Issuu on Google+

(CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE)

Philip and Nancy Anschutz, of Denver, founded the Anschutz Foundation in 1983. Philip Anschutz earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from KU in 1961.

— the major exhibition space for KU Libraries — features multimedia exhibits of KU Libraries collections with related research by KU faculty and students.

“We are pleased to be associated with Gene and Gretchen Budig in this effort to support one of the finest libraries in the state of Kansas,” said Philip Anschutz.

“The Anschutz and Budig families have created a legacy on this campus through their support of its programs, projects and people,” said Lorraine J. Haricombe, dean of KU Libraries. “The gifts to create the new Anschutz-Budig Outstanding Librarian Award show a clear understanding of and commitment to the vital role libraries and librarians play here at KU.” v

Sarah Goodwin Thiel, KU digital services librarian and chair of KU Libraries Exhibits Program, is the inaugural recipient of the new award. Thiel was selected for her leadership role in creating the Library Gallery in Watson Library. The gallery

Gift establishes world’s largest collection of author Theodore FROM Sturgeon’s materials at Kenneth Spencer Research Library (CONTINUED FRONT PAGE) Correspondence includes letters from Sturgeon to his mother (a writer and feminist peace activist) describing his early career in New York, and letters between Sturgeon and editors and authors, including John W. Campbell, Judy Lynn del Rey, Poul Anderson, Robert Heinlein, Edgar Pangborn, Harlan Ellison, Isaac Asimov, Kurt Vonnegut, Damon Knight, Clifford Simak, James Tiptree, Jr. and others, such as Gene Roddenberry and T.H. White. Vonnegut, who named his iconic pulp fiction writer, Kilgore Trout, in Sturgeon’s honor, called him “one of the best writers in America.” Sturgeon’s writing influenced sixties countercultural icons like The Grateful Dead and Crosby, Stills and Nash. His lyrical and varied style represented a turn from the “hard” science fiction of the forties to the socially conscious topics more common in contemporary science fiction, including sexuality, gender, pacifism and the individual cost of social conventions.

“This extraordinary gift ensures that Sturgeon’s profound literary and cultural legacy will be available to new generations of scholars, writers and readers.“ - Beth Whittaker “We are thrilled and honored to be entrusted with this outstanding collection,” said Beth Whittaker, head of Spencer Research Library. “This extraordinary gift ensures that Sturgeon’s profound literary and cultural legacy will be available to new generations of scholars, writers and readers. These materials, in the context of our existing collections, build an increasingly rich resource of primary materials in the field. I am especially pleased with the partnership among the Libraries, the English department, and the Center for the Study of Science Fiction that made this possible.”

Noël Sturgeon (right) tours Spencer Research Library with Library Head Beth Whittaker (left) and Special Collections Librarian Elspeth Healey. Photo by Sarah Kanning.

In making the donation, Noël Sturgeon credits the work of James Gunn, professor emeritus of English at KU and a noted science fiction author who created KU’s Intensive English Institute on the Teaching of Science Fiction in 1975 and the CSSF in 1982, and was named a Damon Knight Grand Master in 2007 by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. “Jim’s long dedication to the teaching and scholarship of science fiction, and his particular interest in and support of my father’s work, was the main impetus behind our choice of the Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas as the home for Sturgeon’s collection of papers,” Noël Sturgeon said. “What was crucially important to us is that the Center for Science Fiction has the firm support of the English Department and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, meaning that there will be an on-going vibrant community of scholars and students who will benefit from the Sturgeon collection,” Noël Sturgeon said. “I hope that other science fiction and fantasy authors will be inspired by our donations to also contribute their papers, making the Center for the Study of Science Fiction and Spencer Library the premier institutions for the study of science fiction in the United States.” v

Library alumni updates Former KU Libraries student workers share their news:

Braden Conrad-Heibner named first Price Fellow

Penny Clark writes that she has worked in three different repositories of Southeast Texas archives in the past 15 years. She is now the university archivist at Lamar University’s University Archives and Special Collections. Clark notes, “One of our landmark collections is the David Lewis Collection, one of the largest image collection of fungi in the South. David dries the actual mushrooms and sends the specimens to the Field Museum in Chicago and the National Natural History Museum in Paris. This summer I traveled to Paris where I saw their mycology department and David’s actual specimens! I utilize the great education I received at KU every day in my work.” Recent KU graduate Jono Bowles writes, “My time working in Instructional Services in KU Libraries served as the perfect complement to my education in preparing me for my career. The skills that I developed there benefit me every day in the workplace, and my time at the Libraries helped make me a better student and, ultimately, a better job candidate.” Bowles now works for Perceptive Software in Kansas City. Amanda Bailey writes, “I worked at the library’s Conservation Lab during my graduate studies in the Museum Studies program (2006-2008). After leaving KU, I went on to work on contract with the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, then spent a short stint in Waco, Texas at the Texas Ranger Museum, and now I find myself at the Kansas Cosmosphere & Space Center working as their Collections Registrar. My experiences in the lab have been invaluable in every place I have ended up since. I have a good foundation about the preservation of paper and books.” For more updates from library alumni, visit www.lib.ku.edu/bibliophile. v

FALL 2011 A University of Kansas Libraries publication for friends and benefactors

MAJOR GIFTS

The Anschutz-Budig Award Braden Conrad-Hiebner, at work in Spencer Research Library. Photo by Dylan Derryberry.

Braden Conrad-Hiebner is the inaugural recipient of the G. Baley Price Graduate Fellowship at Kenneth Spencer Research Library. The Price Fellowship provides students with demonstrated interest in scholarly archival research and/or librarianship the opportunity to gain direct experience working with archivists in the Spencer Research Library collections. The fellowship will enable the recipient to engage in hands-on work helping to organize, catalog and preserve the library’s materials and to make them accessible to others. The Price Fellowship was funded by a gift from G. Baley Price to KU Endowment. v

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: OCT. 24-28

KU Celebrates International Open Access Week

NOV. 16

“Saints and Scholars, Poets and Politicians: An Introduction to Kenneth Spencer Research Library’s Irish Collections”

BOSTON, MA

NOV. 29

Grand opening of the Marilyn Stokstad Reading Room at Kenneth Spencer Research Library

For additional details about our fall events, visit www.lib.ku.edu/events.

CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF BIBLIOPHILE? Visit Bibliophile online (www.lib.ku.edu/ bibliophile) for more news and updates, including news from former student employees, our “library alumni.”

KEEP IN TOUCH!

The Anschutz-Budig Award

Questions? Comments? E-mail us at rasmith@ku.edu or send your letter to : Bibliophile 502 Watson Library 1425 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045

www.facebook.com/KULibraries twitter.com/kulibraries www.flickr.com/kulibraries www.youtube.com/kulibraries

1425 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045

A new University of Kansas Libraries award, established by two longtime KU Libraries supporters, will honor an outstanding KU librarian each year. The Anschutz Foundation and former KU Chancellor Gene Budig along with his wife, Gretchen, each provided $25,000 to KU Endowment to create the endowed fund. “There are no great universities without superior libraries,” said Gene Budig, who served as KU’s chancellor from 1981 to 1994. “With that belief, Gretchen and I support libraries at KU, and have for years. It is especially important for undergraduate students to learn from the priceless treasures therein. Effective use of a great library opens the doors of opportunity; it assures intellectual

Sarah Goodwin Thiel, digital imaging librarian and first recipient of the new AnschutzBudig Award. Photo by David McKinney, KU University Relations.

growth and access to modern-day opportunities. Phil Anschutz shares our views and commitment, as reflected by this award.” (CONTINUED ON INSIDE FLAP)

Gift establishes world’s largest collection of author Theodore Sturgeon’s materials at Kenneth Spencer Research Library By sarah kanning

A gift valued at more than $600,000 of author Theodore Sturgeon’s books, papers, manuscripts and correspondence has established the definitive collection of his work at the Kenneth Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas. Sturgeon (1918-1985) was one of the most influential writers of the “Golden Age” of science fiction, and won virtually every major award in his field, including the Hugo, the Nebula, the World Fantasy Achievement Award, the Gaylactica/Spectrum Award and induction into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. Gene Roddenberry credited him with inventing (with Leonard Nimoy) the famous Vulcan phrase, “Live long and prosper,” for the original Star Trek television show. Sturgeon’s papers had been privately held in two parts: the Woodstock collection, from Marion Sturgeon, his widow; and the Sturgeon Literary Trust collection, managed by Trustee Noël Sturgeon, his daughter. The gift was made possible with additional support from KU’s Center for the

Study of Science Fiction (CSSF), the English department and Spencer Research Library. The collection includes the original manuscript of “More Than Human,” Sturgeon’s best-known novel and winner of the International Fantasy Award, and manuscripts of his short stories and screenplays, including Sturgeon’s outline for “Amok Time,” the episode of Star Trek for which he won the Outstanding Achievement Award from the International Society of Science Fiction, Horror and Fantasy. (CONTINUED ON INSIDE FLAP)

IN THIS ISSUE: • In Memoriam • KU Libraries awarded NEH grant • Team up for Touchdown Challenge 2011 • KU leads national open access efforts • Stansifer gift broadens Latin American collections • Library alumni updates • Braden Conrad-Heibner named first Price Fellow

In Memoriam We are sad to note the recent loss of several friends and colleagues. Carolyn Berneking (1915-2011) graduated from KU in 1937 with a degree in music, and earned her master’s in library science from Emporia. She worked for several public and academic libraries before returning to KU as a serials librarian; after retirement, Carolyn volunteered at the University Archives in Spencer for fourteen more years. Edwyna Gilbert (1936-2011) was a professor emerita of English and the chair of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates. “We were most fortunate to count Edwyna as a colleague and friend,” said KU Libraries Dean Lorraine Haricombe. “As chair of our Board of Advocates and in her many roles across campus, Edwyna emanated an affection for KU that inspired all of us. Despite her humble demeanor, her ardent passion for the people and programs she believed in led her to willingly embrace not only the role of an educator, but that of an advocate. Her contributions and spirit of enthusiasm will have a lasting and positive impact at KU and beyond.” L. E. James (Jim) Helyar (1931-2011) served as a KU librarian from 1955 to 1956 and from 1961 to 2006. Jim, who served as the graphics curator at Spencer and worked for KU for more than 48 years, was an expert on the 1851 World’s Fair and worked extensively on the Gould Collection.

National Endowment for the Humanities awards $70,939 to KU Libraries for cataloging and digitizing John Gould bird illustrations By Sarah Kanning

KU Libraries was awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to catalog and digitize scientific illustrations from the collection of John Gould (1804-1881), a notable nineteenth-century British publisher of illustrated bird books. The NEH grant will help fund the costs of creating metadata and providing access to the Gould collection, as well as the related research archive of the late Gordon Sauer, leading Gould biographer and historian. Approximately 6,300 of Gould’s drawings, watercolors, lithographic stones, lithographic proofs, color trials and published prints will be digitized and made accessible online for access by scholars around the world. The grant was one of only 33 in the nation awarded by NEH this year for humanities collections and reference resources projects, and one of two in the state of Kansas in that category. The Gould manuscripts and publications form the centerpiece of the Ralph Ellis collection of 25,000 natural-history volumes, which is one of the best ornithological libraries in America for the period up to 1945, when Ellis died and the collection came by bequest to the University of Kansas. In addition to the development of ornithological science and illustration, the Gould collection offers insight into the techniques of lithographic printing and watercolor painting and the naturalhistory publishing business during the mid-19th century. v

Alexandra (Sandy) Mason (1931-2011) served as the first librarian of the Kenneth Spencer Research Library and was the one who inspired the current head of Spencer, Beth Whittaker, to pursue a career in librarianship. “Sandy was a huge influence on generations of librarians and scholars,” Whittaker said. “She set the highest standards for special collections librarianship and lived up to those standards.”

KU Libraries team up with gridiron Jayhawks for Touchdown Challenge 2011

KU was the first public university in the nation to share faculty research with audiences beyond those with academic journal subscriptions.

The Touchdown Challenge campaign, now in its second year, is dedicated to raising funds for the seven libraries on the Lawrence and Edwards campuses. Participants in the challenge will pledge a certain amount of money per touchdown that KU scores during the 2011 season and postseason play. The contributions support the KU Libraries’ enrichment fund. Zenger, who earned his doctoral degree at KU, emphasized the importance of the library for undergraduate and graduate students alike. “In many ways, the library is the heart of campus and touches each one of the students at KU.” Gill is also a supporter of the libraries. He said that the entire staff encourages all football players to focus on education, and that the libraries are an essential part of helping them thrive academically. “As every one of our football players knows, education is the number one priority,” Gill said. “It is up to each student to stay on top of his grades. The critical support the library provides — not only to KU student-athletes, but to the student body as a whole — makes that possible.” In addition to teaching hundreds of workshops and courseintegrated instruction sessions each semester, library faculty teach for-credit courses aimed at improving information literacy.

Now KU has once again taken the lead in forming a coalition with 21 other universities and colleges with established faculty open access policies in North America—such as Harvard University, Stanford University, Duke University and Concordia University in Montreal—to establish the new Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions. READ poster featuring Coach Turner Gill. Photo by Jeff Jacobsen.

“Librarians work with all students to help them develop a better understanding of the research process, an important step that contributes to improved student retention now and helps them develop lifelong information and technology literacy skills,” said Lorraine J. Haricombe, dean of KU Libraries. “KU studentathletes benefit from a specially designed research methods and information literacy course taught by KU librarians. We are proud of our partnership with Kansas Athletics, and we look forward to the second year of this campaign to benefit all KU students.” “The University of Kansas is known not just for its great athletics program, but also for the high level of expectations in academics,” Gill said. “I hope KU fans will join me in supporting the libraries.” For more information about the campaign, visit the Touchdown Challenge website at www.lib.ku.edu/touchdown. Pledge online or by mailing in the pledge card below. v

P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928 1-800-444-4201 | www.kuendowment.org

I want to participate in the Touchdown Challenge!

100 percent of your gift will be used to benefit the area of your choice at the University of Kansas.

My pledge per touchdown (for 2011-12 season and post-season play) is:

Pledge is from:

q $1

q $50

Name ____________________________________________________________

q $3

q $100

q $5

q Other amount: _____

Address __________________________________________________________

q $10

q I would like to make a gift in the amount of: _____

Name(s) as they should appear on receipt

Bibliophile is published in print and online semi-annually by the University of Kansas Libraries for alumni, friends and benefactors. Printing is paid for with private contributions.

City _____________________________________________________________ State ____________________________________________________________ From “A Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains” by John Gould (London, 1831). Courtesy of Special Collections, Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

Dean of Libraries - lorraine j. haricombe | Editor - Rebecca Smith Content - Sarah Kanning and Dylan Derryberry Design and production - Courtney Foat and Claire Dooley

By Sarah Kanning

KU Libraries have teamed up with KU Athletics Director Sheahon Zenger and Head Football Coach Turner Gill to launch a fundraising campaign to support KU Libraries.

__________________________________________________________

Loraine Vosper (1918-2011), wife of former KU Libraries Director Robert Vosper (for whom the KU Libraries Vosper Society was named), was, like her husband, a strong supporter of KU Libraries.

KU establishes first North American coalition of institutions practicing open access

ZIP Code _________________________________________________________ Phone (home or mobile) _____________________________________________

I’d like to pledge my support to: q Library Enrichment

q Library Collections

q Library Facilities

q Other (please specify): __________

I agree to the above and acknowledge that I will receive a statement from KU Endowment with my pledge total to be paid in spring of 2012. The amount to be charged will be based upon the total of touchdown scored during the KU football season, including regular and bowl games.

Phone (business/daytime) _____________________________________________

Questions?

E-mail _____________________________________________________________

Rebecca Smith, KU Libraries: rasmith@ku.edu or 785-864-1761

Known as COAPI, the group will collaborate and share implementation strategies and advocate on a national level for institutions with open access policies. In July, KU Libraries Dean Lorraine Haricombe contacted deans and directors at universities and colleges with

established open access policies and invited them to participate in a teleconference to discuss the possibility of organizing. During the July 19 teleconference, the group resolved to formalize as COAPI. Their next steps will include a pre-conference meeting at the Berlin 9 Open Access Conference in November in Washington, D.C. “Society depends on universities for the creation of new knowledge,” said Haricombe. “We at KU understand well our responsibility to disseminate and share that knowledge to gain the most benefit for science and society.” “It’s my hope that this new coalition will offer academic institutions an opportunity to stand together and establish open access to knowledge in the sciences and humanities as a broad societal norm,” Haricombe said. v

Stansifer gift broadens Latin American collections at KU Libraries By Rebecca Smith

An extensive gift of more than 20,000 Latin American books, pamphlets and papers from a KU emeritus professor will serve to deepen an already substantial collection that he helped to create. Dr. Charles Stansifer, professor emeritus of history and a former director of the KU Center of Latin American Studies, has donated his personal collection and papers, including items from Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Mexico, Paraguay and other Central and South American countries. Some books will go to the Latin American collection in Watson Library; the rarer books, papers, pamphlets and other ephemera will go to Spencer Research Library. The collection, which Stansifer built over more than five decades, contains thousands of items. The gift is the capstone of Stansifer’s long-standing efforts on behalf of the Latin American collection at KU Libraries. He served on the committee that selected and purchased the core collection in the ‘60s, a time when there were few sources of books from Central and South America in the United States. Collection-building meant traveling to those regions and bringing back the books. “I remember going to Costa Rica with him,” said Jana Krentz, KU librarian and head of KU Libraries’ International Area Studies department. “He would pack suitcases inside suitcases for the trip down, and fill them all with books for the trip back. It was just incredible.” Melissa Birch, KU associate professor of business, worked

Charley Stansifer with KU Librarian John Stratton at the September 22 reception honoring his gift. Photo by Sarah Kanning.

with Stansifer in the Center of Latin American Studies, where he served as director for many years. “Dr. Stansifer is a noted Central American historian, but his interests go well beyond Central America,” said Birch. “Charley was instrumental in the University’s acquisition of the Natalicio Gonzalez collection and in encouraging many scholars to come use the materials. Always a Jayhawk, Charley devotes incredible energy to building bridges between Kansas, its people and its academic institutions, and all of Latin America.” Stansifer explained how his 42-year career at KU led him to make the gift. “During my time at KU, I have become very aware of the outstanding Latin American resources and collections held within KU Libraries,” said Stansifer. “I hope this gift will make this collection even stronger, because the libraries and its resources are vital to research, teaching and learning at KU.” Stansifer was honored for his contributions at a reception in Watson Library on September 22. v

(CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE)

Philip and Nancy Anschutz, of Denver, founded the Anschutz Foundation in 1983. Philip Anschutz earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from KU in 1961.

— the major exhibition space for KU Libraries — features multimedia exhibits of KU Libraries collections with related research by KU faculty and students.

“We are pleased to be associated with Gene and Gretchen Budig in this effort to support one of the finest libraries in the state of Kansas,” said Philip Anschutz.

“The Anschutz and Budig families have created a legacy on this campus through their support of its programs, projects and people,” said Lorraine J. Haricombe, dean of KU Libraries. “The gifts to create the new Anschutz-Budig Outstanding Librarian Award show a clear understanding of and commitment to the vital role libraries and librarians play here at KU.” v

Sarah Goodwin Thiel, KU digital services librarian and chair of KU Libraries Exhibits Program, is the inaugural recipient of the new award. Thiel was selected for her leadership role in creating the Library Gallery in Watson Library. The gallery

Gift establishes world’s largest collection of author Theodore FROM Sturgeon’s materials at Kenneth Spencer Research Library (CONTINUED FRONT PAGE) Correspondence includes letters from Sturgeon to his mother (a writer and feminist peace activist) describing his early career in New York, and letters between Sturgeon and editors and authors, including John W. Campbell, Judy Lynn del Rey, Poul Anderson, Robert Heinlein, Edgar Pangborn, Harlan Ellison, Isaac Asimov, Kurt Vonnegut, Damon Knight, Clifford Simak, James Tiptree, Jr. and others, such as Gene Roddenberry and T.H. White. Vonnegut, who named his iconic pulp fiction writer, Kilgore Trout, in Sturgeon’s honor, called him “one of the best writers in America.” Sturgeon’s writing influenced sixties countercultural icons like The Grateful Dead and Crosby, Stills and Nash. His lyrical and varied style represented a turn from the “hard” science fiction of the forties to the socially conscious topics more common in contemporary science fiction, including sexuality, gender, pacifism and the individual cost of social conventions.

“This extraordinary gift ensures that Sturgeon’s profound literary and cultural legacy will be available to new generations of scholars, writers and readers.“ - Beth Whittaker “We are thrilled and honored to be entrusted with this outstanding collection,” said Beth Whittaker, head of Spencer Research Library. “This extraordinary gift ensures that Sturgeon’s profound literary and cultural legacy will be available to new generations of scholars, writers and readers. These materials, in the context of our existing collections, build an increasingly rich resource of primary materials in the field. I am especially pleased with the partnership among the Libraries, the English department, and the Center for the Study of Science Fiction that made this possible.”

Noël Sturgeon (right) tours Spencer Research Library with Library Head Beth Whittaker (left) and Special Collections Librarian Elspeth Healey. Photo by Sarah Kanning.

In making the donation, Noël Sturgeon credits the work of James Gunn, professor emeritus of English at KU and a noted science fiction author who created KU’s Intensive English Institute on the Teaching of Science Fiction in 1975 and the CSSF in 1982, and was named a Damon Knight Grand Master in 2007 by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. “Jim’s long dedication to the teaching and scholarship of science fiction, and his particular interest in and support of my father’s work, was the main impetus behind our choice of the Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas as the home for Sturgeon’s collection of papers,” Noël Sturgeon said. “What was crucially important to us is that the Center for Science Fiction has the firm support of the English Department and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, meaning that there will be an on-going vibrant community of scholars and students who will benefit from the Sturgeon collection,” Noël Sturgeon said. “I hope that other science fiction and fantasy authors will be inspired by our donations to also contribute their papers, making the Center for the Study of Science Fiction and Spencer Library the premier institutions for the study of science fiction in the United States.” v

Library alumni updates Former KU Libraries student workers share their news:

Braden Conrad-Heibner named first Price Fellow

Penny Clark writes that she has worked in three different repositories of Southeast Texas archives in the past 15 years. She is now the university archivist at Lamar University’s University Archives and Special Collections. Clark notes, “One of our landmark collections is the David Lewis Collection, one of the largest image collection of fungi in the South. David dries the actual mushrooms and sends the specimens to the Field Museum in Chicago and the National Natural History Museum in Paris. This summer I traveled to Paris where I saw their mycology department and David’s actual specimens! I utilize the great education I received at KU every day in my work.” Recent KU graduate Jono Bowles writes, “My time working in Instructional Services in KU Libraries served as the perfect complement to my education in preparing me for my career. The skills that I developed there benefit me every day in the workplace, and my time at the Libraries helped make me a better student and, ultimately, a better job candidate.” Bowles now works for Perceptive Software in Kansas City. Amanda Bailey writes, “I worked at the library’s Conservation Lab during my graduate studies in the Museum Studies program (2006-2008). After leaving KU, I went on to work on contract with the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, then spent a short stint in Waco, Texas at the Texas Ranger Museum, and now I find myself at the Kansas Cosmosphere & Space Center working as their Collections Registrar. My experiences in the lab have been invaluable in every place I have ended up since. I have a good foundation about the preservation of paper and books.” For more updates from library alumni, visit www.lib.ku.edu/bibliophile. v

FALL 2011 A University of Kansas Libraries publication for friends and benefactors

MAJOR GIFTS

The Anschutz-Budig Award Braden Conrad-Hiebner, at work in Spencer Research Library. Photo by Dylan Derryberry.

Braden Conrad-Hiebner is the inaugural recipient of the G. Baley Price Graduate Fellowship at Kenneth Spencer Research Library. The Price Fellowship provides students with demonstrated interest in scholarly archival research and/or librarianship the opportunity to gain direct experience working with archivists in the Spencer Research Library collections. The fellowship will enable the recipient to engage in hands-on work helping to organize, catalog and preserve the library’s materials and to make them accessible to others. The Price Fellowship was funded by a gift from G. Baley Price to KU Endowment. v

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: OCT. 24-28

KU Celebrates International Open Access Week

NOV. 16

“Saints and Scholars, Poets and Politicians: An Introduction to Kenneth Spencer Research Library’s Irish Collections”

BOSTON, MA

NOV. 29

Grand opening of the Marilyn Stokstad Reading Room at Kenneth Spencer Research Library

For additional details about our fall events, visit www.lib.ku.edu/events.

CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF BIBLIOPHILE? Visit Bibliophile online (www.lib.ku.edu/ bibliophile) for more news and updates, including news from former student employees, our “library alumni.”

KEEP IN TOUCH!

The Anschutz-Budig Award

Questions? Comments? E-mail us at rasmith@ku.edu or send your letter to : Bibliophile 502 Watson Library 1425 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045

www.facebook.com/KULibraries twitter.com/kulibraries www.flickr.com/kulibraries www.youtube.com/kulibraries

1425 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045

A new University of Kansas Libraries award, established by two longtime KU Libraries supporters, will honor an outstanding KU librarian each year. The Anschutz Foundation and former KU Chancellor Gene Budig along with his wife, Gretchen, each provided $25,000 to KU Endowment to create the endowed fund. “There are no great universities without superior libraries,” said Gene Budig, who served as KU’s chancellor from 1981 to 1994. “With that belief, Gretchen and I support libraries at KU, and have for years. It is especially important for undergraduate students to learn from the priceless treasures therein. Effective use of a great library opens the doors of opportunity; it assures intellectual

Sarah Goodwin Thiel, digital imaging librarian and first recipient of the new AnschutzBudig Award. Photo by David McKinney, KU University Relations.

growth and access to modern-day opportunities. Phil Anschutz shares our views and commitment, as reflected by this award.” (CONTINUED ON INSIDE FLAP)

Gift establishes world’s largest collection of author Theodore Sturgeon’s materials at Kenneth Spencer Research Library By sarah kanning

A gift valued at more than $600,000 of author Theodore Sturgeon’s books, papers, manuscripts and correspondence has established the definitive collection of his work at the Kenneth Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas. Sturgeon (1918-1985) was one of the most influential writers of the “Golden Age” of science fiction, and won virtually every major award in his field, including the Hugo, the Nebula, the World Fantasy Achievement Award, the Gaylactica/Spectrum Award and induction into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. Gene Roddenberry credited him with inventing (with Leonard Nimoy) the famous Vulcan phrase, “Live long and prosper,” for the original Star Trek television show. Sturgeon’s papers had been privately held in two parts: the Woodstock collection, from Marion Sturgeon, his widow; and the Sturgeon Literary Trust collection, managed by Trustee Noël Sturgeon, his daughter. The gift was made possible with additional support from KU’s Center for the

Study of Science Fiction (CSSF), the English department and Spencer Research Library. The collection includes the original manuscript of “More Than Human,” Sturgeon’s best-known novel and winner of the International Fantasy Award, and manuscripts of his short stories and screenplays, including Sturgeon’s outline for “Amok Time,” the episode of Star Trek for which he won the Outstanding Achievement Award from the International Society of Science Fiction, Horror and Fantasy. (CONTINUED ON INSIDE FLAP)

IN THIS ISSUE: • In Memoriam • KU Libraries awarded NEH grant • Team up for Touchdown Challenge 2011 • KU leads national open access efforts • Stansifer gift broadens Latin American collections • Library alumni updates • Braden Conrad-Heibner named first Price Fellow

In Memoriam We are sad to note the recent loss of several friends and colleagues. Carolyn Berneking (1915-2011) graduated from KU in 1937 with a degree in music, and earned her master’s in library science from Emporia. She worked for several public and academic libraries before returning to KU as a serials librarian; after retirement, Carolyn volunteered at the University Archives in Spencer for fourteen more years. Edwyna Gilbert (1936-2011) was a professor emerita of English and the chair of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates. “We were most fortunate to count Edwyna as a colleague and friend,” said KU Libraries Dean Lorraine Haricombe. “As chair of our Board of Advocates and in her many roles across campus, Edwyna emanated an affection for KU that inspired all of us. Despite her humble demeanor, her ardent passion for the people and programs she believed in led her to willingly embrace not only the role of an educator, but that of an advocate. Her contributions and spirit of enthusiasm will have a lasting and positive impact at KU and beyond.” L. E. James (Jim) Helyar (1931-2011) served as a KU librarian from 1955 to 1956 and from 1961 to 2006. Jim, who served as the graphics curator at Spencer and worked for KU for more than 48 years, was an expert on the 1851 World’s Fair and worked extensively on the Gould Collection.

National Endowment for the Humanities awards $70,939 to KU Libraries for cataloging and digitizing John Gould bird illustrations By Sarah Kanning

KU Libraries was awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to catalog and digitize scientific illustrations from the collection of John Gould (1804-1881), a notable nineteenth-century British publisher of illustrated bird books. The NEH grant will help fund the costs of creating metadata and providing access to the Gould collection, as well as the related research archive of the late Gordon Sauer, leading Gould biographer and historian. Approximately 6,300 of Gould’s drawings, watercolors, lithographic stones, lithographic proofs, color trials and published prints will be digitized and made accessible online for access by scholars around the world. The grant was one of only 33 in the nation awarded by NEH this year for humanities collections and reference resources projects, and one of two in the state of Kansas in that category. The Gould manuscripts and publications form the centerpiece of the Ralph Ellis collection of 25,000 natural-history volumes, which is one of the best ornithological libraries in America for the period up to 1945, when Ellis died and the collection came by bequest to the University of Kansas. In addition to the development of ornithological science and illustration, the Gould collection offers insight into the techniques of lithographic printing and watercolor painting and the naturalhistory publishing business during the mid-19th century. v

Alexandra (Sandy) Mason (1931-2011) served as the first librarian of the Kenneth Spencer Research Library and was the one who inspired the current head of Spencer, Beth Whittaker, to pursue a career in librarianship. “Sandy was a huge influence on generations of librarians and scholars,” Whittaker said. “She set the highest standards for special collections librarianship and lived up to those standards.”

KU Libraries team up with gridiron Jayhawks for Touchdown Challenge 2011

KU was the first public university in the nation to share faculty research with audiences beyond those with academic journal subscriptions.

The Touchdown Challenge campaign, now in its second year, is dedicated to raising funds for the seven libraries on the Lawrence and Edwards campuses. Participants in the challenge will pledge a certain amount of money per touchdown that KU scores during the 2011 season and postseason play. The contributions support the KU Libraries’ enrichment fund. Zenger, who earned his doctoral degree at KU, emphasized the importance of the library for undergraduate and graduate students alike. “In many ways, the library is the heart of campus and touches each one of the students at KU.” Gill is also a supporter of the libraries. He said that the entire staff encourages all football players to focus on education, and that the libraries are an essential part of helping them thrive academically. “As every one of our football players knows, education is the number one priority,” Gill said. “It is up to each student to stay on top of his grades. The critical support the library provides — not only to KU student-athletes, but to the student body as a whole — makes that possible.” In addition to teaching hundreds of workshops and courseintegrated instruction sessions each semester, library faculty teach for-credit courses aimed at improving information literacy.

Now KU has once again taken the lead in forming a coalition with 21 other universities and colleges with established faculty open access policies in North America—such as Harvard University, Stanford University, Duke University and Concordia University in Montreal—to establish the new Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions. READ poster featuring Coach Turner Gill. Photo by Jeff Jacobsen.

“Librarians work with all students to help them develop a better understanding of the research process, an important step that contributes to improved student retention now and helps them develop lifelong information and technology literacy skills,” said Lorraine J. Haricombe, dean of KU Libraries. “KU studentathletes benefit from a specially designed research methods and information literacy course taught by KU librarians. We are proud of our partnership with Kansas Athletics, and we look forward to the second year of this campaign to benefit all KU students.” “The University of Kansas is known not just for its great athletics program, but also for the high level of expectations in academics,” Gill said. “I hope KU fans will join me in supporting the libraries.” For more information about the campaign, visit the Touchdown Challenge website at www.lib.ku.edu/touchdown. Pledge online or by mailing in the pledge card below. v

P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928 1-800-444-4201 | www.kuendowment.org

I want to participate in the Touchdown Challenge!

100 percent of your gift will be used to benefit the area of your choice at the University of Kansas.

My pledge per touchdown (for 2011-12 season and post-season play) is:

Pledge is from:

q $1

q $50

Name ____________________________________________________________

q $3

q $100

q $5

q Other amount: _____

Address __________________________________________________________

q $10

q I would like to make a gift in the amount of: _____

Name(s) as they should appear on receipt

Bibliophile is published in print and online semi-annually by the University of Kansas Libraries for alumni, friends and benefactors. Printing is paid for with private contributions.

City _____________________________________________________________ State ____________________________________________________________ From “A Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains” by John Gould (London, 1831). Courtesy of Special Collections, Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

Dean of Libraries - lorraine j. haricombe | Editor - Rebecca Smith Content - Sarah Kanning and Dylan Derryberry Design and production - Courtney Foat and Claire Dooley

By Sarah Kanning

KU Libraries have teamed up with KU Athletics Director Sheahon Zenger and Head Football Coach Turner Gill to launch a fundraising campaign to support KU Libraries.

__________________________________________________________

Loraine Vosper (1918-2011), wife of former KU Libraries Director Robert Vosper (for whom the KU Libraries Vosper Society was named), was, like her husband, a strong supporter of KU Libraries.

KU establishes first North American coalition of institutions practicing open access

ZIP Code _________________________________________________________ Phone (home or mobile) _____________________________________________

I’d like to pledge my support to: q Library Enrichment

q Library Collections

q Library Facilities

q Other (please specify): __________

I agree to the above and acknowledge that I will receive a statement from KU Endowment with my pledge total to be paid in spring of 2012. The amount to be charged will be based upon the total of touchdown scored during the KU football season, including regular and bowl games.

Phone (business/daytime) _____________________________________________

Questions?

E-mail _____________________________________________________________

Rebecca Smith, KU Libraries: rasmith@ku.edu or 785-864-1761

Known as COAPI, the group will collaborate and share implementation strategies and advocate on a national level for institutions with open access policies. In July, KU Libraries Dean Lorraine Haricombe contacted deans and directors at universities and colleges with

established open access policies and invited them to participate in a teleconference to discuss the possibility of organizing. During the July 19 teleconference, the group resolved to formalize as COAPI. Their next steps will include a pre-conference meeting at the Berlin 9 Open Access Conference in November in Washington, D.C. “Society depends on universities for the creation of new knowledge,” said Haricombe. “We at KU understand well our responsibility to disseminate and share that knowledge to gain the most benefit for science and society.” “It’s my hope that this new coalition will offer academic institutions an opportunity to stand together and establish open access to knowledge in the sciences and humanities as a broad societal norm,” Haricombe said. v

Stansifer gift broadens Latin American collections at KU Libraries By Rebecca Smith

An extensive gift of more than 20,000 Latin American books, pamphlets and papers from a KU emeritus professor will serve to deepen an already substantial collection that he helped to create. Dr. Charles Stansifer, professor emeritus of history and a former director of the KU Center of Latin American Studies, has donated his personal collection and papers, including items from Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Mexico, Paraguay and other Central and South American countries. Some books will go to the Latin American collection in Watson Library; the rarer books, papers, pamphlets and other ephemera will go to Spencer Research Library. The collection, which Stansifer built over more than five decades, contains thousands of items. The gift is the capstone of Stansifer’s long-standing efforts on behalf of the Latin American collection at KU Libraries. He served on the committee that selected and purchased the core collection in the ‘60s, a time when there were few sources of books from Central and South America in the United States. Collection-building meant traveling to those regions and bringing back the books. “I remember going to Costa Rica with him,” said Jana Krentz, KU librarian and head of KU Libraries’ International Area Studies department. “He would pack suitcases inside suitcases for the trip down, and fill them all with books for the trip back. It was just incredible.” Melissa Birch, KU associate professor of business, worked

Charley Stansifer with KU Librarian John Stratton at the September 22 reception honoring his gift. Photo by Sarah Kanning.

with Stansifer in the Center of Latin American Studies, where he served as director for many years. “Dr. Stansifer is a noted Central American historian, but his interests go well beyond Central America,” said Birch. “Charley was instrumental in the University’s acquisition of the Natalicio Gonzalez collection and in encouraging many scholars to come use the materials. Always a Jayhawk, Charley devotes incredible energy to building bridges between Kansas, its people and its academic institutions, and all of Latin America.” Stansifer explained how his 42-year career at KU led him to make the gift. “During my time at KU, I have become very aware of the outstanding Latin American resources and collections held within KU Libraries,” said Stansifer. “I hope this gift will make this collection even stronger, because the libraries and its resources are vital to research, teaching and learning at KU.” Stansifer was honored for his contributions at a reception in Watson Library on September 22. v

In Memoriam We are sad to note the recent loss of several friends and colleagues. Carolyn Berneking (1915-2011) graduated from KU in 1937 with a degree in music, and earned her master’s in library science from Emporia. She worked for several public and academic libraries before returning to KU as a serials librarian; after retirement, Carolyn volunteered at the University Archives in Spencer for fourteen more years. Edwyna Gilbert (1936-2011) was a professor emerita of English and the chair of the KU Libraries Board of Advocates. “We were most fortunate to count Edwyna as a colleague and friend,” said KU Libraries Dean Lorraine Haricombe. “As chair of our Board of Advocates and in her many roles across campus, Edwyna emanated an affection for KU that inspired all of us. Despite her humble demeanor, her ardent passion for the people and programs she believed in led her to willingly embrace not only the role of an educator, but that of an advocate. Her contributions and spirit of enthusiasm will have a lasting and positive impact at KU and beyond.” L. E. James (Jim) Helyar (1931-2011) served as a KU librarian from 1955 to 1956 and from 1961 to 2006. Jim, who served as the graphics curator at Spencer and worked for KU for more than 48 years, was an expert on the 1851 World’s Fair and worked extensively on the Gould Collection.

National Endowment for the Humanities awards $70,939 to KU Libraries for cataloging and digitizing John Gould bird illustrations By Sarah Kanning

KU Libraries was awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to catalog and digitize scientific illustrations from the collection of John Gould (1804-1881), a notable nineteenth-century British publisher of illustrated bird books. The NEH grant will help fund the costs of creating metadata and providing access to the Gould collection, as well as the related research archive of the late Gordon Sauer, leading Gould biographer and historian. Approximately 6,300 of Gould’s drawings, watercolors, lithographic stones, lithographic proofs, color trials and published prints will be digitized and made accessible online for access by scholars around the world. The grant was one of only 33 in the nation awarded by NEH this year for humanities collections and reference resources projects, and one of two in the state of Kansas in that category. The Gould manuscripts and publications form the centerpiece of the Ralph Ellis collection of 25,000 natural-history volumes, which is one of the best ornithological libraries in America for the period up to 1945, when Ellis died and the collection came by bequest to the University of Kansas. In addition to the development of ornithological science and illustration, the Gould collection offers insight into the techniques of lithographic printing and watercolor painting and the naturalhistory publishing business during the mid-19th century. v

Alexandra (Sandy) Mason (1931-2011) served as the first librarian of the Kenneth Spencer Research Library and was the one who inspired the current head of Spencer, Beth Whittaker, to pursue a career in librarianship. “Sandy was a huge influence on generations of librarians and scholars,” Whittaker said. “She set the highest standards for special collections librarianship and lived up to those standards.”

KU Libraries team up with gridiron Jayhawks for Touchdown Challenge 2011

KU was the first public university in the nation to share faculty research with audiences beyond those with academic journal subscriptions.

The Touchdown Challenge campaign, now in its second year, is dedicated to raising funds for the seven libraries on the Lawrence and Edwards campuses. Participants in the challenge will pledge a certain amount of money per touchdown that KU scores during the 2011 season and postseason play. The contributions support the KU Libraries’ enrichment fund. Zenger, who earned his doctoral degree at KU, emphasized the importance of the library for undergraduate and graduate students alike. “In many ways, the library is the heart of campus and touches each one of the students at KU.” Gill is also a supporter of the libraries. He said that the entire staff encourages all football players to focus on education, and that the libraries are an essential part of helping them thrive academically. “As every one of our football players knows, education is the number one priority,” Gill said. “It is up to each student to stay on top of his grades. The critical support the library provides — not only to KU student-athletes, but to the student body as a whole — makes that possible.” In addition to teaching hundreds of workshops and courseintegrated instruction sessions each semester, library faculty teach for-credit courses aimed at improving information literacy.

Now KU has once again taken the lead in forming a coalition with 21 other universities and colleges with established faculty open access policies in North America—such as Harvard University, Stanford University, Duke University and Concordia University in Montreal—to establish the new Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions. READ poster featuring Coach Turner Gill. Photo by Jeff Jacobsen.

“Librarians work with all students to help them develop a better understanding of the research process, an important step that contributes to improved student retention now and helps them develop lifelong information and technology literacy skills,” said Lorraine J. Haricombe, dean of KU Libraries. “KU studentathletes benefit from a specially designed research methods and information literacy course taught by KU librarians. We are proud of our partnership with Kansas Athletics, and we look forward to the second year of this campaign to benefit all KU students.” “The University of Kansas is known not just for its great athletics program, but also for the high level of expectations in academics,” Gill said. “I hope KU fans will join me in supporting the libraries.” For more information about the campaign, visit the Touchdown Challenge website at www.lib.ku.edu/touchdown. Pledge online or by mailing in the pledge card below. v

P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928 1-800-444-4201 | www.kuendowment.org

I want to participate in the Touchdown Challenge!

100 percent of your gift will be used to benefit the area of your choice at the University of Kansas.

My pledge per touchdown (for 2011-12 season and post-season play) is:

Pledge is from:

q $1

q $50

Name ____________________________________________________________

q $3

q $100

q $5

q Other amount: _____

Address __________________________________________________________

q $10

q I would like to make a gift in the amount of: _____

Name(s) as they should appear on receipt

Bibliophile is published in print and online semi-annually by the University of Kansas Libraries for alumni, friends and benefactors. Printing is paid for with private contributions.

City _____________________________________________________________ State ____________________________________________________________ From “A Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains” by John Gould (London, 1831). Courtesy of Special Collections, Kenneth Spencer Research Library.

Dean of Libraries - lorraine j. haricombe | Editor - Rebecca Smith Content - Sarah Kanning and Dylan Derryberry Design and production - Courtney Foat and Claire Dooley

By Sarah Kanning

KU Libraries have teamed up with KU Athletics Director Sheahon Zenger and Head Football Coach Turner Gill to launch a fundraising campaign to support KU Libraries.

__________________________________________________________

Loraine Vosper (1918-2011), wife of former KU Libraries Director Robert Vosper (for whom the KU Libraries Vosper Society was named), was, like her husband, a strong supporter of KU Libraries.

KU establishes first North American coalition of institutions practicing open access

ZIP Code _________________________________________________________ Phone (home or mobile) _____________________________________________

I’d like to pledge my support to: q Library Enrichment

q Library Collections

q Library Facilities

q Other (please specify): __________

I agree to the above and acknowledge that I will receive a statement from KU Endowment with my pledge total to be paid in spring of 2012. The amount to be charged will be based upon the total of touchdown scored during the KU football season, including regular and bowl games.

Phone (business/daytime) _____________________________________________

Questions?

E-mail _____________________________________________________________

Rebecca Smith, KU Libraries: rasmith@ku.edu or 785-864-1761

Known as COAPI, the group will collaborate and share implementation strategies and advocate on a national level for institutions with open access policies. In July, KU Libraries Dean Lorraine Haricombe contacted deans and directors at universities and colleges with

established open access policies and invited them to participate in a teleconference to discuss the possibility of organizing. During the July 19 teleconference, the group resolved to formalize as COAPI. Their next steps will include a pre-conference meeting at the Berlin 9 Open Access Conference in November in Washington, D.C. “Society depends on universities for the creation of new knowledge,” said Haricombe. “We at KU understand well our responsibility to disseminate and share that knowledge to gain the most benefit for science and society.” “It’s my hope that this new coalition will offer academic institutions an opportunity to stand together and establish open access to knowledge in the sciences and humanities as a broad societal norm,” Haricombe said. v

Stansifer gift broadens Latin American collections at KU Libraries By Rebecca Smith

An extensive gift of more than 20,000 Latin American books, pamphlets and papers from a KU emeritus professor will serve to deepen an already substantial collection that he helped to create. Dr. Charles Stansifer, professor emeritus of history and a former director of the KU Center of Latin American Studies, has donated his personal collection and papers, including items from Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Mexico, Paraguay and other Central and South American countries. Some books will go to the Latin American collection in Watson Library; the rarer books, papers, pamphlets and other ephemera will go to Spencer Research Library. The collection, which Stansifer built over more than five decades, contains thousands of items. The gift is the capstone of Stansifer’s long-standing efforts on behalf of the Latin American collection at KU Libraries. He served on the committee that selected and purchased the core collection in the ‘60s, a time when there were few sources of books from Central and South America in the United States. Collection-building meant traveling to those regions and bringing back the books. “I remember going to Costa Rica with him,” said Jana Krentz, KU librarian and head of KU Libraries’ International Area Studies department. “He would pack suitcases inside suitcases for the trip down, and fill them all with books for the trip back. It was just incredible.” Melissa Birch, KU associate professor of business, worked

Charley Stansifer with KU Librarian John Stratton at the September 22 reception honoring his gift. Photo by Sarah Kanning.

with Stansifer in the Center of Latin American Studies, where he served as director for many years. “Dr. Stansifer is a noted Central American historian, but his interests go well beyond Central America,” said Birch. “Charley was instrumental in the University’s acquisition of the Natalicio Gonzalez collection and in encouraging many scholars to come use the materials. Always a Jayhawk, Charley devotes incredible energy to building bridges between Kansas, its people and its academic institutions, and all of Latin America.” Stansifer explained how his 42-year career at KU led him to make the gift. “During my time at KU, I have become very aware of the outstanding Latin American resources and collections held within KU Libraries,” said Stansifer. “I hope this gift will make this collection even stronger, because the libraries and its resources are vital to research, teaching and learning at KU.” Stansifer was honored for his contributions at a reception in Watson Library on September 22. v

(CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE)

Philip and Nancy Anschutz, of Denver, founded the Anschutz Foundation in 1983. Philip Anschutz earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from KU in 1961.

— the major exhibition space for KU Libraries — features multimedia exhibits of KU Libraries collections with related research by KU faculty and students.

“We are pleased to be associated with Gene and Gretchen Budig in this effort to support one of the finest libraries in the state of Kansas,” said Philip Anschutz.

“The Anschutz and Budig families have created a legacy on this campus through their support of its programs, projects and people,” said Lorraine J. Haricombe, dean of KU Libraries. “The gifts to create the new Anschutz-Budig Outstanding Librarian Award show a clear understanding of and commitment to the vital role libraries and librarians play here at KU.” v

Sarah Goodwin Thiel, KU digital services librarian and chair of KU Libraries Exhibits Program, is the inaugural recipient of the new award. Thiel was selected for her leadership role in creating the Library Gallery in Watson Library. The gallery

Gift establishes world’s largest collection of author Theodore FROM Sturgeon’s materials at Kenneth Spencer Research Library (CONTINUED FRONT PAGE) Correspondence includes letters from Sturgeon to his mother (a writer and feminist peace activist) describing his early career in New York, and letters between Sturgeon and editors and authors, including John W. Campbell, Judy Lynn del Rey, Poul Anderson, Robert Heinlein, Edgar Pangborn, Harlan Ellison, Isaac Asimov, Kurt Vonnegut, Damon Knight, Clifford Simak, James Tiptree, Jr. and others, such as Gene Roddenberry and T.H. White. Vonnegut, who named his iconic pulp fiction writer, Kilgore Trout, in Sturgeon’s honor, called him “one of the best writers in America.” Sturgeon’s writing influenced sixties countercultural icons like The Grateful Dead and Crosby, Stills and Nash. His lyrical and varied style represented a turn from the “hard” science fiction of the forties to the socially conscious topics more common in contemporary science fiction, including sexuality, gender, pacifism and the individual cost of social conventions.

“This extraordinary gift ensures that Sturgeon’s profound literary and cultural legacy will be available to new generations of scholars, writers and readers.“ - Beth Whittaker “We are thrilled and honored to be entrusted with this outstanding collection,” said Beth Whittaker, head of Spencer Research Library. “This extraordinary gift ensures that Sturgeon’s profound literary and cultural legacy will be available to new generations of scholars, writers and readers. These materials, in the context of our existing collections, build an increasingly rich resource of primary materials in the field. I am especially pleased with the partnership among the Libraries, the English department, and the Center for the Study of Science Fiction that made this possible.”

Noël Sturgeon (right) tours Spencer Research Library with Library Head Beth Whittaker (left) and Special Collections Librarian Elspeth Healey. Photo by Sarah Kanning.

In making the donation, Noël Sturgeon credits the work of James Gunn, professor emeritus of English at KU and a noted science fiction author who created KU’s Intensive English Institute on the Teaching of Science Fiction in 1975 and the CSSF in 1982, and was named a Damon Knight Grand Master in 2007 by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. “Jim’s long dedication to the teaching and scholarship of science fiction, and his particular interest in and support of my father’s work, was the main impetus behind our choice of the Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas as the home for Sturgeon’s collection of papers,” Noël Sturgeon said. “What was crucially important to us is that the Center for Science Fiction has the firm support of the English Department and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, meaning that there will be an on-going vibrant community of scholars and students who will benefit from the Sturgeon collection,” Noël Sturgeon said. “I hope that other science fiction and fantasy authors will be inspired by our donations to also contribute their papers, making the Center for the Study of Science Fiction and Spencer Library the premier institutions for the study of science fiction in the United States.” v

Library alumni updates Former KU Libraries student workers share their news:

Braden Conrad-Heibner named first Price Fellow

Penny Clark writes that she has worked in three different repositories of Southeast Texas archives in the past 15 years. She is now the university archivist at Lamar University’s University Archives and Special Collections. Clark notes, “One of our landmark collections is the David Lewis Collection, one of the largest image collection of fungi in the South. David dries the actual mushrooms and sends the specimens to the Field Museum in Chicago and the National Natural History Museum in Paris. This summer I traveled to Paris where I saw their mycology department and David’s actual specimens! I utilize the great education I received at KU every day in my work.” Recent KU graduate Jono Bowles writes, “My time working in Instructional Services in KU Libraries served as the perfect complement to my education in preparing me for my career. The skills that I developed there benefit me every day in the workplace, and my time at the Libraries helped make me a better student and, ultimately, a better job candidate.” Bowles now works for Perceptive Software in Kansas City. Amanda Bailey writes, “I worked at the library’s Conservation Lab during my graduate studies in the Museum Studies program (2006-2008). After leaving KU, I went on to work on contract with the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, then spent a short stint in Waco, Texas at the Texas Ranger Museum, and now I find myself at the Kansas Cosmosphere & Space Center working as their Collections Registrar. My experiences in the lab have been invaluable in every place I have ended up since. I have a good foundation about the preservation of paper and books.” For more updates from library alumni, visit www.lib.ku.edu/bibliophile. v

FALL 2011 A University of Kansas Libraries publication for friends and benefactors

MAJOR GIFTS

The Anschutz-Budig Award Braden Conrad-Hiebner, at work in Spencer Research Library. Photo by Dylan Derryberry.

Braden Conrad-Hiebner is the inaugural recipient of the G. Baley Price Graduate Fellowship at Kenneth Spencer Research Library. The Price Fellowship provides students with demonstrated interest in scholarly archival research and/or librarianship the opportunity to gain direct experience working with archivists in the Spencer Research Library collections. The fellowship will enable the recipient to engage in hands-on work helping to organize, catalog and preserve the library’s materials and to make them accessible to others. The Price Fellowship was funded by a gift from G. Baley Price to KU Endowment. v

MARK YOUR CALENDARS: OCT. 24-28

KU Celebrates International Open Access Week

NOV. 16

“Saints and Scholars, Poets and Politicians: An Introduction to Kenneth Spencer Research Library’s Irish Collections”

BOSTON, MA

NOV. 29

Grand opening of the Marilyn Stokstad Reading Room at Kenneth Spencer Research Library

For additional details about our fall events, visit www.lib.ku.edu/events.

CAN’T GET ENOUGH OF BIBLIOPHILE? Visit Bibliophile online (www.lib.ku.edu/ bibliophile) for more news and updates, including news from former student employees, our “library alumni.”

KEEP IN TOUCH!

The Anschutz-Budig Award

Questions? Comments? E-mail us at rasmith@ku.edu or send your letter to : Bibliophile 502 Watson Library 1425 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045

www.facebook.com/KULibraries twitter.com/kulibraries www.flickr.com/kulibraries www.youtube.com/kulibraries

1425 Jayhawk Blvd. Lawrence, KS 66045

A new University of Kansas Libraries award, established by two longtime KU Libraries supporters, will honor an outstanding KU librarian each year. The Anschutz Foundation and former KU Chancellor Gene Budig along with his wife, Gretchen, each provided $25,000 to KU Endowment to create the endowed fund. “There are no great universities without superior libraries,” said Gene Budig, who served as KU’s chancellor from 1981 to 1994. “With that belief, Gretchen and I support libraries at KU, and have for years. It is especially important for undergraduate students to learn from the priceless treasures therein. Effective use of a great library opens the doors of opportunity; it assures intellectual

Sarah Goodwin Thiel, digital imaging librarian and first recipient of the new AnschutzBudig Award. Photo by David McKinney, KU University Relations.

growth and access to modern-day opportunities. Phil Anschutz shares our views and commitment, as reflected by this award.” (CONTINUED ON INSIDE FLAP)

Gift establishes world’s largest collection of author Theodore Sturgeon’s materials at Kenneth Spencer Research Library By sarah kanning

A gift valued at more than $600,000 of author Theodore Sturgeon’s books, papers, manuscripts and correspondence has established the definitive collection of his work at the Kenneth Spencer Research Library at the University of Kansas. Sturgeon (1918-1985) was one of the most influential writers of the “Golden Age” of science fiction, and won virtually every major award in his field, including the Hugo, the Nebula, the World Fantasy Achievement Award, the Gaylactica/Spectrum Award and induction into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. Gene Roddenberry credited him with inventing (with Leonard Nimoy) the famous Vulcan phrase, “Live long and prosper,” for the original Star Trek television show. Sturgeon’s papers had been privately held in two parts: the Woodstock collection, from Marion Sturgeon, his widow; and the Sturgeon Literary Trust collection, managed by Trustee Noël Sturgeon, his daughter. The gift was made possible with additional support from KU’s Center for the

Study of Science Fiction (CSSF), the English department and Spencer Research Library. The collection includes the original manuscript of “More Than Human,” Sturgeon’s best-known novel and winner of the International Fantasy Award, and manuscripts of his short stories and screenplays, including Sturgeon’s outline for “Amok Time,” the episode of Star Trek for which he won the Outstanding Achievement Award from the International Society of Science Fiction, Horror and Fantasy. (CONTINUED ON INSIDE FLAP)

IN THIS ISSUE: • In Memoriam • KU Libraries awarded NEH grant • Team up for Touchdown Challenge 2011 • KU leads national open access efforts • Stansifer gift broadens Latin American collections • Library alumni updates • Braden Conrad-Heibner named first Price Fellow


Bibliophile Fall 2011