................................................. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Saturday-Sunday ............................................................................ CLOSED Ph. 800-252-1562 x 7116 • Fax (269) 637-7521 http://lakemichigan-shc.bncollege.com

Cashiers Office

Tuition payments, billings, Flex Payment Plan Napier Avenue Campus............................................................ 269-927-8610 Location: A207, Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center Hours: M-F 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Bertrand Crossing Campus ........................................................ 269-695-1391 Location: Student Services Hours: M-Th 7:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.; F 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. South Haven Campus ............................................................... 269-637-7500 Location: Student Services Hours: M-Th 7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.; F 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Child Care Center (Kidzone)

On-campus infant, toddler, pre-school, and child care for children between the ages of 2 weeks and 12 years of students, employees, and community residents Napier Avenue Campus............................................................ 269-927-6293 Location: B-107 Hours: M-F 6 a.m. - 6 p.m., evening care available Fall and Winter semesters 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. M-Th only South Haven Campus ............................................................... 269-637-7501 Hours: M-F 6 a.m. - 6 p.m., evening care available Fall and Winter semesters 6 p.m. - 10 p.m. M-Th only

Disability Services (Student)

Napier Avenue Campus……. .................................................... 269-927-5192 Location: Room C205a Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. South Haven Campus by appointment.

Financial Aid

Financial aid, financial aid forms, scholarships, work study, loans Napier Avenue Campus............................................................ 269-927-8112 Location: A202, Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center Hours: M-F 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Bertrand Crossing Campus ........................................................ 269-695-1391 Location: Room 101 Hours: M-Th 7:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.; F 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. South Haven Campus ............................................................... 269-637-7500 Location: Student Services area Hours: M-Th 7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m., F 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

International Student Services

Napier Avenue Campus............................................................ 269-927-6181 Location: D201a, Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center Hours: M-F 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. or by appointment South Haven Campus by appointment.

Learning Assistance Center

Napier Avenue Campus............................................. 269-927-8100 ext. 5169 Location: B203 Hours: M-Th 8 a.m. - 9 p.m., F 8 a.m. - 3 p.m., Sat by appt. South Haven Campus ..................Student Services area by group or appointment Bertrand Crossing Campus ...........Student Services area by group or appointment

Library

Napier Avenue Campus............................................................ 269-927-8605 Location: L-100 M-Th 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.; F 8 a.m. - 4 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Program Information

Math, Physical Education, Wellness................................................. ext. 5070 Humanities, Fine Arts, Foreign Language ......................................... ext. 5017 Natural Sciences .......................................................................... ext. 5075 Social Science .............................................................................. ext. 5016 Allied Health ................................................................................ ext. 5092 Business, Computer Info Systems, Graphic Design Hospitality, Office Information Systems ............................................ ext. 8171 English, Communications ............................................................... ext. 5182 Transitional Studies ....................................................................... ext. 5185 Technologies Programs .................................................................. ext. 3032

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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Where to Find It Records Office

Name and address changes, transcripts, graduation audits and information, enrollment verification, admissions application processing Napier Avenue Campus............................................................ 269-927-8107 Location: Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center Hours: M-F 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Bertrand Crossing Campus ........................................................ 269-695-1391 Location: Room 101 Hours: M-Th 7:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.; F 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. South Haven Campus ............................................................... 269-637-7500 Location: Student Services area Hours: M-Th 7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. F 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Registration

Napier Avenue Campus............................................................ 269-927-8119 Registration Hours M-F 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., M-Th 5 – 9 p.m., Sat 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Location: Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center ................. 269-927-8128 Bertrand Crossing Campus ........................................................ 269-695-1391 Location: Student Services Hours: M-Th 7:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.; F 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. South Haven Campus ............................................................... 269-637-7500 Location: Student Services area Hours: M-Th 7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m., F 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Student Resource Center

Disability Services, Perkins, Special Populations Napier Avenue Campus……. .................................................... 269-927-5192 Location: Room C205a Hours: M-F 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sat/Sun Closed

Keep up with what’s going on at Lake Michigan College by becoming a fan of the LMC Facebook page. Learn about events and campus activities as they happen. See photos and video of the happenings at the college.

www.facebook.com/ lakemichigancollege

Veterans’ Student Services

Napier Avenue Campus............................................................ 269-927-6181 Location: D-201a, Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center Hours: M-F 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. or by appointment Must see Veteran Affairs before registering at campus or online. South Haven Campus by appointment.

Your Classes are Guaranteed to Go! You depend on the right classes being available to balance your busy life, or to complete your certificate or degree. With that in mind, Lake Michigan College is pleased to offer the Guaranteed to Go schedule of classes. Guaranteed to Go means that classes won’t be cancelled due to low enrollment. So, now you can build your schedule with confidence that the class you want will be there for you when you want it. Certain restrictions do apply: 1. Guarantee applies only to class sections listed in the printed Spring 2012 class schedule, and only to classes being held at one of the College’s four campuses: Napier Avenue Campus, Bertrand Crossing Campus, South Haven Campus, or M-TEC. Class sections added after October 13, 2011 will be listed on the College web site, but the College reserves the right to cancel any of these new additions if there is insufficient enrollment. 2. Guarantee applies only to classes offered and does not guarantee specific instructional personnel. 3. If an instructor becomes unavailable, the College will make every effort to find a replacement instructor. If a replacement cannot be found, the College reserves the right to cancel the class. 4. Lake Michigan College reserves the right to customize class offerings for classes that have low enrollment. This may include independent study, or other flexible approaches. 5. Foreign language courses from FORL 125 thru 198 are excluded from this guarantee. These require that two students be enrolled in order to run. 6. Classes may be cancelled due to natural disasters or acts of God that make College-owned facilities unavailable. 7. Guarantee does not apply to Early College or Direct Credit classes offered by Lake Michigan College.

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Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Tuition, Fees & Residency Tuition

Credit Hour Limit

Tuition rates per contact hour are: $81.00 - In-district $122.00 - In-state $159.00 - Out-of-state $174.00 - International

Contract Hour Fees 

A $35 per-contact-hour fee will be charged to all students. The fee supports services provided by the College that directly enhance the learning experience. Of the $35, $13  is assessed as an Enrollment and General Academic Fee, $1 as a Student Activity Fee, $10 as a Facility Use Fee to assist in the upgrade and maintenance of the campuses, $10 as a Technology Fee to fund campus computer and classroom technology equipment upgrades, and $1 for the Student Senate Campus fund which will be used to address campus needs students identify as a priority. Other fees may be assessed based on the course structure, payment timing or late registration.

Contact Hours

Lake Michigan College assigns the number of contact hours for a course based upon the total amount of weekly instructional time a student will receive in the course. This instructional time includes all types of instruction such as lecture, lab, etc.

No student may take more than 18 semester hours without special permission from the appropriate dean or designee. Permission may be granted in those instances where students have a 3.00 (B) cumulative GPA or better. During the Summer or Spring sessions, a student may not exceed a maximum of 8 semester hours without permission from the appropriate Dean.

Late Registration Fee

A late registration fee will be charged if you register for classes after the regular registration period.  The dates for the spring semester are as follows: October 17 through January 10 Regular registration

Delinquency/ Collection Fee

January 11 through January 16 Late registration; a $20 late registration fee will be charged to students registering for the first time, or who are adding classes to their existing schedule during these dates

Experiential Fee

January 17 through January 23 Students must have instructor permission to register for or add classes that have met a least once. Late registration fees apply.

A $25 delinquency/collection fee will be added to all account balances not paid by the due date on their final notice. The experiential fee is for students who, through work experience and demonstration of their knowledge, place out of classes. If you substitute work experience for a class this way and have the credits applied toward your transcript, a fee of $50 will be charged for each course.

Full-Time Status

A student must be registered for a minimum of 12 credit hours to be designated as a full-time student during the 14-week semesters.

Tuition Fee Chart 2011-2012 Contact Hours

In-district Tuition & Fees

In-state Tuition & Fees

Out-of-state Tuition & Fees

International Tuition & Fees

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

$116 $232 $348 $464 $580 $696 $812 $928 $1,044 $1,160 $1,276 $1,392 $1,508 $1,624 $1,740

$157 $314 $471 $628 $785 $942 $1,099 $1,256 $1,413 $1,570 $1,727 $1,884 $2,041 $2,198 $2,355

$194 $388 $582 $776 $970 $1,164 $1,358 $1,552 $1,746 $1,940 $2,134 $2,328 $2,522 $2,716 $2,910

$209 $418 $627 $836 $1,045 $1,254 $1,463 $1,672 $1,881 $2,090 $2,299 $2,508 $2,717 $2,926 $3,135

Internet Course Tuition

Tuition for Internet courses offered through Lake Michigan College, to students referred by Michigan Community College Virtual Learning Consortium (MCCVLC), differs from standard tuition rates paid by accepted LMC students. The rates are: In-district Out-of-district Out-of-state *rates subject to

$150.00 per contact hour $215.00 per contact hour $280.00 per contact hour change without notice.

For Internet courses offered through MCCVLC only, students are eligible for in-district tuition rates if they are residents of any Michigan community college district. Michigan residents who do not live within a community college district will be charged out-of-district rates. All other students will pay the out-of-state tuition rate. The only LMC fee that is applied, in addition to the internet tuition rate, is a Late Registration fee as appropriate.

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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Tuition, Fees & Residency Residency

A student’s residency for tuition purposes is determined from information provided on the Application for Admission. Status, as defined below, may be reconsidered upon presentation of written proof that the student’s place of residency has changed. The College may require verification of a student’s place of residency.

Change of Status

An International student may qualify for classification according to the definitions of residency stated above if (1) the student holds a valid Alien Registration Receipt Card (Permanent Resident Card), political asylum status or (2) a student owns, or a documented dependent student whose parents or legal guardians own, property within the United States.

Early College Students

A student who currently is classified as a In-state student, Out-of-state student, or International is eligible for review of residency status for subsequent semesters upon proof that the legal home of residence is within the district or state.

A student participating in Early College courses is defined as a resident as described above. However, during enrollment in an Early College course held at a high school, tuition for that course is based upon the residency of the location of the high school instead of the student’s residency.

Documentation

Senior Citizens

The College reserves the right to require documentation acceptable to the College in all cases of residency determination and verification including, but not limited to, the following criteria: a student’s current residency address and one or more of the following documents confirming that address as the legal home of residence. Acceptable documentation includes state driver’s license, state ID card, military ID card, state voter registration card, tribal card with address, property tax statement, utility bill, or home, or renter’s insurance policy.

In-district Student

A citizen or eligible non-citizen of the United States who is (1) a student whose legal residence is within the Lake Michigan College district, or (2) a student who owns, or a documented dependent student whose parents or legal guardians own, real taxable property in the Lake Michigan College district of Berrien County, (including the Niles zip code 49120), the South Haven Public School District or Covert Township in Van Buren County, or (3) a student who is a veteran, or a dependent of a member of the U.S. Armed Forces, and who qualifies for Veteran’s Education Benefits, is classified as an In-district student. In-district status is determined at the time of registration.

In-state Student

A citizen or eligible non-citizen of the United States who is a student whose legal residence is outside the Lake Michigan College district, but within Michigan, is classified as an In-state student. In-state status is determined at the time of registration.

Out-of-state Student

A citizen or eligible non-citizen of the United States who is (1) a student with legal residence in a US state other than Michigan, or (2) a student who does not qualify as an In-district student or as an In-state student as defined above, is classified as an Out-of-state student. Out-of-state status is determined at the time of registration.

International Student

A student who is (1) not a United States citizen or (2) a student who has been admitted to the United States on a temporary, non-resident status, is classified as an International student. International students should be prepared to document status or property ownership at the time of registration.

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Senior citizens sixty (60) years of age and over who meet In-District criteria will qualify for tuition-free enrollment in any College credited course subject to the following provisions: (1) Registration fees and special fees (if any) for courses selected must be paid by the individual enrolled and (2) All regular registration procedures will be followed.

Discretion to Adjust

Discretion in adjusting individual cases within the spirit and intent of these regulations is vested with the Board of Trustees or their designee.

Kidzone Preschool & Childcare Ctr,LLC www.kidzoneonline.com 269-927-6293- Napier Avenue Campus 269-637-7501- South Haven Campus

Located on the Napier Avenue and South Haven campuses for your convenience!

Preschool Program

Ages 2 1/2 -5 years old Ready to Read Early Start Curricula

Infant/Toddler

0-2 ½ Years old Active Learning Series Curricula

Happy to serve Everyone! Ready to make a difference!

Before/After School Care 6-12 Years old

Drop in Care/Night Care 2 ½ -12 Years old

Kidz on Kampus-June-Aug. Kidzone partnering with Boy Scouts of America and Girl Scouts of America 6-12 Years old

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Ways to Help You Pay Tuition and Fee Payment Policy

Tuition and fees must be paid in full at the time of registration, or payment arrangements through the Flex Pay Plan must be made at that time. By registering for classes at Lake Michigan College, you agree to financial responsibility for all charges on your college account. You also promise to pay Lake Michigan College the full amount of the obligation by the due date. Further, you agree to pay any and all costs, including collection, attorney, and litigation costs incurred by Lake Michigan College in its effort to collect, should you default on your account. Each time you register for courses you must make payment arrangements. If payment for a course is not made within the 24 hour timeframe, ALL courses will be dropped and a refund issued for courses already paid for.

Methods of Payment

You must pay for your classes in full, or make payment arrangements through Flex Pay, when you register. Your class registration is not complete until you have paid in full or enrolled in Flex Pay. If the payment portion of registration is not complete, your class registration will be cancelled and you will need to re-register at a later date.

Your two payment options are: 1. Paying in full at time of registration with: • Cash • Personal check or money order made payable to Lake Michigan College • MasterCard, Visa, Discover Card, American Express, or Diner’s Club Card • Third-party payment • Funds held by LMC in an international student deposit account 2. Enrolling in the Flex Pay plans If you don’t pay in full at the time of registration, or if you receive financial aid, or are a Chapter 33 veteran, you must sign up for Flex Pay. Flex Pay is a payment plan that spreads your tuition and fee payments out over time. See more detail under the Flex Pay section on page 11 and 12.

In Person You may pay tuition and fees at the Napier Avenue, Bertrand Crossing, or South Haven campuses during regular business hours (see page 5). You can pay with cash, check, debit card, Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, employee tuition voucher, or Flex Pay program.

Online You can pay your tuition and fees online through WaveLink. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Log on www.lakemichigancollege.edu Click on the WaveLink icon. Enter your login information. Select the “LMC Student” tab. After you’ve registered for classes, click on the ‘View Registration Charges’ link to review your tuition balance. 6. Select a payment option. If you register for classes online and do not pay with a credit card and do not sign up for Flex Pay, you have 24 hours from the time of online registration to pay your tuition in person at the Napier Avenue, Bertrand Crossing, or South Haven campuses. After 24 hours, your class registration will automatically be cancelled.

Financial Aid If you receive some form of financial aid, you must sign up for Flex Pay when you register for classes. When your financial aid award is finalized, the amount will automatically be credited to your account. If the award does not cover the balance in full, the remaining balance will activate your Flex Pay account. Your remaining balance will be split into two payments that will be automatically deducted from your checking account or charged to your credit card. See pages 11 and 12 for important Flex Pay information that relates specifically to students receiving financial aid.

Third-party Payment If someone other than the student is paying for tuition and fees, (an employer, school district, Michigan Works, etc.), authorization to bill tuition and fees to a third party must be brought to the Business Office at least two weeks prior to the student registering for classes. You can access the required Third Party Billing Authorization form at www.lakemichigancollege.edu/waystopay.

International Student Deposit A $5,500 deposit is collected before International students are admitted to the College for the first time.  This is a onetime deposit which is required and must be paid in the form of cash, credit card, money order or cashier’s check.  The deposit is held exclusively for tuition, fees , and books.   The Business Office will open accounts at the Bookstore for all International students with funds on deposit.  If an International student decides to transfer to another school, the Business Office will refund any remaining balance to the student.  Students who leave the College and want to re-enroll will follow regular payment procedures.

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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Tuition and Fee Payment Pathways Pay in full at time of registration

Pay with financial aid or are a Chapter 33 veteran

Make monthly tuition and fee payments

1. Register for classes online or on campus

1. Complete the FAFSA at www.fafsa.ed.gov

1. Register for classes online or on campus

2. Pay • • • • •

2. Receive estimated financial aid award letter from Lake Michigan College

2. Select “Flex Pay” as your payment option

entire tuition and fee balance with: Cash Credit card Check or money order Third-party payment International student deposit account

3. Register for classes online or on campus

4. Select “Flex Pay pending” as your payment option

5. Provide a checking account or credit card number which will be used for monthly automatic payment withdrawals if your Flex Pay – Pending Aid is activated by an outstanding tuition and fee balance after your final financial aid award has been applied to your account. See www.lakemichigancollege.edu/flexpay for Flex Pay-Pending Aid details.

3. Provide a checking account or credit card number which will be used for monthly automatic payment withdrawals

4. Make necessary down payment as determined by the date you are signing up for Flex Pay. Down payment will be charged to the checking account or credit card number you provide. See www.lakemichigancollege.edu/flexpay for the enrollment/down payment chart as well as full Flex Pay details.

NOTE: COMPLETE THE FAFSA EARLY!! It can take 3 – 4 weeks from the time you submit the FAFSA until you receive your estimated financial aid award package from LMC. If you register for classes before receiving your estimated financial aid award letter from LMC, you will automatically be placed into the regular Flex Pay program and charged the $25 fee. Once you have been placed into the regular Flex Pay program, the $25 fee cannot be refunded.

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Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Flex Pay

Which Flex Pay plan will you be placed into?

Flex Pay Monthly Tuition Payment Plan

Flex Pay is a low-cost way to spread your tuition and fee payments out over time. • Payments are automatically deducted from your checking account or your MasterCard, Discover Card or American Express. • Flex Pay is not a loan program so you won’t have interest or finance charges, and there is no credit check. • There is a $25-per-semester, non-refundable enrollment fee. • A small convenience fee is charged for credit card payments. • Payments are processed on the 5th of each month and continue until the balance is paid in full. • There is a $25 fee if a payment is returned for insufficient funds. • You must sign up each semester that you want to use the program.

Flex Pay Options

There are two Flex Pay options. Your financial aid status at the time you register for classes determines which Flex Pay program you will be placed into.

1. Flex Pay for those without financial aid.

If you do not pay in full at the time you register for classes, and you do not receive financial aid including scholarships, grants and loans, you will be placed into the traditional Flex Pay plan. The amount of the down payment you must make will be determined by the date you enroll in the program. The earlier you enroll, the smaller the down payment is. Flex Pay enrollment deadlines are listed in the chart on this page.

2. Flex Pay – Pending Aid for those receiving financial aid or are a Chapter 33 veteran.

Flex Pay – Pending Aid is similar to the traditional Flex Pay Program. One difference is that your payment plan will only be activated if a tuition and fee balance remains after all of your financial aid is applied. Another difference is how the monthly payment plan is structured. Only if Flex Pay - Pending Aid is activated due to an outstanding balance will Flex Pay fees be charged.

To be enrolled in Flex Pay – Pending Aid, you must:

• Complete the FAFSA, or be a Chapter 33 veteran • Receive an estimated financial aid award package from LMC before you register for classes, and • Have a checking account or credit card. (Visa not accepted)

Note: It can take 3 – 4 weeks after you submit the FAFSA until the time you receive your estimated financial aid award package. If you anticipate receiving financial aid, and want to utilize Flex Pay – Pending Aid, you will need to wait until your estimated financial aid award package is complete to register for classes.

Chapter 33 veteran

X

When you register for classes after you receive an estimated financial aid award package from LMC that shows you are receiving some level of financial aid, and sign up for Flex, you will be placed into Flex Pay – Pending Aid. When you register for classes before receiving your estimated financial aid award letter from LMC, and sign up for Flex, you will automatically be placed into the regular Flex Pay program and charged the $25 fee. Once you have been placed into the regular Flex Pay program, the $25 fee cannot be refunded.

How to Enroll in Flex Pay

If you wish to use Flex Pay, you must re-enroll each semester at the time of registration. Go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/ flexpay and click on the e-Cashier link. Please have the following information available: 1. LMC student ID number 2. Name, address and email of person responsible for making payments 3. Account information for the person responsible for payment. • By automatic withdrawal from your checking account - have the bank name, telephone number, account number and bank routing number available. • By credit card - have the credit card number and expiration date available. NOTE: Students who have previously defaulted on the Flex Pay/FACTS/ e-Cashier program are not eligible to participate.

Flex Pay enrollment deadlines – Spring 2012 Semester Enrollment on e-Cashier will be available beginning October 17, 2011. Last day to enroll online Nov. 3 Nov. 21 Dec. 21 Jan. 24

Required down payment none 20% 33% 50%

# of Payments 5 4 3 2

Months of Payments November-March December-March January-March February-March

Flex Pay – Pending Aid Spring 2012 Semester Last day to enroll online

Required down payment

# of Payments

Months of Payments

January 24

none

2

March & April

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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Ways to Help You Pay Important Financial Aid notes • All Financial Aid documents must be on file in the Financial Aid Office before a financial aid award can be made. No Documents = No Award. • If you sign up for Flex Pay before having a financial aid award, a $25 application fee will be assessed and payments will begin right away. • All students, including those on financial aid, must sign up for Flex Pay. The only exceptions are: • Students who pay in full at the time of registration. • Students who are funded through Michigan Works! • Students who have made arrangements with the College’s Financial Services Office through their employer. • Class attendance is required to receive financial aid. If you do not attend classes, your grants will be reduced for each course you do not attend, and your loan may be cancelled.

Financial Aid Policy

When your financial aid award is finalized, the amount will automatically be credited to your account. If the award does not cover the full balance, you are responsible for paying the difference. If you receive some form of financial aid, you must sign up for Flex Pay when you register for classes for your registration to be complete.

Grants Grants are available from state and federal sources and do not have to be repaid. Most require that you complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine your level of eligibility. Some grants have limited funding and are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis, so early application is encouraged. Grants may include:

Scholarships Lake Michigan College awards hundreds of scholarships each year based on academic achievement, financial need and special talent. Many LMC scholarships require a FAFSA to be completed as part of the application process. Scholarships have a priority deadline of March 1, but applications will be accepted after that date. For complete details, visit www.lakemichigancollege.edu/scholarships.

Work Study/Student Employment

Each year, there are a several Work Study opportunities available on campus. These on-campus jobs require that a FAFSA be completed. Then students contact the Career and Transfer Center to fill out an application, review open positions and begin the interview process. For more information, contact the Career and Transfer Center at (269) 927-6284.

Direct Loan Program Students who complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), are making satisfactory academic progress, and are at least half-time, may choose to borrow through the Direct loan program. Loan proceeds will be awarded based on the student’s financial need. Repayment begins when the student leaves school, or drops to below half-time status. For more information regarding Stafford Loans, contact the Financial Aid Office at (269) 927-8112.

How to Apply for Financial Aid 1. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You can complete the application online at www.fafsa.gov. 2. Complete the LMC admission process. 3. When applying for LMC scholarships, you must complete the LMC Scholarship Application available online at www.lakemichigancollege.edu/scholarships. 4. Questions about financial aid can be directed to the Financial Aid Office at (269) 927-8112 or by visiting the Students Services area on the Napier Avenue Campus. You can also call the Bertrand Crossing Campus at (269) 695-1391 or the South Haven Campus at (269) 637-7500.

• • • • • •

Pell Grants Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant Academic Competitiveness Grants Indian Tuition Waiver Michigan Tuition Incentive Program (TIP) Carl D. Perkins Grant – Single Parent/Displaced Homemaker Grant & Non-Traditional Job Trainee (Sex Equity) Program • Children of Veterans Tuition Grant • Veterans Administration Educational Benefits

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Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Ways to Help You Pay Lifetime Learning Credit

You may be able to claim a Lifetime Learning tax credit through your federal tax return for qualified education expenses paid for all students in your household enrolled in postsecondary education. The amount of lifetime learning credit is 20% of the first $10,000 of qualified education expenses you paid for all eligible students in your household. The credit is available for out-of-pocket tuition and fees for one or more courses – part-time or full-time status is not required. Qualified individuals or households must have a modified adjusted gross income of $60,000 or less for individuals, and $120,000 or less for joint filers. This credit is non-refundable. The above information is based on IRS information available for 2010 tax filings. Changes in tax code may occur. Please consult a qualified tax advisor for full details. To receive more information about the education tax credits, please visit www.IRS.gov.

Did you know you can finish your bachelor’s degree on the campus of LMC?

• Accredited bachelor’s degree programs available in: • Accounting • Applied Science Majors in occupational/technical fields, allied health, and public safety • Business Administration • Community Services - Family Systems Concentration • Multidisciplinary Studies

• Transfer up to 90 semester hours toward your Siena Heights University degree. • Evening, weekend, and online classes are designed for working adults on LMC’s campus. • Master’s degree available in Leadership.

Contact Us Today!

Phone: 269.927.6711 Visit: Stop by and see us at LMC RM C-204 Web: www.sienaheights.edu/lmc All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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Learning With a Flexible Twist Life happens... but, that doesn’t have to get in the way of earning your college degree. With flexible courses offerings on the weekend, online and through telecourses, you have options that help you fit college into your busy life.

Online Courses Online classes from Lake Michigan College allow you to attend class from your home, office or anywhere you have access to a computer and Internet service. You do much of your coursework on the Internet. Individual instructors can give you details about the amount of time required on campus for orientation and testing. Information about specific classes can be found in the schedule listing for each one on pages 26 - 57. BUSA 105    BUSA 115 BUSA 202     BUSA 203      BUSA 205 BUSA 207 BUSA 208 BUSA 209      CIS 100      CIS 108      CIS 208       ENGL 101     ENGL 102     MATH 122 MATH 128    OIS 220 POSC 101 PSYC 203     PSYC 201 PSYC 204    

Principles of Retailing Principles of Customer Service Principles of Accounting II Principles of Economics (Macro) Business Law I Small Business Management Advertising/Sales Promotion Principles of Marketing Introduction to Computer Literacy Computer Operations/Microcomputing Advanced Microcomputing Applications English Composition English Composition Intermediate Algebra Pre-Calculus Algebra Medical Office Procedures National Government Human Development Intro to Psychology Child Development/Presonality

Hybrid Courses Hybrid classes mix the best of both worlds – online and on campus. You complete the majority of your coursework online, when it best fits into your schedule. You then visit campus for labs and hands-on work that enhances your learning experience. All on-campus coursework for the Spring 2012 hybrid internet courses will take place on the Napier Avenue Campus. See the course listings on pages 26 - 57 for specific details for each class. BIOL 101     BIOL 205 BUSA 209 CHEM 101 CHEM 104    

Biological Science Human Anatomy Principles of Marketing Intro to Chemistry I Fundamentals of General, Organic & Biochemistry CIS 100      Introduction to Computer Literacy PHED 200      Healthful Living PHED 212     Health & Fitness PHSC 101      Physical Science, Chemistry, and Physics

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Spring Telecourses Telecourses allow you to take college courses in the convenience of your home. You check out DVDs from the LMC bookstore to study at home or view the DVDs in the College’s Napier Avenue Campus Learning Resource Center. Just as in traditional college courses, you purchase textbooks, complete homework assignments, and take exams. Instructors are available by appointment, phone, or e-mail. You will be required to attend five (5) sessions on campus consisting of an orientation and four (4) exams.

Cost, Textbooks, and DVDs

See page 7 for tuition and fee charges. There is also a $40 telecourse enrollment fee. Note: Tuition and fees are subject to change without prior notice. Telecourse DVDs are available in the LMC library. Students must have an LMC student ID card to check out telecourse DVDs from the library. DVDs are to be returned to the library at the end of the semester. If DVDs are not returned, library fines may apply.

Telecourses Orientation & Testing

Before taking a telecourse, enrolled students must attend the following orientation sessions. Orientation is mandatory. Syllabi will be distributed, course content will be outlined, and the instructor’s expectations of the students will be discussed. If you are unable to take any of the tests at their scheduled times, you must make special arrangements, in advance, with the instructor.

Orientation

Testing Locations

Thursday, Jan. 19, 5 pm Friday, Jan. 20, 12:45 pm

Brown Lecture Hall (D-112)

Napier Avenue Campus

Napier Avenue Campus

Bertrand Crossing Campus

Check in at the office, Room 101

Test Dates

Feb. 9 & 10; Mar. 1 & 2; Apr. 5 & 6; Apr. 26 - 27

South Haven Campus Check in at the office

You have the option of taking your tests on Thursday or Friday dates, as your schedule permits. All Thursday tests begin at 5 – 6:30 pm, all Friday tests begin at 12:45 – 2:15 pm.

Telecourses BUSA 103 BUSA 201 HIST 202 HUMN 211 SOC 101 SOC 202

Introduction to Business Principles of Accounting I American History Studies in Film Art Principles of Sociology Marriage and Family

Orientation Room C-223 C-223 C-105 C-107 C-214 C-214

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Learning With a Flexible Twist Saturday Classes Saturday classes are offered at all campus locations to help you better fit your goal of earning a college degree into your schedule. For full course information, please reference the appropriate campus in pages 26-57 of the schedule.

Napier Avenue Campus BIOL 101    CHEM 101 ENGL 102       MATH 090        MATH 095     

Biological Science, 8 a.m. – noon Intro Chemistry I, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Hybrid Lab English Composition, 9:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Pre-Algebra, 8 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. Introductory Algebra, 8 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.

Bertrand Crossing Campus - Niles BIOL 205 BUSA 205        BUSA 210        BUSA 216 ENGL 103        MATH 090        MATH 095        MATH 128        

Human Anatomy, 9 a.m. – noon Business Law I, 9 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Business Correspondence, 9 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Business Statistics, 9 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Technical Writing, 9 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Pre-Algebra, 8 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. Introductory Algebra, 8 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. Pre-Calculus Algebra, 8 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.

Agriculture Applied Plant Science Lake Michigan College and Michigan State University’s Institute of Agriculture Technology (IAT) have partnered to offer an MSU certificate in Applied Plant Science with an LMC Associate’s Degree. Students must apply to both LMC and MSU’s IAT concurrently. The following classes are offered through MSU on LMC’s Napier Avenue Campus at the MSU tuition rate.

AT 293 Professional Internship in Agriculture Technology HRT 213 Landscape Maintenance HRT 205 Plant Mineral Nutrition HRT 208 Pruning & Training Systems in Horticulture HRT 253 Compost Production and Use HRT 242 Passive Solar Greenhouses for Protected Cultivation

Bertrand Crossing Campus - Niles MATH 216 OIS 211  

Intro to Statistics, 9 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Office Procedures, 9 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

BIOL 205        BUSA 150      BUSA 203      BUSA 210        CLS 100          ENGL 101       ENGY 182       MATH 090     MATH 095      MATH 095      READ 110        

Human Anatomy, 9 a.m. – noon Job Search Seminar, 9:30 a.m. – 12:40 p.m. Principles of Economics (MACRO), 9 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Business Correspondence, 1:00 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. College & Career Success, 1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. English Composition, 12:45 – 4 p.m. Boiler Theory, Safety & Design, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Pre-Algebra, 8 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. Introductory Algebra, 8  a.m. – 12:20 p.m. Introductory Algebra, 12:30 p.m. – 4:50 p.m. Medical Terminology Vocabulary, 9:30 a.m. – 11:40 a.m.

South Haven Campus

Agriculture--Viticulture Lake Michigan College and Michigan State University’s Institute of Agriculture Technology (IAT) have partnered with the Viticulture and Enology Science and Technology Alliance (VESTA) to offer an MSU certificate in Viticulture with an LMC associate’s degree. Students must apply to both LMC and MSU’s IAT concurrently. The following classes are offered through MSU on LMC’s Napier Avenue Campus at the MSU tuition rate, or online through VESTA.

VIN 111 Introduction to Viticulture & Vineyard Establishment VIN 113 Winter Viticulture Technology   VIN 114 Spring Viticulture Technology VIN 146 Introduction to Enology VIN 190 Vineyard Safety VIN 266 Sensory Evaluation VIN 293 Soils for Viticulture

AllAll prospective students must see Stacey Rocklin, Program Coordinator to apply and register for MSU classes. times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu Please call 269.927.8100 x 5712 or email rocklin@msu.edu to make an appointment.

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Services to Help You Succeed Admission Policy

Lake Michigan College offers an “open door” admissions policy for individuals who are interested in and capable of benefiting from the post-secondary experience. Any person can apply for admission to Lake Michigan College who is interested in and capable of benefiting from the post-secondary experience, and who is: 1. A high school graduate or GED recipient, or 2. Eighteen years of age or older, or 3. Demonstrates Ability to Benefit on an approved College assessment instrument. Individuals who are under the age of 18 and demonstrate the Ability to Benefit will be offered acceptance after that individual’s high school class has graduated. Individuals can be admitted as a student at LMC without a high school diploma or GED. Individuals who are still in high school may enroll in classes at the College with permission of their high school guidance officer by completing an Early College Registration form. Early College participants are to apply for admission to the College for any semester after their graduation date. Guest student status will be granted to individuals who attend other colleges and universities upon completion of the Michigan Uniform Undergraduate Guest Application. Guest students may enroll in course work for which all stated pre-requisites have been met. The College reserves the right to evaluate and document special cases and to refuse admission and/or continued enrollment if the College determines that the applicant/student is a threat or a potential danger to the college community or if such refusal is considered in the best interest of the College. The College retains the right to deny and/or revoke admission/ enrollment of any applicant or student who was convicted of a felony or a crime requiring listing on the sex offender registry. A registered sex offender is defined as any person who is required pursuant to State or Federal Law to be registered on any Criminal Information Network and/or the National Crime Information Center Convicted Sexual Offender registry. The College will monitor the sex offender registry list to identify persons on the list who have been convicted of a felony or a crime requiring listing on the sex offender registry and are applying for admission to or enrolled in Lake Michigan College. Individuals convicted of a felony or a crime requiring listing on the sex offender registry are required to inform the Vice President, Student Services of their status at the time they seek admission to the College. Failure to comply with notification requirements may result in immediate denial of admission or expulsion from the College. As required by Federal Law, Lake Michigan College will provide a link in one or more areas of its web site and in appropriate College publications to the Michigan State Police Sex Offender Registry. A student whose admission is revoked after enrollment must be notified of the right to an appeal process and provided due process. The student whose admission is revoked is provisionally enrolled and permitted to attend classes pending the outcome of the appeal process, if the student chooses to appeal.

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Admissions Status New Students

A new or first time in any college student is someone who has never attended any college or university. All new degree-seeking students must apply for admission to LMC. Students who participated in LMC’s Early College program during high school and have never attended another college or university, are classified as new students during the first fall semester enrolled as degree-seeking at LMC after high school graduation. Non degree-seeking students may enroll in classes at LMC for personal interest. All non degree-seeking students are encouraged to apply for admission before first semester of enrollment. However, non degree-seeking students must apply for admission before the next semester of enrollment.

Continuing Students

Any LMC student who has enrolled at any time within four consecutive semesters (excluding summer), may return to study without applying for readmission to the college provided the student’s account is in good standing and all other obligations to the college have been met. Upon completion of the first semester enrolled at LMC, a student is classified as a continuing student and remains a continuing student until the student no longer meets the definition of a continuing student.

Returning Students

Any student who has not attended another post-secondary institution but has previously attended LMC after high school is a returning student.  Any student who has not enrolled within four or more consecutive full semesters (excluding summer), must contact the Records Office at 269-927-8107 to determine if a new application for admission is required.  These students are classified as returning students for the first semester of enrollment.  

Transfer Students

Any student who has attended another post-secondary institution and will now be attending LMC for the first time as degree-seeking is classified as a transfer student during the first semester of enrollment at LMC. A transfer student must apply for admission and have official transcripts sent directly to LMC to have previously taken courses evaluated for transfer equivalency credit.

Guest Students

Students, who are enrolled as degree-seeking at another institution, may apply for guest status at LMC to enroll in courses intended to transfer back to the degree-seeking institution. Students are requested to complete the Michigan Uniform Undergraduate Guest application and the LMC full registration card. The guest application and registration card must be submitted for every semester in which the student wishes to enroll as a guest. To enroll, the student must provide proof all prerequisites required by the specific courses have been satisfied. A guest student who wishes to be admitted as a degreeseeking LMC student for the first time must apply for admission. A guest student who previously has been admitted to LMC as a degreesseeking student must contact the Records Office at 269-927-8107 to determine if a new application for admission is required.

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Services to Help You Succeed Early College Students

Early College provides high school students with an excellent opportunity to get a jump start on their college education while still in high school. Taking college classes while still in high school reduces the overall cost of a college education and gives students the experience of college-level courses. Classes are offered at all LMC campuses, as well as at many high schools and technology centers. To participate in Early College, students must demonstrate a readiness for college-level course work and meet the eligibility requirements of their high school. Students must satisfy the course prerequisites with acceptable PLAN, ACT or SAT scores, or by achieving acceptable scores on the  College’s assessment.  All courses are reflected on an official LMC transcript. Students interested in attending LMC after graduation are encouraged to submit an application for admission at www.lakemichigancollege.edu. For more information, contact Early College at: www.lakemichigancollege.edu/ earlycollege; e-mail earlycollege@lakemichigancollege. edu; phone (269) 927-6198 or text (269) 449-2568. You may also speak with your high school guidance counselor, or career and technical education director about Early College opportunities.

Advising

Prior to registering as a new student, if you are taking six or more credit hours or plan on obtaining an associate’s degree or certificate, you are required to see a Student Service Academic Advisor or faculty advisor for assistance in planning your schedule for your first semester. As a current Lake Michigan College student, you are encouraged to meet with a Student Service Academic Advisor or faculty advisor prior to each semester and anytime you have questions.

AlertNow

AlertNow is an automated system that Lake Michigan College uses to inform students of important campus information such as weatherrelated campus closings and campus emergencies. The message can be delivered as a voice message to a landline telephone or cell phone, as a text message to a cell phone, and/or as an email message. You will automatically be registered for the service at the time of class registration based on telephone and email information you provide to the College.

Updating your AlertNow Contact Information

Your AlertNow contact information is maintained within your student profile settings in WaveLink.      For additional details on how to update your contact information (cell phone,  home phone) please refer to the online user’s guide on  www.lakemichigancollege. com\alertnow.  

Opt-Out Process

To opt out from receiving alerts,  please send an email using your LMC provided student email account to AlertNowOptOut@ Lakemichgiancollege.edu. The opt out process must be repeated for each term you desire to be excluded from receiving alerts. Notice: General fees from your cell phone carrier may apply when using this service. Lake Michigan College is not responsible for any

fees that may be charged by your cell phone carrier for voice and text messages sent to your cell phone.  This includes overages on your monthly minutes and/or fees your carrier may charge for text messaging.

Assessment & Placement

For course placement purposes, all students new to Lake Michigan College will be required to complete an assessment of writing, mathematics, and reading skills prior to registration unless an exemption applies based on current procedure. English, mathematics and reading basic skills prerequisites for College classes are listed in the course description section of the College catalog as E-English, M-Mathematics or R-Reading. Students whose assessment scores do not meet or exceed levels set for E, M, R prerequisites must successfully complete appropriate Transitional Studies courses prior to registration in courses with these prerequisites. There is no charge for the assessment. The initial assessment is completed as a unit; however, students may retake each portion once. If you have not enrolled for five consecutive years, you must take the assessment unless an exemption applies. Upon request, students with disabilities, with documentation on file in the Office of Special Populations, will be provided special testing accommodations. Students who will be exempt from assessment include: • Students who submit ACT or SAT scores at or above current qualifying levels for E, M, and R prerequisites. Documentation of current qualifying levels will be maintained in the Assessment Center. • Students with an associate degree or higher, based on documentation. • Students with a minimum grade of “C” in the equivalent of a college-level freshman composition course and a college-level algebra course, based on documentation. • Students with documented transfer credit in a college-level composition class will be exempt from the reading and writing portions of the assessment. Those students with documented transfer credit in college-level algebra will be exempt from the math portion of assessment • Students enrolling ONLY in courses with no prerequisites as printed in the current LMC College Catalog. • Students taking non-credit courses and courses for Continuing Education units (CEUs). The Assessment Testing Center is located in room B200 on the Napier Avenue Campus. Bertrand Crossing assessment is located in room 100. Assessment at the South Haven Campus is located in the Student Services area. Assessment hours can be found in the class schedule. Must bring photo i.d. Questions may be addressed to LMC’s Assessment Coordinator at (269) 927-6173 .

Note - Additional assessment is required for Health Science Applicants. 17 All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

Services to Help You Succeed English As a Second Language

All incoming students, including those who speak English as a Second Language (ESL), are assessed relative to reading, writing, and mathematics skills. Lake Michigan College is aware that assessment instruments designed for students whose first language is English do not adequately assess the skills of ESL students. Therefore, ESL students will be assessed for English language proficiency using a test of English language. ESL students are required to take an ESL assessment and to take appropriate courses based on those scores. Non-native speakers of English must take the ESL assessment unless they can present proof of a TOEFL score >500 for the paper test or >173 for the computer version at the time of their initial registration. Questions regarding Assessment for ESL students should be directed to the Assessment Center at 927-8100 ext. 6173.

Blackboard

Blackboard is a flexible, e-learning software tool that many Lake Michigan College instructors use to create supplemental web-based course pages. Though each instructor uses it differently, things you might find include assignment information, lecture PowerPoints, messages to the class and supplemental readings. To access Blackboard, go to the bottom of any LMC web page.

Career and Transfer Center

The Career and Transfer Center is available to provide comprehensive support in all aspects of workforce development. The center also provides a centralized location for resources on LMC’s campus designed to facilitate a smooth transition for students who are either transferring into LMC or transferring to a four-year college or university. Career exploration, local job postings, transfer information and other support services are included. The Career and Transfer Center is conveniently located in the Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center on the Napier Avenue Campus. For more information please contact (269) 927-6284. Information brochures are also available in the main reception area of the Bertrand Crossing, South Haven, and M-TEC campuses.

Class Registration and Schedule Changes Class Schedule

Exact deadlines for all course changes are established and published each semester. (See Academic Calendar.) No course changes may be made after the deadline except when initiated by the instructor because the student has been misplaced and the change is approved by the departmental dean. Each student is responsible for his or her course schedule and any changes to it, such as adding, dropping, or withdrawing. WaveLink displays all courses for which a student is enrolled. Each student

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should print and inspect a schedule of his or her classes from WaveLink after registration and each time a change (drop, add, etc.) is made. Any discrepancy should be addressed immediately by making the appropriate change in WaveLink . Students requiring assistance may call or visit the One-Stop Registration area on any LMC campus.

Add

Students add course work to their schedule by enrolling through their WaveLink account. Students requiring registration assistance may call or visit the One-Stop Registration area on any LMC campus. Students may add courses up to the published last day to add for the semester. Students may register for Open Entry/Open Exit or Open Entry/Defined Exit courses throughout the semester up to the last two weeks of the semester. During the last week of the semester, students register for OE/OE or OE/DE courses beginning in the next semester. To use their financial aid (this includes grants, most scholarships, loans, and work study), a student must be registered for all classes before the end of the add/drop period for the semester. This pertains to registration for all courses, including OE/OE, OE/DE and late starting classes.

Drop

Students drop course work through their WaveLink account. Students requiring assistance to drop a course may call or visit the One-Stop Registration area on any LMC campus. The student will receive a refund of any tuition and fees already paid for the dropped course. Students may drop a course only during the published drop dates. (Normally, this date extends to the end of the first two weeks of the semester.) Late starting and Open Entry/Open Exit or Open Entry/ Defined Exit courses permit a drop up to the end of the third day after registration.

Withdraw

Students receiving financial aid (this includes grants, most scholarships, loans, and work study), must contact the Financial Aid Office in room A-219 or (269) 927-8112, prior to withdrawing from any course. Students withdraw from a course by submitting the withdraw form directly to the One-Stop Registration area on any campus. Withdraws are not available through WaveLink. A withdraw does not qualify for a refund of tuition and fees. During the first 80% of the course, a student may withdraw with a guaranteed “W” grade. During the final 20% of the course, the student must confer with the instructor to request permission to withdraw. Permission to withdraw is solely at the discretion of the instructor. Withdraw requests received after the last day of the class will not be honored.

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Services to Help You Succeed Attention

• Discontinuing attendance in a class does not constitute dropping or withdrawing from a course. Failure to officially drop or withdraw from a course that the student is not attending will result in the grade earned according grading criteria outlined in the course syllabus. A drop or withdraw is not official until the student successfully completes and verifies the drop action in WaveLink or completes the appropriate withdraw form and delivers it, in person, to the One-Stop Registration area on any LMC campus. No student should assume that an instructor has dropped or withdrawn him/her from a course. • Requests to add, drop, or withdraw from classes that are mailed or faxed (269-927-6874) to the college will be honored only if they are postmarked or received by the posted deadline. Mailed or faxed request must contain a readable copy of a photo ID which contains the student’s signature, full name, LMC ID number, specific instructions for amending the schedule, and the student’s signature matching the signature on the photo ID. Unsigned requests will not be honored.

Independent Study

At Lake Michigan College, you have the opportunity to participate in Independent Study course work. This must be arranged with a supervising instructor and must be approved by the appropriate dean. Independent study is designed to provide an opportunity for outstanding students to pursue special or advanced study topics. Independent study may be elected for one or two semester hours of credit, depending on the nature of the project undertaken. The amount of credit assigned is determined by you, the supervising faculty member and the appropriate dean. Enrollment for Independent Study will take place during regular registration only.

Diversity

Grades

Final grades are available via the student’s WaveLink account approximately one week after the end of the semester. The student assumes responsibility to monitor grades at the end of the semester. Any grade challenges must be made within one semester after the grade has been issued.

Honors Program

The Lake Michigan College Honors Program offers academically talented students the opportunity to study together in a core of Honors courses taught by some of the College’s most experienced faculty. Honors students also attend several outside events together each year, such as museum exhibits, plays, seminars and workshops. The LMC Honors Program has an agreement with Western Michigan University that allows LMC Honors students who are transferring to WMU to be automatically accepted into the prestigious WMU Lee Honors College. For more information about the Honors Program, contact Dr. Gary Roberts at (269) 927-8100, ext. 5016.

Library

Students have access to an electronic library with over 100 electronic databases available through the LMC William Hessel Library’s Web page. These databases are searchable from all LMC campuses; many are available for students to access from home. These databases contain full-text articles from over 15,000 magazines as well as fulltext information from published books. The Online Catalog provides a “Reserve a Title” function so users at Bertrand Crossing, M-TEC, and South Haven campuses can request library owned items to be sent to their respective campuses. There are 67 web accessible computers containing Microsoft applications, and DVD viewing software, in the library.

Lake Michigan College is an equal opportunity institution, affording enrollment, employment and services without distinction on the basis of age, color, height, weight, creed, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, or gender. Any questions regarding your rights under Title VI and Title IX should be directed to the Assistant Director, Human Resources and Diversity, (269) 927-8102, room A-305. Any questions regarding your rights under Section 504 should be directed to the Student Resource Center, (269) 927-8100 ext. 5192, room C-205a. The grievance procedures for Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of Education Amendments of 1972 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 can be found in the College Catalog.

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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Services to Help You Succeed LMC Transcripts

An official transcript or student copy will be issued upon a written request and payment of the necessary $5 fee, provided there is no outstanding balance or hold on your account. A student copy is not official and will be identified as a student copy.

Mission Statement

The philosophy of Lake Michigan College, an institution of higher education, is founded on the belief that education is for all who wish to develop their potential. It is fundamental that a community college assist in meeting the educational, career, cultural, wellness and recreational needs of the community it serves. This involves a five-fold obligation: • to provide for the educational aspirations, needs and learning expectations of the individual and the community; • to provide for the occupational needs and desires of the learner and the community; • to provide for the cultural interests and the wellness and recreational needs of the individual, and thus contribute to the development of effective citizens; • to provide an assurance of quality in programs and in people; • to develop an international perspective that prepares students, and develop employees and community members for a world economy and global citizenship.

Open Entry/Open Exit (OE/OE) and Open Entry/ Defined Exit (OE/DE) Registration & Completion

Open Entry/Open Exit (OE/OE) and Open Entry/Defined Exit (OE/ DE) courses are self-paced classes designed to allow students more flexibility in completing some of their coursework. Courses offered in these formats are designated in the Course Schedule with either an OE/OE (Open Entry/Open Exit) or an OE/DE (Open Entry/ Defined Exit). An Open Entry/Open Exit course allows the student to complete the course by the end of the following semester, if necessary. Students may register at any time up to the last week of the semester; however, they must begin the course immediately upon enrollment. Students must engage in at least one instructional activity within the first week of enrolling in the course to maintain academic progress. After that, students should work to complete the coursework as quickly as they are able.  Open Entry/Open Exit courses must be completed by the end of the next full semester. (Financial Aid students, please see special note below for requirements.) Open Entry/Defined Exit courses must be completed within the semester the student registers. Students must register no later than two weeks prior to the end of the semester but must begin coursework immediately upon registration and complete at least one instructional activity within the first week of registering for the class. Open Entry/ Defined Exit courses do not extend into the following semester.

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Grading

If an OE/OE (Open Entry/Open Exit) course is not completed by the end of the semester in which the student enrolled, students will receive an IP (In-Progress) at the end of the term. Sufficient academic progress toward completion, as defined in the course syllabus, will determine if a student is eligible for an IP or will receive a failing grade. Students, therefore, must satisfy requirements for continued progress before an IP will be awarded. If an IP is awarded, students have until the end of the following semester to complete their coursework. An OE/DE (Open Entry/Defined Exit) course must be completed by the end of the semester, regardless of when the student enrolled for the course. The grade earned will be recorded on the student’s transcript.  

Withdrawal from an OE/OE or OE/DE Course

Students may withdraw from an OE/OE or OE/DE course with a “W” up through 80% of the allotted completion time of the course. Students should consult the College’s web site for specific dates.  Late withdrawals are solely at the discretion of the instructor and must be completed on the appropriate form with the instructor’s signature.  

Dropping a OE/OE or OE/DE Course

Students who register for an OE/OE or OE/DE course by the last day to add courses for the semester, may drop the course according to the published semester drop date. OE/OE or OE/DE courses registered for after the full semester’s last day to add may be dropped within three days of the posted registration. For courses OE/OE or OE/DE courses dropped during the allowable timeframe, the regular tuition refund policy applies.  

Special Note for Financial Aid Students Enrolled in Open Entry Courses

Students using financial aid to pay for an Open Entry course must register during the regular semester registration period at the beginning of the semester in order for these classes to be included in their financial aid package. Students MUST begin work on their Open Entry course (whether it is OE/OE or OE/DE) before the financial aid for the class will be released to the student’s account. Students must continue regularly participating in the class to maintain academic standards of progress for the course. If students do not continue working on the course, (more than two weeks with no class activity) through at least the 60% point of the semester in which they enrolled, the financial aid award will be recalculated and possibly reduced, which could result in the student owing the College or the Department of Education for previously awarded financial aid. In addition, the student’s Flex Pay – Pending Aid account may be activated. Students with a financial aid hold on their account may not be permitted to enroll in future terms.  

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Services to Help You Succeed Sex Offender Registration

In accordance to the “Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act” of 2000, which amends the Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act, the Jeanne Clery Act and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, Lake Michigan College is providing a link to the Michigan State Police Sex Offender Registry. This act requires institutions of higher education to issue a statement advising the campus community where law enforcement information provided by a State concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained. It also requires sex offenders already required to register in a State to provide notice of each institution of higher education in that State at which the person is employed, carries a vocation, or is a student. In the State of Michigan, convicted sex offenders must register with the Sex Offender and Crimes Against Minors Registry maintained by the State Police. The Sex Offenders Registration Act, MCL 28.721et seq., directs the Michigan State Police to develop and maintain a public registry and provides guidelines on the type of offender information available to the public. The registration requirements of the Sex Offenders Registration Act are intended to provide the people of this state with an appropriate, comprehensive, and effective means to monitor those persons who pose such a potential danger. In accordance with the Wetterling Act, Megan’s Law and the Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act of 2000, it is now mandatory that all registered sex offenders report to the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction in which the institution of higher learning is located. The Michigan Public Sex Offenders Registry can be accessed at http://www.mipsor.state.mi.us/

Student E-mail

When you register for classes at Lake Michigan College, either full- or part-time, a student email account is automatically setup on your behalf. Your email will then be accessible via WaveLink at http://wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu and is hosted by Google. Your email account will be active the entire time you are enrolled as a student at LMC, and will stay active up to a year after graduation or the last semester for which you have enrolled. For questions regarding your account, please contact the IT Helpdesk at: ITHelpDesk@lakemichigancollege.edu. • LMC provides an email account for all students which is the official communication channel between LMC and the student.    • Email accounts are created for you automatically during the course registration process. • Your email address is:  (Wavelink user name)@email. lakemichigancollege.edu • Your LMC issued email account is forwarded to your personal email account of record in Banner at the start of each term.   • Please validate and update the forwarding rules for your college issued email account at the start of each term. • Your email address will be kept active one year from the last term attended.

Student Identification Cards

All LMC students need to obtain an LMC Student Identification Card. Cards cost $3 and are valid for one academic year.  

Obtaining a Card

Visit the Student Services One Stop area of the Napier Avenue, Bertrand Crossing or South Haven campuses during regular business hours with a photo identification (valid driver’s license, passport, or other official identification card) and the $3 fee. Your card will be issued while you wait. A $3 replacement fee will be charged for lost or damaged ID cards.  

Card Guidelines

Students must carry their ID cards when on campus and be able to present the card if asked to do so by LMC faculty or staff. Loaning or allowing someone else to use your card is prohibited. A complete list of LMC Student ID card guidelines are available online at www.lakemichigancollege.edu/ID.  

Card benefits

LMC Student ID cards allow students to use campus computer labs, check out materials from the LMC library, gain free admission to LMC home athletic events and earn a 10% discount on Mendel Center Mainstage tickets. Several local businesses offer discounts to students with valid IDs. A list of merchants providing these types of discounts are listed on the LMC website.   Questions about the LMC Student Identification Cards can be directed to the Student Services area at the Napier Avenue Campus (269) 927-8128, the South Haven Campus (269) 637-7500, or the Bertrand Crossing Campus at (269) 695-1391.  

Student Resource Center

Students requesting a disability-related accommodation must register with the Student Resource Center - Disability Services office located in room C-205 of the Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center.   The Student Resource Center also serves any student enrolled in a Career and Technical Occupation program and who is an:   • Individual with a disability • Economically disadvantaged • Non-traditional training by gender • Single parent, including single pregnant women • Displaced homemaker • Individual with limited English proficiency Students who meet one of the six criteria may register for services in C-205 of the Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center. The purpose of this office is to help registered students be successful. Call (269) 927-8100, ext. 5191 or 1-800-252-1562, ext. 5191 or 5192 for more information or to set-up an appointment.  

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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Services to Help You Succeed Supplemental Instruction Courses

Supplemental Instruction sessions integrate how to learn with what to learn. Students discover appropriate study strategies and test preparation as they review course material. Assistance begins the first week of the term and typically two or more supplemental instruction sessions are scheduled each week thereafter. Inquire in the Learning Assistance Center about what Supplemental Instruction courses may be available.

Tutoring (Learning Assistance)

Learning Assistance is available free of charge, to Lake Michigan College students at all campuses through the Learning Assistance Center in room B-203 on the Napier Avenue Campus. To learn more call 269-927-8100 ext. 5169 or 1-800-252-1562 ext. 5169. For specific course questions, on-line tutoring is available. Email the question to tutoring@lakemichigancollege.edu. You're limited to one question per email.

Wavelink Wavelink is Lake Michigan College’s student portal that gives you access to such services as: • Register for classes • View your schedule of classes • Receive financial aid updates • Access final semester grades • Access free LMC student email account hosted by Google • Review your unofficial transcript • Update personal information • Receive campus announcements  

Accessing Wavelink

• Go to wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu or visit the LMC home page at www.lakemichigancollege.edu and click on the WaveLink icon. • Login using your Wavelink User Name* and Password • Make sure the “LMC Student” tab is selected. • Click the “Register/Add/Drop Classes” link and follow the posted instructions. *Your WaveLink User Name is automatically created when you first set up your WaveLink account. Your User Name will be the first character of your first name, first four (4) characters of your last name, and three (3) random numeric values (Example: Thomas Blake =  tblak123). If you have not already activated your new account, please go to the WaveLink home page at wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu and click the setup link in the NOTICE box.

Forgot your password?

Forgot your User Name, Password, or Security Question? You can find your LMC ID, WaveLink User Name, Password, or Security Question by clicking on the “Forgot User Name or Password?” link in the WaveLink Login box and answering a security question. The original security question is a randomized question from your own personal information. Follow the directions to change the security question. All WaveLink login issues should be directed to the Information Technologies HelpDesk at (269) 927-8189 or via email at ITHelpDesk@lakemichigancollege.edu.

LMC IT Helpdesk

The IT Helpdesk provides phone-based support for students from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays.

Support is provided for: Email WaveLink BlackBoard Password resets and account login issues

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Contact the IT Helpdesk at (269) 927-8189 or by email at ITHelpDesk@lakemichigancollege.edu. Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Workforce Training Institute Spring 2012 The following classes offered through the Workforce Training Institute on pages 23 - 24 are non-credit and do not apply to certificates or degrees.

*Certified Nurse Aide (CNA)

Please check our website at www.lakemichigancollege.edu\wti for the most up to date schedule and additional class offerings.

Pre-Assessment for the WTI Healthcare Programs

This pre-assessment is required in order to be accepted into the Certified Nurse Aide, Pharmacy Technician, Certified Electronic Health Record Specialist and Patient Registrar Programs. Assessments will be facilitated using WorkKeys in locating information, applied mathematics, and reading for information. Admission to these training programs is competitive. Those with the highest scores, while meeting minimum requirements, will be accepted as space allows. Check www.lakemichigancollege.edu\wti for additional dates and times.

Registration Deadline: Date: Time: Place: Cost: Instructor: CRN: Registration Deadline: Date: Time: Place: Cost: Instructor: CRN: Registration Deadline: Date: Time: Place: Cost: Instructor: CRN: Registration Deadline: Date: Time: Place: Cost: Instructor: CRN:

Friday, December 9, 2011 Wednesday, December 14, 2011 9 am- 12 pm MT 133 M-TECSM at Lake Michigan College FREE Staff 50662 Tuesday, January 3, 2012 Wednesday, January 4, 2012 1-4 pm MT 133 M-TECSM at Lake Michigan College FREE Staff 60673 Friday, January 27, 2012 Tuesday, January 31, 2012 1-4 pm Bertrand Crossing FREE Staff 60674 Friday, March 2, 2012 Tuesday, March 6, 2012 9 am – 12 pm MT133 M-TECSM at Lake Michigan College FREE Staff 60675

*Pharmacy Technician Training

This 120-hour class will prepare you to test for the national certification in a growth industry. The course outline includes duties of a pharmacy technician, HIPPA and privacy laws, the top 200 prescribed drugs, insurances and billing, hands-on training in pharmacy math, conversions and measurement, dosages, reconstitution, and compounding. A strong background in math and some knowledge of chemistry is recommended. This class will prepare you to take the national certification exam. Certification exam cost not included. This program also includes College and Career Knowledge, an online Customer Satisfaction and fractions/decimals component, KeyTrain and WorkKeys toward the National Career Readiness Certificate.

Registration Deadline: Date: Time: Place: Cost: Instructor: CRN:

Successful completion of pre-assessment Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, January 16 – March 21, 2012 6-9 pm Bertrand Crossing $1,225 Lorrie Vosburgh 60676

Acquire the knowledge, skills and confidence to assist patients with health and daily living activities in healthcare facilities under the direction of a registered nurse. The Certified Nursing Aide program is a 128-hour program with a state approved curriculum which qualifies you to take the Michigan CNA Exam (exam not included). This program also includes your clinical, KeyTrain, and WorkKeys toward the National Career Readiness Certificate, on online Customer Satisfaction component, and College and Career Knowledge. On-time, daily attendance is mandatory for the entire program. In order to be eligible to register for this class, students must complete the following prerequisites: Successful completion of the pre-assessment course Be at least 17 years of age Pass a criminal background check Pass a physical examination Provide evidence of immunizations Attend an orientation session for the class (Date and time will be provided when the student has clearance to register for the course.) Books, scrub top, name badge, background check, drug screen, lab time, clinical time, classroom time, and fingerprinting are included in the fee for the class. Calendars for class times, etc. will be distributed at time of registration.

Orientation Date: Date: Time: Place: Cost: Instructor: CRN: Orientation Date: Date:

Check the website for additional classes www.lakemichigancollege.edu\wti

Time: Place: Cost: Instructor: CRN: Orientation Date: Date: Time: Place: Cost: Instructor: CRN:

Wednesday, January 11, 2012, 10 am Monday- Friday, January 16 – March 9, 2012 8am-noon M-TECSM at Lake Michigan College/ Cedarwood Medical Center $1,150 Courtney Still 60668 Wednesday, February, 8, 2012, 10 am Monday- Friday, February 13 – April 6, 2012 1pm – 5pm Bertrand Crossing $1,150 Taya Rohl 60669 Wednesday, March 14, 2012, 10 am Monday- Friday, March 19 – May 11, 2012 8 am-Noon M-TECSM at Lake Michigan College/ Cedarwood Medical Center $1,150 Courtney Still 60670

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Workforce Training Institute Spring 2012 The following classes offered through the Workforce Training Institute on pages 23 - 24 are non-credit and do not apply to certificates or degrees. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Welding Academy or permission of the instructors Date: Time: Place: Cost: Instructor: CRN:

Pipe Welding Academy

This 360-hour course provides the welding student with hands-on experience with pipe welding with emphasis on safe practices, safety hazards, and efficiency. Certified welders continue to be in high demand in many industries including nuclear energy and petroleum. Prerequisites for this class are successful completion of all modules of the Welding Academy or permission of the Instructors.

Registration Deadline: Date: Time: Place: Cost: Instructor: CRN:

Tuesday, January 10, 2012 Monday – Thursday, January 16– May 4, 2012 12pm – 5pm (Monday – Thursday), 1pm – 5pm (Friday) M-TECSM at Lake Michigan College $5,725 John and Heidi Closson 60379

Aluminum Welding Academy

In this 48-hour course, participants will use cutting edge welding inverter technology to produce gas metal arc welds on two gauges of aluminum. Projects will include several basic and advanced weld position and joint combinations. The curriculum is based on the Hobart Institute® of Welding Technology’s GMAW Advanced Training series. Prerequisites for this class are successful completion of all modules of the Welding Academy or permission of the Instructors. Learning objectives for the course include: Ability to work safely in the welding environment Welding machine set up and troubleshooting Proper aluminum welding techniques Metal surface preparation Identification and correction of weld defects

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Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, January 16 – February 9, 2012 8am – 11am M-TECSM at Lake Michigan College $700 John and Heidi Closson 60746

COMING SOON! CHECK WEBSITE FOR UPDATES! *Certified Electronic Health Record Specialist Program

ASSESSMENTS WorkKeys 2012

Lake Michigan College is regarded as the regional expert for WorkKeys, an innovative job profiling and testing program developed by ACT, the nationally recognized expert in educational assessments. Businesses use WorkKeys as a hiring and promotional tool and some Michigan paraprofessionals (teachers’ aides) are required to take the Reading for Information, Applied Mathematics and Writing assessments as part of the “No Child Left Behind” Act.

The National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC)

The NCRC is the cornerstone to a national system that documents core foundational skills that are essential to workplace success. Because it is based on WorkKeys, the certificate enables educators, employers, and economic developers to work collaboratively toward the common goal establishing a highly-skilled Michigan workforce that can compete in a global economy.

This 140-hour course will cover the usage and management of health information and the electronic health record (EHR). This course will introduce the students to the use of health information and the EHR for any setting within the health care industry from acute, ambulatory, long term, home health, specialty, population health, and personal health that encompass the continuum of care. This course will provide students with a practical understanding of what an electronic health record specialist is and how important they are in the job market today. This course will enable the students to assemble the patient’s health record and ensure all information is complete, properly identified, and authenticated. This program also includes College and Career Knowledge, an online Customer Satisfaction component, KeyTrain and WorkKeys toward the National Career Readiness Certificate.

The three WorkKeys assessments that identify the skill levels for the certificate are Reading for Information, Applied Mathematics and Locating Information. For more information on the NCRC go to www.ncrcadvocates.org

*Patient Registrar Program

M-TEC at Lake Michigan College is an approved GED testing site. Please call for dates (269-927-8100 x2554) or check our website at www.lakemichigancollege.edu\wti.

This career requires confidentiality, accuracy, flexibility, and adaptability. You will also earn several nationally recognized certificates including the National Career Readiness Certificate and a nationally recognized healthcare credential. The course outline includes duties of a patient registrar, customer satisfaction training, data entry and keyboarding, medical terminology, stress management, communications and interpersonal skills. An online Customer Satisfaction component, Key Train, Workkeys, and College and Career Knowledge is also included.

To set up a testing session for your employees, please contact us at (269)926-4294 or tgaugler@lakemichigancollege.edu For pre-registration assessments for some programs or for paraprofessional assessments, please contact Todd Gaugler at (269) 926-4294 or tgaugler@lakemichigancollege.edu

GED Testing

Click on the “GED Testing” tab on the left side. For testing on Mondays, in person registration is required by the Thursday before the test by 4:00 p.m. For testing on Wednesdays & Thursdays, in person registration is required by the Monday before the test by 4:00 p.m. Please arrive at least 30 minutes before the testing is scheduled to begin. The cost for 5 tests is $200; each test is $40. Space is limited, please register early. For more information, please contact us at (269) 927-8100 x 6832 or smitht@lakemichigancollege.edu, amar@lakemichigancollege.edu, or joldenburg@lakemichigancollege.edu

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Spring 2012 Schedule of Classes The Lake Michigan College schedule of courses is on the following pages. Unique course offerings are designated by special icons on the right hand side of the page. An icon and abbreviation key is located at the bottom of the page.

Napier Avenue Campus

M-TECSM at Lake Michigan College

Bertrand Crossing Campus

Off Campus

Pages 26 - 42 Pages 43 -48

Pages 55 - 56 Pages 57

South Haven Campus Pages 49 - 54

Courses not listed in this schedule may be added if there is sufficient demand. Please note course prerequisites by reading the course descriptions that begin on page 58. Students must meet all pre-requsites to register for a course. The College reserves the right to drop you from any course for which you have not met the prerequisites.

Legend for Class Schedule Icons Evening Courses – Courses offered in the evening are highlighted with shading throughout the class listing. TBA – You will find TBA listed in the class schedule offerings. This means these class details are yet to be announced. Hybrid Courses – Hybrid classes mix the best of both worlds – online and on campus. You complete the majority of your coursework online, when it best fits into your schedule. You then visit campus for labs and hands-on work that enhances your learning experience. Internet Course – You do much of your work on the Internet. Individual instructors can give you details about the amount of time required on campus for orientation, possible lab work, and testing. Contact the instructor for more information regarding on-campus requirements. Live Interactive – These courses meets in several places at the same time. The instructor will meet with you through one of the College’s TV studios. That class is broadcast live to other locations.

Open Entry/Open Exit - Open entry/open exit courses are self-paced classes. You may register at any time, begin the course module immediately, and complete the coursework as quickly as you are able. OE/OE courses must be completed by the end of the next semester. Open Entry/Defined Exit -  Open entry/defined exit courses are self-paced classes. You may register at any time, begin the course module immediately, and complete the coursework as quickly as you are able. OE/DE courses must be completed by the end of the term. Telecourses – You can take these courses for college credit in the convienence of your home. Rent videotapes/DVDs from the Lake Michigan College Bookstore to study at home or go to the William Hessel Library to view the same selection. You will be required to purchase textbooks, complete homework assignments, and take exams. Instructors are available by appointment, phone, or e-mail. You will be required within the semester to attend orientation and exams.

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

ART 102 ART 105 ART 106 ART 107

0.00 0.00 0.00 20.00

20309 20317 20327 21799

3.0 4.0 4.0 6.0

3.0 2.0 2.0 3.0

T W W MW

0200-0515 PM 0600-1000 PM 0600-1000 PM 0900-1215 PM

L-308A L-308 L-308 L-308A

Story, T Payovich, M Payovich, M Hunerjager, J

ART 108 ART 110 ART 111 ART 115 ART 116 ART 120 ART 121 ART 122 ART 122 ART 123 ART 123 ART 201

20.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 50.00 50.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21800 20764 20312 20287 20292 20340 20342 20765 21314 20766 21315 20745

6.0 6.0 4.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 3.0

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

MW TR T TR TR MW MW MW TR MW TR TR

0900-1215 PM 0910-1225 PM 0600-1000 PM 1240-0400 PM 1240-0400 PM 0600-0915 PM 0600-0915 PM 1020-0120 PM 0600-0915 PM 1020-0120 PM 0600-0915 PM 0800-0930 AM

L-308A L-308 L-308A L-308 L-308 L-308B L-308B L-308 L-308 L-308 L-308 F152

Hunerjager, J Waterloo, C Story, T STAFF STAFF Schaber, K Schaber, K Schaber, K Payovich, M Schaber, K Payovich, M Hunerjager, J

ART 203

0.00

21375

3.0

3.0

TR

1020-1150 AM F152

Hunerjager, J

ART 251 ART 252 ART 254 ART 260 ART 260

0.00 50.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20294 20344 20330 20767 21316

ART APPRECIATION II WATERCOLOR I WATERCOLOR II BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY I 35mm camera required INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY BASIC DESIGN II (3-D) ART EDUCATION PAINTING I PAINTING II CERAMICS I CERAMICS II DRAWING I DRAWING I DRAWING II DRAWING II HISTORY OF ART II Live interactive course ART HISTORY: 1900-1945 Live interactive course STUDIO PROB:PAINTING STUDIO PROB:CERAMICS STUDIO PROB:WATERCOLOR STUDIO PROBLEMS: DRAWING STUDIO PROBLEMS: DRAWING

6.0 6.0 4.0 6.0 6.0

3.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 3.0

TR MW W MW TR

1240-0400 PM 0600-0915 PM 0600-1000 PM 1020-0120 PM 0600-0915 PM

STAFF Schaber, K Payovich, M Schaber, K Payovich, M

Art

Biology

BIOL 101 BIOL 101 BIOL 101 BIOL 101 BIOL 101 BIOL 101 BIOL 101 BIOL 101

10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00

20404 20410 20412 20414 20461 21335 21581 21626

BIOL 101 BIOL 101 BIOL 108 BIOL 108 BIOL 112 BIOL 205 BIOL 205 BIOL 205 BIOL 205 BIOL 205 BIOL 205

10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00

22057 22608 20468 22419 20417 20419 20422 20425 20801 21336 21643

BIOL 206 BIOL 206 BIOL 210 BIOL 212 BIOL 270

10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00

20445 20459 21376 21646 22465

Icon Key:

26

– Internet Course

L-308 L-308B L-308 L-308 L-308

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 TR 1240-0320 PM C-313 Patterson, A BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 MW 0910-1150 AM C-317 Schodorf, R BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 TR 0910-1150 AM C-313 Lentz, S BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 MW 1240-0320 PM C-317 Schodorf, R BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 MW 0150-0430 PM C-308 STAFF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 TR 0600-0840 PM C-313 Hawn, C BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 TR 0220-0500 PM C-317 STAFF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 S 0800-1200 PM C-310 Lawrence, C Above class is a hybrid class. Mandatory labs will be held at Napier Avenue Campus on 1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/25, 3/3, 3/17, 3/24, 3/31, (4/14 snow date), in C-310 8:00am to 12:00pm. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 MW 0600-0840 PM C-313 STAFF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 TR 0910-1150 AM C-308 Patterson, A BS.HUM.ANAT.& PHY. 5.0 4.0 MW 0600-0840 PM C-318 Holloway, D BS.HUM.ANAT.& PHY. 5.0 4.0 TR 0230-0510 PM C-318 STAFF PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II 6.0 4.0 TR 0910-1225 PM C-317 Schodorf, R HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 MW 0910-1150 AM C-318 Block, K HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 MW 0150-0430 PM C-318 STAFF HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 TR 0800-1040 AM C-318 Hartman, B HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 TR 0600-0840 PM C-318 STAFF HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 TR 1110-0150 PM C-318 Block, K HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 M 0600-0900 PM C-323 Stijnman, F Above class is a hybrid class. Mandatory laboratory attendance on Monday evenings, 6-9pm, Napier Avenue Campus. Please contact instructor at stijnman@lakemichigancollege.edu or 269 927-8100 x5256 with any questions. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY 6.0 4.0 MW 0910-1225 PM C-323 Stijnman, F HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY 6.0 4.0 TR 0150-0505 PM C-323 Stijnman, F MICROBIOLOGY 6.0 4.0 MWF 0910-1120 AM C-308 Parkinson, L GENETICS 6.0 4.0 MW 0100-0415 PM C-313 Lentz, S LIFE SCIENCE ELEM TEACH II 5.0 3.0 TR 0830-1110 AM C-310 Howse-Willard, M

– Live Interactive

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 INSTRUCTOR(S)

Business Administration BUSA 100

0.00

20673

BUSA 103 BUSA 103 BUSA 103 BUSA 103

0.00 0.00 0.00 40.00

20677 20678 20679 21927

BUSA 105

0.00

22754

BUSA 115

0.00

21268

BUSA 150

0.00

20688

BUSA 201

0.00

20691

BUSA 201

0.00

20692

BUSA 201

0.00

20693

BUSA 201

40.00

20739

BUSA 202

0.00

20695

BUSA 202

0.00

20696

BUSA 202

0.00

20697

BUSA 202

0.00

22031

BUSA 203 BUSA 203 BUSA 203 BUSA 203

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20700 20701 20702 20864

BUSA 204 BUSA 204 BUSA 205

0.00 0.00 0.00

20703 20704 20707

BUSA 207

0.00

20710

BUSA 208

0.00

20919

BUSA 209

0.00

20751

BUSA 209

0.00

21822

BUSA 209 BUSA 210 BUSA 211 BUSA 211

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

22616 20716 20718 20719

BUSA 212 BUSA 213 BUSA 216 BUSA 216 BUSA 219

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20927 20722 20723 20733 20725

BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 3.0 3.0 MW 1240-0220 PM F152 Leitz, N Live interactive course INTRO.TO BUSINESS 3.0 3.0 MW 1020-1210 PM C-223 Zwiller, J INTRO.TO BUSINESS 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1210 PM B-309 Zwiller, J INTRO.TO BUSINESS 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM C-111 Zwiller, J INTRO.TO BUSINESS 3.0 3.0 C-223 Zwiller, J Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee - $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING 3.0 3.0 Dee, C Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online PRIN. OF CUSTOMER SERVICE 3.0 3.0 Dee, C Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online JOB SEARCH SEMINAR 1.0 1.0 W 0600-0915 PM C-210 LeRoux, K Course meets 1/12 - 2/9 PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING I 5.0 4.0 MW 1020-1230 PM B-211 Pifer, E Plus one hour TBA PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING I 5.0 4.0 MTWR 0910-1010 AM B-211 Pifer, E Plus one hour TBA PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING I 5.0 4.0 MW 0600-0810 PM B-312 STAFF Plus one hour TBA PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING I 5.0 4.0 C-107 Pifer, E Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee - $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING II 5.0 4.0 TR 1020-1230 PM B-211 Pifer, E Plus one hour TBA PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING II 5.0 4.0 MW 1240-0250 PM B-211 Richter, M Plus one hour TBA PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING II 5.0 4.0 MW 0600-0810 PM B-211 Boguth, T Plus one hour TBA PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING II 5.0 4.0 Iwaniuk, G Above course in an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online PRIN.OF ECON.(MACRO) 3.0 3.0 MWF 1240-0140 PM C-109 Augustyniak, L PRIN.OF ECON.(MACRO) 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM C-104 STAFF PRIN.OF ECON.(MACRO) 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM C-105 Augustyniak, L PRIN.OF ECON.(MACRO) 3.0 3.0 Augustyniak, L The above economics course is an internet course. Please contact the instructor at augustyn@lakemichigancollege.edu. PRIN.OF ECON.(MICRO) 3.0 3.0 MWF 1020-1120 AM C-109 Augustyniak, L PRIN.OF ECON.(MICRO) 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM C-215 STAFF BUSINESS LAW I 3.0 3.0 Wiley, D Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online SMALL BUSINESS MANAG. 3.0 3.0 Bradford, M The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ADVER./SALES PROMOTION 3.0 3.0 Moon, K Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3.0 3.0 Moon, K Above course is an internet course.For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3.0 3.0 T 0840-1010 AM C-109 Lafrenz, K The above course is a hybrid course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM C-105 Sheehan, T BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1200 PM B-313 Lafrenz, K PRINC. OF MANAGEMENT 3.0 3.0 TR 0840-1010 AM B-307 Zwiller, J PRINC. OF MANAGEMENT 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM F152 STAFF Live interactive course ACCTG.APPLICATIONS/COMP 4.0 3.0 R 0600-1015 PM B-313 Boguth, T COST ACCOUNTING I 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM C-105 Zelmer, A BUSINESS STATISTICS 3.0 3.0 MWF 1130-1230 PM B-307 Bendixen, C BUSINESS STATISTICS 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM B-307 Baumgartner, E INTERMED. ACCOUNTING II 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM C-216 Iwaniuk, G

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

27

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

Business Administration continued BUSA 220 BUSA 261

0.00 35.00

21930 20726

BUSA 262

35.00

20727

BUSA 263

35.00

20728

BUSA 264

35.00

20729

BUSA 265

35.00

20730

BUSA 266

35.00

20731

Chemistry CHEM 101

10.00

21991

CHEM 101 CHEM 101 CHEM 101 CHEM 101 CHEM 101 CHEM 101 CHEM 104

10.00 0.00 10.00 0.00 10.00 0.00 10.00

20477 22205 20479 22206 21343 22207 22610

CHEM 104

10.00

22611

CHEM 104

10.00

22609

CHEM 112 CHEM 112 CHEM 204 CHEM 204

10.00 10.00 15.00 15.00

21356 21759 20497 22777

CREDITS

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 3.0 3.0 DISTRIB. ED. CO-OP I 3.0 3.0 This course meets 1/19, 2/2, 2/23, 3/22, 4/19 plus hours TBA. DISTRIB. ED. CO-OP II 3.0 3.0 Above course meets 1/26, 2/19, 3/1, 3/29, 4/26 plus hours TBA MANAG. TRAINEE CO-OP I 3.0 3.0 Above course meets 1/19, 2/2, 2/23, 3/22, 4/19 plus hours TBA MANAG. TRAINEE CO-OP II 3.0 3.0 Above course meets 1/26, 2/19, 3/1, 3/29, 4/26 plus hours TBA ACCOUNTING CO-OP I 3.0 3.0 Above course meets 1/19, 2/2, 2/23, 3/22, 4/19 plus hours TBA ACCOUNTING CO-OP II 3.0 3.0 Above course meets 1/26, 2/9, 3/1, 3/29, 4/26 plus hours TBA

DAYS

TIME

TR R

0800-0940 AM C-105 0100-0415 PM C-111

STAFF Woodruff, C

R

0100-0415 PM C-111

Woodruff, C

R

0100-0415 PM C-111

Woodruff, C

R

0100-0415 PM C-111

Woodruff, C

R

0100-0415 PM C-111

Woodruff, C

R

0100-0415 PM C-111

Woodruff, C

INTRO. CHEMISTRY I 6.0 4.0 S 0800-0500 PM C-303 Above course is a hybrid course, labs on 1/21, 2/25, 3/24, 4/28, 8:00-5:00 @ Napier Avenue Campus. INTRO. CHEMISTRY I 6.0 4.0 MW 1240-0250 PM C-303 INTRO. CHEMISTRY I 0.0 0.0 R 1240-0250 PM C-303 INTRO. CHEMISTRY I 6.0 4.0 MW 0910-1120 AM C-303 INTRO. CHEMISTRY I 0.0 0.0 R 0910-1120 AM C-303 INTRO. CHEMISTRY I 6.0 4.0 T 0600-0915 PM C-303 INTRO. CHEMISTRY I 0.0 0.0 R 0600-0915 PM C-303 FUND OF GEN, ORGANIC & BIOCHEM 6.0 4.0 MW 0600-0810 PM C-301 Above course is a hybrid course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid FUND OF GEN, ORGANIC & BIOCHEM 6.0 4.0 MW 0100-0310 PM C-301 Above course is a hybrid course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid FUND OF GEN, ORGANIC & BIOCHEM 6.0 4.0 TR 0910-1120 AM C-107 Above course is a hybrid course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 6.0 4.0 TR 0600-0915 PM C-307 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 6.0 4.0 TR 0100-0415 PM C-307 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 6.0 4.0 MWF 0800-0900 AM C-303 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 6.0 4.0 T 0150-0505 PM C-303

College Life Studies CLS 100

0.00

20904

CLS 100

0.00

20905

CLS 100

0.00

20907

CLS 100

0.00

20961

CLS 100

0.00

20962

CLS 100

0.00

21151

CLS 100

0.00

21152

CLS 110 CLS 216 CLS 216 CLS 217

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20533 22103 22746 22104

Icon Key:

28

– Internet Course

ROOM

COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS 1.0 1.0 MW 0910-1010 AM Above course meets 5 weeks 1/18 - 2/20 Four seminars outside of class time are also required. COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS 1.0 1.0 MW 1020-1120 AM Above course meets 5 weeks 1/18 - 2/20 Four seminars outside of class time are also required. COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS 1.0 1.0 MW 1130-1230 PM Above course meets 5 weeks 1/18 - 2/20 Four seminars outside of class time are also required. COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS 1.0 1.0 F 1030-1230 PM Above course meets 5 weeks 1/20 - 2/17. Four seminars outside of class time are also required. COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS 1.0 1.0 MW 1240-0140 PM Above course meets 5 weeks 1/18 - 2/20 Four seminars outside of class time are also required. COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS 1.0 1.0 TR 0445-0545 PM Above course meets 5 weeks 1/17- 2/16 Four seminars outside of class time are also required. COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS 1.0 1.0 TR 1240-0140 PM Above course meets 5 weeks 1/17 - 2/16 Four seminars outside of class time are also required. CAREER DECISION MAKING 2.0 2.0 F 1220-0230 PM STRESS MANAGEMENT 2.0 2.0 W 1240-0250 PM STRESS MANAGEMENT 2.0 2.0 R 1020-1230 PM SELF ESTEEM 1.0 1.0 W 1240-0250 PM Course meets 7 weeks, 1/18-2/29

– Live Interactive

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

INSTRUCTOR(S)

Barot, B Barot, B Barot, B Barot, B Barot, B Barot, B/Barot, A Barot, B/Barot, A Klann, L Hennen, R Parkinson, L Yates, L Parkinson, L Barot, B Barot, B

C-210

STAFF

C-210

STAFF

C-210

STAFF

C-210

STAFF

C-210

STAFF

C-210

STAFF

C-210

STAFF

C-227 C-227 C-107 C-105

Closson, B Meyer, D Lamar, M McKean, A

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

Communication

COMM 101 COMM 101 COMM 101 COMM 101 COMM 101

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20359 20360 20361 20362 20364

COMM 101 0.00

20365

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING Special Topic: Environmental Issues INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

TR MW MW TR TR

0830-1000 AM 1020-1150 AM 1240-0210 PM 1020-1150 AM 1240-0210 PM

C-213 C-213 C-213 C-213 C-213

Klemm, S Klemm, S Klemm, S Klemm, S Klemm, S

3.0

3.0

W

0600-0915 PM C-213

Lieberg, S

Computer Information Systems

CIS 100 CIS 100 CIS 100 CIS 100

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20212 20217 20316 21532

CIS 102

0.00

20224

CIS 102

0.00

22486

CIS 106 CIS 106 CIS 108

0.00 0.00 0.00

21119 21342 20548

CIS 108 CIS 121 CIS 122 CIS 123 CIS 124 CIS 125 CIS 140 CIS 155 CIS 156 CIS 200 CIS 201 CIS 208

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20265 20541 20542 20543 20544 20545 20874 21928 22100 21123 22665 21125

CIS 222 CIS 223 CIS 224 CIS 225 CIS 226 CIS 227 CIS 251 CIS 251 CIS 254 CIS 260 CIS 261

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 35.00

20752 20753 20754 20755 22192 22219 20285 20536 21130 20859 20289

CIS 262

35.00

20297

INTRO COMPUTER LITERACY 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-1000 AM INTRO COMPUTER LITERACY 3.0 3.0 MW 1240-0220 PM INTRO COMPUTER LITERACY 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM INTRO COMPUTER LITERACY 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online BASIC COMPUTER LITERACY 1.0 1.0 W 0300-0500 PM Course meets 8 weeks BASIC COMPUTER LITERACY 1.0 1.0 W 0300-0500 PM Course meets 7 weeks, 3/21 - 5/2 INTRO TO OPERATING SYSTEMS 3.0 3.0 MW 0830-1010 AM INTRO TO OPERATING SYSTEMS 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM COMP.OPERAT/MICROCOMP. 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online COMP.OPERAT/MICROCOMP. 3.0 3.0 MW 1240-0220 PM WINDOWS SKILLS 1.0 1.0 WORDPROCESSING SKILLS 1.0 1.0 WORKSHEET SKILLS 1.0 1.0 DATABASE SKILLS 1.0 1.0 PRESENTATION SKILLS 1.0 1.0 COMPUTER NETWORKING FUND. 4.0 3.0 MW 1020-1230 PM COMPARATIVE OPERATING SYSTEMS 4.0 3.0 R 0600-1015 PM PRACTICAL COMPUTER SECURITY 4.0 3.0 T 0600-1015 PM PC HARDWARE 4.0 3.0 R 0600-1015 PM Cisco-HEALTH INFO NETWORKING 4.0 3.0 M 0600-1015 PM ADV. MICROCOMPUTING APPS 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ADV. WORD PROCESSING SKILLS 1.0 1.0 ADV. WORKSHEET SKILLS 1.0 1.0 ADV. DATABASE SKILLS 1.0 1.0 ADV. PRESENTATION SKILLS 1.0 1.0 CISCO ICND 1 REVIEW 4.0 3.0 W 0600-1015 PM CISCO ICND 2/CCNA REVIEW 4.0 3.0 T 0600-1015 PM COMP.PROG./BASIC 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM COMP.PROG./BASIC 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM COMP.PROG./C 3.0 3.0 R 0630-0930 PM COMP.PROG./VISUAL BASIC 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM COMP.INFORM.SYST/COOP I 3.0 3.0 R 0100-0415 PM Above course meets 1/19, 2/2, 2/23, 3/22, 4/19. Plus Hours TBA COMP.INFORM.SYST/COOP II 3.0 3.0 R 0100-0415 PM Above course meets 1/26, 2/9, 3/1, 3/29, 4/26. Plus Hours TBA

Corrections, Probation, Parole

CORR 162 CORR 164 CORR 264

0.00 0.00 0.00

20526 20527 21579

INSTITUTION POPULATION LEGAL ISSUES IN CORRECTIONS CASE STUDIES IN REHAB.

3.0 3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0 3.0

T W R

B-306 B-306 B-306

Figlia, J Figlia, J Rueb, T Maxson, D

B-306

Figlia, J

B-306

Figlia, J

B-310 B-310

Figlia, J Babiarz, R STAFF

B-302

Rueb, T STAFF OE/DE STAFF OE/DE STAFF OE/DE STAFF OE/DE STAFF OE/DE Olszewski, C Hisle, S Olszewski, C Jackson, S Olszewski, C STAFF OE/DE

B-314 B-314 B-316 B-316 B-314

B-314 B-314 B-302 B-306 B-310 B-306 C-111

STAFF OE/DE STAFF OE/DE STAFF OE/DE STAFF OE/DE Olszewski, C Sloan, D STAFF Figlia, J Brown, T Williams, K Woodruff, C

C-111

Woodruff, C

0600-0915 PM C-215 0600-0915 PM C-215 0600-0915 PM C-216

Brown, A Wiley, D Shuler, C

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

29

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

Dental Assisting DENT 165 DENT 166 DENT 167 DENT 168 DENT 169 DENT 170 DENT 171 DENT 171

0.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 0.00 27.00 27.00

20581 20582 20583 20584 20585 20586 20587 20588

DENT 172 DENT 173 DENT 174 DENT 175 DENT 176

0.00 27.00 20.00 20.00 27.00

20589 20590 20591 20592 20593

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

INTRO TO DENTAL ASSISTING CHAIRSIDE I CHAIRSIDE II CHAIRSIDE III CHAIRSIDE IV INTRO TO BUSINESS ASSISTING INTRO TO DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY INTRO TO DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY Above course is evenings only MEDICAL ISSUES IN DENTAL OFF. CLINICAL I RDA I RDA II CLINICAL II

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 6.0 6.0

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

C-119 C-119 C-119 C-119 C-119 C-119 C-119 C-119

Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J

OE OE OE OE OE OE OE OE

2.0 6.0 4.0 4.0 5.0

2.0 6.0 3.0 3.0 5.0

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

C-119 C-119 C-119 C-119 C-119

Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J

OE OE OE OE OE

3.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 3.0

R W TR M W WRF T

0100-0400 PM 0900-1215 PM 0430-0900 PM 0100-0530 PM 0430-0900 PM 0700-0330 PM 1200-0300 PM

C-123 C-123 C-120 C-120 C-120 TBA C-123

McFanin, K Zak, E LeRoy, M LeRoy, M Zak, E LeRoy, M Zak, E

F123 F123 F123 F123 F123 F123

Wurz, K Wurz, K Wurz, K STAFF Wurz, K Wurz, K

Diagnostic Medical Sonography

DMSO 200 DMSO 201 DMSO 202 DMSO 202 DMSO 202 DMSO 204 DMSO 213

0.00 0.00 58.00 58.00 58.00 0.00 0.00

Drama

DRAM 110 DRAM 111 DRAM 112 DRAM 201 DRAM 201 DRAM 202

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

22187 22188 22189 22404 22405 22191 22403

GENERAL SONOGRAPHY II ABDOMEN GENERAL SONOGRAPHY II OB/GYN SONOGRAPHY LAB APPLICATIONS II SONOGRAPHY LAB APPLICATIONS II SONOGRAPHY LAB APPLICATIONS II CLINICAL EXPERIENCE B SONOGRAPHIC PHYSICS II

21094 21095 20062 20060 21093 20066

PRIN & PRAC OF ACTING I 4.0 3.0 TR PRIN/PRACT.-ACTING II 4.0 3.0 TR STAGECRAFT 4.0 3.0 MW INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE 3.0 3.0 TR INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE 3.0 3.0 MWF THEATRE PRACTICUM 3.0 3.0 MTWR Auditions 1/18 & 1/19 - 7:00 PM - Hanson Theatre course meets 9 weeks.

1240-0250 PM 1240-0250 PM 1240-0250 PM 1020-1150 AM 1020-1120 AM 0700-1015 PM

INTRO TO EARLY CHILDHOOD DIVERSITY IN EARLY CHILD EDUC ADMIN OF EARLY CHILD PROGRAMS

Early Childhood ELCH 110 ELCH 211 ELCH 212

0.00 0.00 0.00

21171 21954 21264

Electronics Technology ELEC 214

25.00

English

ENGL 091 ENGL 091 ENGL 091 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 095

Icon Key:

30

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

3.0 3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0 3.0

T M W

0600-0915 PM D-116 0600-0915 PM D-116 0600-0915 PM D-116

Haley, C Veurink-Meyer, S Sylvester, K

21181

PC MAINTENANCE

5.0

4.0

MW

0100-0300 PM B-316

Olszewski, C

21051 21457 21615 22422 22423 22424 22425 22426 22427 22428 22429 22430 22431

ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

MTWR MTWR MTWR MW TR MW TR TR MW MW MW TR TR

0910-1010 PM 1020-1120 AM 0430-0530 PM 0800-1010 AM 0620-0830 PM 1020-1230 PM 1020-1230 PM 1240-0250 PM 0410-0620 PM 0620-0830 PM 1240-0250 PM 0410-0620 PM 0800-1010 AM

Simons, N Simons, N Newmiller, S Bean, E Smith, S Bean, E Wilson-McKenzie, R Brittin, N Wilson-McKenzie, R Bean, E Jordan, C Jukuri, S Landgraf, M

– Internet Course

– Live Interactive

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

1303 1303 B-313 B-207 B-207 B-207 B-207 B-207 B-207 B-207 B-207 B-207 B-207

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

ENGL 095 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

22504 20207 20208 20214

ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20216 20219 20220 20221 20223 20225 20227 20231 20233 20235 20238 20244 20740 21632

ENGL 101

0.00

21245

ENGL 102

0.00

22778

ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20251 20254 20256 20257 20259 20261

ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20263 20264 20267 20279 20799 21871

ENGL 103 ENGL 103 ENGL 103 ENGL 205 ENGL 208 ENGL 214 ENGL 217

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20288 20291 20298 20301 20958 20743 20306

FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING 4.0 4.0 TR 1210-0220 PM B-313 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 0830-1000 AM B-311 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 1020-1150 AM B-311 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 1020-1150 AM B-313 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM B-311 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 1200-0130 PM B-313 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-1000 AM B-311 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 1240-0210 PM B-311 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 0150-0320 PM B-313 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 0230-0400 PM B-313 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM B-307 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM B-302 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM B-311 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM B-209 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 0230-0400 PM B-311 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 0230-0400 PM B-209 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 0830-1000 AM B-313 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MWF 1020-1120 AM B-209 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 0230-0400 PM C-104 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 1100-1230 PM C-217 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 0130-0300 PM C-217 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MWF 1240-0140 PM B-311 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM B-209 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM B-209 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 S 0915-1230 PM B-311 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM B-209 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 The above course is an internet course. Before registering contact instructor at yackshaw@lakemichigancollege.edu TECHNICAL WRITING 3.0 3.0 MW 1240-0210 PM B-209 TECHNICAL WRITING 3.0 3.0 MW 0230-0400 PM B-311 TECHNICAL WRITING 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM C-217 INTRO TO SHAKESPEARE 3.0 3.0 MW 1020-1150 AM C-221 LIT INTERPRETATION 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-1000 AM B-313 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM C-227 CREATIVE WRITING 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM B-313

Foreign Language

FORL 102 FORL 122 FORL 122 FORL 123 FORL 124 FORL 125

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 60.00

20314 20335 20337 21310 21591 21636

FORL 181

60.00

21086

FORL 182

60.00

20354

FORL 188

60.00

20355

ELEMENTARY FRENCH II ELEMENTARY SPANISH II ELEMENTARY SPANISH II SPANISH FOR THE WORKPLACE I SPANISH FOR THE WORKPLACE II ELEMENTARY MANDARIN CHINESE I Plus lab 2 hours TBA ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN I Plus lab 2 hours TBA ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN II Plus lab 2 hours TBA ELEMENTARY JAPANESE I Plus lab 2 hours TBA

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0

TR TR TR TR MW T

1010-1220 PM 1010-1220 PM 0630-0840 PM 0600-0810 PM 0600-0810 PM 0600-0810 PM

C-219 C-221 C-219 C-214 C-214 C-223

4.0

4.0

M

0600-0810 PM C-210

4.0

4.0

T

0600-0810 PM C-219

4.0

4.0

T

0600-0810 PM C-210

INSTRUCTOR(S) Smith, S Zerfas, J Zerfas, J Borgman, J Smith, S Kellogg, F Wilson-McKenzie, R Kellogg, F Eklund, J Smith, S Wiesman, J Sarra, D Johnson-McWilliams, K Elson, M Newmiller, S Jones, M Wiesman, J Yackshaw, J Borgman, J Borgman, J Szaflarski, B Elson, M Eklund, J Eklund, J Eklund, J Borgman, J Elson, M Sundberg, G Sundberg, G Sundberg, G Szaflarski, B Yackshaw, J Dwyer, S Dwyer, S Eklund, J Jordan, C Brittin, N Sarra, D Zerfas, J

Saint-Phard, R Hanks, P Collins, C De Los Rios, C STAFF Scameheorn, D Scameheorn, D/ Artaeva, S Scameheorn, D/ Artaeva, S Scameheorn, D/ Matychuk, T

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

31

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

Foreign Language continued FORL 189

60.00

20356

FORL 195

60.00

20357

FORL 196

60.00

20358

FORL 198

60.00

FORL 199 FORL 222

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

4.0

4.0

W

0600-0810 PM C-223

4.0

4.0

W

0350-0600 PM C-219

4.0

4.0

M

0350-0600 PM C-213

21959

4.0

4.0

W

0600-0810 PM C-221

60.00

21962

ELEMENTARY ARABIC II

4.0

4.0

T

0600-0810 PM C-213

0.00

20341

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

4.0

4.0

TR

0115-0325 PM C-221

21565 21567 21528 21529 21674 21675

DIGITAL STUDIO INTRO TO GRAPHIC DESIGN DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY PROD SKILLS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS TYPOGRAPHY II PORTFOLIO

6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0 6.0

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

TR TR MW TR MW MW

0600-0915 PM 0100-0415 PM 0600-0915 PM 0900-1215 PM 0900-1215 PM 0100-0415 PM

Pierce, B Pierce, B Schroeder, T Pierce, B Pierce, B Pierce, B

FIRST AID/PERSONAL SAFETY Course meets first 9 weeks of semester. CPR/AED Course meets last 5 weeks of semester. CPR/AED Course meets last 5 weeks of semester.

2.0

2.0

F

1220-0355 PM L-301

Cowan, A

1.0

1.0

F

1240-0355 PM L-301

Cowan, A

1.0

1.0

F

0900-1215 PM L-301

Cowan, A

15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00

HEAL 165

10.00

20572

HEAL 166

20.00

21271

HEAL 166

20.00

21272

History

HIST 102 HIST 201 HIST 201 HIST 201 HIST 201 HIST 202 HIST 202 HIST 202

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 40.00

20171 20174 21378 21379 21533 20177 20180 20189

HIST 209 HIST 210

0.00 0.00

20186 22029

Honors HONR 121 HONR 141 HONR 143 HONR 210

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21813 21748 22781 22655

HONR 215 HONR 241 HONR 251 HONR 258

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

22782 21684 21865 22455

32

DAYS

Scameheorn, D/ Matychuk, T Scameheorn, D/ Liano-Button, L Scameheorn, D/ Liano-Button, L Scameheorn, D/ Manawi, E Scameheorn, D/ Manawi, E Hanks, P

Health

Icon Key:

CREDITS

ELEMENTARY JAPANESE II Plus lab 2 hours TBA ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I Plus lab 2 hours TBA ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II Plus lab 2 hours TBA ELEMENTARY ARABIC I

Graphic Design

GRDN 101 GRDN 110 GRDN 130 GRDN 140 GRDN 201 GRDN 250

CONTACT HRS.

– Internet Course

B-303 B-303 B-303 B-303 B-303 B-303

HIST/WEST CIVILIZ. II 4.0 4.0 MWF 0840-1000 AM C-223 Robinson, K AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 MWF 1020-1120 AM C-104 Paine, C AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 MWF 0910-1010 AM C-104 Paine, C AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 MWF 1130-1230 PM C-104 Paine, C AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM C-109 Reuss, D AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-1000 AM C-104 Paine, C AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM C-104 Paine, C AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 C-105 Paine, C Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse fee $40. Orientation is at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. WOMEN IN THE WESTERN WORLD 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM C-105 STAFF THE CIVIL WAR & RECONSTRUCTION 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM C-104 Paine, C

HONORS INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-1000 AM C-106 Scrima, A HONORS NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 MWF 0800-0900 AM C-106 Roberts, G HONORS STATE GOVERNMENTS 3.0 3.0 MW 1240-0210 PM C-106 Roberts, G HONORS HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 M 1130-1230 PM C-105 Peters, D This is a hybrid course. Coursework is conducted outside of class, and weekly session includes lab and classroom discussion. HONORS AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-100 AM C-104 Paine, C HONORS COLLOQUIUM 1.0 1.0 F 1240-0140 PM C-106 Roberts, G HONORS ENGLISH COMPOSITION II 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 PM B-309 Szaflarski, B HONORS LITERARY INTERPRETATION 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-1000 AM B-313 Brittin, N

– Live Interactive

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

Hospitality Management HOSP 110

0.00

22112

HOSP 111

0.00

22479

HOSP 113 HOSP 117 HOSP 150

0.00 0.00 0.00

20850 21318 20380

HOSP 200

35.00

20408

HOSP 201 HOSP 250 HOSP 250 HOSP 253 HOSP 254

0.00 145.00 145.00 0.00 0.00

21319 20388 22341 20393 20397

Humanities

HUMN 201 HUMN 211 HUMN 211

0.00 0.00 40.00

21091 20268 20858

SANITATION 1.0 1.0 M Course meets 5 weeks, January 23, 30, February 6, 13, 20 RESPONSIBLE BEVERAGE SERVICE 1.0 1.0 M Course meets February 27, March 12, 19, 16 April 2 NUTRITION/DIET THERAPY 3.0 3.0 R INTRO TO MEETINGS & EVENTS 3.0 3.0 M INTRO TO HOSPITALITY CAREERS 3.0 3.0 W Live interactive course. HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INTERNS 3.0 3.0 R Course meets January 19, February 2, 23, March 22, April 26 Plus hours TBA RESTAURANT OPERATIONS 3.0 3.0 T FOOD PREPARATION SKILLS 4.0 2.0 T FOOD PREPARATION SKILLS 4.0 2.0 T TOURISM 3.0 3.0 M HOSPITALITY COST CONTROL SYSTE 3.0 3.0 R

TIME

ROOM

Woodruff, C

0900-1215 AM L-308A

Woodruff, C

0600-0915 PM C-227 0600-0915 PM C-223 0900-1215 PM F152

STAFF STAFF Woodruff, C

0900-1215 PM C-111

Woodruff, C

0100-0415 PM 0430-0845 PM 0800-1215 PM 0100-0415 PM 0600-0900 PM

Woodruff, C STAFF STAFF Woodruff, C Smith, M

INTRO. TO THE ARTS 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM C-215 STUDIES IN FILM ART 3.0 3.0 R 0630-0945 PM D-105 STUDIES IN FILM ART 3.0 3.0 C-107 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee - $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses

Law Enforcement

LAWE 140 LAWE 142 LAWE 144 LAWE 250 LAWE 251

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20520 20521 20522 20523 20524

LAWE 252

0.00

20525

INTRO/CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM C-109 POLICE ORG & ADMINIS. 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM C-111 CRIMINOLOGY 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM C-106 JUV.DELINQ & BEHAVIOR 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM C-106 SEMINAR/CRIM. JUSTICE 5.0 3.0 R 0500-0600 PM C-106 Plus additional hours TBA CRIMINAL PROCEDURE 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM C-106 ABOVE CLASS IS FOR CORRECTIONS STUDENTS ONLY - Department chair authorization needed to enroll.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

MRIT 106 MRIT 107 MRIT 107

0.00 0.00 0.00

22183 22184 22751

MRIT 109

13.00

22186

MRIT 115 MRIT 115

0.00 0.00

22752 22753

MRI PROCED & PATHOPHYSIO II 3.0 3.0 MRI PHYSICS II 3.0 3.0 MRI PHYSICS II 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For MRI consortium students. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE II 3.0 3.0

COMPUT APPS IN MEDICAL IMAGING 3.0 3.0 COMPUT APPS IN MEDICAL IMAGING 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For MRI consortium students.

INSTRUCTOR(S)

0900-1215 AM L-308A

C-105 L-310 L-310 C-223 C-109

Muhme, M Muhme, M Muhme, M

Doak, S Barker, S Davis, T Cleveland, G Doak, S Cleveland, G

M M TBA

0600-0915 PM C-121 0230-0545 PM C-121 TBA TBA

McPherson, S Hennen, R Klos, J

TBA

TBA

W TBA

0545-0900 PM C-123 TBA TBA

Riley, L/ Vamanannair, S Rishel, D Tuller, S

TBA

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

33

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

Mathematics MATH 090

0.00

20119

MATH 090

0.00

20122

MATH 090

0.00

20131

MATH 090

0.00

20139

MATH 090

0.00

20144

MATH 090

0.00

20153

MATH 090

0.00

20170

MATH 090

0.00

20218

MATH 090

0.00

20222

MATH 090

0.00

20378

MATH 090

0.00

20938

MATH 090

0.00

22432

MATH 090

0.00

22467

MATH 095

0.00

21932

MATH 095

0.00

21933

MATH 095

0.00

21934

MATH 095

0.00

21935

MATH 095

0.00

21936

MATH 095

0.00

21937

MATH 095

0.00

21938

MATH 095

0.00

21939

MATH 095

0.00

21940

MATH 095

0.00

21941

MATH 095

0.00

21942

MATH 095

0.00

22433

MATH 095

0.00

22434

MATH 095

0.00

22468

MATH 095

0.00

22493

MATH 095

0.00

22622

Icon Key:

34

– Internet Course

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 The above course is delivered in a lecture format.

– Live Interactive

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

4.0

TWRF

0910-1010 AM B-208

Hively, K

4.0

TWRF

1020-1120 AM B-208

Bendixen, C

4.0

TWRF

1130-1230 PM B-208

Shepard, B

4.0

MTWR

1240-0140 PM B-208

Toner, V

4.0

MW

0150-0400 PM B-208

Goldner, N

4.0

TR

0150-0400 PM B-208

Toner, V/Wilson, J

4.0

MTWR

1240-0140 PM C-208

Brown, P

4.0

TR

0600-0810 PM B-211

Hively, K

4.0

MW

0600-0810 PM B-208

Weber, K

4.0

TR

0600-0810 PM B-208

Wilson, J

4.0

MW

0400-0610 PM C-208

Crouse, J

4.0

MTWR

0910-1010 AM C-214

Brown, P

4.0

S

0800-1220 PM B-208

Wilson, J

4.0

TWRF

1130-1230 PM B-208

Shepard, B

4.0

MTWR

1240-0140 PM B-208

Toner, V

4.0

MW

0150-0400 PM B-208

Goldner, N

4.0

TR

0150-0400 PM B-208

Toner, V/Wilson, J

4.0

TWRF

1020-1120 AM C-208

Shepard, B

4.0

MW

0600-0810 PM B-208

Weber, K

4.0

TR

0600-0810 PM C-208

Holleman, B

4.0

TR

0600-0810 PM B-208

Wilson, J

4.0

MWRF

0910-1010 AM C-216

Han, M

4.0

TWRF

1020-1120 AM B-208

Bendixen, C

4.0

TWRF

0910-1010 AM B-208

Hively, K

4.0

TR

1020-1230 PM C-227

Crouse, J

4.0

MW

0300-0510 PM B-312

STAFF

4.0

S

0800-1220 PM B-208

Wilson, J

4.0

TWRF

0800-0900 AM C-214

Shepard, B

4.0

MTWR

1130-1230 PM C-208

Larson, J

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

MATH 122

0.00

21967

MATH 122 MATH 122 MATH 122 MATH 122 MATH 122 MATH 122 MATH 122 MATH 128 MATH 128 MATH 128 MATH 128

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21969 21970 21971 21972 21973 21975 22629 21977 21978 21980 21987

MATH 130 MATH 135 MATH 151 MATH 151 MATH 200 MATH 200 MATH 201 MATH 216 MATH 216 MATH 252 MATH 265

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21976 22173 20210 20248 21227 22477 20873 20215 20262 20266 21289

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 Elwell, M Above course is an internet course. Exams to be taken at LMC Assessment Centers on 2/20 or 2/21, 3/26 or 3/27, 4/23 or 4/24, 4/30 or 5/1 or pre-approved proctored testing. Contact instructor at elwell@lakemichigancollege.edu. INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MTWR 0910-1010 AM B-312 Bendixen, C INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MWRF 1020-1120 AM C-216 Han, M INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 TR 0300-0500 PM C-214 Weber, K INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 TR 0600-0810 PM C-227 Weil, M INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MWRF 1240-0140 PM C-216 Han, M INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 TR 1240-0250 PM C-214 Weber, K INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MWF 0845-1010 AM B-307 Baumgartner, E PRE-CALCULUS ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MTWR 1020-1120 AM B-312 Toner, V PRE-CALCULUS ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MTWR 0910-1010 AM C-208 Toner, V PRE-CALCULUS ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MW 0620-0830 PM C-208 Baumgartner, E PRE-CALCULUS ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 Elwell, M Above course is an internet course. Exams to be taken at LMC Assessment Centers on 2/20 or 2/21, 3/26 or 3/27, 4/23 or 4/24, 4/30 or 5/1 or pre-approved proctored testing. Contact instructor at elwell@lakemichigancollege.edu. PRE-CALCULUS TRIG 3.0 3.0 MWF 1240-0140 PM B-307 Bendixen, C PRECALCULUS ALGEBRA/TRIG. 5.0 5.0 MTWRF 1240-0140 PM C-104 Shepard, B CALCULUS I 5.0 5.0 MTWR 1010-1125 AM C-214 Larson, J CALCULUS I 5.0 5.0 MW 0600-0840 PM C-217 Singh, V MATH FOR ELEMEN.TEACH. 4.0 4.0 MW 0530-0740 PM B-307 Ernst, C MATH FOR ELEMEN.TEACH. 4.0 4.0 MW 0300-0510 PM B-307 Ernst, C CALCULUS III 5.0 5.0 MWR 0820-1000 AM C-301 Larson, J INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 3.0 3.0 MWF 1130-1230 PM B-307 Bendixen, C INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM B-307 Baumgartner, E DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 4.0 4.0 TR 0800-1010 AM C-217 Larson, J PROB & STATS FOR ELEM/MID SCH 4.0 4.0 MW 1240-0250 PM B-312 Ernst, C

MUSI 101

0.00

20044

MUSI 103

0.00

20046

MUSI 104

0.00

20048

MUSI 108

0.00

20049

MUSI 109 MUSI 113

0.00 0.00

20899 21197

MUSI 114

0.00

20057

MUSI 115

0.00

20059

MUSI 117 MUSI 163 MUSI 165 MUSI 185

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20774 21279 21280 21214

MUSI 187 MUSI 200 MUSI 214 MUSI 263 MUSI 265

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21798 21290 20830 21383 21384

Music

CONCERT CHOIR Audition required. SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

4.0

2.0

4.0

2.0

JAZZ LAB BAND 2.0 Audition required. SHOW CHOIR 4.0 “Voices LMC” Audition required. MUSIC APPRECIATION 3.0 VOICE CLASS 2.0 This course must have a minimum of 6 students enrolled. of enrolling in Beginning Applied Voice 100A. PIANO CLASS I 2.0 This course must have a minimum of 6 students enrolled. of enrolling in Beginning Applied Piano 100B. PIANO CLASS II 2.0 This course must have a minimum of 6 students enrolled. of enrolling in Beginning Applied Piano 100B. SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE 2.0 BASIC MUSIC II 3.0 AURAL COMPREHENSION II 2.0 GUITAR CLASS I 1.0 This course must have a minimum of 6 students enrolled. of enrolling in Beginning Applied Guitar 100C or D. HISTORY OF ROCK MUSIC 3.0 MUSIC FOR CLASSROOM TEACHER 3.0 MUSIC HISTORY II 3.0 BASIC MUSIC IV 3.0 AURAL COMPREHENSION IV 2.0

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 INSTRUCTOR(S)

1.0

TR T M R W

0300-0400 PM 0700-0920 PM 0300-0500 PM 0700-0920 PM 0410-0620 PM

F125 F125 F125 F125 F125

Hendrickson, D Hendrickson, D Reuss, D Reuss, D Slabaugh, S

2.0

MW

1240-0250 PM F125

Hendrickson, D

3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM S-116 Gibson, C 2.0 TR 0410-0510 PM F125 Krueger, B If minimum enrollment is not met students will have the option 2.0 TR 0910-1010 AM B-103 Flyger, P If minimum enrollment is not met students will have the option 2.0 TR 0150-0250 PM B-103 Flyger, P If minimum enrollment is not met students will have the option 1.0 M 0300-0510 PM F125 Gibson, C 3.0 MWF 0910-1010 AM S-116 Lunn, R 1.0 TR 0910-1010 AM B-102 Lunn, R 1.0 R 1240-0140 PM F125 Lunn, R If minimum enrollment is not met students will have the option 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 1.0

MW W MWF MWF TR

0130-0300 PM 0600-0915 PM 1130-1230 PM 1020-1120 AM 1020-1120 AM

S-116 S-116 S-116 S-116 B-102

Baker, R Gibson, C Hendrickson, D Lunn, R Lunn, R

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

35

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

Music continued MUSI 100

180.00

20009

MUSI 100

180.00

20014

MUSI 100

180.00

20015

MUSI 100

180.00

22771

MUSI 100

180.00

20017

MUSI 100

180.00

20021

MUSI 100

180.00

20022

MUSI 100

180.00

20023

MUSI 100

180.00

20027

MUSI 100

180.00

20029

MUSI 100

180.00

20030

MUSI 100

180.00

20035

MUSI 100

180.00

20042

MUSI 100

180.00

21039

MUSI 100

180.00

21221

MUSI 100

180.00

21283

MUSI 100

180.00

21670

MUSI 100

180.00

21672

MUSI 100

180.00

22097

MUSI 100A

180.00

21281

MUSI 100A

180.00

21282

MUSI 100B

180.00

21276

MUSI 100B

180.00

21278

MUSI 100C

180.00

21275

MUSI 100C

180.00

21382

MUSI 100D

180.00

21277

MUSI 120 MUSI 120 MUSI 130 MUSI 130 MUSI 134 MUSI 140

180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00

20094 21198 20096 21040 20064 20065

Icon Key:

36

– Internet Course

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 TROMBONE, EUPHONIUM, BARITONE BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 PIPE/ELECTRONIC ORGAN--Permission of instructor only BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 TRUMPET, CORNET BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 TRUMPET, CORNET BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 BASSOON BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 TUBA BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 FLUTE BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 OBOE BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 CLARINET BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 SAXOPHONE BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 PERCUSSION BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 CELLO BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 STRING BASS BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 TUBA BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 Beginning Applied Electric Bass (Permission of instructor only) BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 FRENCH HORN BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 VIOLIN BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 VIOLA BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 1.0 HARP BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC/VOICE 1.0 Permission of instructor only. BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC/VOICE 1.0 Permission of instructor only. BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC/PIANO 1.0 Permission of instructor only. BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC/PIANO 1.0 Permission of instructor only. BEGIN APPL MUSIC ELEC/ACC 1.0 Permission of instructor only. BEGIN APPL MUSIC ELEC/ACC 1.0 Permission of instructor only. BEGIN APPL MUS/CLASSICAL GUIT 1.0 Permission of instructor only. APPLIED VOICE 1.0 APPLIED VOICE 1.0 APPLIED PIANO 1.0 APPLIED PIANO 1.0 APPLIED PIPE/ELECTRIC ORGAN 1.0 APPLIED TRUMPET,CORNET 1.0

– Live Interactive

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

1.0

TBA

Mitchell, A

1.0

TBA

Kraus, J

1.0

TBA

McCarthy, D

1.0

TBA

Slabaugh, S

1.0

TBA

Bubar, L

1.0

TBA

Mitchell, A

1.0

TBA

Gibson, C

1.0

TBA

STAFF

1.0

TBA

STAFF

1.0

TBA

Brumbelow, D

1.0

TBA

Churchill, M

1.0

TBA

Cook, L

1.0

TBA

Randles, E

1.0

TBA

Davids, M

1.0

TBA

Pantaleo, P

1.0

TBA

Bomer, D

1.0

TBA

Oeseburg, B

1.0

TBA

Oeseburg, B

1.0

TBA

Davids, M

1.0

TBA

Krueger, B

1.0

TBA

Mow, P

1.0

TBA

Flyger, P

1.0

TBA

Kraus, J

1.0

TBA

Pantaleo, P

1.0

TBA

Lunn, R

1.0

TBA

Lunn, R

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Krueger, B Mow, P Flyger, P Kraus, J Kraus, J McCarthy, D

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

MUSI 140 MUSI 142 MUSI 144 MUSI 146 MUSI 150 MUSI 152 MUSI 154 MUSI 156 MUSI 158 MUSI 160 MUSI 170 MUSI 172 MUSI 174 MUSI 178

180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00 180.00

22772 20067 20068 20072 20073 20075 20076 20078 20079 21200 21671 21673 20085 20088

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

MUSI 178

180.00

20091

MUSI 180

180.00

20093

MUSI 181 MUSI 188 MUSI 220 MUSI 220 MUSI 230 MUSI 230 MUSI 234 MUSI 240 MUSI 240 MUSI 242 MUSI 244 MUSI 246 MUSI 250 MUSI 252 MUSI 254 MUSI 256 MUSI 258 MUSI 260 MUSI 270 MUSI 272 MUSI 274 MUSI 276 MUSI 278 MUSI 278 MUSI 280 MUSI 281 MUSI 288

180.00 180.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00 360.00

20851 22064 20099 20101 20870 21041 20103 20104 22773 20105 20106 20108 20109 20111 20113 20115 20116 20876 20120 20124 20125 21067 20128 20130 20134 20890 22065

APPLIED TRUMPET,CORNET APPLIED FRENCH HORN AP.TROM,EUPHON,BARITONE APPLIED TUBA APPLIED FLUTE APPLIED OBOE APPLIED BASSOON APPLIED CLARINET APPLIED SAXOPHONE APPLIED PERCUSSION APPLIED VIOLIN APPLIED VIOLA APPLIED CELLO APPLIED ELECTRIC/ACOUSTIC GUIT Permission of instructor only. APPLIED ELECTRIC/ACOUSTIC GUIT Permission of instructor only. APPLIED CLASSICAL GUITAR Permission of instructor only. APPLIED STRING BASS APPLIED HARP APPLIED VOICE APPLIED VOICE APPLIED PIANO APPLIED PIANO APPLIED PIPE/ELECTRIC ORGAN APPLIED TRUMPET, CORNET APPLIED TRUMPET, CORNET APPLIED FRENCH HORN APPLIED TROM,EUPHON,BARITONE APPLIED TUBA APPLIED FLUTE APPLIED OBOE APPLIED BASSOON APPLIED CLARINET APPLIED SAXOPHONE APPLIED PERCUSSION APPLIED VIOLIN APPLIED VIOLA APPLIED CELLO APPLIED STRING/ELECTRIC BASS APPLIED ELECTRIC/ACOUSTIC GUIT APPLIED ELECTRIC/ACOUSTIC GUIT APPLIED CLASSICAL GUITAR APPLIED STRING BASS APPLIED HARP

Natural Sciences SCIE 095 SCIE 095

0.00 0.00

22195 22420

DAYS

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Slabaugh, S Bomer, D Mitchell, A Mitchell, A Gibson, C STAFF Bubar, L STAFF Brumbelow, D Churchill, M Oeseburg, B Oeseburg, B Cook, L Pantaleo, P

1.0

1.0

TBA

Lunn, R

1.0

1.0

TBA

Lunn, R

1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Randles, E Davids, M Krueger, B Mow, P Flyger, P Kraus, J Kraus, J McCarthy, D Slabaugh, S Bomer, D Mitchell, A Mitchell, A Gibson, C STAFF Bubar, L STAFF Brumbelow, D Churchill, M Oeseburg, B Oeseburg, B Cook, L Pantaleo, P Pantaleo, P Lunn, R Lunn, R Randles, E Davids, M

FUNDAMENTALS OF SCIENCE REASON 5.0 FUNDAMENTALS OF SCIENCE REASON 5.0

4.0 4.0

TR TR

TIME

0910-1150 AM C-301 1240-0320 PM C-310

Muhlenkamp, C Howse-Willard, M

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

37

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

Nursing

NURS 135 NURS 135 NURS 135 NURS 185 NURS 185 NURS 186 NURS 186 NURS 187 NURS 187 NURS 285 NURS 285 NURS 286 NURS 286 NURS 287 NURS 287 NURS 288

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.00 0.00 10.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.00 0.00 10.00 0.00 10.00 0.00

NURS 288

0.00

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

PHARMACOLOGY II PHARMACOLOGY II PHARMACOLOGY II WOMEN’S HEALTH WOMEN’S HEALTH MEDICAL/SURGICAL NURSING I MEDICAL/SURGICAL NURSING I MEDICAL/SURGICAL NURSING II MEDICAL/SURGICAL NURSING II CHILDREN’S HEALTH CHILDREN’S HEALTH MED/SURG NURSING V MED/SURG NURSING V MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING VI MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING VI CURRENT ISSUES IN NURSING Course meets first 7 weeks CURRENT ISSUES IN NURSING Course meets last 7 weeks

2.0 2.0 2.0 7.2 0.0 6.3 0.0 6.3 0.0 7.6 0.0 6.0 0.0 6.3 0.0 1.0

2.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 4.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 1.0

R R R MF

1130-0140 PM 0250-0500 PM 0800-1010 AM 0815-1230 PM

D-112 D-112 D-112 D-112

Szymanski, K Szymanski, K Szymanski, K Francis, K

MF

0915-1155 AM D-105

Klein, S

MF

0915-1155 AM D-116

MF

0800-1200 PM C-302

MF

0915-1155 AM C-307

MF

0915-1155 AM C-227

Gardner, D Gardner, D Hennen, S Hennen, S Risetter, M Risetter, M Sobaski, T

M

TBA

D-105

Jackson, D

1.0

1.0

M

TBA

D-105

Hennen, S

Office Information Systems OIS 101

0.00

20931

OIS 102

0.00

20932

OIS 103

0.00

20933

OIS 114 OIS 201 OIS 204 OIS 208 OIS 211 OIS 213 OIS 217 OIS 218 OIS 220

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20648 20659 20661 21157 20662 20663 20665 20667 22618

OIS 261

35.00

20671

OIS 262

35.00

20672

Paramedic

KEYBOARDING I 2.0 2.0 Skinner, S OE/DE This class is an OE/DE. Please contact the instructor at skinner@lakemichigancollege.edu for information about how to start this class. KEYBOARDING II 2.0 2.0 Skinner, S OE/DE This class is an OE/DE. Please contact the instructor at skinner@lakemichigancollege.edu for information about how to start this class. KEYBOARDING III 2.0 2.0 Skinner, S OE/DE This class is an OE/DE. Please contact the instructor at skinner@lakemichigancollege.edu for information about how to start this class. INTERMEDIATE KEYBOARDING 3.0 3.0 T 0530-0845 PM B-311 Skinner, S ADVANCED KEYBOARDING 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM B-311 Skinner, S LEGAL TRANSCRIPTION 3.0 3.0 W 0530-0845 PM B-313 Skinner, S MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION 3.0 3.0 W 0530-0845 PM B-313 Skinner, S OFFICE PROCEDURES 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM B-313 LeRoux, K WORD PROCES. TRANSCRIPTION 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM B-313 Skinner, S INTRO TO WORD PROCES. APPLICAT 3.0 3.0 R 0530-0845 PM B-311 Davis, C ADV WORD PROCES. APPLICATIONS 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM B-311 Davis, C MED. OFFICE PROCEDURES 3.0 3.0 TBA TBA TBA STAFF The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online OFFICE CO-OP I 3.0 3.0 R 0100-0415 PM C-111 Woodruff, C Class meets 1/19, 2/2, 2/23, 3/22, 4/26 plus hours TBA OFFICE CO-OP II 3.0 3.0 R 0100-0415 PM C-111 Woodruff, C Class meets 1/26, 2/9,3/1, 3/29, 4/26 plus hours TBA

PARA 201 PARA 202

50.00 50.00

22343 22344

ADVANCED EMT II ADVANCED EMT LAB II

8.0 4.0

8.0 2.0

PARA 203 PARA 204

50.00 50.00

22345 22346

ADVANCED EMT CLINICAL II ACLS-ADV CARDIAC LIFE SUPPORT

2.0 1.0

2.0 1.0

Icon Key:

38

– Internet Course

– Live Interactive

MW R F TBA TBA

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

0800-1200 PM 0530-0930 PM 0800-1200 PM TBA TBA

B-309 B-309 B-309 TBA TBA

– Telecourse

Pantaleo, A Pantaleo, A Pantaleo, A Pantaleo, A Pantaleo, A

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

Physical Ed./Wellness WELLNESS CENTER HOURS: MTWT 6:30 AM - 6:30 PM; F 6:30AM-2:30PM, S 8:00-11:00 AM PHED 105

0.00

21100

PHED 106

0.00

21101

PHED 118

0.00

22132

PHED 124

0.00

20614

PHED 125

0.00

20615

PHED 145

0.00

21995

PHED 146

0.00

21996

PHED 200

0.00

20621

PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20622 20623 20624 20625 20626 20627 20628 20629 20631 21628 22133 22174 22261

PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 212

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

22262 22481 22498 22156

PHED 212

0.00

22157

PHED 212

0.00

22158

PHED 212

0.00

22159

PHED 212

0.00

22160

PHED 212

0.00

22161

PHED 212

0.00

22162

PHED 212

0.00

22163

PHED 212

0.00

22164

PHED 212

0.00

22175

PHED 212

0.00

22342

BOWLING 2.0 1.0 R 0200-0410 PM TBA Meyer, D Above course meets at Blossom Lanes. INTERMEDIATE BOWLING 2.0 1.0 R 0200-0410 PM TBA Meyer, D Above course meets at Blossom Lanes. PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 2.0 1.0 L-306 Meyer, D Third semester enrollment in Wellness Center. WEIGHT LIFTING 2.0 1.0 L-306 Meyer, D Fourth semester enrollment in Wellness Center. INTMED. WEIGHT LIFTING 2.0 1.0 L-306 Meyer, D Fifth semester enrollment in Wellness Center. TOTAL FITNESS I 2.0 1.0 L-306 Meyer, D First semester enrollment in Wellness Center. TOTAL FITNESS II 2.0 1.0 L-306 Meyer, D Second semester enrollment in Wellness Center. HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 Meyer, D Above course is a hybrid course. Three meetings on the Napier Avenue Campus are required. (2/9 5:30-8:30pm or 2/10 12:30-3:30pm or 2/11 9-noon and 2/25 9:00-11:00am or 3/1 5:30-7:30pm or 3/2 12:30-2:30pm and final exam. HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 MW 0910-1010 AM L-301 Lamar, M HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 MW 1020-1120 AM L-301 Lamar, M HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 MW 1130-1230 PM C-107 Shoemaker, V HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 MW 1240-0140 PM C-107 Shoemaker, V HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 MW 0150-0250 PM C-107 Shoemaker, V HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 T 1240-0250 PM C-107 Arbut, N HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 T 1020-1230 PM C-107 Arbut, N HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 MW 0800-0900 AM L-301 Lamar, M HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 T 0600-0810 PM C-107 Peters, D HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 T 1020-1230 PM L-301 Gathright, L HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 R 0600-0810 PM C-107 STAFF HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 T 0800-1010 AM C-107 Arbut, N HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 M 1130-1230 PM C-105 Peters, D This course is a hybrid course. Coursework is conducted outside of class, and weekly session includes lab and classroom discussion. HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 MW 1240-0140 PM L-301 Nevins, L HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 R 1020-1230 PM L-301 Gathright, L HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 MW 1130-1230 PM L-301 Nevins, L HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 MW 0910-1010 AM C-107 Lamar, M Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 MW 1020-1120 AM C-107 Lamar, M Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 MW 1130-1230 PM C-107 Shoemaker, V Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 MW 1240-0140 PM C-107 Shoemaker, V Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 MW 0150-0250 PM C-107 Shoemaker, V Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 T 1240-0250 PM C-107 Arbut, N Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 T 1020-1230 PM C-107 Arbut, N Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 MW 0800-0900 AM C-107 Lamar, M Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 T 0600-0810 PM C-107 Peters, D Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 T 0800-1010 AM C-107 Arbut, N Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 M 1130-1230 PM C-105 Peters, D This course is a hybrid course. Coursework and exercise is conducted outside of scheduled class time, and weekly session includes lab and classroom discussion. Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in the Wellness Center.

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

39

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

Physical Ed./Wellness continued PHED 212

0.00

22482

PHED 212

0.00

22484

PHED 212

0.00

22485

PHED 212

0.00

22488

PHED 212

0.00

22499

PHED 212

0.00

22630

PHED 214 PHED 214 PHED 214 PHED 216 PHED 216 PHED 217

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

22165 22167 22747 20732 22748 20807

Philosophy

PHIL 101 PHIL 102

0.00 0.00

20229 20234

Physical Science PHSC 101

5.00

22248

PHSC 104 PHSC 104 PHSC 205 PHSC 280 PHSC 290 PHSC 290

5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00

Physics

PHYS 102 PHYS 102 PHYS 104 PHYS 104 PHYS 202 PHYS 202

10.00 0.00 10.00 0.00 10.00 0.00

3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

MW MW

1020-1150 AM C-215 1240-0210 PM C-216

Keith, D Keith, D

C-301

STAFF

20474 22612 22763 22037 22094 22661

C-306 C-306 C-306 C-310 C-306 C-306

Lovett, C Lovett, C Lovett, C Howse-Willard, M Lovett, C Lovett, C

20608 22216 21793 22217 20610 22218

GENERAL PHYSICS II GENERAL PHYSICS II INTRO TO SKY & SOLAR SYSTEM INTRO TO SKY & SOLAR SYSTEM ENGR.PHYS II(ELECT&MAG) ENGR.PHYS II(ELECT&MAG)

0150-0250 PM 0300-0510 PM 1020-1150 AM 0300-0510 PM 1240-0140 PM 0300-0510 PM

C-302 C-302 C-302 C-302 C-302 C-302

Durren, M Durren, M Durren, M Durren, M Durren, M Durren, M

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 MWF 0800-0900 AM NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 MWF 0910-1010 AM NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 MWF 1020-1120 AM NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 TR 1240-0210 PM NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM STATE GOVERNMENTS 3.0 3.0 MW 1240-0210 PM INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM

C-106 C-106 C-106 C-106 C-106

Roberts, G Roberts, G Roberts, G Penn-Grove, E McKean, B Roberts, G

C-217 C-106 C-106

Kurtz, A Roberts, G Penn-Grove, E

POSC 101 POSC 101 POSC 101 POSC 101 POSC 101 POSC 101

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20077 20080 20084 20087 20095 21960

POSC 101 POSC 102 POSC 203

0.00 0.00 0.00

22053 20090 22741

40

INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY INTRO TO LOGIC

PHYS.SCI./CHEM.-PHYS. 5.0 4.0 MW 0600-0810 PM The above course is a hybrid course For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 5.0 4.0 TR 0910-1150 AM PHYSICAL GEOLOGY 5.0 4.0 TR 1240-0320 PM WEATHER & CLIMATE 5.0 4.0 MW 0910-1150 AM PHYS SCI FOR ELEM TEACHERS II 5.0 3.0 MW 0830-1110 AM EARTH SCI FOR ELEM/MID TEACHER 5.0 3.0 TR 0910-1150 AM EARTH SCI FOR ELEM/MID TEACHER 5.0 3.0 TR 1240-0320 PM

Political Science

Icon Key:

HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 MW 1240-0140 PM L-301 Nevins, L Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 T 1020-1230 PM L-301 Gathright, L Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 R 1020-1230 PM L-301 Gathright, L Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 R 0600-0810 PM C-107 STAFF Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 MW 1130-1230 PM L-301 Nevins, L Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 TBA TBA TBA Claeys, J Above course is a hybrid course. Additional 1 hour 2 days per week in the Wellness Center required. Also three lab/exam meetings on the Napier Avenue Campus are required. (2/9 5:30-8:30pm or 2/10 12:30-3:30pm or 2/11 9-12pm and 2/25 9:00-11:00am or 3/1 5:30-7:30 pm or 3/2 12:30-2:30pm and final exam PERSONAL HEALTH 3.0 3.0 MWF 0800-0900 AM C-107 Peters, D PERSONAL HEALTH 3.0 3.0 MWF 0910-1010 AM C-107 Peters, D PERSONAL HEALTH 3.0 3.0 MWF 1020-1120 AM C-107 Peters, D HEALTH ISSUES: STRESS MGMT 2.0 2.0 W 1240-0250 PM C-227 Meyer, D HEALTH ISSUES: STRESS MGMT 2.0 2.0 R 1020-1230 PM C-107 Lamar, M HEALTH ISSUES: SELF ESTEEM 1.0 1.0 W 1240-0250 PM C-105 McKean A Course meets 7 weeks 1/18 - 2/29

– Internet Course

– Live Interactive

6.0 0.0 5.0 0.0 6.0 0.0

5.0 0.0 4.0 0.0 5.0 0.0

MTWR W TR T MTWR M

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

Psychology

CRN

TITLE

INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 T 0915-1230 PM INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MWF 0910-1010 AM INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MWF 1020-1120 AM INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MWF 1130-1230 PM INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-1000 AM HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 3.0 3.0 R 0915-1230 PM HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 3.0 3.0 MW 0120-0250 PM HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online CHILD DEV./PERSONALITY 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM INTRO.SOC.SCI.RESEARCH 3.0 3.0 MW 1020-1150 AM Instructor permission only

PSYC 201 PSYC 201 PSYC 201 PSYC 201 PSYC 201 PSYC 201

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20020 20024 20026 20028 20045 20047

PSYC 201 PSYC 203 PSYC 203 PSYC 203

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20051 20031 20034 20054

PSYC 204

0.00

21963

PSYC 205 PSYC 250

0.00 0.00

20037 21385

Radiologic Technology

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

TIME

INSTRUCTOR(S)

C-220 C-220 C-220 C-220 C-220

Scameheorn, D Dinges, A Chambers, D Chambers, D Chambers, D Scrima, A

C-106 C-220 C-220

Scrima, A Scameheorn, D Scrima, A Scameheorn, D Scameheorn, D

C-210 C-219

Scrima, A Scrima, A

C-121 C-120 C-120 C-120 C-120 C-121 C-120 C-120 C-120 C-120 C-121 C-121 TBA C-120 C-121 C-121 TBA

Widman, I Widman, I Widman, I Widman, I Widman, I Widman, I Schaible, P Schaible, P Schaible, P Schaible, P Lee, P Lee, P Widman, I/ Widman, I/Delaney, H Perez, M Service, J Widman, I/Jones, D

173.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 173.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20842 22226 22227 22228 22229 20843 22230 22231 22232 22233 20844

RADIOGRAPHIC POSIT. II RADIOGRAPHIC POSIT. II RADIOGRAPHIC POSIT. II RADIOGRAPHIC POSIT. II RADIOGRAPHIC POSIT. II CONTRAST STUDIES CONTRAST STUDIES CONTRAST STUDIES CONTRAST STUDIES CONTRAST STUDIES RADIOGRAPHIC PHYSICS

4.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.0

RADT 143

13.00

20845

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE B

2.0

RADT 240 RADT 241 RADT 245

0.00 0.00 13.00

20846 20847 22150

RADIOGRAPHIC QUALITY SPC. PROC/EMRG. MODALITIES CLINICAL EXPERIENCE F

4.0 3.0 3.0

READING IMPROVEMENT I 4.0 4.0 MTWR 1020-1120 AM C-111 Baker, R READING STRATEGIES 4.0 4.0 MTWR 1020-1120 AM C-111 Baker, R READING IMPROVEMENT II 4.0 4.0 MTWR 0910-1010 AM C-111 Baker, R READING IMPROVEMENT II 4.0 4.0 TR 0430-0630 PM B-204 McMurray, J READING IMPROVEMENT II 4.0 4.0 MTWR 1130-1230 PM C-111 Baker, R READING STRATEGIES II 2.0 2.0 TR 1240-0140 PM B-204 Pieplow, K READING STRATEGIES II 2.0 2.0 MW 0530-0630 PM B-204 Pieplow, K 1100 WORDS 2.0 1.0 TBA TBA B-204 Schodorf, C Contact instructor at 269 927-6871. Hours available: Mon 1:50-2:50, Wed 1:50-4:30, Thurs 9:10-10:10, 1:50-4:00, Fri 9:10-2:50 SUPER SPEED READING I 2.0 1.0 TBA TBA B-204 Schodorf, C Contract instructor at 269 927-6871. Hours available: Mon. 9:10-10:10, 3:00-4:30, Tues. 9:10-10:10, 1:50-4:00, Wed. 9:10-10:10, Fri. 9:10 - 2:50 SPELLING MASTERY 2.0 1.0 TBA TBA B-204 Schodorf, C Contact instructor at 927-6871. Hours available: Mon 1:50-2:50, Wed 1:50-4:30, Thurs 9:10-10:10, 1:50-4:00, Fri 9:10-2:50 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB. 2.0 1.0 MW 1130-1230 PM C-108 Schodorf, C MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB. 2.0 1.0 MW 0420-0520 PM C-108 Pieplow, K MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB. 2.0 1.0 TR 1240-0140 PM C-108 Schodorf, C MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB. 2.0 1.0 T 0530-0730 PM C-108 Schodorf, C MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB. 2.0 1.0 MW 1020-1120 AM C-108 Schodorf, C MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB. 2.0 1.0 TR 1020-1120 AM C-108 Schodorf, C MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB. 2.0 1.0 TR 0150-0250 PM C-108 Pieplow, K

READ 081 READ 083 READ 084 READ 084 READ 084 READ 085 READ 085 READ 088

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21109 20810 20812 20813 22668 20780 20852 20114

READ 093

0.00

20121

READ 099

0.00

20126

READ 110 READ 110 READ 110 READ 110 READ 110 READ 110 READ 110

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20129 21220 22435 22436 22437 22438 22490

W 1040-1250 PM W 0100-0300 PM W 0300-0500 PM F 0100-0300 PM F 0300-0500 PM F 1050-0100 PM M 0730-0930 AM M 1150-0150 PM M 0150-0350 PM M 0350-0550 PM M 0930-1140 AM 0820-1030 AM TR TBA 0830-1040 AM R 0830-1245 PM T 0830-1145 AM MWF TBA

ROOM

RADT 140 RADT 140 RADT 140 RADT 140 RADT 140 RADT 141 RADT 141 RADT 141 RADT 141 RADT 141 RADT 142

Reading

3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.0 W 2.0 F 4.0 3.0 3.0

DAYS

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

41

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012

NAPIER AVENUE CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

Sociology

CRN

TITLE

PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MWF 0800-0900 AM PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 TR 1240-0210 PM PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MWF 0910-1010 AM PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MWF 1130-1230 PM PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MWF 1020-1120 AM MODERN SOCIAL PROBLEMS 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM MARRIAGE AND FAMILY 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM SOCIOLOGY OF AGING 3.0 3.0 F 0840-1155 AM Live interactive course

SOC 101 SOC 101 SOC 101 SOC 101 SOC 101

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 40.00

20001 20002 20003 20007 20011

SOC 101 SOC 101 SOC 101 SOC 201 SOC 202

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 40.00

21244 21638 21961 20748 20013

SOC 205 SOC 210

0.00 0.00

20006 22459

Icon Key:

42

– Internet Course

– Live Interactive

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

C-109 C-109 C-109 C-109 C-214

Rodak, I Stone, M Stone, M Brady, D Stone, M

C-109 C-109 C-105 C-107 C-214

Rodak, I Barfield, G Barfield, G Halteman, J Stone, M

C-107 F152

Barfield, G Stone, M

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ART 101 ART 201

0.00 0.00

20371 21856

3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

R TR

0630-0945 PM 107 0800-0930 AM 107

Story, T Hunerjager, J

ART 203

0.00

21541

ART APPRECIATION I HISTORY OF ART II Live interactive course ART HISTORY: 1900-1945 Live interactive course

3.0

3.0

TR

1020-1150 AM 107

Hunerjager, J

Art

Biology

BIOL 101 BIOL 101

10.00 10.00

21544 21626

BIOL 101 BIOL 108 BIOL 108 BIOL 205 BIOL 205

10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00

22761 21992 22416 21312 21643

BIOL 205 BIOL 205

10.00 10.00

22417 22764

0.00

21521

BUSA 103 BUSA 103

0.00 40.00

20681 21927

BUSA 105

0.00

22754

BUSA 115

0.00

21268

BUSA 150

0.00

21184

BUSA 201

40.00

20739

BUSA 202

0.00

21390

BUSA 202

0.00

22031

BUSA 203

0.00

20864

BUSA 205

0.00

20707

BUSA 205 BUSA 207

0.00 0.00

20863 20710

BUSA 208

0.00

20919

BUSA 209 BUSA 209

0.00 0.00

20715 20751

BUSA 210 BUSA 211

0.00 0.00

21036 21274

BUSA 216

0.00

22756

INSTRUCTOR(S)

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 TR 0630-0910 PM 114 STAFF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 S 0800-1200 PM C-310 Lawrence, C Above course is a hybrid course. Mandatory labs will be held at Napier Avenue Campus on 1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/25, 3/3, 3/17, 3/24, 3/31, (4/14 snow date), in C-310 8:00 am to 12:00 pm. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 TR 0800-1040 AM 114 STAFF BS.HUM.ANAT.& PHY. 5.0 4.0 TR 0310-0550 PM 114 Springsteen, M BS.HUM.ANAT.& PHY. 5.0 4.0 MW 1020-0100 PM 114 Whitfield, A HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 TR 1100-0140 PM 114 Myers, J HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 M 0600-0900 PM C-323 Stijnman, F Above course is a hybrid course. Mandatory laboratory attendance on Monday evenings, 6-9pm, Napier Avenue Campus. Please contact instructor at stijnman@lakemichigancollege.edu or 269 927-8100 x5256 with any questions. HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 MW 0600-0840 PM 114 Hartman, B HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 S 0900-1200 PM SH209 Miles, F/ The above class is a hybrid course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid Blankenship, S

Business Administration BUSA 100

ROOM

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012

BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 3.0 3.0 MW 1240-0210 PM Live interactive course INTRO.TO BUSINESS 3.0 3.0 MWF 0800-0900 AM INTRO.TO BUSINESS 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee - $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online PRIN. OF CUSTOMER SERVICE 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online JOB SEARCH SEMINAR 1.0 1.0 R 0600-0810 PM Course meets 7 weeks 2/18-4/8 PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING I 5.0 4.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse fee - $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING II 5.0 4.0 R 0545-1000 PM Plus 1 hour TBA PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING II 5.0 4.0 Above course in an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online PRIN.OF ECON.(MACRO) 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. Please contact the instructor at augustyn@lakemichigancollege.edu BUSINESS LAW I 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online BUSINESS LAW I 3.0 3.0 S 0900-1215 PM SMALL BUSINESS MANAG. 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ADVER./SALES PROMOTION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE 3.0 3.0 S 0900-1215 PM PRINC. OF MANAGEMENT 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM Live Interactive course BUSINESS STATISTICS 3.0 3.0 S 0900-1215 PM

107

Leitz, N

104 C-223

Bradford, M Zwiller, J Dee, C Dee, C

TBA

Mandarino, R

C-216

Pifer, E

104

Iwaniuk, G Iwaniuk, G Augustyniak, L Wiley, D

117

Bell, M Bradford, M Moon, K

108A

Martin, J Moon, K

108A 107

Sheehan, T STAFF

108B

STAFF

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

43

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

Chemistry

CRN

TITLE

INTRO. CHEMISTRY I 6.0 4.0 S 0800-0500 PM C-303 Above course is a hybrid course, labs on 1/21, 2/25, 3/24, 4/28, 8:00-5:00 @ Napier Avenue Campus. INTRO. CHEMISTRY I 6.0 4.0 TR 0800-1115 AM 116 FUND OF GEN, ORGANIC & BIOCHEM 6.0 4.0 TR 0600-0810 PM 116 Above course is a hybrid course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid

CHEM 101

10.00

21991

CHEM 101 CHEM 104

10.00 10.00

22762 22606

CONTACT HRS.

College Life Studies CLS 100

0.00

20963

CLS 216 CLS 217

0.00 0.00

22101 22102

Communication

COMM 101 0.00 COMM 101 0.00

20369 20959

COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS Course meets 5 weeks 1/20 - 2/17 STRESS MANAGEMENT SELF ESTEEM Course meets 7 weeks 1/20-3/2

INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

0.00

21532

CIS 100

0.00

20550

CIS 102 CIS 108

0.00 0.00

22757 22141

CIS 108

0.00

20552

CIS 121 CIS 122 CIS 123 CIS 124 CIS 125 CIS 140 CIS 208

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20554 20555 20556 20557 20558 22758 21125

CIS 222 CIS 223 CIS 224 CIS 225 CIS 251

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20854 20855 20856 20857 21524

Dental Assisting

DENT 165 DENT 166 DENT 167 DENT 168 DENT 169 DENT 170 DENT 172 DENT 173 DENT 174 DENT 175 DENT 176

Icon Key:

44

0.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00 0.00 0.00 27.00 20.00 20.00 27.00

21185 21186 21187 21188 21189 21190 21191 21192 21193 21194 21195

– Internet Course

– Live Interactive

STAFF Duis, M

1.0

F

0800-1115 AM 111

Mandarino, R

2.0 1.0

2.0 1.0

R F

1020-1230 PM 106A 1240-0250 PM 117

Meyer, D McKean A

3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

M MWF

0600-0915 PM 109 0800-0900 AM 109

Hamilton, L Curtis, S

INTRO COMPUTER LITERACY 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online INTRO COMPUTER LITERACY 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM The above class is a hybrid course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid BASIC COMPUTER LITERACY 1.0 1.0 M 0600-0915 PM COMP.OPERAT/MICROCOMP. 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online COMP.OPERAT/MICROCOMP. 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM The above class is a hybrid course which meets every other week beginning January 17. WINDOWS SKILLS 1.0 1.0 WORDPROCESSING SKILLS 1.0 1.0 WORKSHEET SKILLS 1.0 1.0 DATABASE SKILLS 1.0 1.0 PRESENTATION SKILLS 1.0 1.0 COMPUTER NETWORKING FUND. 4.0 3.0 W 0600-1000 PM ADV. MICROCOMPUTING APPS 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ADV. WORD PROCESSING SKILLS 1.0 1.0 ADV. WORKSHEET SKILLS 1.0 1.0 ADV. DATABASE SKILLS 1.0 1.0 ADV. PRESENTATION SKILLS 1.0 1.0 COMP.PROG./BASIC 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM

INTRO TO DENTAL ASSISTING CHAIRSIDE I CHAIRSIDE II CHAIRSIDE III CHAIRSIDE IV INTRO TO BUSINESS ASSISTING MEDICAL ISSUES IN DENTAL OFF. CLINICAL I RDA I RDA II CLINICAL II

Barot, B

1.0

Computer Information Systems CIS 100

INSTRUCTOR(S)

4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 6.0 4.0 4.0 5.0

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 6.0 3.0 3.0 5.0

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

Maxson, D 102

STAFF

TBA

STAFF STAFF

102

STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF Place, P STAFF

OE/DE OE/DE OE/DE OE/DE OE/DE

113

STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF

OE/DE OE/DE OE/DE OE/DE

123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123 123

Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J Uribe, J

104

– Telecourse

OE/DE

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

English

CRN

TITLE

ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS 4.0 4.0 MW 0330-0540 PM 113 FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING 4.0 4.0 MTWR 0220-0320 PM 113 FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING 4.0 4.0 TR 0600-0810 PM 113 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 0800-0930 AM 111 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM 111 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. Before registering contact instructor at yackshaw@lakemichigancollege.edu ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 1240-0210 PM 111 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MWF 0800-0900 AM TBA ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM 111 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 0230-0400 PM 113 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MWF 1020-1120 AM TBA ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. Before registering contact instructor at yackshaw@lakemichigancollege.edu TECHNICAL WRITING 3.0 3.0 S 0900-1215 PM 111 MASTERPC./BRIT LIT II 3.0 3.0 MWF 0910-1010 AM TBA POETRY 3.0 3.0 TR 0800-0930 AM TBA CREATIVE WRITING 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM 107

ENGL 091 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 101

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

22779 22446 22447 20214

ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101

0.00 0.00 0.00

20246 20247 21632

ENGL 101

0.00

21245

ENGL 102

0.00

22778

ENGL 102

0.00

20261

ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20281 20738 20744 21016 21785 21871

ENGL 103 ENGL 204 ENGL 215 ENGL 217

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20957 22744 22766 22039

Foreign Language FORL 122

0.00

Health

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

Bergman, J Borgman, J Shaw, T Brittin, N Thomas, A Schirripa, M Schirripa, M Yackshaw, J Dwyer, S Brittin, N Thomas, A Sarra, D

0600-0810 PM 108A

Beller, M

FIRST AID/PERSONAL SAFETY Course meets first 9 weeks CPR/AED Course meets last 5 weeks

2.0

2.0

R

1020-0135 PM 108A

Cowan, A

1.0

1.0

R

1020-0135 PM 108A

Cowan, A

21952

HIST 102 HIST 201 HIST 202

0.00 0.00 40.00

22742 21201 20189

HIST 202

0.00

22601

HIST/WEST CIVILIZ. II 4.0 4.0 TR 0910-1120 AM AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse fee $40 Orientation is at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 MWF 1020-1120 AM

21751 22783

HONORS NATIONAL GOVERNMENT HONORS ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Hospitality Management 0.00 0.00

Bergman, J

MR

20.00

HOSP 113 HOSP 150

Shaw, T Thomas, A Yackshaw, J

4.0

HEAL 166

0.00 0.00

Simon, N Newmiller, S Scarbeck, J Borgman, J

4.0

20573

HONR 141 HONR 231

INSTRUCTOR(S)

ELEMENTARY SPANISH II Plus 1 hour lab

10.00

Honors

ROOM

21518

HEAL 165

History

CONTACT HRS.

21261 22621

NUTRITION/DIET THERAPY INTRO TO HOSPITALITY CAREERS Live interactive class

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012

TBA 117 C-105

Robinson, K Moore, T Paine, C

117

Moore, T

3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

MWR MW

0800-0900 AM 117 0300-0430 PM 117

Ellis, J Scameheorn, D

3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

W W

0600-0915 PM 117 0900-1215 PM 107

STAFF Woodruff, C

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

45

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

Humanities HUMN 211

40.00

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

20858

STUDIES IN FILM ART 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse fee $40 Orientation is at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses.

C-107

Muhme, M

Law Enforcement LAWE 142

0.00

Logistics

LOGI 101 LOGI 103

0.00 0.00

CREDITS

DAYS

22760

POLICE ORG & ADMINIS.

3.0

3.0

T

0600-0915 PM TBA

STAFF

22647 22787

INTRO TO LOGISTICS TRAFFIC ANDS TRANSPORTATION

3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

T R

0600-0915 PM 107 0615-0915 PM 107

STAFF STAFF

Machine Tool Techology

MACH 110 MACH 120 MACH 130

75.00 75.00 0.00

20458 20466 22788

MACHINE TOOL I 5.0 3.0 R 0515-1040 PM 106A MACHINE TOOL II 5.0 3.0 R 0515-1040 PM 106A PRECISION INSPECTION 4.0 3.0 Above course is an OE/DE and may be taken concurrently with either MACH 110 or MACH 120. For more information contact flowers@lakemichigancollege.edu

Manufacturing Technology

MANU 112 40.00 MANU 215 100.00 MANU P221 250.00

22412 22653 22500

Mathematics MATH 090

0.00

20385

MATH 090

0.00

20389

MATH 090

0.00

21724

MATH 090

0.00

22448

MATH 095

0.00

21949

MATH 095

0.00

21950

MATH 095

0.00

21989

MATH 095

0.00

22449

MATH 110 MATH 122 MATH 122

0.00 0.00 0.00

20399 21966 21967

MATH 122 MATH 128

0.00 0.00

22470 21987

MATH 128 MATH 135 MATH 151 MATH 216

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

22623 22172 22624 22774

Icon Key:

46

– Internet Course

INTRO TO FABRICATION FAB LAB I COMPETITIVE ROBOTICS PRACTICUM

4.0 4.0 4.0

4.0 4.0 4.0

M M TBA

0600-1020 PM 108 0600-1020 PM 108 TBA 106

STAFF STAFF

OE/DE

Willis, J Willis, J Oblak, P

PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MTWR 0110-0210 PM 115 Duis, M Above course is delivered in a lecture format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 TR 0330-0540 PM 115 Duis, M Above course is delivered in a lab format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MW 0600-0810 PM 115 STAFF Above course delivered in a lecture format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 S 0800-1220 PM 115 Runyon, N Above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 TR 0330-0540 PM 115 Duis, M Above course is delivered in a lab format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MTWR 0110-0210 PM 105 Cox, G Above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MW 0600-0810 PM 105 Runyon, N Above course delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 S 0800-1220 PM 115 Runyon, N Above course is delivered in a lab format. TECHNICAL MATH 4.0 4.0 W 0600-1020 PM 106A STAFF INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MTWR 1200-0100 PM 105 Cox, G INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 Elwell, M Above course is an internet course. Exams to be taken at LMC Assessment Centers on 2/20 or 2/21, 3/26 or 3/27, 4/23 or 4/24, 4/30 or 5/1 or pre-approved proctored testing. Contact instructor at elwell@lakemichigancollege.edu. INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 TR 0600-0810 PM 115 Runyon, N PRE-CALCULUS ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 Elwell, M Above course is an internet course. Exams to be taken at LMC Assessment Centers on 2/20 or 2/21, 3/26 or 3/27, 4/23 or 4/24, 4/30 or 5/1 or pre-approved proctored testing. Contact instructor at elwell@lakemichigancollege.edu. PRE-CALCULUS ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 S 0800-1220 PM 105 Singh, V PRECALCULUS ALGEBRA/TRIG. 5.0 5.0 MTWR 0800-0915 AM 105 Cox, G CALCULUS I 5.0 5.0 MTWR 0940-1055 AM 105 Cox, G INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 3.0 3.0 S 0900-1215 PM 108B STAFF

– Live Interactive

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

Office Information Systems OIS 101

0.00

20924

OIS 102

0.00

20925

OIS 103

0.00

20926

OIS 114 OIS 201 OIS 211 OIS 217 OIS 218 OIS 220

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21686 21687 22458 20666 20669 22618

KEYBOARDING I 2.0 2.0 Chancellor, K OE/DE Above course is an OE/DE. Please contact the instructor at chancell@lakemichigancollege.edu for information on how to start this course. KEYBOARDING II 2.0 2.0 Chancellor, K OE/DE Above course is an OE/DE. Please contact the instructor at chancell@lakemichigancollege.edu for information on how to start this course. KEYBOARDING III 2.0 2.0 Chancellor, K OE/DE Above course is an OE/DE. Please contact the instructor at chancell@lakemichigancollege.edu for information on how to start this course. INTERMEDIATE KEYBOARDING 3.0 3.0 W 0530-0830 PM 108 STAFF ADVANCED KEYBOARDING 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM 108 STAFF OFFICE PROCEDURES 3.0 3.0 S 0900-1215 PM 104 Chancellor, K INTRO TO WORD PROCES. APPLICAT 3.0 3.0 M 0530-0830 PM 113 STAFF ADV WORD PROCES. APPLICATIONS 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM 113 STAFF MED. OFFICE PROCEDURES 3.0 3.0 STAFF Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online

Physical Ed./Wellness PHED 118

0.00

22252

PHED 118

0.00

22253

PHED 118

0.00

22625

PHED 200

0.00

20621

PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 212

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

20632 20633 20797 21627 22153

PHED 212

0.00

22154

PHED 212

0.00

22155

PHED 212

0.00

22483

PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 2.0 1.0 T 1020-1120 AM TBA McKean, A Above course is held at Niles YMCA. Additional hour on Thursday between 9-4:30 PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 2.0 1.0 T 0330-0430 PM TBA McKean, A Above course is held at Niles YMCA Additional hour on Thursday between 9-4:30. PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 2.0 1.0 T 0910-1010 AM TBA McKean, A Above course is held at Niles YMCA. Additional hour on Thursday between 9:00-4:30. HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 TBA TBA TBA Meyer, D Above course is a hybrid course. Three meetings on the Napier Avenue Campus are required. (2/9 5:30-8:30pm or 2/10 12:30-3:30pm or 2/11 9-noon and 2/25 9:00-11:00am or 3/1 5:30-7:30pm or 3/2 12:30-2:30pm and final exam. HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 R 0800-1010 AM 108A Meyer, D HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 W 0600-0810 PM 108A Cook, B HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 W 1240-0250 PM 108A Lamar, M HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 T 1240-0250 PM 108A McKean, A HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 R 0800-1010 AM 108A Meyer, D Exercise Tues. 9:10 or10:20 or 3:30 and 1 hour Thurs between 9-4:30 at Niles YMCA. HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 W 0600-0810 PM 108A Cook, B Exercise Tues. 9:10, 10:20 or 3:30 and 1 hour Thurs between 9-4:30 at Niles YMCA. HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 W 1240-0250 PM 108A Lamar, M Exercise Tues. 9:10 or 10:20 or 3:30 and 1 hour Thurs. between 9 - 4:30 at Niles YMCA. HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 T 1240-0250 PM 108A McKean, A Exercise Tuesday 9:10 or 10:20 or 3:30 and 1 hour Thursday between 9-4:30 at Niles YMCA

STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR PHED212 MUST ALSO REGISTER FOR ONE OF THE FOLLOWING EXERCISE TIMES AT THE NILES/BUCHANAN YMCA PHED 212

0.00

22626

PHED 212

0.00

22627

PHED 212

0.00

22628

PHED 216 PHED 217

0.00 0.00

20896 21641

Philosophy

PHIL 101 PHIL 102

0.00 0.00

20242 22456

HEALTH & FITNESS 0.0 0.0 T Exercise at Niles/Buchanan YMCA, plus 1 hour on Thursday between 9:00-4:30. HEALTH & FITNESS 0.0 0.0 T Exercise at Niles/Buchanan YMCA, plus 1 hour on Thursday between 9:00-4:30 HEALTH & FITNESS 0.0 0.0 T Exercise at Niles/Buchanan YMCA, plus 1 hour on Thursday between 9:00-4:30 HEALTH ISSUES: STRESS MGMT 2.0 2.0 R HEALTH ISSUES: SELF ESTEEM 1.0 1.0 F Course meets 7 weeks, 1/20-3/2

0910-1010 AM TBA

McKean, A

1020-1120 AM TBA

McKean, A

0330-0430 PM TBA

McKean, A

1020-1230 PM 106A 1240-0250 PM 117

Meyer, D McKean, A

INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY INTRO TO LOGIC

0940-1110 AM 105 0600-0915 PM 115

Reimers, A Reimers, A

3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

TR T

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

47

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012

BERTRAND CROSSING CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

Physical Science PHSC 101

5.00

22607

Political Science

POSC 101 POSC 101

0.00 0.00

20965 21960

POSC 101

0.00

22600

Psychology

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

PHYS.SCI./CHEM.-PHYS. 5.0 4.0 MW 0600-0810 PM 116 Above course is a hybrid course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancolleg.edu/hybrid

STAFF

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM 108B NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancolleg.edu/online NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 MWF 0800-0900 AM 117

Penn-Grove, E Roberts, G

C-220

Scrima, A

117 117

Van Cleave, B Ryan, R Scameheorn, D

117

Van Cleave, B Scameheorn, D

117

Scameheorn, D

PSYC 201

0.00

20047

PSYC 201 PSYC 201 PSYC 203

0.00 0.00 0.00

20069 20070 20054

PSYC 203 PSYC 204

0.00 0.00

21213 21963

PSYC 231

0.00

20074

INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancolleg.edu/online INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MWF 0800-0900 AM INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancolleg.edu/online HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 3.0 3.0 MWF 0910-1010 AM CHILD DEV./PERSONALITY 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancolleg.edu/online ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MW 0300-0430 PM

20162 22496

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB.

PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MWF 0910-1010 AM PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM MODERN SOCIAL PROBLEMS 3.0 3.0 MWF 1020-1120 AM MARRIAGE AND FAMILY 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. SOCIOLOGY OF AGING 3.0 3.0 F 0840-1155 AM Live interactive course

Reading READ 110 READ 110

0.00 0.00

Sociology SOC 101

40.00

20011

SOC 101 SOC 101 SOC 201 SOC 202

0.00 0.00 0.00 40.00

20016 21596 29064 20013

SOC 210

0.00

22222

Trade Related/Apprentice TRIN 105

0.00

Icon Key:

48

20502

– Internet Course

INSTRUCTOR(S)

APPLIED TRIGONOMETRY II

– Live Interactive

2.0 2.0

2.0

1.0 1.0

2.0

W TR

T

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

0600-0810 PM 113 0800-0900 AM 113

Ellis, J

Scarbeck, J Scarbeck, J

Stone, M 108A TBA TBA

Halteman, J Halteman, J Halteman, J Stone, M

107

Stone, M

0600-0810 PM 106A

Cook, C

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ART 122 ART 123 ART 201

0.00 0.00 0.00

21400 21401 21857

6.0 6.0 3.0

3.0 3.0 3.0

MW MW TR

0600-0915 PM SH215 0600-0915 PM SH215 0800-0930 AM SH203

Binnington, K Binnington, K Hunerjager, J

ART 203

0.00

21511

3.0

3.0

TR

1020-1150 AM SH203

Hunerjager, J

ART 260

0.00

21402

DRAWING I DRAWING II HISTORY OF ART II Live interactive course ART HISTORY: 1900-1945 Live interactive course STUDIO PROBLEMS: DRAWING

6.0

3.0

MW

0600-0915 PM SH215

Binnington, K

Art

Biology BIOL 101

10.00

21626

BIOL 101 BIOL 108 BIOL 108 BIOL 108 BIOL 108 BIOL 205 BIOL 205

10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00

21651 21981 22250 22421 22613 21447 21643

BIOL 205 BIOL 205

10.00 10.00

21874 22764

BIOL 206

10.00

21817

0.00 40.00

22259 21927

BUSA 105

0.00

22754

BUSA 115

0.00

21268

BUSA 150

0.00

22041

BUSA 201

40.00

20739

BUSA 202

0.00

21410

BUSA 202

0.00

22031

BUSA 203

0.00

20864

BUSA 203 BUSA 204 BUSA 205

0.00 0.00 0.00

21739 21411 20707

BUSA 207

0.00

20710

BUSA 208

0.00

20919

BUSA 209

0.00

20751

BUSA 210 BUSA 211

0.00 0.00

22035 21513

INSTRUCTOR(S)

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 S 0800-1200 PM C-310 Lawrence, C Above course is a hybrid course. Mandatory labs will be held at Napier Avenue Campus on 1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/25, 3/3, 3/17, 3/24, 3/31, (4/14 snow date), in C-310 8:00am to 12:00pm. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 5.0 4.0 MW 0600-0840 PM SH209 STAFF BS.HUM.ANAT.& PHY. 5.0 4.0 TR 0910-1150 AM SH209 STAFF BS.HUM.ANAT.& PHY. 5.0 4.0 MW 0100-0340 PM SH205 Blankenship, S BS.HUM.ANAT.& PHY. 5.0 4.0 TR 0130-0410 PM SH209 Miles, F BS.HUM.ANAT.& PHY. 5.0 4.0 MW 0910-1150 AM SH205 Miles, F HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 MW 0910-1150 AM SH209 Blankenship, S HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 M 0600-0900 PM C-323 Miles, F Above course is a hybrid course. Mandatory laboratory attendance on Monday evenings, 6-9pm, Napier Avenue Campus. Please contact instructor at miles@lakemichigancollege.ed or 269 927-8100 x7157 with any questions. HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 TR 0600-0840 PM SH209 Woolcock, M HUMAN ANATOMY 5.0 4.0 S 0900-1200 PM SH209 Miles, F Above course is a hybrid course. Mandatory laboratory attendance on Monday evenings, 6-9pm, Napier Avenue Campus. Please contact instructor at miles@lakemichigancollege.ed or 269 927-8100 x7157 with any questions. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY 6.0 4.0 TR 0900-1215 PM SH205 Miles, F

Business Administration

BUSA 103 BUSA 103

ROOM

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012

INTRO.TO BUSINESS 3.0 3.0 MW 0130-0315 PM INTRO.TO BUSINESS 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee - $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online PRIN. OF CUSTOMER SERVICE 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online JOB SEARCH SEMINAR 1.0 1.0 S 0930-1240 PM Course meets 3/26 to 4/24. PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING I 5.0 4.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee - $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING II 5.0 4.0 TR 0630-0830 PM Plus one hour TBA. PRINC.OF ACCOUNTING II 5.0 4.0 Above course in an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online PRIN.OF ECON.(MACRO) 3.0 3.0 Above course in an internet course. Please contact the instructor at augustyn@lakemichigancollege.edu. PRIN.OF ECON.(MACRO) 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM PRIN.OF ECON.(MICRO) 3.0 3.0 S 0900-1215 PM BUSINESS LAW I 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online SMALL BUSINESS MANAG. 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ADVER./SALES PROMOTION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE 3.0 3.0 S 0100-0415 PM PRINC. OF MANAGEMENT 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-1000 AM

SH125 C-223

STAFF Zwiller, J Dee, C Dee, C

SH144

LeRoux, K

C-216

Pifer, E

SH220

Zelmer, A Iwaniuk, G Augustyniak, L

SH145 TBA

STAFF STAFF Wiley, D Bradford, M Moon, K Moon, K

SH140 SH144

STAFF STAFF

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

49

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

Business Administration continued BUSA 211

0.00

22755

BUSA 216 BUSA 220

0.00 0.00

22095 22180

Chemistry CHEM 101

10.00

21991

CHEM 104

10.00

22614

PRINC. OF MANAGEMENT Above course is an interactive course. BUSINESS STATISTICS ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

3.0

3.0

W

0600-0915 PM SH203

STAFF

3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

MW T

1240-0210 PM SH144 0600-0915 PM SH221

Cosgrove, V STAFF

INTRO. CHEMISTRY I 6.0 4.0 S 0800-0500 PM C-303 Barot, B Above course is a hybrid course, labs on 1/21, 2/25, 3/24, 4/28, 8:00-5:00 @ Napier Avenue Campus. FUND OF GEN, ORGANIC & BIOCHEM 6.0 4.0 MW 0600-0810 PM SH205 Stap, S Above course is a hybrid course and computer internet access is required. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid

College Life Studies CLS 100

0.00

21449

CLS 100

0.00

21821

CLS 216 CLS 217

0.00 0.00

22106 22107

CIS 216

0.00

22789

Communication

COMM 101 0.00 COMM 101 0.00 COMM 101 0.00

21238 21452 21453

COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS 1.0 1.0 F 1245-0245 PM Above course meets 5 weeks 1/20-2/17 Four seminars outside of class time are also required COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS 1.0 1.0 S 0130-0330 PM Above course meets 5 weeks 1/21 - 2/18 Four seminars outside of class time are also required STRESS MANAGEMENT 2.0 2.0 R 1020-1230 PM SELF ESTEEM 1.0 1.0 R 0300-0510 PM Above course meets 7 weeks, 1/19-3/15 STRESS MANAGEMENT 2.0 2.0 T 1020-1230 PM

INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING INTRO TO PUBLIC SPEAKING

3.0 3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0 3.0

TR T MW

SH221

STAFF

SH221

STAFF

SH145 SH144

Hunsberger, K Hunsberger, K

TBA

Hunsberger, K

0120-0250 PM SH204 0600-0915 PM SH204 0120-0250 PM SH204

Computer Information Systems

CIS 100 CIS 100

0.00 0.00

21414 21532

CIS 106 CIS 108 CIS 108

0.00 0.00 0.00

21416 21417 22141

CIS 121 CIS 122 CIS 123 CIS 124 CIS 125 CIS 208

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21419 21420 21421 21422 21423 21125

CIS 222 CIS 223 CIS 224 CIS 225

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21424 21425 21426 21427

Early Childhood ELCH 111 ELCH 113 ELCH 210 ELCH 213

Icon Key:

50

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21455 21951 21738 21631

– Internet Course

INSTRUCTOR(S)

Kohn, H Kohn, H Kohn, H

INTRO COMPUTER LITERACY 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM SH124 INTRO COMPUTER LITERACY 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online INTRO TO OPERATING SYSTEMS 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0910 PM SH124 COMP.OPERAT/MICROCOMP. 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM SH124 COMP.OPERAT/MICROCOMP. 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online WINDOWS SKILLS 1.0 1.0 WORDPROCESSING SKILLS 1.0 1.0 WORKSHEET SKILLS 1.0 1.0 DATABASE SKILLS 1.0 1.0 PRESENTATION SKILLS 1.0 1.0 ADV. MICROCOMPUTING APPS 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ADV. WORD PROCESSING SKILLS 1.0 1.0 ADV. WORKSHEET SKILLS 1.0 1.0 ADV. DATABASE SKILLS 1.0 1.0 ADV. PRESENTATION SKILLS 1.0 1.0

STAFF Maxson, D

EARLY CHILD LRNG ENVIRONMENTS GUID YOUNG CHILDRENS SOC DEV CURR PLNG FOR YOUNG CHILD II CURRENT ISSUES IN EARLY CHILD

Stegman, J Stegman, J Petersen, S Stegman, J

– Live Interactive

2.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

2.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

M W T R

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

0600-0810 PM 0600-0915 PM 0600-0915 PM 0600-0915 PM

SH144 SH144 SH144 SH144

– Telecourse

STAFF Maxson, D STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF

OE/DE OE/DE OE/DE OE/DE OE/DE

STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF

OE/DE OE/DE OE/DE OE/DE

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

Emergency Medical Technician EMT 162

0.00

Energy ENGY 182

15.00

English

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

BASIC EMT Plus 9 Saturdays tba.

12.0

8.0

MW

0600-1020 PM SH124

Wheeler, J

22633

BOILER THEORY, SAFETY & DESIGN Course meets 6 weeks.

3.0

3.0

S

0900-0100 PM SH204

Wearne, C

ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS 4.0 4.0 MW 1020-1230 PM SH143 FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING 4.0 4.0 MW 1210-0220 PM SH124 FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING 4.0 4.0 TR 0730-0940 PM SH143 FOUND OF COLL READ & WRITING 4.0 4.0 TR 1210-0220 PM SH143 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TBA TBA TBA The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 1020-1150 AM SH124 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 1020-1150 AM SH124 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM SH146 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 S 1245-0400 PM SH143 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. Before registering contact instructor at yackshaw@lakemichigancollege.edu ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemihcigancollege.edu/online ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 MW 0830-1000 AM SH143 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-1000 AM SH124 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM SH143 ENGLISH COMPOSITION 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. Before registering contact instructor at yackshaw@lakemichigancollege.edu TECHNICAL WRITING 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM SH216 LIT INTERPRETATION 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM SH204

Lankheet, S Nelson, K Jones, M Jordan, C Borgman, J

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21734 22439 22440 22441 20214

ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101 ENGL 101

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21462 21463 21464 21598 21632

ENGL 101

0.00

21245

ENGL 102

0.00

22778

ENGL 102

0.00

20261

ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102 ENGL 102

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21465 21466 21467 21871

ENGL 103 ENGL 208

0.00 0.00

21468 21469

Foreign Language FORL 122

0.00

21470

FORL 124 FORL 222

0.00 0.00

21471 20343

Health HEAL 165

10.00

21473

HEAL 166

20.00

21472

History

INSTRUCTOR(S)

22114

ENGL 091 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 095 ENGL 101

HIST 102 HIST 201 HIST 202

0.00 0.00 40.00

21474 21475 20189

HIST 202 HIST 204

0.00 0.00

21476 22266

Lankheet, S Foster, J Nelson, K Nelson, K Yackshaw, J Borgman, J Borgman, J Borgman, J Nelson, K Lankheet, S Foster, J Yackshaw, J Simmons, C Jordan, C

ELEMENTARY SPANISH II 4.0 4.0 F 0900-1215 PM SH144 Above course is a hybrid course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid SPANISH FOR THE WORKPLACE II 4.0 4.0 MW 0600-0810 PM SH219 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II 4.0 4.0 F 1230-0345 PM SH144 Above course is a hybrid course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/hybrid

Collins, C

FIRST AID/PERSONAL SAFETY Course meets first 9 weeks of semester. CPR/AED Course meets first 5 weeks of semester.

Hanks, P Collins, C

2.0

2.0

W

0600-0915 PM SH146

Cowan, A

1.0

1.0

W

0600-0915 PM TBA

Cowan, A

HIST/WEST CIVILIZ. II 4.0 4.0 TR 0135-0335 PM AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 W 0600-0915 PM AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee $40 Orientation is at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. AMERICAN HISTORY 3.0 3.0 MW 0150-0320 PM MODERN EAST ASIA 3.0 3.0 MW 1240-0210 PM

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012

SH219 SH219 C-105

Robinson, K Moore, T Paine, C

SH219 SH217

Moore, T STAFF

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

51

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

Hospitality Management HOSP 150

0.00

Humanities HUMN 211

40.00

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

3.0

3.0

W

0900-1215 PM SH203

22620

INTRO TO HOSPITALITY CAREERS Live interactive class

20858

STUDIES IN FILM ART 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse Fee - $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses

Mathematics

ROOM

C-107

INSTRUCTOR(S)

Woodruff, C

Muhme, M

MATH 090

0.00

21478

MATH 090

0.00

21479

MATH 090

0.00

22443

MATH 090

0.00

22444

MATH 095

0.00

21943

MATH 095

0.00

21944

MATH 095

0.00

21945

MATH 095

0.00

22445

MATH 095

0.00

22657

MATH 122

0.00

21967

MATH 122 MATH 122 MATH 122 MATH 128 MATH 128

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21968 21982 21983 21985 21987

MATH 135 MATH 216

0.00 0.00

22194 22096

PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MW 0830-1040 AM SH221 STAFF Above course is delivered in a lecture format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 TR 0510-0720 PM TBA STAFF Above course is delivered in a lecture format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MW 1230-0240 PM SH221 Lin, S Above course is delivered in a lecture format. PRE-ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 S 0800-1220 PM SH220 Crouse, J Above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MW 0945-1155 AM SH204 Lin, S Above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 TR 0510-0720 PM TBA Brown, P Above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 TR 1240-0250 PM SH222 Verdonk, S Above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 S 0800-1220 PM SH222 Shabazz, M Above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 S 1230-0450 PM SH222 Shabazz, M Above course is delivered in a lecture format. INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 Elwell, M Above course is an internet course. Exams to be taken at LMC Assessment Centers on 2/20 or 2/21, 3/26 or 3/27, 4/23 or 4/24, 4/30 or 5/1 or pre-approved proctored testing. Contact instructor at elwell@lakemichigancollege.edu. INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 TR 1020-1230 PM SH222 Verdonk, S INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MW 1020-1230 PM SH222 Cosgrove, V INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MW 0630-0840 PM SH221 Brown, P PRE-CALCULUS ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 MW 0800-1010 AM SH222 Cosgrove, V PRE-CALCULUS ALGEBRA 4.0 4.0 Elwell, M Above course is an internet course. Exams to be taken at LMC Assessment Centers on 2/20 or 2/21, 3/26 or 3/27, 4/23 or 4/24, 4/30 or 5/1 or pre-approved proctored testing. Contact instructor at elwell@lakemichigancollege.edu. PRECALCULUS ALGEBRA/TRIG. 5.0 5.0 MW 0600-0840 PM SH203 Verdonk, S INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 3.0 3.0 MW 1240-0210 PM SH144 Cosgrove, V

0.00

21486

MUSIC APPRECIATION

Music MUSI 109

3.0

3.0

F

1240-0355 PM SH125

Bomer, D

Office Information Systems OIS 101

0.00

21429

OIS 102

0.00

21430

OIS 103

0.00

21431

OIS 114 OIS 125 OIS 201 OIS 211 OIS 220

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21689 22457 21690 21740 22618

Icon Key:

52

– Internet Course

KEYBOARDING I 2.0 2.0 Mangold, P OE/DE Above course is an OE/DE. Please check the Distance Learning page on the LMC website for more information about how to start this class. KEYBOARDING II 2.0 2.0 Mangold, P OE/DE Above course is an OE/DE. Please check the Distance Learning page on the LMC website for more information about how to start this class. KEYBOARDING III 2.0 2.0 Mangold, P OE/DE Above course is an OE/DE. Please check the Distance Learning page on the LMC website for more information about how to start this class. INTERMEDIATE KEYBOARDING 3.0 3.0 M 0530-0845 PM SH216 Mangold, P RECORDS MANAGEMENT 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM SH216 STAFF ADVANCED KEYBOARDING 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM SH216 Mangold, P OFFICE PROCEDURES 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM SH222 STAFF MED. OFFICE PROCEDURES 3.0 3.0 TBA TBA TBA STAFF The above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemichigancollege.edu/online

– Live Interactive

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

Physical Ed./Wellness PHED 105

0.00

21504

PHED 106

0.00

21505

PHED 118

0.00

21868

PHED 118

0.00

22268

PHED 118

0.00

22269

PHED 118

0.00

22492

PHED 118

0.00

22596

PHED 200

0.00

20621

PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 200 PHED 212

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21499 21500 21502 22487 22597 22166

PHED 212

0.00

22168

PHED 212

0.00

22170

PHED 212

0.00

22489

PHED 212

0.00

22598

BOWLING 2.0 1.0 M 0130-0430 PM TBA DuCharme, M Above course meets at Lake Side Lanes, student must attend 2 hours. INTERMEDIATE BOWLING 2.0 1.0 M 0130-0430 PM TBA DuCharme, M Above course meets at Lake Side Lanes, student must attend 2 hours. PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 2.0 1.0 TR 0730-0830 AM TBA Wheaton, J Above course held at Shoreline Wellness Center PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 2.0 1.0 MW 0300-0400 PM TBA Wheaton, J Above course is held at Shoreline Wellness Center PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 2.0 1.0 UF 0600-0700 PM TBA Wheaton, J Above course held at Shoreline Wellness Center PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 2.0 1.0 MW 1100-1200 PM TBA Wheaton, J Above course is held at Shoreline Wellness Center. PHYSICAL CONDITIONING 2.0 1.0 TR 0300-0400 PM TBA Wheaton, J Above course is held at Shoreline Wellness Center. HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 Meyer, D Above course is a hybrid course. Three meetings on the Napier Avenue Campus are required. (2/9 5:30-8:30pm or 2/10 12:30-3:30pm or 2/11 9-noon and 2/25 9:00-11:00am or 3/1 5:30-7:30pm or 3/2 12:30-2:30pm and final exam. HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 T 1240-0250 PM SH145 Meyer, D HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 T 1020-1230 PM SH145 Meyer, D HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 R 0410-0620 PM SH144 Wheaton, J HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 TR 0830-0930 AM SH145 Thomas, D HEALTHFUL LIVING 2.0 1.0 R 0630-0840 PM SH145 Thompson, K HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 T 1240-0250 PM SH145 Meyer, D Additional 1 hour 2 times a week at local fitness center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 T 1020-1230 PM SH145 Meyer, D Additional 1 hour 2 times week at local fitness center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 R 0410-0620 PM SH144 Wheaton, J Additional 1 hour 2 times week at local fitness center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 TR 0830-0930 AM SH145 Thomas, D Additional 1 hour 2 times week at local fitness center HEALTH & FITNESS 4.0 3.0 R 0630-0840 PM SH145 Thompson, K Additional 1 hour 2 times a week at local fitness center

STUDENTS REGISTERING FOR PHED212 MUST ALSO REGISTER FOR ONE OF THE FOLLOWING EXERCISE TIMES AT SHORELINE WELLNESS CENTER PHED 212

0.00

22263

PHED 212

0.00

22264

PHED 212

0.00

22267

PHED 212

0.00

22491

PHED 212

0.00

22599

PHED 216 PHED 216 PHED 217

0.00 0.00 0.00

21503 22790 21654

Philosophy

PHIL 101 PHIL 102

0.00 0.00

21488 20237

HEALTH & FITNESS 0.0 Exercise for PHED212 at Shoreline Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 0.0 Exercise for PHED212 at Shoreline Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 0.0 Exercise for PHED212 at Shoreline Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 0.0 Exercise for PHED212 at Shoreline Wellness Center HEALTH & FITNESS 0.0 Exercise for PHED212 at Shoreline Wellness Center HEALTH ISSUES: STRESS MGMT 2.0 STRESS MANAGEMENT 2.0 HEALTH ISSUES: SELF ESTEEM 1.0 Course meets 7 weeks 1/19 - 3/15

0.0

TR

0730-0830 AM TBA

Wheaton, J

0.0

MW

0300-0400 PM TBA

Wheaton, J

0.0

UF

0600-0700 PM TBA

Wheaton, J

0.0

MW

1100-1200 PM TBA

Wheaton, J

0.0

TR

0300-0400 PM TBA

Wheaton, J

2.0 2.0 1.0

R T R

1020-1230 PM SH145 1020-1230 PM TBA 0300-0510 PM SH144

Hunsberger, K Hunsberger, K Hunsberger, K

INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY INTRO TO LOGIC

3.0 3.0

T TR

0600-0915 PM SH145 0200-0330 PM TBA

Keith, D Keith, D

3.0 3.0

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

53

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012

SOUTH HAVEN CAMPUS SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

Physics

CRN

TITLE

GENERAL PHYSICS II 6.0 Above course meets Jan - June at South Haven High School INTRO TO SKY & SOLAR SYSTEM 5.0 TECHNICAL PHYSICS 5.0

PHYS 102

0.00

21333

PHYS 104 PHYS 110

0.00 0.00

21796 22475

Political Science

POSC 101 POSC 101 POSC 101

0.00 0.00 0.00

21489 21812 21960

POSC 102

0.00

22125

Psychology

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

5.0

MTWRF

1124-1219 PM TBA

Stap, S

4.0 4.0

MW R

0600-0840 PM TBA 0530-1040 PM SH204

Olsen, R Stap, S

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM SH219 NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 TR 1240-0210 PM SH221 NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemihcigancollege.edu/online STATE GOVERNMENTS 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM SH221

PSYC 201

0.00

20047

PSYC 201 PSYC 201 PSYC 201 PSYC 203

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

21404 21490 21599 20054

PSYC 203 PSYC 204

0.00 0.00

21491 21963

PSYC 231

0.00

21677

INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemihcigancollege.edu/online INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 TR 1240-0210 PM INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 M 0600-0915 PM INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 TR 0830-1000 AM HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemihcigancollege.edu/online HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 3.0 3.0 R 0600-0915 PM CHILD DEV./PERSONALITY 3.0 3.0 Above course is an internet course. For more information go to www.lakemihcigancollege.edu/online ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM

21492 21493 21495 21592 22780

READING IMPROVEMENT II READING STRATEGIES II MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB. MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCAB.

Reading

READ 084 READ 085 READ 110 READ 110 READ 110

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

Sociology SOC 101

40.00

20011

SOC 101 SOC 101 SOC 201 SOC 202

0.00 0.00 0.00 40.00

21496 21964 21497 20013

SOC 210

0.00

22146

Icon Key:

54

– Internet Course

INSTRUCTOR(S)

King, R King, R Roberts, G King, R

C-220

Scrima, A

SH217 SH204 SH217

Hunsberger, K Soukup, M Hunsberger, K Scameheorn, D

SH220

Hunsberger, K Scameheorn, D

SH220

Soukup, M

0230-0440 PM 0330-0440 PM 0930-1140 AM 0445-0545 PM 0445-0545 PM

SH143 SH143 SH217 SH217 SH217

Cardelli, V Cardelli, V Wildt, M Wildt, M Wildt, M

PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse fee $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 MW 0200-0330 PM PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3.0 3.0 T 0600-0915 PM MODERN SOCIAL PROBLEMS 3.0 3.0 MW 1220-0150 PM MARRIAGE AND FAMILY 3.0 3.0 Above course is a telecourse. Telecourse fee $40. Orientation at Napier Avenue Campus. Testing at Napier Avenue, South Haven, and Bertrand campuses. SOCIOLOGY OF AGING 3.0 3.0 F 0840-1155 AM Live interactive course

C-214

Stone, M

SH222 SH222 SH220 C-214

Schada, S Riffer-Reinert, A Riffer-Reinert, A Stone, M

SH203

Stone, M

– Live Interactive

4.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

4.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0

TR TR S MW TR

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

M-TECSM SPRING 2012 FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

Drafting & Design Technology

DRAF 203 DRAF 208

60.00 60.00

20416 20426

DRAF 211

60.00

22099

DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY 5.0 3.0 TR 0900-1130 AM MT122 CAD-MECHANICAL DETAILING 5.0 3.0 Above course is OE/DE. Contact instructor at huycke@lakemichigancollege.edu for information. MACHINE DESIGN 5.0 3.0 Above course is OE/DE, contact instructor at flowers@lakemichigancollege.edu for information.

Electronics Technology

ELEC 100 ELEC 106 ELEC 106 ELEC 111

25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00

20949 20950 22767 20428

ELEC 151 ELEC 211

25.00 25.00

20828 20951

Engineering

ENGR 103 ENGR 103 ENGR 205

60.00 60.00 60.00

Energy

ENGY 111 ENGY 210 ENGY 233 ENGY 235 ENGY 274

0.00 15.00 0.00 0.00 15.00

80.00 80.00 80.00 15.00 15.00 15.00

Huycke, S Huycke, S

OE/DE

Flowers, K

OE/DE

OE/DE

D. C. ELECTRICITY 5.0 4.0 TR A. C. ELECTRICITY 4.0 3.0 M A. C. ELECTRICITY 4.0 3.0 MW SEMICONDUCTORS 5.0 4.0 Above course is OE/DE. See instructor for class times. TRANSFORMERS, MOTORS, CONTROLS 5.0 4.0 W SOLDERING 1.0 1.0 Contact instructor at karsten@lakemichigancollege.edu for more information

0900-1150 AM MT119 0500-0920 PM MT119 0900-1120 AM MT119 MT131

Karsten, S Karsten, S Karsten, S Karsten, S

0500-1020 PM MT130

Karsten, S Karsten, S

20606 22768 20607

BEG. ENGINEER.DRAWING BEG. ENGINEER.DRAWING DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY

6.0 6.0 5.0

4.0 4.0 3.0

MW MW TR

0900-1215 PM MT122 0600-0915 PM MT122 0900-1130 AM MT122

Huycke, S STAFF Huycke, S

22410 22179 22409 22631 22408

ENERGY GENERATION & DISTRIBUTI RADIATION DETECTION & PROTECTI DOSIMETRY POWER PLANT COMPONENTS ELECTRICAL & HVAC OPERATIONS

3.0 4.0 4.0 3.0 4.0

3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

T M R W R

0600-0915 PM 0600-1015 PM 0600-0915 PM 0600-0915 PM 0600-0915 PM

MT134 MT130 MT128 MT119 MT134

Karsten, S Niffenegger, L Simpson, K Ebright, R Martin, S

2.0 2.0 3.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

M F M W W W

0600-0915 PM 1010-0130 PM 0600-1020 PM 0600-0915 PM 0500-0800 PM 0500-0800 PM

MT114 MT114 MT114 MT128 MT128 MT128

Closson, J Kreitner, K Closson, J Strunk, P Strunk, P Strunk, P

0800-1040 AM 0515-1040 PM 0515-1040 PM 0800-1040 AM

MT113 MT113 MT113 MT113 MT113

Kreitner, K Vales, D Vales, D Kreitner, K Kreitner, K

0600-0915 PM 1050-1220 PM 0530-0840 PM 1050-1220 PM

MT113 MT113 MT113 MT113

Vales, D Kreitner, K Vales, D Kreitner, K

Industrial Maintenance Technology

INMT 109 INMT 109 INMT 110 INMT 204 INMT 205 INMT 206

INSTRUCTOR(S)

20823 21049 20824 20491 21043 20494

INTRO TO WELDING INTRO TO WELDING MIG/TIG WELDING BAS.HYDRAUL.& PNEUMATIC HYDRAUL/PNEUMATIC MAIN. HYDRAUL/PNEUMA.CIRCUT.

3.0 3.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 3.0

Machine Tool Technology

MACH 110 MACH 110 MACH 120 MACH 120 MACH 130

75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 0.00

20457 21073 20460 20462 20741

MACH 140 MACH 140 MACH 241 MACH 241

20.00 20.00 20.00 20.00

20467 20469 20475 22243

MANU 122

40.00

20891

MACHINE TOOL I 5.0 3.0 TR MACHINE TOOL I 5.0 3.0 T MACHINE TOOL II 5.0 3.0 T MACHINE TOOL II 5.0 3.0 TR PRECISION INSPECTION 4.0 3.0 Please contact instructor at kkreitner@lakemichigancollege.edu for more information. INTRO TO NC-CNC 3.0 2.0 R INTRO TO NC-CNC 3.0 2.0 TR CNC PROGRAMMING I 3.0 2.0 W CNC PROGRAMMING I 3.0 2.0 TR

Manufacturing Technology

INTRO/ROBOTICS 1.0 1.0 Please contact at flowers@lakemichigancollege.edu for information.

Flowers, K

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

55

M-TECSM AT LAKE MICHIGAN COLLEGE SPRING 2012

SUBJ

M-TECSM AT LAKE MICHIGAN COLLEGE SPRING 2012

M-TECSM SPRING 2012 SUBJ

FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

20230 20940

APPLIED MATHEMATICS TECHNICAL MATH

4.0 4.0

4.0 4.0

R M

0600-1020 PM MT114 0600-1020 PM MT133

Strain, R Waheed, M

20609

TECHNICAL PHYSICS

5.0

4.0

W

0600-1020 PM MT134

Hanchey, J

Mathematics

MATH 100 MATH 110

0.00 0.00

Physics PHYS 110

0.00

Trade Related/Apprentice TRIN 138

0.00

22415

TRIN 145

0.00

Welding

WELD 201 WELD 202 WELD 203 WELD 204 WELD 205

Icon Key:

56

120.00 120.00 120.00 80.00 80.00

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

1.0

1.0

T

0600-0810 PM MT128

Closson, A

22769

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY Course meets 8 weeks 1/11 -3/2 GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING & POSITI

2.0

2.0

W

0600-0810 PM MT114

Kreitner, K

22674 22675 22676 22677 22678

GMAW WELDING II GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING GAS METAL ARC WELDING PROD SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING PROD

3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 2.0

2.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 1.0

M T W R R

0800-1115 AM 0800-1115 AM 0800-1115 AM 0800-1010 AM 1020-1230 PM

Closson, J Closson, J Closson, J Closson, J Closson, J

– Internet Course

– Live Interactive

OE – Open Entry/Open Exit OE/DE – Open Entry/Defined Exit

MT114 MT114 MT114 MT114 MT114

– Telecourse

– Hybrid Course

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

OFF CAMPUS SPRING 2012 FEE

CRN

TITLE

CONTACT HRS.

CREDITS

DAYS

TIME

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR(S)

2.0 2.0

F F

0830-1040 AM TBA 1210-0220 PM TBA

STAFF STAFF

ALLEGAN TECH CENTER College Life Studies CLS 216 CLS 216

0.00 0.00

22791 22792

HEALTH ISSUES/STRESS MANAGEMENT 2.0 HEALTH ISSUES/STRESS MANAGEMENT 2.0

Electronics Technology ELEC 100

0.00

English

ENGL 102 ENGL 102

0.00 0.00

Engineering ENGR 103

60.00

22593

D. C. ELECTRICITY

5.0

4.0

MTWRF

1200-0215 PM TBA

Karns, R

21346 20250

ENGLISH COMPOSITION ENGLISH COMPOSITION

3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

MW MW

0815-0945 AM TBA 1210-0140 PM TBA

Dick, L Dick, L

22234

BEG. ENGINEER.DRAWING

4.0

4.0

MW

0400-0710 PM TBA

Cain, W

MACHINE TOOL I

5.0

3.0

TR

0400-0640 PM TBA

Sarver, J

22648 20100

NATIONAL GOVERNMENT NATIONAL GOVERNMENT

3.0 3.0

3.0 3.0

TR TR

0830-1000 AM TBA 1210-0140 PM TBA

Schada, S STAFF

22784 22785 22786

GMAW I SMAW I GAS TUNSTEN WELDING

3.0 3.0 3.0

2.0 2.0 2.0

M M M

0400-0710 PM TBA 0400-0710 PM TBA 0400-0710 PM TBA

Currie, R Currie, R Currie, R

6.0 2.0 6.0 4.0 4.0 5.0

4.0 2.0 6.0 3.0 3.0 5.0

MW MW MW MW MW MW

0600-0900 PM 0600-0900 PM 0600-0900 PM 0600-0900 PM 0600-0900 PM 0600-0900 PM

Uribe, J/Griffore, S Uribe, J/Griffore, S Uribe, J/Griffore, S Uribe, J/Griffore, S Uribe, J/Griffore, S Uribe, J/Griffore, S

3.0

3.0

MW

1220-0150 PM TBA

Machine Tool Technology MACH 110

75.00

22640

Political Science

POSC 101 POSC 101

0.00 0.00

Welding

WELD 102 WELD 103 WELD 202

30.00 30.00 120.00

HOLLAND CAREER LINE TECH CENTER Dental Assisting

DENT 171 DENT 172 DENT 173 DENT 174 DENT 175 DENT 176

27.00 0.00 27.00 20.00 20.00 27.00

21292 21293 21294 21295 21296 21297

INTRO TO DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY MEDICAL ISSUES IN DENTAL OFF. CLINICAL I RDA I RDA II CLINICAL II

TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

VAN BUREN TECHNICAL CENTER Psychology PSYC 201

0.00

21345

INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY

Polaskey, J

List of Abbreviations M–Monday, T–Tuesday, W–Wednesday, R–Thursday, F–Friday, S–Saturday, U–Sunday; TBA–To Be Arranged, Shaded Areas–Evening Classes All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

57

OFF CAMPUS SPRING 2012

SUBJ

Spring 2012 Course Descriptions This section contains a description of courses offered during the Spring 2012 semester at Lake Michigan College. In using this course list, the student should note the following: The three-digit number appearing after the department name is the identifying code for the department. The three-digit numbers preceding the course titles identify individual course offerings within a department of study. In general, a first digit “1” indicates a first-year subject, a “2” a second-year subject. FALL, SPRING, SUMMER, after title indicate when the course will normally be offered. The numbers on the right immediately following the course title indicate semester hours credit, class contact hours per week and laboratory hours per week. For example, the code 4(3-2) on Physical Science 101 indicates that this subject carries 4 semester hours credit, 3 hours weekly for class activities and 2 hours weekly for laboratory. Refer to Schedule for specific FEE amounts. Prerequisites Some courses call for certain prerequisite skills by the student. Prerequisites may be other classes in the same subject area but on introductory levels, or basic skills such as English, mathematics, or reading. Basic skill prerequisites are identified as: E = English; M = Math; and R = Reading These prerequisites require students to demonstrate basic skill capabilities by meeting cutoff scores on the skills assessment or successfully completing developmental course work.

ART

101 ART APPRECIATION I, FALL

3(3-0)

Introduction to appreciation of visual arts. Study of artistic styles that explains ideas about visual art and architecture through discussion and field trips. Open to all students.

102 ART APPRECIATION II, SPRING

3(3-0)

Explores visual arts through studio projects, slides, lectures and discussion. Work in basic elements of design and form organization through various two-dimensional and three-dimensional media. Open to all students.

105 WATERCOLOR I, SPRING

2(0-4)

Survey of painting techniques and issues of compositional problem solving through emphasis on elements of design--line, value, texture, color, form and space. Open to all students. Recommended Prerequisites: ART 102, ART 103 and/or ART 112 or equivalents

106 WATERCOLOR II, SPRING

2(0-4)

Advanced study in watercolor through investigation of elements of design for personal expression. Open to all students. Prerequisite: ART 105

107 BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(2-4)

Focus on direct experience in materials, techniques, processes and ideas fundamental to black-and-white photography. Working knowledge of camera, light metering, flash, black-and-white films, film development, darkroom chemistry, photographic papers, printing techniques and mounting prints. Discussion of historical background and current developments. Open to all students.

108 INTERMEDIATE PHOTOGRAPHY, FALL, SPRING FEE, 3(2-4)

Explores materials, techniques, processes and ideas of advanced and experimental black-and-white photography. Working knowledge of Kodalith high-contrast orthochromatic film used for production of silver experimental processes, infrared film, photo-silkscreen, advanced studio lighting techniques and composition. Open to all students. Prerequisite: ART 107

58

110 BASIC DESIGN (3-D), SPRING

3(0-6)

111 ART EDUCATION, SPRING

3(2-2)

115 PAINTING I, SPRING

3(0-6)

116 PAINTING II, SPRING

3(0-6)

Focus on visual fundamentals of three-dimensional design and study of form as means of expression. Open to all students. Required for Art majors.

Explores wide range of visual experiences. Emphasis on understanding child growth and development against background of various painted, drawn and sculptured images. For students interested in teaching. Prerequisites: E, R

Fundamentals of form and their relationships in painting. Range of subject matter includes portrait and figure studies. Open to all students. Further study in structural concerns of painting. Emphasis on discipline and integration of personal expression through principles of form, organization, movement, repetition, proportion, balance, etc. Open to all students. Prerequisite: ART 115

120 CERAMICS I, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(0-6)

121 CERAMICS II, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(0-6)

Focus on materials, tools, and special equipment used in working with clay. Investigation of firing procedures, preparation of clay and glazes, and fundamentals of throwing pottery on wheel. Open to all students.

Advanced course in study of clay. Hand-building and/or wheel-throwing problems according to individual interests. Experiments in glazing. Open to all students. Prerequisite: ART 120

122 DRAWING I, FALL, SPRING

3(0-6)

123 DRAWING II, FALL, SPRING

3(0-6)

201 HISTORY OF ART II, FALL (EVEN YEARS)

3(3-0)

203 20th CENTURY ART HISTORY: 1900-1945 SPRING, EVEN YEARS

3(3-0)

251 STUDIO PROBLEMS: PAINTING, SPRING

3(0-6)

Explores the fundamentals of drawing. Investigation of the elements of design and other ideas underlining a successful drawing. Includes drawing portraits. Open to all students. Required for Art majors.

Continued study in drawing. Emphasis on development of personal expression through use of line and value. Open to all students. Required for Art majors. Prerequisite: ART 122 Lecture course that discusses a historical survey of architecture, sculpture and painting from Renaissance to Twentieth Century. Focus on important aspects of Baroque, Neo-classical and Romantic art culminating in Modern Movement. Open to all students. Prerequisites: E, R

Art from 1900 to 1945 will be discussed in terms of its origins, trends, and the contributions of culture and technology. Major developments to be covered include Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Dadaism, Surrealism, and Abstract Expressionism. Photography and Architecture will be discussed, too. Open to all students. Prerequisite: None.

Advanced study in acrylic and/or oil painting, emphasis on development of technical skills according to individual student interest. Prerequisites: ART 115, ART 116

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

252 STUDIO PROBLEMS: CERAMICS, FALL, SPRING FEE, 3(0-6) Advanced study in ceramics with more individualized directions. Handbuilding and wheel-thrown objects as well as experiments with glaze compounds. Prerequisites: ART 120, ART 121

254 STUDIO PROBLEMS: WATERCOLOR, SPRING

2 (0-4)

260 STUDIO PROBLEMS: DRAWING, FALL, SPRING

3(0-6)

Advanced study in watercolor to explore color and form according to individual interests. Prerequisites: ART 105, ART 106 Advanced course in drawing. Exploration of different directions of expression through personal experimentation. Prerequisites: ART 122, ART 123

BIOLOGY

101 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 4(3-2)

Introduction to basic principles and concepts of biology as well as related laboratory experiences. Areas of emphasis include ecology, evolution, unity and diversity of life, molecular biology, genetics, cell biology, biotechnology and behavior. NOTE: Students with two (2) or more years of high school biology are recommended to take BIOL 111, BIOL 112, or BIOL 204. Prerequisites: E, R, M

108 BASIC HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY FALL, SPRING

FEE, 4(3-2)

A lecture and laboratory course covering the structure and function of cells, organs and systems within the human body. Online and classroom lectures are used to present core content. Hands-on laboratories, including student-led instruction, are designed to help students understand and apply selected principles of cell biology, anatomy and physiology. Case studies are designed to help make connections between knowledge of anatomy & physiology and realworld situations. Testing outside scheduled class time required. Prerequisites: E, M, R

112 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II, SPRING

FEE, 4(3-3)

Emphasizes diversity of organisms, animal and plant structure, animal behavior, and ecology. For Biology majors and minors, or those students planning to transfer to pre-professional programs requiring Biology. Includes a three-hour laboratory experience per week. Students with two years of high school biology, or one year of high school biology and one year of chemistry will serve as BIOL 101 prerequisite. Prerequisites: E, M, R, BIOL 101

205 HUMAN ANATOMY, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

4(3-2)

A lecture and laboratory course in which the human body is studied at the histological and gross levels of structure. Online and classroom lectures in conjunction with hands-on laboratories are used to present core content. Case studies are designed to help students apply their knowledge of human anatomy to real-world situations. Testing outside scheduled class time is required. Two years of high school biology within the last 5 years may substitute for the biology prerequisite. Prerequisites: E, R, BIOL 101or BIOL108

206 PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

4(3-3)

A lecture and laboratory course covering the basic principles and concepts of human physiology. Online and classroom lectures are used to present core content. Computer simulations and hands-on laboratories are integrated with discussions and provide oppportunity to apply basic physiological principles. Case studies are designed to help students make connections between knowledge of physiology and realworld situations. Testing outside scheduled class time required. Prerequisites: E, M, R, BIOL 205, CHEM 101 or CHEM 104 or equivalent.

210 MICROBIOLOGY, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 4(3-3)

212 GENETICS, SPRING

FEE, 4(3-3)

This is a basic microbiology course that introduces students to the principles of microbiology with an additional emphasis on health career applications. Instructor and student-led discussion sessions present the principles of microbiological morphology, physiology, reproduction and pathology, with special attention given to human disease. Laboratory exercises are integrated with discussion sessions and develop standard microbiology lab skills in the identification, culture, control and assay of microorganisms. Prerequisites: E, M, R, BIOL 101 or BIOL 111, CHEM 101 or CHEM 104 or CHEM 111 all with a grade of C or better.

This discussion based course (both instructor and student-led) includes the following sections: Mendelian genetics, DNA and chromosomes; gene transmission; linkage and recombination; genes and enzymes; the genetic code; mutations and variations; recombinant DNA; introduction to genomics; gene regulation; developmental, population, quantitative, and evolutionary genetics. Lab experiences include statistical anaylsis, molecular techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis, RNA interference in Caenorhabditis elegans, and various computer exercises in bioinformatics. Prerequisites: E, M, R, BIOL 101 or equivalent.

270 LIFE SCIENCE FOR THE ELEMENTARY TEACHER II SPRING 3(2-3)

The second of a two course laboratory based biology sequence designed for prospective elementary school science teachers. This course is intended to acquaint the student with the important concepts of biology and why it is important for children to learn biology and how to help them become independent and creative investigators of nature. This course will explore the practice of science rather than a body of revealed knowledge to be memorized. Prerequisites: E, R, M

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

100 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

101 BUSINESS ACCOUNTING I, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Fundamentals of addition, subtraction, division and multiplication with whole numbers, common fractions, percentage and their application in business transactions. Prerequisites: M, R

Accounting course for secretaries, small-business accountants and owners, and those interested in double-entry accounting system. Work includes development of basic principles underlying accounting procedures and discussion of techniques and records used in analyzing, classifying, recording, summarizing and reporting business transactions. Laboratory materials, a practice set and use of computers incorporated. Prerequisites: M, R

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

59

103 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

105 PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING, ON DEMAND

3(3-0)

Survey, orientation and background course acquaints students with role of business enterprise. Deals with various areas of business and designed to help students decide field of specialization. Prerequisite: R Overview of field of retailing. Covers types of institutions, store location, fixtures and equipment, store organization, and retail sales. Prerequisites: E, M, R

115 PRINCIPLES OF CUSTOMER SERVICE ON DEMAND

3(3-0)

Applies basic business knowledge and skills to develop customerfocused strategies necessary to maintain competitive edge in business world. Emphasizes fundamentals, skill-building and practical ideas to keep satisfied customers. Prerequisite: BUSA 103

150 JOB SEARCH SEMINAR, SPRING

1(1-0)

Introduction to techniques of locating and obtaining employment. Includes practice-letter and resume-writing skills and discussion of interviewing skills. Utilizes library and outside resources.

201 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I FALL, SPRING

4(4-1)

Basic theoretical framework of accounting presented to enable students to understand accounting principles and concepts as developed for sole proprietorship and partnership. Integration of microcomputers enables students to experience computers in accounting. Prerequisites: E, M, R

202 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

4(4-1)

Continuation of BUSA 201. Emphasis on corporation's management controls and use of accounting data. Integration of microcomputers enables students to use computer accounting programs to generate financial statements and learn to interpret these statements as basis for business decisions. Prerequisites: E, M, R, BUSA 201 in previous 3 years with C or better

203 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (Macro) FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

Emphasizes general principles of macroeconomics. Topics include supply and demand, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, business cycles, money, taxes, government spending, gross national product, price indexes, technology, wages, fiscal and monetary policy, interest rates, deficit and national debt, and international trade. Prerequisites: E, M, R

204 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS (Micro) FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

Emphasizes general principles of microeconomics. Topics include supply and demand, consumer behavior, cost theory, market structures, pricing factors of production, unions, poverty, government regulation and international trade. Prerequisites: E, M, R

205 BUSINESS LAW I, FALL, SPRING

Promotes understanding of laws covering business transactions encountered in everyday life and small businesses. Areas covered include simple contracts and negotiable instruments. Prerequisites: E, R

60

3(3-0)

207 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT, FALL

3(3-0)

For small business managers and entrepreneurs. Analytical approach embodies sound basic principles of good management. Business functions of sales, production, procurement, personnel, finances and managerial functions of planning, organizing, actuating and controlling. Actual case problems related to small business management. Prerequisites: E, R

208 ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION, SPRING 3(3-0) Analysis of principles and practices of advertising and promoting merchandise. Study of organization and sales practices within industry and business. Prerequisites: E, M, R

209 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

210 BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

211 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

212 ACCOUNTING APPLICATIONS ON COMPUTERS SPRING, ODD YEARS

3(2-2)

213 COST ACCOUNTING I, SPRING

3(3-0)

216 BUSINESS STATISTICS, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

219 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II, SPRING

3(3-0)

Analysis of the marketing task, various essential functions performed in marketing and numerous and varied types of institutions performing role of marketing. Prerequisites: E, M, R

Principles of business letter writing. Provides understanding of components of written communications that influence people toward desired results: clear thinking, effective application of psychology and correct use of language. Prerequisite: E, R

Principles of management and organization in modern business and industry. Deals with standards, methods and problems in management. Prerequisites: E, M, R

Computer applications for accounting including general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, depreciation and payroll and spreadsheet accounting using Lotus 1-2-3. Prerequisites: E, M, R, CIS 108, BUSA 201 or BUSA 101, BUSA 202 or BUSA 102 (BUSA 202 or BUSA 102 may be taken concurrently with this class)

Fundamentals of cost accounting procedures including job cost principles and practices. Basic course in manufacturing accounting and problem solving. Prerequisites: E, M, R, BUSA 201, BUSA 202 in previous 3 years with C or better Statistical decision-making surveyed. Topics include sampling techniques, tabular and graphical data, measures of central tendency and variability, simple probability, probability distributions (binomial, normal, t, chi-square and F), Central Limit Theorem, correlation and regression, estimation, hypothesis testing and analysis of variance. Prerequisites: E, R, MATH 128 with C or better or equivalent

Stockholder's equity, treasury stock, long-term liabilities, income tax allocation, investments, statement of cash flow, analysis of financial statements, price level changes, pension fund provisions and leases. Prerequisites: E, M, R, BUSA 201,BUSA 202, BUSA 218 in previous 3 years with C or better

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

220 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 3(3-0) This course provides an examination of individual, interpersonal, group, and organization processes faced by employees. Current theory, research, and practive regarding variables that influence human behavior are discussed. Emphasis is placed on learning relevant to goal setting, managing change, team processes, reward structures, human productivity, and career management in organization settings. Prerequisites: E, M, R

261 DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION CO-OP I FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-15)

Classroom and supervised on-the-job training in approved jobs obtained in retailing, wholesaling, marketing, or service outlets. Includes classroom lectures, research and work experience in related business organization. Requires minimum 15 hours of work per week. Application must be placed with coordinator to participate in class. Prerequisites: E, M, R, advanced standing for marketing and retailing majors, 2.00 GPA or higher in all previous college work, approval of Co-op Coordinator and signature of marketing program advisor.

262 DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION CO-OP II SPRING

FEE, 3(1-15)

For those students who successfully complete BUSA 261. Requires minimum 15 hours of work per week. Application must be placed with coordinator to participate in class. Prerequisites: E, M, R, BUSA 261 or equivalent

263 MANAGEMENT TRAINEE CO-OP I, FALL, SPRING FEE, 3(1-15)

Classroom and cooperative training includes supervised, on-the-job managerial experience in business and industry. Requires minimum 15 hours of work per week. Application must be placed with coordinator to participate in class. Prerequisites: E, M, R, advanced standing in management trainee program,

264 MANAGEMENT TRAINEE CO-OP II, SPRING FEE, 3(1-15) For students who successfully complete BUSA 263. Requires minimum 15 hours of work per week. Application must be placed with coordinator to participate in class. Prerequisites: E, M, R, BUSA 263 or equivalent, approval of Co-op Coordinator and signature of management program advisor.

265 ACCOUNTING CO-OP I, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-15)

Students work in approved accounting position to gain on-the-job training. Requires minimum 15 hours of work per week. Each student meets one hour per week with advisor in related class. Prerequisites: E, M, R, completion of all first year courses in Accounting program with minimum GPA of 2.00, approval of Co-op coordinator and signatures of Accounting program advisor and one other full-time business administration instructor

266 ACCOUNTING CO-OP II, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-15)

For students who successfully complete BUSA 265. Requires minimum 15 hours of work per week. Application must be placed with coordinator to participate in class. Prerequisites: E, M, R, BUSA 265, approval of Co-op Coordinator and signatures of Accounting program coordinator and one other full-time business administration instructor

CHEMISTRY

101 INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY I FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 4(3-3)

For students with little or no background in chemistry. Concepts of energy and matter, properties of gases, liquids and solids, structure of atoms, periodic table, chemical bonds, formulas and equations, stoichiometry and solutions. Laboratory includes introduction to qualitative analysis. Credits apply toward Associate Degree. May transfer for science credit but usually not as General Chemistry (depends on specific school and program). Prerequisites: E, M, R, one year of high school algebra, with C or better

104 FUNDAMENTALS OF GENERAL, ORGANIC AND BIOCHEMISTRY, FALL, SPRING FEE, 4(3-3)

Intense introductory course that integrates topics from general, organic and biochemistry and is geared toward Allied Health students. Measurements, conversions, atomic structure, bonding, states of matter, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, acid/base chemistry, nuclear chemistry, functional groups, organic/biochem structures, isomers, nomenclature, enzymatic activity, and basic biochemical/metabolism reactions are all topics covered. Includes integrated laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: E, M, R, MATH 095 or pass algebra proficiency test

112 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II, SPRING

FEE, 4(3-3)

204 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II, SPRING

FEE, 4(3-3)

Continuation of CHEM 111 with emphasis upon ionic equilibria. Laboratory exercises involve solubility product, potentiometric titration and methods of quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: E, M, R, CHEM 111 Continuation of CHEM 203. Includes additional functional groups and mechanisms plus introduction to biochemistry. Laboratory includes qualitative analysis and use of infrared spectrometer, gas chromatograph, polarimeter, refractometer. Prerequisites: E, M, R, CHEM 203

COLLEGE LIFE STUDIES

100 COLLEGE & CAREER SUCCESS FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

1(1-0)

110 CAREER DECISION MAKING, FALL, SPRING

2(2-0)

Designed to increase student success by offering a comprehensive orientation to the Lake Michigan College experience. Students will be introduced to college web-based resources and services including Wavelink and Blackboard, technology-based program planning and transfer information, and library research databases. Additional topics include career/major decision-making, understanding college expectations, time management, effective study and learning strategies, and living and working in a diverse global society. Pre-requisites: none Realistic career decision making and planning important to any stage of life. Students learn career paths most appropriate now and in future. Students examine resources, values and abilities through testing and computerized search processes. Students identify three to five career opportunities appropriate to aptitude and skills. Not intended for transfer.

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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216 STRESS MANAGEMENT, FALL, SPRING

2(2-0)

This course assists the student in understanding the physiological responses to stress and assist in developing techniques for better stress management.

217 HEALTH ISSUES: SELF-ESTEEM

1(1-0)

Assists in growth in ability to love and care for oneself and others. Techniques practiced daily to enhance self-esteem and variety of self-esteem issues presented.

COMMUNICATION

101 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC SPEAKING FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Beginning course in public speaking dealing with application of basic principles and practices of effective speaking. Coursework includes oral presentations and practical applications of speech communication theory. Prerequisites: E, R

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS -CIS

100 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER LITERACY, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

Introductory course for non-dataprocessing majors. Addresses following topics: history of computing, computer hardware, computer software, computers in business and society, and ethical issues. Students get hands-on use of software packages. Gain familiarity with programming function by coding and executing simple BASIC language programs. Prerequisites: E, M, R

102 BASIC COMPUTER LITERACY, FALL, SPRING

1(1-0)

Addresses the following topics: history of computing, computer hardware, computer software, computers in business and society, and ethical issues in addition to basic computer operation and introduction to application packages. Minimal typing skills.

106 INTRODUCTION TO OPERATING SYSTEMS FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

Build a foundation of knowledge about Graphical User Interface that prepares for skilled use of operating systems. Topics include command line prompts, GUI fundamentals, modifying the desktop, file/document/ folder management, customizing the desktop, communications, working with multimedia and maintaining the computer system. Prerequisite: E, M, R

108 COMPUTER OPERATIONS - MICROCOMPUTING FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

117 INTRODUCTION TO GAME DESIGN THEORY FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Provides experience in operating systems, word processing, electronic spreadsheet, database and graphic presentation software. Emphasis placed on practical use of application software. No prior computing knowledge required. Not designed for transfer. Prerequisites: E, M, R, Minimum typing skills

This survey course is an interdisciplinary Core Topic that combines approaches from history, literature, media studies and design. The goal is to develop and refine a critical vocabulary for articulating the aesthetics of games. Games Studies offers insight into the textual analysis of game play, while established work on other media, such as literature, film, television, theater, and interactive arts provides a rich critical framework. Prerequisites: R, or instructor permission

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118 WEB APPLICATION DESIGN, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Basic web page design will be covered. Developing and maintaining Internet and Intranet applications by introducing various aspects of the Web design process. Storyboarding, content management, design elements, navigational design, link management, database connectivity, scripting tools, search engines and indexing. Prerequisites: E,M,R, CIS 108 (or equivalent)

121 WINDOWS SKILLS FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 1(0-1)

122 WORDPROCESSING SKILLS FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 1(0-1)

123 SPREADSHEET SKILLS FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 1(0-1)

124 DATABASE SKILLS FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 1(0-1)

125 GRAPHIC PRESENTATION SKILLS FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 1(0-1)

Fundamentals of Graphic User Interface and proper ways to solve GUI problems. Practical applications illustrate many new capabilities of graphical user/World Wide Web environment. Introductory course covering essential aspects of Graphic User Interface.

Fundamentals of document construction and proper ways to solve document problems. Practical problems illustrate wordprocessing applications and capabilities of wordprocessing in graphical user/ World Wide Web environment. Introductory course, covering essential aspects of wordprocessing.

Fundamentals of worksheet construction and proper ways to solve worksheet problems. Practical problems illustrate worksheet applications and capabilities of worksheets in graphical user environment. Introductory course, covering essential aspects of worksheets.

Fundamentals of database construction and proper ways to solve database problems. Practical problems illustrate database applications and capabilities of database in graphical user environment. Introductory course, covering essential aspects of databases.

Fundamentals of presentation construction (projection devices, transparencies and 35mm slides) and proper ways to solve presentation problems. Practical problems illustrate presentation applications and capabilities of presentation graphics in graphical user environment. Introductory course, covering essential aspects of presentation graphics.

140 COMPUTER NETWORKING FUNDAMENTALS FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(2-2)

This covers basic computer networking terminology, topologies, systems, protocols, devices and management. The ISO standards are covered. Emphasis is placed on peer-to-peer networking, media and cable installation standards, IP addressing including subnet masks and encapsulation. Students will create and secure a peer-to-peer networks containing both Windows 98, Windows 2000 and Windows XP computers and can differentiate between OS/NIC and network problems and overcome the OS problems. Students will create Windows XP networks, secure the network and create base line data. Prerequisites: E,M,R, CIS 100 or CIS 106 or CIS 108.

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

155 COMPARATIVE OPERATING SYSTEMS FALL, SPRING

3(2-2)

This course is designed for those students wishing to develop an understanding of current operation systems, their differences and similarities, user interfaces and application considerations. Given a PC install windows 2000, windows XP, Vista or Linux and access and change BIOS, configure users, and automatic back ups (data and system information/settings), demonstrate recovery from crashes, use the command line (shell), maximize the security of the PC, use system and administrative tools. This course is not intended for transfer. Prerequisites: E,M,R, CIS100 or 106 or 108 or instructor approval.

156 PRACTICAL COMPUTER SECURITY FALL, SPRING

3(2-2)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive overview of computer and network security issues including the numerous types of attacks computers are vulnerable to, the types of attacker profiles, and the hardware and software defense solutions available. Covers topics from configuring personal virus detection and firewalls to VPNs, Firewalls and Access Control lists. it is a practical course where students will gain an appreciation and better understanding of the terms and devices employed in securing networks and home computers rather than developing employable skills. Prerequisites: E,M,R, CIS100 or CIS106 or CIS108

200 PC HARDWARE, FALL, SPRING

3(2-2)

201 Cisco - HEALTH INFORMATION NETWORKING, SPRING

3(2-2)

Personal computer system operation, maintenance and repair. Includes keyboard, monitors, chassis and power supply, logic board, processors, drives and printers. Students use diagnostic software and hardware, specify and assemble computer systems. Prepares fore the A+ Certification Examination. Prerequisites: E,M,R, CIS 100 or CIS 106 or CIS108

This course is the Cisco Academy Health Information networking course. Topics include: Basic information on healthcare settings, principles of security and privacy in healthcare, fundamentals of Information Technology in healthcare, fundamentals of electronic health records systems, basic information on medical practice workflows and how to adjust workflows for electronic medical record implementations, designing a network to support a medical group, securing a network for a medical group, and troubleshooting a network for medical group. Prerequisite: CIS228 with a C or better.

208 ADVANCED MICRO APPLICATIONS, SPRING

3(3-0)

Advanced experience in office productivity software. Topics include word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation graphics, and topics of current interest. Emphasis on practical use of application software in business environment. Not intended for transfer. Prerequisites: E, M, R, CIS 108 (or equivalent)

222 ADVANCED WORD PROCESSING SKILLS FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 1(0-1)

Advanced principles of document construction and proper ways to solve document problems. Practical problems illustrate word processing applications and capabilities in a graphical user/World Wide Web environment. Prerequisite(s): CIS 108 or CIS 122, (or equivalent)

223 ADVANCED WORKSHEET SKILLS, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 1(0-1)

224 ADVANCED DATABASE SKILLS, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 1(0-1)

225 ADVANCED PRESENTATION SKILLS, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 1(0-1)

Advanced principles of worksheet construction and proper ways to solve worksheet problems. Practical problems illustrate worksheet applications and capabilities in a graphical user/World Wide Web environment. Prerequisite(s): CIS 108 or CIS 123, (or equivalent)

Advanced principles of database construction and proper ways to solve database problems. Practical problems illustrate database applications and capabilities in a graphical user/World Wide Web environment. Prerequisite(s): CIS 108 or CIS 124 (or equivalent)

Advanced principles of presentation construction and proper ways to solve presentation problems. Practical problems illustrate presentation applications and capabilities in a graphical user/World Wide Web environment. Prerequisite(s): CIS 108 or CIS 125 (or equivalent)

226 CISCO ICND 1 REVIEW, SPRING

3(2-2)

227 CISCO ICND2/CCNA REVIEW, SPRING

3(2-2)

251 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING - BASIC FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

This course covers the topics of the Cisco ICND 1 exam. This course covers LAN technologies and operation, WAN devices, explaining and selecting appropriate administrative tasks required for WLANs, identifying security threats and methods to mitigate them, implementing small routed networks, small switched networks, implement and verify WAN links, Implement an IP addressing scheme and IP services to met network requirements for a small branch office, subnetting, routed and routing protocols, components of and boot sequence of a Cisco router. Students will configure routers and routing protocols and switches. Prerequisites: E,M,R, CIS140, Cis 150, or Cisco Academy CCNA 1, or instructor permission. This course generally covers LAN technologies, WAN protocols, VLSM, bridging, switching, routed and routing protocols. Students will configure routers and switches including VLANs with trunking & ACLs as required by the certification exams (see cisco.com - certifications for specific topics). Prerequisites: E,M,R, CIS226 or Cisco Academy CCNA1, 2 & CCNA 3, or instructor permission.

Designed for students with little programming experience beyond Computer Literacy. Problem solving, program design, coding, debugging and system commands necessary to create and execute programs in BASIC. Programming assignments given to build technical skills. Topics include language syntax, declaration and data types, variables and constants, arrays, executable instructions, statements and expressions, programming structures (i.e. sequence, selection, iteration) and modularity. Prerequisites: E, M, R, MATH 109 or CIS 100 (or equivalent)

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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254 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING - C, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Fundamentals of programming microcomputer using C language. Students obtain knowledge and practice writing programs in C. Requires substantial prior programming experience in structured highlevel language (see prerequisites) as C is programming language used as basis for Graphic User Interfaces in Windows. Prerequisites: E, M, R, CIS 145 or CIS 245 or CIS 251 or CIS 252 (or equivalent)

260 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING - VISUAL BASIC FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Introduction to Visual BASIC, used by Windows and Windows based applications to create and modify applications. Highly recommended for individuals wishing to design or modify Application Programs. Not intended for transfer. Prerequisites: E, M, R, CIS 251 (or equivalent)

261 COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS CO-OP I FALL, SPRING FEE 3(1-15)

This course integrates a student's academic studies with work experience in an approved data processing job that the student has obtained and in which the student earns credits for satisfactory data processing experience. A minimum of 15 hours per week is required. Each student meets one hour per week with the coordinator in a related class. To participate in the class, application must be placed with the coordinator. Prerequisites: advanced standing in the data processing program, a 2.00 GPA or higher in all previous college work, and approval of the co-op coordinator, the Computer Information Systems program coordinator, and one of the full-time Business Administration Faculty; E, M, R.

262 COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS CO-OP II SPRING FEE 3(1-15) This is an elective course for those students who have successfully completed 261 Computer Information Systems Co-op I. A minimum of 15 hours of work per week is required. Each student meets one hour per week with the coordinator in a related class. To participate in the class, application must ber placed with the coordinator. Prerequisites: CIS261, and approval of the Co-op coordinator; E, M, R

264 COMPUTER PROGRAMMING - “C++”

3(3-0)

This course is designed for those students desiring advanced experience in the AC=language. The fundamentals of programming the microcomputer using the “C++” language will be covered. Students obtain knowledge and practice by writing programs in “C++”. The course requires substantial prior programming experience in a structured high-level language (see prerequisites) as “C++” is one of the programming languages used as the basis for today’s Graphic User Interfaces. This course is not intended for transfer. Prerequisites: CIS254, Computer Programming - AC=, previous programming experience or permission of the instructor, E,M,R

295 PROJECT MANAGEMENT, SPRING

3(3-0)

Understand the genesis of project management and its importance to improving the success of information technology projects. Prerequisite(s) – E,M,R, CIS-108 or CIS-208 or instructor permission

CORRECTIONS, PROBATIONS, PAROLE

162 INSTITUTIONAL POPULATIONS, SPRING

3(3-0)

164 LEGAL ISSUES IN CORRECTIONS, SPRING

3(3-0)

264 CASE STUDIES IN REHABILITATION, SPRING

3(3-0)

Basic principles of human and criminal behavior and role of biological, psychological, environmental and social influences in development of normal and criminal personalities. Individual and group techniques for changing attitudes. Institutionalization and controlled community alternatives to institutionalization evaluated. NOTE: To qualify for Corrections Officer Academic Certificate, a student must achieve at least a C (2.0) in course. Prerequisites: E, R

Explores legal issues in corrections. Topics include constitutional law, law and court process, U.S. and State courts and court cases, Section 42 and prisonery rights. Cases and statutes read and analyzed for impact on corrections. Role of corrections officers in complying with law discussed. NOTE: To qualify for Corrections Officer Academic Certificate, a student must achieve at least a C (2.0) in course. Prerequisites: E, R Modern trends in corrections, such as community-based programs in work-release, halfway houses, contract program planning. Therapeutic community and treatment team concept in institutions described and evaluated. Problems of correctional programming for short-term offender, special emphasis on alcoholism, drug abuse and narcotic problems, prostitution, homeless persons and related problems. Prerequisites: E, R, Sophomore standing in Corrections, Probation & Parole

DENTAL ASSISTING

165 INTRODUCTION TO DENTAL ASSISTING FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(2-2)

Introductory course to dental assisting. Topics include dental teamwork, use of language, listening skills and personal oral hygiene. Prerequisites: E, R, acceptance into Dental Assisting Program or permission of Dental Assisting Director Transitional Studies courses can be taken concurrently.

166 CHAIRSIDE I FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 3(2-2)

167 CHAIRSIDE II FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 3(2-2)

168 CHAIRSIDE III FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 3(2-2)

Introductory course in concepts of four-handed dentistry. Basic dental equipment, instrument identification, sterilization procedures, medical record history, infection control and vital signs presented. Prerequisites: E, R, DENT 165 or permission of Dental Assisting Director

Continuation of DENT 166, Chairside I, and includes identification of handpieces, proper mixing of dental materials, precautions in use of nitrous oxide and assisting with topical and local anesthetics. Prerequisites: E, R, DENT 165, DENT 166 or permission of Dental Assisting Director

Continuation of DENT 167, Chairside II. Topics addressed include performing chairside functions, fabricating custom trays, preparing final impressions, taking bite registrations, pouring and trimming study model and utilizing various types of orthodontic appliances. Prerequisites: E, R, DENT 167 or permission of Dental Assisting Director

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Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

169 CHAIRSIDE IV, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 3(2-2)

Introduces the dental assistant's role in oral surgery, endodontics and pediatric dentistry. Prerequisites: E, R, DENT 168 or permission of Dental Assisting Director

170 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS ASSISTING FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(2-2)

Duties of dental business assistant including maintaining appointment book, controlling supply inventory, processing and mounting radiographs, completing insurance forms and preparing written communications. Prerequisites: E, R, DENT 169 or permission of Dental Assisting Director

171 INTRODUCTION TO DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 4(2-4)

Study of use of x-radiation in dentistry. Exposure techniques of dental radiography, radiation dosage and hazards. Protective measures for patient and operator are stressed. Students must be 18 years of age or older to enroll in course. Prerequisites: DENT 170 or permission of Dental Assisting Director

172 MEDICAL ISSUES IN THE DENTAL OFFICE FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

2(2-0)

Medical and dental emergencies and drugs encountered in treatment of dental patients. Prerequisites: E, R, DENT 170 or permission of Dental Assisting Director

173 CLINICAL I (OFF-CAMPUS) FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 6(1-15)

Students assigned in community dental offices for clinical experiences. Includes review for Dental Assisting National Board examination and professional activities. Weekly seminar held with college instructor. Prerequisites: E, R, DENT 169, DENT 171 and DENT 172

174 RDA I, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 3(2-2)

Advanced functions of Michigan Registered Dental Assistant including placement and removal of temporaries and rubber dams. Students study state and national guidelines in infection control, hazard communication and waste disposal. Prerequisites: E, R, successful completion and/or current enrollment in DENT 173 or permission of Dental Assisting Director

175 RDA II, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 3(2-2)

Continuation of RDA I includes advanced charting, extraoral and intraoral examination, suture removal and application of periodontal dressing, topical fluoride and pit and fissure sealants. Ethics and jurisprudence presented. Simulated RDA written and clinical board given at end of course. Prerequisites: E, R, DENT 174 or permission of Dental Assisting Director

176 CLINICAL II (OFF-CAMPUS), FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 5(1-12)

Students assigned to community dental offices for clinical experience in expanded functions. Weekly seminar held with college instructor. Prerequisites: E, R, Successful completion of all dental assisting courses.

DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY

200 GENERAL SONOGRAPHY II ABDOMEN, SPRING

3(3-0)

201 GENERAL SONOGRAPHY II OB/GYN, SPRING

3(3-0)

Intermediate to advanced identification and interpretation of anatomy and pathology of the abdomen, venous system and small parts. Emphasis will be on abnormal anatomy/pathology with hepatic and renal transplant. Prerequisites: E,M,R, DMSO100, DMSO101, DMSO102, DMSO103, DMSO103 A continuation of the DMSO 102. Intermediate to advanced identification of an interpretation of cross sectional anatomy and pathology of the female pelvis and fetal and placental development. Prerequisited: E,M,R, DMSO101, DMSO102, DMSO103, DMSO104

202 SONOGRAPHY LAB APPLICATIONS II SPRING

FEE, 2(0-4)

A continuation of DMSO103, with lab applications in general abdominal, small parts and OB/GYN sonographic cross sectional anatomy and pathology demonstrated in the transverse, longitudinal and coronal planes. Prerequisites: E,M,R, DMSO101, DMSO102, DMSO103, DMSO104

204 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE B, SPRING

3(0-24)

Second in a five-semester sequence of clinical application involving intermediate scanning techniques including trauma and critical care patients, with imaging related to abdomen, pelvic, small parts and gravid uterus. Prerequisites: E, M, R, DMSO101, DMSO102, DMSO103, DMSO104

213 SONOGRAPHIC PHYSICS II, SPRING

3(3-0)

Focus will be a review of the Doppler Effect, in addition to fluid dynamics, hemodynamics, harmonics, artifacts and developing a quality assurance program. Prerequisites: E,M,R, DMSO224

DRAFTING AND DESIGN 203 DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-4)

Comprehensive study of combinations of points, lines, planes, injections, true sizes and shapes of plane areas, tangent planes measurement of angles and development of surfaces. Prerequisites: ENGR 103

208 CAD-MECHANICAL DETAILING, SPRING

OE/DE, FEE, 3(1-4)

Detailed engineering drawings from 3-dimensional part database information. Dimensioning, layering and hatching routines learned. Students modify detailing menus and plot constructions on drum plotter. Prerequisite: DRAF 207

211 MACHINE DESIGN, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-4)

Exit level course engages student in development of mechanical devices. Students involved with engineering of machinery and designing of mechanisms, components and analysis of a project. Student projects from written proposal, designing a device to achieve solution, engineer components with team/group concepts, detail needed drawings and compose final written summary. May be offered in alternate formats. Prerequisites: ENGR 103, DRAF 102

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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DRAMA/THEATRE

110 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF ACTING I ON DEMAND

3(2-2)

111 PRINCILES AND PRACTICE OF ACTING II, ON DEMAND

3(2-2)

Principles of acting for the stage. Emphasis on performance through exercises and scene work. Movement and voice work covered. Brief study of general theatre language and terms. Prerequisites: R

Techniques and problems of state actor. Emphasis on performing scenes. Stresses character development and ensemble acting. Students develop audition pieces. Prerequisites: DRAM 110

112 STAGECRAFT, SPRING

3(2-2)

201 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE

3(3-0)

Basics of technical theatre production. Study of set design and construction, basic lighting and sound principles and scenery styles. Work required on department productions. Course may be repeated once for additional credit.

General theatre practice, dramatic types (comedy, tragedy, farce, etc.), areas of production responsibilities and theatre history. Study of various dramatic types and periods, and attendance at theatrical performances. Prerequisites: E, R

202 THEATRE PRACTICUM, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Supervised experience in one or more areas of theatre. Nature of involvement determined by student theatre contract. Students may add class within one week after casting. Course may be repeated for credit.

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 110 INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION FALL 3(3-0) This course serves as an introduction to early childhood education. During this class, settings where children age six weeks to twelve years receive care and education will be examined. Factors such as quality, licensing, and accreditation will be addressed. Also included will be ways in which social, emotional, physical, cognitive, and language development are supported in developmentally appropriate programs. Prerequisites: R

111 EARLY CHILDHOOD LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS SPRING, FALL

2(2-0)

This course explores how space and environments facilitate the implementation of goals in programs for infants, toddlers, preschoolers and school-agers (in before-and after-school programs) in a variety of settings. Within the context of environments, materials and equipment will also be explored. Opportunities to assess existing environments will be included. Prerequisite: R

113 GUIDE YOUNG CHILDREN’S SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

This course explores specific strategies and methods that guide children’s social development and their behavior. The ultimate goal is to promote growth in internal self-control. Students will learn techniques for listening and talking to children, guiding children’s problem solving and choices, and disciplining for inappropriate behavior. Weekly field experiences with children will provide opportunities to use the strategies that are presented. This course is not applicable toward elementary education certification. Prerequisites: E, R

66

210 CURRICULUM PLANNING FOR YOUNG CHILDREN II, FALL

3(3,0)

211 DIVERSITY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, FALL

3(3-0)

212 ADMINISTRATION OF EARLY CHILD PROGRAMS

3(3-0)

213 CURRENT ISSUES IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

3(3-0)

This course is a continuation of Curriculum Planning for Young Children I. Students will learn how to plan and implement curriculum that supports creative, social, emotional, and physical development. The role of play in a child’s development will be explored. Students will also gain knowledge of methods for documenting children’s growth for use in planning and informing parents of their child’s progress. This course is not applicable toward elementary education certification. Prerequisites: E,R

This course introduces students to anti-bias curriculum and setting up an anti-bias clasroom environment. Discrimination issues in all areas, including ethnicity, religion, gender, economic class, age, ability, and sexual preference will be addressed. The student will examine their own attitudes and stereotypes and learn how to create an environment where differences are appreciated and valued and confident self identities developed. Opportunities will be given to learn about equipment, materials and curriculum that will support such an environment. This course will also look at ways to help children stand for oneself and take action in unjust situations. This course is not applicable toward elementary education certification. Prerequisites: E,R This course addresses the administrative responsibilities of operating an early childhood program. Topics that are addressed include developing a program philosophy and budget, choosing a site and designing the environment, hiring and supervising staff, planning curriculum, and involving parents. Students will interact with a program administrator to better understand that role and work in groups to design a model program. This course is not applicable toward elementary education certification. Prerequisites: E, R This course explores current issues in the field of early childhood and assists students in forming research-based responses to these issues. Current topics that will be addressed include gender issues, media and technology, child abuse and neglect, working with a diverse population of families, quality in childcare, kindergarten readiness, and recent brain research. Students will also learn strategies for advocating on critical issues that affect young children and their families. This course is not applicable toward elementary education certification. Prerequisites: E, R

ELECTRONICS

100 DC ELECTRICITY, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 4(3-2)

106 AC ELECTRICITY, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(2-2)

Fundamentals of Direct Current (DC) electricity. Concepts include voltage, current, resistance, power, Ohm’s Law, electromagnetism and identification, operation and characteristics of passive components. Circuit analysis introduced using Ohm’s and Kirchoff’s Voltage and Current Laws involving series, parallel and compound circuits. Circuit construction from schematics and use of basic test equipment in lab. Prerequisites: M, R Beginning course in AC electricity. Topics include average, effective, peak, period and frequency of sine wave. Reactance, impedance and phase relationship of current and voltage in R-C, R-L and RLC circuits. Resonance, time constants and complex numbers covered. Use of oscilloscope and meters in lab. Prerequisite: ELEC 100

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

111 SEMICONDUCTORS, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 4(3-2)

Commonly used solid state devices including diodes, special application diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, thyristors, optoelectronic devices and integrated circuit manufacturing techniques. Discussion of most commonly used semiconductor devices and their theory of operation. Emphasis on characteristics of operation and application. Prerequisite: E, M, R, ELEC 100, ELEC 106 or equivalent

151 TRANSFORMERS, MOTORS AND MOTOR CONTROLS, SPRING FEE, 4(3-2) Generation of AC voltage, transformer action and principles of AC motors, Delta and Wye transformer connection, and single-phase and three-phase motor controls. Students read and interpret motor and transformer electrical diagrams. Students spend approximately two hours per week participating in laboratory. Exercises provide relationship between theory and practical application. Prerequisites: ELEC 100, ELEC 106

211 SOLDERING, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 1(1-0)

Survey course about terminology and types of solder, techniques of soldering and unsoldering terminals and components to circuit boards, and various tools used in soldering process. Assembly of sample circuit board used to practice proper techniques.

EMT-EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECH

162 BASIC EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN FALL, SPRING

8(6-6)

Entry-level course in emergency medical services. Teaches patient assessment, access, stabilization and treatment of patients, communication basics and transportation considerations. 32 hours arranged clinical time required. Lab time includes 8 Saturdays.

ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

111 ENERGY GENERATION & DISTRIBUTION FALL, SPRING

To introduce students to energy production and distribution. Prerequisites: E,M,R

120 ENERGY PLANT DRAWINGS, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

FEE, 3(2-2)

This course covers the use of and relationship among typical drawings found at a nuclear power plant. Topics include using mechanical, electrical, and isometric drawings; the information contained in the lead sheet of a set of drawings; the use of notes and legends; standard symbology used in engineering drawings; and the use of various tpes of drawings together in order to perform work, locate components, or use for other typical applications. Prerequisites: ENGY 100 OR ENGY 111 with a grade of "C" or better

160 WIND INSTALLATIONFALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-3)

This course introduces fundamental concepts used to install small wind components. Prerequisites: M, R, ENGY155 with a C or better (classes may be taken concurrently)

210 RADIATION DETECTION & PROTECTION FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(2-2)

233 DOSIMETRY. FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(2-2)

This course presents the theory, application detection and shielding of the various types of radiation. it also covers detection devices such as typical survey meters, core power detectors and personnel monitoring devices. The course will also discuss how exposure to radiation can be minimized and the biological impact of radiation. Prerequites: ENGY100 or ENGY 111 and MATH 122 and PHYS 110 all with a "C" or better A study of radiation biology, radiation effects on simple chemical systems, biological molecules, cell, organisms and humans. Stochastic vs. deterministic effects, units of exposure, dose and dose equivalent, external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, control of external and internal exposure, detector and instrumentation systems for measuring dose are included. Prerequisites: ENGY223 with a greade of C or better

235 POWER PLANT COMPONENTS FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

This course introduces students to fundamental components and pieces of equipment that are used throughout electrical power generating facilities such as pumps, valves, heat exchangers, motors, and generators. It will cover the purpose, construction, theory of operation, and typical maintenance requirements of these devices. Prerequisites: ENGY100 or ENGY111 with a grade of C or better and MATH122 with a grade of C or better and PHYS110 with a grade of C or better

240 CAPSTONE & CASE STUDY IN ENERGY PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY FALL, SPRING FEE, 2(2-0)

This is a capstone course that will utilize topics that were covered throughout the curriculum. A large portion of the course will examine case studies from the power generation industry. It will also examine case studies of incidents from other industries. The course will discuss precursors to poor decision making and how the proper use of human performance enhancement (HPE) and event free tools can minimuze the risks of accidents. This course will also introduce students to pre-job interviewing and testing. Prerequisites: ENGY100 with a grade of C or better or ENGY111 with a grade of C or better and ENGY116, ENGY200, ENGY205, ENGY225, ENGY230, ENGY235, all with a grade of C or better

274 ELECTRICAL & HVAC OPERATIONS FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(2-2)

This course covers the basic operation of electrical and HVAC systems associated with a power plant. It also describes basic construction, application, and operation of basic electrical and HVAC power plant components. Prerequisites: ENGY270 with a C or better

182 BOILER THEORY, SAFETY, AND DESIGN SYSTEMS FALL, SPRING FEE, 3(3-0) This course provides an understanding of the concepts related to boiler design, boiler and boiler auxiliary equipment protection, combustion, heat production, steam production, boiler efficiency and operation. Prerequisites: MATH 110 or MATH 122 and ENGY 111 and PHYS 110 and ENGY 230 all with a C or better.

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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ENGINEERING

103 BEGINNING ENGINEERING DRAWING FALL, SPRING

FEE, 4(2-4)

Introductory technical drawing course which studies lettering, geometric construction, sectional views, dimensioning techniques, Basic 2D CAD and pictorials. Drawing skills and knowledge gained by student through exercises including text assignments, handout assignments and chapter tests. Students learn to produce and evaluate blueprints. Prerequisites: E, M, R

205 DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-4)

Problems combining point, line and plane, intersections, developments, warped surfaces and tangent planes. Prerequisite: ENGR 103

ENGLISH

091 ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER 4(4-0) Introduces the building blocks of college composition. Primary attention given to creating well-organized paragraphs developed with complete sentences using Standard English. Attention is also given to the closely related activities of critical reading and thinking. Prerequisite: Assessment Placement

095 FOUNDATIONS OF COLLEGE READING & WRITING FALL, SPRING, SUMMER 4(4-0) Develops critical thinking, reading and writing skills necessary to succeed in college. Primary focus will be learning and applying reading and writing processes to enhance communication. Prerequisites: Assessment Placement

101 ENGLISH COMPOSITION FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

First course in two-semester English sequence focuses on expository writing and closely related activities of critical reading and thinking. Primary attention given to formal elements of short essays based upon or incorporating documented source material. (This sequence can be completed by taking either ENGL 102 or 103). Prerequisites: E, R,

102 ENGLISH COMPOSITION FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

Extension and intensification of elements of expository writing and critical reading and thinking covered in ENGL 101. Particular emphasis given to formal, stylistic and rhetorical considerations and techniques involved in developing longer critical essays that incorporate documented evidence from broad range of source materials. Prerequisite: ENGL 101

103 TECHNICAL WRITING, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

Helps students write with greater skill, confidence and effectiveness on job. Writing assignments develop ability to analyze specific organization, purposes and situations and to use appropriate content, organization, style, form and format. Writing assignments include job application letter and resume, summary, process explanation, proposal, various short reports, research report and formal report. Either ENGL 102 or ENGL 103 in addition to ENGL 101 will fulfill English Composition requirements. Prerequisite: E, R, and ENGL 101

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205 INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE, SPRING

3(3-0)

208 LITERARY INTERPRETATION, ON DEMAND

3 (3-0)

215 POETRY, (ON-DEMAND)

3(3-0)

217 CREATIVE WRITING, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Nine of Shakespeare’s greatest plays and selection of sonnets read intensively and discussed. Universality of Shakespeare’s thought emphasized and qualities that make his work applicable to modern day. Leads to greater understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare’s writing. Prerequisites: E, R

Study of literature to develop sensitivity and skill in critical interpretation of poetry, drama, and prose fiction. Includes characteristics of different literary genre, their analysis, and increased reading and interpretation skills. Prerequisites: E, R Appreciation and understanding of poetry. Study of important aspects of a poem: images, figures, symbols, rhythm, sounds and tone. Emphasis on twentieth-century poetry. Recommended for English majors. Prerequisites: E, R Imaginative writing, i.e., writing of original poetry, fiction, drama, and creative non-fiction (memoir). Study and application of specific techniques in each genre. Conducted on a workshop basis. Students expected to produce a portfolio of finished pieces in the four genres. Prerequisites: E,R

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

102 ELEMENTARY FRENCH II, SPRING

4(4-0)

122 ELEMENTARY SPANISH II, SPRING

4(4-0)

123 SPANISH FOR THE WORKPLACE, FALL, SPRING

4(4-0)

Continuation of FORL 101. Basic grammatical principles; conversation of more advanced level, continued writing, dictation and cultural study. Continued use of tapes or cassettes required. Prerequisites: E, R, FORL 101 Continuation of FORL 121. Study of basic grammatical principles is completed with continued conversation, writing, dictation and cultural study. Prerequisites: E, R, FORL 121 This course offers an introduction to the Spanish language with particular emphasis on applying acquired knowledge within the realm of the workplace. Prerequisistes: None

124 SPANISH FOR THE WORKPLACE II FALL, SPRING 4(3-1) This course is a continuation of basic Spanish with particular emphasis on applying acquired knowledge within the realm of the workplace. Prerequisites: FORL 123 or two years of high school Spanish or one semester of College Spanish.

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL LANGUAGE PROGRAM

The following are National Association for Self-Instructional Language Program courses addressing the needs of beginning students in various languages. Courses concentrate on functional communication with emphasis on outcome-based goals such as being able to speak in basic sentence patterns, ask questions, engage in telephone conversations, make requests, give orders, etc., in situational introductions of reality. Communication is emphasized; grammar is introduced to support this process. Permission required from program coordinator before registering for these classes. Each course has a separate fee. 125 126 174 175 181 182 188 189 195 196 198 199

Elementary Mandarin Chinese I Elementary Mandarin Chinese II Elementary Polish I Elementary Polish II Elementary Russian I Elementary Russian II Elementary Japanese I Elementary Japanese II Elementary Italian I Elementary Italian II Elementary Arabic I Elementary Arabic II

222 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II, SPRING

4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs. 4 cr. hrs.

101 DIGITAL STUDIO FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3 (2-4)

250 ADVANCED GRAPHIC DESIGN, SPRING

FEE, 3 (2-4)

This course is a continuing study of the typographic arts in the twentiethcentury and the information age. Emphasis will be placed on the use of type in professional communication, the grid system, information design, international typographic style, type used in digital and other media, and the contribution of graphic design as a language for social reform. Prerequisites: E, R, GRDN 101, GRDN 110, GRDN 200 or instructor’s consent This course will guide the student in refining and presenting a portfolio based on their personal career objectives. Students will prepare for their career by researching transfer institutions or implementing a job search. Professional practice will be emphasized. Prerequisites: E, R, GRDN 101, GRDN 110, GRDN 130, GRDN 140, GRDN 200, GRDN 201, GRDN 220 or instructor’s consent

HEALTH

165 STANDARD FIRST AID AND PERSONAL SAFETY, FALL, SPRING FEE, 2(2-0) 4(4-0)

Continuation of FORL 221. Emphasizes ability to speak, read, and write in Spanish. Prerequisites: E, R, FORL 221

GRAPHIC DESIGN

201 TYPOGRAPHY II, SPRING

Intensive course on beginning first aid that includes choking, shock, burns, wounds, poison, heat and cold reactions, bandaging, sudden illness and other emergency situations. Students receive American Red Cross or American Heart Association certification in Standard First Aid upon successful completion of course. Prerequisite: None

166 CPR/AED FEE, 3 (2-4)

Introduces a working knowledge of the Macintosh computer platform as a design tool. Provides experience in industry standard software used by graphic designers including illustration, image manipulation and page layout programs. Serves as a foundation course in the use of computer technology for artists and graphic designers. Prerequisites: E, R

110 INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3 (2-4)

130 DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY, SPRING

FEE, 3 (2-4)

This course investigates the graphic design profession. Students engage in simulation of client pitches, participate in group critiques and brainstorming sessions, create design briefs, thumbnail sketches, mood boards and “comps”. Conceptual design and client research is emphasized. Students evaluate their career goals through readings and discussion on design specialties and schools. Prerequisites: E, R

This course advances the student in the fundamentals of digital imaging using industry standard image manipulation software and serves as a foundation course in the creation, use and selection of original photographic images for advertising and graphic design work. Prerequisites: E, R, GRDN 101 or instructor’s consent.

140 PRODUCTION SKILLS FOR GRAPHIC DESIGN, SPRING FEE, 3 (2-4) This course emphasizes the practice of functional design by developing the student’s knowledge of the production processes in graphic media. Designing a message to work efficiently within the production process and on budget while employing original thought. Prerequisites: E, R, GRDN 101, GRDN 110 or instructor’s consent

FEE, 1 (3-0)

The purpose of the CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer course is to teach professional rescuers (those with a duty to act) the skills needed to respond appropriately to breathing and cardiac emergencies. CPR/AED also includes the use of automated external defibrillators, oxygen administration and airway management. American Red Cross or American Heart Association certificate issued upon successful completion of course.

HISTORY

102 HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION, SPRING

4(4-0)

201 AMERICAN HISTORY, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Examines developments in European world from 1500 to 1920. Begins with analysis of forces that shaped early modern society: Protestant Reformation, commercial revolution, rise of absolute monarchies and nation state, and scientific and intellectual revolution of 17th and 18th centuries. Explores impact of two upheavals, French Revolution and Industrial Revolution, on events and ideologies of 19th century. Among topics considered are growth of liberalism, socialism, Marxism, nationalism and scientific secularism, and their social and political consequences. Study of causes and effects of World War I. Prerequisites: E, R

United States history from the colonial period through the Civil War. Topics include process and problems of colonization, factors promoting independence, difficulties encountered in developing workable political structure, the process of democratization, socio-economic change, territorial expansion and rivalries leading to Civil War. Special attention is paid to the modern legacy from America’s past. Prerequisites: E, R

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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202 AMERICAN HISTORY, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

United States history from the Civil War to the present. Topics include Reconstruction, conquest of the West, industrialization and its impact, various movements to reform America and the increasingly important role this country plays in international community. Special attention is paid to the modern legacy from America’s past. Prerequisites: E, R

204 MODERN EAST ASIA, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Explores traditional cultures of China and Japan, interaction with the West in the 19th and 20th centuries, and contemporary events and conditions in both nations. Examines how traditional political systems, social structures, economic systems, and religions and philosophies were progressively modified under impact of modernization but continue to influence contemporary culture. Studies effects of Western encroachment on East-West relations in modern period. Features evolution of Communist China and Japan’s imperialist experiment. Prerequisites: E, R

209 WOMEN IN THE WESTERN WORLD, ON DEMAND

3(3-0)

Examines experience of women in selected sample of Western cultures from ancient world to modern times. Explores how societies create and modify definitions of gender-appropriate roles and behavior. Investigates how such definitions affect women as family members, workers, and participants in society. Analyzes how women respond historically to challenges and contraints of their lives and what insights past experiences and modern feminist theory offer for understanding gender issues in present. Prerequisites: E, R

210 THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION, SPRING 3(3-0) The history of the United States Civil War and Reconstruction period. Topics include the causes of the war, slavery, military history, major battles, the impact of the war on slavery, the politics of Reconstruction, and the promise and problems or=f a biracial South. Special attention is paid to the legacy from the Civil Ware and Reconstruction on 21stcentury America Prerequisites: E,R

HONORS 141 NATIONAL GOVERNMENT, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Structure and operation of national government; meaning and practice of democracy, power relationships, civil rights and liberties, and American method of conducting elections. Role of citizens and their choices. Prerequisites: E, R

210 HONORS HEALTH & FITNESS, FALL

4(2-2)

This course combines classroom experience and personal exercise. Students establish knowledge of wellness, physical fitness, CV disease, nutrition, weight management, behavior modification, stress, cancer, addiction and sexually transmitted infections. Students implement an individualized exercise program and are required to exercise two days per week in the specified fitness center. Prerequisites: None

241 HONORS COLLOQUIUM, FALL, SPRING

1(1-0)

The Honors Colloquium, offered every fall and winter semesters, involves an intensive study/research on a topic for that year to go along with the theme(s) of the public lectures for that year. All honors students are required to register for the Colloquium every semester they are in the Program. The Colloquium topic will be announced each year. The Colloquium incorporates open discussion of the main theme and mutual criticism of the study/research projects related to the main theme being done by the participants. The Colloquium includes attendance at the public lectures and discussion with these lecturers.

70

251 ENGLISH COMPOSITION, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

258 HONORS LITERARY INTERPRETATION, SPRING

3(3-0)

Extension and intensification of elements of expository writing and critical reading and thinking covered in ENGL 101. Particular emphasis given to formal, stylistic and rhetorical considerations and techniques involved in developing longer critical essays that incorporate documented evidence from broad range of source materials. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 Study of literature to develop sensitivity and skill in critical interpretation of poetry, drama, and prose fiction. Includes characteristics of different literary genre, their analysis, and increased reading and interpretation skills. Prerequisites: E, R, HONR250 or ENGL101

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

110 SANITATION, FALL, SPRING

1(1-0)

111 RESPONSIBLE BEVERAGE SERVICE

1(1-0)

113 NUTRITION AND DIET THERAPY SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

117 INTRODUCTION TO MEETINGS AND EVENTS SPRING

2 (2-0)

150 INTRODUCTION TO HOSPITALITY CAREERS FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Sanitation policies necessary to effectively operate commercial food service facility. Students successful in course will receive Educational Foundation of National Restaurant Association Certification in Applied Food Service Sanitation. Prerequisites: E, R

This class explores the service policies and practices necessary to effectively serve alcohol in a hospitality establishment. Upon successful completion, students will receive ServSafe Certification in Applied Alcohol Service Training.

Basic principles of human nutrition including nutrients and allowances for various ages and normal conditions. Use of diet therapy in disease and abnormal conditions. Course directed to students interested in health-related professions including nursing and dietetics. Prerequisites: E, M, R

Overview of the planning and implementation of meetings and events that includes types of meetings and events, site selection, marketing, food and beverage, budget, reservations and evaluation. Prerequisites E, M, R (It is advisable that student take HOSP 116 prior to this course)

Covers career opportunities in restaurants, hotels, institutional feeding, travel and tourism, and hospitality management for those considering the hospitality industry as career. Prerequisites: E, R

200 HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-8)

Supervised work experience integrates academic study with hospitality industry experience in hotel/motel or restaurant work site. Students work 120 hours at assigned hospitality management sites and complete 15 hours of camous class time. Students must meet with coordinator prior to enrollment. Prerequisites: E, M, R, HOSP 110, HOSP 115, HOSP 150, HOSP 252, students must meet with coordinator prior to enrollment.

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

201 RESTAURANT OPERATIONS, SPRING

3 (3-0)

Overview of Restaurant Operations that includes; menus, cost control, financial operations, training, staffing, equipment and product purchasing, marketing, regulations, sanitation, and customer service. Prerequisites: E, M, R

250 FOOD PREPARATION SKILLS, SPRING

FEE, 2(0-4)

Proficiency in tool, equipment usage, standardized recipes found in commercial kitchen and learn to insure high level of guest satisfaction. Emphasis on soup, sauces, entrees, salads, fruits and vegetables.

253 TOURISM, SPRING

3(3-0)

Understanding of tourism, its nature, history and organization. Topics include cultural aspects, sociology, psychology and motivation, economics, forecasting demand, consumers, research and planning, and development for tourism industry. Prerequisites: E, M, R

254 HOSPITALITY COST CONTROL SYSTEMS, SPRING 3(3-0) Capstone course in financial control for hospitality student. Areas covered include room, food and beverage control systems, operating budget, income and cost control, menu pricing and practical application. Co/Prerequisites: HOSP 150, E,M,R

275 HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT,

FEE, 3(3-0)

In this course of food and beverage service students will discuss and practice customer services, proper service of foods and beverages, and basic table setting and decor. Students will also learn proper use and set up of serving dishes, utensils and glassware. Basic food preparation will be introduced, as well as introduction to the service of wine, liquors, and non-alcoholic beverages. This course will also include a full glossary of culinary terms.

HUMANITIES

201 INTRO TO THE ARTS, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

110 MIG/TIG WELDING, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(2-2)

204 BASIC HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATICS FALL, SPRING

FEE, 2(1-2)

Considers various gas metal arc welding (MIG) processes, including microwire, flux-core, innershield and submerged arc, with emphasis on metal inert gas welding. Provides extensive experience in gas tungsten arc welding (TIG). Students will demonstrate techniques of welding in MIG and TIG, in all positions, using various gauges of metal. Prerequisites: None

Basic industrial fluid power systems common to field of industrial automation. Course includes basic principles, components, standards, symbols, cylinders, intensifiers, valves, motor circuit and related electrical control. Prerequisites: M, R

205 HYDRAULICS AND PNEUMATICS MAINTENANCE, FALL FEE, 2(1-2)

Troubleshooting, preventive maintenance and repair methods for industrial fluid power systems common to field of industrial automation. Topics include pumps, cylinders, intensifiers, valves, motor circuits and related electrical control. Prerequisite: INMT 204 or industrial experience

206 HYDRAULIC AND PNEUMATIC CIRCUITRY SPRING

FEE, 2(1-2)

Practical hydraulic and pneumatic power and control circuitry; selection of control methods and component sizing for desired function, timing, sequence, speed and pressure requirements. Considerations such as cost, efficiency, energy consumption and maintainability with practice in connecting circuits and testing proper function. Prerequisite: INMT 204 or industrial experience.

LAW ENFORCEMENT

This cross-disciplinary course is intended to enhance individual critical sensibility and responsiveness to the arts. This course consists of two complimentary components: the first, an introductory survey of influential theories on criticism and on the nature of art; and the second, a survey of the distinguishing formal characteristics of major artistic media. Prerequisites: E, R

140 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

211 STUDIES IN FILM ART, SPRING

142 POLICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

144 CRIMINOLOGY, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

250 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY AND BEHAVIOR FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

3(3-0)

Critical exploration of general concepts of genre, style, theme and technique of related films. Specific focus and films varies each semester, with emphasis indicated in class schedule. Prerequisites: E, R, HUMN 209 or Consent of instructor

INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE TECH

109 INTRO TO WELDING, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 2(1-2)

Basic skills and techniques in oxyacetylene welding and shielded metal arc welding. Introduction to welding for maintenance welders and welding technicians. Instruction and practice in brazing, flame cutting, electrode selection and various types of welds. Techniques of welding in all positions are learned through hands on practice. Safety hazards and safe practices in oxyacetylene welding, cutting and shielded metal arc are emphasized. Prerequisites: None

History, philosophy and mechanics of several elements that comprise criminal justice system. Related responsibilities and vocational opportunities discussed. Designed to introduce students to criminal justice system. Prerequisites: E, R

Functional divisions of organization and operation of modern police departments. Functions studied are management operations, communications, budgeting, public relations, recruiting and training. Prerequisites: E, R

Nature and development of criminal behavior. Emphasis on examination of leading theories concerning cause of crime, nature of criminal offender and treatment of convicted offenders. Public reaction to crime reviewed. Prerequisites: E, R

Problems of juvenile delinquency, theories on juvenile delinquency, work of youth agencies, legislative involvement and new approaches to prevention of juvenile crimes. Prerequisites: E, R

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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251 SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND PUBLIC SAFETY SPRING 3(1-4) Current problems in criminal justice and public safety area. Special issues discussed and pre-service students assigned to agencies or departments as interns for field experience. Reports required. Prerequisites: E, R

252 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE, SPRING

3(3-0)

Study of Anglo-American system for detecting, proving and punishing perpetrators of crime. Legal protection of citizens from improper searches, arrests and coerced confessions by constitution, statute and case law. Rules of evidence in assisting judicial search for truth covered. NOTE: Only Corrections students should take this course.

LOGISTICS

101 INTRODUCTION TO LOGISTICS FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

103 TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

This is an introductory course. It will explain why logistics is important in everyday living. The course will provide an overview of five subsectors of logistics - rules and regulations, domestic transportation, warehouse, inventory, and purchasing. Prerequisites: None

 This course will compare and contrast modes of transportation.  Commercial, third party, private and expedited logistics will be discussed.  Students will develop critical thinking and reasoning skills as well as decision making techniques.  For a given product, the student will be able to describe the most appropriate mode of transportation for product-specific requirements and other requirements such as time, temperature, size, value.  Students will be able to describe emergency contingent planning for spills, power outages, etc.  Site visits and guest speakers will provide students with an introduction to current and emerging career opportunities specific to traffic and transportation. Prerequisite:  LOGI101

MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY

110 MACHINE TOOL I, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-4)

Introductory course includes theory, demonstrations and shop experience. Basics in safety, blueprint reading, layout, band sawing, machine setup, lathe work, milling machine work, surface grinding. Machine theory and machine application comply with National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Level I Machining Skill Standards. Prerequisites: none

120 MACHINE TOOL II, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-4)

Advanced course covers metals, their composition and heat treatment, machining of threads and tapers on a lathe, milling of gears and other advanced machining and precision machining techniques. Machine theory and machine applications comply with National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) Level I and Level II Machining Skill Standards. Each student will be assessed to determine his/her starting point in the program. Prerequisites: MACH 110

130 PRECISION INSPECTION, FALL, SPRING

3(3-1)

Methods of inspecting industrial products. Emphasis on measuring devices such as sine bar, gage blocks, micrometers, vernier scales, electronic comparator, and coordinate measuring machine. Students will develop skills in basic blue print reading, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, understanding datums, and using the inch and metric systems. Prerequisites: M,R, MACH 110 or by permission of instructor

72

140 INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL CONTROL (NC) COMPUTER NUMERICAL CONTROL (CNC), FALL, SPRING FEE, 2(1-2) Numerically controlled machines for metal cutting. Required course for students enrolled in Machine Tool program, also recommended as introductory experience for employees attending factory training schools in future. Systems studied include microcomputer-controlled machines and CAD/CAM systems. Prerequisites: M,R, MACH 110 or by permission of instructor

241 CNC PROGRAMMING I FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 2(1-2)

Second of three courses in CNC sequence and required for students in Machine Tool program. Course teaches students to program numerically controlled machine tool and machine shape called out on part print. Programs for three axis machines prepared and used to make completed parts. Students learn to select appropriate fixtures, tools, inserts, speeds, feeds and depth of cuts. Laboratory concentrates on preparation and debugging of tool path, tool application, selection of speeds and feeds, and auxiliary machine functions. Employs special features of computerized machining such as contour interpolations, absolute incremental switching, inch/metric selection and tool offsets. Prerequisites: M, R, MATH 110, MACH 140 and working knowledge of trigonometry and blueprint reading or by permission of instructor.

MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

106 MRI PROCEDURES & PATHOPHYSIOLOGY II, SPRING

3(3-0)

107 MRI PHYSICS II, SPRING

3(3-0)

108 MRI IMAGE ANALYSIS, SUMMER

3(3-0)

Provides an overview of imaging techniques related to the thorax/ abdomen, special imaging techniques (functional MRI, spectroscopy, DWI, heart) and breast. Specific clinical applications, coils available and their use, considerations in scan sequences, specific choices in the protocols, and positioning criteria are practiced. Thoracic and abdominal anatomical structures and the plane that best demonstrates anatomy will be discussed as well as signal characteristics of normal and abnormal structures. Prerequisites: E,M,R, MRIT102, MRIT103, MRIT105 and MRIT114, with a C or better. The second in a two semester course that provides a comprehensive overview of MRI pulse sequences, imaging parameters and image quality control. Prerequisites: E,M,R, MRIT102, MRIT 103, MRIT 114 and MRIT 105

Case study analysis and student image portfolios will be utilized to evaluate for optimal diagnostic value. Critical assessment will include principles of quality image formation, identification of anatomy, identification of pathology, and parameter adjustments needed for differential diagnosis. Additional discussion will focus quality control procedures, PACS image display, image post processing, and image archiving. Prerequisites: E,M,R, MRIT106, MRIT107, MRIT109 and MRIT115, with a C or better.

109 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE II, SPRING

FEE, 3(0-24)

The second of a three semester sequence of clinical application. Neurological and extremity competency work will continue as well as introductory experience in thoracic and abdominal scanning. Prerequisites: E,M,R, MRIT102, MRIT103, MRIT104 and MRIT105

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

115 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN MEDICAL IMAGING SPRING 3(3-0) Computer applications in the radiologic sciences related to image capture, display, storage and distribution. Specific to MR, the content imparts an understanding of the components, principles and operation of digital imaging systems, image data management and data manipulation. Additional content provides basic concepts of patient information management including medical records concerns and privacy and regulatory issues. Prerequisites: E,M,R, MRIT102, MRIT103, MRIT105, MRIT114 with a C or better.

MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY

112 INTRODUCTION TO FABRICATION FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE, 4(2-2)

Students will learn to use commercially available technologies to “conceptualize, design, develop, fabricate and test” objects. The Lab features advanced computer software and contemporary tools for cutting, milling, electronics, engraving, and other processes of rapid and automated prototyping. Products and processes are typically individualized but can be developed entrepreneurially for commercial production. Prerequisites: None

122 INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS FALL, SPRING

OE/OE 1(1-0)

Types of robots, axis designation, application, terminology, drive systems and control systems as related to industrial robots. Prerequisite: R

215 FAB LAB I, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

FEE 4(2-2)

Students will develop science and engineering skills by having hands-on access to high-tech manufacturing processes, specialized embedded software, computer-aided design software, and mechanical subsystems. The Fab Lab will provide applied technical opportunities in an industry that is continuously changing and redefining itself. Prerequisite: MANU112

P221 COMPETITIVE ROBOTICS PRACTICUM,   

4(2-2)

This course provides the 180 hours of build time required to design, assemble, prepare and test a competition-ready robot.  Course will include programmable controllers, construction, computer programming, and machine design.  This class meets intensely for several weeks and team building and problem solving are essential. Preprequisites:  None

MATHEMATICS

NOTE: Courses that have identification numbers below 100 do not count toward total credit hours needed to earn Certificate or Associate Degree.

MATHEMATICS MINI-COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

Basic mini-courses are designed to provide remedial or review work for students with deficiencies in specific areas of basic math. The seven units of Basic Mathematics (090) are paired in a variety of combinations to serve as one-credit mini-courses. The materials covered in each of the seven units of Basic Mathematics are as follows: WHOLE NUMBERS - representation, rounding, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, primes, powers and roots. FRACTIONS - definitions, equivalents, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. DECIMALS - representation, rounding, binary operations and applications. RATIO AND PROPORTION - definitions and applications. PERCENT - percents as fractions, finding a percent of a number, fractions as percents and applications of percents. PRACTICAL GEOMETRY - basic concepts, perimeters, circumferences and areas. 060 061 062 063 064 066 067 068 069 071 072 073 075 076 078

Whole Numbers and Fractions Whole Numbers and Decimals Whole Numbers, Ratio and Proportion Whole Numbers and Percent Whole Numbers and Practical Geometry Fractions and Decimals Fractions, Ratio and Proportion Fractions and Percent Fractions and Practical Geometry Decimals, Ratio and Proportion Decimals and Percent Decimals and Practical Geometry Ratio, Proportion and Percent Ratio, Proportion and Practical Geometry Percent and Practical Geometry

1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0) 1(1-0)

090 PRE-ALGEBRA FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

4(4-0)

095 INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

4(4-0)

Individualized competency-based or lecture course in basic mathematical skills. Students placed by assessment results at appropriate level at beginning of course. Proficiency at 70-percent level must be demonstrated in each unit before progressing to next unit. Basic Mathematics covers whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion, percent, practical geometry and/or introduction to algebra. Prerequisites: Assessment Placement

Covers all topics in one-year beginning algebra course, including sets and numeration systems, set of integers, multiplication and division, algebraic operations, equations, introduction to factoring, factoring techniques, basic fractional operations; addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, complex fractions, introduction to rectangular coordinate system and systems of equations. Elementary Algebra is offered as a self-paced course or in a traditional classroom format. Cannot be used to meet math graduation requirements for A.A., A.S. or A.A.S. degrees. Prerequisites: M, R

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

73

100 APPLIED MATHEMATICS, FALL

4(4-0)

Basic mathematics needed in occupational fields such as machine tool, electronics, industrial manufacturing, service and maintenance, etc. Topics include fractions, percent, decimals, angular measurement, square root, basic geometry, formulas and basic algebra conversions. Practice and practical applications. Prerequisites: M, R

110 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I, SPRING

4(4-0)

Introduction to mathematics applicable to technical areas. Includes topics in dimensional analysis, problem solving, approximate numbers, trigonometry of right angle and oblique triangles, vectors, radian measure, algebra and geometry applications and metric measurement and conversion. Prerequisites: MATH 100 or MATH 095 with “C” or better

122 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER 4(4-0)

Provides students with sufficient algebraic knowledge and skills for success in subsequent mathematics or science courses. Brief review of four fundamental operations, real number system, factoring, fractions, linear and fractional equations and inequalities, linear and quadratic functions and their graphs, systems of equations, determinants and Cramer’s rule, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations. Prerequisites: R, MATH 095 with “C.” or better, or associated placement test score(s).

128 PRE-CALCULUS ALGEBRA, FALL, SPRING

4(4-0)

130 PRE-CALCULUS TRIGONOMETRY, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Prepares students for calculus. Topics include review of exponents and factoring, equations, graphs and functions, composite functions, inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, linear programming, complex numbers, sequences and binomial theorem. Prerequisites: R, MATH 122 with C or better, or associated placement test score(s). Fundamental concepts of trigonometry and elementary applications of results. Topics include angle measure, fundamental identities, variation and graphs of trigonometric functions, right-angle trigonometry, equations and polar coordinates. For students who intend to toke calculus, this course may be taken concurrently with MATH 128. Prerequisites: R, MATH 122 with C or better, or associated placement test score(s).

135 PRECALCULUS ALGEBRA/TRIG, FALL, SPRING

5(5-0)

151 CALCULUS I, FALL, SPRING

5(5-0)

200 MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS, SPRING

4(4-0)

202 CALCULUS III, FALL

5(5-0)

216 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

252 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS, SPRING

4(4-0)

Calculus with multiple independent variables. Topics include threedimensional vectors, partial derivatives, multiple integrations and vector analysis. Prerequisites: R, MATH 201 with “C” or better. Statistical decision-making. Topics include sampling techniques, tabular and graphical data, measures of central tendency and variability, simple probability, probability distributions (binomial, normal, t, chi-square and F), central limit theorem, correlation and regression, estimation, hypothesis testing, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: E, R, MATH 122 with C or better or equivalent Ordinary differential equations. Topics include equations with variables separable, homogenous equations, exact equations, integrating factors, linear equations with constant coefficients, simultaneous linear equations and Laplace transformations. Applications to physics and engineering. Prerequisites: R, MATH 201 with “C” or better, or MATH 202 with “C” or better.

265 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS FOR ELEMENTARY/ MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS, FALL, SPRING 4(4-0) This course explores the basic concepts of statistics and probability appropriate for elementary and middle school teachers. Topics include statistical techniques for organizing, summarizing, presenting, and interpreting data; sampling techniques; simulation methods; counting techniques; and analytic methods in probability. Graphing calculators are used to reinforce major course ideas. This course is designed specifically to transfer Western Michigan University’s elementary education program and may not transfer to other institutions. Prerequisites: R, MATH 200 with “C” or better.

MUSIC

100 BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC

The following one-credit hour, Beginning Applied Music classes are individual instruction, intended for personal enrichment: A

This course is designed to provide the student with basic algebraic and trigonometric concepts necessary for calculus. Topics include: real numbers, inequalities, coordinate systems, functions, polynomials, solutions of polynomical equations, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry and trigonometric functions. Prerequisites: “C” or better in MATH 122 or necessary placement score. Study of calculus of single variable. Topics include limits, derivative and integral properties of algebraic and transcendental functions and elementary applications of derivatives and integrals. Prerequisites: R, MATH 128 and MATH 130 with “C” or better, or MATH 135 with “C” or better, or associated placement test score(s).

For students preparing to teach grades K-6. Gives prospective teacher thorough understanding of important mathematical concepts, terminology and relationships. Helps students see how these concepts are presented to children at each grade level. Students expected to observe teaching of elementary children in actual classroom. Prerequisites: R, MATH 095 with “C.” or better, or associated placement test score(s).

74

B

C D

Beginning Voice (Prerequisite: MUSI 113) Beginning Clarinet Beginning Trumpet, Cornet Beginning French Horn Beginning Trombone, Euphonium, Baritone Beginning Tuba Beginning Flute Beginning Oboe Beginning Bassoon Beginning Piano (Prerequisite: Music 115) Beginning Pipe/Electric Organ Beginning Saxophone Beginning Percussion Beginning Violin Beginning Viola Beginning Cello Beginning String Bass Beginning Electric/Acoustic Guitar BeginningClassical Guitar

FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE. 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5)

The following one-credit hour, college-level Applied Music classes require an audition or permission of instructor to qualify and include individual instruction for Music majors or highly-proficient musicians. All students required to perform a jury:

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

120 130 132 133 134 140 142 144 146 150 152 154 156 158 160 170 172 174 178 180 181 188

Applied Voice Applied Piano Applied Piano/Rhythm, Jazz, Blues Applied Piano/Rhythm, Jazz, Blues Applied Pipe/Electric Organ Applied Trumpet, Cornet Applied French Horn Applied Trombone, Euphonium, Baritone Applied Tuba Applied Flute Applied Oboe Applied Bassoon Applied Clarinet Applied Saxophone Applied Percussion Applied Violin Applied Viola Applied Cello Applied Acoustic/Electric Guitar Applied Classical Guitar Applied String Bass Applied Harp

FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5) FEE, 1(0-.5)

The following two-credit hour, college-level Applied Music classes are for Music majors and other accomplished musicians. Successful completion of one-credit hour college class in instrument or permission of instructor a prerequisite for all classes. All students required to perform a jury: 220 230 234 240 242 244 246 250 252 254 256 258 260 270 272 274 276 278 280 281 288

Applied Voice Applied Piano Applied Pipe/Electric Organ Applied Trumpet, Cornet Applied French Horn Applied Trom., Euphon., Baritone Applied Tuba Applied Flute Applied Oboe Applied Bassoon Applied Clarinet Applied Saxophone Applied Percussion Applied Violin Applied Viola Applied Cello Applied String/Electric Bass Applied Acoustic/Electric Guitar Applied Classical Guitar Applied String Bass Applied Harp

ENSEMBLES: 101 CONCERT CHOIR, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1) FEE, 2(0-1)

2(0-4)

Varied range of sacred and secular music for purpose of study and performance. Choir performs in regular concerts each semester. Opportunity for small ensemble participation. Open to all students and community members with vocal ability through audition. May be repeated for credit.

103 SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE-SOUTHSHORE CONCERT BAND FALL, SPRING 2 (0-4)

Music ranging from traditional through contemporary styles. Open to all students and community members, through audition, with interest in performing concert band music. May be repeated for credit.

104 JAZZ BAND, FALL, SPRING

1(0-2)

108 SHOW CHOIR, FALL, SPRING

2(0-4)

CLASSROOM COURSES: 109 MUSIC APPRECIATION, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

113 VOICE CLASS, FALL, SPRING

2(2-0)

114 PIANO CLASS I, FALL, SPRING

2(2-0)

115 PIANO CLASS II, FALL, SPRING

2(2-0)

117 SYMPHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE

1(0-2)

Music in all styles of jazz and rock idioms. Includes techniques of rehearsing stage band, playing of student arrangements and performance of jazz compositions, and arrangements in concert and various rock idioms. Open to all students by audition. May be repeated for credit. Musical theatre and jazz music; open through audition. Performs regularly during semester, accompanied by small instrumental ensemble. Staging and choreography as important parts of performances. May be repeated for credit.

Exposure to various compositions and techniques from major periods of music history beginning with antiquity, including 20th-century contemporary works and brief look at jazz. For non-Music majors. Prerequisite: E, R Fundamentals of vocal production including posture, breathing and diction. Students perform in class on regular basis. Open to all students at well as Music majors and minors.

Beginning piano class for students with little or no prior musical experience. Focus on learning to read music as well as harmonization and transposition. Continuation of Piano Class I, with emphasis on increased keyboard facility through technical study, acquisition of simple repertoire, harmonization and transposition. Prerequisite: MUSI 114

This group performs regular public concerts. It performs the best in wind ensemble music, with particular emphasis on compositions composed expressly for the wind and percussion instrument medium.

APPLIED MUSIC:

1-credit hour lesson = 1/2 hour private lesson per week requiring 1 hour daily practice. 2-credit hour lesson = 1 hour private lesson per week requiring 2 hours daily practice - limited to Music majors or with permission of instructor. All Applied Music classes involve required concert attendance. THE FOLLOWING APPLIED MUSIC CLASSES (private music instruction) ARE OFFERED FALL AND WINTER When offered, one-credit hour classes are available during the Spring and Summer sessions. Placement in class level determined by instructor.

163 BASIC MUSIC II

3(3-0)

Continuation of MUSI 162. The study of diatonic and chromatic harmony through analysis and part writing, including diatonic, and secondary 7th chords, the Neapolitan chord, augmented sixth chords, and modulation to foreign keys. Prerequisite: E, R, MUSI 162 AND Math 095 with a grade of C or higher Corequisite: MUSI 115 and MUSI 165

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

75

165 AURAL COMPREHENSION II

1(0-2)

A continuation of MUSI 164. Sight-reading, prepared performance and improvisation of melodies using solfegge syllables, dictation, recognition of musical events, and ensemble skills. This course concentrates on diatonic melodies, simple and compound divisions of the beat, triads and seventh chords, and harmonic dictation. Prerequisite: MUSI 164 with a grade of “C” or better Corequisites: MUSI 115 and MUSI 163

185 GUITAR CLASS I

1(1-0)

Group instruction in guitar fundamentals for the student who has had little or no previous experience. The course will provide basic instruction in using the guitar as an accompanying instrument and as a solo or melody-playing instrument, and will provide the fundamentals of music reaading. The student will be required to have access to a Classical or Folk type guitar.

186 GUITAR CLASS II

1(1-0)

187 HISTORY OF ROCK MUSIC, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

A continuation of Guitar Class I. Instruction will be provided on bar chords, transposition, improvisation, tablature, and various strumming techniques. The student will be required to have access to a Folk or Classical type guitar. Prerequisites: Musi 185 or permission of the instructor

The course seeks to deepen students’ understanding of modern society and culture through the examination of rock and roll music. The development and evolution of the music’s diverse styles are explored within the context of sociological and political events. Prerequisites: E, R

200 MUSIC FOR THE ELEMENTARY TEACHER FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

214 MUSIC HISTORY II, SPRING

3(3-0)

Designed for elementary education majors and assuming little or no musical background, this course will develop skill in the teaching and the performing of music in the elementary classroom setting. Students will develop fundamental musical skills, organize and develop musical activities and lesson plans, as well as explore the integration of music across the curriculum and in specialized areas. This course is designed to transfer to Western Michigan University’s elementary education program and may not transfer to any other institutions. Prerequisites: E, R

Survey course of music in Western world from antiquity through Twentieth Century. Covers later Classical period, Romantic period and Twentieth Century. American composers of Twentieth century emphasized. Prerequisites: E, R

263 BASIC MUSIC IV

3(3-0)

265 AURAL COMPREHENSION

1(0-2)

A continuation of MUSI 262. A study of the organizational techniques of 20th century music, including the extension of chromaticism in late 19th century music, impressionism, pandiatonicism, polytonality, modality, 20th century tonality, atonality, serial techniques and minimalism. Prerequisite: E, R, MUSI 262 with a grade of “C” or higher Corequisite: MUSI 265 A continuation of MUSI 264. Sight-reading, prepared performance and improvisation of melodies using solfegge syllables, dictation, recognition of musical events, and ensemble skills. This course concentrates on modes, asymmetrical meters, altered chords, and interval music. Prerequisite: MUSI 264 with a grade of “C” or higher Corequisite: MUSI 263

76

NATURAL SCIENCES

095 FUNDAMENTALS OF SCIENCE REASONING FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

4(3-2)

Provides students the opportunity to develop science reasoning skills and thought processes that are critical in all College-level science courses. Areas covered include scientific process, observations, value judgments, inferences; experimental set-up, data collection, variables; scientific communication; study techniques; problem solving, basic statistical analysis, graph interpretation, spatial relationships; measurements, metric system, estimation; and basic laboratory skills.

NURSING 135 PHARMACOLOGY II, SPRING

2(2-0)

Nursing 135 builds on Nursing 130, continuing and expanding upon concepts learned. The focus of this course is the study of selected classifications of medications and the nurse’s role in administering and monitoring them. Principles are based on the concepts of the role of the nurse as well as the concepts of client-centered care, critical thinking, communication, accountability, and competence. Learning focuses on the care of the individual across the healthcare continuum and throughout the life span. Prerequisites: E, M, R, READ 110, BIOL205, BIOL 206, CIS 102, CHEM 105, ENGL 101, PSYC 201, NURS 130, NURS 180, and acceptance into the nursing program or permission of instructor/coordinator

185 WOMEN’S HEALTH, SPRING

FEE, 4(2.4-4.8)

186 MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING I SPRING

FEE, 3(1.5-4.8)

Nursing 185 builds on Nursing 180, continuing and expanding the base of science, art and technology, guiding the student towards identifying self as an individual and nurse in the associate or practical nurse role within the environment. Concepts of client-centered care, critical thinking, communication, accountability, and competence are expanded upon. The course reinforces student understanding and adoption of the nursing roles as provider of care, manager of care, and member of profession. The learning focuses on the care of individuals along the health continuum and across the lifespan with common women’s health conditions such as adolescence, childbearing experience, menopause and simple gynecological conditions. Learning is applied during 5 weeks of clinical experience in community and acute care settings Prerequisites: E, M, R, READ 110, BIOL 205, BIOL 206, CIS 102, CHEM 105, ENGL 101, PSYC 201, PSYC 203 (may take currently), NURS 130, NURS 180, and acceptance into the nursing program or permission of instructor/coordinator.

Nursing 186 builds on Nursing 180, continuing and expanding concepts learned. The course reinforces student understanding and adoption of nursing roles as provider of care, manager of care, and member of a profession. Learning focuses on the care of the individual along the health continuum and across the life span with selected common medical-surgical conditions. These conditions include the perioperative experience, fluid and electrolyte imbalance, and gastrointestinal impairment. Learning is applied during four and one half weeks of clinical experience in an acute-care facility. Prerequisites: E, M, R, READ 110, BIOL 205, BIOL 206, CIS 102, CHEM 105, ENGL 101, PSYC 201, NURS 130, NURS 180, and acceptance into the nursing program or permission of instructor/coordinator

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

187 MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING II, SPRING

288 CURRENT ISSUES IN NURSING, SPRING, SUMMER (1-0) FEE, (1.5-4.8)

Nursing 187 builds on NURS 180, continuing and expanding concepts learned. The course reinforces student understanding and adoption of nursing roles as provider of care, manager of care, and member of a profession. Learning focuses on the care of individuals along the health continuum and across the lifespan with selected common medical-surgical conditions. These conditions include diabetes, acute and chronic respiratory impairment, and acute and chronic cardiac impairment. Clinical experience is scheduled for four and one half weeks in medical-surgical settings within the community. Prerequisites: E, M, R, READ 110, BIOL 205, BIOL 206, CIS 102, CHEM 105, ENGL 101, PSYC 201, NURS 130, NURS 180, and acceptance into the nursing program or permission of instructor/coordinator.

285 CHILDREN’S HEALTH, SPRING

FEE, (2.3 – 5.3)

The major emphasis in this course will be upon the child and family in health and illness. Safe, competent, and client-centered care will be provided in hospital and community settings over a five-week period using the nursing process, critical thinking, and concepts of caring. Students will manage care for culturally diverse individuals and groups. In addition, as future members of the nursing profession, students will accept responsibility for ethical, legal, and professional dimensions of nursing practice. Prerequisites: E, M, R; READ 110, BIOL 205, CIS 102, CHEM 105, ENGL 101, PSYC 201, PSYC 203, BIOL 206, ENGL 102, HOSP 113, PHED 200, SOC 101, NURS 130, NURS 180, NURS 135, NURS 185, NURS 186, NURS 187, NURS 280, NURS 281, NURS 282, and acceptance into the nursing program or permission of the instructor/coordinator

286 MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING V, SPRING FEE, 3(1.5-4.8) NURS 286 expands upon student understanding and adoption of nursing roles as provider of care, manager of care, and member of the profession. Students continue to relate concepts of client-centered care, communication, critical thinking, accountability and competency learned from previous nursing courses to the care of individuals along the health care continuum and across the lifespan with selected common recurring conditions. These conditions include acute cardiovascular impairment and endocrine disorders. Also included in this course are nursing leadership and nursing management concepts. Clinical experience is provided for 4.5 weeks in acute/long-term care, community, and specialty care settings. Prerequisites: E, M, R, READ 110, CIS 102, CHEM 105, ENGL 101, ENGL 102, HOSP 113, BIOL 205, BIOL 206, PSYC 201, PSYC 203, NURS 130, NURS 135, NURS 180, NURS 185, NURS 186, NURS 187, NURS 280, NURS 281, NURS 282, and acceptance into the nursing program or permission of the instructor/coordinator

Current Issues in Nursing is a capstone class intended to expand on the socialization of the student into the role of Member of a Profession. Contemporary trends and issues in nursing are discussed with a brief historical perspective. Levels of educational preparation for nursing with scope of practice for the levels, along with the need for lifelong learning, are presented along with ethical and legal issues. Licensure issues, professional organization, and employability skills complete the preparation for the professional role. Prerequisites: E, M, R, READ 110, CIS 102, CHEM 105, BIOL 205, BIOL 206, ENGL 101, ENGL 102, PSYC 201, PSYC 203, NURS 130, NURS 135, NURS 180, NURS 185, NUR 186, NURS 187, NURS 130, NURS 135; Also either NURS 190 and NURS 191 or NURS 280, NURS 281, NURS 282, and acceptance into the nursing program or permission of instructor/ coordinator.

OIS-OFFICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS

101 KEYBOARDING I FALL, SPRING, SUMMER OE/OE 2(0-2) Beginning keyboard course for students with no prior training in use of a keyboard. Class is self-paced and self-instructional. Students learn alphabetic, numeric, and symbol keys including ten-key pad. Prerequisite: R

102 KEYBOARDING II FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 2(0-2)

103 KEYBOARDING III FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

OE/OE 2(0-2)

Introductory course on a computer using a software package. Students develop correct keyboarding techniques and skill in practical production problems such as centering, letters, manuscript, simple tabulations and forms. This class is self-paced and self-instructional. Those planning to enter business should continue with OIS 103 or OIS 114. Open to students with limited training in keyboarding or speeds less than 25 net words per minute. Prerequisite: R

Concentrates on using a computer software package to review the keyboard, improve techniques, and build speed and accuracy. This class is self-paced and self-instructional. The course is designed for students who plan to use keyboarding either vocationally or personally. The course is review of OIS 102. Prerequisites: R, OIS 102 or equivalent and keyboarding speed of at least 25 net words per minute

114 INTERMEDIATE KEYBOARDING, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

125 RECORDS MANAGEMENT, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

77

287 MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING VI SPRING

FEE, 3(1.5-4.8)

NURS 286 expands upon student understanding and adoption of nursing roles as provider of care, manager of care, and member of the profession. Students continue to relate concepts of client-centered care, communication, critical thinking, accountability and competency learned from previous nursing courses to the care of individuals along the health care continuum and across the lifespan with selected common recurring conditions. These conditions include acute cardiovascular impairment and endocrine disorders. Also included in this course are nursing leadership and nursing management concepts. Clinical experience is provided for 4.5 weeks in acute/long-term care, community, and specialty care settings. Prerequisites: E, M, R, READ 110, CIS 102, CHEM 105, ENGL 101, ENGL 102, HOSP 113, BIOL 205, BIOL 206, PSYC 201, PSYC 203, PHED 200, SOC 101, NURS 130, NURS 135, NURS 180, NURS 185, NURS 186, NURS 187, NURS 280, NURS 281, NURS 282, and acceptance into the nursing program or permission of the instructor/coordinator

Development of greater speed and accuracy on computer keyboard using a software package. Emphasis is on production work required in offices. Prerequisites: R, OIS 102 or equivalent and keyboarding speed of at least 40 net words per minute Concentrates on effective and efficient management of business records. This course covers both manual and computer records management systems. Topics include basic filing methods, storage systems and supplies, information retrieval, records retention and disposition, indexing, records protection and procedures, and the operation and control of filing systems. Database applications are also covered. Prerequisite: M, R

201 ADVANCED KEYBOARDING, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

204 LEGAL TRANSCRIPTION, SPRING (ODD YEARS)

3(3-0)

Further development in speed and accuracy on computer using a software package. Attention given to advanced keyboarding problems such as statistical keyboarding, tabulations, charts, graphics, and presentations. Special attention is given to attaining high standards of production. Prerequisites: R, OIS 114 or equivalent and keyboarding speed of at least 50 net words per minute Learn legal terminology and build transcription skills with materials encountered in legal offices. Prerequisites: E, R, OIS 114 or equivalent, OIS 217

208 MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION, SPRING (EVEN YEARS)3(3-0) Learn medical terminology and build transcription skills with materials encountered in medical offices. Prerequisites: E, R, OIS 114 or equivalent, OIS 217, READ 110

211 OFFICE PROCEDURES, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Concentrates on secretarial and clerical technologies studied and practiced in a typical office environment. Topics include: discussion and hands on use of the latest office technologies, personal presentation, practice in mailing procedures, proper use of communication mediums, employment strategies, office etiquette and development of appearance and personality.

213 WORD PROCESSING TRANSCRIPTION, SPRING

3(3-0)

Instruction and practice in transcribing from machines to microcomputers using wordprocessing software. Students develop skills in punctuation, grammar, spelling, proofreading, and typing mailable copy directly from machine dictation. Prerequisites: R, OIS 114, OIS 217

217 INTRODUCTION TO WORD PROCESSING APPLICATIONS, FALL, SPRING 3(3-0) Concepts, systems, and practices used in information processing. Students with no previous experience learn by lecture, discussion and hands-on activities with various software commands, functions and skills. Students will gain an understanding of a total information processing operation. Prerequisites: R, OIS 102 or equivalent

218 ADVANCED WORD PROCESSING APPLICATIONS, FALL, SPRING 3(3-0) Follows OIS 217, Introduction to Word Processing Applications, and expands student understanding of concepts, systems, and practices used in information processing. Students learn by lecture, discussion and hands-on activities. Includes more advanced word processing applications. Prerequisites: R, OIS 114 or equivalent, OIS 217

220 MEDICAL OFFICE PROCEDURES, SPRING (EVEN YEARS)

3(3-0)

Concertrates on duties of medical secretaries. Special attention given to medical vocabulary, typing, documents, filing and accounting. Prerequisites: E, R, OIS 114 or equivalent, OIS 217

261 OFFICE CO-OP I, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 3(1-15)

Allows students to work in approved office training station and earn credits for satisfactory secretarial experience. Minimum of 15 hours work per week required. Each student meets one hour per week with coordinator in related class. To participate in class, application must be placed with coordinator. Prerequisites: E, M, R, advanced standing in Office Information Systems program, 2.00 GPA or higher in all previous college work and approval of coordinator.

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262 OFFICE CO-OP II, SPRING

3(1-15)

Elective for students who successfully completed OIS 261. Minimum of 15 hours work per week required. Each student meets one hour per week with coordinator in related class. To participate in class, application must be placed with coordinator. Prerequisites: E, M, R, OIS 261 or equivalent, approval of coordinator.

PARAMEDIC

201 ADVANCED EMT II, SPRING

FEE, 8(8-0)

202 ADVANCED EMT LAB II, SPRING

FEE, 2(0-4)

203 ADVANCED EMT CLINICAL II, SPRING

FEE, 2(0-8)

204 ACLS, SPRING

FEE, 1(1-1)

This course involves medical procedures and use of equipment set forth by the U. S. DOT, MDCH and the AHA. Topics to be covered include rapid interpretation of ECG’s, static recognition of ECG’s, electrical therapy, pharmacological therapy, basic algorithms for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and ACLS. Also pathophysiology of heart disorders, 12 lead EKG interpretation, pediatric ACLS, pediatric pharmacological therapy. It will also include the MDCH requirements for trauma patient management. Prerequisites: E,M,R, PARA 101, 102, 103 and 104, with a grade of ”C” or better in each course. Provides the Paramedic student with skills requirements set forth by the MDCH. This course will include skill practice and scenarios with special emphasis on trauma management in spinal precautions, injuries to the; head, thoracic cavity, abdominal cavity, extremities, and shock treatment as well. This skills lab will also have emphasis on cardiac care. Areas to be covered would be; cardiac rhythm interpretation, treatment of the cardiac patient given various situations, acute myocardial infarction, angina, arrhythmias, Acute Coronary Syndrome, ACLS algorithms, 12 lead intrepretation, and pharmacological intervention. Preprequisites: E,M,R, PARA 101, 102, 103 and 104, with a grade of ”C” or better in each course. qthe U.S. DOTt& MDCH. This area of clinical will involve rotations with various departments within the hospital setting as well as rotations in the pre-hospital setting. Areas of concentration will be on advanced airway management, IV therapy, patient assessment and administration of cardiac medications, cardiac cath lab, and complete trauma care. (128 hours of clinical time will be done) Prerequisites: E,M,R, PARA 101, 102, 103 and 104, with a grade of ”C” or better in each course. This program is a 2 day provider course providing certification in ACLS this course is presented in a format to follow the AHA guidelines for ACLS. Prerequisites: E,M,R, PARA 101, 102, 103 and 104, with a grade of ”C” or better in each course.

PHILOSOPHY

101 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Nature of Philosophy by consideration of major types of philosophical questions, such as principles of rational belief, existence of God, pursuit of good life, nature of knowledge, problem of truth and verification and relationship of people to state. Establishes frames of reference so students can begin asking philosophical questions. Prerequisites: E, R

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

102 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Ways people reason and come to conclusions. Helps students to understand and evaluate other people’s arguments. Focus on ways to test reliability of own reasoning and construct sound arguments. Prerequisites: E, R

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

102 INTERMEDIATE VOLLEYBALL

ON DEMAND

1(0-2)

For students with experience playing power volleyball. Advanced offenses and defenses. Competitive tournaments run throughout class.

105 BOWLING, ON DEMAND

1(1-1)

Emphasis will be placed on fundamental skills including footwork, approach, delivery, timing, release, and scoring.

106 INTERMEDIATE BOWLING, ON DEMAND

1(1-1)

118 PHYSICAL CONDITIONING, FALL, SPRING

1(0-2)

Designed for the bowler who possesses basic techniques. Emphasis will include spare angles, ball drilling, lane maintenance, ball adjustment for strikes, and correction of form. Prerequisite: PHED 105 or equivalent Knowledge and appreciation of continued state of physical fitness. Personal fitness program developed and implemented. Actual implementation of individual’s personal fitness program.

124 WEIGHTLIFTING, FALL, SPRING

1(0-2)

125 INTERMEDIATE WEIGHTLIFTING FALL, SPRING

1(0-2)

Taught in classroom and gym. Classroom portion emphasizes human musculature as related to weight resistive programs. Lifting portion involves both weight training and cardiovascular with emphasis being total fitness.

Continuation of basic course. Individual programs designed based upon student goals. Opportunity to develop strength or body-building programs utilizing universal equipment and/or free weights. Prerequisite: PHED 124

133 BEGINNING VOLLEYBALL, ON DEMAND

1(0-2)

145 TOTAL FITNESS I

1(0-2)

Current rules, history, skill techniques of spike, service, forearm pass, setup, blocking and strategy. Tournaments conducted throughout class.

This is an individualized course which offers an introduction to and participation in multi-station aerobic super-circuit utilizing sub maximal weights with multiple repetitions. The class utilizes an open lab concept where students satisfy requirements of the class by attending open hours The average workout time for all stations including warm-up and cool down is 50 minutes. The course is taken for college-credit with a letter grade assigned. Prerequisites: None

146 TOTAL FITNESS II FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

1(0-2)

This class is designed for students who have successfully completed PHED146 Total Fitness I or PHED212 Health and Fitness and desire to continue to utilize the Wellness Center while earning college credit. This is an individualized course which offers a continuation of exercise with a multi-stations aerobic super-circuit or a specialized individual program. Prequisites: PHED145 or PHED212

200 HEALTHFUL LIVING, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

2(1-1)

212 HEALTH AND FITNESS FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(2-2)

214 PERSONAL HEALTH, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

216 HEALTH ISSUES: STRESS MANAGEMENT

2(2-0)

217 HEALTH ISSUES: SELF ESTEEM

1(2-0)

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with concepts of wellness and the relationship between physical activity and optimal health and fitness. Topics include CV disease, exercise, nutrition, weight management, behavior modification, stress, cancer, addiction and sexually transmitted infections. Prerequisites: none Note: Credits from only one of the following courses will count toward LMC graduation; PHED 200, 212 or 214.

This course combines classroom experience and personal exercise. Students establish knowledge of wellness, physical fitness, CV disease, nutrition, weight management, behavior modification, stress, cancer, addiction and sexually transmitted infections. Students implement an individualized exercise program and are required to exercise two days per week in the specified fitness center. Prerequisites: none Note: Credits from only one of the following courses will count toward LMC graduation; PHED 200, 212 or 214.

This course provides an understanding of the responsibility we have for our own health. Topics include CV disease, exercise, nutrition, weight management, behavior modification, stress, cancer, substance abuse, mental and emotional health, sexuality, contraception, infectious and non-infectious disease, personal safety, death and dying. Prerequisites: none Note: Credits from only one of the following courses will count toward LMC graduation; PHED 200, 212 or 214. Physiological responses to stress and developing techniques for better stress management. Assists in growth in ability to love and care for oneself and others . Techniques practiced daily to enhance self-esteem and variety of selfesteem issues presented.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

101 PHYSICAL SCIENCE: CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS FALL, SPRING 4(3-2)

Provides students the opportunity to explore the connections of chemistry and physics as it relates to a variety of occupations. Integrated areas covered include the fundamental principles of light, sound, motion, energy, electricity, magnetism, states of matter, semiconductors, digital imaging, instrumentation components and block diagrams, and scientific conversion/units. This course will require some online work and out-of-class testing. Prerequisite: E, R, and Math 095 (C. or better), or a College assessment score qualifying for MATH 122 or higher.

104 PHYSICAL GEOLOGY, FALL, SPRING

4(3-2)

Study of geologic processes. Topics include rock and mineral identification, topographic maps, plate tectonics and rock cycle, earthquakes and earth’s interior, role of wind and water, glaciation, deserts, mass wasting, shorelines, resources, geologic time and astrogeology. Includes a two hour laboratory experience per week. Prerequisites: E, M, R

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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205 WEATHER AND CLIMATE, SPRING

FEE, 4(3-2)

This laboratory-based course provides students with the opportunity to investigate the causes and the characteristics of the Earth’s weather and climate. Topics covered include: earth-sun relations, oceanic circulation, structure of the atmosphere, heating of the atmosphere and surface, global warming and the greenhouse effect, climate change, stability, moisture, cloud formation, precipitation, air pressure and wind, mid-latitude cyclones, global patterns of wind and precipitation, meteorological maps, severe weather, El Nino and La Nina, fronts and air masses, weather forecasting, and the scientific process. Students are expected to have the ability to use the internet. Prerequisites: E, M, R

280 PHYSICAL SCIENCE FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS II, SPRING 3(2-3) This is a laboratory-based course specifically designed for prospective elementary teachers. This course will aid students in developing meaningful and functional understanding of key physics concepts and their interrelations. This course is specifically designed to transfer to Western Michigan University’s Elementary Education program and may not transfer to other institutions. Prerequisites: E, M, R, and computer literacy.

290 EARTH SCIENCE FOR ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS II, SPRING FEE, 3(2-3)

The second of a two-course laboratory-based earth science sequence designed for preservice elementary and middle school teachers. The intent of this course is to acquaint future teachers with the important concepts of earth science, and to provide the basic tools of independent, creative inquiry that teachers can take into the classroom. Emphasis will be given to study of the geology of Earth. This course will explore the practice of science by incorporating inquiry-based activities into the pedagogy. This course is specifically designed to transfer to Western Michigan University’s Elementary Education program and may not transfer to other institutions. Prerequisite: E, M, R, and computer literacy.

PHYSICS

102 GENERAL PHYSICS II, SPRING

5(4-2)

Principles of electricity and magnetism, light and modern physics. Continuation of Physics 101. Includes a two hour laboratory experience per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 101

104 INTRODUCTION TO THE SKY AND SOLAR SYSTEM FALL, SPRING 4(3-2) Introduction to the night sky and our solar system including cycles of the Sun, Moon, planets, and constellations; the historical development of astronomy; basic properties of light and telescopes; nature and properties of the planets and the Sun; asteroids, meteorites, and comets; and the origin and evolution of the solar system. Includes laboratory component designed to illustrate and explore the topics covered. Includes a two hour laboratory experience per week. Prerequisites: E,M,R and MATH 095 (or equivalent)

110 TECHNICAL PHYSICS, SPRING

4(3-2)

Topics from general physics for students pursuing technical program; emphasis on matter, force, power, basic machines, torque, power transmission and topics from heat, sound and light. Includes a two hour laboratory experience per week. Prerequisites: M, R, MATH 110 or MATH 130

80

202 ENGINEERING PHYSICS II (ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM), SPRING

5(4-2)

Electricity, magnetism and light for Engineering, Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry transfer students. Includes a two hour laboratory experience per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 201

POLITICAL SCIENCE

101 NATIONAL GOVERNMENT, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER 3(3-0) Examine the structure and operation of the national government, the meaning and practice of democracy, the various power relationships, civil liberties and civil rights, as well as the American method of conducting elections. The role of citizens and their choices is also examined. Prerequisite: E, R

102 STATE GOVERNMENT, FALL, SPRING (SPRING & SUMMER, ON DEMAND)

3(3-0)

Examines political decision-making and public policies of state governments, with particular emphasis on Michigan. Analyzes both the relationships of states with the national government as well as each other, and contrasts policies and political structures in each state. Prerequisites: E, R

203 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS SPRING (EVEN YEARS) 3(3-0)

Examines the relations that exist among nation-states. Particular emphasis is placed upon the factors/variables contributing to national power, the instruments used by nation-states to promote their own interests and the methods used to control interstate relations such as international law, balance of power arrangements, pacific settlement of disputes and international organizations. Prerequisites: E, R

PSYCHOLOGY

201 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

203 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

204 CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND PERSONALITY FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

205 INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS, SPRING

3 (3-0)

Description, understanding and control of human behavior. Twofold aims: increase student ability to understand self and others and make more satisfactory adjustment to life and introduction to field of Psychology. Prerequisites: E, R

Physical, cognitive, social and emotional development from conception through death. Emphasis upon factors influencing development of personality. Prerequisites: E,R, PSYC201 with a C or better

Physical, social, intellectual and personality development from conception through adolescence. Emphasis upon factors influencing development of personality. Prerequisites: E,R, PSYC201 with a C or better

Interpersonal communication theory and practice to enhance effectiveness in interpersonal relations through better understanding of self and others. Topics include areas such as active listening behaviors, assertive confrontation and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: PSYC 201

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

231 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY, FALL, SPRING

3 (3-0)

Descriptions of cognitive, affective and behavioral disorders. Origins of specific disorders considered along with nature and problem of diagnosis and classification, and contemporary modes of treatment. Prerequisite: E,R, PSYC201 with a C or better

250 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH, SPRING 3(3-0)

Research process, from development of hypotheses to report of findings. Research strategies include survey research, experimental designs, interviewing, observation and content analysis. For Social Science majors who plan to transfer. Prerequisites: B or better in PSYC 201and permission of instructor

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY

140 RADIOGRAPHIC POSITIONING II, SPRING

FEE, 3(2-2)

Routine positioning of vertebral column, lower extremities, special views of body and related pathologies. Prerequisites: E, M, R, RADT 130, RADT 131, RADT 133

READING

081 READING IMPROVEMENT I FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

4(3-1)

Improves student academic preparedness. Emphasis on techniques and strategies to help improve reading skills, read more effectively and develop appreciation for reading. Computer-assisted instruction occurs in the Reading Laboratory. Prerequisite: Appropriate assessment Reading score

083 READING STRATEGIES I, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER 4(3-1) Provides techniques and strategies to help develop college-level vocabulary and reading proficiency. Emphasis on learning and practicing a combination of reading skills and integrating them into a college text. Computer-assisted instruction occurs in the Reading Laboratory. Prerequisite: Appropriate assessment Reading score, or READ 081

084 READING IMPROVEMENT II FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

4(3-1)

085 READING STRATEGIES II FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

2(0-2)

088 1100 WORDS (YOU NEED TO KNOW) FALL, SPRING

1 (0-2)

093 SUPER-SPEED READING, FALL, SPRING

1 (0-2)

099 SPELLING MASTERY, FALL, SPRING

1 (0-2)

110 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY VOCABULARY FALL, SPRING

1 (0-2)

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

81

141 CONTRAST STUDIES, SPRING

FEE, 3(2-2)

Anatomy and positioning of gastrointestinal, biliary, genitourinary systems, glands and related pathology. Prerequisites: E, M, R, RADT 130, RADT 131, RADT 133

142 RADIOGRAPHIC PHYSICS, SPRING

4(4-0)

Physics as related to the operation of x-ray equipment. Topics include atomic theory, x-ray properties, necessary units of measurement, electricity and electromagnetism, basic electrical circuit components, and electrical circuitry. Prerequisites: E, M, R and RADT 130, 131, 133.

143 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE B, SPRING FEE $16.50, 2(0-16)

Continuation of RADT 133. Students continue to refine positioning skills taught in the first semester, adding to their repertoire with positioning of lower extremity and spine. Prerequisites: E, M, R, RADT 130, 131, 133

240 RADIOGRAPHIC QUALITY, SPRING

4(2-2)

Lecture/lab course covering principles of radiographic image formation, quality assurance tests and technical variables that affect finished radiographs. Prerequisites: E, M, R, RADT 230, RADT 231, RADT 242

241 SPECIAL PROCEDURES/EMERGING MODALITIES SPRING 3(3-0) Specialized radiologic procedures including tomography, myelography and angiography. Introduction to other imaging’s modalities including CT, MRI and Sonography. Prerequisites: E, M, R, RADT 230, RADT 231, RADT 242

245 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE FALL, SPRING FEE $16.50, 3(0-24)

Weekly 24 hour clinical rotation at area health facilities. Students expected to perform more complex radiographic examinations in preparation for graduation from the program. Students will also participate in supervised clinical practicums in specialty imagining modalities. Modalities include: CT, MRI, Ultrasound, Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy, and Cardiovascular. Prerequisites: E, M, R, and RADT 230, 231, and 242.

Enables learners to acquire competencies needed for success in college courses. Emphasis on strategies necessary to deal with vocabulary required by college curriculum, content comprehension of college texts and other required readings, and ability to apply critical reading principles to reading materials. Computer-assisted instruction occurs in the Reading Laboratory. Prerequisite: Appropriate assessment Reading score, or READ 083

Interactive, computer delivered instructional course, teaching comprehension strategies through understanding, evaluating, and researching ideas, answering questions, and locating information. Goes beyond teaching of literal comprehension to include integration and synthesis of information. Prerequisite: Appropriate assessment Reading score or READ 084

Improves speaking and reading vocabulary. Vocabulary exercises employ techniques of using pronunciation symbols, using terms in context and completing sentences. Prerequisite: READ 096

Increases reading speed and comprehension. Utilizes individualized audio-visual techniques to fit needs, interests and abilities of student. Prerequisite: READ 085

For students with below-average spelling skills. Modular audio materials allow mastery to be accomplished individually.

Learn structure of medical vocabulary. Provides aids to pronunciation, spelling and meaning of continually expanding medical vocabulary. Utilizes audio-visual, programmed materials. Applies to General Studies and Associate Degrees. Prerequisite: R

SOCIOLOGY

WELDING

101 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY, FALL, SPRING, SUMMER

3(3-0)

201 MODERN SOCIAL PROBLEMS, FALL, SPRING

3(3-0)

Principles of human association and interaction, with emphasis on interrelationship of heredity, environment, culture, groups and institutions in life of humans and society. Prerequisites: E, R Contemporary social problems and related rehabilitative and ameliorative resources and approaches in solving problems, with emphasis on problems of inter-group and inter-culture conflicts regarding differing beliefs and value systems. Prerequisites: E, R

201 GMAW WELDING II, FALL, SPRING

FEE, 2(2-1)

202 GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING (GTAW), FALL, SPRING

FEE, 2(2-1)

Teaches students to weld on stainless steel and aluminum sheet metal and plate. The student will be able to differentiate, select proper electrodes, shielding gases, and properly adjust parameters. Emphasis is placed on axial spray, pulse spray and short circuit mode of transfer depending on base metal. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to weld in all positions, read some basic weld symbols, and have a basic understanding of written welding procedures. Preprequisites: WELD103 and WELD104, with a C or better

Is a study and operation of primarily gas tungsten arc welding on some mild steel, with the majority of work on stainless steel and aluminum. The student will learn about the different types of electrodes and shielding gases used in these processes. Students will be able to weld in all positions, read some basic weld symbols, and have a basic understanding of written welding procedures. Prerequisites: WELD103 and WELD201, with a C or better

202 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY, SPRING

3(3-0)

205 RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS

3(3-0)

203 GAS METAL ARC WELDING (GMAW) PRODUCTION, FALL, SPRING FEE, 2(2-1)

3(3-0)

204 SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING (SMAW), PRODUCTION, FALL, SPRING FEE, 1(1-2)

Personal, social and cultural factors relating to pre-marriage and marriage; emphasis on interpersonal aspects of marriage, parenthood and family living in a changing world. Students with sophomore standing preferred. Prerequisites: E, R Studies of divisions among people along racial and ethnic heritages in today’s American society. Includes various ethnic groups from five categories: 1) European ethnics; 2) Hispanic ethnics; 3) Asian ethnics; 4) historically American subjugated ethnics; and 5) socio-religious ethnic minorities. Prerequisites: E, R

210 SOCIOLOGY OF AGING, FALL, SPRING

The study of the socio-cultural, economic, and physical aspects of aging in the United States and other societies with an emphasis on the diversity of the aging process. Prerequisites: E,R

TRADE RELATED INSTRUCTION 105 APPLIED TRIGONOMETRY II, FALL, SPRING

2(2-0)

Oblique angle trigonometry which incorporates law of sines, cosines, cotangents and right triangles in solving practical shop problems. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or TRIN 107

145 GEOMETRIC TOLERANCING AND POSITIONING SPRING

2(2-0)

Second in a series of three blueprint reading courses providing an in-depth study of interpreting geometric tolerancing as it is used on blueprints in today’s industrial environment. Prerequisites: M, R, TRIN144, MACH 110, MATH 100

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An emphasis on metal cored and flux cored electrodes. The main focus is skill enhancement to set standards set forth in AWAS and steel building construction codes. The testing will consist primarily of 0.375” and 1.00” carbon steel in the 3G and 4G positions. Prerequisites: WELD103 and WELD201, with a C or better

A continuation of SMAW Welding I (WELD102). The primary emphasis will be in the use of E6010, E7018 and E8018 electrodes within the parameters set forth in the various welding codes. The students will enhance skills to standards set forth in AWS, ASME and steel building codes. The testing will incorporate 3G and 4G positions with both carbon steels and stainless steels. Prerequisites: WELD102, with a C or better

205 GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING (GTAW) PRODUCTION, FALL, SPRING FEE, 1(1-2)

A continuation of GTAW Welding (WELD202). The primary emphasis will be in the use of the various tungsten electrodes being used in industry. The main focus is skill enhancement to standards set forth in AWS, ASME and API codes. The students will be tested in the 3G and 4G plate positions in steel applications, with the greatest emphasis being in the 5G and 6G positions using thin wall stainless steel pipe and tubing and aluminum plate less than 0.315” thick. Prerequisited: WELD202, with a C or better

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Campus

Maps Napier Avenue Campus

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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84

A201 A202 A203 A204 A205 A206 A207 A208 A209 A210 A212 A213 A214 A215 A216 A217 A218 A219 A220 A221 A222 B200 B202 B203 B204

Director, Financial Aid Financial Aid Office Financial Aid Office Financial Aid Student Information Center Accounts Receivable Cashier’s Office Generalists Career & Transfer Center Switchboard Director, Enrollment Management Academic Advisor/International Academic Advisor Lead Academic Advisor Vice President, Student Services Copy Room Academic Advisor Academic Advisor Registrar Records Records Assessment Center Learning Assistance Center Writing Lab Reading Lab

Richard J. Pappas Student Services Center

Napier Avenue Campus

C202 C203 C204 C205 C205a C205b C206 C207 C208 C209 C209a C211 C211a D201a D202a D113 D122 F152

Conference Room Writing Lab Math Lab Trio Lab Student Support Services, Academic Transfer Advisor Student Support Services, Educational Skills Specialist Staff Lounge Conference Room Siena Heights University Student Resource Center Director, Special Populations Special Populations Financial Services Director, Student Support Services Classroom Educational Opportunity Center Director, Educational Opportunity Center Upward Bound Director, Upward Bound Admissions Lead Admission Specialist Catch the Dream Director Catch the Dream Mendel Center

Maps C201b

B206 B207 B208 C201 C201a

Campus

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Campus

Maps

Bertrand Crossing Campus Map Linemen Area

Metalworking/Robotics Lab 106

Open Lab 102

Faculty Chemistry Lab 116

Dental Assisting Classroom 123

Biology Lab 114

Classroom 117

Mens Room

Classroom 115

Womens Room

Fab Lab 108

Computer Computer Classroom Classroom 113 111

Computer Lab 104

Classroom 106a

Class room 109b

Class room 109a

2 Way Classroom Video 105 Classroom 107

Michigan Works 100

Office 101

M-TECSM Map

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

85

Campus

Maps

South Haven Map

Michigan Works!

Michigan Works!

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Bo

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Classroom

Classroom

86

Lake Michigan College • Spring 2012 • 1-800-252-1562 • Get the most up-to-date course info at www.lakemichigancollege.edu

Programs

of Study

Career Education

Career Education programs at Lake Michigan College can prepare you for many well-paying, in-demand careers that require two years of college or less. The programs LMC offers are listed below. Associate degree options are available in each area of study. Those programs indicated with * also are offered in a 30+ credit hour certificate. Accounting Administrative Office Systems* Agriculture–Applied Plant Science Agriculture–Viticulture Business Administration Computer Information Systems– Information Technology Computer Information Systems– Networking Option

Computer Information Systems– Programming Option Computer Information Systems– Web Option Computer Science (WMU) Corrections, Probation & Parole Dental Assisting* Diagnostic Medical Sonography Drafting & Design*

Early Childhood Education* Education - Elementary (WMU) Energy Production Technology General Technology Graphic Design* Hospitality Management* Industrial Maintenance Technology Law Enforcement Legal Office Systems*

Manufacturing Engineering (WMU) Machine Tool Technology* Magnetic Resonance Imaging* Management & Marketing Medical Office Assistant* Music Nursing (RN) (LPN*) Paramedic* Radiologic Technology Skilled Trades Technology*

Other Apprentice Training Apprentice training courses offered at Bertrand Crossing Campus and M-TEC at Lake Michigan College facility Cardio Respiratory Care (with KVCC) Cisco Certificate of Achievement Computer Information Systems– Technology Level I Certificate Computer Information Systems– PC and Network Technician Level I Certificate Computer Information Systems– Programming Level I Certificate Computer Information Systems– Web Level I Certificate Corrections Officer Most courses offered at Kalamazoo Valley Community College through a consortium. Customer Service Level I Certificate Dental Hygiene (1+2 KVCC) First year classes offered at LMC. Remaining classes offered at Kalamazoo Valley Community College. Drafting and Design Level I Certificate Emergency Medical Technician Most courses offered off site. Fire Science (with KVCC) Most courses offered at Kalamazoo Valley Community College through a consortium.

Fluid Power Certificate (Industrial Maintenance Technology) Level I Certificate Industrial Computing (Industrial Maintenance Technology) Level I Certificate General Education Law Enforcement (1+1 KVCC) First year classes offered at LMC. Remaining classes offered at Kalamazoo Valley Community College. Machine Tool (Machine Tool Technology) Level I Certificate Management Level I Certificate Manufacturing Production (Machine Tool Technology) Level I Certificate Marketing Level I Certificate Medical Assistant (1+2 KVCC) First year classes offered at LMC. Remaining classes offered at Kalamazoo Valley Community College. Numerical Control Specialty (Machine Tool Technology) Level I Certificate Respiratory Care (1+2 with KVCC) First year classes offered at LMC. Remaining classes offered at Kalamazoo Valley Community College. Office Automation Specialist Technology Level I Certificate Water Purification Technology (1+2 with Bay de Noc Community College) First year classes offered at LMC. Remaining classes offered at Bay de Noc Community College.

Areas of Study Leading to Associate in Art, Science, and General Studies Degrees

Based on your goals and interests, you can select from many areas of study that will lead to Associate in Arts, General Studies, and Sciences degrees. The Associate in Arts is generally used for Humanities and Social Science areas of study, and the Associate in Science generally is used for areas of study with more mathematics and science requirements. Art Athletic Training (Pre) Biology Chemistry Chiropractic (Pre) Communication Dentistry (Pre) Education - Elementary Education - Secondary Engineering (Pre)

English Environmental Science Foreign Language Forensics (Pre) General Studies Geography Geology Health History Humanities

Law (Pre) Liberal Arts Mathematics Medicine & Osteopathic Medicine (Pre) Mortuary Science (Pre) Music Optometry (Pre) Pharmacy (Pre) Philosophy Physical Education & Wellness

Physical Therapy (Pre) Physical Science Physician’s Assistant (Pre) Physics Political Science Psychology Sociology/Social Work (Pre) Theatre Veterinary (Pre)

All times are Michigan Time • Returning students– sign up for classes online with WaveLink, visit wavelink.lakemichigancollege.edu

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Napier Avenue Campus 2755 E. Napier Avenue, Benton Harbor, MI 49022

269-927-8100

Bertrand Crossing Campus 1905 Foundation Drive, Niles, MI 49120

269-695-1391

M-TECSM at Lake Michigan College 400 Klock Road, Benton Harbor, MI 49022

269-926-6832

South Haven Campus 125 Veterans Boulevard, South Haven, MI 49090

269-637-7500

1-800-252-1562 • www.lakemichigancollege.edu Lake Michigan College is an equal opportunity institution, affording enrollment, employment and services without distinction on the basis of age, color, height, weight, creed, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, national origin, political affiliation, race, religion, or gender.

Lake Michigan College Board of Trustees Ms. Judy Truesdell, Chair • Dr. David Maysick, Vice-chair • Ms. Renee Williams, Secretary • Ms. Mary Jo Tomasini, Treasurer Mr. Paul Bergan, Trustee • Dr. Michael Lindley, Trustee • Mr. Pat Moody, Trustee Dr. Robert Harrison, President

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© 2011 Lake Michigan College


Lake Michigan College Spring Semester Class Schedule