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H EALT H + FINANCE S + RE S OURCE S

SENIORITY S

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An Active Resource for 55+

+Let Inga Tell You: Remodeling Her Estate Plan +Communities Offer Diverse Services, Classes +Key Steps to Keep Your Bones Strong

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Table of C ontents

5.......Let Inga tell you: Remodeling her estate plan 6.......Communities offer variety of services, classes 10.....Key steps to take to keep bones healthy and strong 12.....Best ways to shed pounds after 50 14.....Finding time to exercise 16.....Things to consider as retirement approaches 18.....How to make informed healthcare decisions 20.....Ways to avoid overspending as retirement nears 24.....How to improve your heart health 26.....Essential senior resources Published by MainStreet Media San Diego 565 Pearl Street, La Jolla, CA 92037 | (858) 459-4201 Phyllis Pfeiffer, Publisher Don Parks, Chief Revenue Officer/General Manager Contents of Seniority San Diego Š 2013-2014

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Let Inga teLL You...

Remodeling our estate plan Y

when both kids and families show up. We think ou know you’re it will make a wonderful remodel for someone. getting older But we’re not those someones. when you catch I’ll confess that a part of me has always your adult kids walking regretted that the timing was never right for around with a tape that view remodel (divorce, college bills, etc.). measure envisioning As we’ve explained to the kids, the house, the the remodel after cars, and their educations are finally paid for. you’re dead. Actually, We’re definitely not looking for more debt, exin our younger son’s case, he’s sort of hoping cept at tax time when we realize our deducfor the remodel before we’re dead. “You could tionless tax burden singlehandedly supports really do something with this place,” he enseveral branches of thuses hopefully when state and federal govhe and his wife and the ernment. kids and dog are down We’ve told our for the weekend. He enyounger son that we visions, at minimum, a think all of his remodel second story master ideas are wonderful and suite angled to maximize that we will be happily what would be an unoblooking down (or up) on structable ocean view, a them when the time wrap-around front porch comes. He actually for waving to the neighowns his own house in bors in our family-friendL.A. so it’s not like he ly neighborhood, and and his family don’t reconverting the ill-conhave a nice roof over sidered 1955 garage retheir heads. But I think model back into a gaWhen our kids do the remodel, all we if you grow up in La Jolrage (amen to that). ask is an ocean view. la, you never lose the We’re very clear that his draw to this place. fantasies include a reOf course, the other way you know you’re model to his specifications on our dime. getting old besides the kids standing on the We couldn’t agree more that this tiny roof with a sketch pad is you have to set up house on a prime lot could be morphed into a those nagging Living Will instructions. (It’s really fantastic place. It’s had a lot of interior pretty much all down hill once you wake up on upgrades over time but it is still the original your 50th birthday and find both an AARP card 1947 footprint. Its 1,600 square feet (including and an appointment for a routine colonoscopy the converted garage) felt enormous when my in the mail.) But one does have to decide at ex and I bought it in 1973, much smaller when we added two kids, positively palatial when the kids departed, and now totally sardine-ish C o N T I N U E D o N PA G E 7

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Communities offer variety of services, classes By Kathy Day

W

e’ve heard it all before — people are living longer, healthier lives. And if you pay attention to Census numbers and county estimates, the senior population is growing faster than the population as a whole. That means more people will be looking for services to help them in their later years. The regional planning agency known as SANDAG estimates that between 2000 and 2013 the number of residents in both the 60plus and 65-plus age groups will increase by 130 percent, while the general population increase is expected to be 38 percent. And, as baby boomers continue to age, those numbers are expected to grow significantly in years to come. “Caring for seniors is one of the most pressing issues families face today,” says Dave Roberts, San Diego County supervisor and former Solana Beach city councilman. “Government can provide assistance, but we cannot do it all.” The county offers more than 30 programs through its Aging and Independence Services (AIS) division, http://tinyurl. com/7du6huj or (800) 510-2020, and the City of San Diego offers some classes and occasional special activities, such as dances at its recreation centers in Carmel Valley and La Jolla. For community-specific information, visit http://tinyurl.com/kl2r95g or call (619) 525-8213. Ellen Schmeding, AIS director, said, “We want to do everything we can to help clients live safely in their homes, while encouraging them to remain active and find continued meaning in their lives.” But in the face of tighter government budgets, nonprofit organizations are carrying a bigger load in helping to meet older adults’ needs around the region.

PERcENT oF PoPULATIoN 60 oR oLDER: Del Mar: 32 Solana Beach: 22 Carmel Valley: 7 La Jolla: 27 Rancho Santa Fe*: 12 * (includes 4S Ranch by census area) SOURCE: SANDAG (San Diego Association of Governments)

lana Beach Senior Community Center for 25 of its 27 years, said seniors are often searching for a connection or a purpose. “We have folks who have lived in the area forever and others who are transplants,” she said. Some moved to the area when their spouse died or to be closer to their children, or perhaps they have been a caregiver for years. “There is a tremendous need for people to stay socially connected, to have fellowship with people.” The center, an outreach program of Solana Beach Presbyterian Church at 120 Stevens Ave., http://tinyurl.com/lq8fkbv or (858) 509-2580, serves Solana Beach as well as surrounding communities. People come from as far as La Jolla, Escondido and Oceanside, as well as neighboring Del Mar and Carmel Valley. Participants do not have to be members of the church, Wright said, inviting people to join them for discussion groups, classes and outings, as well as projects like knitting caps and blankets for the children of military members. “Many people come here for a sense of purpose,” she said. “It gives them an opportunity to be involved and give back.” Some people also make lasting friendships, including, in a few cases, ones that re-

s oLA N A b E Ach

Cindy Wright, who has been with the So-

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some point who will make decisions for one’s health care once neither you nor your spouse are able to. Did we want to appoint our older son, the clinical social worker who runs programs for the homeless and has done hospice care? Or should we go for the younger son who has an MBA? In our fantasies, the social worker kid is sitting by our bedside adjusting our blankets and patiently listening to our endless repetitious stories as he quietly strokes our hands. The MBA kid, we envision, is parked on the other side, ear buds cranked up to 120 decibels to drown out the annoying stories, comforting us with one hand, and calculating the negative cash flow of long-term care on his Blackberry with the other. Next thing we know, Pffft! Someone accidentally trips over the plug and we’re buried in the back yard. For the record, the MBA kid does not find this story funny at all, insisting that a business

degree would hardly prevent him from making compassionate decisions about our care. And besides, he points out, there’s barely enough room in the back yard to park the two of us without having to replace the entire irrigation system. And where’s the economy in THAT? Actually, said my husband, Olof, the tripping over the plug part, intentionally or not, didn’t sound half bad. Put us out of our misery. Besides, for all we’d know, it was the social worker kid, driven cumulatively mad after the 500th repetition of the infamous dead possum incident, whose foot suddenly intersected with the power cord. And if it came right down to it, burying us in the back yard (despite being massively illegal) actually sounds kind of charming given our fondness for the place. But one request: When you do the remodel, can we have a spot with a view? ■ — If you like La Jolla resident Inga’s lighthearted looks at life, you can find her in the La Jolla Light or at www.lajollalight.com.

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C o N T I N U E D F R o M PA G E 6

sulted in marriage, Wright added. LA Jo LLA

That connection is a common bond many are looking for when they turn to programs like the La Jolla Community Center, formerly the Riford Center, www.ljcommunity center.org or (858) 459-0831. Described by Executive Director Nancy Walters as a place to come for “lifelong learning, friendship and wellness,” the center offers programs similar to those at the Solana Beach center. From fitness, cooking, language and art classes to bridge groups and day trips, the La Jolla center at 6811 La Jolla Blvd. gives members a break on fees and some activities are free. Non-members are welcome, too, although they pay higher prices, Walters said. “It is really neat to see the friendships that are formed,” she said. DEL MAR

Del Mar Community Connections, like the La Jolla Center, is a nonprofit organization “providing programs and services since 1999 that allow our maturing and specific needs residents to live safely, vibrantly and independently in the homes they love rather than moving to a retirement or assisted living facility,” explained Program Director Heather Glenn. The center is located in the Community Building at 225 9th St. in Del Mar, www. dmcc.cc or (858) 792-7565. The centers are about more than just socializing, the directors noted. For example, Glenn cited transportation and housing assistance, elder law and legal clinic services, and programs like Dr. Mark Kalina’s Senior Health Forum. And each organization plans special programs on topics such as disaster preparedness or driver safety courses and can even pitch in — as DMCC does — with pet adoption services and lost pet email alerts. RA NC H o sAN TA F E

In Rancho Santa Fe, older residents often turn to the Rancho Santa Fe Senior Center, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary in November. Located at 16780 La Gracia,

Local community groups challenge seniors to stay active and be creative. www.rsfseniors.org or (858) 756-3041, the center meets the social service needs of the community while also being a place for enrichment and emotional support in times of crisis. Terrie Litwin, executive director, said they serve several hundred people a month on average. With no membership or residence requirement, participants can pick and choose according to their needs and interests. She said the most popular programs are lectures, particularly those on health topics, and their arts classes, from oil painting and writing to acting. They have even inspired some people to pursue their creative passions beyond their own expectations. “One gentleman published a novel and several have gone on to acting in local theater groups,” Litwin noted. s o RREN To VA L L Ey

That creative urge also has an outlet in Sorrento Valley aimed at seniors. Villa Musica, www.villamusica.org or (858) 550-8100, describes itself as “San Diego’s community music center.” A nonprofit founded in 2005, it recently launched a Creative Aging Program that includes a class called “Your Life Story: Explorations in Music and Memory,” as well as a Tuesday concert series. Other specialized programs for seniors include the membership-based Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, which operates through UCSD Extension. It offers educa-

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tional and cultural programs for retirees, olli. ucsd.edu or (858) 534-3409. And The Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center in La Jolla has its own programs aimed at seniors, emphasizing Jewish cultural heritage and values, www.lfjcc.org or (858) 362-1141. GET T I NG ARo UN D

In some instances, older adults who want to partake in the area’s programs and services — or just want to get to a doctor’s appointment or the grocery store — are no longer driving. That is a major concern for Sherri Lightner, San Diego city councilwoman and council president pro tem, who says she is “committed to making San Diego an age-friendly city” and Supervisor Roberts, who has worked to find ways for seniors to get around for more than a decade. Among the groups Lightner has assisted by providing grant funding is Rides & Smiles, one of the many programs provided by Jew-

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ish Family Service of San Diego. Serving Carmel Valley and recently expanding to Del Mar, the program utilizes volunteer drivers to take older adults to medical and personal appointments, the Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center or area synagogues. Visit www.jfssd.org/onthego or call (858) 6377320. Del Mar’s Community Connections also offers a volunteer driving service and residents of Solana Beach, west of I-5, can ride NCTD’s 357 bus for $2.50 each way within a zone that extends to Encinitas. While transportation is an issue for many seniors, so, too, is nutrition. Programs like La Jolla Meals on Wheels and Greater San Diego Meals on Wheels are often lifesavers with their regular deliveries. The La Jolla program, independent from the regional group, delivers meals twice a day, Monday through Friday, www.lajollamealsonwheels.org or (858) 452-0391. The Greater San Diego group, www.meals-on-wheels.org or (619) 295-9501, deliver once or twice a day. ■

WE’RE WITH YOU

When you need reliable transportation, help paying bills, or want to volunteer in your community. When you need a warm meal delivered, personalized care, or to connect with others at a social & wellness center. Even when you just need a friendly conversation— we're here for you, throughout the entire aging process. To learn more, visit our website or give us a call. We look forward to hearing from you.

www.jfssd.org/olderadults • (858) 637-3040 Serving the Entire Community

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Key steps to take to keep bones healthy and strong

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s men and women age, many take steps to improve their overall health. These steps can be as simple as cutting back on dinner portions or as significant as joining a gym and committing to an exercise regimen. One of the best things men and women can do to improve their health, as well as their quality of life, as they age is to protect their bones. Though some are aware of the importance of protecting their bones, which weaken as the aging process progresses, leaving older adults susceptible to fractures, many might not know that protecting their bones is quite simple. What’s more, many of the roughly two million bone fractures caused by osteoporosis, a medical condition in which the bones become brittle from loss of tissue, are preventable. Men and women who heed the following tips to help protect their bones can reduce their risk of fractures as they age.

Get a bone density test from your doctor and then get out and get moving to protect your bones. tified cereals and juices, dark leafy greens like broccoli, almonds and a host of dairy products.

* GET youR cALcIum ANd vITAmIN d.

Many people are aware that calcium and vitamin D promote bone health. However, a 2005 study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocriology found that 52 percent of postmenopausal women on osteoporosis treatment had insufficient levels of vitamin D, despite being told by their doctors to take both vitamin D and calcium. If your diet does not include adequate vitamin D, which can be found in fortified dairy products, egg yolks and fish, then vitamin D supplements can help meet your needs. Calcium can be found in a variety of products, including for-

* v IsIT you R ph ysIc IA N . Few people

might know that bone health is actually measurable. A bone density screening can assess your bone health, while FRAX®, an online tool developed by the World Health Organization, evaluates an individual’s risk of fracture based on a host of factors, including age, weight, height and medical history. FRAX® models give a 10-year probability of fracture, which can help prevent injuries down the road for people whose risk might not be immediate. The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends all women be-

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gin bone density screenings at age 65. However, women with additional risk factors, including smokers, those with low weight or a thin frame, family history of osteoporosis, late onset of menstrual periods, and a history of anorexia or bulimia, should consult their physician about screenings regardless of their age. * GET o uT ANd E x E R c I s E . Exercise is another great way to protect your bones. Unless you suddenly embrace competitive weightlifting, exercise won’t increase your bone density, but it will help you maintain the bone density you already have. Something as simple as walking can help maintain bone density, as can other weight-bearing activities like jogging. Cardiovascular weight-bearing activities can be coupled with strength training, which recent studies have found may improve bone mineral density, something that could delay the onset of osteoporosis and reduce your risk of fracture. A gym will likely have all of

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s E N I o R I T y FA c T

“Everyone grows old eventually. How you live can determine how old you actually become.” the strength-training materials you will need, but you can also purchase hand weights or additional resistance training products to ensure your bones are getting adequate exercise. Consult a physician before beginning an exercise regimen, especially if you have recently had a fracture. More information about bone health is available at www.nof.org. ■

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Best ways to shed pounds after 50

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osing weight is a goal for many people regardless of age. While youngsters and young adults might be able to get away with a few extra pounds without suffering any significant consequences, older adults carrying extra weight might be putting their overall health at considerable risk. Shedding weight after the age of 50 is not always easy. As a person ages, muscle mass tends to dwindle while body fat has a tendency to increase. Since fat burns fewer calories than muscle, it is easier to gain weight as we grow older. But weight gain is not inevitable. In fact, men and women willing to make certain changes with regard to diet and exercise can shed pounds after 50 while preventing future weight gain. DIET

Men and women need fewer calories as they age. For example, men and women in their 40s may need as many as 200 calories more per day than they will when they reach their 50s. Counting calories might seem difficult, so men and women in their 50s and older who don’t think they can count calories can try to eat more low-calorie foods like fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Consuming fewer calories often requires changing dietary habits, not only with regard to what you’re eating but also how you’re eating and even how you shop for food. If you often go out for lunch, bring your lunch from home to gain greater control of your daily caloric intake. If you’re too exhausted to cook every night, prepare meals in advance to have healthy, homemade meals waiting instead of ordering takeout or delivery. When

Men and women need fewer calories as they get older and consequently need to change their eating habits.

shopping for food, avoid doing so on an empty stomach so you’re less inclined to buy unhealthy snacks. E x ERcIsE

Exercise is another essential component to shedding pounds after 50, though you should always consult a physician before you begin a new exercise regimen. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention points out that regular exercise can help older men and women prevent the onset of a host of ailments, including heart disease and diabetes. In addition, the CDC notes that regular physical activity as one ages helps muscles grow stronger, which increases the chances that an individual will be able to perform necessary daily activities without the assistance of others. Maintaining that independence into older adulthood is a goal for many men and women, and it’s a goal that’s far more realistic for men and women who

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exercise than it is for those who don’t. When coupled with a healthy, low-calorie diet, routine exercise can help men and women over 50 shed extra weight and keep the weight off once it’s gone. According to the CDC, older adults need at least two hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intense aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, every week and muscle-strengthening activities twice a week. Muscle-strengthening activities should work all the major muscle groups, including the legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms. Muscle-strengthening activities include lifting weights, working out with resistance bands, exercise such as push-ups and sit-ups that use body weight for resistance, and yoga. Even gardening that involves digging and shoveling can be considered a muscle-strengthening activity. Weight gain is often an expected side effect of aging. But men and women don’t have to gain weight as they get older. Some simple dietary changes and a commitment

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Weight lifting when coupled with a healthy diet will help men and women lose weight.

to routine exercise is all it takes to shed weight after 50 and keep that weight off once it’s gone. ■

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Get up early to exercise and you’ll start your day feeling great.

Finding time for exercise

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any men and women cite hectic schedules as the primary reason they fail to get enough exercise. Commitments to work and family may dominate your schedule, but daily exercise can drastically reduce your risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes and help reduce stress. Because exercise can vastly improve quality of life and even life expectancy, it’s imperative that even the busiest men and women find time to exercise several times per week. The following are a handful of ways to do just that. *

T RANs F o R m

youR

c om m u T E .

Many men and women find their commutes to be a significant waste of time. But instead of sitting in traffic or napping on public transportation, consider transforming your daily commute into an exercise regimen. If you live close to your office, ride your bicycle to

work each day rather than driving or taking the bus or train. If that’s not an option, avoid working during your commute so you aren’t stressing out on your way into or home from the office. Instead, spend your commute listening to an audiobook in the car or reading a book or watching a movie if you take public transportation. Use your commute as an opportunity to exercise, ease into your day or unwind after a long day rather than extending the workday. * mA kE ThE mosT oF you R LuNch ho u R. Many working professionals are

aware that a big lunch in the middle of the day can drain them of energy and make the afternoon crawl. So instead of indulging in a big lunch, use your lunch hour to squeeze in a workout. If your company has an on-site fitness facility, visit it during your lunch hour. If not, walk around the campus during lunch instead of sitting at your desk. Exercising

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during your lunch hour is a great way to squeeze in a workout, and chances are your afternoon productivity will benefit from your midday workout. * GET up E ARLy. Men and women who workout in the morning often rave about the impact such workouts have on the rest of their days. While it might not be easy to rise when it’s still dark out, waking up as little as 30 minutes before you normally would can work wonders. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend adults get at least two hours and 30 minutes of moderateintensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, every week and some muscle-strengthening activities that focus on all the major muscle groups on two or more days per week. So setting your alarm 30 minutes earlier and making the most of that dusty fitness equipment in the basement is all that stands between you and a much healthier lifestyle. Once you get used to exercising in the early morning hours, you might realize just how

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much more energy you have throughout the day and how little you miss that extra sleep in the morning.

* FoRGo h A ppy h ou R FoR WoRkou T h ou R. The days when professionals

would finish off a workday with a few drinks at a nearby tavern are largely a thing of the past, but some professionals still like to indulge in one or two alcoholic beverages at the end of the workday. If that’s your modus operandi but you bemoan your lack of time to get to the gym, then say goodbye to happy hour in favor of working out at the gym. Working out after work is a healthier way to relieve stress than having a few drinks, and choosing to work out instead of going out for drinks is a great way to trim your waistline. Daily exercise can drastically improve your quality of life while significantly reducing your risk for potentially deadly diseases. And even the busiest men and women can find time to exercise every day when motivated to do so. ■

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Things to consider as retirement approaches

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hough many people are delaying retirement, the day will still come when they leave their jobs behind and retire. Retirement can be a difficult adjustment that takes some getting used to, but it can also prove an exciting time, especially for those who planned ahead to ensure their retirement was a time to be cherished and not feared. Whether retirement is right around the corner or still a decade or so away, men and women should consider several factors to make sure their retirement years are an enjoyable time that allows them to live life to the fullest. * INcomE : Just because you’re no longer

spoNsoRED coNTENT

Remington Club Resort Retirement

working doesn’t mean you won’t have income. Government benefits, retirement accounts and perhaps even some light consulting work are just a few ways retirees can earn an income. Though your retirement income will likely pale in comparison to your income as an adult working full-time, estimate what that income will be so you can get at least an idea of how much will be coming in each month. * 0 moNThLy ExpENsEs: Once you have an idea of what’s coming in, estimate how much will be going out each month. Certain costs associated with working, such as the cost of commuting and maintaining a professional wardrobe, can be removed

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AIS: Helping Seniors & Disabled

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Visit www.TheRemingtonclub.com or call (858) 673-6340.

For more information about AIs, visit www.ais-sd.org or www.sand iego.networkofcare.org/aging. you can also contact the AIs call center toll-free at (800) 510-2020.

he Remington Club is a luxury, full-service, resort-style, rental retirement community in Rancho Bernardo. With breathtaking views as well as a nearly perfect climate, we are walking distance to restaurants, shopping, banking, a post office and medical facilities. We provide a wide range of services and care options, including independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing. We do the cooking, cleaning, and we’ll even do the driving. We offer stimulating activities such as social, recreational and spiritual programs designed to enhance the lives of our residents.

hen you don’t know where to turn for comprehensive information and impartial help, turn to Aging and Independence Services, a division of San Diego County’s Health and Human Services Agency. AIS provides more than 30 different programs that benefit older adults and individuals with disabilities. AIS can help with finding in-home care, meal programs, classes, reporting suspected elder abuse, volunteer opportunities, veterans services, and much more.

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from the ledger. But other expenses, including utilities, car payments and possibly even a mortgage payment, will still need to be made. Once you have an idea of your projected income and your expenses during retirement, work on a prospective budget that details what you will need to live on during retirement. * EmpLo ymE N T: Many people now look at retirement as the end of one career and the beginning of another. As retirement draws closer, men and women might want to consider turning an interest or passion into a second career. Such a move might make retirement more exciting while removing some of the fear of finding enough things to pass the time that many people have with regard to retirement. * RELo cAT I o N : Where to spend your retirement years is another thing to consider before the big day arrives. Do you, like many retirees, prefer to stay in your own home? Do you want to relocate to a warmer climate or

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move to another country? Do you want to move closer to your children and grandchildren? Do you want to split your time in separate cities? Is a retirement village something you might be amenable to? Each of these options is different, and each requires a different financial commitment, so carefully consider where you want to spend your retirement and then consider how you can make those wishes a reality. * m EdIcA L cosT s: Private insurance or government-sponsored programs likely won’t cover all of your medical costs, which typically increase as a person ages. There are various ways to prepare for the medical costs that might arise during retirement, and the earlier you start that preparation the less stressful paying for medical care as you age figures to be. Retirement should be an exciting time for men and women, especially for those who have spent years planning their retirement to ensure it’s as enjoyable as possible. ■

A Senior Residential Community Devoted to Enhancing Life for Those with Memory Loss

6255 Nygaard St. Carlsbad, CA 92009 800-896-2980 activcareliving.com

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How to make informed healthcare decisions

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he typical healthcare patient has changed in recent years. No longer are individuals putting all of their healthcare decisions into the hands of nurses and doctors. Patients are more informed than ever before and are interested in taking a more active role in their own care. Thanks to the Internet, people are able to access information that, in the past, was not easily available. A few decades ago, medical data may have been elusive and filled with confusing jargon the layperson might not have understood without a crash course in biology. However, today there are different websites that clearly spell out information about certain illnesses and diseases. This means that patients may no longer be walk-

ing blindly into appointments with doctors. Facing an illness is never easy, and the decision-making abilities could be hampered by emotions and the desire to improve as quickly as possible. Patients who do not have all of the facts may have to rely solely on the expertise of caregivers and physicians when making important healthcare decisions. By knowing the avenues of information, a patient can find assistance with careful decision-making. While learning about an ailment is important, there are some things to consider. * Th E IN TERN ET IsN’T F ooL PRooF.

Many online medical sites are very reliable and offer a wealth of pertinent information. They can be good starting points when seek-

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Casa de Manana Retirement Community: Rich in Tradition, Beauty and Style on the La Jolla Coast

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ich in tradition, beauty and style, the award-winning Casa de Mañana is a place to enjoy the best in retirement living. Featuring Spanish-style architecture set amid gorgeous ocean vistas, Casa de Mañana is a world-class retirement experience on the La Jolla coast. Casa de Mañana features modern amenities but retains its classic style with cathedral ceilings, Spanish-arched picture windows and sunny patios from its early days as a luxury hotel. Many accommodations, including beachfront villas, feature breathtaking views of the Pacific. An ocean view greets residents in the main dining room, lower lounge and library. And if you need a little extra help with daily activities, Casa de Mañana offers assisted living services. Located near culturally-rich La Jolla Village, Casa de Mañana residents and visitors need not sacrifice convenience and culture to live in a quiet setting. Climate, culture, entertainment, service — and the ocean, too! Casa de Mañana is an ideal community where you can enjoy the best years of your life. Call us today at (800) 959-7010 or visit us online at www.casademanana.org for a tour.

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ing information on a particular condition. It is in your best interest to visit sites that are wellknown and monitored by respected medical affiliations. Other sites may be peppered with exaggerated claims or misinformation. Therefore, do not go by online information alone.

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a second opinion or go to a published medical journal to find out more about a condition. You have rights as a patient to be comfortable with the advice doctors give and be as involved in your treatment as you want to be.

* oN L IN E FoR u ms cou L D Do moRE hA Rm Th A N hEL p. Many people turn to on-

* DoN ’ T s E L F - DI A g N os E .

It can be easy to use the Internet line forums and blogs to gain as a means to narrowing down insight into particular diseases. symptoms and making assumpWhile these forums may be tions about what ailments you good sources of support, informay have. Instead of using the mation published on these Internet to self-diagnose your Let your doctor sites could be misleading, inaccondition, leave the diagnosis diagnose your condition. curate or unsafe. Before trying up to your doctor and rely on any proposed treatment, it is online information after you are best to consult with your doctor. diagnosed. This can improve your underHaving a general knowledge of a medistanding of the condition and any potential cal condition can enable healthcare consumtreatment options. ers to make more informed decisions about * s EE k o T hE R Av E N u E s o F IN F o R their situations. ■ mAT Io N . You should never hesitate to seek

Law Offices of Ramon E. Lewis

Elder Abuse Attorney Physical Abuse•Financial Abuse•Neglect

Family members are often the first to recognize and report elder neglect or abuse. If you suspect someone you care about is being abused or neglected, you can help. TAKE IMMEDIATE ACTION and contact the Law Offices of Ramon E. Lewis for effective, confidential and professional legal representation.

858.259.9696 “After many years defending corporate owners of nursing homes, I decided I would rather help protect those who cannot protect themselves... My experience makes me uniquely qualified to represent these individuals and their families at the level they deserve.” – Ramon E. Lewis

www.raylewislaw.com | 11943 El Camino Real #220 San Diego CA 92130

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Ways to avoid overspending as retirement nears

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hen the nest is empty and the kids no longer need financial support, many men and women find themselves with some extra money in their budget. Fewer mouths to feed and no more college tuition bills can give parents a sense of financial freedom they may not have had since before starting their family. But that freedom can also lead to overspending, something that can put retirement in jeopardy if people are not careful. Though it’s understandable to splurge on a well-deserved getaway once the kids have finally left the house, it’s important for adults to ensure that such splurging does not become routine. The following are a few ways men and women with some newfound disposable income can avoid overspending and putting themselves in financial hot water as they get closer to retirement.

* PAy W I T h cAs h W hE N E v E R P os s I bLE. Swiping a debit card or credit card is

certainly a convenient way to shop, but it can also be dangerous. Many people find it difficult to keep track of their spending when they use debit cards or credit cards to make their purchases. Using cash to make purchases, especially daily purchases like a morning cup of coffee, reduces the likelihood of overspending. An effective way to use cash is to withdraw money from the bank once per week and use that as your weekly supply of money. If you find yourself frequently running out of money each week, then you’re likely spending more than you should. * K EEP A FIN A N cIA L jou RN A L . Men and women who must adapt to having newfound disposable income may find it is not much different from younger men and women learning to manage their money when they first start working. Some of those c o N T I N u E D o N PA G E 2 2

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Personalized Service for all Your Financial Needs Integrated Planning Services-Cook and Cook Associates

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or retirement, financial planning or even health insurance for your employees, rely on Integrated Planning Services — Cook and Cook Associates, to handle all your financial planning needs. Husband-and-wife team Larry and Katie Cook have been working together in San Diego as Cook and Cook Associates for 25 years. “Our whole focus is financial planning, retirement planning and estate planning,” said Larry Cook. “We also do business planning for small businesses.” The Cooks have lived in Rancho Bernardo for six years. Larry specializes on retirement planning, 401Ks and annuities. Katie’s areas of expertise include business health, as well as health and life insurance. Cook and Cook Associates, who work with more than 80 companies, custom design a financial plan to fit the client’s individual needs. “We really help individual families and [small] businesses protect their assets, grow assets, and when the time comes, distribute their assets,” said Cook. “We make sure they get the maximum amount of money each month, so they never outlive their money.” To schedule an appointment with Integrated Planning services – cook and cook Associates, visit their website at www.cookandcookassociates.com or call (858) 361-0734 or (858) 361-0735.

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Harmony Home Medical: Mobility specialists

ActivCare: Compassionate Memory Care Community

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he loss of mobility as one ages doesn’t have to be scary or challenging thanks to Harmony Home Medical. Our experts can educate you on the full spectrum of safety and self-reliance solutions. The combination of medical equipment, home modifications and technology produce the best results for independent living, and Harmony Home Medical is the only provider in town to take care of all three of these needs at once. We carry the widest selection of products from simple accessories such as hip kits and cup holders to power chairs and ceiling track lifts. Don’t wait until you have a mobility crisis, find out today what you can do to maintain a healthy, independent lifestyle for as long as possible. Call (858) 560-8177

ActivCare at Bressi Ranch is a specialized residential memory loss care community built exclusively to serve the needs of those with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia. Every part of our building is built for individuals experiencing memory loss — from the themed murals and corridors to assist with wayfinding to secure courtyards safe for exploring. Residents can select from private and semi-private accommodations. An engaging activity program helps boost self-esteem and feelings of usefulness. ActivCare at Bressi Ranch offers a new life to those with memory loss, giving them purpose in a caring social environment, and providing peace of mind for their families. To schedule a tour or for more information, call (760) 603-9999.

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C o N T I N u E D F R o M PA g E 2 0

lessons, like saving more than you spend, might need to be relearned. One way to get a grip on your spending is to keep a financial journal to track your daily and monthly expenses as well as larger purchases like a new television. Write down the monthly expenses you know you have each month, such as a mortgage payment or a car note, and each and every purchase you make, including how much you spend on dining out each month. Do this for at least a couple of months. When you have logged several months’ activity, examine your journal to see if there are any expenses that can be trimmed to save money. * DoN ’ T g o o v E R b o A R D R E WA R D INg y o uR sE L F. Once your last child has

left the nest, the temptation to reward yourself with a luxury item or two might prove overwhelming. After all, raising a family and paying for college tuition has no doubt required substantial sacrifice on your part, so

it’s well within reason that you want to reward yourself after all these years. Avoid overdoing it so your finances aren’t stretched too thinly. A vacation with your spouse is reasonable, but buying a villa overseas might be a little over the top. Luxuries can be nice, but they can also drain a budget. Your monthly expenses once the kids have moved out should be lower, so if you find your cost of living has increased now that your nest is empty, you might be forced to determine which of your expenses are luxuries and which are necessities. * TAkE A DvA N TA gE oF you R “ ExPER IEN CE. ” Though accepting a “senior” dis-

count might be a blow to your pride, it also can be a boon to your bottom line. Many establishments, including gyms, restaurants and movie theaters, offer discounts to men and women age 55 and older. This can help you save a substantial amount of money over time, and no one has to know you’ve started cashing in on your experience. ■

sPoNsoRED CoNTENT

La Jolla Wellness Studio Introduces Revolutionary 15-Minute Exercise Workout Program

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he La Jolla Wellness Studio is home to a unique exercise regimen that has its roots in NASA training and is proven to improve health and wellness as skeletal muscles begin declining between the ages of 45-55. MyoMetrix, the premise of which is grounded in whole body vibration training or WBVT (also known as acceleration training), increases lean muscle mass through burning calories. According to recent research, MyoMetrix can produce the same results in 15 minutes as 60 minutes on an elliptical machine. Program users include Dr. Jim Labell, chief medical officer of Scripps Health, Terry Whitcomb, retired UC Davis assistant to the chancellor, Tom Brown, dentist, and Pam Marks, entrepreneur. “The beauty of this workout is that I come in my everyday clothes, have my own personal trainer and I am in and out in 15 minutes,” Terry said. “It is a dream come true!” MyoMetrix, which translates into “muscle data,” has significant clinical analysis showing that it is able to change a person’s body composition. Specifically, it reduces cortisol (the stress hormone) and lactic acid (the enzyme that causes soreness after a workout) enabling maximum impact of a high-intensity workout. Dr. Joseph McGreevy, the chief medical officer who is also a cardiologist at Sharp HealthCare, has confirmed the impact of MyoMetrix. “This is a unique and ideal program to maximize your time to build muscle mass and reduce body fat, both critical factors in a person’s health,” he said.

La Jolla Wellness studio, www.lajollawellnessstudio.com

The Leading Provider of 24/7 Live-in Services

Welcome Home!

We offer both Independent and Assisted Living Senior Living The Gateway and Gateway Gardens Independent and Assisted Living offers you the opportunity to enjoy retirement living at it’s best. At The Gateway, you have a choices of 9 spacious one or two bedroom floor plans, each with patios and walk in closets. The Gateway Gardens offers studio and one bedroom private apartments with large windows and beautiful views. Our friendly and experienced staff is here to serve you! Our peaceful community is located next to Pomerado hospital in beautiful Poway, California.

Call or Email us today to schedule your personal tour at thegateway@rhf.org (tel) 858.487.1197

Not All Home Care is Alike Home Care Assistance provides the industry’s best in care! Call us today for your stacked logo cmyk FREE assessment!

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7521 Fay Avenue La Jolla, CA 92037 HomeCareAssistance.com

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Specialized Treatment from MedCare Specialty Clinics

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edCare Specialty Clinics is a practice group of Board Certified Medical Doctors and Licensed Physical Therapists focused on providing specialized treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee, shoulder and other joints, degenerative joint disease, peripheral neuropathy, fibromyalgia, chronic headache, and other pain conditions. MedCare Specialty Clinics is conveniently located just off Interstate 5 Freeway in Carlsbad. MedCare Specialty Clinics, 1281 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92008 Toll-free (888) 992-3390 or call (760) 585-7720 • www.medcaresc.com

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How to improve your heart health

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eart disease is one of the leading causes of death across the globe. According to the World Health Organization, ischaemic heart disease, in which blood supply to the heart is reduced, is the leading cause of death in middle- and high-income countries and the fourth-leading cause of death in lowincome countries. Perhaps the most troubling fact about the prevalence of heart disease is that it can be largely preventable. The American Heart Association notes that there are several ways to easily improve heart health and avoid becoming one of the millions of people to succumb to heart disease.

* mo N IToR you R b L ood pREssu RE.

be a friend or foe with regards to heart disease. A heart-friendly diet that’s low in sodium and cholesterol can help you maintain healthy cholesterol levels as well as a healthy blood pressure.

A blood pressure reading is a staple of many doctor visits, but men and women should monitor their blood pressure even when they aren’t visiting their physicians. High blood pressure does not always produce symptoms, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t potentially deadly. High blood pressure is the leading cause of stroke and can contribute to heart and kidney disease. So be sure to monitor your blood pressure and discuss with your physician ways to lower high blood pressure. * Emb RA cE A ERob Ic ExERcIsE. Aerobic exercise is essential to cardiovascular health. Daily aerobic exercise, which can be as simple as walking around the neighborhood, can help men and women lower their blood pressure, maintain a healthy weight and lower their bad cholesterol, which can circulate in the blood and cause blockages that can lead to heart attack. ■

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JFS’ On the Go Gives Seniors Independence and a Ride

Encinitas Nursing Honored for AwardWinning Rehab Care

* A do p T A L o W- s o d I u m d IE T T h AT’ s ALs o L o W I N ch o L E s T E R o L . Diet can

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iving up the car keys is a very tough decision. To many, not driving means a loss of independence, reduced mobility and possible isolation. The Jewish Family Service’s on the Go, Transportation Solutions for Older Adults, offers affordable shuttles, excursions, direct rides to any destination (provided by volunteers) and customized personal transportation through a Silver sedan service. on the Go is more than a ride — it is independence, community connection, mobility and dignity. To reserve your ride or to volunteer, visit www.jfssd.org/onthego or call (858) 637-7320.

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hen choosing a skilled nursing facility, the quality of the care is more important than marble floors and fancy decorations. Encinitas Nursing and Rehab Center has repeatedly won honors from the American Health Care Association for awardwinning care, outstanding service and successful patient outcomes. We provide affordable advanced rehabilitation care, IV therapy, wound care and other services. When it comes to your health, quality matters.

Encinitas Nursing and Rehab center www.encinitasnursingandrehab.com or call (760) 753-6423.

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Jody Hubbard: Long-term care insurance specialist

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ould you be one of the 70 percent of adults over 65 who will need longterm care? How will you pay for it without depleting your financial resources? How will it affect not only your quality of life, but that of your loved ones? Long-Term Care Insurance • Provides for care at far less expense than paying out-of-pocket. • Allows you to stay in your home. • Removes the financial, physical and emotional burden from family members. • Leaves your estate planning intact. Jody Hubbard, CPA, has specialized in long-term care insurance for more than 15 years. plan for your future care needs with a free no-risk consultation and quote. call Jody at (760) 944-3777.

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Jim@LaJollaHomeFinder.com www.LaJollaHomeFinder.com License # 01434387 La Jolla, CA

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Essential Senior Resources

Legal Services

Moore’s Law Group 6014 La Granada Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92067 (858) 756-5558 Law offices of Ramon E. Lewis 11943 El Camino Real, Ste. 220 San Diego, CA 92130 (858) 259-9696 www.raylewislaw.com Charitable Giving Rancho santa Fe Foundation 162 S. Rancho Santa Fe Road, Ste. B-30 Encinitas, CA 92024 (858) 756-6557 www.rsffoundation.org Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care ActivCare at La Mesa 4960 Mills Street La Mesa, CA 91941 (619) 644-1100 www.activcareliving.com ActivCare at Point Loma 3423 Channel Way San Diego, CA 92110 (619) 224-7300 www.activcareliving.com ActivCare at Bressi Ranch 6255 Nygaard Street Carlsbad, CA 92009 (760) 603-9999 www.activcareliving.com Insurance Integrated Planning services Larry and Katie Cook Larry: (858) 361-0734 Katie: (858)361-0735 cook_and_cook@ yahoo.com cookandcookassociates.wordpress.com

Jody Hubbard Long Term Care Insurance 2033 San Elijo Avenue, Ste. 590 Cardiff By The Sea, CA 92007 (760) 944-377 www.jodyhubbard.com Hospice Hospice of the North Coast 2525 Pio Pico Drive, Ste. 301 Carlsbad, CA 92008 (760) 431-4100 www.HospiceNorthCoast.org Medical Care Aging and Independence services County of san Diego HHsA PO Box 2317 San Diego, CA 92193 (800) 510-2020 www.sandiego. networkofcare.org/ aging/

MedCare specialty Clinics Joint Pain & Neuropathy 1281 Carlsbad Village Drive Carlsbad, CA 92008 (760) 585-7720 www.MedCareSpecialtyClinics.com Home Care & Medical Casa De Manana Retirement Community 849 Coast Boulevard La Jolla, CA 92037 (800) 959-7010 www.casademanana.org Gateway Gardens Assisted Living 12750 Gateway Park Road, Poway CA 92064 (858) 451-9933 www.rhf.org

Jewish Family service San Diego 8804 Balboa Avenue San Diego, CA 92123 (858) 637-3000 www.jfssd.org

Home Care Assistance www.homecareassistance.com Encinitas Rancho Santa Fe Plaza 162 S. Rancho Santa Fe Road, Ste. B-10 Encinitas, CA 92024 (760) 635-3646 La Jolla 7521 Fay Avenue La Jolla, CA 92037 (877) 254-4860 Coronado 1330 Orange Avenue, Ste. 300 Coronado, CA 92118 (619) 795-7457 salus Homecare 2555 Camino Del Rio South, Ste. 202 San Diego, CA 92108 (619) 230-0220 www.salushomecare.com The Gateway Independent Living 12751 Gateway Park Road Poway CA 92064 (858) 487-1197 www.rhf.org The Remington Club 16925 Hierba Drive San Diego, CA 92128 (858) 673-6340 www.TheRemingtonClub.com Health Care Services Encinitas Nursing & Rehab. Center 900 Santa Fe Drive, Encinitas, CA 92024 (760) 753-6423 www.encinitasnursingandrehab.com

La Jolla Nursing & Rehab.Center 2552 Torrey Pines Road La Jolla, CA 92037 (858) 453-5810 www.lajollanursingandrehab.com La Jolla Wellness 7660 Fay Avenue, Ste. F La Jolla, CA 92037 (858) 444-0340 www.lajollawellnessstudio.com Valle Vista Convalescent Hospital 1025 West 2nd Avenue Escondido, CA 92025 (760) 745-1842 www.vallevistanursingandrehab.com Medical supplies Harmony Home Medical 4869 Convoy Street San Diego, CA 92111 (858) 560-8177 www.harmonyhomemedical.com Innovative Healthcare Consultants (760) 731-1334 Local (877) 731-1442 Toll Free www.innovativehc.com 557 E. Alvarado Street Fallbrook, CA 92028 1501 Front Street, Ste. 434 San Diego, CA 92101 Seniors Real Estate Specialist Jim Holland La Jolla Home Finder Broker/Owner, SRES (858) 405-6442 www.lajollahomefinder. com

Integrated Planning Services

When was the last time you reviewed your estate, economic and insurance affairs? We offer assistance to anyone concerned about their future & financial well being.

Cook & Cook Associates Offer • Life Insurance Products • Annuity Products • Individual Insurance - Health, Disability Income, Dental, Vision • Group Insurance - Medical, Dental, Vision, Life • Long Term Care Insurance • Pension, 401(k), Individual IRA, Roth IRA

Integrated Planning Services • Business Planning • Financial Planning • Estate Planning

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Fees are not charged for our services

Katie & Larry Cook

CA Insurance LIC#0576943 & #0760769

www.cookandcookassociates.com Larry: 858.361.0734 Katie: 858.361.0735 cook_and_cook@yahoo.com

849 COAST BLVD. The address Jim and Barbara Stabenau were searching for, just steps from the sea and La Jolla’s restaurants, museums, theatres and galleries. It’s where you’ll find Casa de Mañana, a one-of-a-kind retirement community that offers the freedom to explore everything you love to do. To schedule a visit, please call 800.959.7010 or visit casademanana.org. Historic landmark Ocean view villas 1 & 2 bedroom and studio residences Care on site European-inspired courtyards Ocean view dining

JUST WHERE YOU’D EXPECT

TO FIND A PAIR OF WORLD TRAVELERS.

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL PRICES ON SELECT ACCOMMODATIONS

We’re an equal opportunity housing provider.

License 374603439


Seniority north coast