Issuu on Google+

K u t z t o w n

NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID reading, PA PERMIT NO. 2000

U n i v e r s i t y

M a g a z i n e

15200 Kutztown Road Kutztown, PA 19530-0730 CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

Spring 2013

KU’s World Champion Kutztown University product Ryan Vogelsong was a key component to the San Francisco Giants world championship in October, posting a 1.09 earned run average in four post season starts. Vogelsong, who pitched for the Golden Bears from 1996-98, was the World Series game three winner over the Detroit Tigers.

the

He also was the winning pitcher twice in the National

woman

League Championship Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. In his junior year with KU, Vogelsong led NCAA Division II with a 1.41 ERA. 

behind the

jewels

Lisa Oswald ’82 and the story of Sorrelli

Photo courtesy San Francisco Giants.

page 14

premier painter

Stoudt’s Brewing

Hall of Fame

Holocaust Documentary

Contents

Construction on Schaeffer Auditorium is on schedule to be completed this summer. The 75-year-old structure is receiving a complete renovation and a 14,000-square-foot expansion. The new space adds classrooms, rehearsal and storage space for the Department of Music. It will also provide improved loading areas and a green room for professional productions. For information on opening activities visit www.kutztownpresents.org.

Spring 2013

features

9 12 14 16

18

A modern-day brewmaster

14

Carol Stoudt ’71 celebrates a heady career COLORFUL GENIUS

Artist Dane Tilghman ’79 All that glitters

Lisa Oswald ’82 and Sorrelli Jewelry

12

PIONEER DAY SCHOOL

Jim Leiner ’98 changes lives, one student at a time

departments

4

News and Notes

18

Back to Class with ...

20

KU Foundation Update

23

Classnotes

Dr. Joe Piscitelli

On the cover Lisa Oswald ’82 in the Sorrelli flagship store in Kutztown.

9

Cover Photograph by Douglas Benedict

Kutztown University Magazine

PHOTO BY JEFF MOSSER, STV CONSTRUCTION, INC.

coming attraction

PRESIDENT OF KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY: F. Javier Cevallos

Director of University Marketing: Jennifer Umberger

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT OF COMMUNICATIONS, MARKETING & EXTERNAL AFFAIRS: John Green

Assistant Director, University Marketing/ Design & Print Media: Camille DeMarco ’81, M’01

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT: Alex Ogeka DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS: Matt Santos M ’03 ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS: David Johnson

DESIGN: Gipson Studio, LLC — Linda Gipson CONTRIBUTORS: Sean Dallas, Assistant Director, University Relations (2009-2012); Executive Editor, Tower Magazine Esther Shanahan M’15, University Relations Editorial Graduate Assistant Kevin Hyde, KU Foundation Ken Mandel Photographers – Hub Willson ’71, John Secoges, Susan Angstadt, Jeff Unger

Tower magazine, issued April 1, 2013, is published by Kutztown University, a member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. The Tower is published two times a year and is free to KU alumni and friends of the university. Address correspondence to: Kutztown University, Office of University Relations, P.O. Box 730, Kutztown, PA 19530 or email tower@kutztown.edu. Telephone: 610-683-4114 Submissions for Classnotes may be sent to: alumni@give2ku.org.

Contents

Construction on Schaeffer Auditorium is on schedule to be completed this summer. The 75-year-old structure is receiving a complete renovation and a 14,000-square-foot expansion. The new space adds classrooms, rehearsal and storage space for the Department of Music. It will also provide improved loading areas and a green room for professional productions. For information on opening activities visit www.kutztownpresents.org.

Spring 2013

features

9 12 14 16

18

A modern-day brewmaster

14

Carol Stoudt ’71 celebrates a heady career COLORFUL GENIUS

Artist Dane Tilghman ’79 All that glitters

Lisa Oswald ’82 and Sorrelli Jewelry

12

PIONEER DAY SCHOOL

Jim Leiner ’98 changes lives, one student at a time

departments

4

News and Notes

18

Back to Class with ...

20

KU Foundation Update

23

Classnotes

Dr. Joe Piscitelli

On the cover Lisa Oswald ’82 in the Sorrelli flagship store in Kutztown.

9

Cover Photograph by Douglas Benedict

Kutztown University Magazine

PHOTO BY JEFF MOSSER, STV CONSTRUCTION, INC.

coming attraction

PRESIDENT OF KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY: F. Javier Cevallos

Director of University Marketing: Jennifer Umberger

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT OF COMMUNICATIONS, MARKETING & EXTERNAL AFFAIRS: John Green

Assistant Director, University Marketing/ Design & Print Media: Camille DeMarco ’81, M’01

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT: Alex Ogeka DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS: Matt Santos M ’03 ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS: David Johnson

DESIGN: Gipson Studio, LLC — Linda Gipson CONTRIBUTORS: Sean Dallas, Assistant Director, University Relations (2009-2012); Executive Editor, Tower Magazine Esther Shanahan M’15, University Relations Editorial Graduate Assistant Kevin Hyde, KU Foundation Ken Mandel Photographers – Hub Willson ’71, John Secoges, Susan Angstadt, Jeff Unger

Tower magazine, issued April 1, 2013, is published by Kutztown University, a member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. The Tower is published two times a year and is free to KU alumni and friends of the university. Address correspondence to: Kutztown University, Office of University Relations, P.O. Box 730, Kutztown, PA 19530 or email tower@kutztown.edu. Telephone: 610-683-4114 Submissions for Classnotes may be sent to: alumni@give2ku.org.

and

news notes Dr. David Webb (center) poses with Homo erectus (left) and Australopithecus africanus (right). Bottom right: An ancient footprint in Romania.

Exploring the Cave of Bones Kutztown University has its very own Indiana Jones in Dr. David Webb, professor of anthropology. Like the character Harrison Ford made famous, Webb aims to preserve the remnants of our ancient forefathers. His most recent adventure began with a phone call from his former doctoral adviser, who asked him to travel to Romania and investigate ancient footprints left in the Ciur Izbuc cave, located in the Western Carpathians of Transylvania. The Romanian Academy’s Speleology (study of caves) Institute in Bucharest, Romania, was concerned about tourism-driven damage to the ancient footprints in the cave and needed an expert in preservation. Enter Webb, anthropologist extraordinaire, fedora and whip at the ready.

Spelunkers (cave explorers) had attempted to preserve the footprints, but couldn’t prevent visitors from disturbing the remains of ancient cave bears, taking bones for “souvenirs,” removing identifying flags and trampling the once-unspoiled imprints. First discovered in the 1960s, the Ciur Izbuc cave, also known as the “cave of bones,” once housed 400 footprints. “There were about 200 of them in pretty good condition,” Webb explained. “Now there are only 35, and of those, only one is a very good specimen.” Webb’s team, which included a graduate assistant and Dr. Oana

Moldovan, director of the Romanian Academy’s Speleology Institute, documented every trace of the 28,000-year-old footprints. The explorers had a “total station” – a 3-D mapping device mounted on a tripod. Webb’s group came in with a laser scanner for large 3-D objects and connected it to a laptop. After several hours, the total station created a 3-D list of points within the chamber of footprints. During 3-D mapping, photos are taken every 15 degrees in a sphere. Computer technology can create a virtual model of the chamber, preserving the remaining footprints for research and posterity. The group’s efforts in Romania will ensure that the mysteries of the “cave of bones” will eventually be unearthed. Back at KU, in an office embellished with exotic artifacts and skeletal remains, Webb continues with his research, waiting for the next quest to take him to the far reaches of the earth.

KU Fulbright Fellow in Spain Lindsey Ray ’12 lives in the city of Cádiz, on the western coast of Spain, in an apartment so close to the beach that the ocean breeze glides through her window. During a summer internship two years ago, Ray had the opportunity to study organic synthesis reactions at the University of Cádiz. Winning the Fulbright Scholarship, which provides yearlong funding for U.S. students to conduct research or teach in another country, made it possible for her to continue her education in a town she has already fallen in love with. “I can experience a whole different life here,” Ray said. “This year will open my eyes to other things, and I can grow as a person and a researcher. It is an amazing experience.” Ray noted that Kutztown University’s small class sizes and caring professors were crucial elements for her when she started as an undergraduate student. “Being able to directly talk to my professors and get help oneon-one helped me succeed. At a bigger university, you don’t get that. Having that direct connection was beneficial,” Ray said. “My adviser, Dr. (Thomas) Betts, helped me develop my skills in the lab. My physical

Lindsey Ray ’12 in front of the Cádiz Cathedral in Cádiz, Spain.

chemistry professor, Dr. (Rolf) Mayrhofer, was a great teacher and made me recognize the potential I had.” Also integral to her experience at KU was Ray’s involvement with the cross country and track teams. “Having meets all of the time helped me set goals for my classes,

more than anything else could. I came home with a different outlook on life … more positive and accepting to all circumstances.” Both Ray and Lazzarevich were recipients of scholarships during their time at Kutztown, and benefitted greatly from the philan-

and having the support of a team is a great advantage to have at

thropic support of alumni, parents and friends of the university

college,” she explained.

through the Kutztown University Foundation. Privately supported

Ray is KU’s second student Fulbright winner this decade. Maria (Haverovich) Lazzarevich ’05, a dual major in speech pathology and Spanish, taught English in a small, rural school

scholarships allow students to focus on their goals, and provide opportunities that enhance the overall student experience at KU. In addition to Ray and Lazzarevich, Dr. Andrea Mitnick,

district north of Madrid, Spain. Like Ray, Lazzarevich describes

associate professor of Communication Studies & Theatre,

winning the Fulbright Scholarship as a life-changing opportunity.

recently won a Fulbright that allows her to spend spring

“I traveled all over Spain,” Lazzarevich said, “but also took advan-

2014 at the Budapest College of Communication, Business and

tage of being in Europe, visiting England, Germany, the Netherlands

the Arts. She also won a Fulbright in 2007 to work at the

and Italy. I came home dirt-poor, but the experiences enriched my life

Diplomatic Academy in Moscow.

Folmar Named KU’s 15th Head Football Coach Drew Folmar, who turned the Kutztown University offense into one of the most prolific units in NCAA Division II over the past four seasons, was introduced January 23 as the Golden Bears new head football coach. He replaces Raymond Monica, who resigned December 13 to accept the head coaching position at Arkansas Tech. Folmar has directed KU’s offense and coached its quarterbacks since 2009. During the last three years of his tenure, KU has tallied a record of 28-8, the winningest three-year period in the program’s 97 seasons. His offenses have been ranked among the top in the nation and have set numerous team records. The Golden Bears won the PSAC title in 2011 and advanced to the NCAA playoffs twice. Folmar was a record-breaking quarterback at Millersville University where he graduated in 2001 with a degree in elementary education and a minor in athletic coaching. Folmar has also had coaching stints at his alma mater, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and University of New Haven. Folmar, a native of Chambersburg, Pa., and his wife Heather have two children. The family is expecting its third child this spring.

4 Tower | Spring 2013

Spring 2013 | Tower 5

and

news notes Dr. David Webb (center) poses with Homo erectus (left) and Australopithecus africanus (right). Bottom right: An ancient footprint in Romania.

Exploring the Cave of Bones Kutztown University has its very own Indiana Jones in Dr. David Webb, professor of anthropology. Like the character Harrison Ford made famous, Webb aims to preserve the remnants of our ancient forefathers. His most recent adventure began with a phone call from his former doctoral adviser, who asked him to travel to Romania and investigate ancient footprints left in the Ciur Izbuc cave, located in the Western Carpathians of Transylvania. The Romanian Academy’s Speleology (study of caves) Institute in Bucharest, Romania, was concerned about tourism-driven damage to the ancient footprints in the cave and needed an expert in preservation. Enter Webb, anthropologist extraordinaire, fedora and whip at the ready.

Spelunkers (cave explorers) had attempted to preserve the footprints, but couldn’t prevent visitors from disturbing the remains of ancient cave bears, taking bones for “souvenirs,” removing identifying flags and trampling the once-unspoiled imprints. First discovered in the 1960s, the Ciur Izbuc cave, also known as the “cave of bones,” once housed 400 footprints. “There were about 200 of them in pretty good condition,” Webb explained. “Now there are only 35, and of those, only one is a very good specimen.” Webb’s team, which included a graduate assistant and Dr. Oana

Moldovan, director of the Romanian Academy’s Speleology Institute, documented every trace of the 28,000-year-old footprints. The explorers had a “total station” – a 3-D mapping device mounted on a tripod. Webb’s group came in with a laser scanner for large 3-D objects and connected it to a laptop. After several hours, the total station created a 3-D list of points within the chamber of footprints. During 3-D mapping, photos are taken every 15 degrees in a sphere. Computer technology can create a virtual model of the chamber, preserving the remaining footprints for research and posterity. The group’s efforts in Romania will ensure that the mysteries of the “cave of bones” will eventually be unearthed. Back at KU, in an office embellished with exotic artifacts and skeletal remains, Webb continues with his research, waiting for the next quest to take him to the far reaches of the earth.

KU Fulbright Fellow in Spain Lindsey Ray ’12 lives in the city of Cádiz, on the western coast of Spain, in an apartment so close to the beach that the ocean breeze glides through her window. During a summer internship two years ago, Ray had the opportunity to study organic synthesis reactions at the University of Cádiz. Winning the Fulbright Scholarship, which provides yearlong funding for U.S. students to conduct research or teach in another country, made it possible for her to continue her education in a town she has already fallen in love with. “I can experience a whole different life here,” Ray said. “This year will open my eyes to other things, and I can grow as a person and a researcher. It is an amazing experience.” Ray noted that Kutztown University’s small class sizes and caring professors were crucial elements for her when she started as an undergraduate student. “Being able to directly talk to my professors and get help oneon-one helped me succeed. At a bigger university, you don’t get that. Having that direct connection was beneficial,” Ray said. “My adviser, Dr. (Thomas) Betts, helped me develop my skills in the lab. My physical

Lindsey Ray ’12 in front of the Cádiz Cathedral in Cádiz, Spain.

chemistry professor, Dr. (Rolf) Mayrhofer, was a great teacher and made me recognize the potential I had.” Also integral to her experience at KU was Ray’s involvement with the cross country and track teams. “Having meets all of the time helped me set goals for my classes,

more than anything else could. I came home with a different outlook on life … more positive and accepting to all circumstances.” Both Ray and Lazzarevich were recipients of scholarships during their time at Kutztown, and benefitted greatly from the philan-

and having the support of a team is a great advantage to have at

thropic support of alumni, parents and friends of the university

college,” she explained.

through the Kutztown University Foundation. Privately supported

Ray is KU’s second student Fulbright winner this decade. Maria (Haverovich) Lazzarevich ’05, a dual major in speech pathology and Spanish, taught English in a small, rural school

scholarships allow students to focus on their goals, and provide opportunities that enhance the overall student experience at KU. In addition to Ray and Lazzarevich, Dr. Andrea Mitnick,

district north of Madrid, Spain. Like Ray, Lazzarevich describes

associate professor of Communication Studies & Theatre,

winning the Fulbright Scholarship as a life-changing opportunity.

recently won a Fulbright that allows her to spend spring

“I traveled all over Spain,” Lazzarevich said, “but also took advan-

2014 at the Budapest College of Communication, Business and

tage of being in Europe, visiting England, Germany, the Netherlands

the Arts. She also won a Fulbright in 2007 to work at the

and Italy. I came home dirt-poor, but the experiences enriched my life

Diplomatic Academy in Moscow.

Folmar Named KU’s 15th Head Football Coach Drew Folmar, who turned the Kutztown University offense into one of the most prolific units in NCAA Division II over the past four seasons, was introduced January 23 as the Golden Bears new head football coach. He replaces Raymond Monica, who resigned December 13 to accept the head coaching position at Arkansas Tech. Folmar has directed KU’s offense and coached its quarterbacks since 2009. During the last three years of his tenure, KU has tallied a record of 28-8, the winningest three-year period in the program’s 97 seasons. His offenses have been ranked among the top in the nation and have set numerous team records. The Golden Bears won the PSAC title in 2011 and advanced to the NCAA playoffs twice. Folmar was a record-breaking quarterback at Millersville University where he graduated in 2001 with a degree in elementary education and a minor in athletic coaching. Folmar has also had coaching stints at his alma mater, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and University of New Haven. Folmar, a native of Chambersburg, Pa., and his wife Heather have two children. The family is expecting its third child this spring.

4 Tower | Spring 2013

Spring 2013 | Tower 5

and

news notes

Captain Dave Borden ’03 receives the NCAA Inspiration Award from KU President F. Javier Cevallos at the Honors Celebration in Grapevine, Texas. Borden was featured in the Winter 2009 Tower.

For his incredible sacrifice during a tour of duty in Iraq, U.S. Marine Captain Dave Borden ’03 was honored with the NCAA Inspiration Award as part of the organization’s annual Honors Celebration. He received his award Jan. 18, while standing on a prosthetic right leg, the result of a suicide bomb and a memento of time served. He smiled while accepting the praise of an appreciative crowd, and he recalled his time in college. “The award is a reflection on what I got from Kutztown, from my professors and coaches,” Borden said. “What I learned in the classroom and on the football field translated into my ability to overcome any obstacles.” When Borden graduated from KU, where he caught footballs as a Golden Bears wide receiver and completed a double major in finance and marketing, he accepted a managerial position at Cintas. However, in January 2006, Borden decided to pursue his dream of joining the Marines and enlisted in the Marine Corps Officer Candidate School in Quantico, Va. After completing training and earning second lieutenant ranking, he was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment. Put in charge of about 40 men, Borden, along with his platoon, was deployed to Ramadi, Iraq, in September 2007, with the task of increasing security and safety in the area.

On Jan. 19, 2008, while investigating incidents of small-arms fire, Borden’s unit was struck with a suicide bomb, killing one soldier and injuring Borden and two others. A long and painful recovery followed, including more than 40 operations. Borden would lose his right leg above the knee and require a prosthetic leg. While relearning how to sit up, get out of bed, stand up and walk, Borden also prepared to redeploy. “The decision is the same for anybody who’s been severely injured,” said Borden, who fittingly grew up near Gettysburg, Pa. “You recover from your injuries and transition back into the civilian life, or you stay on active duty. I chose active duty. Many people do, but not with the level of injuries that I sustained. I just wasn’t done being in uniform.” Borden left again for a yearlong assignment in Afghanistan on Jan. 19, 2011, exactly three years to the day he nearly died. He was a commanding officer in charge of 370 Marines and sailors, again focusing largely on their safety and welfare. Today, Borden attends military career school and awaits his next deployment. In his spare time, he enjoys snow skiing and has climbed more than 15,000 feet up Alaska’s Mount McKinley, the highest mountain peak in North America. For living his life, he is an inspiration. “You have to overcome life-altering injuries,” he said. “Each day is a challenge, mentally and physically. It comes down to the discipline, work ethic and hardships that you learn from winning and losing on the football field – and what you have to do to overcome those things.”

A Celestial Journey We glance into eternity every night, at a vast curtain of obsidian

Dr. Janice Gasker

Kutztown University professor of social work, Dr. Janice Gasker, was named Pennsylvania’s Social Worker of the Year by the Washington, D.C.-based National Association of Social Workers (NASW). Gasker was honored during ceremonies on Oct. 13, at the organization’s Annual Leadership Meeting in Valley Forge, Pa.

Dr. Heather Fountain and Dr. Carrie Nordlund

Dr. Heather Leah Ryerson Fountain (left) and Dr. Carrie Nordlund received awards at the Pennsylvania Art Education Association’s (PAEA) annual fall conference, on Oct. 6 in Harrisburg, Pa. Fountain, associate professor of art education and chair of the undergraduate art education program, is PAEA’s 2012 Outstanding Special Needs Art Educator. Nordlund, associate professor of art education and an avid scholar, received the Outstanding Higher Education Art Educator award. KU alumnae PAEA award winners can be found on p. 26 in the Classnotes section.

6 Tower | Spring 2013

diamonds. Jeffrey Dunn ’04, supervisor of Mystic Seaport’s Treworgy Planetarium in Connecticut, teaches budding astronomers how to navigate the mysteries of the heavens. Dunn, who oversees educational programming at the planetarium, is excited about its outreach efforts, which include mini-science instructional units, a “phases of the moon” workshop and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) activities related to navigation and astronomy. Recently, the museum has offered traditional celestial navigation workshops for educators. Dunn is committed to expanding the planetarium’s educational programs and has recently led an initiative to tailor astronomy units for individual classroom curriculum, school groups, home-schooled students and senior centers. When Dunn began managing the planetarium, he had unchartered terrain to investigate. “The last director, Don Treworgy, was here for more than 40 years. When people brought things to donate, he kept it all under a stack of charts,” Dunn explained. Exploring the piles of documents, artifacts and charts has yielded some amazing discoveries. Buried beneath a heap of nautical charts, Dunn discovered a rare and beautiful Haggart-Aquila six-inch telescope, previously

Dr. Phill Reed ’03 directs the new Ritchey-Chretien 24-inch diameter telescope into

owned by the original founder and director of the planetarium,

Grim Observatory for installation.

Frederic Keator. The 52-year-old telescope, in its original case with tripod, accessories, documentation and receipt, was a

A New Era in Astronomy for KU KU Faculty Recognized for Excellence

scattered with shimmering

Photo by: Andrew price, 2012

Inspired to Serve

significant acquisition for the museum. “We found countless things like that – treasures squirreled away in the attic above the dome. Some we were able to sell,

Kutztown University physics major Bernard J. Yuhas ’13 described the long-awaited arrival of Grim Observatory’s latest telescope as a “new era for astronomy here at KU.” The modern 24-inch reflector telescope system and full-dome digital projection system enhance the KU Planetarium, which is used for introductory astronomy laboratory exercises and the university’s Astronomy Outreach Program. “The new telescope is going to open up the sky,” said Dr. Phillip Reed ’03, professor of physics and

astronomy. “The old telescope had a mirror diameter of 18 inches. The new telescope has a 24-inch mirror. With that bigger diameter, the telescope collects more light, and we can see dimmer objects with better accuracy. It should open up thousands of new objects for our students to study in the future.” KU’s investment in future students ensures that the next generation of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) majors can access the latest technology in the field for course work and research projects.

and we raised enough money to purchase a modern telescope for use in school outreach programs,” Dunn said. Kutztown University provided Dunn, the first person in his family to attend a four-year university, with the foundational skills necessary for his future success. “I worked at the McFarland Student Union information desk and, later, as the student union building manager,” Dunn explained. “I was able to acquire a lot of professional life skills at KU.” In the classroom, professors supplied encouragement and intellectual stimulation. Among his influences, Dunn mentions professor of geography Dr. Richard Crooker, who initially ignited his interest in physical geography; Professor Emeritus Dr. Percy Dougherty, who maintained the perfect balance of learning and laughter in class; and retired professor of astronomy and planetarium director John Loomis, who first introduced Dunn to the wonders of the night sky. “You get the tools you need for success at KU; you just need the perseverance to make it happen,” Dunn said.

Spring 2013 | Tower 7

and

news notes

Captain Dave Borden ’03 receives the NCAA Inspiration Award from KU President F. Javier Cevallos at the Honors Celebration in Grapevine, Texas. Borden was featured in the Winter 2009 Tower.

For his incredible sacrifice during a tour of duty in Iraq, U.S. Marine Captain Dave Borden ’03 was honored with the NCAA Inspiration Award as part of the organization’s annual Honors Celebration. He received his award Jan. 18, while standing on a prosthetic right leg, the result of a suicide bomb and a memento of time served. He smiled while accepting the praise of an appreciative crowd, and he recalled his time in college. “The award is a reflection on what I got from Kutztown, from my professors and coaches,” Borden said. “What I learned in the classroom and on the football field translated into my ability to overcome any obstacles.” When Borden graduated from KU, where he caught footballs as a Golden Bears wide receiver and completed a double major in finance and marketing, he accepted a managerial position at Cintas. However, in January 2006, Borden decided to pursue his dream of joining the Marines and enlisted in the Marine Corps Officer Candidate School in Quantico, Va. After completing training and earning second lieutenant ranking, he was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment. Put in charge of about 40 men, Borden, along with his platoon, was deployed to Ramadi, Iraq, in September 2007, with the task of increasing security and safety in the area.

On Jan. 19, 2008, while investigating incidents of small-arms fire, Borden’s unit was struck with a suicide bomb, killing one soldier and injuring Borden and two others. A long and painful recovery followed, including more than 40 operations. Borden would lose his right leg above the knee and require a prosthetic leg. While relearning how to sit up, get out of bed, stand up and walk, Borden also prepared to redeploy. “The decision is the same for anybody who’s been severely injured,” said Borden, who fittingly grew up near Gettysburg, Pa. “You recover from your injuries and transition back into the civilian life, or you stay on active duty. I chose active duty. Many people do, but not with the level of injuries that I sustained. I just wasn’t done being in uniform.” Borden left again for a yearlong assignment in Afghanistan on Jan. 19, 2011, exactly three years to the day he nearly died. He was a commanding officer in charge of 370 Marines and sailors, again focusing largely on their safety and welfare. Today, Borden attends military career school and awaits his next deployment. In his spare time, he enjoys snow skiing and has climbed more than 15,000 feet up Alaska’s Mount McKinley, the highest mountain peak in North America. For living his life, he is an inspiration. “You have to overcome life-altering injuries,” he said. “Each day is a challenge, mentally and physically. It comes down to the discipline, work ethic and hardships that you learn from winning and losing on the football field – and what you have to do to overcome those things.”

A Celestial Journey We glance into eternity every night, at a vast curtain of obsidian

Dr. Janice Gasker

Kutztown University professor of social work, Dr. Janice Gasker, was named Pennsylvania’s Social Worker of the Year by the Washington, D.C.-based National Association of Social Workers (NASW). Gasker was honored during ceremonies on Oct. 13, at the organization’s Annual Leadership Meeting in Valley Forge, Pa.

Dr. Heather Fountain and Dr. Carrie Nordlund

Dr. Heather Leah Ryerson Fountain (left) and Dr. Carrie Nordlund received awards at the Pennsylvania Art Education Association’s (PAEA) annual fall conference, on Oct. 6 in Harrisburg, Pa. Fountain, associate professor of art education and chair of the undergraduate art education program, is PAEA’s 2012 Outstanding Special Needs Art Educator. Nordlund, associate professor of art education and an avid scholar, received the Outstanding Higher Education Art Educator award. KU alumnae PAEA award winners can be found on p. 26 in the Classnotes section.

6 Tower | Spring 2013

diamonds. Jeffrey Dunn ’04, supervisor of Mystic Seaport’s Treworgy Planetarium in Connecticut, teaches budding astronomers how to navigate the mysteries of the heavens. Dunn, who oversees educational programming at the planetarium, is excited about its outreach efforts, which include mini-science instructional units, a “phases of the moon” workshop and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) activities related to navigation and astronomy. Recently, the museum has offered traditional celestial navigation workshops for educators. Dunn is committed to expanding the planetarium’s educational programs and has recently led an initiative to tailor astronomy units for individual classroom curriculum, school groups, home-schooled students and senior centers. When Dunn began managing the planetarium, he had unchartered terrain to investigate. “The last director, Don Treworgy, was here for more than 40 years. When people brought things to donate, he kept it all under a stack of charts,” Dunn explained. Exploring the piles of documents, artifacts and charts has yielded some amazing discoveries. Buried beneath a heap of nautical charts, Dunn discovered a rare and beautiful Haggart-Aquila six-inch telescope, previously

Dr. Phill Reed ’03 directs the new Ritchey-Chretien 24-inch diameter telescope into

owned by the original founder and director of the planetarium,

Grim Observatory for installation.

Frederic Keator. The 52-year-old telescope, in its original case with tripod, accessories, documentation and receipt, was a

A New Era in Astronomy for KU KU Faculty Recognized for Excellence

scattered with shimmering

Photo by: Andrew price, 2012

Inspired to Serve

significant acquisition for the museum. “We found countless things like that – treasures squirreled away in the attic above the dome. Some we were able to sell,

Kutztown University physics major Bernard J. Yuhas ’13 described the long-awaited arrival of Grim Observatory’s latest telescope as a “new era for astronomy here at KU.” The modern 24-inch reflector telescope system and full-dome digital projection system enhance the KU Planetarium, which is used for introductory astronomy laboratory exercises and the university’s Astronomy Outreach Program. “The new telescope is going to open up the sky,” said Dr. Phillip Reed ’03, professor of physics and

astronomy. “The old telescope had a mirror diameter of 18 inches. The new telescope has a 24-inch mirror. With that bigger diameter, the telescope collects more light, and we can see dimmer objects with better accuracy. It should open up thousands of new objects for our students to study in the future.” KU’s investment in future students ensures that the next generation of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) majors can access the latest technology in the field for course work and research projects.

and we raised enough money to purchase a modern telescope for use in school outreach programs,” Dunn said. Kutztown University provided Dunn, the first person in his family to attend a four-year university, with the foundational skills necessary for his future success. “I worked at the McFarland Student Union information desk and, later, as the student union building manager,” Dunn explained. “I was able to acquire a lot of professional life skills at KU.” In the classroom, professors supplied encouragement and intellectual stimulation. Among his influences, Dunn mentions professor of geography Dr. Richard Crooker, who initially ignited his interest in physical geography; Professor Emeritus Dr. Percy Dougherty, who maintained the perfect balance of learning and laughter in class; and retired professor of astronomy and planetarium director John Loomis, who first introduced Dunn to the wonders of the night sky. “You get the tools you need for success at KU; you just need the perseverance to make it happen,” Dunn said.

Spring 2013 | Tower 7

and

news notes

feature 2012 Athletic Hall of Fame:

Mondschein and KU – a Perfect Match Brian Mondschein paused during his Kutztown University Hall of Fame induction speech to absorb the moment. He didn’t need to script this part. “Kutztown was the best thing that ever happened to me,” he said with a trembling voice. “I love this school. I love all the kids I’ve coached. One thing I know for certain is that for everything I gave this school, I got back a hell of a lot more.” Mondschein gave the school plenty during 14 years as head coach of the track and field programs. With few resources, he transformed the Golden Bears into a Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC) force that captured 18 conference titles and crowned 90 individual conference champions and 38 All-Americans. He was named the PSAC Coach of the Year 10 times. Mondschein entered the school’s Hall of Fame as the only coach from among the six 2012 inductees. “I’ve always felt that a list of one’s accomplishments is little more than a list of the situations a person happened to fall into, sort of a right place, right time thing,” Mondschein said. “Coaching is like that. You recruit the right athletes, you train them in a way that they get a little better, and the next thing you know, you’re vying for conference championships.” Mondschein thanked his own collegiate coaches from the University of Washington and his father, Irv “Moon” Mondschein, who competed in the 1948 Olympics, was the head coach at the University of Pennsylvania from 1967 to 1987 and assisted him with the program at KU. “I learned the most important thing from my dad,” he said. “The more you give of yourself, the more you get back. I’ve followed my dad’s lead, and it’s taken me really far.” Through his coaching travails, Mondschein is appreciative of the forces that conspired to bring him to Kutztown. “I’m a pretty good example that things don’t necessarily go as planned, but all the things that happened to me brought me to Kutztown,” he said. “In 1993, I walked around the campus and knew that I wanted to be a part of KU.”

Five Stellar Alumni Round Out Hall of Fame Induction Class

America’s First

Female

Modern-Day BrewMaster Celebrates a Heady Career

Carol Stoudt ’71, could have gone bac k to teaching kindergar ten. Instead, she opted f o r a n education of a different kind. ( c o n t i n u e d o n n e x t pag e )

BY:

Amy Biemiller

Joining former head track and field coach Brian Mondschein (above)

photography by:

as inductees into the KU Athletic Hall of Fame in November were (left to

Da n Z . J o h n s o n

right): Tiffany Mattiuz Keller ’96, a multiple All-PSAC and all-region softball pitcher and record setter; Megan Seefeldt Carson ’02, KU’s first PSAC cross country champion and track and field standout; Paul Schmitt ’02, track and field All-American in the pole vault; Glenn Woolard, a record-setting All-American pitcher for the baseball team and 2002 Rawlings Division II Player of the Year; and Cyndi Wasilius ’93, an All-PSAC women’s basketball performer and one of the top scorers in team history.

8 Tower | Spring 2013

Spring 2013 | Tower 9

and

news notes

feature 2012 Athletic Hall of Fame:

Mondschein and KU – a Perfect Match Brian Mondschein paused during his Kutztown University Hall of Fame induction speech to absorb the moment. He didn’t need to script this part. “Kutztown was the best thing that ever happened to me,” he said with a trembling voice. “I love this school. I love all the kids I’ve coached. One thing I know for certain is that for everything I gave this school, I got back a hell of a lot more.” Mondschein gave the school plenty during 14 years as head coach of the track and field programs. With few resources, he transformed the Golden Bears into a Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC) force that captured 18 conference titles and crowned 90 individual conference champions and 38 All-Americans. He was named the PSAC Coach of the Year 10 times. Mondschein entered the school’s Hall of Fame as the only coach from among the six 2012 inductees. “I’ve always felt that a list of one’s accomplishments is little more than a list of the situations a person happened to fall into, sort of a right place, right time thing,” Mondschein said. “Coaching is like that. You recruit the right athletes, you train them in a way that they get a little better, and the next thing you know, you’re vying for conference championships.” Mondschein thanked his own collegiate coaches from the University of Washington and his father, Irv “Moon” Mondschein, who competed in the 1948 Olympics, was the head coach at the University of Pennsylvania from 1967 to 1987 and assisted him with the program at KU. “I learned the most important thing from my dad,” he said. “The more you give of yourself, the more you get back. I’ve followed my dad’s lead, and it’s taken me really far.” Through his coaching travails, Mondschein is appreciative of the forces that conspired to bring him to Kutztown. “I’m a pretty good example that things don’t necessarily go as planned, but all the things that happened to me brought me to Kutztown,” he said. “In 1993, I walked around the campus and knew that I wanted to be a part of KU.”

Five Stellar Alumni Round Out Hall of Fame Induction Class

America’s First

Female

Modern-Day BrewMaster Celebrates a Heady Career

Carol Stoudt ’71, could have gone bac k to teaching kindergar ten. Instead, she opted f o r a n education of a different kind. ( c o n t i n u e d o n n e x t pag e )

BY:

Amy Biemiller

Joining former head track and field coach Brian Mondschein (above)

photography by:

as inductees into the KU Athletic Hall of Fame in November were (left to

Da n Z . J o h n s o n

right): Tiffany Mattiuz Keller ’96, a multiple All-PSAC and all-region softball pitcher and record setter; Megan Seefeldt Carson ’02, KU’s first PSAC cross country champion and track and field standout; Paul Schmitt ’02, track and field All-American in the pole vault; Glenn Woolard, a record-setting All-American pitcher for the baseball team and 2002 Rawlings Division II Player of the Year; and Cyndi Wasilius ’93, an All-PSAC women’s basketball performer and one of the top scorers in team history.

8 Tower | Spring 2013

Spring 2013 | Tower 9

FEATURE

What’s in a

name? Stoudt’s Brewing Company

The entire beer-making process is rife with creativity, and even more so when it comes to naming the brews. Here is a short list of some of Stoudt’s more creative naming enterprises:

pioneering craft breweries in America. is one of the

Fat Dog

“I

knew I wanted to help my husband with the business,” she explained, referring to the family’s three enterprises in Adamstown, Pa.: A restaurant, an antique mall and a beer garden. “But I also wanted something to call my own.” Seeing a need – the beer garden at that time did not produce its own fresh beer – Stoudt began researching how she could begin brewing beer for the restaurant’s annual beer festival. By 1987, with three years of research, classes and mentorships to her credit, she had become the first female brew master in America since Prohibition and the first woman in the country to oversee the design and development of a microbrewery. “The idea was to brew the beer for use in the restaurant, but in those days, a brewpub was illegal,” she explained. “I had to establish myself as a microbrewery and sell the beer to my husband.” It took more than two years, but Stoudt perfected the German-style pilsner, considered the industry’s litmus test for quality brewing practice, as well as the Munich-style Helles lager, Oktoberfest and Honey Double Maibock. In 1987, its first year of operation, Stoudt’s Brewery produced 500 barrels of beer. The enterprise consisted of Stoudt and one other employee. “I was proud and excited. I had researched and surrounded myself with mentors who helped fan my passion for creating flavorful, fresh beer,” she explained. “We had the product to use at the festival and in the restaurant, but there was a stigma attached to locally brewed beer. My beer was comparable to an import then, and I had to get consumers, retailers, beer salesmen and wholesalers to not only buy into the locally brewed product, but to understand that the taste difference warranted a higher price than a mass-market beer. I had to change the perceptions of a lot of people.” Stoudt attended as many seminars, tastings and public events as she could, “trying to get my beer into other people’s mouths,” she said. “I also had to work to get

10 Tower | Spring 2013

Named for the family pup that enjoyed the product, this is an inviting, silky black stout, which goes great with desserts.

old abominable There is nothing beastly about this full-bodied barley wine-style ale, which blends American and English ingenuity.

women interested. Remember, in those days, women typically chose wine over beer, thinking it was a ‘man’s drink’ and that it was fattening.” Slowly but surely, the fledgling company began to turn the tide. Stoudt’s products, and the concept of microbreweries, began to be synonymous with a different attitude and approach to brewing, creative flavors and friendly customer service. Her marketing strategy has come to define that of brewpubs and microbreweries across the country: offer products that compete on the basis of quality and diversity. Today, still following the strict guidelines of the Reinheitsgebot (the German Purity Law of 1516), Stoudt brews 14 different styles of ales and lagers, which are available in Pennsylvania and nine other states. The brewery has the capacity to produce almost 16,000 barrels of beer a year, averaging about 12,000. With 31 gallons to a barrel, that’s a lot of beer. “Craft beer has come to define affordable luxury,” she said. “We offer a good value and a lot of flavor. Back when we first started the brewery, we were ahead of our time. Today, people want choices and flavor and diversity in everything, including beer. We’re glad to meet that need.” The brewery not only meets the need, but leads in professional accolades. The Stoudt brand has garnered more than 30 medals from the Great American Beer Festival, World Cup Beer and Beverage Tasting Institute. Staying true to the esthetic of an industry that is known for creativity and personality does have its challenges.

While Stoudt has no qualms about the rigors of scientific experimentation and fine-tuning to get a brew just right, she struggles with the creative process required to brand a new offering. “We began naming the beers with the family name and the type of beer,” she explained, referencing the Stoudt’s Pale Ale and Stoudt’s Triple. “But consumers are influenced by product names, so we had to get creative.” One of the first naming successes was the brewery’s Scarlet Lady. “We would have traditionally named it by the English term for pale ale, which is called ‘bitter.’ But ‘bitter’ to most people is an unappealing flavor. Instead, we took a cue from the red hue and came up with Scarlet Lady.” Closely following that success was Fat Dog, named for the family’s pet Labrador who had a preference for the rich stout. “As we got more creative with the names, the sales increased,” she said. With a deep footprint on the Eastern seaboard, Stoudt is happy to keep the production at the brewery level and consistently excellent. “I have no plans to make this any larger than it is,” she said. “I’ve done what I set out to accomplish, and that’s enough. Today, the whole world looks to America as the champion of the craft beer movement. I am proud to have been a part of that.”

The Black Angus Restaurant and Pub provides outstanding food in a family-friendly

Heifer-in-wheat This Bavarian-style unfiltered wheat beer is brewed with 50% malted barley and 50% malted wheat.

environment.

revel red This full-bodied ale, available For more information on Stoudt’s Brewery, visit www. stoudtsbeer.com

only from November through the winter months, is aptly named for its deep amber color and the holiday party season.

scarlet lady There is nothing sinful about this reddish-copper ale, except, perhaps, the delicious taste.

smooth hoperator This medium-bodied lager is a hop lover’s beer with a great flavor profile.

Spring 2013 | Tower 11

FEATURE

What’s in a

name? Stoudt’s Brewing Company

The entire beer-making process is rife with creativity, and even more so when it comes to naming the brews. Here is a short list of some of Stoudt’s more creative naming enterprises:

pioneering craft breweries in America. is one of the

Fat Dog

“I

knew I wanted to help my husband with the business,” she explained, referring to the family’s three enterprises in Adamstown, Pa.: A restaurant, an antique mall and a beer garden. “But I also wanted something to call my own.” Seeing a need – the beer garden at that time did not produce its own fresh beer – Stoudt began researching how she could begin brewing beer for the restaurant’s annual beer festival. By 1987, with three years of research, classes and mentorships to her credit, she had become the first female brew master in America since Prohibition and the first woman in the country to oversee the design and development of a microbrewery. “The idea was to brew the beer for use in the restaurant, but in those days, a brewpub was illegal,” she explained. “I had to establish myself as a microbrewery and sell the beer to my husband.” It took more than two years, but Stoudt perfected the German-style pilsner, considered the industry’s litmus test for quality brewing practice, as well as the Munich-style Helles lager, Oktoberfest and Honey Double Maibock. In 1987, its first year of operation, Stoudt’s Brewery produced 500 barrels of beer. The enterprise consisted of Stoudt and one other employee. “I was proud and excited. I had researched and surrounded myself with mentors who helped fan my passion for creating flavorful, fresh beer,” she explained. “We had the product to use at the festival and in the restaurant, but there was a stigma attached to locally brewed beer. My beer was comparable to an import then, and I had to get consumers, retailers, beer salesmen and wholesalers to not only buy into the locally brewed product, but to understand that the taste difference warranted a higher price than a mass-market beer. I had to change the perceptions of a lot of people.” Stoudt attended as many seminars, tastings and public events as she could, “trying to get my beer into other people’s mouths,” she said. “I also had to work to get

10 Tower | Spring 2013

Named for the family pup that enjoyed the product, this is an inviting, silky black stout, which goes great with desserts.

old abominable There is nothing beastly about this full-bodied barley wine-style ale, which blends American and English ingenuity.

women interested. Remember, in those days, women typically chose wine over beer, thinking it was a ‘man’s drink’ and that it was fattening.” Slowly but surely, the fledgling company began to turn the tide. Stoudt’s products, and the concept of microbreweries, began to be synonymous with a different attitude and approach to brewing, creative flavors and friendly customer service. Her marketing strategy has come to define that of brewpubs and microbreweries across the country: offer products that compete on the basis of quality and diversity. Today, still following the strict guidelines of the Reinheitsgebot (the German Purity Law of 1516), Stoudt brews 14 different styles of ales and lagers, which are available in Pennsylvania and nine other states. The brewery has the capacity to produce almost 16,000 barrels of beer a year, averaging about 12,000. With 31 gallons to a barrel, that’s a lot of beer. “Craft beer has come to define affordable luxury,” she said. “We offer a good value and a lot of flavor. Back when we first started the brewery, we were ahead of our time. Today, people want choices and flavor and diversity in everything, including beer. We’re glad to meet that need.” The brewery not only meets the need, but leads in professional accolades. The Stoudt brand has garnered more than 30 medals from the Great American Beer Festival, World Cup Beer and Beverage Tasting Institute. Staying true to the esthetic of an industry that is known for creativity and personality does have its challenges.

While Stoudt has no qualms about the rigors of scientific experimentation and fine-tuning to get a brew just right, she struggles with the creative process required to brand a new offering. “We began naming the beers with the family name and the type of beer,” she explained, referencing the Stoudt’s Pale Ale and Stoudt’s Triple. “But consumers are influenced by product names, so we had to get creative.” One of the first naming successes was the brewery’s Scarlet Lady. “We would have traditionally named it by the English term for pale ale, which is called ‘bitter.’ But ‘bitter’ to most people is an unappealing flavor. Instead, we took a cue from the red hue and came up with Scarlet Lady.” Closely following that success was Fat Dog, named for the family’s pet Labrador who had a preference for the rich stout. “As we got more creative with the names, the sales increased,” she said. With a deep footprint on the Eastern seaboard, Stoudt is happy to keep the production at the brewery level and consistently excellent. “I have no plans to make this any larger than it is,” she said. “I’ve done what I set out to accomplish, and that’s enough. Today, the whole world looks to America as the champion of the craft beer movement. I am proud to have been a part of that.”

The Black Angus Restaurant and Pub provides outstanding food in a family-friendly

Heifer-in-wheat This Bavarian-style unfiltered wheat beer is brewed with 50% malted barley and 50% malted wheat.

environment.

revel red This full-bodied ale, available For more information on Stoudt’s Brewery, visit www. stoudtsbeer.com

only from November through the winter months, is aptly named for its deep amber color and the holiday party season.

scarlet lady There is nothing sinful about this reddish-copper ale, except, perhaps, the delicious taste.

smooth hoperator This medium-bodied lager is a hop lover’s beer with a great flavor profile.

Spring 2013 | Tower 11

feature

brushstrokes of

genius BY: A m y B i e m i l l e r

photography by: D a n Z . J o h n s o n

The musician depicted in the painting “Before the Gig” radiates quiet energy. His clasped hands allude to strength and composure. His face, without detail, emanates soulful anticipation. It is an evocative and vibrant work and one of thousands crafted by an artist who thinks deeply about the personal story of each subject he paints.

“When people look at my work, I want them to be able to connect with the subject in the painting,” said Dane Tilghman ’79. “I want them to get a sense of the difference that person made and feel like they know a little piece of that person’s story.” Just as an author spins a tale using words, Tilghman, one of America’s leading contemporary African American artists, creates with bold brushstrokes of color. He sets the scene with bright acrylic colors and minimal detail: ochre and amber swaths for a farm field; cool arcs of color for a jazz club; emerald and sage strips to define a baseball outfield. His textural, bold paint strokes also breathe character and depth into his subjects, who range from farmers and railroad workers to musicians and baseball legends. His canvases tell a story so well that you feel part of the subject’s moment in time. “I love a good story, and there’s beauty in the everyday activities of people,” said Tilghman. “I make my art about honoring those people and activities.” Tilghman practices realism, cubism and impressionism and has also developed his own style, which he calls tall-tale art. This style employs exaggerated perspective and caricature, and although it is very allegorical, it evokes a sense of grace and rhythm. His work resonates with a diverse audience and takes prideof-place in collections that range from posters that adorn dorm

12 Tower | Spring 2013

rooms and offices to original canvases setting out the picnic supper. on the walls of Bill Cosby’s and Nelson “As a frozen moment in time that Mandela’s homes. You’ll recognize his captures my father’s place in the family, work in the Butler Institute of Fine Art, this composition has to be my favorite, the University of Pennsylvania and the if I really must choose one,” he joked. Baseball Hall of Fame. You’ll also see Tilghman, who comes from a long line his paintings on stage sets for TV shows of watermen working the Chesapeake and in magazine layouts and as murals Bay, considers the Eastern Shore the in Turner Stadium in Atlanta and ultimate natural environment in which Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia. to immerse himself and paint. “There’s nothing else I’d “When people look at my work, I want them to be rather do to earn a living,” able to connect with the subject in the painting ...” he declared. “I had 26 jobs before I made the commit — Da n e t i lg h m a n ’ 79 ment to go full-out and paint. That was 29 years ago, and I haven’t “While I really do take joy in each looked back.” painting I create, I have a special place Tilghman is a prolific artist, averaging in my heart for painting the black 225 paintings a year. Some are commiswatermen,” he said. “To capture their sions, like one project he is just starting grace and strength in a classic American now for the San Francisco 49ers organizasetting resonates very deeply with me.” tion. Others are simply an answer to the Tilghman also draws on a reserve of call of his muse, the everyday man. inspiration collected from his past profes“I take inspiration from old black and sors at Kutztown University, citing, white photos of people doing everyday among many, his illustration professor things,” he explained. “I’ll use that moment Tom Quirk, his music teacher Charles in time captured on film as a jumping-off Scanzello and his sociology professor point to illustrate a story.” Sam Westmoreland. Family and family history also serve “I was fortunate to have professors as inspiration for his work. One of who not only taught me the skill I use Tilghman’s favorite compositions is today, but helped me expand my creativithat of his extended family caught on ty. Fred Keller, my life drawing teacher, camera at a picnic in 1947. Entitled and (the late) Dr. David Dunn, head of “The Last Family Reunion,” the piece the Black Theatre League, were just two captures Tilghman’s father at age 8 of the professors whose mentorship and and his slightly-older brother waiting influence are their legacy to me and, I am for their mother and aunts to finish sure, to countless other alumni.” Dane Tilghman’s paintings: “Sleepy John” (left), “Fielding the Long Ball” (middle), “Going to Church” (right).

Spring 2013 | Tower 13

feature

brushstrokes of

genius BY: A m y B i e m i l l e r

photography by: D a n Z . J o h n s o n

The musician depicted in the painting “Before the Gig” radiates quiet energy. His clasped hands allude to strength and composure. His face, without detail, emanates soulful anticipation. It is an evocative and vibrant work and one of thousands crafted by an artist who thinks deeply about the personal story of each subject he paints.

“When people look at my work, I want them to be able to connect with the subject in the painting,” said Dane Tilghman ’79. “I want them to get a sense of the difference that person made and feel like they know a little piece of that person’s story.” Just as an author spins a tale using words, Tilghman, one of America’s leading contemporary African American artists, creates with bold brushstrokes of color. He sets the scene with bright acrylic colors and minimal detail: ochre and amber swaths for a farm field; cool arcs of color for a jazz club; emerald and sage strips to define a baseball outfield. His textural, bold paint strokes also breathe character and depth into his subjects, who range from farmers and railroad workers to musicians and baseball legends. His canvases tell a story so well that you feel part of the subject’s moment in time. “I love a good story, and there’s beauty in the everyday activities of people,” said Tilghman. “I make my art about honoring those people and activities.” Tilghman practices realism, cubism and impressionism and has also developed his own style, which he calls tall-tale art. This style employs exaggerated perspective and caricature, and although it is very allegorical, it evokes a sense of grace and rhythm. His work resonates with a diverse audience and takes prideof-place in collections that range from posters that adorn dorm

12 Tower | Spring 2013

rooms and offices to original canvases setting out the picnic supper. on the walls of Bill Cosby’s and Nelson “As a frozen moment in time that Mandela’s homes. You’ll recognize his captures my father’s place in the family, work in the Butler Institute of Fine Art, this composition has to be my favorite, the University of Pennsylvania and the if I really must choose one,” he joked. Baseball Hall of Fame. You’ll also see Tilghman, who comes from a long line his paintings on stage sets for TV shows of watermen working the Chesapeake and in magazine layouts and as murals Bay, considers the Eastern Shore the in Turner Stadium in Atlanta and ultimate natural environment in which Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia. to immerse himself and paint. “There’s nothing else I’d “When people look at my work, I want them to be rather do to earn a living,” able to connect with the subject in the painting ...” he declared. “I had 26 jobs before I made the commit — Da n e t i lg h m a n ’ 79 ment to go full-out and paint. That was 29 years ago, and I haven’t “While I really do take joy in each looked back.” painting I create, I have a special place Tilghman is a prolific artist, averaging in my heart for painting the black 225 paintings a year. Some are commiswatermen,” he said. “To capture their sions, like one project he is just starting grace and strength in a classic American now for the San Francisco 49ers organizasetting resonates very deeply with me.” tion. Others are simply an answer to the Tilghman also draws on a reserve of call of his muse, the everyday man. inspiration collected from his past profes“I take inspiration from old black and sors at Kutztown University, citing, white photos of people doing everyday among many, his illustration professor things,” he explained. “I’ll use that moment Tom Quirk, his music teacher Charles in time captured on film as a jumping-off Scanzello and his sociology professor point to illustrate a story.” Sam Westmoreland. Family and family history also serve “I was fortunate to have professors as inspiration for his work. One of who not only taught me the skill I use Tilghman’s favorite compositions is today, but helped me expand my creativithat of his extended family caught on ty. Fred Keller, my life drawing teacher, camera at a picnic in 1947. Entitled and (the late) Dr. David Dunn, head of “The Last Family Reunion,” the piece the Black Theatre League, were just two captures Tilghman’s father at age 8 of the professors whose mentorship and and his slightly-older brother waiting influence are their legacy to me and, I am for their mother and aunts to finish sure, to countless other alumni.” Dane Tilghman’s paintings: “Sleepy John” (left), “Fielding the Long Ball” (middle), “Going to Church” (right).

Spring 2013 | Tower 13

feature

All that

glitters

can mean

business gold BY:

Amy

Biemiller

photography by: Douglas Benedict

14 Tower | Spring 2013

For Lisa Marino Oswald ’82, the world is one large jewelry box. Inspired by dew-covered gardens, cityscapes of steel or the star-spangled night sky, Oswald translates what delights her into ornaments that bring joy to a very loyal following of fashionistas around the world. “Every woman wants to feel beautiful. It gives me great joy that my jewelry fulfills that desire for so many,” said Oswald, the president and driving creative force behind Sorrelli jewelry designs. “I love this business. It’s very celebratory,” she proclaims. “Our designs are purchased as gifts, bought as reminders of important achievements or to commemorate special occasions, and given as tokens of love. Who wouldn’t want to be involved with that?” As in many good stories about how businesses get launched, Sorrelli began out of necessity. In 1983, Oswald and her husband, Kermit ’81, were living in a Brooklyn loft. She was working with a costume jewelry designer, and he was framing art and hanging gallery shows in

Manhattan. As recent graduates with degrees in fine art, the couple was delighted by one big perk of Kermit’s job: They spent weekends at gallery parties, often in the company of celebrities such as Keith Haring, Andy Warhol and Bianca Jagger. “It was a heady time for us, but I always had a tiny worry, and that was what would I wear to those parties,” Oswald confessed. “I could make do with a little black dress, but my problem was how to dress it up differently every time,” she explained. Channeling her artistic talent and love of heirloom jewelry, she did what any enterprising, creative young woman would: She handcrafted sparkly accessories from bits and pieces of crystal and semi-precious stones. “I found that I could meld my love for vintage design with the hard-edged look of that time, to put together an eclectic collection of jewelry,” she said. Her designs captured the eye of other party guests, and soon she was spending more time at her kitchen table crafting jewelry for a growing clientele. By calling in her sisters for help, she was able to keep up with orders. She was also inspired to name her fledgling company Sorrelli, an appropriation from the Italian word sorrelle, which means “sisters.” Those days crafting jewelry at her kitchen table are long past. Today, she manages the creative design, and Kermit takes care of production and factory setup for the Sorrelli company, now located in Kutztown. The jewelry is sold in the company’s flagship store in Kutztown, as well as in independent retail boutiques nationwide and in major department stores like Nordstrom, Von Maur and Papyrus. The Sorrelli name has become synonymous for boldly beautiful jewelry that may be worn en masse or as single statement pieces to complement any woman’s outfit and personality. Pieces consist of semiprecious stones, such as jasper, opal, pearl, turquoise, amethyst, jade and coral, as well as faceted Swarovski crystals. Sorrelli rings,

bracelets, necklaces, pins and earrings grace synonymous with fashion spreads in beautifully designed magazines including signature pieces. Redbook, Glamour and Lucky, and adorn the fashion conscious as well as the famous. “I still remember when I saw Madonna’s picture at the American Music Awards in 1987. She was wearing my earrings!” Oswald exclaimed. “And you know what the greatest thing about that was? I didn’t give those to her; she bought them.” Oswald gives retired Kutztown University art professor, James Carroll, credit for propelling her into her career and helping her stay focused. “Dr. Carroll made us keep a calendar and record everything we did in 15-minute blocks, every day, all term,” she said. “Now that time really is money for me, I understand how important it is to stay accountable to the business through my actions, even the smallest ones.” Carroll also promoted internships for his students at a time when it was uncommon for fine art students. “He prompted me to take on an internship with a costume jewelry designer in New York when I graduated, and that mentoring and exposure to business has continued to serve me well,” she declared. There have been a number of important accomplishments for the business, said this high-energy self-starter. In 2000, the Sorrelli line was first featured in Nordstrom, “which really put us on the map,” she proclaimed. In 2006, the Oswalds returned to their roots in Kutztown and opened what would become their flagship store. “The business is like a child in some ways. I am so proud to nurture it and see it grow,” she said. That nurturing has recently been focused on relationship building. A new collaboration between Sorrelli and Stacy London, media personality and co-host of “What Not to Wear,” is set to launch a new line of buildable jewelry for the brand. “There’s no end to the possibilities for the business,” she declared. “Jewelry is timeless, and there is a never-ending supply of inspiration for new and creative designs. I’m just lucky to constantly be inspired.” For more information on Sorrelli, visit www.sorrelli.com. The Sorrelli name has become

Spring 2013 | Tower 15

feature

All that

glitters

can mean

business gold BY:

Amy

Biemiller

photography by: Douglas Benedict

14 Tower | Spring 2013

For Lisa Marino Oswald ’82, the world is one large jewelry box. Inspired by dew-covered gardens, cityscapes of steel or the star-spangled night sky, Oswald translates what delights her into ornaments that bring joy to a very loyal following of fashionistas around the world. “Every woman wants to feel beautiful. It gives me great joy that my jewelry fulfills that desire for so many,” said Oswald, the president and driving creative force behind Sorrelli jewelry designs. “I love this business. It’s very celebratory,” she proclaims. “Our designs are purchased as gifts, bought as reminders of important achievements or to commemorate special occasions, and given as tokens of love. Who wouldn’t want to be involved with that?” As in many good stories about how businesses get launched, Sorrelli began out of necessity. In 1983, Oswald and her husband, Kermit ’81, were living in a Brooklyn loft. She was working with a costume jewelry designer, and he was framing art and hanging gallery shows in

Manhattan. As recent graduates with degrees in fine art, the couple was delighted by one big perk of Kermit’s job: They spent weekends at gallery parties, often in the company of celebrities such as Keith Haring, Andy Warhol and Bianca Jagger. “It was a heady time for us, but I always had a tiny worry, and that was what would I wear to those parties,” Oswald confessed. “I could make do with a little black dress, but my problem was how to dress it up differently every time,” she explained. Channeling her artistic talent and love of heirloom jewelry, she did what any enterprising, creative young woman would: She handcrafted sparkly accessories from bits and pieces of crystal and semi-precious stones. “I found that I could meld my love for vintage design with the hard-edged look of that time, to put together an eclectic collection of jewelry,” she said. Her designs captured the eye of other party guests, and soon she was spending more time at her kitchen table crafting jewelry for a growing clientele. By calling in her sisters for help, she was able to keep up with orders. She was also inspired to name her fledgling company Sorrelli, an appropriation from the Italian word sorrelle, which means “sisters.” Those days crafting jewelry at her kitchen table are long past. Today, she manages the creative design, and Kermit takes care of production and factory setup for the Sorrelli company, now located in Kutztown. The jewelry is sold in the company’s flagship store in Kutztown, as well as in independent retail boutiques nationwide and in major department stores like Nordstrom, Von Maur and Papyrus. The Sorrelli name has become synonymous for boldly beautiful jewelry that may be worn en masse or as single statement pieces to complement any woman’s outfit and personality. Pieces consist of semiprecious stones, such as jasper, opal, pearl, turquoise, amethyst, jade and coral, as well as faceted Swarovski crystals. Sorrelli rings,

bracelets, necklaces, pins and earrings grace synonymous with fashion spreads in beautifully designed magazines including signature pieces. Redbook, Glamour and Lucky, and adorn the fashion conscious as well as the famous. “I still remember when I saw Madonna’s picture at the American Music Awards in 1987. She was wearing my earrings!” Oswald exclaimed. “And you know what the greatest thing about that was? I didn’t give those to her; she bought them.” Oswald gives retired Kutztown University art professor, James Carroll, credit for propelling her into her career and helping her stay focused. “Dr. Carroll made us keep a calendar and record everything we did in 15-minute blocks, every day, all term,” she said. “Now that time really is money for me, I understand how important it is to stay accountable to the business through my actions, even the smallest ones.” Carroll also promoted internships for his students at a time when it was uncommon for fine art students. “He prompted me to take on an internship with a costume jewelry designer in New York when I graduated, and that mentoring and exposure to business has continued to serve me well,” she declared. There have been a number of important accomplishments for the business, said this high-energy self-starter. In 2000, the Sorrelli line was first featured in Nordstrom, “which really put us on the map,” she proclaimed. In 2006, the Oswalds returned to their roots in Kutztown and opened what would become their flagship store. “The business is like a child in some ways. I am so proud to nurture it and see it grow,” she said. That nurturing has recently been focused on relationship building. A new collaboration between Sorrelli and Stacy London, media personality and co-host of “What Not to Wear,” is set to launch a new line of buildable jewelry for the brand. “There’s no end to the possibilities for the business,” she declared. “Jewelry is timeless, and there is a never-ending supply of inspiration for new and creative designs. I’m just lucky to constantly be inspired.” For more information on Sorrelli, visit www.sorrelli.com. The Sorrelli name has become

Spring 2013 | Tower 15

feature

Changing Lives

“Treat people as if they were what they ought to be, and you help them become what they are capable of being.”

One Student at a Time

b y : Esther Shanahan M’15

16 Tower | Spring 2013

— Goethe,

Th e c o r e p r i n c i p l e f o r t h e p i o n e e r d a y s c h o o l

When Jim Leiner ’98 founded the Pioneer Day School, located in San Diego, Calif., he didn’t know that he would spend the next three years without a paycheck. “The easiest thing to do would have been to quit,” he confided. “I couldn’t pay myself, and I had to survive by tutoring in the evenings and bartending – but I’m glad I did it.” Leiner’s perseverance paid off. Today, the Pioneer Day School, which enrolls children on the autism spectrum and with special needs, serves as a model for other institutions. In order to provide every student with a holistic educational experience, Leiner and his team of educators begin their assessment on the first day of class. “For most of our students, coming here is a relief,” he explained. “Maybe at their last school, it was too noisy or bright. Our team works one-on-one with the children to discover what their social, emotional and physiological needs are, before the academic component enters the picture. After a few weeks, students start looking forward to school!” Leiner served as a teacher when he first

founded at Pioneer Day School. These days, his responsibilities have grown – he is still teaching (music), provides one-on-one support for severe needs students and fulfills administrative duties. “I do all of the things that need to be done,” he said. “I’ll even scrub a toilet.” A Pennsylvania native, Leiner moved to San Diego in 2001, where he dreamed of starting a small private school devoted to educating special needs children and teaching them life skills. “My goal was to create a unique, small community where students can learn behavioral and social skills while emerging academically,” he revealed. “I wanted to open a school that also fostered the development of life skills, like cooking meals and doing laundry.” The transformations that Leiner has witnessed are a testament to the success of his innovative curriculum. “One fifth-grader’s parents were told that he would never speak,” Leiner recalled. “He came here and thrived. By 10th grade he enrolled in a public high school and won the

‘student of the month’ award. Another student, who originally presented as aggressive and violent, has been here for one-and-a-half years – now he’s practically a teacher!” The road to success hasn’t always been easy. At its inception, the Pioneer Day School faced immense budget shortfalls and struggled for four to five years to stay afloat. A grant from the San Diego Foundation came at a crucial moment, and now the school, through the Pioneer Foundation of San Diego, is able to give back to others in need. “I feel so fortunate,” Leiner said. “I’ve got a great team of people here, and every step along the way, miracles have occurred. Now we can give back.” As a freshman at KU, Leiner knew that he wanted to make a difference for children with special needs. “The only thing I ever wanted to do was teach special education,” he explained. “And I learned a lot from my professors. Dr. Dennis Dietrich, my adviser, taught me that a sense of humor is necessary to survive – or thrive – in this field. I also had class with Dr. Debra Lynch, who was an incredible professor.” The classroom wasn’t the only place where Leiner received an education. A member of the Golden Bears wrestling team and the men’s rugby club, Leiner’s participation in athletics gave him the resiliency to persevere even when the future of his school seemed bleak. “I gained so much from wrestling and rugby,” Leiner proclaimed. “Wrestling is as much about mental strength as it is physical. The lessons I learned while wrestling helped me hang in there when times were tough. I started playing rugby to improve my leg strength for wrestling, but it also taught me how to network, which turned out to be a valuable skill.” Leiner’s determination and fortitude are instrumental to the next phase of his vision – implementing a self-funded pilot program in public schools. “We have a lot of statistically significant results,” he explained. “Some of our findings have been published in medical journals,

Pioneer Day School caters to students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and other special needs. Left: Pioneer students and teachers working on sensory activities. Below: Jim Leiner ’98. Bottom: Pioneer takes learning outside of the classroom.

and we received additional grants to continue our research. The pioneer learning model will provide a ‘how to’ manual for working with special needs children that public schools, or everyone, could use.” As for Leiner, he sees himself one day returning to his Pennsylvania roots. “I was very fond of my time at KU and really appreciate the East Coast mentality,” he declared. “Someday I would love to come back and work with people who want to work in the special education field.” Until then, Leiner will continue his work at the Pioneer Day School – changing lives, one child at a time.

Spring 2013 | Tower 17

feature

Changing Lives

“Treat people as if they were what they ought to be, and you help them become what they are capable of being.”

One Student at a Time

b y : Esther Shanahan M’15

16 Tower | Spring 2013

— Goethe,

Th e c o r e p r i n c i p l e f o r t h e p i o n e e r d a y s c h o o l

When Jim Leiner ’98 founded the Pioneer Day School, located in San Diego, Calif., he didn’t know that he would spend the next three years without a paycheck. “The easiest thing to do would have been to quit,” he confided. “I couldn’t pay myself, and I had to survive by tutoring in the evenings and bartending – but I’m glad I did it.” Leiner’s perseverance paid off. Today, the Pioneer Day School, which enrolls children on the autism spectrum and with special needs, serves as a model for other institutions. In order to provide every student with a holistic educational experience, Leiner and his team of educators begin their assessment on the first day of class. “For most of our students, coming here is a relief,” he explained. “Maybe at their last school, it was too noisy or bright. Our team works one-on-one with the children to discover what their social, emotional and physiological needs are, before the academic component enters the picture. After a few weeks, students start looking forward to school!” Leiner served as a teacher when he first

founded at Pioneer Day School. These days, his responsibilities have grown – he is still teaching (music), provides one-on-one support for severe needs students and fulfills administrative duties. “I do all of the things that need to be done,” he said. “I’ll even scrub a toilet.” A Pennsylvania native, Leiner moved to San Diego in 2001, where he dreamed of starting a small private school devoted to educating special needs children and teaching them life skills. “My goal was to create a unique, small community where students can learn behavioral and social skills while emerging academically,” he revealed. “I wanted to open a school that also fostered the development of life skills, like cooking meals and doing laundry.” The transformations that Leiner has witnessed are a testament to the success of his innovative curriculum. “One fifth-grader’s parents were told that he would never speak,” Leiner recalled. “He came here and thrived. By 10th grade he enrolled in a public high school and won the

‘student of the month’ award. Another student, who originally presented as aggressive and violent, has been here for one-and-a-half years – now he’s practically a teacher!” The road to success hasn’t always been easy. At its inception, the Pioneer Day School faced immense budget shortfalls and struggled for four to five years to stay afloat. A grant from the San Diego Foundation came at a crucial moment, and now the school, through the Pioneer Foundation of San Diego, is able to give back to others in need. “I feel so fortunate,” Leiner said. “I’ve got a great team of people here, and every step along the way, miracles have occurred. Now we can give back.” As a freshman at KU, Leiner knew that he wanted to make a difference for children with special needs. “The only thing I ever wanted to do was teach special education,” he explained. “And I learned a lot from my professors. Dr. Dennis Dietrich, my adviser, taught me that a sense of humor is necessary to survive – or thrive – in this field. I also had class with Dr. Debra Lynch, who was an incredible professor.” The classroom wasn’t the only place where Leiner received an education. A member of the Golden Bears wrestling team and the men’s rugby club, Leiner’s participation in athletics gave him the resiliency to persevere even when the future of his school seemed bleak. “I gained so much from wrestling and rugby,” Leiner proclaimed. “Wrestling is as much about mental strength as it is physical. The lessons I learned while wrestling helped me hang in there when times were tough. I started playing rugby to improve my leg strength for wrestling, but it also taught me how to network, which turned out to be a valuable skill.” Leiner’s determination and fortitude are instrumental to the next phase of his vision – implementing a self-funded pilot program in public schools. “We have a lot of statistically significant results,” he explained. “Some of our findings have been published in medical journals,

Pioneer Day School caters to students with Autism Spectrum Disorders and other special needs. Left: Pioneer students and teachers working on sensory activities. Below: Jim Leiner ’98. Bottom: Pioneer takes learning outside of the classroom.

and we received additional grants to continue our research. The pioneer learning model will provide a ‘how to’ manual for working with special needs children that public schools, or everyone, could use.” As for Leiner, he sees himself one day returning to his Pennsylvania roots. “I was very fond of my time at KU and really appreciate the East Coast mentality,” he declared. “Someday I would love to come back and work with people who want to work in the special education field.” Until then, Leiner will continue his work at the Pioneer Day School – changing lives, one child at a time.

Spring 2013 | Tower 17

Back to Class with ...

Joe Piscitelli By:

Ba rba r a J. M ar s h a l l photography by:

Da n Z . J o h n son

After 30 years at KU and a decade of retirement, Dr. Joe Piscitelli, professor emeritus of biology, is still demanding questions from his students. While cell and molecular biology are Piscitelli’s first love, his undergraduate degree in philosophy inspired him to create courses that stretch beyond hard science – for example, Biology and Society, Man and the Environment and Bioethics. Today he is teaching biology to both science and nonscience majors at Lehigh Carbon Community College. “I ask opinion questions and try to get the group thinking about issues that may come into the social arena from the area of biology. They think education is getting the answers. I think education is knowing how to ask the question, because if you don’t know how to ask the question, you can’t do the research to answer that question.” Stressing that students need to be engaged citizens, “I tell them in biology they need to get involved in the community, they need to run on school boards and borough councils, because if they don’t, other people will come who won’t have as broad of a perspective as they do.”

Still

teaching ,

still learning and still engaged .

Piscitelli is still very much engaged in both the university and local communities. He and his wife, Diane, support the KU scholarship fund they established in 2002 in memory of their late son, Mark, to help students study abroad. “Mark had a whole new perspective after traveling to Europe,” Piscitelli said. Piscitelli loves to travel, recalling such highlights as kissing Diane on the Rialto Bridge in Venice and celebrating his 78th birthday amidst whales on an Alaskan cruise. He will also accompany the KU Jazz Ensemble for an Italian tour in 2013. Although he long ago gave up playing, he attends Jazz Ensemble practices and emcees performances. “It is wonderful to watch the progress of individual students. Kutztown is a great school in the arts!” Still living “10 doors from campus,” Piscitelli is the unofficial chaplain of the rugby team. “I didn’t pray with them at two away games, and some of the team asked why I wasn’t there since they lost both of those games,” he laughed.

“They want answers. I want them to

ask Que st i o n s ! ” — joe piscitelli

Piscitelli continues to question how he can be a better teacher. With disarming modesty, he says he once asked a KU colleague to critique how well he engaged students in the classroom, discovering that he needed to give students more time to think before jumping in with answers. He asks for evaluations of every class session. “Evaluations at the end of the course are never helpful to the current students,” he explained. Additionally, he also participated in a reading apprenticeship program to better teach students how to read a text, attack a chapter and get the most from their text assignments.

18 Tower | Spring 2013

A resigned Roman Catholic priest, he was recently certified to be a hospital chaplain and still performs weddings and baptisms, with all honoraria going to support his son’s scholarship fund. He is deeply invested in the health of the community and is active in the Kutztown University Borough of Kutztown (KUBoK) neighborhood watch program. An avid sailor, Piscitelli spends much of his time in the cockpit of a sailboat, thinking about the big questions in life. His question is simply, “Where am I going? I’m trying my darndest to let God be at the wheel,” he said.

Dr. Joe Piscitelli with Boehm Science Center in background.

Back to Class with ...

Joe Piscitelli By:

Ba rba r a J. M ar s h a l l photography by:

Da n Z . J o h n son

After 30 years at KU and a decade of retirement, Dr. Joe Piscitelli, professor emeritus of biology, is still demanding questions from his students. While cell and molecular biology are Piscitelli’s first love, his undergraduate degree in philosophy inspired him to create courses that stretch beyond hard science – for example, Biology and Society, Man and the Environment and Bioethics. Today he is teaching biology to both science and nonscience majors at Lehigh Carbon Community College. “I ask opinion questions and try to get the group thinking about issues that may come into the social arena from the area of biology. They think education is getting the answers. I think education is knowing how to ask the question, because if you don’t know how to ask the question, you can’t do the research to answer that question.” Stressing that students need to be engaged citizens, “I tell them in biology they need to get involved in the community, they need to run on school boards and borough councils, because if they don’t, other people will come who won’t have as broad of a perspective as they do.”

Still

teaching ,

still learning and still engaged .

Piscitelli is still very much engaged in both the university and local communities. He and his wife, Diane, support the KU scholarship fund they established in 2002 in memory of their late son, Mark, to help students study abroad. “Mark had a whole new perspective after traveling to Europe,” Piscitelli said. Piscitelli loves to travel, recalling such highlights as kissing Diane on the Rialto Bridge in Venice and celebrating his 78th birthday amidst whales on an Alaskan cruise. He will also accompany the KU Jazz Ensemble for an Italian tour in 2013. Although he long ago gave up playing, he attends Jazz Ensemble practices and emcees performances. “It is wonderful to watch the progress of individual students. Kutztown is a great school in the arts!” Still living “10 doors from campus,” Piscitelli is the unofficial chaplain of the rugby team. “I didn’t pray with them at two away games, and some of the team asked why I wasn’t there since they lost both of those games,” he laughed.

“They want answers. I want them to

ask Que st i o n s ! ” — joe piscitelli

Piscitelli continues to question how he can be a better teacher. With disarming modesty, he says he once asked a KU colleague to critique how well he engaged students in the classroom, discovering that he needed to give students more time to think before jumping in with answers. He asks for evaluations of every class session. “Evaluations at the end of the course are never helpful to the current students,” he explained. Additionally, he also participated in a reading apprenticeship program to better teach students how to read a text, attack a chapter and get the most from their text assignments.

18 Tower | Spring 2013

A resigned Roman Catholic priest, he was recently certified to be a hospital chaplain and still performs weddings and baptisms, with all honoraria going to support his son’s scholarship fund. He is deeply invested in the health of the community and is active in the Kutztown University Borough of Kutztown (KUBoK) neighborhood watch program. An avid sailor, Piscitelli spends much of his time in the cockpit of a sailboat, thinking about the big questions in life. His question is simply, “Where am I going? I’m trying my darndest to let God be at the wheel,” he said.

Dr. Joe Piscitelli with Boehm Science Center in background.

KU Foundation

Update

Afflerbach Scholarship

I

n 1991, a bequest from the estate of Mamie H. Afflerbach ’20 established the Calvin E. and Mamie H. Afflerbach Scholarship at Kutztown University. The Afflerbach Scholarship furnishes need-based support for students registered in music courses at KU. Over the last two decades, the scholarship has provided more than $230,000 to students pursuing degrees in music and has had an incredible impact on the music program at Kutztown.

Afflerbach Scholarship recipients (from left): Janelle Decker ’15, Matthew Haelig ’13, Zachary Gardner ’15, Geert Ruelens ’14, Erika Diffendall ’16, Ethan Wightkin ’13, Doreen Smeck ’14. To read more about these students, visit: www.give2ku.org/afflerbach 20 Tower | Spring 2013

This fall, the scholarship was awarded to 16 undergraduates, one of whom is senior Doreen Smeck ’14, a dual major in secondary education and music education. “As a recipient of the Afflerbach Scholarship, I was able to take private organ lessons and accompanied the Kutztown University Choir under the direction of Dr. Dennis Williams,” Smeck said. “Receiving the scholarship was one of the best things to ever happen to me.” Smeck’s music performance studies also led her to an unexpected competition. “A few years ago I entered the Rodgers North American Organ Competition, where I competed against 25 organists ranging in ages from 20 to 35,” she recalled. “After several stages, I advanced to the final stage, which was held here at my own university. I went on to win the People’s Choice Award, and there has yet to be a more satisfying experience in my life.” Philanthropic partnership makes it possible for Kutztown University to provide the types of learning experiences – like Smeck’s – that change lives. Your support helps Kutztown attract talented and diverse students, and through scholarships, the university can offer the KU experience to students who deserve an excellent and accessible education. Planned gifts are a wonderful way to help KU and may qualify you for membership in The Old Main Society, which is named in honor of Old Main, the most historic building on campus and the heart of the university. The Old Main Society recognizes donors who have designated the Kutztown University Foundation as the ultimate beneficiary of a planned gift. Members of The Old Main Society include alumni, current and emeriti faculty, and friends. One of the most important benefits you will receive from joining The Old Main Society is the satisfaction derived from making a contribution to KU’s long-term success. Like the Afflerbachs, you, too, can provide enduring support to the university and its students. To learn more about The Old Main Society and planned giving, please visit www.give2ku.org/ plannedgiving.

and the

O

Campaign for KU

n Friday, Oct. 12, 2012, the Kutztown University Foundation & Alumni Engagement held its annual Celebration of Philanthropy dinner to highlight the achievements of students, faculty and alumni and to recognize the philanthropic support of the university’s generous donors. A special video, produced for the occasion, highlighted the remarkable ways that KU students, alumni and faculty are giving back to the university through their time, talent and contributions. The video can be viewed at www.youtube.com/kufoundation. The evening’s program included faculty and student speakers. Professor Vicki Meloney ’93 of the Communication Design Department and professor David Wagaman ’80 of the Business Administration Accounting and Finance Department spoke eloquently about the pride they feel in seeing their students succeed both in class and in their careers after college. KU students Heather Urban ’14 and Samantha Kronstadt ’12, M’14 shared stories about the impact that scholarship support has had upon their time at the university. Urban’s speech highlighted the importance of the culture of philanthropy at KU: “Though my time here has been relatively short, my experience at Kutztown has had a very positive impact on my life,” she said. “I have acquired valuable skills through the community service and leadership activities I participate in, which include serving as a career peer at the Career Development Center and

acting as a coordinator for the Big Brothers/ Big Sisters program offered on campus. These are all activities I feel really passionate about and love doing,” Urban said. “This year I was chosen as the recipient of a student scholarship. Receiving this scholarship has alleviated a financial burden on me and my family. I come from a single-parent home, and knowing that there won’t be a financial struggle this year relieves some of the stress I have carried in the past. The generosity of alumni, parents and friends who donate to the university has truly made a difference not just to me, but to my family as well.” The event was brought to a close with an exciting announcement by Bill Ribble ’73, who had some help from Avalanche and the KU Marching Unit. Ribble is the co-chair, along with Peter Knight, of Setting the Stage, The Campaign for Kutztown University, a comprehensive capital campaign designed to raise funds to enhance the quality of education at KU and contribute to the renovation of Schaeffer. The campaign entered its public phase with Ribble’s announcement that the foundation had, at the time of the event, raised $11.8 million toward the $15 million campaign goal. The campaign total now stands at $13 million. If you would like to learn more about the campaign or how you can get involved, please visit the foundation’s website at www.give2ku.org/campaign.

1

2

3

4 1 Campaign co-chair Bill ’73 and Joanne (Quinn) Ribble ’74. 2 Professor Vicki Meloney ’93 speaks about her students and her KU teaching experience. 3 Roger Jackson ’90, chair, KU Foundation Board of Directors, and Benjamin Brooks ’79, president, Alumni Association Board of Directors. 4 Presidential Ambassador and scholarship recipient Heather Urban ’14.

Avalanche, the KU mascot, and the KU Marching Unit helped bring the annual Celebration of Philanthropy dinner to a spectacular finish. Spring 2013 | Tower 21

KU Foundation

Update

Afflerbach Scholarship

I

n 1991, a bequest from the estate of Mamie H. Afflerbach ’20 established the Calvin E. and Mamie H. Afflerbach Scholarship at Kutztown University. The Afflerbach Scholarship furnishes need-based support for students registered in music courses at KU. Over the last two decades, the scholarship has provided more than $230,000 to students pursuing degrees in music and has had an incredible impact on the music program at Kutztown.

Afflerbach Scholarship recipients (from left): Janelle Decker ’15, Matthew Haelig ’13, Zachary Gardner ’15, Geert Ruelens ’14, Erika Diffendall ’16, Ethan Wightkin ’13, Doreen Smeck ’14. To read more about these students, visit: www.give2ku.org/afflerbach 20 Tower | Spring 2013

This fall, the scholarship was awarded to 16 undergraduates, one of whom is senior Doreen Smeck ’14, a dual major in secondary education and music education. “As a recipient of the Afflerbach Scholarship, I was able to take private organ lessons and accompanied the Kutztown University Choir under the direction of Dr. Dennis Williams,” Smeck said. “Receiving the scholarship was one of the best things to ever happen to me.” Smeck’s music performance studies also led her to an unexpected competition. “A few years ago I entered the Rodgers North American Organ Competition, where I competed against 25 organists ranging in ages from 20 to 35,” she recalled. “After several stages, I advanced to the final stage, which was held here at my own university. I went on to win the People’s Choice Award, and there has yet to be a more satisfying experience in my life.” Philanthropic partnership makes it possible for Kutztown University to provide the types of learning experiences – like Smeck’s – that change lives. Your support helps Kutztown attract talented and diverse students, and through scholarships, the university can offer the KU experience to students who deserve an excellent and accessible education. Planned gifts are a wonderful way to help KU and may qualify you for membership in The Old Main Society, which is named in honor of Old Main, the most historic building on campus and the heart of the university. The Old Main Society recognizes donors who have designated the Kutztown University Foundation as the ultimate beneficiary of a planned gift. Members of The Old Main Society include alumni, current and emeriti faculty, and friends. One of the most important benefits you will receive from joining The Old Main Society is the satisfaction derived from making a contribution to KU’s long-term success. Like the Afflerbachs, you, too, can provide enduring support to the university and its students. To learn more about The Old Main Society and planned giving, please visit www.give2ku.org/ plannedgiving.

and the

O

Campaign for KU

n Friday, Oct. 12, 2012, the Kutztown University Foundation & Alumni Engagement held its annual Celebration of Philanthropy dinner to highlight the achievements of students, faculty and alumni and to recognize the philanthropic support of the university’s generous donors. A special video, produced for the occasion, highlighted the remarkable ways that KU students, alumni and faculty are giving back to the university through their time, talent and contributions. The video can be viewed at www.youtube.com/kufoundation. The evening’s program included faculty and student speakers. Professor Vicki Meloney ’93 of the Communication Design Department and professor David Wagaman ’80 of the Business Administration Accounting and Finance Department spoke eloquently about the pride they feel in seeing their students succeed both in class and in their careers after college. KU students Heather Urban ’14 and Samantha Kronstadt ’12, M’14 shared stories about the impact that scholarship support has had upon their time at the university. Urban’s speech highlighted the importance of the culture of philanthropy at KU: “Though my time here has been relatively short, my experience at Kutztown has had a very positive impact on my life,” she said. “I have acquired valuable skills through the community service and leadership activities I participate in, which include serving as a career peer at the Career Development Center and

acting as a coordinator for the Big Brothers/ Big Sisters program offered on campus. These are all activities I feel really passionate about and love doing,” Urban said. “This year I was chosen as the recipient of a student scholarship. Receiving this scholarship has alleviated a financial burden on me and my family. I come from a single-parent home, and knowing that there won’t be a financial struggle this year relieves some of the stress I have carried in the past. The generosity of alumni, parents and friends who donate to the university has truly made a difference not just to me, but to my family as well.” The event was brought to a close with an exciting announcement by Bill Ribble ’73, who had some help from Avalanche and the KU Marching Unit. Ribble is the co-chair, along with Peter Knight, of Setting the Stage, The Campaign for Kutztown University, a comprehensive capital campaign designed to raise funds to enhance the quality of education at KU and contribute to the renovation of Schaeffer. The campaign entered its public phase with Ribble’s announcement that the foundation had, at the time of the event, raised $11.8 million toward the $15 million campaign goal. The campaign total now stands at $13 million. If you would like to learn more about the campaign or how you can get involved, please visit the foundation’s website at www.give2ku.org/campaign.

1

2

3

4 1 Campaign co-chair Bill ’73 and Joanne (Quinn) Ribble ’74. 2 Professor Vicki Meloney ’93 speaks about her students and her KU teaching experience. 3 Roger Jackson ’90, chair, KU Foundation Board of Directors, and Benjamin Brooks ’79, president, Alumni Association Board of Directors. 4 Presidential Ambassador and scholarship recipient Heather Urban ’14.

Avalanche, the KU mascot, and the KU Marching Unit helped bring the annual Celebration of Philanthropy dinner to a spectacular finish. Spring 2013 | Tower 21

class notes The 1950s

The 1970s

Edward Pany ’58 started collecting

Nancy Sarangoulis ’70, collections manager

Atlas Cement Company Museum arti-

at Albright College’s Freedman Gallery in

facts when the Northampton, Pa.,

Reading, Pa., was selected to participate in

business stopped production 30 years

the Raghurajpur International Art/Craft

ago. Today, he gives museum tours

Exchange (RIA/CE) artist residency pro-

to cement company employees from

gram in Orissa, India. Sarangoulis joined 15

all over the world, including China,

other artists from around the world during

Brazil, Romania, Ukraine and France.

a five-week exchange from Oct. 11 to Nov.

Recently, museum curators from China

20. RIA/CE is an opportunity for contem-

invited him on an all-expense-paid

porary/conceptual artists to study with

trip to visit a cement museum in

master craftsmen. In exchange, the interna-

their country.

tional artists will share their ideas about

George Meiser ’59 and his wife,

contemporary art with the villagers, who

Gloria, released the 20th volume of

can incorporate these ideas into their tradi-

“The Passing Scene,” a photographic

tional art. Sarangoulis, of Mount Penn, Pa.,

history of Berks County.

has been at Albright College since 2000.

The 1960s

John Stirling ’70 retired after 40 years in

Barbara Ann (Foley) Beswick ’62 has

away from his job as senior vice president

just published a customizable children’s

for the National Penn Investors Trust Co. He

book, “A Christmas Moon,” with Mirror

and his wife, Nancy Wasch, enjoy traveling.

Publishing Co.

the financial services industry, stepping

Jacqueline (Greene) Thomas ’71, a fiber

Rosalie (Dragotta) Mancino ’69 has

artist for more than 50 years, has been

accepted a position as director of

honored by the Getter Center for Education

in the Arts in Los Angeles, the National Art Education Association, the Pennsylvania Alliance for Arts Education, the Pennsylvania Department of Education, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and the PA Council on the Arts. The Williamsport, Pa., resident currently has exhibitions at the nearby Eagles Mere Art Gallery and in Williamsport’s Patinaz Gallery. John DeVere ’74, M’78, principal at Education & Training Solutions LLC, assisted Delaware Technical Community College in designing and equipping their advanced manufacturing laboratories at the Innovation and Technology Center, located in New Castle, Del. William Kuntz ’74, M’85 revised his graduate thesis translation of a Soviet science fiction story, changing the title from “Bandit over the World” to “‘Fat Man’ Over the World.” His current translation is now available on a Ukrainian website. He credits his wife, Sandy (Hambrecht) Kuntz ’73, M’85, for her assistance with editing his original thesis.

elementary education with the Phillipsburg School District in New Jersey. Carole (Boblitz) Snyder ’69, former assistant controller at Met-Ed and its

Celebrating a Century

parent firms, accepted a position as

Ethel Frances Ringer Risley ’31 celebrated her 100th birthday on December 12,

managing director for the City of

2012, at the Luther Crest retirement community, in Allentown, Pa. In 1931, Risley graduated from Kutztown State Teachers College. Twelve years later, in 1943, she returned to Kutztown with her husband, Walter P. Risley Sr., who served as a teacher, coach and athletics director at KU during his 28-year tenure. After his death in 1971, the original campus gymnasium was named for him. In 1991, he was inducted into the KU Athletics Hall of Fame.

Reading, Pa. John Wabby ’69, a Kutztown University hall of fame athlete, serves as vice chair for KU’s Council of Trustees. In 1986,

Risley taught kindergarten at Kutztown

Wabby became principal of Blue

Elementary from 1955 until she retired

Mountain High School in Schuylkill

in 1978. She was active in the university

Haven, Pa. Wabby served as Schuylkill

community as a spouse and alumna,

League president and Eastern Football

and in 1992 she served as honorary

Conference president, was on the board

chairperson for the first KU Athletics

of directors for the District 11 Committee

Fund drive. Risley also endowed a

and joined the PIAA board of directors

baseball scholarship to honor her

in 1993. As an athletic administrator, he

husband. In Kutztown, she was active

began the merging process that led to

at Trinity Lutheran Church, the Kutztown

the Schuylkill League as we know it

Library, and the Women’s Club.

today. He was a driving force behind the

Risley has two children, Walt Risley Jr.

creation of the current PIAA football

and Linda Risley Yoder, five grandchildren,

playoffs and constantly fought for pro-

and eight great-grandchildren. Anyone

portional representation in all sports

who would like to send her greetings can

when it came to state qualifiers.

do so by emailing efr1212@yahoo.com.

22 Tower | Spring 2013 Spring 2013 | Tower 23

class notes The 1950s

The 1970s

Edward Pany ’58 started collecting

Nancy Sarangoulis ’70, collections manager

Atlas Cement Company Museum arti-

at Albright College’s Freedman Gallery in

facts when the Northampton, Pa.,

Reading, Pa., was selected to participate in

business stopped production 30 years

the Raghurajpur International Art/Craft

ago. Today, he gives museum tours

Exchange (RIA/CE) artist residency pro-

to cement company employees from

gram in Orissa, India. Sarangoulis joined 15

all over the world, including China,

other artists from around the world during

Brazil, Romania, Ukraine and France.

a five-week exchange from Oct. 11 to Nov.

Recently, museum curators from China

20. RIA/CE is an opportunity for contem-

invited him on an all-expense-paid

porary/conceptual artists to study with

trip to visit a cement museum in

master craftsmen. In exchange, the interna-

their country.

tional artists will share their ideas about

George Meiser ’59 and his wife,

contemporary art with the villagers, who

Gloria, released the 20th volume of

can incorporate these ideas into their tradi-

“The Passing Scene,” a photographic

tional art. Sarangoulis, of Mount Penn, Pa.,

history of Berks County.

has been at Albright College since 2000.

The 1960s

John Stirling ’70 retired after 40 years in

Barbara Ann (Foley) Beswick ’62 has

away from his job as senior vice president

just published a customizable children’s

for the National Penn Investors Trust Co. He

book, “A Christmas Moon,” with Mirror

and his wife, Nancy Wasch, enjoy traveling.

Publishing Co.

the financial services industry, stepping

Jacqueline (Greene) Thomas ’71, a fiber

Rosalie (Dragotta) Mancino ’69 has

artist for more than 50 years, has been

accepted a position as director of

honored by the Getter Center for Education

in the Arts in Los Angeles, the National Art Education Association, the Pennsylvania Alliance for Arts Education, the Pennsylvania Department of Education, the Pennsylvania House of Representatives and the PA Council on the Arts. The Williamsport, Pa., resident currently has exhibitions at the nearby Eagles Mere Art Gallery and in Williamsport’s Patinaz Gallery. John DeVere ’74, M’78, principal at Education & Training Solutions LLC, assisted Delaware Technical Community College in designing and equipping their advanced manufacturing laboratories at the Innovation and Technology Center, located in New Castle, Del. William Kuntz ’74, M’85 revised his graduate thesis translation of a Soviet science fiction story, changing the title from “Bandit over the World” to “‘Fat Man’ Over the World.” His current translation is now available on a Ukrainian website. He credits his wife, Sandy (Hambrecht) Kuntz ’73, M’85, for her assistance with editing his original thesis.

elementary education with the Phillipsburg School District in New Jersey. Carole (Boblitz) Snyder ’69, former assistant controller at Met-Ed and its

Celebrating a Century

parent firms, accepted a position as

Ethel Frances Ringer Risley ’31 celebrated her 100th birthday on December 12,

managing director for the City of

2012, at the Luther Crest retirement community, in Allentown, Pa. In 1931, Risley graduated from Kutztown State Teachers College. Twelve years later, in 1943, she returned to Kutztown with her husband, Walter P. Risley Sr., who served as a teacher, coach and athletics director at KU during his 28-year tenure. After his death in 1971, the original campus gymnasium was named for him. In 1991, he was inducted into the KU Athletics Hall of Fame.

Reading, Pa. John Wabby ’69, a Kutztown University hall of fame athlete, serves as vice chair for KU’s Council of Trustees. In 1986,

Risley taught kindergarten at Kutztown

Wabby became principal of Blue

Elementary from 1955 until she retired

Mountain High School in Schuylkill

in 1978. She was active in the university

Haven, Pa. Wabby served as Schuylkill

community as a spouse and alumna,

League president and Eastern Football

and in 1992 she served as honorary

Conference president, was on the board

chairperson for the first KU Athletics

of directors for the District 11 Committee

Fund drive. Risley also endowed a

and joined the PIAA board of directors

baseball scholarship to honor her

in 1993. As an athletic administrator, he

husband. In Kutztown, she was active

began the merging process that led to

at Trinity Lutheran Church, the Kutztown

the Schuylkill League as we know it

Library, and the Women’s Club.

today. He was a driving force behind the

Risley has two children, Walt Risley Jr.

creation of the current PIAA football

and Linda Risley Yoder, five grandchildren,

playoffs and constantly fought for pro-

and eight great-grandchildren. Anyone

portional representation in all sports

who would like to send her greetings can

when it came to state qualifiers.

do so by emailing efr1212@yahoo.com.

22 Tower | Spring 2013 Spring 2013 | Tower 23

class notes

Barbara (Smith) Schafer ’74 retired after 33 years of teaching elementary school. Her first year of teaching was for the Allentown School District and the next 32 years were spent with the Southern Lehigh School District. Schafer was recognized in 1992 for teaching excellence by Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers.

the State Museum of Pennsylvania.

Marietta (Brazell) Dantonio-Fryer ’75 is an artist, art educator, healing arts and art therapy interventionist, and a community outreach project organizer. Her artwork was featured in the independent film “Raw Visions: The Art of Survival,” which is based on the Survivor Art Foundation’s mission of healing through art. Dantonio-Fryer is head of the Fine Arts Department at Cheyney University of Pennsylvania.

Award and will become part of the

Carol Oldenburg ’77 participated in one of three “Artists Conversations” held at

Oldenburg, a painter and York resident, provided museum goers with an insightful insider’s tour of the 2012 “Art of the State” exhibition currently on view. Oldenburg has two paintings in “Art of the State,” one of which was chosen as a State Museum Purchase

The 1980s

Lieutenant Colonel John Felins ’82

Stephen Bohlinger ’85 accepted a

Bethlehem Partnership and is a member

retired after 28 years of service in

position as publisher of Eating Well

of the Bethlehem Rotary Club, where he

the Air Force Medical Service Corp.

magazine. Bohlinger most recently

has served as treasurer.

Felins held many positions during

served as the associate publisher for

his career with the Air Force, includ-

Food Network magazine, a Hearst

ing facilities management, patient

publication. Before joining the Food

administration, aeromedical evacua-

Network in May 2011, he was vice presi-

tion and medical readiness, and as

dent and publisher of Cooking Light

bles. Calvario also serves on the Patient

resource manager, administrator,

magazine. Under his guidance, Cooking

Margaret (Margerison) Calvario ’80 became a board member for the nonprofit Professional Women’s Roundtable organization, which is based in Philadelphia. She is a leader, trainer and facilitator for PWR’s monthly roundta-

Gregory Kuritz ’86, vice president and branch claims manager for the Erie Insurance Group, completed a Management Development Studies program at Cornell University.

Family Centered Care Advisory Council

squadron commander and chief

Light was ranked No. 4 on Advertising

Debra (Glass) Harris ’89 has been working

for the Hospital of the University of

(medical readiness division). He also

Age’s “A-List” in 2010. Prior to his role

as a freelance writer, videographer and

Pennsylvania.

served in Operation Desert Storm

leading the Cooking Light sales team,

producer since 1993. In 1999 she produced

Pa. He focuses primarily on incor-

Debra (Stanley) Lapic ’81 is director of

in 1991 and later in Mogadishu,

Bohlinger was vice president and pub-

and directed “The Chinese Acupressure

porating bonsai design elements into

the Berks County and Reading Marbles

Somalia, during a deployment.

lisher of Cottage Living magazine, a

Facelift” video. Harris is also an actress

stoneware or porcelain clay. His

tournament, which is the oldest continu-

Paul Wensel Jr. ’82 of North Wales,

position he held from the magazine’s

who has appeared in local and regional

work was exhibited at the Jewish

ously running marbles tournament in the

Pa., is the former owner of The

launch in 2003 until its closure in 2008.

theatre. “Dance of the Butterfly” is her

Community Center in Allentown, Pa.;

United States. It celebrated its 90th

Hickory Pit restaurant. Wensel was

Gary Maurer ’85 was promoted to senior

first full-length screenplay adaptation,

at the 42nd annual Peters Valley Fine

annual tournament this year. Lapic gives

diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s

vice president, corporate services, at

and she is currently working on an origi-

Craft Fair in Augusta, N.J.; and at the

presentations on marbles and also teaches

disease) in 2010, and an annual golf

Lafayette Ambassador Bank, a local divi-

nal screenplay entitled “P.J.’s Reply.”

Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen

children in the Reading School District

tournament in his honor is held

sion of Fulton Financial Corp. Maurer

Holiday Show in Lancaster, Pa.

and several local scout groups how to play.

every September.

also serves as treasurer of the Historic

The 1990s

museum’s permanent collection. Thomas Laudenslager ’79 works out of a Flint Hill studio in Coopersburg,

Amanda (Bassler) Emig ’93 is a graphic artist and promotions manager at the James V. Brown Library in Williamsport,

Richard Pawling ’73 doesn’t just enter a room – he transforms it.

Pa. She started a pet portrait business and designs specialty items such as photo boxes, bookmarks, calendars, note paper

A multi-talented performer, historic interpreter and former college professor, Richard Pawling ’73 has forged a career bringing the

teaching classes on Civil War dressed in period costume,” he explained. Dr. Lynn Sprankle, a KU professor emeritus, taught Pawling that knowl-

past back to life and creating historical reenactments of coal miners,

edge of geography is integral to understanding history, and Dr. David

ironworkers, loggers, canal men, old-time baseball players and others

Valuska, also a KU professor emeritus, encouraged Pawling to develop

instrumental to the making of early America.

his unique teaching style.

Developing an authentic historical character is a labor of love that includes studying culture, dialects, phrases and costume design. “I try to paint with words, illustrate with emotion and put life into the

“That’s the beauty of Kutztown,” Pawling said. “The professors are

and Christmas ornaments. Emig also donates artwork to the Lycoming County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the Williamsport Riding Club and the James V. Brown Library. Tracy (Simmons) Flail ’93 accepted a

here to teach you.” At Penn State Berks, where Pawling taught for 22 years, he drew

position as marketing strategist for

past to make history come alive,” Pawling said. “Roots are extremely

upon the lessons he learned at Kutztown to give students “a view of the

WellStar Health System in Marietta, Ga.

important. They’re a part of who I am.”

present through the past.” While there, Pawling brought in retirees from

Jonathan Frazier ’93 continues to

Bethlehem Steel and world champion bull rider Adriano Moraes as guest

enjoy recognition for his ongoing

speakers to give students context for classroom discussions.

Skyline Drive painting exhibition.

Those roots began at Kutztown, where his father was a professor of art education for more than 30 years. Pawling’s wife, Diane (Reinhart)

’74, received her bachelor’s degree in library science from KU. Over the summer, Pawling performed taps at the grave of the first

His thrilling career includes a stint with the National Park Service, for which he received the 1989 Freeman Tilden Award, which honors excellence

soldier buried in Arlington National Cemetery for the 150th anniversary of the war anthem. He credits his time at Kutztown University for his prolific musical ability. “Kutztown taught me how to understand tech-

Recently, a piece was selected for the annual juried show at Lebanon Valley College; another is in the

“I try to paint with words, illustrate with emotion and put life into the past to make history come alive.”

— R i ch a r d Paw l i n g ’ 7 3

nique and read music. Marching band gave me the confidence to stand up in front of others and play,” he said. KU also had a profound influence on the formation of his educational ethics and pedagogical methods. “While student teaching at the Lab school (the College of Education’s former early learning center), (the late) Dr. Dorothy ‘Dottie’ Moyer and

in interpretation and education. Pawling is also the owner and educational specialist of History Alive!, which features period perfor-

Washington County Museum of Fine Art’s juried show in Hagerstown, Md.; and another is in the Art of the State: Pennsylvania 2012 exhibition at The State Museum of Pennsylvania, in Harrisburg.

mances of early-American working-class heroes and the music that

John Moninger ’93 joined Eaton Vance

energized their lives.

Corp. as director of retail sales. He will be

Pawling is the recipient of the Kutztown University 1999 Rothermel

responsible for relationship management

former KU professor Dr. (Ted) Rabold encouraged me to develop a teach-

Alumni Award and was named one of KU’s 100 Most Distinguished

and leading all sales for Eaton Vance’s

ing style that incorporated living history. This empowered me to begin

Alumni of the 20th Century in 2000.

brokerage and independent channels.

24 Tower | Spring 2013

Spring 2013 | Tower 25

class notes

Barbara (Smith) Schafer ’74 retired after 33 years of teaching elementary school. Her first year of teaching was for the Allentown School District and the next 32 years were spent with the Southern Lehigh School District. Schafer was recognized in 1992 for teaching excellence by Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers.

the State Museum of Pennsylvania.

Marietta (Brazell) Dantonio-Fryer ’75 is an artist, art educator, healing arts and art therapy interventionist, and a community outreach project organizer. Her artwork was featured in the independent film “Raw Visions: The Art of Survival,” which is based on the Survivor Art Foundation’s mission of healing through art. Dantonio-Fryer is head of the Fine Arts Department at Cheyney University of Pennsylvania.

Award and will become part of the

Carol Oldenburg ’77 participated in one of three “Artists Conversations” held at

Oldenburg, a painter and York resident, provided museum goers with an insightful insider’s tour of the 2012 “Art of the State” exhibition currently on view. Oldenburg has two paintings in “Art of the State,” one of which was chosen as a State Museum Purchase

The 1980s

Lieutenant Colonel John Felins ’82

Stephen Bohlinger ’85 accepted a

Bethlehem Partnership and is a member

retired after 28 years of service in

position as publisher of Eating Well

of the Bethlehem Rotary Club, where he

the Air Force Medical Service Corp.

magazine. Bohlinger most recently

has served as treasurer.

Felins held many positions during

served as the associate publisher for

his career with the Air Force, includ-

Food Network magazine, a Hearst

ing facilities management, patient

publication. Before joining the Food

administration, aeromedical evacua-

Network in May 2011, he was vice presi-

tion and medical readiness, and as

dent and publisher of Cooking Light

bles. Calvario also serves on the Patient

resource manager, administrator,

magazine. Under his guidance, Cooking

Margaret (Margerison) Calvario ’80 became a board member for the nonprofit Professional Women’s Roundtable organization, which is based in Philadelphia. She is a leader, trainer and facilitator for PWR’s monthly roundta-

Gregory Kuritz ’86, vice president and branch claims manager for the Erie Insurance Group, completed a Management Development Studies program at Cornell University.

Family Centered Care Advisory Council

squadron commander and chief

Light was ranked No. 4 on Advertising

Debra (Glass) Harris ’89 has been working

for the Hospital of the University of

(medical readiness division). He also

Age’s “A-List” in 2010. Prior to his role

as a freelance writer, videographer and

Pennsylvania.

served in Operation Desert Storm

leading the Cooking Light sales team,

producer since 1993. In 1999 she produced

Pa. He focuses primarily on incor-

Debra (Stanley) Lapic ’81 is director of

in 1991 and later in Mogadishu,

Bohlinger was vice president and pub-

and directed “The Chinese Acupressure

porating bonsai design elements into

the Berks County and Reading Marbles

Somalia, during a deployment.

lisher of Cottage Living magazine, a

Facelift” video. Harris is also an actress

stoneware or porcelain clay. His

tournament, which is the oldest continu-

Paul Wensel Jr. ’82 of North Wales,

position he held from the magazine’s

who has appeared in local and regional

work was exhibited at the Jewish

ously running marbles tournament in the

Pa., is the former owner of The

launch in 2003 until its closure in 2008.

theatre. “Dance of the Butterfly” is her

Community Center in Allentown, Pa.;

United States. It celebrated its 90th

Hickory Pit restaurant. Wensel was

Gary Maurer ’85 was promoted to senior

first full-length screenplay adaptation,

at the 42nd annual Peters Valley Fine

annual tournament this year. Lapic gives

diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s

vice president, corporate services, at

and she is currently working on an origi-

Craft Fair in Augusta, N.J.; and at the

presentations on marbles and also teaches

disease) in 2010, and an annual golf

Lafayette Ambassador Bank, a local divi-

nal screenplay entitled “P.J.’s Reply.”

Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen

children in the Reading School District

tournament in his honor is held

sion of Fulton Financial Corp. Maurer

Holiday Show in Lancaster, Pa.

and several local scout groups how to play.

every September.

also serves as treasurer of the Historic

The 1990s

museum’s permanent collection. Thomas Laudenslager ’79 works out of a Flint Hill studio in Coopersburg,

Amanda (Bassler) Emig ’93 is a graphic artist and promotions manager at the James V. Brown Library in Williamsport,

Richard Pawling ’73 doesn’t just enter a room – he transforms it.

Pa. She started a pet portrait business and designs specialty items such as photo boxes, bookmarks, calendars, note paper

A multi-talented performer, historic interpreter and former college professor, Richard Pawling ’73 has forged a career bringing the

teaching classes on Civil War dressed in period costume,” he explained. Dr. Lynn Sprankle, a KU professor emeritus, taught Pawling that knowl-

past back to life and creating historical reenactments of coal miners,

edge of geography is integral to understanding history, and Dr. David

ironworkers, loggers, canal men, old-time baseball players and others

Valuska, also a KU professor emeritus, encouraged Pawling to develop

instrumental to the making of early America.

his unique teaching style.

Developing an authentic historical character is a labor of love that includes studying culture, dialects, phrases and costume design. “I try to paint with words, illustrate with emotion and put life into the

“That’s the beauty of Kutztown,” Pawling said. “The professors are

and Christmas ornaments. Emig also donates artwork to the Lycoming County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the Williamsport Riding Club and the James V. Brown Library. Tracy (Simmons) Flail ’93 accepted a

here to teach you.” At Penn State Berks, where Pawling taught for 22 years, he drew

position as marketing strategist for

past to make history come alive,” Pawling said. “Roots are extremely

upon the lessons he learned at Kutztown to give students “a view of the

WellStar Health System in Marietta, Ga.

important. They’re a part of who I am.”

present through the past.” While there, Pawling brought in retirees from

Jonathan Frazier ’93 continues to

Bethlehem Steel and world champion bull rider Adriano Moraes as guest

enjoy recognition for his ongoing

speakers to give students context for classroom discussions.

Skyline Drive painting exhibition.

Those roots began at Kutztown, where his father was a professor of art education for more than 30 years. Pawling’s wife, Diane (Reinhart)

’74, received her bachelor’s degree in library science from KU. Over the summer, Pawling performed taps at the grave of the first

His thrilling career includes a stint with the National Park Service, for which he received the 1989 Freeman Tilden Award, which honors excellence

soldier buried in Arlington National Cemetery for the 150th anniversary of the war anthem. He credits his time at Kutztown University for his prolific musical ability. “Kutztown taught me how to understand tech-

Recently, a piece was selected for the annual juried show at Lebanon Valley College; another is in the

“I try to paint with words, illustrate with emotion and put life into the past to make history come alive.”

— R i ch a r d Paw l i n g ’ 7 3

nique and read music. Marching band gave me the confidence to stand up in front of others and play,” he said. KU also had a profound influence on the formation of his educational ethics and pedagogical methods. “While student teaching at the Lab school (the College of Education’s former early learning center), (the late) Dr. Dorothy ‘Dottie’ Moyer and

in interpretation and education. Pawling is also the owner and educational specialist of History Alive!, which features period perfor-

Washington County Museum of Fine Art’s juried show in Hagerstown, Md.; and another is in the Art of the State: Pennsylvania 2012 exhibition at The State Museum of Pennsylvania, in Harrisburg.

mances of early-American working-class heroes and the music that

John Moninger ’93 joined Eaton Vance

energized their lives.

Corp. as director of retail sales. He will be

Pawling is the recipient of the Kutztown University 1999 Rothermel

responsible for relationship management

former KU professor Dr. (Ted) Rabold encouraged me to develop a teach-

Alumni Award and was named one of KU’s 100 Most Distinguished

and leading all sales for Eaton Vance’s

ing style that incorporated living history. This empowered me to begin

Alumni of the 20th Century in 2000.

brokerage and independent channels.

24 Tower | Spring 2013

Spring 2013 | Tower 25

class notes book of poems as a study project,” said

KU Dominates Awards at PAEA Conference

Valley Journal and Our Haunted World: Ghost Stories from Around the Globe.

to have another poet laureate who not

His writing has appeared in The

only writes poetry, but lives it.”

Philadelphia Inquirer, Main Line Today,

Jennifer Goss ’02 and her students at Fleetwood

CityPaper’s Critical Mass Blog and

Area High School in Fleetwood, Pa., reached across decades

who was a phenomenal professor. The environment at KU

Ale Street News. He holds an MFA in

of history to piece together the remnants of Holocaust

really fostered learning and helped me discover what

creative writing from Rosemont

survivor Frank Grunwald’s life.

communications at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Jill (Rowlands) Atkinson ’98 is a special education teacher in Schuylkill County and serves as a volunteer coach for the Minersville softball league and the Minersville Area Youth Basketball Association. Atkinson was recently inducted into the Allen-Rogowicz Seven alumnae and two faculty received awards at the

Chapter of the Pennsylvania Sports Hall

Pennsylvania Art Education Association’s (PAEA) 2012 fall

of Fame. She resides in Minersville, Pa.,

Heather Fountain (faculty); Mary Kate Bergh ’13, Wendy Sweigart ’90; Lisbeth M. Bucci ’77 and

A history education major, Goss was inspired by Kutztown University professor of history Douglas Lea,

professor at KU. “Berks County is lucky

appointed assistant professor of mass

’88; Jackie Thomas ’71; Kristen Tuerk ’84, ’94, M’09;

Misa’s Fugue Tells Story of Holocaust Survivor

Dr. Heather Thomas, McDonnell’s former

Dr. Scott Weiland M’97 was recently

conference. From Left to Right: Concetta M. Mattioni

Pastime, Think Journal, Schuylkill

with her husband Bill; three sons, Dylan, Bryce and Ty; and two stepdaughters, Kylie and Kelsey.

College, where he was nominated for

A social studies teacher, vice chair of the Pennsylvania

Best New American Voices and earned

Holocaust Education Council and teacher

the Creative Writing Award for most

fellow with the U.S. Holocaust Memorial

outstanding thesis. Proctor blogs on

Museum, Goss led her students in conducting

Nerd Caliber, Geekadelphia and

historical research that utilized the valuable

CultureMob and recently completed a

archival resources made available by the

superhero novel, featuring former college classmates who must fight for their lives when the world’s only superhero is murdered.

who encouraged her to grow and explore other areas of interest. “Another of my favorite teachers was Dr. John Delaney,

interested me in life – it was a great place to start my academic career,” Goss said.

museum, located in Washington, D.C. Fleetwood students and teachers worked with a team of industry professionals for nearly 22 months to produce the documentary film Misa’s Fugue. The project, which explores Grunwald’s

Misa’s Fugue united Goss with other KU alumni:

triumphant survival, gave Goss a lot of hope for the educa-

Diane Chisdak ’85, M’91; Sean Gaston,

student and Fleetwood

Christopher Barnes ’01 is entering his

tional process.

who received his teaching certification from KU; and

Area High School

Zachary Houp M’06.

graduate Margariete

sixth year as an English teacher in the

“It was really an awesome experience to be involved in something so historically significant,” she said. “And for a

“The expertise of these partners really helped the

Malenda ’15 created a

lot of the students, it brought the learning out of the text-

project grow,” Goss declared. “It was a really enjoyable

visual representation

book and let them realize the Holocaust affected a person

experience to be able to bring so many knowledgeable

of the concentration

who was, in many ways, similar to them.”

educators together and see what came of it.”

camp number assigned

Yu Kanazawa ’98 was promoted to asso-

Northern Lehigh School District, after

ciate professor of art at Jamestown

working for seven years in the field of

Community College, a State University of

journalism. He self-published his first

New York. A JCC faculty member since

novel, “180 Days,” and is the proud

2003, he also serves as coordinator of

parent of a little boy, Ike Thomas, who

Dr. William Ziegler ’93, principal of

the art program and director of visual

was born in June 2011.

Pottsgrove Middle School in the Potts-

and performing arts.

Wendy Krisak M’02 was appointed

Joe Emrick M’99 is a member of the

the new victim assistance coordinator

Pennsylvania House of Representatives

for the Diocese of Allentown. Krisak

Philadelphia Film Festival and the

for the 137th District. Emrick ran a grass-

is a licensed professional counselor

Greater Reading Film Festival.

roots campaign, in which he knocked on

with a private practice in Bethlehem

Upcoming plans for the film

6,670 doors in his 13-municipality,

and has been the director of counseling

include submitting it for the 2014

73,000-constituent district. In the past

at DeSales University since 2003.

Academy Award nominations.

two years, Emrick has worked with his

Randy Artz ’04 graduated from the

Melissa Gallagher ’79, M’84. Missing from photo: Carrie Nordlund (faculty).

grove School District, was named president-elect of the Pennsylvania Association of Elementary and Secondary School Principals, headquartered in Summerdale, Pa. He resides in Boyertown, Pa., with his wife, Kim, and their two children, ages 12 and 14.

Above: Current KU

The 2000s

Over the course of shooting the documentary, the

The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts – Partners in the

students were able to reunite Grunwald with one of his

Arts program and the Berks Arts Council recently awarded

liberators. They also organized a donation to the museum –

Misa’s Fugue a grant to subsidize the cost of film distribu-

a letter written by Grunwald’s mother shortly before

tion and entries to film festivals. The documentary began

she was killed at Auschwitz.

its festival tour in October 2012 with screenings at the

to Frank Grunwald.

Goss continues to work tirelessly to design educational materials

Douglas Brewer M’97 was appointed

colleagues to eliminate a $4 billion state

senior vice president and chief develop-

deficit. He also has held an annual senior

ment officer of Select Medical. In this

health fair in Forks, Pa., and legislative

senior leadership role, Brewer will facili-

breakfasts in Forks and Nazareth, Pa.

tate strategic growth through new joint

Seth Miller ’99 was sworn into the

Washington, D.C.

venture partnerships, acquisitions and

Carbon County Bar Association by

other business relationships.

President Judge Roger N. Nanovic. Miller

Shannon Barr ’05 was recently hired as

is a large online repository of millions of documents available

Maria McDonnell ’97 is Berks County’s

practices law with the firm of William G.

a regional sales manager for Bar-Ray,

for Holocaust research.

fifth poet laureate. She began her two-

Schwab and Associates, in Lehighton, Pa.

the world’s largest manufacturer of

year appointment Oct. 2, 2012, during a

He previously worked as a legal intern

ceremony in the Miller Center for the Arts

with Schwab’s practice for the past three

at Reading Area Community College.

years while attending law school.

the mid-Atlantic region including

Jennifer Goss ’02 (second from right, middle row), Diane Chisdak

“Maria had the spark and soul of a poet

Shawn Proctor ’99 has published in

Delaware, Washington, D.C., Maryland,

’85, M’91 (second from left, middle row) and Sean Gaston (first on

when she was a student in KU’s English

several literary journals and anthologies,

northern Virginia and southeastern

left, last row), with Fleetwood Area High School students involved

Department and constructed a handmade

including Storyglossia, Our Washington

Pennsylvania.

with the film’s production..

26 Tower | Spring 2013

University of Maryland with a master’s degree in business administration. He is currently a contracting officer for the U.S. Department of the Interior in

for teaching about the Holocaust. She is developing a webinar in propaganda for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and working on the world memory project, which

radiation protective garments and vinyls. Barr will oversee business development efforts for Bar-Ray in

Spring 2013 | Tower 27

class notes book of poems as a study project,” said

KU Dominates Awards at PAEA Conference

Valley Journal and Our Haunted World: Ghost Stories from Around the Globe.

to have another poet laureate who not

His writing has appeared in The

only writes poetry, but lives it.”

Philadelphia Inquirer, Main Line Today,

Jennifer Goss ’02 and her students at Fleetwood

CityPaper’s Critical Mass Blog and

Area High School in Fleetwood, Pa., reached across decades

who was a phenomenal professor. The environment at KU

Ale Street News. He holds an MFA in

of history to piece together the remnants of Holocaust

really fostered learning and helped me discover what

creative writing from Rosemont

survivor Frank Grunwald’s life.

communications at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Jill (Rowlands) Atkinson ’98 is a special education teacher in Schuylkill County and serves as a volunteer coach for the Minersville softball league and the Minersville Area Youth Basketball Association. Atkinson was recently inducted into the Allen-Rogowicz Seven alumnae and two faculty received awards at the

Chapter of the Pennsylvania Sports Hall

Pennsylvania Art Education Association’s (PAEA) 2012 fall

of Fame. She resides in Minersville, Pa.,

Heather Fountain (faculty); Mary Kate Bergh ’13, Wendy Sweigart ’90; Lisbeth M. Bucci ’77 and

A history education major, Goss was inspired by Kutztown University professor of history Douglas Lea,

professor at KU. “Berks County is lucky

appointed assistant professor of mass

’88; Jackie Thomas ’71; Kristen Tuerk ’84, ’94, M’09;

Misa’s Fugue Tells Story of Holocaust Survivor

Dr. Heather Thomas, McDonnell’s former

Dr. Scott Weiland M’97 was recently

conference. From Left to Right: Concetta M. Mattioni

Pastime, Think Journal, Schuylkill

with her husband Bill; three sons, Dylan, Bryce and Ty; and two stepdaughters, Kylie and Kelsey.

College, where he was nominated for

A social studies teacher, vice chair of the Pennsylvania

Best New American Voices and earned

Holocaust Education Council and teacher

the Creative Writing Award for most

fellow with the U.S. Holocaust Memorial

outstanding thesis. Proctor blogs on

Museum, Goss led her students in conducting

Nerd Caliber, Geekadelphia and

historical research that utilized the valuable

CultureMob and recently completed a

archival resources made available by the

superhero novel, featuring former college classmates who must fight for their lives when the world’s only superhero is murdered.

who encouraged her to grow and explore other areas of interest. “Another of my favorite teachers was Dr. John Delaney,

interested me in life – it was a great place to start my academic career,” Goss said.

museum, located in Washington, D.C. Fleetwood students and teachers worked with a team of industry professionals for nearly 22 months to produce the documentary film Misa’s Fugue. The project, which explores Grunwald’s

Misa’s Fugue united Goss with other KU alumni:

triumphant survival, gave Goss a lot of hope for the educa-

Diane Chisdak ’85, M’91; Sean Gaston,

student and Fleetwood

Christopher Barnes ’01 is entering his

tional process.

who received his teaching certification from KU; and

Area High School

Zachary Houp M’06.

graduate Margariete

sixth year as an English teacher in the

“It was really an awesome experience to be involved in something so historically significant,” she said. “And for a

“The expertise of these partners really helped the

Malenda ’15 created a

lot of the students, it brought the learning out of the text-

project grow,” Goss declared. “It was a really enjoyable

visual representation

book and let them realize the Holocaust affected a person

experience to be able to bring so many knowledgeable

of the concentration

who was, in many ways, similar to them.”

educators together and see what came of it.”

camp number assigned

Yu Kanazawa ’98 was promoted to asso-

Northern Lehigh School District, after

ciate professor of art at Jamestown

working for seven years in the field of

Community College, a State University of

journalism. He self-published his first

New York. A JCC faculty member since

novel, “180 Days,” and is the proud

2003, he also serves as coordinator of

parent of a little boy, Ike Thomas, who

Dr. William Ziegler ’93, principal of

the art program and director of visual

was born in June 2011.

Pottsgrove Middle School in the Potts-

and performing arts.

Wendy Krisak M’02 was appointed

Joe Emrick M’99 is a member of the

the new victim assistance coordinator

Pennsylvania House of Representatives

for the Diocese of Allentown. Krisak

Philadelphia Film Festival and the

for the 137th District. Emrick ran a grass-

is a licensed professional counselor

Greater Reading Film Festival.

roots campaign, in which he knocked on

with a private practice in Bethlehem

Upcoming plans for the film

6,670 doors in his 13-municipality,

and has been the director of counseling

include submitting it for the 2014

73,000-constituent district. In the past

at DeSales University since 2003.

Academy Award nominations.

two years, Emrick has worked with his

Randy Artz ’04 graduated from the

Melissa Gallagher ’79, M’84. Missing from photo: Carrie Nordlund (faculty).

grove School District, was named president-elect of the Pennsylvania Association of Elementary and Secondary School Principals, headquartered in Summerdale, Pa. He resides in Boyertown, Pa., with his wife, Kim, and their two children, ages 12 and 14.

Above: Current KU

The 2000s

Over the course of shooting the documentary, the

The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts – Partners in the

students were able to reunite Grunwald with one of his

Arts program and the Berks Arts Council recently awarded

liberators. They also organized a donation to the museum –

Misa’s Fugue a grant to subsidize the cost of film distribu-

a letter written by Grunwald’s mother shortly before

tion and entries to film festivals. The documentary began

she was killed at Auschwitz.

its festival tour in October 2012 with screenings at the

to Frank Grunwald.

Goss continues to work tirelessly to design educational materials

Douglas Brewer M’97 was appointed

colleagues to eliminate a $4 billion state

senior vice president and chief develop-

deficit. He also has held an annual senior

ment officer of Select Medical. In this

health fair in Forks, Pa., and legislative

senior leadership role, Brewer will facili-

breakfasts in Forks and Nazareth, Pa.

tate strategic growth through new joint

Seth Miller ’99 was sworn into the

Washington, D.C.

venture partnerships, acquisitions and

Carbon County Bar Association by

other business relationships.

President Judge Roger N. Nanovic. Miller

Shannon Barr ’05 was recently hired as

is a large online repository of millions of documents available

Maria McDonnell ’97 is Berks County’s

practices law with the firm of William G.

a regional sales manager for Bar-Ray,

for Holocaust research.

fifth poet laureate. She began her two-

Schwab and Associates, in Lehighton, Pa.

the world’s largest manufacturer of

year appointment Oct. 2, 2012, during a

He previously worked as a legal intern

ceremony in the Miller Center for the Arts

with Schwab’s practice for the past three

at Reading Area Community College.

years while attending law school.

the mid-Atlantic region including

Jennifer Goss ’02 (second from right, middle row), Diane Chisdak

“Maria had the spark and soul of a poet

Shawn Proctor ’99 has published in

Delaware, Washington, D.C., Maryland,

’85, M’91 (second from left, middle row) and Sean Gaston (first on

when she was a student in KU’s English

several literary journals and anthologies,

northern Virginia and southeastern

left, last row), with Fleetwood Area High School students involved

Department and constructed a handmade

including Storyglossia, Our Washington

Pennsylvania.

with the film’s production..

26 Tower | Spring 2013

University of Maryland with a master’s degree in business administration. He is currently a contracting officer for the U.S. Department of the Interior in

for teaching about the Holocaust. She is developing a webinar in propaganda for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and working on the world memory project, which

radiation protective garments and vinyls. Barr will oversee business development efforts for Bar-Ray in

Spring 2013 | Tower 27

class notes Jenna Casaldi ’06 is a master of arts candidate in art education at Marywood University in Scranton, Pa. She is currently an art teacher at Lake-Lehman Junior/Senior High School in Lehman, Pa. Jessica (Kiscadden) Slish ’06 received her master’s degree in quality assurance from the California State University, Dominguez Hills campus.

Laura Beckmann ’09 graduated from St. Joseph’s University with a master’s degree in instructional technology. She is currently teaching alternative education in Philadelphia and inspiring underprivileged children.

Sergeant Raymond Max Harris ’07 launched a new website designed to assist combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder. He also blogged for the Huffington Post and appeared in an HBO documentary entitled “Wartorn: 1861-2010.” Harris currently resides in Pennsylvania with his wife and daughter. Daniel Roe ’07 is the director of education for the York County Heritage Trust, a nonprofit historical institution that operates five museums, a library and archives in York, Pa. He previously served as the trust’s museum educator and coordinator of public programming. Jaclynn (Klush) Kendzor ’08 was united in marriage to Michael Kendzor on Oct. 1, 2011, at Skytop Lodge in Skytop, Pa., by the Rev. Roger E. Griffith. She is employed as a recruiter for GUARD Insurance Group, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and he is employed as a help desk supervisor at C3i, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.

inmemory

They reside in Yatesville, Pa.

Sarah (Serfass) Schmoyer ’31 • 8/26/2012 Ruth Ash ’33 • 8/27/2012 Dorothy Lewis ’33 • 5/20/2011 Margaret (Sherman) Wills ’33 • 11/15/2012 Grace (Weber) Yocom ’33 • 9/15/2011 Kathryn (Early) Newbern ’36 • 4/23/2012 Frances (Moore) Thompson ’36 • 3/2/2012 Wayne Wessner ’37 • 6/27/2011 Catharine Sheidy ’38 • 3/20/2012 Edith (Kuhns) Prendergast ’40 • 10/17/2011 Mary (Ent) Honicker ’41 • 3/22/2012 Paul Schucker ’41 • 10/1/2011 Verna Wolfe ’42 • 7/1/2012 Arlene Leas ’43 • 8/31/2011

28 Tower | Spring 2013

Stephanie Allen ’09 graduated from West Chester University, with a master’s degree in English. She was hired as the TRIO retention advisor for Central Maine Community College in Auburn, Maine, where she will work with socioeconomically disadvantaged community college students and assist them in completing their education.

Richard Adams ’11 graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Jhoselis Brioso ’11 graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. Christina Clark ’11 was hired as a

2

public relations specialist at Sylvia Marketing & Public Relations

1 Heilman Herd breakfast at KU. 2 The Reading event was hosted by Susan (Young) M’91 and Olin Marth at Berkshire Country Club. 3 Alumni at a Lehigh Valley IronPigs game. 4 Washington D.C. area alumni gathered at the German American Heritage Center. 5 The many KU alumni who work at Vanguard in Malvern, Pa.

located in King of Prussia, Pa. She resides in Denver, Pa., with her boyfriend, Alex, and their miniature pinscher, Peanut. Samantha Miller ’11 was awarded the Benjamin Franklin/Fontaine

John Mark Pruitt ’09 is engaged to Laura Leinbach ’10. Pruitt is employed as an instructor at Lehigh Valley Martial Arts in Emmaus, Pa., and Leinbach is employed by Liquid Interactive in Breinigsville, Pa. A wedding is planned for June.

Fellowship for Early American

Ashley Rushatz ’09 is an elementary education art teacher in the Southern York County School District. She is currently pursuing an M.Ed. in art education from KU and is engaged to Alexander Gonzalez, a Baltimore City police officer. A wedding is planned for July 2014 at the Roxy Theater.

century religious immigration.

Brandon St. Clair ’09 is engaged to Christina Ann Cousino. Both are employed by Loudon County Public Schools in Virginia. A wedding is planned in Montego Bay, Jamaica.

strategies and techniques she

Mildred Ruttenberg ’43 • 6/12/2012 Elizabeth (Mountz) Bauer ’44 • 8/8/2012 Sylvia (Angstadt) Bell ’44 • 11/26/2012 Helen (Redline) Farrell ’45 • 3/31/2012 Virginia-Lou (Austin) McKeown ’46 • 10/28/2012 Thomas Regan ’49 • 5/20/2012 Robert Doney ’50 • 5/7/2012 Sally (Edwards) Jolly ’52 • 10/24/2012 Jewel (Schock) MacWilliam ’52 • 11/16/2012 Edward Watson ’52 • 9/9/2011 Edward Griffin ’54 • 6/23/2012 Kathryn Rau ’54 • 10/28/2012 Richard Berger ’55 • 12/22/2011

1

Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. The award provides full tuition and a stipend for five

3

years. Miller plans to study Penn-

alumni networking series 2012

sylvania German history with an emphasis on 17th and 18th-

Anna (Mealey) Picchini ’11 was selected as a guest speaker for the Prince William County, Va., annual Excellence and Equity in Education Conference. Picchini, who is a first-year teacher, presented a selection of lesson plans, uses in her career in special education. She also organized a workshop to demonstrate her teaching methods.

Eleanor (Gehris) Botsford ’55 • 5/21/2012 Robert Wolfskill ’55 • 9/14/2012 Ruth Petrowicz ’58 • 3/22/2012 Carol (Bruton) Blangsted ’60 • 8/20/2012 Lynne (Chelius) Cadmus ’61 • 5/14/2012 Roland Richards ’61 • 7/2/2011 Phyllis (Stump) Althouse ’63 • 7/9/2012 Richard Gattone ’64 • 3/14/2012 John McCloskey ’64 • 4/9/2012 David Denick ’65 • 5/31/2012 Dennis Green ’66 • 9/12/2012 Frances Keever ’66 • 9/18/2012 Wayne Schaltenbrand ’66 • 9/30/2012 Curtis Jurey ’67 • 5/11/2012

4

5 Barbara Reese ’67 • 5/20/2012 Dennis Hauck ’68 • 9/3/2012 Frederick Sponenburg ’68 • 11/6/2012 Stephen Brunda ’69 • 10/22/2011 Donald Campbell ’69 • 7/20/2011 C. Edward Crim ’69 • 9/22/2012 Eileen (Klonsky) Singer ’70 • 7/17/2012 Margaret Horne ’71 • 10/6/2012 Adele Bryan ’72 • 7/8/2012 Paul Goldbach ’72 • 5/30/2012 Ernest Orphanos ’72 • 7/23/2012 Walter March ’73 • 4/14/2012 William Houtz ’74 • 6/11/2012 Kathleen (Sedmak) Schlaffer ’74 • 6/14/2012

Barbara (Bomberger) Apelian ’75 • 6/17/2012 Nancy (Braun) Beitler ’75 • 10/16/2012 Samuel Liddle ’75 • 10/25/2011 Maureen Blewitt ’76 • 12/1/2011 James Fronk ’76 • 6/4/2011 Russell Troxell ’77 • 9/8/2012 C. Linda Smith ’81 • 4/28/2012 Steve Wilson ’82 • 8/13/2012 Ronald Pringle ’84 • 6/17/2012 Sharon Defassio ’87 • 1/9/2012 Michele Honochick ’88 • 6/25/2012 Carol Umphrey ’88 • 9/21/2012 Robin (Zeigler) Mammola ’92 • 3/16/2012

Jayne Eidle ’96 • 10/15/2012 Shannon Torola ’98 • 4/10/2011 Beth (Pearson) Williams ’99 • 5/7/2012 Jennifer Brown ’03 • 11/14/2012 Tim Lewis ’05 • 10/10/2012 Matthew Bortz ’07 • 12/5/2012 Matthew Steiner ’10 • 3/13/2012 D. Seth Fuoti ’13 • 12/5/2012 Alfred Huff • 1/7/2012 former KU trustee Frederick Giorgi • 2/18/2012 Karen Blomain • 8/15/2012 Emerita Stephen Justham • 10/21/2012 Emeritus Peter Miller • 12/1/2012 Emeritus David Haas • 12/14/2012 Emeritus

Spring 2013 | Tower 29

class notes Jenna Casaldi ’06 is a master of arts candidate in art education at Marywood University in Scranton, Pa. She is currently an art teacher at Lake-Lehman Junior/Senior High School in Lehman, Pa. Jessica (Kiscadden) Slish ’06 received her master’s degree in quality assurance from the California State University, Dominguez Hills campus.

Laura Beckmann ’09 graduated from St. Joseph’s University with a master’s degree in instructional technology. She is currently teaching alternative education in Philadelphia and inspiring underprivileged children.

Sergeant Raymond Max Harris ’07 launched a new website designed to assist combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder. He also blogged for the Huffington Post and appeared in an HBO documentary entitled “Wartorn: 1861-2010.” Harris currently resides in Pennsylvania with his wife and daughter. Daniel Roe ’07 is the director of education for the York County Heritage Trust, a nonprofit historical institution that operates five museums, a library and archives in York, Pa. He previously served as the trust’s museum educator and coordinator of public programming. Jaclynn (Klush) Kendzor ’08 was united in marriage to Michael Kendzor on Oct. 1, 2011, at Skytop Lodge in Skytop, Pa., by the Rev. Roger E. Griffith. She is employed as a recruiter for GUARD Insurance Group, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and he is employed as a help desk supervisor at C3i, Wilkes-Barre, Pa.

inmemory

They reside in Yatesville, Pa.

Sarah (Serfass) Schmoyer ’31 • 8/26/2012 Ruth Ash ’33 • 8/27/2012 Dorothy Lewis ’33 • 5/20/2011 Margaret (Sherman) Wills ’33 • 11/15/2012 Grace (Weber) Yocom ’33 • 9/15/2011 Kathryn (Early) Newbern ’36 • 4/23/2012 Frances (Moore) Thompson ’36 • 3/2/2012 Wayne Wessner ’37 • 6/27/2011 Catharine Sheidy ’38 • 3/20/2012 Edith (Kuhns) Prendergast ’40 • 10/17/2011 Mary (Ent) Honicker ’41 • 3/22/2012 Paul Schucker ’41 • 10/1/2011 Verna Wolfe ’42 • 7/1/2012 Arlene Leas ’43 • 8/31/2011

28 Tower | Spring 2013

Stephanie Allen ’09 graduated from West Chester University, with a master’s degree in English. She was hired as the TRIO retention advisor for Central Maine Community College in Auburn, Maine, where she will work with socioeconomically disadvantaged community college students and assist them in completing their education.

Richard Adams ’11 graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Jhoselis Brioso ’11 graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. Christina Clark ’11 was hired as a

2

public relations specialist at Sylvia Marketing & Public Relations

1 Heilman Herd breakfast at KU. 2 The Reading event was hosted by Susan (Young) M’91 and Olin Marth at Berkshire Country Club. 3 Alumni at a Lehigh Valley IronPigs game. 4 Washington D.C. area alumni gathered at the German American Heritage Center. 5 The many KU alumni who work at Vanguard in Malvern, Pa.

located in King of Prussia, Pa. She resides in Denver, Pa., with her boyfriend, Alex, and their miniature pinscher, Peanut. Samantha Miller ’11 was awarded the Benjamin Franklin/Fontaine

John Mark Pruitt ’09 is engaged to Laura Leinbach ’10. Pruitt is employed as an instructor at Lehigh Valley Martial Arts in Emmaus, Pa., and Leinbach is employed by Liquid Interactive in Breinigsville, Pa. A wedding is planned for June.

Fellowship for Early American

Ashley Rushatz ’09 is an elementary education art teacher in the Southern York County School District. She is currently pursuing an M.Ed. in art education from KU and is engaged to Alexander Gonzalez, a Baltimore City police officer. A wedding is planned for July 2014 at the Roxy Theater.

century religious immigration.

Brandon St. Clair ’09 is engaged to Christina Ann Cousino. Both are employed by Loudon County Public Schools in Virginia. A wedding is planned in Montego Bay, Jamaica.

strategies and techniques she

Mildred Ruttenberg ’43 • 6/12/2012 Elizabeth (Mountz) Bauer ’44 • 8/8/2012 Sylvia (Angstadt) Bell ’44 • 11/26/2012 Helen (Redline) Farrell ’45 • 3/31/2012 Virginia-Lou (Austin) McKeown ’46 • 10/28/2012 Thomas Regan ’49 • 5/20/2012 Robert Doney ’50 • 5/7/2012 Sally (Edwards) Jolly ’52 • 10/24/2012 Jewel (Schock) MacWilliam ’52 • 11/16/2012 Edward Watson ’52 • 9/9/2011 Edward Griffin ’54 • 6/23/2012 Kathryn Rau ’54 • 10/28/2012 Richard Berger ’55 • 12/22/2011

1

Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. The award provides full tuition and a stipend for five

3

years. Miller plans to study Penn-

alumni networking series 2012

sylvania German history with an emphasis on 17th and 18th-

Anna (Mealey) Picchini ’11 was selected as a guest speaker for the Prince William County, Va., annual Excellence and Equity in Education Conference. Picchini, who is a first-year teacher, presented a selection of lesson plans, uses in her career in special education. She also organized a workshop to demonstrate her teaching methods.

Eleanor (Gehris) Botsford ’55 • 5/21/2012 Robert Wolfskill ’55 • 9/14/2012 Ruth Petrowicz ’58 • 3/22/2012 Carol (Bruton) Blangsted ’60 • 8/20/2012 Lynne (Chelius) Cadmus ’61 • 5/14/2012 Roland Richards ’61 • 7/2/2011 Phyllis (Stump) Althouse ’63 • 7/9/2012 Richard Gattone ’64 • 3/14/2012 John McCloskey ’64 • 4/9/2012 David Denick ’65 • 5/31/2012 Dennis Green ’66 • 9/12/2012 Frances Keever ’66 • 9/18/2012 Wayne Schaltenbrand ’66 • 9/30/2012 Curtis Jurey ’67 • 5/11/2012

4

5 Barbara Reese ’67 • 5/20/2012 Dennis Hauck ’68 • 9/3/2012 Frederick Sponenburg ’68 • 11/6/2012 Stephen Brunda ’69 • 10/22/2011 Donald Campbell ’69 • 7/20/2011 C. Edward Crim ’69 • 9/22/2012 Eileen (Klonsky) Singer ’70 • 7/17/2012 Margaret Horne ’71 • 10/6/2012 Adele Bryan ’72 • 7/8/2012 Paul Goldbach ’72 • 5/30/2012 Ernest Orphanos ’72 • 7/23/2012 Walter March ’73 • 4/14/2012 William Houtz ’74 • 6/11/2012 Kathleen (Sedmak) Schlaffer ’74 • 6/14/2012

Barbara (Bomberger) Apelian ’75 • 6/17/2012 Nancy (Braun) Beitler ’75 • 10/16/2012 Samuel Liddle ’75 • 10/25/2011 Maureen Blewitt ’76 • 12/1/2011 James Fronk ’76 • 6/4/2011 Russell Troxell ’77 • 9/8/2012 C. Linda Smith ’81 • 4/28/2012 Steve Wilson ’82 • 8/13/2012 Ronald Pringle ’84 • 6/17/2012 Sharon Defassio ’87 • 1/9/2012 Michele Honochick ’88 • 6/25/2012 Carol Umphrey ’88 • 9/21/2012 Robin (Zeigler) Mammola ’92 • 3/16/2012

Jayne Eidle ’96 • 10/15/2012 Shannon Torola ’98 • 4/10/2011 Beth (Pearson) Williams ’99 • 5/7/2012 Jennifer Brown ’03 • 11/14/2012 Tim Lewis ’05 • 10/10/2012 Matthew Bortz ’07 • 12/5/2012 Matthew Steiner ’10 • 3/13/2012 D. Seth Fuoti ’13 • 12/5/2012 Alfred Huff • 1/7/2012 former KU trustee Frederick Giorgi • 2/18/2012 Karen Blomain • 8/15/2012 Emerita Stephen Justham • 10/21/2012 Emeritus Peter Miller • 12/1/2012 Emeritus David Haas • 12/14/2012 Emeritus

Spring 2013 | Tower 29

Save the Date

2012homecoming

Alumni Tailgate Reception

2013 Student Recreation Center 1113a.m.– 3 p.m. 0 2 Great food and a great view of

homecoming sat., October 26, 2013

1 Alumni, families, and students joined Fan-Fest activities under the tent on the DMZ. 2 KU fans come in all species, including Mack the bulldog. 3 Crowds filled the

the football game from the Rec Center patio.

stands and cheered on the Golden Bears at University Field. 4 Quarterback Kevin Morton’s ’12 family and friends gathered to tailgate before the big game.

Cost: $15 per person Space is limited to the first 125 guests.

5 The popular 5th Quarter Party in South Dining Hall again provided good food, entertainment and the opportunity to reconnect with classmates.

KU Football vs. ESU

1

Cheer on your golden bears!

University Field • 1:05 p.m. Tickets available at the gate.

“The 5th Quarter” Alumni Party

10:30 a.m.– 1 p.m.

2

Interactive fan entertainment located on the DMZ includes giveaways, games and inflatables, food, campus tours, and more! 6 President Cevallos (bottom left) joined Alumni Association board

Contact the KU Alumni Engagement office to reserve a reunion table (610-683-4110).

South Dining Hall • 4– 6 p.m. Plenty of fun and food is in store at this annual after-game party. Please check www.give2ku.org regularly for an updated list of events and to register.

members in the photo 3

booth to capture the day’s

4

fun. 7 Norma Castellucci, wife of Arthur Castellucci

Come C heer o n the KU R ugby Se v e n s

’58, and their grandson (a future Golden Bear?) show their KU spirit at the party.

Collegiate Rugby Championship June 1-2, 2013 PPL Park in Philadelphia For tickets and information, visit

5

6

30 Tower | Spring 2013

7

http://www.kutztown.edu/events/ collegiate-rugby-championship.htm

Spring 2013 | Tower 31

Save the Date

2012homecoming

Alumni Tailgate Reception

2013 Student Recreation Center 1113a.m.– 3 p.m. 0 2 Great food and a great view of

homecoming sat., October 26, 2013

1 Alumni, families, and students joined Fan-Fest activities under the tent on the DMZ. 2 KU fans come in all species, including Mack the bulldog. 3 Crowds filled the

the football game from the Rec Center patio.

stands and cheered on the Golden Bears at University Field. 4 Quarterback Kevin Morton’s ’12 family and friends gathered to tailgate before the big game.

Cost: $15 per person Space is limited to the first 125 guests.

5 The popular 5th Quarter Party in South Dining Hall again provided good food, entertainment and the opportunity to reconnect with classmates.

KU Football vs. ESU

1

Cheer on your golden bears!

University Field • 1:05 p.m. Tickets available at the gate.

“The 5th Quarter” Alumni Party

10:30 a.m.– 1 p.m.

2

Interactive fan entertainment located on the DMZ includes giveaways, games and inflatables, food, campus tours, and more! 6 President Cevallos (bottom left) joined Alumni Association board

Contact the KU Alumni Engagement office to reserve a reunion table (610-683-4110).

South Dining Hall • 4– 6 p.m. Plenty of fun and food is in store at this annual after-game party. Please check www.give2ku.org regularly for an updated list of events and to register.

members in the photo 3

booth to capture the day’s

4

fun. 7 Norma Castellucci, wife of Arthur Castellucci

Come C heer o n the KU R ugby Se v e n s

’58, and their grandson (a future Golden Bear?) show their KU spirit at the party.

Collegiate Rugby Championship June 1-2, 2013 PPL Park in Philadelphia For tickets and information, visit

5

6

30 Tower | Spring 2013

7

http://www.kutztown.edu/events/ collegiate-rugby-championship.htm

Spring 2013 | Tower 31

K u t z t o w n

NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID reading, PA PERMIT NO. 2000

U n i v e r s i t y

M a g a z i n e

15200 Kutztown Road Kutztown, PA 19530-0730 CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

Spring 2013

KU’s World Champion Kutztown University product Ryan Vogelsong was a key component to the San Francisco Giants world championship in October, posting a 1.09 earned run average in four post season starts. Vogelsong, who pitched for the Golden Bears from 1996-98, was the World Series game three winner over the Detroit Tigers.

the

He also was the winning pitcher twice in the National

woman

League Championship Series against the St. Louis Cardinals. In his junior year with KU, Vogelsong led NCAA Division II with a 1.41 ERA. 

behind the

jewels

Lisa Oswald ’82 and the story of Sorrelli

Photo courtesy San Francisco Giants.

page 14

premier painter

Stoudt’s Brewing

Hall of Fame

Holocaust Documentary


Spring 2013 Tower Magazine