Issuu on Google+

KU Law

magazine for alumni & Friends | Fall 2008

A supreme experience Chief Justice dispenses wisdom, judgment during KU Law visit

healthy bench n supreme court clerks n Donor report

staying in touch, going green We’re trying to get your attention, and we hope you’ve noticed.

KU Law magazine is published biannually for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law. Green Hall 1535 W. 15th St. Lawrence, KS 66045-7577 785.864.4550 Fax: 785.864.5054 www.law.ku.edu DEAN Gail Agrawal Editor & Designer Mindie Paget kulaws@ku.edu 785.864.9205 Contributors Stephen McAllister, L’88 Sandra Craig McKenzie Sandy Patti Ann Scarlett, L’98 Photos Mindie Paget Steve Puppe Supreme Court Archives University Archives University Photo University Relations COVER Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. speaks at the University of Kansas on May 1, 2008. Photo by R. Steve Dick/ University Relations

The University of Kansas School of Law has launched a series of e-communication initiatives designed to strengthen connections with our alumni and be more conscientious about the environmental impact of printing and mailing. The first issue of the KU Law Brief, a quarterly electronic newsletter, hit alumni inboxes in March. The publication features stories about the school and its faculty, students and graduates. You can find an archive of past issues in the Publications section of our Web site, www.law.ku.edu, where back issues of the KU Law Magazine are also available in electronic form. About the same time, we started sending HTML e-mail invitations to alumni for KU Law events across the country, and Dean Gail Agrawal has issued several Dean’s Notes to report special news. In addition to these targeted efforts, the online face of KU Law got a major upgrade with the launch of a new Web site in September. The revamped home page centers on a photo slideshow that highlights law school news and events, and a more sophisticated visual approach carries throughout the site.

But it’s not just a cosmetic upgrade. Information is easier to find and presented more efficiently with the help of streamlined navigation and site architecture. That means fewer clicks for you, prospective students, members of the media and other visitors to find information. The Alumni section, easily accessible from a link on the home page, contains elements of interest to KU Law graduates, including stories, photo galleries and a form for updating your records and submitting news. The Web site is an ongoing project, but already we’ve added an archive of photo galleries and our first podcasts and videos. Look for more podcasts and videos of classes and public lectures down the road.

As we move ahead with digital communication and scale back printing and mailing, it’s more important than ever that we have your current e-mail address. Please update your alumni records so you don’t miss any invitations or news from your legal alma mater. Here’s how:

2

Visit our Web site, www.law.ku.edu. Click on Alumni and look for Keep in Touch; or E-mail Sandy Patti, director of alumni relations, at patti@ku.edu; or

3

Fill out the postage-paid postcard in the back of this magazine and send it in.

1

Contents KU law magazine | Fall 2008

14 16 2 Cover story

A supreme experience During his visit to KU Law last spring, the Chief Justice of the United States spoke to students and faculty, and judged the final round of the moot court competition

Healthy bench

Elder law Q&A

Students in Professor Elizabeth Weeks Leonard’s Public Health Law Seminar crafted a bench book that will guide the Kansas judiciary during times of crisis, such as a pandemic flu outbreak

Professor Sandra McKenzie, director of KU’s Elder Law Program, provides counsel to a hypothetical client on issues facing the rapidly expanding aging population

or terrorist attack Profile Betsy Tedrow, L’87, returns to earn Elder Law LL.M.

Profiles KU Law’s Supreme Court clerks reminisce

departments

22

12 News Briefs 19 Student Awards 24 International Law Briefs

36

20 Picturing graduation

Making up the class

Alumni honorees

Images from the spring hooding ceremony, where David Elkouri, L’78, addressed the graduates on behalf of alumni

The Class of 2011 includes musicians, storm chasers, volunteers, sword fighters, impersonators and speakers of 15 foreign languages

Five new recipients of the James Woods Green Medallion were honored in May at a ceremony that also recognized the school’s trio of Distinguished Alumni

26 Faculty Kudos 27 Faculty Notes 35 Adjunct Spotlight 42 Alumni Notes 48 The Way We Were 49 Donor Report 71 In Memoriam

KU LAW MAGAZINE 1

A

supreme 

experience

Chief Justice Roberts dispenses wisdom, judgment during spring visit to KU Law 2 KU LAW MAGAZINE

By Mindie Paget

Chief justice John Roberts learned a discomforting lesson

KU Law student Brian Nye argues during the moot court finals before a distinguished panel of judges that includes, from left, U.S. District Judge John Lungstrum, U.S. Circuit Judge Deanell Tacha, Chief Justice John Roberts, U.S. Circuit Judge Mary Beck Briscoe and Kansas Supreme Court Justice Carol Beier.

on his first day at the U.S. Supreme Court. He went to lunch with the other justices after morning arguments, expecting to discuss the case before the Court. He realized quickly that his colleagues reserved that sort of business for chambers and conference rooms. At lunch, they talked about the lawyers. “It’s sobering after arguing before them 39 times to sit down and watch them say, ‘I can’t believe what so and so did’ and ‘What a horrible answer to this question,’” Roberts recalled during a question-and-answer session with University of Kansas law and business students and faculty in May. The anecdote probably offered little comfort to Brian Nye, a second-year law student in the audience. Later that day, he would argue before Roberts and four other distinguished judges in the final round of KU’s moot court competition. No pressure. Clearly, however, Nye paid attention to the rest of the Chief’s response to the student who asked how he would advise future lawyers interested in appellate advocacy. “First of all, just answer the question,” Roberts said. “Of course justices are going to ask generally hostile questions. There will be questions you’d rather they didn’t ask in terms of presenting your case, but they know that. They know it’s a question that’s difficult. If you immediately try to avoid it, as so many lawyers do, you erect a wall between yourself and the justices. He’s asking you a question because he wants to get an answer, and he may want to make a point. It doesn’t mean he’s going to rule against you.” Nye learned this firsthand during the moot court finals. Roberts and the other judges threw him a barrage of challenges, interrupting his argument and dissecting it while more than 120 people watched. Nye responded every time and held his ground. After deliberations, Nye and his co-counsel, Daniel Morris, were declared the winning team, defeating Michael Crabb and Lindsey Heinz. Nye was named Best Oral Advocate. “Hearing a Supreme Court justice telling an audience comprised largely of future attorneys that we need to be forthcoming when asked tough questions was refreshing,” Nye said. “Instinctively, I never want to display any weakness in my position, but the judges know the weakness and I will make more of an impression by acknowledging the weakness and then responding with my position’s strengths.”

KU LAW MAGAZINE 3

T

Roberts is the first sitting chief justice to visit the University of Kansas, but the law school boasts a strong history of bringing justices to Green Hall. Six have visited over the last few decades, and the law school has sent five graduates to the Court as clerks. McAllister, who clerked for two Supreme Court justices, said bringing them to campus humanizes them. “When justices visit KU Law, I have always strived to make them as available as possible to the students,” he said. “It is important to let students see that justices are real people, to let them learn firsthand how the justices do their work and view their positions and, hopefully, maybe some students will come

University Relations

hat was just one lesson imparted by the Chief during what Dean Gail Agrawal characterized as an “amazing day” at the KU School of Law. Roberts had delivered a public lecture on April 30 at the Lied Center as a guest of the School of Business, and he devoted May 1 to speaking with law students both during a Q&A at the Dole Institute and in Professor Stephen McAllister’s Constitutional Law class. After judging the moot court finals, Roberts socialized with members of the law school community at a reception.

Chief Justice John Roberts speaks with second-year KU Law student Brian Nye, second from right, and his family during a reception following the moot court finals. to see these justices as role models and inspirations. The justices are, after all, an extraordinary group of people serving a special role in an institution that is truly unique.”

R

oberts impressed many of the students with his modesty and sense of humor. One student asked whether the atmosphere ever gets heated in his chambers.

“You mean in the chambers where I’m working with my law clerks? Sure

Supreme Court justices at KU Law

Justice Wiley Blount Rutledge December 1946

4 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Justice Byron White

October 1984, March 1996

Justice Stephen Breyer January 2001

does; they’re always yelling at me,” Roberts said, drawing laughter. “I assume you mean in the conference with the other justices. I have never heard a word raised in anger in the conference room – ever. Yes, we have strongly held views. Yes, we debate at a quite serious level, but never anger.” That amicable interaction, he explained, has something to do with the fact that all the justices read the same briefs, hear the same arguments, sit in the same conference room and research the same cases. “If you picked nine people out ran-

Justice Antonin Scalia October 1996, Fall 2001

Justice Clarence Thomas April 1996, April 2000 Fall 2002, Fall 2004

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg March 2005

Law students test advocacy skills in front of Chief

University Relations

domly and said, ‘Sit here and debate an issue that’s sensitive and controversial,’ you might get angry words. But it’s because you come with different levels of experience and information,” Roberts said. “We go through the same process. So even in the most difficult cases that we feel very strongly about, we have that sympathetic relationship. We’re looking for the same end: What do we think the Constitution or law requires? “I’ve never doubted the good faith of my colleagues. I don’t think they’ve ever doubted mine.” Students quizzed Roberts on a range of topics, from his relationship with his law clerks and his views on specific constitutional issues to the size of the Supreme Court’s docket and the journey a case takes through the Roberts Court. There was curiosity about whether the justices discuss cases or form opinions before oral arguments. “The protocol is that the argument is the first time that we learn what our colleagues are thinking about a case,” Roberts said. “My views on a case change or are susceptible to change at every stage of the process. Part of what defines a good judge is a healthy skepticism toward arguments.” The justices read briefs, hear arguments and hold a conference before one of them writes an opinion. All the stages are crucial, Roberts said, noting that his views sometimes shift based on what his colleagues say about an issue. Modifications can also occur during the opinion-writing process. The conclusion the justices reach may not look as persuasive on paper as it did around the conference table. There might be a dissent. “So it’s a very fluid process,” Roberts said. “What would you have decided after the briefs? What would you have decided after the arguments? What would you have decided after the conference? Fortunately we don’t have to do that. We only have to finally come to rest when that opinion is released, and that way every stage of the process is pretty important.”

Daniel Morris, 2L, argues before the Chief Justice and other judges during the moot court finals on May 1, 2008.

D

aniel Morris wrote out the first 30 seconds of his oral argument word for word at the top of his outline in case he went blank during KU Law’s moot court finals last spring. The second-year law student had prepared for every question the judges would pose, but he couldn’t be sure that words would actually come out when he opened his mouth. After all, it’s hard to know how you’ll react when you find yourself arguing before the most senior judge in the nation. “I stood up and focused on not tripping as I walked to the podium,” Morris said. “I set my outline down, took a deep breath and found myself facing the Chief Justice of the United States. He is a gentleman with a very kind smile that I appreciated immensely in that moment. There was no place in the world I wanted to be more, but that crushing instant would affirm everything I wanted to do in my career or kill me.” Morris and three other KU law students – Brian Nye, Michael Crabb and Lindsey Heinz – presented oral arguments to Chief Justice John Roberts and a panel of distinguished judges on May 1. The finalists emerged from a pool of 46 students who competed in the law school’s moot court competition, which requires second-year students to

KU LAW MAGAZINE 5

“That was a ball, counselor.” Nate Hill, a student in McAllister’s Constitutional Law class last spring, was struck by Roberts’ candor with students. “His responses to the questions were honest and practical, not vague or guarded as one might expect from a prominent figure,” said Hill, who met and spoke briefly with Roberts at the reception following the moot court round. Finalist Lindsey Heinz met the Chief Justice at the reception, too. Roberts wished her a happy birthday. All in all, it was a pretty surreal day for the secondyear student. “I made a point not to really think about the magnitude of it all until after the arguments were complete,” Heinz said. “It’s just mindboggling to think that when I look back, this will likely be one of the biggest moments of my law career and it happened before I even passed the bar.” n

analyze legal issues similar to those currently before the U.S. Supreme Court. Students must write a brief and make an oral argument as if they were appearing before the Court. Students in the finals of this year’s competition couldn’t have had a more realistic experience, as the Chief Justice of the United States presided over the arguments. Roberts was in town for a two-day visit to KU, where he delivered a public lecture and met with law and business students and faculty. The moot court panel also included U.S. Circuit Judges Deanell Tacha and Mary Beck Briscoe, U.S. District Judge John Lungstrum, and Kansas Supreme Court Justice Carol Beier. During the round, the students responded to difficult questions from all of the judges. More than 120 people watched the arguments, including state and federal judges, attorneys, and law faculty and students. Morris and Nye, who argued for the petitioner, were deemed the winning team. Crabb said he couldn’t recall a more intense 15 minutes in his life. “All five judges took the competition very seriously. They seemed to have studied our fact scenario carefully and posed some incisive questions,” he said. “I think the high point of the round for me was when Chief Justice Roberts asked me

6 KU LAW MAGAZINE

University Relations

T

hroughout his visit, Roberts stressed the importance of an independent judiciary, untainted by partisanship. And he stood by the analogy he used at his 2005 confirmation hearing, equating the role of a justice to that of an umpire. “Nobody goes to a baseball game to see the umpire,” Roberts said. “The Congress, executive, governors, state legislators – those are the people playing the game. And as umpire, you’re trying to do as good a job as you can to make the calls without taking a side in the game.” The umpire reference surfaced again during the moot court finals, when Morris argued that the Second Amendment does not contain an individual right to bear arms. One of the judges asked him if a particular case was binding. “Not at all; this court remains the umpire of its own precedent,” Morris said. As the audience laughed, Roberts made his call:

whether the phrase ‘bear arms’ had a uniquely military meaning. He suggested that private gun owners don’t usually use that phrase in their activities. “I replied that, here in Kansas, there were plenty of folks who absolutely intend to ‘bear arms’ against those deer. To my great relief, everyone laughed.” The students had about a week and a half to prepare for the final round. They pored over their outlines and revisited relevant cases, reviewed questions asked by justices during oral arguments in similar cases, and delivered practice speeches. Chief Justice Roberts, who argued 39 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court as an attorney, said that the students did a “fabulous job” preparing for the round and maintaining control of their arguments in the face of intense scrutiny. “For those of you observing, you may not appreciate how much work goes into this,” Roberts said. “What you have to remember is that for every question we asked, they had obviously prepared for 25 more.” While only the top two teams earned the honor of arguing before the Chief Justice, the best eight teams will represent the school in national and international competitions this year.

School’s first Supreme Court clerk recalls experience fondly

By Mindie Paget

contributed photo

H

eywood “Woody” Davis started his Supreme Court clerkship just in time to witness a piece of civil rights history. In the wake of the Court’s 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education, President Eisenhower sent troops to protect black children attending a previously all-white school in Little Rock, Ark. During a special session in September of 1958, the Court heard the state’s plea to postpone its segregation efforts in order to ease tensions. Thurgood Marshall, then with the NAACP, argued on behalf of the respondents. “As new law clerks, we were all interested in seeing these titans of the bar and the Supreme Court justices themselves,” said Davis, L’58, of Davis, Sands & Collins PC in Kansas City, Mo. Observing the case made a memorable first impression on Davis. But then it was straight to work for his new boss, Justice Charles E. Whittaker, a fellow Midwesterner who had interviewed Davis and offered him the clerkship during a return visit to Kansas City. “At the conclusion of the personal interview, he said, ‘Well if you’ll take a chance on me, I’ll take a chance on you,’” Davis recalled. “And I, of course, said I’d be honored and delighted.” Davis was the first Supreme Court clerk from the University of Kansas School of Law, serving Whittaker during his second year on the Warren Court. Fifty years later, he doesn’t remember all the details of particular cases. He does recall, however, the basic responsibilities entrusted to him and fellow clerk William Canby, now a senior judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for

Heywood “Woody” Davis, L’58, works on a typewriter during his clerkship for Supreme Court Justice Charles E.Whittaker. Davis clerked during the 1958-59 term. the 9th Circuit. Much like clerks today, they read briefs, wrote summaries and crafted bench memos. That was before the cert pool, so they had their hands full. “They had little carts that the clerk’s office would bring around with all these briefs,” Davis said. “A new stack would come in every week, and we’d groan and moan looking at them and realizing what we had to do to get them done.” Another difference from then to now? Davis pecked out memos on a typewriter with carbon paper. He characterized his relationship with Whittaker as “cordial but business-like.” “We didn’t have a lot of social contact with him,” Davis said. When Davis and Canby worked on Saturdays, Whittaker took them to lunch at a Methodist cafeteria across the street. “We’d chit-chat. He was just pretty much his own man and very professional and not a back-slapper or gossiper.”

Davis harbors no illusions that he had any real influence on Whittaker’s decisions. “On occasion, he would have us draft opinions,” Davis said. “If there was any similarity between any draft that we might have submitted and the final one that came out from him, it was because it had the word ‘a’ or ‘the’ in it.” A few years after his clerkship, Davis argued his first and only case before the Supreme Court. The day he argued, Whittaker was absent. Arguments ran onto a second day, and that morning Chief Justice Warren announced that Whittaker had resigned. “He wasn’t there to hear his former law clerk argue the case,” Davis said. “But he probably wouldn’t have been on my side anyway.” After leaving the Court in 1962, Whittaker returned to practice in Kansas City. Davis was a pall bearer at his funeral in 1973.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 7

Two-time Supreme Court clerk learned from his ‘heroes’

By stephen McAllister, L’88

8 KU LAW MAGAZINE

supreme Court Archives

I

will never forget my first week as a law clerk at the Supreme Court of the United States. It was the first week of July 1989. On my first day, the Court was announcing its final decision from the 1988 term, a Missouri case involving state abortion laws and one in which many people thought the Supreme Court might overrule Roe v. Wade. Justice White led me and the other clerk who started that day to the area on one side of the courtroom where the law clerks sit. He deposited us there and went to put on his robe and take the bench with his colleagues. We had little idea what we were doing that day, but the atmosphere was electric and it did not take a lawyer to sense the excitement and anticipation permeating the courtroom. When the Court announced its opinion, it became clear that Roe would not to be overruled, though Justice Blackmun read dramatically from his dissenting opinion and predicted the ultimate demise of Roe. The next day it was as if the Court had been forgotten by the world. The past term was effectively over, with no more arguments or opinions until October, and the justices were exiting not only the building but the city and even the country. We settled into a summer routine of reviewing petitions for a writ of certiorari, dealing with requests for stays of execution in capital cases, and preparing a few bench memoranda to assist Justice White with merits cases to be argued in the fall. I remember my first Saturday at the Court because of someone I met that day. We always worked in the building on Saturdays because Justice White did. Seeking a snack, I started down the stairs

Top: KU Law Professor Steve McAllister with Justice Byron White, for whom he clerked from 1989-1991 Left: McAllister with Justice Clarence Thomas, for whom he clerked during the 1991-92 term

near Justice White’s chambers. Someone else was coming up, and he stopped to ask my name, whether I was a new law clerk and for whom I was clerking. After I responded to his questions, this Southern gentleman held out his hand to shake and, with a smile, declared, “I am Lewis Powell, and it is a pleasure to meet you.” I knew it was Justice Powell all along,

but the fact that he made no assumptions and behaved so modestly was very endearing. I have to admit that I was a bit awestruck to be meeting someone whose name I had seen on so many opinions in my constitutional law class. During the next two-plus years, I met all of the justices and interacted with them in ways both substantive

and trivial. I have fond memories of a casual discussion on the back stairs with Chief Justice Rehnquist about my career plans, a conversation about Seventh Circuit Judge Richard Posner with Justice William Brennan, tea in Justice O’Connor’s chambers and watching Justice Scalia merrily sing Christmas carols. A particularly special memory is of the intense putting competitions we sometimes had with Justice White in his chambers. The goal was to make putts – typically through doorways and under particular furniture – so that the other competitors would have to put money in a kitty. The most difficult putt was two full rooms away from the Justice’s office. If you struck the ball just right, it would go through multiple doorways, behind a corner leg and out through the front of the couch in the Justice’s office. Once the kitty got large enough, Justice White and the law clerk competitors would go to lunch and spend the money. One fun tradition was that the clerks of one chambers would invite a justice out for lunch. I recall eating barbecue with Justice Brennan at a place called Hogs on the Hill; being tested on Supreme Court trivia by the Chief Justice at The Monocle, a Capitol Hill institution; and Justice Scalia’s enthusiasm for the AV Ristorante on New York Avenue, where he loved the anchovy pizza and played opera on the jukebox. I also remember trips to the National Gallery of Art, the National Arboretum and an NBA basketball game with Justice White. For the NBA game, the Justice insisted that we rent a 15-passenger van and that the small-town Kansas boy take the wheel because he assumed I could drive just about anything since I grew up in a rural area. Justice Thurgood Marshall would host an end-of-term lunch with all the law clerks in the building. He was an incomparable storyteller with a tremendous sense of humor. Indeed, another fond memory I have of Justice Marshall is watching his press conference when he announced his retirement in June 1991. Crafty and witty as ever, I remember him walking into the press conference and a reporter shouting, “Justice Marshall, how do you feel?” Justice Marshall looked in the reporter’s general direction and, with a sly smile, declared “with my hands” as he raised his arms in the air. Similarly, I have fond memories of my time with Justice Thomas, though my law clerk experience with him was extremely intense and much shorter than my time with Justice White. Unlike Justice White, who had served on the Court literally for longer than I had been alive, I was present on Justice Thomas’ very first day. Because the Justice was confirmed after the term started, we jumped right in with no summer to gear up. We had no established chambers procedures. Fortunately, we had three former clerks and myself. As a result, many of the initial procedures in the Thomas chambers were borrowed

Alumnus in the thick of clerkship with Justice Anthony Kennedy Travis Lenkner can’t talk about it right now. The 2005 graduate of the KU School of Law is in the midst of a clerkship with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, so he’s not allowed to conduct interviews with the media. But it’s safe to make a few assumptions: 1) He’s working extraordinarily hard; 2) He’s honing his legal research and writing

skills; and

3) He’s having a great time.

“Some cases make more headlines than

others, but by the time they reach the Supreme Court, all of the cases pose interesting legal issues and will be fun to research and consider,”

Lenkner

he said last spring in an interview about the

clerkship. “I’m just looking forward to the experience generally. It’s going to be a fantastic year.”

In December, Lenkner became the fifth KU Law graduate to be

accepted for a Supreme Court clerkship. He will work for Justice Anthony Kennedy through the 2008-09 term. Lenkner practiced for two years after law school at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher in Washington, D.C., and then clerked for Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

from or a hybrid of those utilized by Justices White and Scalia. I never worked harder as a law clerk than those first few months with Justice Thomas. Being an early riser, Justice Thomas favored 7 a.m. meetings with his law clerks on oral argument days. More than once we struggled to be ready and alert at that time of the morning, but Justice Thomas was always enthusiastic and often jolly as he debated cases and displayed his sense of humor. There are many stories I could tell, but suffice it to say that Justice Thomas is one of the warmest and most giving people I have ever known – something many KU Law students and alumni know from firsthand experience during his four visits to the law school. I treasure the memories and experiences I obtained from working for two remarkable individuals, Justice Byron White and Justice Clarence Thomas. A gratifying connection for me was the bond that Justice White and Justice Thomas developed during their time together on the Court. I have heard Justice Thomas more than once declare his deep respect and admiration for Byron White, whom he refers to as a “real American hero.” To me, they are both heroes.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 9

clerk surpasses Justice’s test

By Ann M. Scarlett, L’98

10 KU LAW MAGAZINE

contributed photo

My

interview with Justice Clarence Thomas was not the typical job interview. During most of our 30-minute conversation, he explained what it is like to be a Supreme Court law clerk and how unpleasant those law clerks would treat someone like me who did not earn a law degree from Harvard, Yale, Stanford, Chicago, etc. He emphasized that I was the test case and that my performance would determine whether he would hire future law clerks from other lesser-known law schools.* He only asked me one question during that interview: Could I handle it? I answered yes, and it proved to be an incredible experience from which I learned many lessons. When I arrived at the Supreme Court in July 2000, some of my fellow law clerks did treat me with disdain, and a couple of the justices expressed disbelief when I told them my alma mater. But I had chosen to attend KU Law even though I was accepted at some of the same schools those clerks attended, so I knew that I was capable and worked hard to prove myself. Ultimately, I passed the test and Justice Thomas has since hired another clerk from KU Law, as well as clerks from other law schools such as North Carolina, George Mason, Rutgers and Creighton. Justice Thomas often says he wants to demonstrate that not all smart people choose to go to an Ivy League law school, and I’m sure he was pleased that Justice Kennedy hired a KU Law graduate for the current term. My Supreme Court clerkship taught me a number of life lessons, including that you should never judge a book by its cover and sometimes you’ll have to prove that lesson to others by your example. It has helped me immeasurably in dealing with colleagues in academia who, like

Top: Justice Clarence Thomas, right, stands next to KU Law alumna Ann Scarlett and the other law clerks from the 2000-01 term during a trip to Harper’s Ferry. Left: Thomas and Scarlett, courtesy of the Supreme Court Archives

my fellow law clerks, often stereotype me based on my background. In addition, even though I am not a particularly ideological person, I became skilled at making arguments from all ideological perspectives for the debates within our chambers. As a law clerk, I also learned to express my opinions with clarity and logic, to prove that my views defy any stereotype, to respect others’ opinions and to disagree without being disagreeable. Justice Thomas taught me other lessons that made even more lasting impressions. He taught me the importance of standing up for your beliefs, being confident in your ideas and holding true to yourself at all times. By his example, he taught me to act with integrity, to live a moral life and to be thoughtful and deliberate with my words. Detesting the beltway mindset, he also emphasized the value of one’s roots and the significance of not following the crowd. He encour-

aged his clerks to return home to practice law and positively impact their communities. Some of my fondest memories are of the numerous times during clerk conferences that the Justice would tell us stories from his life experiences. Thinking of those stories – which are told in his autobiography, “My Grandfather’s Son” – I draw the encouragement to persevere whenever life gets overwhelming. Remembering the Justice’s booming laugh during our clerk conferences can also lift my spirits. I try to impart these same lessons to the students with whom I interact now that I am a law professor at Saint Louis University School of Law. I only hope that I am half as successful a teacher and mentor as Justice Thomas. * Although KU Law alumnus Steve McAllister clerked for Justice Thomas during the 1991-92 term, he had Supreme Court experience, having served under Justice White the previous two years.

Three times a clerk, professor reaps benefits of days in court

By Mindie Paget

Supreme Court Archives

D

avid Stras still has the autograph he snagged from Clarence Thomas when the Supreme Court justice visited the KU School of Law in 1996. Stras was a first-year student – awed by the opportunity to meet Justice Thomas – with no inkling that their paths might cross again someday. Five years later, Stras found himself talking Nebraska football and NASCAR with Thomas during an interview for a clerkship on the nation’s highest court. “The interview with the law clerks was more intimidating,” said Stras, who earned a dual degree in law and business administration in 1999 and is now an associate professor at the University of Minnesota Law School. “The clerks asked a lot of very substantive questions about constitutional law and statutory interpretation. “The interview with Justice Thomas was really an enjoyable conversation. I think that’s really important for him, to make sure there’s compatibility of personalities.” Thomas must have been impressed, because Stras got the job. He served the Justice during the 2002-2003 term, after clerking for then-Judge J. Michael Luttig of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit. By all accounts, Stras landed at the Court during a huge term. Cases on the docket during his tenure included Gratz and Grutter, the two University of Michigan affirmative action cases; Lawrence v. Texas, addressing state anti-sodomy laws; the Megan’s Law cases, regarding sex offender registration; Lockyer v. Andrade and Ewing v. California, upholding California’s three strikes law; and Eldred v. Ashcroft, affirming a 20-year extension of copyright protection. “It was very exciting and very interesting,” Stras said. “It’s a very humbling experience to be working on some of the most important cases before the country.” Despite the caliber of matters before the Court and their competing views on the issues, Stras and his fellow clerks maintained a collegial relationship. Thomas respected their opinions, Stras said, and always met with his clerks before and after oral arguments to hear their thoughts on the case. Much of Stras’ scholarly work focuses on the Supreme Court, including research on its dwindling docket and the influence of law clerks on justices. Much has been made of the latter question, but Stras has found no evidence that clerks exert inappropriate sway.

Justice Clarence Thomas and David Stras, L’99 As a reward for their hard work, Justice Thomas takes his clerks on a trip in his 40-foot motor home at the end of each term. Civil War sites are the usual destination; Stras went to Gettysburg. He has maintained a friendship with Thomas over the years. People frequently ask Stras what the Justice is like. “You meet him on the street and you think he’s an ordinary person,” Stras said. “He’s very approachable, very warm. And he’s got a booming belly laugh that’s very funny. It was always our goal to make Justice Thomas laugh, because his laugh would make you laugh.” Although no one can count on a Supreme Court clerkship – “It’s like being struck by lightning,” Stras said – he recommends that students pursue clerkships at all levels of the federal judiciary. “I think you can learn an awful lot about the practice of law, making good arguments, writing good briefs – all of those elements – by doing a clerkship at some level,” said Stras, who also clerked for the Hon. Melvin Brunetti of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 11

green hall news

New center to promote excellence in legal advocacy The KU School of Law and the law firm of Shook, Hardy & Bacon have created an academic center aimed at connecting experienced trial lawyers with the students who will follow in their footsteps. KU Law Professor

The Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy will capitalize on its namesake’s distinguished history in litigation to cultivate a new generation of trial lawyers. The firm hosted a private reception on June 10 to launch the center.

Dennis Prater, left, and Stan Davis, a partner at Shook, Hardy & Bacon, will serve as co-directors of the Shook, Hardy & Bacon

Apart from its core mission — to enhance the learning experience of students who aspire to be trial lawyers — the center will also create opportunities for mentorship between experienced litigators and law students, provide a forum for practicing trial lawyers to share information with one another and create outlets to educate the public about the role of litigation in a democratic society. In that spirit, the center will invite distinguished trial lawyers to campus to give

Center for Excellence in Advocacy.

public lectures and serve as practitionersin-residence, create environments in which law school faculty and legal practitioners can provide trial skills training to students and host a Judges’ Forum that draws sitting members of the judiciary to campus. The center will be led by co-directors Dennis Prater, Connell Teaching Professor of Law at KU, and Stan Davis, a partner at

the firm’s Kansas City, Mo., office and a former KU Law professor. The law school and the firm are planning an inaugural lecture; the Hon. Robert H. Henry, chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, will speak at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 29 at the Dole Institute of Politics. Henry has served on the court since 1994. Prior to that he was dean and professor of law at Oklahoma City University School of Law.

law school Book Exchange closes after seven decades It’s the final chapter for a KU law school institution. After some 70 years in operation, the Law School Book Exchange closed in April. Tamara Dutton, who managed the store for 30 years, retired in May. Dutton’s pending retirement and increasing competition from online bookstores led to the decision to close up shop. The KU Bookstores have taken over retail textbook services for the law school. “We are extremely grateful to Tamara and her leadership over these many years, and we wish her all the best,” said Crystal Mai, associate dean for administration. Dutton began working at the Book Exchange as

12 KU LAW MAGAZINE

change has been around since 1939, although alumni from that era have said it existed as a student-run operation before that.

Tamara Dutton, former Book Exchange manager

assistant manager in August of 1978, shortly after the law school moved into its home at the new Green Hall, which had been completed the year before. She took over as manager in late December. The oldest record she can find indicates the Book Ex-

Always a nonprofit entity, the store incorporated as a 501(c)(3) organization in 1982. In addition to books, the store sold study aids, course packets and office supplies. It also employed student workers and stayed open from about 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on weekdays. Although she doesn’t have any definitive plans for retirement, Dutton is looking forward to traveling with her husband and seeing what life turns up. “This is a new era for me, and I don’t want to eliminate possibilities by making plans,” she said.

news briefs

Green Hall classrooms get facelift The Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP Lecture Hall at the University of Kansas School of Law got a facelift this summer.

Justice Fred Six, L’56, and the Hon. Jan Karlin, L’80

Alumni ‘Return to Green’ for spring 2008 CLE About 120 KU Law alumni learned about a variety of issues they might encounter as practicing attorneys during the inaugural spring CLE, “A Return to Green.” The program, on April 4 at Green Hall, included the following presentations: n “What’s new in Bankruptcy Court since BAPCPA: For Those Who Do Not Have the Good Fortune to Spend Much Time There!” by the Hon. Janice Karlin, L’80, U.S. bankruptcy judge for the District of Kansas. n “Recent Kansas and Missouri Decisions” by Justice Carol Beier, L’85, Kansas Supreme Court; and the Hon. Thomas Clark, L’64, circuit court judge, Missouri.

Thanks to generous support from the law firm, the first-floor classroom and venue for public lectures underwent a complete cosmetic transformation: new paint, new carpet, new blinds, new desktops, new chairs, new whiteboard. Windows were even installed in the previously solid doors to allow visual access. “Because of the generosity of the firm, we were able to improve the learning environment for students and the public,” said Crystal Mai, associate dean for administration, who oversaw the renovation project. “Securing funds for classroom renovations and other building projects isn’t always easy, but we couldn’t exist without the building, classrooms and infrastructure. We’re grateful to the firm for its support.” The desks and chairs were original to Green Hall, which opened to students in

1977. They had worn well, but worn they were – and dated, too. The carpet, paint and blinds had last been updated a decade ago as part of a legislative appropriation for “crumbling classrooms.” Colors and materials in the renovated lecture hall (Room 104) were chosen with a richer palette in mind. Off-white desktops with wooden trim were replaced with solid surface desktops in Sonora Granite. The walls got a fresh coat of Kilim Beige paint, and the wall panels were reupholstered in Bleu Papier. New black armless chairs with flexible back supports rest on Bigelow carpet in Cool Gray. The school made similar upgrades to Room 107, another classroom. The library, two classrooms and a conference room have been named after firms or alumni who have donated funds that allow the school to upgrade the rooms and support other law school activities. Naming opportunities are still available.

n “Immigration – The Civil Rights Issue of the Decade” by Angela Ferguson, L’86, partner, Austin & Ferguson, Kansas City, Mo. n “Special Responsibility for the Quality of Justice” by David Gottlieb, professor of law, University of Kansas School of Law. n “The Best of Ethics for Good” by the Hon. Steve Leben, L’82, Kansas Court of Appeals judge; Stan Davis, L’82, partner, Shook, Hardy & Bacon, Kansas City, Mo.; and Mark Hinderks, L’82, partner, Stinson Morrison Hecker, Kansas City, Mo. The second annual “Return to Green” CLE is tentatively scheduled for April 3, 2009.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 13

green hall news

Damage control KU Law students create bench book to help prepare Kansas judges for public health emergencies Pandemic flu. Catastrophic tornados. Mass terrorist attacks. They’re scenarios we’d rather not contemplate, but they’re all potential public health emergencies with specialized legal ramifications. In Kansas, however, there hasn’t been a go-to guide for the judges and public health officials who might be called upon to sort out the details amid the chaos. That’s changing, thanks to Professor Elizabeth Weeks Leonard and the students in her spring 2008 Public Health Law seminar. Leonard and her research assistant, third-year law student Neal Johnson, are putting the final touches on the Kansas Public Health Bench Book, an “elbow guide” for Kansas judges that summarizes the laws that might arise in these situations. Leonard’s students researched, wrote and edited the book at the request of the Kansas Office of Judicial Administration and the Kansas Public Health Association. “Previously, there was not much information available for judges in this area,” said Doug Cruce, court security analyst at the Office of Judicial Administration. “There have been some localized CLE programs done

14 KU LAW MAGAZINE

By Mindie Paget

around the state, but we are not sure many of our judges attended. So unless our judges picked up some education on their own at a conference or otherwise, there has not been much out there for them.” The students worked in teams, focusing on substantive and due process orders, public health authority, executive power and responsibility, and judicial administration. They found the research challenging because of a lack of relevant case law and documented procedures in the area. When they couldn’t find information, the students pointed out the gaps and made recommendations. “I certainly hope that the bench book will contribute significantly to clear and efficient resolution of cases,” said Austin Murrey, a thirdyear law student who worked on the book. “It’s certainly gratifying to get to work on a project that will make such a contribution to the work of the Kansas courts.” In addition to Leonard, representatives of the Office of Judicial Administration, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, the Adjutant General’s Office – even a few judges – reviewed the students’ drafts as they worked on the book. “So they had to not only

write for their professor, but for people who are out in practice and in government,” Leonard said. “It raises the stakes a little. Hopefully they would do the same product regardless, but I think that makes it a very real experience.” Megan Chapman, who graduated in May, was part of a group that examined the structures and interactions of KDHE and local health departments. It’s important, she said, for the courts to be familiar with the powers of local health departments and the resources they offer. “I think right now so much is happening at the local level that’s not standardized,” Chapman said. “I think it would help the public as well as the people administering the programs if there were more mandates, more regulations and more guides.” The bench book project advances the broader mission of the University of Kansas to provide service to the state. “The reason this is such an excellent example of service learning is because not only are the students getting practical experience in what they’re going to be doing with their discipline and seeing how what they’re studying fits into the broader context, but also the community is benefiting from what the students are doing as they’re learning,” said Amanda Schwegler, assistant director of the KU Center for Service Learning. “So it’s a reciprocal relationship, and that’s really the crux of what we try and establish in a service learning situation.” Cruce said working with the students had been a good experience. His office will take a look at the final draft of the bench book and determine whether more work needs to be done.

Back row, from left, Professor Elizabeth Weeks Leonard, Serena Hawkins, BJ Craig, David Nekunazarazad, Michael Crabb, David Warner; middle row, from left, Austin Murrey, Megan Chapman, Ellen Jensby; front row, from left, Mark Heling, Jessica Madrid

When the guide is complete, it will become an invaluable resource for judges confronted with public health emergencies small or large. The students are already reaping the rewards of their work. “Obviously, through the course of the research we picked up some substantive knowledge about health law,” Murrey said. “But the participation in research on real topics and the production of a real legal work product is, I think, the main value of this class.”

3D rendering of flu virus

KU LAW MAGAZINE 15

green hall news

Elder law attorneys serving a

booming population Client: I have some concerns about my 74-yearold mother. She is a widow and has lived by herself for several years. She gets around pretty well, but I worry about her falling and not being able to call for help. She won’t talk about moving out of her house. As far as I can tell she is in reasonably good health, but I am afraid she is skipping meals and I know that she sometimes forgets to change her clothes and brush her hair. I’m not all that familiar with the measures she has taken for financial planning or health care. I try to visit once a week, but I wonder if there is more I can do to help plan for the future. What advice can you give me?

To illustrate the concerns of the growing elderly population and their families as they might pertain to interactions with attorneys who specialize in elder law, we invented a hypothetical client and asked Professor Sandra Craig McKenzie to respond to the client’s questions. McKenzie

McKenzie: First, let me say that you are not alone in this situation. Thanks in part to advances in science and health care, Americans have seen a dramatic increase in longevity. Life expectancy for Americans went up from 47 years for those born in 1900, to 68 in 1950, and 77 for those born in 2000. Longevity is also its own reward. Americans reaching age 65 in 2000 could expect to live another 18 years; those reaching 75 could expect to reach age 86. One important resource for you and your mother would be an attorney who specializes in elder law. This is a relatively new area of specialty for lawyers. Client: Why is elder law such a new area of specialization for lawyers? How quickly is it growing and why?

directs the school’s Elder Law Program. The discussion is not intended as legal advice. However, it might be a starting point for conversations many will have about their parents or themselves – whether they practice elder law or not.

16 KU LAW MAGAZINE

McKenzie: Elder Law has emerged as a specialty in response to the growth in the elderly population. The most prominent organization for elder law specialists, the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, was founded in 1987. The need for elder law specialists will certainly grow as the estimated 78 million Americans

born between 1945 and 1964, the baby boomers, reach retirement age. When this group begins to retire, the country will experience an increased demand for health care and other services – and a dwindling workforce to support those services. Client: How might an elder law practitioner help my mother? McKenzie: Your inquiry raises a number of issues to consider – with both legal and nonlegal aspects. “Aging in place” is a concept illustrated by your mother’s desire to remain in her home. Staying in familiar surroundings is the preference of many seniors, and research supports that it contributes to well-being. You may want to look into assistance with meals or housekeeping. Modifications to the physical structure of her house, such as grab bars, ramps and lighting can make it easier for her to remain. Check with her doctor to identify treatable conditions affecting balance, hearing, etc. Client: How can I find all of these services? McKenzie: Finding and implementing the community services necessary to make aging in place a realistic possibility can be a frustrating experience. In most communities, there is no single source for transportation, meals, nursing care and other services. The fragmented delivery system is complicated further by limited availability of some services and varying eligibility requirements. Specialists, called Geriatric Care Managers, can be helpful with these choices. Client: Aging in place sounds good, but what if it doesn’t work out for my mother? McKenzie: At some point, declining physical capacity or more serious health issues may require decisions about other living arrangements and care for your mother. Health care issues require an experienced elder law attorney to navigate the waters of Medicare, Medicaid and private health insurance. Medicare is a federal program that provides some hospital coverage, supplemental coverage for physician office visits, and prescrip-

Class of 1987 alumna earns school’s second LL.M. in Elder Law

T

he U.S. population has aged a lot since Betsy Tedrow got her law degree from the University of Kansas in 1987. Couple that demographic shift with Tedrow’s own experience helping her mother navigate the legal issues that arise with getting older, and you learn why Tedrow came back to law school in 2005. “I got interested in elder law by seeing how much of a struggle it was for older people to deal with the system. It was kind of a maze,” said Tedrow, who finished her LL.M. in Elder Law at KU last spring. “My hope was to help older people navigate that maze.” Since 1995, KU Law has been a leader in offering course work and a clinical experience for law students interested in elder law. The school offers a Certificate in Elder Law; 23 students have earned the certificate since 2003. In 2005, KU became the first law school in the country to offer an LL.M. in Elder Law. Tedrow is the second student to graduate from the program. The first was Lauren Marinaro, L’04, who now practices at Fink Rosner ErshowLevenberg in Clark, N.J. A third student, Steven Anderson, first graduated from KU Law in 1981 and has returned to Green Hall to pursue an LL.M. In addition to coursework that covers topics such as public benefits, the private pension system, property management, health care decision making, guardianship and

Betsy Tedrow, L’87 protection, end-of-life issues, wills and estates, and long-term care, students in the LL.M. program produce a thesis on an elder law topic. Tedrow focused her thesis on approaches to end-of-life planning by minority cultures. She did her required elder law externship with Stacey Janssen, L’88, who has an elder law practice in Overland Park. Having worked as a bank examiner at the Federal Reserve Bank in Kansas City for 17 years, Tedrow was familiar with many of the financial-planning tools available to elder lawyers and their clients. “But the direct exposure to clients was new,” she said of her externship experience. “I really did enjoy working with that population because they’re so grateful for the help that you can give them.” Tedrow is now senior vice president at Country Club Bank

KU LAW MAGAZINE 17

green hall news tion drug coverage for seniors. Medicaid is a joint program of the federal and state governments which provides benefits to low-income children and other lowincome individuals who are disabled or elderly. There are other long-range planning issues to address as well. One of the most difficult is a decline in mental capacity – the ability to make competent decisions. This does not mean that the individual always makes good decisions, just that she is capable of doing so. This can be an especially difficult situation for those involved. Client: What are the most common legal tools to assist with decision making in the elder population? McKenzie: There are a variety of tools you might want to consider, and an elder law attorney could help you with any of them. The elder law attorney can also advise you about the advantages and disadvantages of each option. Note that these tools are available to individuals other than seniors and may be appropriate in situations other than those discussed here. Tools for decision making and financial management include: Conservator: A person appointed by the court who is responsible for managing the estate and financial affairs of an incapacitated person. Guardian: A person appointed by the

court who makes personal decisions for an incapacitated individual. Durable power of attorney: A power of attorney is a document in which you appoint someone to manage your finances or make other decisions regarding your property. A durable power of attorney is one that is effective if you become incapacitated. The DPOA can serve as an alternative to the appointment of a guardian and/or conservator. Designated Payee: An individual or McKenzie organization appointed by the Social Security Administration to receive Social Security and/or Supplemental Security Income payments for someone who cannot manage his or her money. Tools specifically designed for health care decisions: Health care power of attorney: A document in which you appoint someone to be your health care agent to make any necessary health care decisions for you and to see that doctors and other health care providers give you the type of care you wish to receive. This is also typically a durable power. Living will: A written statement that details the type of care you want (or don’t want) if you become incapacitated. Living wills are based on the legal right to refuse treatment, and gained acceptance prior to the development of the comprehensive Health

and Trust Co. in Prairie Village, Kan., where she handles trust administration, working directly with clients and compliance issues. “So I’m still drawing on my bank regulation compliance background, but I’m getting to have that human contact in helping people with estate and retirement planning and trust administration,” she said. “We have all kinds of trusts here ... so I’m really getting to utilize that Elder Law LL.M. – Mindie Paget in my work now.”

18 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Care Power of Attorney. Tools for planning the disposition of assets: Estate plan: Documents in which you designate how you wish for your estate – real estate, bank accounts, stocks and other securities, and personal property – to be dealt with and distributed at your death. Wills and trusts are typically part of an estate plan. Client: Do the complexities of elder law cases call for an approach by attorneys that exceeds purely analyzing and advising on legal issues? McKenzie: Yes. Legal issues are often inseparable from the individual’s physical and mental condition, health issues and social setting. It may take a combination of professionals to assess what approach will be most effective. At the same time, the elder lawyer must be sensitive to the effects on the client, who may find dealing with multiple providers to be confusing. – Professor Sandra Craig McKenzie has been on the KU Law faculty for 30 years. She finds teaching elder law to be a wonderful experience that draws on her expertise in property, tax, estate planning, local government and alternative dispute resolution. As director of the Elder Law Program, she oversees both the Elder Law Certificate and the Elder Law LL.M. programs. She acknowledges a degree of personal interest in the subject based on her status as a member of the baby boom generation.

Support for elder law Several donors have specified support for the school’s Elder Law Program. Gifts from Donald W. Giffin, L’53, and Esther Brown Giffin, as well as Max and Mary Brown, established the Paul H. and Daisy E. Brown Elder Law Fund. A general Elder Law Program fund was established through gifts from several sources, including the Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Foundation and Mrs. Mary Kathleen Connell.

2007-08 Student Awards & Prizes Order of the Coif Francis Baalmann Joseph Bant Adam Davis Samia Khan Zachary Lerner Maren Ludwig Sarah Lynn Jessica Morgan Mark Newcomer Jessica Pownell Nicole Proulx Stephanie Sowers Jonathon Szumny Brad Vining Cheri Whiteside Benjamin Zimmerman Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award Stephanie Sowers Justice Lloyd Kagey Leadership Award Justin Elkouri Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership, and Service Award Adam Davis C.C. Stewart Award in Law Adam Davis Zachary Lerner ABA/BNA Award for Excellence in the Study of Labor and Employment Law Christy Marlett Nicole Proulx Robert F. Bennett Student Award Sara Zafar

William L. Burdick Prize Christopher Grenz Mary Anne Chambers Service Award Sara Stieben George Gary Duncan Scholastic Improvement Prize Marcos San Martin Robert E. Edmonds Prize in Corporation and Securities Law John Nolan McWilliams Faculty Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement Jonathan Grossman Zachary Lerner Family Fund Award Clay Britton Robert C. Foulston and George Siefkin Prizes for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy First Place Oralist: Brian Nye Second Place Oralist: Daniel Morris Finalists: Michael Crabb and Lindsey Heinz First Place Brief: Brian Nye and Daniel Morris Second Place Brief: Luke Wohlford and Christina Elmore

Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Tax Procedure Award Francis Baalmann W. Ross Hutton Legal Aid Award Jeremy Mai Brad Vining Jessup International Law Moot Court In-House Competition Awards Best Oral Argument: Michael Lee Runner-up Best Oral Argument: Dani Davey Runner-up Best Oral Argument: Maria Salcedo Best Brief Writer: Michael Lee Best Brief Writer: Maria Salcedo Runner-up Best Brief: Ashlyn Buck Law Class of 1949 Award for Leadership Sara Stieben Media, Law & Policy Intellectual Property Law Prize Justin Hendrix Janean Meigs Memorial Award in Law Ambereen Shaffie James P. Mize Trial Advocacy Award Lindsey Heinz Cullin Hughes

Payne & Jones Awards Summer 2007: Christopher Grenz W. Robert Nelson Fall 2007: Anne Gepford Michael Lee Stephanie Lovett Alison Lungstrum Shane McCall Chadron Patton Erica Schroeder Spring 2008: Christopher Grenz Kyle Hertel Megan Hoffman Rich Klein Andrea Morrow Kendra Oakes Andrew Ricke Erin Weekley Shapiro Award for Best Paper on Law & Public Policy Dennis Golden Sonnenschein Scholars Award Benjamin Miller-Coleman Shane McCall Susman Godfrey Trial Advocacy Award Brian Nye UMB Bank Excellence in Trust Planning Award Michael T. Shelton

Hershberger, Patterson, Jones & Roth Energy Law Award Benjamin Zimmerman

KU LAW MAGAZINE 19

green hall news

20 KU LAW MAGAZINE

qualities through public service. Zafar, Wichita, was president of Women in Law and communications director of the International Law Society. Zafar Stephanie Sowers received the Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award, which honors the graduate whose service to fellow students demonstrates the greatest promise for contribution to the legal profession and society. Sowers, a Rice scholar from Hesston, was a note and comment editor of the Kansas Law Sowers Review and treasurer of Women in Law and the Student Bar Association. She was student director of the Paul E. Wilson Defender Project during her third year of law school. The Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership and Service Award went to Adam Davis, Lawrence. Davis was executive note and comment editor of the Kansas Law Review and participated in the law school’s moot court competition. He was Davis a member of the KU Law Moot Court Council and was active in the Catholic Law Students organization. Davis also volunteered in the tax preparation program.

University PHOTO

T

he University of Kansas School of Law honored graduates at a hooding ceremony May 18. During the ceremony, four students were recognized for distinguishing themselves in the areas of scholarship, leadership and service to the law school and community at large. Sixteen members of the Class of 2008 were selected for induction into the Order of the Coif. The Order of the Coif is an honorary scholastic society that encourages excellence in legal education. The 2008 inductees are: Francis Baalmann, Joseph Bant, Adam Davis, Samia Khan, Zachary Lerner, Maren Ludwig, Sarah Lynn, Jessica Morgan, Mark Newcomer, Jessica Pownell, Nicole Proulx, Stephanie Sowers, Jonathon Szumny, Brad Vining, Cheri Whiteside and Benjamin Zimmerman. Justin Elkouri, Wichita, received the Justice Lloyd Kagey Leadership Award, which honors the graduate who has most distinguished him or herself through leadership within the law school. Elkouri was editor-in-chief of the Kansas Journal Elkouri of Law and Public Policy and participated in the school’s Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. The Robert F. Bennett Award went to Sara Zafar, a founding member of the Multicultural Student Leadership Council and the Muslim Law Students Association. The award is given to a graduate whose undergraduate degree is from a Kansas university or college and who has demonstrated leadership

University PHOTO

Outstanding 2008 grads honored for scholarship, leadership, service

Left: Law school graduate Sarah Lynn shares a smile with fellow members of the Class of 2008 during the hooding ceremony on May 18 at the Lied Center. Bottom left: David Elkouri, L’78, addresses graduates on behalf of the alumni. Bottom middle: Grant Hash,Thomas Maltese and Megan Salyers

University Relations

University PHOTO

Below: Graduate Adam Davis carries the law banner during the university’s commencement ceremony.

Graduation2008 KU LAW MAGAZINE 21

16%

green hall news

21%

63%

Person most admire Parent(s) Other family member Other

Getting to know the KU Law Class of 2011

P

oets, champion debaters, rugby players, volunteers, teachers, recent immigrants and members of the military are among the students in the KU Law Class of 2011. One hundred thirteen anxious first-year students arrived at Green Hall on a warm day in late August, joining 49 classmates who started their studies in May. In total, the incoming class numbers 162 students from 19 states and eight foreign countries – roughly 41 percent women, 59 percent men. Twenty percent are ethnic minorities. There is more demographic data about the class on the law school’s Web site. What those numbers don’t fully reveal, though, is the incredible diversity of viewpoints and life experiences these students bring to the law school. We conducted an informal survey of the incoming class and mined their applications to add some personality to the raw data. Nearly two-thirds of the students responded to the online poll. Not surprisingly, the class members

Path to law school Directly from undergrad Out 1-2 years Out 3-5 years Out 5+ years Out 10+ years

53%

20% 11%

11%

5%

are a multitalented and accomplished bunch. They draw, sing and make music 48%teach others to do the same. They – and write and publish poetry. They Areas of report law most 28% interested in the news. They lift weights and play Business all manner of sports. One even studied 4% Criminal Japanese sword and staff fighting for Elder 16% four years under the tutelage of a Taoist Environmental International sensei. 34% They juggle, perform Media magic, dance Other in powwows, chase storms andPolicy imperPublic 17% Tax and Elmo. sonate Yoda, Austin Powers Tribalto feel re% 30student One touts the ability juvenated after a 15-minute power nap, 29% a skill that undoubtedly will serve him well during law school. Numbers don’t add up to 100% 11% because respondents were allowed Forty-seven percent of the students to make multiple selections. 5%

surveyed own pets – mostly dogs and cats but also a bunny, a turtle and a rat. Class members claim proficiency in 15 languages, including Italian, Mandarin Chinese, Spanish, French, Arabic, Gujurati, Swedish, Serbian, Japanese and Urdu. More than a quarter of the students surveyed had studied abroad in places such as Italy, Saudi Arabia, Chile, Nigeria, China, India, Mexico, Argentina and Ghana. They most admire their parents or another family member. Other heroes cited include Nelson Mandela, Andre Agassi, Stanley Kubrick, Indira Gandhi, Tiger Woods, Jesus Christ and Bill Watterson, the creator of Calvin and Hobbs. Seventy-five percent of those surveyed say they volunteer. They build houses for Habitat for Humanity and wheelchair ramps for disabled individuals. They ring bells for the Salvation Army and deliver Meals on Wheels. They serve with Genocide Watch and the International Justice Mission. They also serve in the military and AmeriCorps.

Graphic by Mindie Paget

Student with musical roots branches out Natasha Kwapich brought music to the ears of children who had never heard it. Kwapich started a classroom music program at St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf, a Lenexa school that prepares recent recipients of cochlear implants for the transition from a deaf education to a mainstream hearing program in public schools. “It was fascinating,” Kwapich said. “Basic concepts such as ‘high and low’ or ‘loud and soft’ were suddenly new and exciting. By the end of our first year, the students could read basic notes and play simple tunes with handbells.” For a final project, each student “composed” two measures of music. Kwapich

22 KU LAW MAGAZINE

assembled the pages into one masterpiece for the class to play. “It was a wonderful experience,” she said. Kwapich, who plays the violin and teaches private strings lessons at her Olathe home, started her undergraduate career at the University of Missouri-Kansas City as a music composition major but changed course at the last minute and earned a liberal arts degree. Her new path led her to take courses on the Supreme Court and constitutional law. She was hooked. If she can’t land her dream job – FBI agent – then she hopes to work in the public interest sector, possibly with immigration, child advocacy or education.

Fire survivor determined to achieve success

A modern Thoreau with mortuary experience It’s safe to say Damien Baranski took the road less traveled on his way to KU Law. While completing a horticulture degree at Kaw Area Technical School, he moved into a 14-square-foot stucco hut near the Kansas River outside of Topeka. He lived for a year in one room with no kitchen, preparing food with a hot plate and microwave and sleeping on a mattress on the floor. He had a stereo and chair, but no TV or air conditioning. “One time it got so hot in the hut that some long, tapered candles on my wall started to melt,” Baranski said. At the end of the Thoreau-like adventure, Baranski was more than ready to go to college. But his path didn’t get any more ordinary. For two years he lived in the basement of the Lawrence mortuary where he worked. Baranski cleaned, helped with visitations and funerals and did after-hours pick-ups of the deceased. “Sometimes I assisted the funeral director in preparing the body,” he said. Not one to shy away from challenging experiences, Baranski admits that his first semester of law school was pretty intense. To relax, he spends time with his wife, watches movies, plays pool and cooks. He would like to get into jury consulting when he graduates and eventually open his own restaurant near the ocean.

Yan Liu was studying in the apartment she shared with her younger brother on an October 2005 morning when a raging fire quickly engulfed the building. They managed to escape, climbing to the ground from a bedroom window. Not everyone was so fortunate. The fire claimed three lives and destroyed 76 units. But even in her hurry to evacuate, Liu grabbed her backpack, wallet and a blanket. She made it to class at the University of Kansas the next day, never allowing the tragedy to interrupt her studies. “I think you can always discover something good in life even when you are in a terrible situation,” Liu said. “I was lucky. There was a lot of help available for me afterwards.” Last spring, Liu, a native of Fujian, China, became the first recipient of the Nicole Bingham Memorial Scholarship, created by the mother of a KU student who died in the fire. Liu graduated from KU in May with a bachelor’s in history. As long as she’s been a full-time college student, she has been raising her brother and holding down a job. She is interested in international intellectual property law and hopes to help fund her brother’s college education.

A hometown voice for the legal stage Lawrence Henderson may be from Kansas, but he could fool you when he talks. The former theater major can speak in several accents, including Scottish, Cockney, Russian, Irish and Deep South. He picked up the skill from KU theater professor Paul Meier. “I only keep one or two accents in a condition that I would call acceptable, but I keep Professor Meier’s book on accents in my library in case I should need one for a voice-over or other purpose,” said Henderson, of Leavenworth. Growing up, Henderson participated in wrestling, football, track, forensics, and instrumental and vocal music. After graduating from KU, he worked as a professional actor at the Creede Repertory Theatre in Colorado. When he realized his heart wasn’t in the business, he returned to Kansas to follow in his mother’s footsteps; she graduated from KU Law in the 1980s and now practices in Leavenworth. Henderson enjoys watching KU sports and hanging out with his fiancée and their miniature Australian shepherd, Sasha Kaun. He intends to put his law degree to use close to home. “I’d like to go back to Leavenworth and work alongside my mother,” he said, “and give back to the community that helped to shape me.”

KU LAW MAGAZINE 23

green hall news school opened its doors in 1878. Their books and articles cover diverse international and comparative law topics and were published in many different venues. Some publications are in a foreign language. Copies of the publications are now on permanent display on the fourth floor of Green Hall. Among the faculty represented are William Livesey Burdick, William Edward Higgins, Dan Hopson, Walker Miller and Ira Robbins.

International students participated in KU Law’s first Overseas Student Orientation in August.

New orientation prepares overseas law students Professor Raj Bhala offered tips to international students for navigating a KU Law education during the school’s first Overseas Student Orientation. The Aug. 25 session was mandatory for all new students in the school’s Two-Year J.D. for Foreign-Trained Lawyers Program and Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) Program and strongly recommended for current students in those programs. Overseas Visiting Scholars were also encouraged to attend. Bhala suggested five dos and five don’ts to help international students acclimate to the legal and educational culture in the United States. For example, he recommended that the students join a study group with American students and bring their country into the classroom, teaching fellow students how a legal problem might be examined and decided in their country. Conversely, he urged the students not to pass when called upon in class and not to be intimidated by their teachers and classmates.

24 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Fourteen students are enrolled in the school’s Two-Year J.D. Program, and seven are pursuing an S.J.D. The Two-Year J.D. Program allows students who hold law degrees from accredited foreign law schools to obtain a U.S. law degree in two years. The S.J.D. Program is designed for academics who already have an advanced law degree and wish to pursue in-depth legal scholarship. Many of the program’s participants are international scholars.

“The bottom line from this list seems to be that the ICL tradition at KU Law is long and deep – in a word, grand,” said Raj Bhala, the Raymond F. Rice Distinguished Professor of Law. “The law school appears to have been a ‘Powerhouse on the Prairie’ in ICL for a century.”

9/11 Forum examines U.S. defense policies The school’s annual 9/11 Forum explored the international defense and terrorism policies of Sens. John McCain and Barack Obama, who were candidates for president at the time.

International scholarship boasts rich history at KU

The event, which took place on the seventh anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, was sponsored by the International Law Society and Phi Beta Delta, an international scholar honor society.

The International and Comparative Law Program at KU has expanded rapidly in the past several years. Research conducted by Tammy Steinle, information technology and digital librarian for the Wheat Library, shows that scholarship in the area is deeply rooted in the law school’s history.

Schrodt

Steinle has compiled a list of 10 former KU Law faculty members – who predate current active and emeritus faculty – and their publications. Five of the 10 scholars served before World War II, and two of them began their service about 20 years after the law

Speakers included Philip Schrodt, a KU Indyk professor of political science, and Capt. Lawrence Indyk, a KU Law student and U.S. Army veteran who is serving in Afghanistan.

International Law Briefs Recent KU Law graduate Devin Sikes began a two-year federal clerkship with Barzilay in September. Classmate John Foote is clerking for Judge Gregory Carmen on the same court. Judge Barzilay plans to return to Green Hall on March 31.

Symposium examines human rights issues The Hon. Judith M. Barzilay

International trade judge visits KU law school A judge from the U.S. Court of International Trade encouraged University of Kansas law students to think seriously about global trade issues during a public lecture at the law school in March. “It’s not going to be long before you are the decision-makers,” said Judge Judith M. Barzilay, a Russell native who has served on the court since 1998.

Leading scholars and attorneys in the areas of human rights, immigration and international law spoke at a KU Law symposium on April 11 titled “Lessons Learned, Future Paths: A Human Rights Symposium.” Panelists discussed issues of human rights violations in areas of conflict, the politics of human rights in practice and from a judicial perspective, and the status of individual human rights in domestic immigration cases. The event was co-sponsored by the International Law Society, Public Interest Law Society and Muslim Law Students Association. Panelists included:

n Ali Khan, Washburn University School of Law professor specializing in international law, Islamic law and human rights n Ahmad Amara, global advocacy fellow with the International Human Rights Clinic in Harvard University’s Human Rights Program n Anne Goldstein, human rights education director for the International Association of Women Judges n Lisa Laplante, human rights lawyer, author and co-founder of Praxis Institute for Social Justice n Emily Haverkamp, L’05, immigration lawyer with Mdivani Law Firm in Overland Park n Jonathan Wilmoth, immigration lawyer with McCrummen Immigration Law Group in North Kansas City, Mo. The second annual human rights symposium is scheduled for Feb. 6.

Barzilay spoke during a March 25 forum sponsored by the International Law Society. She also addressed students in Professor Raj Bhala’s Advanced International Trade Law class. Barzilay, who was appointed by President Clinton, has handled cases in the areas of customs law, antidumping and countervailing duties, and trade adjustment assistance for workers who lose their jobs because of trade agreements between the U.S. and foreign countries. During her lecture, titled “The Court of International Trade, Issues and Trends in World Trade, and the Challenges of Globalization,” Barzilay explained the role of the court, shared examples of the types of cases it hears and pointed out gaps between existing law and the quickly evolving realities of international trade.

Anne Goldstein, human rights education director for the International Association of Women Judges speaks during the law school’s human rights symposium on April 11.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 25

faculty news

Raj Bhala, the Raymond F. Rice Distinguished Professor of Law, received a W.T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence, a universitywide award that recognizes outstanding teaching and advising as determined by a sevenmember selection committee. Bhala, who earned his law degree from Harvard University in 1989, has not wasted any time since arriving at KU in 2003. “I cannot remember any faculty member who has so quickly and effectively transformed what we do,” said a colleague in nominating Bhala for a Kemper fellowship. Among programs Bhala has created and implemented at KU are the Certificate in International Trade and Finance and the Two-Year J.D. Program for Foreign-Trained Lawyers, which allows international students with prior law experience to obtain a degree that entitles them to take bar examinations in the United States. Programs such as these have brought to KU Law students from Australia, Brazil, China, Colombia, France, Germany, India, Liberia, Nigeria and Saudi Arabia. As his nominating colleague said, “Perhaps most important is his celebration of the limitless variety of the human condition. If the world is to be a better place, it is students of teachers like Raj Bhala who will make it so.” Shelley Hickman Clark, clinical associate professor, received the Heritage Preservation Award for legal advocacy from the Shawnee County Historical Society. Clark serves as pro Clark bono counsel for

26 KU LAW MAGAZINE

David McKinney/University Relations

Faculty Kudos

A team led by Provost Richard Lariviere, left, surprises KU Law Professor Raj Bhala during class with news that he has received a Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence. the Friends of Bethany Inc., a nonprofit group dedicated to the preservation of Bethany Place, a property listed on the Register of Historic Kansas Places. Professor George Coggins’ casebook “Federal Public Land and Natural Resources Law” was recognized as the dominant authority among natural resources law textbooks for the past 25 years in a University of Colorado Law Review article. The article (Vol. 78, Issue 2, Spring 2007) traces the evolution of natural resources law casebooks and pedagogy over the past half-century. The article authors, Michael Blumm and David Becker, write of Coggins’ book: “More than any of the earlier texts, this casebook presented the rich cultural history of the law of natural resources,

identifying landmark cases of the nineteenth and early twentieth century and establishing a Western canon of public lands and resource law.” They also credit the book, which Coggins co-authored with Charles Wilkinson and (beginning with the third edition) John Leshy, with “placing resource expansion on equal footing with resource consumption.” That groundbreaking approach, write Blumm and Becker, appealed to many law students who study natural resources law with the hope of protecting natural resources. Professor John Head was one of three recipients of the 2008 Michael P. Malone International Leadership Award, granted by the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. The award Head

recognizes individuals with a “career of outstanding contributions that furthers international education of state and land-grant institutions.” Head has taught law in several countries in Europe and Asia and regularly undertakes overseas assignments involving international financial law, international organizations, and international legal training. He coaches the law school’s highly successful international law moot court teams and cosponsors the International Law Society. In addition to the Malone Award, Head also received a Fulbright Distinguished Chair Award to teach and conduct research at the University of Trento in northern Italy. This is Head’s second Fulbright award; he went to China in 1994. Webb Hecker received the 2008 Frederick J. Moreau Award, given annually to a law school faculty member who, in the eyes of law students, has been particularly helpful in advising and counseling students. Hecker teaches Business Hecker Associations and Estates and Trusts. He was the Robert A. Schroeder Teaching Fellow from 1990 to 1993 and received the Immel Award for Teaching Excellence in 1996 and a W.T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence in 2000. Professor Stacy Leeds won a Fletcher Fellowship for work that contributes to improving racial equality in American society and furthers the broad social goals of the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education. She received a $50,000 stipend to produce a book called “Ties

that Bind: Freedmen Citizenship and the Cherokee Nation,” which will provide a comprehensive history of the Cherokee freedmen, the African American slaves held by the Cherokee Nation until the 1860s, and their descendants. While a Leeds justice on the Cherokee Nation Supreme Court, Leeds authored the majority opinion in Allen v. Cherokee Nation, a judicial decision that upheld the tribal citizenship rights of the “freedmen” and is considered a decision parallel to Brown v. Board. Stephen R. McAllister, professor of law, has received a Steeples Service to Kansans Award, which is given to faculty members who provide significant service to the people of Kansas as a purposeful extension of their teaching and research. Previously, the award was McAllister limited to faculty in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This year, faculty members from the entire university were eligible. McAllister has served as dean of the law school and as interim director of the Dole Institute of Politics. He teaches courses in Constitutional Law, Constitutional Litigation and Torts. He is currently the solicitor general of Kansas, and is the first person in that position to represent the state in constitutional cases. The award provides recipients with $1,000 and an additional $1,000 base adjustment to their salaries.

Faculty Notes Gail Agrawal published “Be Careful What You Wish For: Succeeding in the Dean Candidate Pool” in the Seattle University Law Review (Vol. 31, 2008). She gave a joint presentation on Feb. 29 with Professor Elizabeth Weeks Leonard to the University Scholars at the invitation of Professor Steve McAllister and participated in a panel discussion with the Kansas Bar Association’s Health Law Section on March 28 in Lenexa. Agrawal delivered the welcome and introduction for the law school’s first global human rights symposium on April 11, and she chaired the May 5-6 meeting of the Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. Agrawal was initiated into the Lawrence Rotary Club on Feb. 18; she was sponsored by alumnus Pete Curran, L’66. She was also named a Kansas Fellow of the American Bar Foundation. She participated in the Justice Sandra Day O’Connor portrait unveiling on Sept. 12 and attended receptions and dinners associated with the unveiling at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University in Temp, Ariz. Agrawal was one of four of O’Connor’s former law clerks to commission the portrait by artist Michael Shane O’Neal.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 27

faculty news

Raj Bhala received a book publishing contract to write “Understanding Islamic Law.” The book will be published by LexisNexis and is designed for Islamic Law courses taught in English in law schools in the U.S. and around the world. The project will take about two years to complete. Bhala’s article, “Virtues, The Chinese Yuan, and the American Trade Empire,” was published in the Hong Kong Law Journal (Vol. 38, 2008). He presented the article in February in Toronto at Heenan Blaikie, one of Canada’s premier law firms, to an audience that included Canada’s former Minister of Trade. Bhala also presented his research titled “Doha Round Schisms: Numerous, Technical and Deep” at a symposium on the World Trade Organization (WTO) in February at Loyola Law School in Chicago. Along with Professor Steve McAllister, Bhala wrote an amicus brief for the United States Supreme Court in a case involving alleged dumping of enriched uranium by French producer-exporters into the American market. It is rare for the Supreme Court to accept certiorari in an international trade matter. The amicus brief argues that both WTO and American antidumping law apply only to goods, not to services such as uranium enrichment, and that is how it should be. LexisNexis has appointed Bhala to its Law School Publishing Advisory Board for a three-year term commencing Jan. 1, 2009. He received a W.T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence in September. Finally, Bhala completed the 9/11 Patriots’ Run Marathon in Olathe in a time of 3 hours and 44 minutes, and continued on for another 45 minutes for an Ultra Marathon of 30.5 miles – good

28 KU LAW MAGAZINE

for a second-place finish. The event is in remembrance of the victims of the terrorist attacks, and proceeds go to the Salvation Army. Robert Casad published the 2008-2009 supplement to Gard and Casad, “Kansas Code of Civil Procedure Annotated,” 4th edition (3 volumes). Shelley Hickman Clark, pro bono counsel for the Friends of Bethany Inc., a nonprofit group dedicated to the preservation of Bethany Place, a property listed on the Register of Historic Kansas Places, was a recipient of the Heritage Preservation Award for legal advocacy from the Shawnee County Historical Society. Joseph Custer co-authored with Chris Steadham a book titled “Kansas Legal Research” (Carolina Academic Press, 2008). The book is being used as the legal research text for the law school’s first-year students in Lawyering. Custer also wrote a book chapter in “Exploring Initiative and Referendum Law” (Hayworth Press, 2008). Michael Davis taught Comparative Religion & The State in Istanbul this summer. While there, he also spoke on accreditation at the Black Sea Countries Accreditation Association’s annual meeting, and on regulation of American lawyers to the Istanbul Bar Association. Martin Dickinson edited the 2008-2009 edition of “Federal Income Tax Code and Regulations: Selected Sections” (CCH). Christopher Drahozal published the following articles: “Codifying Manifest

Disregard,” 8 Nev. L.J. 234 (2007), as part of a symposium on “Rethinking the Federal Arbitration Act”; “Arbitration Costs and Forum Accessibility: Empirical Research,” 41 Mich. J. L. Ref. 813 (2008), as part of a symposium on “Empirical Studies of Mandatory Arbitration”; and “Busting Arbitration Myths,” 56 U. Kan. L. Rev. 663 (2008), which is the text of his inaugural lecture as the John M. Rounds Distinguished Professor of Law. Drahozal presented a paper on “Franchising, Arbitration, and the Future of the Class Action” at a symposium on franchising law, held March 7 at Moritz College of Law, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. The paper is co-authored with Quentin Wittrock, a partner at Gray Plant Mooty in Minneapolis; it will be published in the Entrepreneurial Business Law Journal at Ohio State. He presented a paper titled “Is There a Flight from Arbitration?” also co-authored with Wittrock, at the Quinnipiac-Yale Dispute Resolution Workshop on Feb. 29, and at the Conference on Empirical Legal Studies, held Sept. 12 at Cornell Law School. Drahozal organized and moderated a panel and made a presentation on “Supreme Court Arbitration Jurisprudence: Future Issues” at the annual meeting of the ABA Dispute Resolution Section in Seattle on April 4. Drahozal is on sabbatical during the 2008-2009 academic year, working on two projects. First, he continues work as an associate reporter for the “Restatement (Third) of the U.S. Law on International Commercial Arbitration.” With Jack Coe, one of his co-associate reporters, Drahozal did a presentation on the “Restatement” at the Friday Forum of the Institute for Transnational Arbitration during its annual meeting on June 20 in Dallas.

Second, Drahozal is co-principal investigator for the Arbitration Task Force of the Searle Civil Justice Institute at Northwestern University School of Law. The task force is in the midst of an empirical research project examining the consumer arbitration caseload of the American Arbitration Association. Drahozal did a presentation on the project during the Civil Justice Institute’s Spring Research Retreat, held on May 19 at Northwestern University School of Law. Finally, Drahozal was named to the editorial board of the World Arbitration and Mediation Review. Jelani Jefferson Exum published “In Whose ‘Best Interests’? – An International and Comparative Assessment of U.S. Rules on Sentencing of Juveniles,” 1 Human Rights & Globalization Law Review 89. Exum co-authored the article with Professor John Head. Robert Glicksman published the following books: n 2008 summer supplement to the 5th edition of his environmental law casebook, “Environmental Protection: Law and Policy” (2d ed., Aspen Publishers). n Release Nos. 1 and 2 to the 2d edition of the treatise “Public Natural Resources Law” (co-authored with Professor George Coggins, published by Thomson-West). n Annual updates to chapters 4, 7 and 9 of the treatise “Daniel R. Mandelker, NEPA Law and Litigation” (Thomson/ West). Law review articles: n “Balancing Mandate and Discretion in the Institutional Design of Federal Climate Change Policy,” 102 N.W. U. L. Rev. Colloquy 196 (2008). n “Nothing Is Real: Protecting the

Regulatory Void through Federal Preemption by Inaction,” 26 Va. Envtl. L.J. 5 (2008). n “Bridging Data Gaps through Modeling and Evaluation of Surrogates: Use of the Best Available Science to Protect Biological Diversity Under the National Forest Management Act,” 83 Ind. L.J. 465 (2008). n “Effectiveness of Government Interventions at Inducing Better Environmental Performance: Does Effectiveness Depend on Facility of Firm Characteristics?” 35 B.C. Envtl. Aff. L. Rev. 479 (2008), with Professor Dietrich Earnhart. n “Coal-Fired Power Plants, Greenhouse Gases, and State Statutory Substantial Endangerment Provisions: Climate Change Comes to Kansas,” 56 U. Kan. L. Rev. 517 (2008). n “A Collective Action Perspective on Ceiling Preemption by Federal Environmental Regulation: The Case of Global Climate Change,” 102 N.W. U. L. Rev. 579 (2008), with Professor Rick Levy. Other publications: n “Cooperative Federalism and Climate Change: Why Federal, State, and Local Governments Must Continue to Partner,” Center for Progressive Reform White Paper (May 29, 2008), with William Andreen, Nina Mendelson, Rena Steinzor and Shana Jones. n On June 30, 2008, Glicksman’s oped, “Conservatives Flip-Flopped on Cap-and-Trade,” was published in The Wichita Eagle. Speaking engagements: n “Coal, Electric Power, and the Environment: Climate Change comes to Kansas,” presentation to the University of Kansas School of Law Environmental Law Society, April 17, 2008. n “The Holcomb Power Plant Imbroglio: Using Statutory Endangerment

Provisions to Combat Climate Change,” presentation to University of Kansas School of Law faculty, April 25, 2008. n “Climate Change Causes, Consequences, and Policies: The Science and the Law,” two-hour presentation at EPA-funded conference on “Climate Change, Myth or Reality,” University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Education, Global and Multicultural Education Center, Kansas City, Mo., June 2, 2008. An article that Glicksman co-authored with George Coggins, “Wilderness in Context,” 76 Den. Univ. L. Rev. 383 (1999), was cited several times in Wyoming v. U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2008 WL 3397503 (D. Wyo. Aug. 12, 2008). In addition, National Parks Conservation Association v. United States Army Corps of Engineers, 2008 WL 3982375 (S.D. Fla. Aug. 22, 2008), cited the Coggins & Glicksman treatise, 1 Public Natural Resources Law § 8:34. Glicksman also participated in a research roundtable on Expansion of Liability Under Public Nuisance at the Searle Center on Law, Regulation, and Economic Growth on April 7-8 at Northwestern University School of Law. David Gottlieb gave a CLE presentation on “The Lawyer’s Obligation as a Public Citizen” at the spring 2008 CLE, “A Return to Green,” sponsored by the KU School of Law on April 4. He spoke on “Conflicts and Contacts for Government Attorneys” on Aug. 21 at the U.S. Bureau of Prisons Attorney Conference. In July, Gottlieb directed the school’s study abroad program in Limerick, Ireland. Katherine Green was program chair for the 50th annual meeting of the Southwest Association of Law Libraries (SWALL) in April. She was elected

KU LAW MAGAZINE 29

faculty news

SWALL president and presented “Hot Topic: Tech Tools and Tips” at the same meeting. Green’s review of the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) annual meeting session, “K-1 CRIV Tools: Useful Resources for Working with Information Vendors,” was published in the September/October 2008 AALL Spectrum, Vol. 13, No. 1. John Head completed three books: n “General Principles of Business and Economic Law, published spring 2008 by Carolina Academic Press, designed for use in law schools and business schools in various countries. n “Losing the Global Development War: A Contemporary Critique of the IMF, the World Bank, and the WTO,” published by Brill/Nijhoff in spring 2008. n “China���s Legal Soul: The Modern Chinese Legal Identity in Historical Context,” completed in July 2008 and now under production at Carolina Academic Press. In addition, Head published three law journal articles: n “Law and Policy in International Financial Institutions: The Changing Role of Law in the IFIs,” 17 Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy 194 (2008). n “In Whose ‘Best Interests’? – An International and Comparative Assessment of U.S. Rules on Sentencing of Juveniles,” 1 Human Rights and Globalization Law Review 89 (2008), co-authored with Professor Jelani Jefferson Exum. n “How Letters of Credit Operate in International Commercial Transactions,” 77 Journal of the Kansas Bar Association 16 (2008). Head also prepared a second edition of his monograph “The Asian Development Bank,” published by Kluwer Law International in its International Ency-

30 KU LAW MAGAZINE

clopaedia of Laws series on Intergovernmental Organizations. Head’s current writing project is a book titled “Great Legal Traditions: Civil Law, Common Law, and Chinese Law in Historical and Operational Perspective.” In March and April, Head served as Paul Hastings Visiting Professor of international law and finance at the University of Hong Kong, where he gave several public lectures, taught in two courses and conducted research. In late March, he visited Renmin (People’s) University of China and Peking University, both in Beijing, where he gave lectures and discussed collaborative publishing projects. Head received the Michael P. Malone award for leadership in international education at an April meeting of NASULGC (National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges) in Portsmouth, N.H. He has been awarded the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Law at the University of Trento for the spring 2009 term. Head continues to chair the Graduate and International Programs Committee, serve on three universitywide committees, and to assist generally with the International and Comparative Law Program. During the spring 2008 term, Head served as the faculty sponsor for Edina Sudzuka, a visiting scholar from Bosnia. Webb Hecker presented “The Model Entity Transaction Act Comes to Kansas (Almost)” in June at the Kansas Bar Association Annual Meeting. Also in June, he conducted a seminar on corporate governance for the board of directors of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas. In September, the Kansas Bar Association Subcommittee to Study the Model

Entity Transaction Act, on which Hecker serves, completed its work and recommended introduction of the Act in the 2009 session of the Kansas Legislature. Mike Kautsch participated in planning and presenting the 21st annual Media and the Law Seminar, “Fourth Estate or Fifth Wheel? Government Curbs on Free Speech,” on April 18 in Kansas City, Mo. He served as moderator for the seminar, which offered seven hours of continuing legal education credit and was attended by approximately 300 media lawyers, educators, students, judges, journalists and members of the public. During the seminar, he conducted a discussion of legal ethics titled “Do Judges Have First Amendment Rights? Judicial Canons as Vehicles to Curtail Speech.” On Feb. 21, he testified before the Kansas Senate Committee on Elections and Local Government concerning a proposed amendment to the Kansas Open Meetings Act. On March 10, he testified before the Kansas Judiciary Committee regarding a proposed shield law that would give journalists a qualified testimonial privilege. His other activities included a copresentation Feb. 7 in Ellsworth, Kan., on Kansas open government laws. The program was sponsored by the Ellsworth County Independent/Reporter newspaper, and the attendees included area public officials. On March 1, he served as a judge for a regional mock trial competition in Olathe. The competition, open to Kansas high school students, was sponsored by the Kansas Bar Association’s Young Lawyers Section Competition and presented by Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP. On March 7 on the Lawrence campus, he led two workshops on Creative

Commons copyright licensing. The workshops were conducted as part of a KU library-sponsored conference titled “Copyright in Academia: Challenges and Opportunities.” During the Kansas Press Association’s annual convention April 11 in Junction City, Kan., Kautsch moderated a panel discussion titled “Online Comments and Blogs: What Does the Law Have to Say?,” about the federal Privacy Protection Act. In cooperation with the Great Bend Tribune newspaper, the Kansas Judicial Branch and others, Kautsch co-presented a media law seminar Aug. 27 in Great Bend. Sessions that he conducted included one called “First and Sixth Amendment: Is the Conflict Necessary?” Pamela Keller did a podcast for Suffolk University Law School titled, “Feedback on Assignments: How to Get It and Make the Best Use of It.” The installment was part of Suffolk’s podcast series on transitioning from first-year law student to summer legal work. Stacy Leeds was a contributing author to Treaties with American Indians: An Encyclopedia of Rights, Conflicts and Sovereignty, Fixico ed. 2007, ABCCLIO, and published the law review article “Defeat or Mixed Blessing: Tribal Sovereignty and the State of Sequoyah, 43 Tulsa L. Rev. 5 (2007). She made the following presentations: n “Current Legislation Affecting Tribes,” 2008 Native Nations Law Symposium, Kickapoo Tribe of Kansas, Aug. 22, 2008. n “Commentary on Federal-Tribal Trust Doctrine and Indigenous Property Rights,” Native Land Law Expert Panel, sponsored by the Indian Law Resource Center at the University of Oklahoma

School of Law, March 1, 2008. n “Too Much Left Undone,” keynote address, Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) Regional Minority Recruitment Event, Tulsa, Okla., Feb. 29, 2008. n National Advisory Committee Roundtable on Creative Civil Remedies, hosted by the United States Department of Justice, Office of Violence Against Women in partnership with the Southwest Center for Law and Policy, Tucson, Ariz., Jan. 15-16, 2008. In August, Leeds ended a two-year term as chair of the ABA Judicial Division’s Tribal Courts Council. She was appointed in January to a four-year term as chief judge of the Prairie Band Potawatomi Tribal Court. Leeds won a Fletcher Fellowship for work that contributes to improving racial equality in American society and furthers the broad social goals of the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Brown v. Board of Education. She received a $50,000 stipend to produce a book called “Ties that Bind: Freedmen Citizenship and the Cherokee Nation,” which will provide a comprehensive history of the Cherokee freedmen, the African American slaves held by the Cherokee Nation until the 1860s, and their descendants. On May 12, 2008, Leeds and her husband Michael Stewart became parents of their first child, Hunter Andrew Stewart. Elizabeth Weeks Leonard published “Cooperative Federalism and Health Care Reform: The Medicare Part D ‘Clawback’ Example,” 1 St. Louis Univ. J. Health Law & Pol’y 79 (2007). She also gave the following presentations: n “Teaching ‘Sicko,’” panel on “What’s Hot in Health Law for Those Who Don’t

Teach it,” Southeastern Association of Law Schools, annual meeting, Palm Beach, Fla., July 28, 2008. n “Cooperative Federalism and Health Care Reform: The Medicare Part D ‘Clawback’ Example,” panel on Federalism and Government Health Care Programs, Health Law Professors Conference, Drexel University School of Law, Philadelphia, June 7, 2008. n “Public Health Legal Preparedness: Preparing a Guide for the Kansas Judiciary,” Joint annual meetings of the Law and Society Association and Canadian Law and Society Association, Montreal, May 31, 2008. n “FDA Drug Approval and Constitutional Rights,” Regional Junior Faculty Workshop, Washington University in Saint Louis Law School, Saint Louis, Mo., April 18, 2008. n “Right to Experimental Treatment: FDA New Drug Approval, Constitutional Rights, and the Public’s Health,” McGeorge Health Law Association, Sacramento, Calif., March 14, 2008. Leonard was a guest lecturer on ERISA Health Plans, on federal regulation of employee benefits plans in a Health Law course taught by Professor Edward D. Spurgeon at the University of the Pacific-McGeorge School of Law, Sacramento, Calif., March 12 and 14, 2008. She was appointed to the inaugural class of the Sunflower Foundation’s Advocacy Fellowship, a year-long program for health policy leaders promoting health care for Kansans, and she is serving a two-year term as vice president of the Health Care Access Clinic, Lawrence’s private, nonprofit safety net clinic. Rick Levy published “A Collective Action Perspective on Ceiling Preemption by Federal Environmental Regulation:

KU LAW MAGAZINE 31

faculty news

The Case of Global Climate Change,” 102 N.W.L. Rev. 579 (2008), with Professor Robert L. Glicksman; and a book chapter, “Constitutional Law, ” 2008 Kansas Annual Survey 93 109. He also received a book contract from Foundation Press for “Administrative Law, Principles, Policies, and Problems,” with Glicksman. Levy made the following presentations: n “The Tie That Binds: Some Thoughts about the Rule of Law, Law and Economics, Collective Action Theory, Reciprocity, and the Heisenberg Principle,” inaugural lecture as J.B. Smith Distinguished Professor of Law, March 2008, forthcoming in the Kansas Law Review. n CLE: “Recent Developments in the Law: Agency Adjudication under KAPA and KJRA,” University of Kansas School of Law, May 2008. n Panelist, “Documentation of Teaching,” University of Kansas Teaching Summit, August 2008. n Panelist, “The Electoral College: Historical, Political and Constitutional Issues,” Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics, September 2008. Levy completed his term as president of the University of Kansas Faculty Senate on May 15, 2008. He continues to serve on the Kansas Judicial Council’s advisory committees on Administrative Procedure and Juvenile Offender/Child in Need of Care. Stephen Mazza taught in the Istanbul study abroad program during the summer of 2009. During his time there, he gave a series of lectures on various U.S. law topics and spoke to groups of Turkish attorneys, judges and government ministers in Trabzon, Giresun and Samsun.

32 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Stephen McAllister became the first KU School of Law professor to teach the University Scholars course for 20 of KU’s outstanding undergraduates. He involved several other KU law professors in the course and took the class to Washington, D.C., for a spring break trip during which they watched a Supreme Court oral argument, met with justices and met lawyers involved in the case they had watched. McAllister gave a CLE presentation on “The First Amendment and Political Campaigns” at the annual meeting of the Kansas City Attorneys Association on June 6 in Lenexa. He was appointed to the NCAA Certification Process Steering Committee in the spring of 2008 and will continue service through fall 2009. He is a member of the Advisory Committee on the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure and finished a six-year term as a trustee of the Supreme Court Historical Society in June. McAllister continues to serve as Solicitor General of Kansas, handling appellate cases for the state in the Kansas Supreme Court, the Tenth Circuit and the Supreme Court of the United States. He won the Steeples Service to Kansans Award, bestowed in May by the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences. Sandra Craig McKenzie gave a onehour CLE presentation on “Helping Elders Manage their Affairs: Lessons from Therapeutic Jurisprudence” to the Women Attorneys Association of Topeka on May 28. She covered guardianship, conservatorship and durable powers of attorney, including the Health Care DPOA. McKenzie continues as the newsletter editor for the Kansas Women Attorneys Association.

Joyce McCray Pearson published a chapter in a book, “The Law School Librarian’s Role as an Educator: Leading Librarians on Adapting to New Technologies, Maximizing Research Skills, and Helping Students Transition from Law School to Law Firm.” The title of her chapter is “The Director and Law School Librarian’s Role as Educator.” McCray was elected president of the KU Black Faculty and Staff Council. She was elected to the Faculty and University senates for a three-year term (20082011). She was also elected to serve a one-year term on the nominations committee of the American Association of Law Libraries. John Peck published “Groundwater Law and Management: The Asia (IWMI)-Kansas Program,” 41 Creighton Law Rev. 315 (2008), co-authored with Burke Griggs; and the Water Law chapter in the “KBA Annual Survey of the Law,” June 2008. He also made the following presentations: n “Challenges Kansas Faces with a Legal and Institutional System Based on Property Rights in Groundwater,” annual meeting of the International Water Management Institute, Hyderabad, India, April 2, 2008. n CLE: “Land Description Errors: Recognition, Avoidance, and Consequences,” University of Kansas School of Law, May 2008. n “Kansas-Nebraska Water Law Review: Prior Appropriation and Interstate Compacts,” Kansas Field Conference, Lovewell Lake, Kansas, sponsored by the Kansas Geological Survey, June 5, 2008. n “Water Issues in Kansas and India,” Lawrence Rotary Club, July 28, 2008.

A paper that Peck co-authored with Burke Griggs and Yunpeng Xue of China, “Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin in Western China and the State of Kansas in the Western U.S.,” was presented by Xue on July 22, 2008, at a conference in Xian, China. Peck attended the annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation as the KU Law School Trustee on July 15-19 in Aspen, Colo. He received the “Quiet Rotarian” award, in recognition of his many years of service writing program notes for the Lawrence Rotary NEWS. Jean Phillips published “The Insanity of the Mens Rea Model: Due Process and the Abolition of the Insanity Defense” last spring in the Pace Law Review. Elinor Schroeder spoke in May at the 25th annual Carl A. Warns Jr. Labor and Employment Law Institute sponsored by the Brandeis School of Law at the University of Louisville. Her topic was “Employment at Will in 2008: What Do We Do Now?” She also published the 2008 supplement to her treatise, “Employment Law” (3d edition). Andrew Torrance published or had the following articles accepted for publication: n “Patents and the Regress of Useful Arts” (2008), Columbia Science and Technology Law Review, with W.M. Tomlinson, accepted for publication. n “Physiological Steps Doctrine” (2009), Berkeley Technology Law Journal, in editorial preparation. n “Open and Proprietary Biological Innovation in Human Genetic Enhancement” (2008), Washington University

Journal of Law and Policy, in editorial preparation (invited). n “Patenting Human Evolution” 56 Kansas Law Review 1075 (2008). n “An Extinction Bar to Patentability,” 20 Georgetown International Environmental Law Review 237 (2008). n “Are the Brookhill-Wilk Patents Impediments to Market Growth in Cybersurgery?” (2008), International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery, with Thomas McLean. n “Metaphysics and Patenting Life,” 76 University of Missouri-Kansas City Law Review 363. Presentations: n “Metaphysics and Patenting Life,” Intellectual Property Scholars Roundtable, Drake University School of Law, Des Moines, Iowa, February. n “An Extinction Bar to Patentability,” Boston College School of Law, Boston, March. n “Protecting and Promoting Biotechnology Innovation” (guest lecture), Life Science Business, University of Kansas School of Business, Lawrence, March. n“Open Source Biology as an Antidote to Proprietary Human Evolution,” Conference on Open-Source and Proprietary Models of Innovation, Washington University School of Law, Saint Louis, Mo., April. n “Mental Steps and Physiological Steps,” Junior Scholars Workshop on Neuroscience and Law, Stanford Law School, Palo Alto, Calif., April. n “Climate Change and the Changing Legal Climate,” University Lecture Series at the Commons, Hall Center, University of Kansas, Lawrence, April. n “Gene Patents and Gene Concepts,” STS and IP Law, co-sponsored by Stanford Law School and Berkeley Law School, Saint Helena, Calif., May.

n “Patents and Disasters,” 2008 Joint Annual Meetings of Law and Society Association and Canadian Law and Society Association, Montreal, May. n “PatentSim™ for Chemical Engineers,” American Institute of Chemical Engineers 2008 Process Development Symposium, The Berkshires, Hancock, Mass., June. n “Patents and Regress in the Useful Arts,” Conference on Innovation and Communications Law, Turku University School of Law, Turku, Finland, July. n “Patents and Regress in the Useful Arts,” Harvard Business School-MIT User and Open Innovation Conference, Harvard Business School, Allston, Mass., August. n Speaker, Midwest Law & Society Conference, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis., September. n Speaker, University of Oregon School of Law, Eugene, Ore., September. Torrance discussed “The Patent Game” during an August interview on Atlanta’s WREK radio program “Inside the Black Box.” He was also interviewed in May by the ABC affiliate in Topeka about defenses to copyright infringement. Suzanne Valdez was appointed by Chancellor Robert Hemenway to serve on the Steering Committee for the third-cycle NCAA athletics certification process. She was also appointed chair of the diversity issues subcommittee for the self-study. In May, Valdez was appointed as a temporary Judge Pro Tem for Douglas County. Stephen Ware was invited to testify to the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Antitrust, Competition and Consumer

KU LAW MAGAZINE 33

faculty news

Faculty blogs explore scholarly interests

S

everal KU Law faculty members supplement their scholarship and teaching with blogs about subjects that interest them most. Among them, Professor Michael Hoeflich might win the prize for quirkiest blog. He started one last spring called “The Legal Antiquarian” (www.thelegalantiquarian.blogspot.com). Its purpose, he explained, is to “foster interest in the material and popular culture of the law, a subject which I have published on over the past decade in various law journals, including a series of articles in The Green Bag and Commonplace.” Hoeflich’s posts have included musings about the history of binding law books, a series of 19th-century French feminist postcards in support of women attorneys and his discovery of a Colorado beer called Collaboration Not Litigation Ale, which he contends should be the official brew of any law school course on alternative dispute resolution. In addition to “The Legal Antiquarian,” Hoeflich maintains the “KUContracts1” blog (http://kucontracts1. blogspot.com) and “The Ethical KS Lawyer” blog (http://theethicalkslawyer.blogspot.com). Both are associated with Hoeflich’s fall courses, and he uses them to provide assignments and commentary for the classes. Other faculty members with blogs include: Andrew Torrance “Biolaw: Law and the Life Sciences” Cofounder and contributor www.biolaw.blogspot.com Elizabeth Weeks Leonard “Ratio Juris: Law, Politics, Philosophy” Contributor http://ratiojuris.blogspot.com Stacy Leeds “Tsalagi Think Tank” Author www.stacyleeds.com A Cherokee-centric blog about tribal law, good native governance and education

34 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Rights and Senate Special Committee on Aging. On June 18, he testified before these committees in opposition to a bill that would amend the Federal Arbitration Act. On the topic of judicial selection, Ware submitted testimony in February to the Kansas Legislature, House Federal and State Affairs Committee, and the Missouri Legislature, House General Laws Committee. He also spoke about judicial selection to the Judge Hugh Means Inn of Court on March 26, and to audiences in Leavenworth and Manhattan on Feb. 27 and 29, respectively. Ware spoke on arbitration law at the Southeastern Association of American Law Schools annual meeting on Aug. 1 in Florida, on April 10 at the Hamline University School of Law in Minnesota, and on April 2 at the University of Washington School of Law. He spoke on “Justice and Dispute Resolution” at the annual meeting of the American Bar Association’s Dispute Resolution Section on April 3 in Seattle. And he published “Selection to the Kansas Supreme Court,” 17 Kan. J. L. & Pub. Pol’y 386 (2008). As of September 2008, Ware had appeared on television and radio several times and in more than 50 newspapers, from the Great Bend Tribune and USA Today to The Washington Post and The Guardian (London). Melanie Wilson published the following article and essays: n “Prosecutors ‘Doing Justice’ Through Osmosis – Reminders to Encourage a Culture of Cooperation,” 45 Am. Crim. L. Rev. 67 (2008). n “Finding a Happy and Ethical Medium Between a Prosecutor Who Believes the Defendant Didn’t Do It and the Boss Who Says That He Did,” 103 Nw. U. L. Rev. Colloquy 65 (Aug. 25, 2008). n “DNA – Intimate Information or Trash for Public Consumption?” Baylor Law Review’s TexSupp (July 24, 2008). n “A Return to the Grand Jury to Promote a Zen Zeal in Prosecutors,” Washington University Law Review’s Slip Opinions (April 2, 2008). Wilson also presented a paper, “The Return of Reasonableness: Saving the Fourth Amendment from the Supreme Court,” as part of a panel on privacy at the Midwest Law and Society Retreat at the University of Wisconsin.

ADJUNCT SPOTLIGHT The Hon. John W. Lungstrum

Judge, U.S. District Court, Kansas

J

udge Lungstrum’s day job keeps strum described himself as a “shameless him pretty busy, hearing all manhomer” while bragging on the students. ner of criminal and civil cases from “It makes such an impression on me across the District of Kansas. Yet 25 when I judge these moot court rounds. years after teaching his first course at The level of advocacy is so often as high KU Law, Lungstrum still sets aside time or higher than people who are doing it to serve as an adjunct faculty member at for handsome compensation,” he said. his legal alma mater. “I just hope that I get to see you all some “I have continued teaching over the day when it’s for real.” years primarily because I enjoy the interaction “I have pride in maintaining a relationship with the students,” with the university I care so much about.” Lungstrum said. “I also consider teaching to be an opportunity for service, both to the In addition to professional service school and to the profession. Moreover, through the years with organizations as a loyal Jayhawk, I have pride in main- such as the Kansas Bar Association and taining a relationship with the university the Kansas Judicial Conference, LungI care so much about.” strum has served the law school on two During the fall semester he taught dean search committees and a commitContracts I, but Lungstrum has also tee dealing with ABA accreditation. The taught Evidence, Trial Advocacy and students keep him engaged in teaching. Civil Procedure. He routinely judges “It is fun to try to help them unmoot court practice rounds and the derstand the concepts and ideas, and finals of the school’s in-house moot court it is stimulating for me to hear and try competition. In the most recent contest, to answer their questions,” Lungstrum Lungstrum sat on a five-judge panel that said. “Additionally, it is nice to meet at included Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. an early stage some of the future generaAt the conclusion of the round, Lungtions of lawyers KU is helping launch.”

at a glance Education J.D., 1970, Kansas B.A., 1967,Yale Courses Contracts Career Associate, Latham & Watkins Los Angeles, 1970-71 Lieutenant, U.S. Army Served 21 months active duty with 13 months in Korea 1971-72 Partner, Stevens, Brand, Lungstrum, Golden & Winter Lawrence, 1972-1991 Lecturer, KU School of Law 1973-1995 Judge, U.S. District Court, District of Kansas Kansas City, Kan., 1991-present Visiting professor from the judiciary, KU Law, 1996-present

KU LAW MAGAZINE 35

alumni news

Trio of alumni receive law school’s

highest honor The University of Kansas School of Law bestowed three of its most accomplished graduates with its 2008 Distinguished Alumni Citations. Sheila Bair, L’78, William Sampson, L’71, and Mikel Stout, L’61, received the awards during a May 2 ceremony at HH Bar & Grill in Lawrence. The citations — the highest honor given by the School of Law — are presented annually to graduates who have distinguished themselves through exemplary service to the legal profession, the community or KU. The school invites nominations for the 2009 Distinguished Alumni Citations. Since 1964, the school has honored 59 alumni “whose lives have benefited the community and whose noteworthy contributions through the years have brought honor to the School of Law.” Please send a statement explaining how your candidate meets the quoted criteria; include career and service history, with any previous honors. Nominations should be sent by e-mail to kulawoutreach@ku.edu or by regular mail to: Office of the Dean University of Kansas School of Law 1535 W. 15th St. Lawrence, KS 66045-7577 The deadline for nominations is Jan. 15, 2009.

36 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Sheila Bair KU degrees: Bachelor’s in philosophy ’75 & Juris Doctor ’78 In June 2006, Sheila Bair became the 19th chair of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Just five months after her appointment, she was named to the Wall Street Journal magazine Smart Money’s “Power 30” list, a lineup of the 30 most influential people in investing. Now she’s leading the federal agency through one of the worst economic crises in U.S. history – and being lauded for it by her colleagues and the media. A native of Independence, Bair began her career working as chief counsel to former U.S. Sen. Robert Dole. Before joining the FDIC, Bair established herself as a national leader in financial policy through various positions, including a stint as senior vice president for government relations at the New York Stock Exchange. She has lent time and expertise to a host of professional and nonprofit organizations, including the Insurance Marketplace Standards Association and Women in Housing and Finance. Her first children’s book, “Rock, Brock, and the Savings Shock,” which encourages children to save money, was published in 2006.

William Sampson

Mikel Stout

KU degrees: Bachelor’s in history ’68 & Juris Doctor ’71

KU degree: Juris Doctor ’61

Sampson, who moved to Kansas in time for high school, was topics editor of the Kansas Law Review and a finalist in the James Barclay Smith Moot Court Competition. Four years of active duty as a Navy judge advocate followed law school, and Sampson returned to Wichita in 1975 to join the trial section of Foulston Siefkin. In 1987, he moved to Shook, Hardy & Bacon, where he remains.

Born and raised in Kansas, Stout earned a bachelor’s in animal husbandry at Kansas State University in 1958. He served as an editor of the Kansas Law Review and was inducted into Order of the Coif. Following graduation, Stout was a captain in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General Corps.

Sampson has been recognized nationally and internationally and is listed in the Best Lawyers in America, Chambers USA: America’s Leading Lawyers for Business and in Who’s Who Legal — The International Who’s Who of Business Lawyers. With his law partner, Bill Hays, he is the author of “Kansas Trial Handbook,” part of Thomson/West’s Kansas Law and Practice Series. He has tried cases in Kansas and in numerous other states and has taught more than 100 continuing legal education programs in this country and abroad. He is a member of the International Association of Defense Counsel and spent years on the trial tactics faculty at the Emory University School of Law.

In 1963, he joined the law firm of Foulston Siefkin in Wichita, where his focus is business litigation. Stout is a past president of the Kansas Association of Defense Counsel, the Wichita Bar Association and the Kansas Bar Association. He was co-chair of the Civil Justice Reform Act Advisory Group for five years. In 1984, he was appointed to the Kansas Commission on Judicial Qualifications, a position he continues to hold. Inducted into the American College of Trial Lawyers in 1984, Stout is the current and 57th president of the group. Stout has been selected for inclusion in the Best Lawyers of America, the Missouri and Kansas Super Lawyers and Chambers USA.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 37

alumni news

Donors recognized for exemplary support of law school

T

Steve Puppe

he law school honored recipients of the James Woods Green Medallion at a dinner on May 2 at HH Bar and Grill in Lawrence. The medallion recognizes those whose cumulative contributions to the school exceed $25,000. Following are this year’s honorees.

Clockwise from top left, Lydia I. Beebe, L’77, and Charles E. Doyle, L’78; Jay Simpson, L’85, on behalf of the Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation; Professor Mike Kautsch and Elaine Kautsch; Stanley N.Woodworth, L’78; The Hon.Theodore B. Ice, L’ 61, and Sue H. Ice

38 KU LAW MAGAZINE

A McPherson native, Lydia Beebe received journalism and law degrees from the University of Kansas. She also holds an M.B.A. from Golden Gate University. Following graduation from law school in 1977, Beebe joined the Chevron legal department. She has since held a variety of legal and government affairs positions, including service as a legislative representative for Chevron in Washington, D.C., a tax lawyer and a senior manager in Chevron’s tax department. Appointed by President Bush, Beebe served on the board of directors of the Presidio Trust from 2003 until 2008. She is past president and board member and current advisory board member of the Professional Business Women of California, and was a member of the San Francisco Municipal Fiscal Advisory Committee to the mayor for more than 10 years. She is a member of the KU Law Alumni Board of Governors. A frequent speaker and panelist on corporate governance topics, Beebe received the “Breakthrough Award” from the Professional Business Women of California in 1996 for her lasting and vital contributions to business and the community. The San Francisco Business Times has named her one of “the most influential businesswomen in the Bay Area” for the last nine years. Charles Doyle received his bachelor’s degree in accounting in 1975 and his law degree in 1978 from the University of Kansas. He worked for United Airlines for more than 20 years, beginning his career

in 1985 managing contracts for the maintenance sales group. He also held subsequent positions managing the engine shop, airframe maintenance, and purchasing. In 2006, he was appointed managing director of sales and service for United Services. Doyle was responsible for commercial and government MRO sales, aircraft sales, parts leasing, and line maintenance sales. With years of expertise in the airline industry, Doyle is now a consultant, advising on aircraft maintenance operations globally. The Hon.Theodore B. Ice received his bachelor’s degree in 1956 and his law degree in 1961 from the University of Kansas. After 25 years in private practice, he was appointed to the bench for the 9th Judicial District of Kansas, where he served for 15 years. Despite his “official” retirement in 2002, Judge Ice remains active in the legal arena. He has continued to serve the Judicial District when needed and he presently serves on the Supreme Court Judicial Qualifications Committee. Judge Ice also has remained active in his community. Named “Newton Citizen of the Year” in 1997, he is on the Board of Trustees for the Presbyterian Manors of Mid-America and is on the Board of Directors for the Newton Medical Center and the Newton Art Association. He is a past president of the Newton Rotary Club, a session elder for the First Presbyterian Church and a volunteer driver for Meals on Wheels. In 2006, Judge Ice received the Lifetime Achievement Award from Newton High School. Mike Kautsch is a professor of law and directs the Media, Law and Policy program that he helped launch in 1997 at the law school. He previously was a professor at KU’s William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Commu-

nications, where he served as dean from 1987 to 1997. He earned a bachelor’s degree, with a certificate in journalism, in 1968 and a juris doctor in 1971 from the University of Iowa. He joined the Iowa bar, but soon moved to Georgia to fulfill an active duty obligation as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army Signal Corps. He remained in Georgia and worked as a journalist until joining the KU journalism faculty in 1979. As a member of the journalism faculty, Kautsch taught communication law. At the law school, he teaches Media Law, Copyright Law and Digital Works, and Torts. He also directs the Media Law Clinic. He is a principal in planning and presenting a national seminar series on media and the law in Kansas City. The seminar, now in its 21st year, is attended by media lawyers from throughout the United States. He also helps plan educational programs sponsored by the Media Bar Committee of the Kansas Bar Association. His research interests include open government law, and he writes and makes presentations to the bar, bench, press and public on topics related to First Amendment freedoms. Kautsch’s wife, Elaine Kautsch, holds academic degrees in speech-language pathology: a bachelor’s from Minnesota State University and a master’s from Georgia State University. She has served as a speech-language pathologist in Iowa and Georgia and, since 1997, in Eudora public schools. Her volunteer activities have included service to church and civic organizations in Lawrence. The primary mission of the Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation is to fund scholarships for low-income and/or minority students for their law school education. Since its creation in 2000, the Foundation has been working diligently toward this mission, with a

goal of increasing diversity in the legal work force. The Foundation’s efforts are funded by contributions from the firm, as well as contributions from individual firm attorneys. In recent years, the Foundation has funded three-year scholarships for students from under-represented groups at several area law schools. Most recently, the Foundation committed to fund the Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Diversity in Law Scholarship at the KU School of Law. As a result, the school has awarded diversity scholarships to four students. To date, the Foundation has funded more than $100,000 in scholarship grants. Jay Simpson, president of the Foundation and a 1985 graduate of the law school, accepted the medallion on behalf of the foundation. Stanley Woodworth received his law degree in 1978 from the University of Kansas. He was a partner with Stinson Mag & Fizzel before joining the ranks of Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus in 1992. Woodworth has more than 29 years of diverse legal experience in the areas of residential real estate development, closely held businesses, partnerships, limited liability companies, franchising and capital formation. He represents clients of all sizes, from sole proprietorships to publicly held companies. Woodworth is listed in Chambers USA: America’s Leading Lawyers, The Best Lawyers in America for Real Estate Law, and both Missouri and Kansas Super Lawyers. A member of the Missouri Bar, Woodworth is also a past president of the KBA’s Corporation, Banking and Business Law Section. He is a current board member as well as a past president for the Kansas City Businessmen’s Club.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 39

Steve Puppe

alumni news

Members of the KU Law Class of 1958 who attended the 50/50+ Reunion in April were, back row from left, Richard Rumsey, Richard Foster, Don Burnett, Roth Gatewood, Robert Wunsch and, seated from left,William Nulton, Gerald Rushfelt, Heywood Davis and Frank Spurney.

Classmates swap memories at 50/50+ reunion

F

ifty years after graduation, members of the KU Law Class of 1958 recalled beloved professors, impossible tests and ornery pastimes during the 50/50+ Reunion on April 19. Nine 1958 graduates reminisced about Dean Frederick Moreau and his contemporaries, tug-of-war with engineering students, admiring girls who walked past the steps of old Green Hall and facing down the dreaded bar exam during a video interview with law school staff. The recording joins a growing collection of past 50-year reunion interviews, offering a personality-laden glance back at the law school’s history

40 KU LAW MAGAZINE

through the memories of its graduates. Joining the 50-year class were alumni representing the classes of 1937, 1944, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956 and 1957. In all, more than 30 alumni, many accompanied by spouses, took part in the event. During the traditional reunion dinner at the Adams Alumni Center, Dean Gail Agrawal addressed the group, noting that the Class of 1958 established the Student Bar Association, put an end to the tug-of-war between the law and engineering students and produced the school’s first Supreme Court clerk, Heywood “Woody” Davis.

Enjoying the reunion dinner are, from left, John Hite, Peter Martin, Alvin Herrington, all L’57, and Ann Martin.

Alumni, students spend day ‘Making a Difference for Lawrence’

J

ournalist Tom Brokaw said, “It’s easy to make a buck. It’s a lot tougher to make a difference.” A group of KU Law alumni and students took that message to heart on a picturesque Saturday in September as they completed service projects during the second annual “KU Law – Making a Difference for Lawrence.” More than 100 volunteers donned blue T-shirts bearing Brokaw’s words and, after some words of encouragement from Dean Gail Agrawal, headed to sites across the community to lend a hand. Armed with work gloves, paint brushes, wrapping paper, cleaning supplies and bingo cards, the volunteers completed the following projects: n Cleaned a half-mile stretch of road between Louisiana Street and Haskell Avenue on 31st Street for the Haskell Ecology Club, which had scheduled canoe rides and tours of the wetlands for the following weekend. n Sorted, inventoried and wrapped dozens of gifts at the Lawrence Arts Center for its Children’s Holiday Shop. n Organized building materials at Habitat Restore. n Helped run a nonprofit soccer tournament. n Painted six bedrooms and closets at The Villages, a nonprofit organization that provides housing to children in need. n Did yard work and other cleaning, cleaned vans and did deep-cleaning at three Community Living Opportunity homes for adults with developmental disabilities. n Helped greet and answer questions at the River City Reading Festival. n Painted and did yard word at East Heights Early Childhood Family Education. n Ran a bingo session with seniors at Pioneer Ridge Retirement Community. n Painted three wooden playground structures with wood preservative at Hilltop Child Development Center. “We had glorious weather, everyone showed up ready and eager to work, and I think we got everything accomplished that we hoped to,” said the Hon. Janice Miller Karlin, L’80, a U.S. bankruptcy judge for the District of Kansas who helped organized the service projects through the Roger Hill Volunteer Center. “I was especially proud of the students, who took a beautiful fall day out of their busy schedules to help others less fortunate than they.” Organizers also conducted a mini-food drive in conjunction with the event, and contributions were distributed to a local food pantry.

By Mindie Paget

Top: At Hilltop Child Development Center, the Hon. Karen Arnold-Burger, a municipal court judge in Overland Park, and the Hon. Janice Miller Karlin, a U.S. bankruptcy judge for the District of Kansas, both alumnae; student James Nelson; Pat Pisani, executive director of the center; and student Josh Williamson Bottom: KU Law students Chris Coleman, Josh Berry and Anna Schall sort trophies during a girl’s soccer tournament sponsored by the Kaw Valley Soccer Association. “While we had big expectations this year, we managed to surpass every one of them,” said Josh Berry, a second-year law student and vice president of the Student Bar Association, which helped organize the event. “The individuals who gave their time and effort deserve a special thank-you because it is events such as this that make our law school community a great place to be.”

KU LAW MAGAZINE 41

alumni news

Alumni Notes

Items were received or collected prior to Oct. 1, 2008. Send your news by e-mail to patti@ku.edu or by the return postcard attached to the back of this issue.

1950s

Stanley Nelson, L’50, received a Kansas Bar Association Outstanding Service Award in June at the KBA annual meeting in Topeka. He is with Hampton & Royce LC in Salina. Robert Pennington, L’50, reports that he is enjoying his 10th year of retirement in Arizona. Justice Fred N. Six, L’56, received the Kansas Bar Association Phil Lewis Medal of Distinction in June at the KBA annual meeting in Topeka. Gary W. Davis, L’57, who practices in the Oklahoma City office of Crowe & Dunlevy, was recently honored as a leader in his practice area by Chambers & Partners, an international legal publisher. Davis practices in the area of litigation: general commercial. His selection was based on interviews conducted with more than 14,000 attorneys and clients throughout the United States to identify and rank the nation’s leading business lawyers. The rankings are based on factors such as technical legal ability, professional conduct, client service, commercial awareness/astuteness, diligence, commitment and other qualities most valued by clients.

Willard B. Thompson, L’58, received a Wichita Bar Association Lifetime Achievement Award in June at the annual WBA Installation and Awards dinner. He was also recognized for his many contributions to the Wichita community, including through many nonprofit organizations.

1960s Judge Michael Corrigan, L’61, received a Wichita Bar Association President’s Award in June at the annual WBA Installation and Awards dinner. Corrigan received the award for his many years of service to WBA and the Wichita community, including working with the Kansas Legislature to obtain two new judgeships in Wichita.

42 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Robert L. Driscoll, L’64, received the Fred Ellsworth Medallion from the University of Kansas Alumni Association during a ceremony on Sept. 19 at the Adams Alumni Center. The award recognizes “unique and significant” service to the university. Driscoll, who also received an undergraduate degree from KU in 1961, is a partner at Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP in Kansas City, Mo.

1970s Wally Underhill, L’70, received a Wichita Bar Association newly created one-time Board of Governors Award in June at the annual WBA Installation and Awards dinner. Underhill received the award for his work with impaired lawyers. He has served Wichita lawyers in that capacity for more than 20 years and has saved many lives and professional careers. Underhill now heads up the state Lawyers Assistance Program in Topeka. The Hon. Willard B. “Will” Hardesty, L’71, has been elected president of the Colorado Municipal Judges Association. He is a judge in the Denver suburbs of Broomfield, Golden, Lakewood, Thornton and Wheat Ridge. William P. Coates Jr., L’72, Overland Park, was elected vice president, central region, of the National Association of Railroad Trial Counsel. Thomas Kokoruda, L’72, has been named the new chairman of the Kansas City-based law firm of Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC. Kokoruda is the fourth chairman in the firm’s 68-year history. Thomas W. Wagstaff, L’72, received the Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association’s prestigious Deans of the Trial Bar Award, presented May 1 during the 35th Annual Bench-Bar & Boardroom Conference at Tan-Tar-A Resort. Wagstaff is a founding partner of Wagstaff & Cartmell LLP.

Kenneth A. Webb, L’72, has joined the Pittsburg law firm of Wheeler & Mitchelson, Chartered. Webb will concentrate his practice in income tax and estate planning matters. John C. Peck, L’74, a Connell Teaching Professor of Law at KU, was honored with the “Quiet Rotarian” award, in recognition of his many years of service writing program notes for the Lawrence Rotary NEWS. Peck works tirelessly writing articles about Rotary programs of interest especially to members who have to miss an occasional meeting. Linda Legg, L’75, senior vice president, general counsel and secretary for AT&T Advertising & Publications in St. Louis, Mo., is the first recipient of the Enterprise Award, one of the Women’s Justice Awards from the St. Louis Daily Record. The award recognizes women in a business setting who have demonstrated leadership, integrity, service, sacrifice and accomplishment in improving the quality of justice and furthering the highest ideals of the legal profession in contributing to the improvement of the justice system. Legg was selected by a committee of lawyers from around the state, including the deans of law schools, judges, elected officials and members of Missouri law firms. Tyrone C. Means, L’76, has been named by Super Lawyers Magazine as one of Alabama’s Super Lawyers for 2008. Super Lawyers is a listing of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. Only 5 percent of the lawyers in the state are selected each year. Means practices with Thomas, Means, Gillis & Seay PC in Birmingham, Ala., in the area of personal injury plaintiff: general. David L. Davenport, L’77, Stanford, Calif., is counselor to the director for external relations research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. Cal Karlin, L’77, received the Kansas Bar Association Professionalism Award in June at the KBA annual meeting in Topeka. Carlin practices with the Lawrence firm of Barber Emerson LC.

Julie E. Levin, L’77, received an American Bar Association 2008 Dorsey Award, honoring an outstanding public defender or legal aid lawyer. Levin’s work with Legal Aid of Western Missouri (LAWMO) transformed public housing in Kansas City. In 1989, Levin filed a lawsuit in Federal District Court against the Housing Authority of Kansas City (HAKC) on behalf of tenants of the Theron B. Watkins housing development. Tensley v. Kemp, 750 F.Supp. 1001 (W.D.Mo. 1990), was one of the first cases to allege that HAKC’s failure to maintain hundreds of public housing units constituted de facto demolition of those units and violated Fair Housing laws. Tinsley led to $143 million in construction and renovation of high-quality and affordable public housing in Kansas City and inspired many similar class action suits. Dwight Sutherland, L’77, of counsel for Norton, Hubbard, Ruzicka, Kreamer & Kincaid LC, is a recipient of the Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association’s 2008 Robert C. Welch Volunteer Attorney Project Award. The award recognizes attorneys and law firms who, through their participation in the Volunteer Attorney Project (VAP), have demonstrated exemplary commitment to the delivery of pro bono services in the Kansas City metropolitan area community. Sutherland provided outstanding representation on behalf of his VAP client, who was a victim of home improvement fraud. The client was convinced to mortgage her home to pay for desired renovations. Shortly after pocketing the mortgage proceeds, the “remodeler” disappeared. Sutherland sued the remodeler on behalf of his client, successfully obtaining a default judgment. However, the defendant turned out to be judgment proof. Unable to keep up with the mortgage payments, the client was faced with a foreclosure action. After two years of litigation, Sutherland was able to resolve the matter by having the client refinance her house and pay the existing mortgage at about 30 cents on the dollar. Sutherland’s hard work and diligence prevented his client from becoming homeless. He devoted 145 hours of pro bono service on the matter. Marie Woodbury, L’79, was recognized in the Kansas City Business Journal’s “2008 Women Who Mean Business” issue. Woodbury is managing partner of the pharmaceutical and medical device division at Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP.

1980s Judy Nelson, L’80, is an executive coach, keynote speaker and leadership trainer. She has been selected from a nationwide search to be featured

in the 1st edition of “Leading the Way to Success.” The book features a number of best-selling authors and offers time-tested strategies for success in frank and intimate interviews. Nelson has 30 years experience as a “coaching CEO.” In addition to a law degree and master’s degree in social work, Nelson is a certified professional coach, public speaker and management trainer specializing in the relationships that make or break great leaders. She also hosts an online radio show called, “Leading the Way to Success.” Parthenia Evans, L’82, was recognized in the Kansas City Business Journal’s “2008 Women Who Mean Business” issue. Evans is a partner, board member and chairwoman of client development at Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP. John Jennings, L’82, is in-house attorney with Scientific Atlanta’s European headquarters in Belgium. Kim Baker, L’83, a member in the Seattle office of Williams Kastner, has been awarded the Defense Research Institute’s Richard H. Krochock Award for 2008, in recognition of the outstanding leadership she has continuously provided to members of its Young Lawyers Committee. The annual award honors a select individual who serves in a mentor capacity to members of the Young Lawyers Committee, sponsors and participates in its various programs and activities, and helps advance, in members of the committee, “those qualities which enhance the public image of the civil defense lawyer.” Baker, an active member of the Defense Research Institute who has served on its board of directors since 2005, accepted the award In October at the organization’s 2008 annual meeting in New Orleans. John Carmichael, L’83, has been named chair of the Kansas Human Rights Commission. Carmichael is practicing with the Wichita law firm of Conlee, Schmidt and Emerson. The Hon. Peggy Carr Kittel, L’83, has been appointed as the new 7th Judicial District judge for the Douglas County District Court by Gov. Kathleen Sebelius. Kittel previously served as judge pro tem for the Douglas County District Court, overseeing juvenile offender proceedings, criminal appearances and enforcement of child support and parenting time orders. Marie-Bernarde Miller, L’83, has accepted a position at Williams & Anderson PLC in Little Rock, Ark. Miller formerly practiced with Gill Elrod Ragon Owen and Sherman PA in Little Rock. She is the president-elect of the KU Law Alumni Board of Governors.

Timothy M. O’Brien, L’83, has been selected as the new clerk of court for the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas, effective April 1. O’Brien has been a partner at Shook, Hardy and Bacon in the business litigation section since 1991. Michele Ticknor Gehres, L’84, has relocated from Tulsa, Okla., to Grangeville, Idaho. Missy Conboy, L’85, was recently named Notre Dame’s interim athletic director. Conboy has been deputy director of athletics since October 2004. She also served 11 years as associate athletic director and five years as assistant athletic director. Randall J. Snapp, L’85, who practices in the Tulsa, Okla., office of Crowe & Dunlevy, was recently honored as a leader in his practice area by Chambers & Partners, an international legal publisher. Snapp practices in the area of labor and employment. His selection was based on interviews conducted with more than 14,000 attorneys and clients throughout the United States to identify and rank the nation’s leading business lawyers. The rankings are based on factors such as technical legal ability, professional conduct, client service, commercial awareness/astuteness, diligence, commitment and other qualities most valued by clients. Carol R. Bonebrake, L’86, was appointed by order of the Kansas Supreme Court to the Kansas Impaired Lawyers Assistance Commission for a three-year term beginning July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2011. She previously served on the commission and also has served as a volunteer with the Kansas Lawyers Assistance Program. Bonebrake is in private practice in Topeka with a focus on employment and health law for health and human service organizations. Sean C. McEnulty, L’86, was named president and general counsel in September for Sagebrush Partners LLC, builders and developers of cell tower transmission sites in Colorado, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas and New Mexico. Bradley A. Stout, L’86, received a Wichita Bar Association President’s Award in June at the annual WBA Installation and Awards dinner. Stout received the award for his work in reducing the tax appraisal on the Law Center building, which resulted in substantial savings.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 43

alumni news

Women’s Advisory Council formed

Bryan Wright, L’87, accepted a position in July as vice president and general counsel of KSL Resorts in La Quinta, Calif.

Stacey L. Janssen, L’88, received a Kansas Bar Association Outstanding Service Award in June at the KBA annual meeting in Topeka. Janssen is practicing with The Law Office of Stacey L. Janssen in Overland Park.

The number of women applicants

to law school is dropping nationally and at the University of Kansas, and anecdotal evidence suggests that young women lawyers are leaving the profession in meaningful numbers early in their careers. In an attempt to ensure that KU Law is preparing all of its students to succeed in their chosen career path, Dean Gail Agrawal recently formed the Women’s Advisory Council. The group is composed of accomplished KU Law alumnae who have agreed to share their wisdom and experience. The founding members of the council are: n Katharina Babich, L’91, Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal, Kansas City, Mo. n Holly Dyer, L’94, Foulston Siefkin, Wichita n Parthenia Evans, L’82, Stinson Morrison Hecker, Kansas City, Mo. n Amy Fowler, L’01, Husch Blackwell Sanders, Kansas City, Mo. n Cathy Havener Greer, L’76, Wells Anderson & Race, Denver n Carrie Josserand, L’98, Lathrop & Gage, Overland Park n Madeleine McDonough, L’90, Shook, Hardy & Bacon, Kansas City, Mo., and Washington, D.C. n The Hon. Mary Murguia, L’85, U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona, Phoenix n Cathy Reinhardt, L’83, Reinhardt Financial Services, Lawrence n Elizabeth Schartz, L’88, Thompson & Knight, Dallas n Lisa Schultes, L’85, Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus, Kansas City, Mo.

“I decided to form a Women’s Ad-

visory Council to provide mentors and

44 KU LAW MAGAZINE

KU Law Professor Steve McAllister, L’88, received a Steeples Service to Kansans Award, given to faculty members who provide significant service to the people of Kansas as a purposeful extension of their teaching and research. Previously, the award was limited to faculty in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This year, faculty members from the entire university were eligible. During his time at KU, McAllister has served as dean of the law school and interim director of the Dole Institute of Politics. He teaches courses in Constitutional Law, Constitutional Litigation and Torts. He is currently the solicitor general of Kansas, and is the first and only person in that position to represent the state in constitutional cases. Elizabeth A. Schartz, L’88, was selected by her peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2009. Schartz practices in the Dallas office of Thompson & Knight LLP in the area of labor and employment law. Published since 1983, The Best Lawyers in America is widely regarded as one of the preeminent referral guide to the legal profession in the U.S., compiling lists through an exhaustive peerreview survey in which tens of thousands of the top attorneys in the U.S. and other major legal communities confidentially evaluate their professional peers. Deborah L. Riley, L’89, Lawrence, has been promoted to vice president, HealthPro Claim, CNA Global Specialty Claim. Riley oversees all medical malpractice claims for the United States, Europe and Canada. Her main office is in Chicago.

1990s John Barbian, L’90, is working as a foreign service officer in the economic section of the U.S. Embassy in Berlin, Germany.

Phillips. His practice includes workers’ compensation defense in Kansas and Missouri. Stubbs is a member of the Kansas Bar Association, The Missouri Bar, the American Bar Association and the Wyandotte County Bar Association. Thomas K. Pratt, L’92, has been elected president of the intellectual property firm Banner & Witcoff Ltd. Pratt is a senior partner in the Chicago office and concentrates his practice on patent litigation. He is also an adjunct professor of law at the Georgetown University Law Center, where he teaches Patent Trial Practice. Kimberly Hays, L’93, Tulsa, Okla., has been selected to participate in the Oklahoma Bar Association inaugural Leadership Academic class. Hays was among 28 attorneys selected from around the state. Participants will learn how to communicate and motivate more effectively, leading to greater success not only in law, but also in service to professional, political, judicial, civic and community organizations. Marc Erickson, L’94, is a member of Kansas City’s business magazine Ingram’s 40 Under Forty 2008 Class. These honorees are made up of busy professionals who contribute to every facet of the Kansas City community. They are also active in community service organizations, schools, churches, little league and scouting troops. Erickson is a partner at Wagstaff & Cartmell LLP, practicing in the areas of commercial litigation and products liability. He is an adjunct professor at KU Law, where he teaches a trial advocacy class. He is also involved in the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Grant Development Committee. Katherine (Basom) McClendon, L’94, Plano, Texas, is pleased to announce the birth of son, Cole Alexander, in December 2007. He joins big brother, Drake Alan, 2. Kellie E. Hogan, L’95, received a Wichita Bar Association President’s Award in June at the annual WBA Installation and Awards dinner. Hogan received the award for her work with the Professional Diversity Committee’s “Grow Your Own Lawyer” Program.

David Bax, L’90, Stilwell, has joined the executive team of Pontus Global Inc. He is responsible for worldwide customer operations.

Tricia M. (Smith) Knoll, L’95, and husband, Christopher, proudly announce the birth of their daughter, Lola MacKenzie, in February 2008. The Knolls live in Kechi.

Clifford Stubbs, L’91, became a member of the board of directors at McAnany,Van Cleave &

Margann Bennett, L’96, received a Kansas Bar Association Outstanding Service Award in June

at the KBA annual meeting in Topeka. She is director of professional development at the Washburn University School of Law in Topeka. Charles Casassa, L’96, has been named a new partner in the capital markets practice in the Milan, Italy, office of Clifford Chance. Carolyn Rumfelt Matthews and William Matthews, both L’97, welcomed their first child, a son, George, in January 2008. Carolyn and Bill are both partners at Foulston Siefkin LLP in Wichita, Kan. Mike Mohlman, L’98, was named a shareholder in the Sly James Firm. He has been with the personal injury firm since it was founded in 2002 in Kansas City, Mo. Mohlman, who has been practicing law for 10 years, focuses on the areas of plaintiff’s nursing home negligence, medical malpractice and personal injury litigation. He is the president of Missouri Watch, a consumer rights organization dedicated to protecting the rights of individuals from wealthy special-interest lobbies. He is the former vice chair of the Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association’s Nursing Home Negligence Committee and a speaker for the National Business Institute. Hale Sheppard, L’98, is a shareholder in the Atlanta office of Chamberlain, Hrdlicka, White, Williams & Martin, where he represents clients during federal and state tax audits, criminal tax investigations, tax appeals, and tax litigation. He is also a member of the editorial board of the Georgia Bar Journal and the board of trustees of the Atlanta Tax Forum. He has recently published articles in the Practical Tax Lawyer (Summer 2008), The Tax Adviser (April 2008), Journal of Tax Practice & Procedure (2008), The Monthly Digest of Tax Articles (2008), The International Tax Journal (2008) and the Journal of Passthrough Entities (2007). Wesley F. Smith, L’98, has joined the Lawrence law firm of Stevens & Brand LLP. As a partner, Smith’s practice will emphasize bankruptcy, debtor and creditors’ rights and banking law. He was formerly in private practice in Topeka for more than 10 years. Smith also has served at KU Law as an adjunct instructor in Commercial Law since 2002. Jean Block, L’99, has been appointed the head of the newly created Health Care Bureau in the Arkansas Attorney General’s Office.

Karrie J. Clinkinbeard, L’99, has been selected by the Missouri Lawyers Weekly as one of Missouri’s rising stars. The 11th annual “Up and Coming Lawyers” issue honored 48 attorneys who were chosen based on their career achievements and dedication to improving the community. Clinkinbeard is a partner in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Armstrong Teasdale LLP, and is a member of the firm’s explosion, fire and electrocution practice group. Clinkinbeard also litigates life, health and disability matters. Sarah Deer, L’99, is serving as a visiting professor of law at the William Mitchell College of Law in St. Paul, Minn. Deer is teaching Constitutional Law – Powers and Indian Law during the 2008-2009 academic year.

advisers for our students, especially our women students,” Agrawal said, “and to provide guidance to me about the recruitment, retention and preparation of women law students for the rigors of their professional lives.”

help address ways to ensure that the ratio of male to female attorneys who continue to actively practice law equalizes.

“Part of that is discussing how

we can find mentors for female law students and lawyers in their

Getting involved

chosen fields

Interested in serving on the Women’s Advisory Council? Please contact Dean Gail Agrawal at gagrawal@ku.edu.

Ryan Dixon, L’99, has been named director of governmental & legal affairs for the Kansas Bar Association. Dixon was in solo practice for the past eight years. He also served as a part-time municipal court judge in Olathe. Christopher Stucky, L’99, has been named a new member of Douthit Frets Rouse Gentile & Rhodes LLC in Kansas City, Mo. He focuses his practice on personal injury litigation with an emphasis on vehicle-related product liability cases.

Fowler, a partner at Husch Blackwell

Sanders, said she hopes the council will

of practice, addressing family and work-life balance, and simply providing advice about the many different options for female

lawyers and what works best for them,” Fowler said.

“My ultimate goal is that we can

2000s

help reach a day where there is no need

Marci Gilligan, L’00, has joined the Denver firm of Kamlet Shepherd as a partner in the white collar defense and criminal defense practice areas. Gilligan specializes in the representation of corporate and individual clients facing criminal and regulatory actions in both state and federal courts.

male and female lawyers or law stu-

Greg Skoch, L’00, has been named as a partner at Hovey Williams LLP in Overland Park. Skoch specializes in preparation and prosecution of chemical and mechanical patent applications and trademark applications.

will work closely with Women in Law.

Amy Fellows Cline, L’01, has been named a member of Triplett, Woolf & Garretson LLC in Wichita. Cline’s practice focuses on business and consumer litigation and insurance defense. She and her husband, James Cline, L’90, welcomed their second child, Olivia Kathleen Cline, in March 2008. Amy and James have a 20-month-old son, Ethan, and James has two daughters, Amanda, 12, and Madison, 11.

closely with the Women’s Advisory

to talk about the difference between dents.”

Tentatively, the group’s first activity

will be a combined meeting and panel discussion this spring on topics of interest to women law students. The council

“I have received an overwhelming

response from current members expressing their gratitude and excitement for the invaluable opportunity to work Council,” said Monika Groom, president of Women in Law. “Not only will this make KU Law a better place for women to study law, but it will also give us the tools to prepare ourselves for what lies in today’s professional community.”

KU LAW MAGAZINE 45

alumni news Brian Gaffney, L’01, and his wife, Kerry, welcomed a daughter, Ashlynn Corrine, born in April 2007. She joins big brother, Connor, 5. Brian is an intellectual property attorney for Baker Botts LLP in Dallas.

Hawks in Robes The Hawks in Robes section of the KU Law Alumni Board of Governors is developing a roster of KU Law graduates who have served or now serve as judges. The section is exploring ways in which judges are uniquely positioned to support the mission of KU Law through mentoring students, judging moot court competitions, conducting judicial proceedings at the law school and more. If you have served or now serve in a judicial capacity, we want to hear from you. Notification does not obligate you to participate in activities, but it helps us compile a complete roster. Please e-mail the following information to kulawoutreach@ku.edu with a subject line of “Hawks in Robes”: n Name n Chambers address, telephone,

fax and e-mail n Judicial position(s) and dates of service n Home address, telephone and e-mail n Undergraduate degree, institution and year of graduation n KU Law year of graduation

46 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Chris Sherman and Melissa Hoag Sherman, both L’01, Leawood, are pleased to announce the birth of daughter Zoe Jean Sherman in March 2008. She joins big sister, Audrey, who is 2 1/2. Richard Federico, L’02, is working as a defense attorney at the Office of Military Commissions in Arlington,Va. Jason H. Klein, L’02, has accepted an in-house counsel position with Wyndham Vacation Ownership Inc. in Orlando, Fla. He is counsel in resort management. Drew Roberts, L’02, is the deputy staff judge advocate at Altus Air Force Base, Altus, Okla. Ellen Sexton Wingenter, L’02, married Steve Wingenter in October 2007. Ellen graduated from the University of Alabama School of Law with an LL.M. in taxation in December 2007. She joined the Decatur, Ala., office of Wilmer & Lee PA in January 2008. Robert J. Wonnell, L’02, has been named a shareholder at McAnany,Van Cleave & Phillips. Wonnell represents employers and insurance carriers’ workers’ compensation claims in Kansas and Missouri. A member of the firm’s workers’ compensation defense practice group in Kansas City, Wonnell often speaks at seminars concerning Kansas and Missouri workers’ compensation laws. James Belshe, L’03, was named a shareholder at the Salt Lake City law firm of Workman Nydegger. Belshe is a member of the firm’s patent litigation group and focuses his practice on the representation of plaintiffs in patent litigation matters. Erika Donner, L’03, was named an Up & Coming Attorney for 2008 by Minnesota Lawyer magazine. Now in its eighth year, the award is reserved for newer attorneys who have distinguished themselves during their first 10 years of practice. Criteria for selection include leadership, professional accomplishment and service to the legal community. Donner works part-time for the Kuhn Law Firm in Minnetonka, a boutique concentrating in business transactions and litigation. She is active with the New Lawyers Section of the Minnesota State Bar Association, serving as vice chairwoman of the 4,000-plus member group.

Daniel J. Dye, L’03, is an assistant professor of law at the Phoenix School of Law in Phoenix, and has moved to a tenure-track position teaching Civil Procedure. He previously taught Lawyering Process. Heber Gonzalez, L’03, and his wife, Diane, are pleased to announce the birth of their son, Adrian Oscar Gonzalez, who arrived on June 12, 2008. Christy Jensen Rosensteel, L’03, is the assistant general counsel for the Van Tuyl Group Inc., in Phoenix, Ariz. She previously worked at Snell & Wilmer LLP. Jack McInnes, L’04, is pleased to announce the birth of daughter Mira Jane in June. McInnes is practicing with Shughart Thomson & Kilroy in Kansas City, Mo. Kyle Skillman, L’04, and Sheri Brune were married in May 2008 in Lawrence. Skillman is an attorney with the collegiate sports practice group of Bond, Schoeneck and King in Overland Park. Emily (Schutte) Vijayakirthi, L’04, is an in-house attorney at Terracon Consultants Inc. in Lenexa. Heath Hawk, L’05, has joined Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP in Kansas City, Mo., with a practice focused in the areas of business and commercial litigation with an emphasis in the construction industry. He represents contractors and other clients on a broad range of contract, insurance and litigation issues and disputes. Jocilyn B. Oyler, L’05, and David G.Vermooten, L’06, announce the birth of Annika Katherine Oyler Vermooten on Aug. 3, 2008. She joins big sister Isabella, 4. Trevor D. Riddle, L’05, has joined the Wichita law firm of Monnat & Spurrier, Chartered, as a trial attorney. He will practice primarily in the areas of criminal defense, municipal defense and federal criminal law. Megan C. Winter, L’05, has joined the San Diego, Calif., office of Fisher & Phillips LLP as an associate. Michael DiPasquale, L’06, is vice president of operations for Newport Television in Kansas City, Mo. Lacy J. Gilmour, L’06, has been accepted to attend the National Criminal Defense College in

Macon, Ga., for the summer of 2008. Only 124 participants are accepted nationally each year. Jay McLaughlin, L’06, received his LL.M. in international economic law from the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2007. He is currently working as a corporate counsel at Envestnet Asset Management in Chicago. Richard Cook, L’07, is practicing with Spencer Fane Britt & Browne in Kansas City, Mo. Aimee Minnich, L’07, is an associate at Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee in Kansas City, Mo., where she is practicing in the areas of estate planning, general business law and tax. Tucker Poling, L’07, is practicing with Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP in Wichita. Sarah Preston, L’07, is an associate at Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee in Kansas City, Mo., where she is practicing in the areas of employment law and commercial litigation. Elizabeth Rogers, L’07, was recognized at the Dodge City Community College spring commencement ceremony as the Distinguished Alumnus for 2008. Elizabeth graduated from DCCC with an Associate of Arts degree in 2001 and an Associate of Science degree in 2002. She is currently a research attorney for The Hon. Justice Lawton Nuss at the Kansas Supreme Court. Rachel E. Rolf, L’07, joined the Roeland Park office of McAnany,Van Cleave & Phillips as an associate in the litigation practice group. Angela Angotti, L’08, has accepted an associate position with Coates & Logan, Overland Park. Her practice will focus on civil defense litigation. Maren Ludwig, L’08, has accepted a judicial clerkship with the Hon. Jerome A. Holmes, a U.S. Court of Appeals judge for the 10th Circuit. Jessie Thompson, L’08, is an associate at Kluin Law Firm in Chanute, Kan. Justin Waggoner, L’08, won first place in the State Bar of Texas International Law Section’s Law School Writing Contest and second place in the seventh annual Environmental Law Essay Contest, sponsored by the Environmental Law Section of the Michigan State Bar. Waggoner works for Case, Moses, Zimmerman & Wilson PA in Wichita.

Noelle Uhler

external relations director to foster alumni connections

T

he University of Kansas School From 2002-2004, Uhler served as of Law welcomed Noelle Uhler development officer for the KU School in November as its new direcof Engineering during the KU First tor of external relations. Campaign. Uhler will continue fostering the Uhler has lived in Lawrence for school’s relationships with its 6,800the past 17 years, and her family is plus alumni, serving as a point of contact for gradu- “I have enjoyed working at KU in the ates and working closely past, and I look forward to meeting with Dean Gail Agrawal and the KU Law Alumni the School of Law alumni.” Board of Governors to coordinate events and projects. from Kansas. She has three children Before joining the law school staff, and a husband who love the Uhler was director of development for Jayhawks. the Lawrence Arts Center, where she “I have enjoyed working at KU in oversaw all aspects of giving, including the past, and I look forward to meeting major gifts, memberships and corpothe School of Law alumni,” Uhler said. rate sponsorships. She also planned stewardship events and wrote grants.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 47

alumni news

university archives

The Way We Were

Professor John Peck, left, and Sam Logan, L’90, on Halloween 1987 (above) and today (below)

Students don professor’s ‘uniform’ for Halloween trick

T

wenty-one years ago on Halloween, the students in Professor John Peck’s small section of Contracts I decided to haunt their teacher with his mirror image. Make that 21 mirror images. The students observed that Peck almost always wore the same basic outfit to class: khaki pants, a white or blue button-down shirt rolled up to the elbows, a tie and a wristwatch (which he routinely offered to sell in class). They thought it would be fun to emulate him, although they weren’t sure he would notice because he always conducted class in a very down-to-business manner.

48 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Halloween arrived, and all the students donned the “Peck uniform.” They were waiting in the classroom when their professor arrived. Peck didn’t seem to notice.

Then student Sam Logan made his entrance. “I sat next to him and took my watch off and put it on the table next to me – another mannerism John always did to keep the class on schedule,” said Logan, L’90, a partner at the Overland Park office of Foulston Siefkin LLP. “He looked at me and laughed.” Then another student asked, “Don’t you notice anything else?” As Logan recalls, Peck “then looked around and noticed everyone else dressed like him. I recall he was thrown off a bit in class that day and cracked up every time he looked over at me.”

Dear alumni and friends of KU Law, Thank you for your support and generosity to your legal alma mater. Just over 930 of you made a gift to the law school this year. Approximately 120 of you are members of the Deans Club, and six of you are new James Woods Green Medallion honorees. The classes of 2007 and 2008 have begun to fulfill their three-year pledges to give back. With them, we continue to build a culture of philanthropy to support a strong future for KU Law. Your gifts helped talented law students, making it possible for them to attend law school and enriching their educational experience in Green Hall. You provided scholarships and financial aid. You gave summer stipends to 19 law students who worked in otherwise unpaid public sector positions during the summer. You sent students to compete in moot court competitions, including the prestigious National and Jessup International Law Moot Court competitions, and specialty competitions in environmental and health law. You made it possible for a team of our Native American law students to travel and compete in the National Native American Law Students Association Moot Court competition. Your gifts support an outstanding faculty and their cutting-edge research in environmental law, international arbitration, intellectual property and international trade law, to name just a few of the areas in which our faculty members are working. You made sure that we have a first-class law library for our students, practicing lawyers in our community and legal scholars to study, read and to conduct research. Because of you, we renovated the Stinson Morrison Hecker Lecture Hall, our largest classroom and frequent meeting place. And we finally bid farewell to the 1970s-era orange chairs in one of our most-used classrooms with its remodeling over the summer. You ensure that Green Hall offers a strong learning and teaching environment to prepare tomorrow’s leaders. The tangible effects of your generosity are essential amid decreasing state support. To the institutions that accredit and rank American law schools, financial resources count. Your support is used as a measure of the quality of your law school. As we succeed, your investment in our future enhances the value of the degree you earned here. To our current students, your contributions signal your commitment as a member of the KU Law family to them and their success. We build the KU Law legacy with each donation. This issue of the KU Law Magazine celebrates that legacy: three distinguished alumni recognized for service and excellence in the practice of law; five exceptional KU Law graduates who served as law clerks on the Supreme Court of the United States; and four talented second-year law students who presented their moot court arguments before Chief Justice John Roberts. In recent weeks, we hosted the Diplomat’s Forum, the annual Law Review and Law Journal symposia, and the inaugural Robert Casad Comparative Law Lecture. We will begin the spring 2009 semester with the Hon. Robert Henry, chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, who will present the inaugural lecture of KU Law’s Shook Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy. These are exciting times in Green Hall. On behalf of the students, staff and faculty of KU Law, thank you for making our successes possible. In these trying economic times, your continued support is crucial to our ability to provide a first-rate legal education to the daughters and sons of Kansas, as well as the students from across the nation and around the world who join them in Green Hall.

Letter from the

Dean

Gail B. Agrawal Dean and Professor of Law

KU LAW MAGAZINE 49

donor report

with sincere thanks to our donors JAMES WOODS GREEN MEDALLION HONOREES

The James Woods Green Medallion honors donors whose cumulative giving to the University of Kansas School of Law is $25,000 and above. Honorees whose names are italicized are deceased.

Individuals Constance M. Achterberg, L’53 Frank A. Ackerman, L’80 J. Eugene Balloun, L’54 Richard A. Barber, L’34 Mrs. Richard A. Barber Lydia I. Beebe, L’77, & Charles E. Doyle, L’78 Blake A. Biles, L’75 Richard L. Bond, L’60, & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond John K. Bremyer, L’46, & Jayne Williamson Bremyer The Hon. Clayton Brenner, L’28 Daisy E. & Paul H. Brown Max & Mary Brown Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad Barkley Clark Gertrude Clark Peggy A. Clark Teresa Blatchley Conkey Mary K. Connell O. J. Connell Jr., L’38 Donald L.Cordes, L’59 Suzanne M. Decker Glen W. Dickinson Professor Martin B. Dickinson Jr. Carolyn A. Dillon & Richard W. Dillon William R. Docking, L’77, & Judy O. Docking Robert L. Driscoll, L’64 G. Gary Duncan, L’74, & Adrianna D. Gonzales Duncan Ruth Adair Dyer, L’21 Mildred A. Early David S. Elkouri, L’78 Clem Fairchild Dorothy Feir, Ph.D. Bruce A. Finzen, L’73 David H. Fisher, L’38, & Mary Frances Fisher Loren M. Gensman Roland D. Gidney Jr., L’47 Donald W. Giffin, L’53, & Esther Brown Giffin Ernest J. Goppert, L’17 Brian G. Grace, L’67 Jordan L. Haines, L’57, & Shirley Cundiff Haines Kenneth M. Hamilton, L’47, & Ruth Hamilton

50 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Roberta B. Harkness Minnie I. Harms Edward J. Healy, L’79 Alvin D. Herrington, L’57 Al J. & Sylvia M. Herrod Elma A. Holdeman Alice A. Hook Mrs. A. Bryce Huguenin John E. Hurley Jr., L’62, & Jo Sicking Hurley Elizabeth Ann Hylton The Hon. Theodore B. Ice, L’61, & Sue H. Ice Howard M. Immel, L’38, & Sue Immel Balfour & Margaret Jeffrey Richard Kane Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch John M. Kilroy Jr., L’73 Fred C. & Mary Robinson Koch Thomas G. Kokoruda, L’72 Florence M. Kuske Linda S. Legg, L’75, & Judge Lawrence G. Crahan The Hon. James K. Logan & Beverly Logan Robert W. Loyd, L’62, & Mary Jo Loyd Lyle D. Lutton Jr., L’50, & De Nell T. Lutton Daniel J. Lyons, L’77, & Maryanne Lyons Glenn E. McCann, L’40 Brian K. McLeod, L’89 Eunice H. Melik Col. Edward A. Metcalf III, retired, L’49 George D. Miner, L’22 John R. Morse, L’75 Judge Ronald C. Newman, L’70 Bernard E. Nordling, L’49, & Barbara A. Nordling Charles H. Oldfather Jr. Hortense Casady Oldfather Bernard V. O’Neill Jr., L’76 The Hon. James W. Paddock, L’56 Marjorie L. Page Robert A. Page, L’53 Mary Louise Parker Diane S. Parrish, L’79 William B. Pendleton, L’57 Mary Ruth Watermulder Petefish Arthur C. Piculell Jr., L’65, & Dee W. Piculell Donald H. Postlethwaite, L’26, & Ruth Lawless Postlethwaite Jean Humphrey Proffitt & Roy F. Proffitt Raymond F. Rice, L’1908, & Ethel Rice John M. Rounds, L’39 The Hon. M. Kay Royse, L’78

Bill R. Sampson, L’71 Drucilla J. Sampson, L’96 Elizabeth A. Schartz, L’88 Janet Manning Schroeder Robert A. Schroeder, L’37 Carolyn Henry Shinkle & J. Frank Shinkle, L’41 Mary Maurine Shurtz Leo R. Sissel, L’50 Beatrice Siegel The Hon. Fred N. Six, L’56, & Lilian Six Christopher “Kit” Smith, L’72 Glee S. Smith Jr., L’47, & Geraldine B. Smith Frank L. Snell, L’24 Mary Ellen Stadler Roger D. Stanton, L’63, & Judith Duncan Stanton Kate Stephens The Hon. Donnan Stephenson, L’48, & Patricia Ledyard Stephenson Mikel L. Stout, L’61, & LeAnn R. Stout Edna J. Sullivan & James E. Sullivan, L’29 Willard B. Thompson, L’58 Erma B. & Frank E.Tyler Omer G.Voss, L’39, & Annabele K. Voss Katherine Hall Wagstaff & Robert W. Wagstaff Gary A. Waldron, L’79, & Carol A. Foster Charles R. Wall Professor William E. Westerbeke Douglas D. Wheat, L’74, & Laura L. Wheat Houston L.Whiteside Willard G.Widder, L’49 Karl T.Wiedemann Paul L.Wilbert, L’38 Susan Scott Wilner R. Dean Wolfe, L’69 Stanley N. Woodworth, L’78 Robert S. Wunsch, L’58, & Barbara Bateman Wunsch Paul Yde, L’85, & Sarah Elder D. Spencer Yohe, L’54

Firms & Foundations Foulston & Siefkin LLP Hampton & Royce LC Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Hite Fanning & Honeyman LLP Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy, Chtd. Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus PC

The Ethel & Raymond F. Rice Foundation Ross Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP

Deans Club Ambassadors ($10,000 and above)

Blake A. Biles Richard L. Bond & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond Mary Kathleen Connell Donald L. Cordes David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City Elizabeth Ann Hylton Judge Theodore B. Ice & Sue Harper Ice Joy Morrison Johnson Trust Kansas Health Foundation Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd Judge Sebastian T. Patti Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus PC Jean Humphrey Proffitt & Roy F. Proffitt The Ethel & Raymond F. Rice Foundation Ross Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shughart Thomson & Kilroy, PC Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Douglas D. Wheat & Laura L. Wheat R. Dean Wolfe & Cheryl L. Wolfe Paul L.Yde & Sarah R. Elder D. Spencer Yohe & Betty Foster Yohe

DEANS CLUB BENEFACTORS ($5,000 to $9,999)

Dean Gail B. Agrawal & Naurang M. Agrawal, M.D. Lydia I. Beebe Heywood H. Davis & Louise Swigart Davis Charles E. Doyle Estate of James M. Haughey Edward J. Healy & Helen Healy John E. Hurley Jr. & Jo Sicking Hurley Judge James K. Logan & Beverly Jennings Logan Daniel J. Lyons & Maryanne Lyons Macy’s Foundation Lucy E. Mason Dara Trum Miles Robin J. Miles

Holly Nielsen Elizabeth A. Schartz David G. Seely & Debra Short Seely Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith Sonnenschein Scholars Foundation United States District Court Bar Registration

DEANS CLUB PATRONS ($3,000 to $4,999)

Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad & Sarah McKeighan Casad Chevron Matching Gift Program Bruce A. Finzen Foulston Siefkin LLP Donald W. Giffin & Esther Brown Giffin Cathy Havener Greer Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Calvin J. Karlin Judge Janice Miller Karlin Larry E. Keenan & Patricia L. Degner-Keenan KU Public Interest Law Society Audrey B. Magaña & Sue Anne Magaña Brian K. McLeod David R. Morris John R. Morse & Kay Stine Morse Professor John C. Peck & Pamela C. Peck Cathy A. Reinhardt & Norman A. St. Laurent Joel M. Shields Snell & Wilmer LLP Omer G.Voss & Annabelle K.Voss Stanley N. Woodworth & Nancy G. Woodworth

DEANS CLUB ($1,000 to $2,999)

Constance M. Achterberg Donald D. Adams & Ann Wees Adams Larry D. Armel & JoAnne Armel J. Eugene Balloun Barber Emerson LC Barristerbooks Inc. Brian L. Becker Belin Foundation J. Rod Betts Husch Blackwell Sanders LLP John W. Brand Jr. & Barbara Sample Brand Anne E. Burke Robert B. Castor & Gloria Nelson Castor Bruce E. Cavitt J. Shawn Chalmers & Leslie Chalmers John D. Conderman & Patricia R. Conderman

Class of 2007 nurtures culture of philanthropy at KU Law

T

hirty members of the KU Law Class of 2007 have taken the first steps toward building a culture of philanthropy at their legal alma mater. We want to say thank you. These newly minted alumni – who can still see Green Hall in their rearview mirror – have begun to fulfill the first generation of the Class Pledge. This giving initiative, created by the Class of 2007, asks alumni to donate at least $25 one year out of school, $50 two years out and $100 three years out. The amount of the gift is not the most important factor. The creators of the Class Pledge wanted to establish a habit of giving, a sense of pride that their law school continues to produce excellent lawyers because of their support – now and in the future. We extend special thanks to 2007 graduates Dan Calderon and Katie Gates who, as president and vice president respectively of the Student Bar Association, led the charge to establish the pledge and encourage their classmates to invest. Thirty members of the class have accepted the challenge so far, contributing a total of $1,840. That’s a giving rate of about 20 percent, which exceeds the overall KU Law giving average by approximately 6 percent. Already, a handful of alumni from the Class of 2008 have started fulfilling their pledges. Some of them wrote checks as soon as they graduated, and we thank them for leading by example. At right are the members of each class who had made a contribution through Oct. 31, 2008:

Class of 2007 Misti D. Brumback Jana R. Budde P. Dan Calderon Crissa Seymour Cook Richard A. Cook II Rachel S. Dean Oscar P. Espinoza Mary K. Gates Rusty E. Glenn Amy Pettit Gnau Eric R. Gray Elizabeth M. Hafoka Tina M. Hardin Kathryn L. Harpstrite Ryan J. Huschka Megan Barr Jennings James R. McCullough Emily A. McProud Laura Dakhil Monahan Michael J. Nichols Leena D. Phadke Tucker L. Poling Sarah E. Preston John P. Smolen Natalie M. Stoker Adrienne E. Strecker Carrie B. Temm Heather O’Hara Tombs David P. Trevino Jamie L. Weese Class of 2008 Justin D. Elkouri Blythe Bradley Glemming Zachary A. Lerner Jeremy G. Mai Stephanie L. Sowers Jonathon A. Szumny Thu T. Vo

KU LAW MAGAZINE 51

donor report Kevin M. Connor & Anne L. Connor Daniel D. Crabtree Peter K. Curran & Virginia Schubert Curran Molly A. Daniels David L. Davenport & Sally Nelson Davenport Professor Michael J. Davis & Faye S. Davis Mark M. Deatherage Kirt D. DeHaan & Cheryl R. DeHaan Michael F. Delaney & Kathleen Gibbons Delaney Professor Martin B. Dickinson Jr. & Sallie Francis Dickinson Donald N. Dirks Robert E. Donatelli & Katherine Donatelli Professor Christopher R. Drahozal & Kaye M. Drahozal Robert L. Driscoll & Marilyn Rockwell Driscoll Judge Jerry G. Elliott & Debra S. Duncan Jeffrey R. Emerson ExxonMobil Foundation Jill S. Ferrel Jane A. Finn, Ph.D. Myron L. Frans Lawrence C. Gates & Jeanne K. Gates Timothy A. Glassco Frederick B. Gould Barry D. Halpern & Cynthia Zedler Halpern Jason B. Harper Sr. Professor John W. Head & Lucia Orth Head Alvin D. Herrington Mark D. Hinderks & Mary Ann Hinderks Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Joseph J. Hoagland & Norma Decker Hoagland Charles H. Hostetler & Julie A. Hostetler Illinois Tool Works Foundation Dorothy M. Ingalls & Kevin K. Jurrens Kimberly A. Jones Kansas Women Attorneys Association Kathleen Clubb Kauffman & Charles M. Kauffman, Ph.D. Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch Ronald R. Kimzey & Emily Cooper Kimzey Thomas H. Krueger & Jean Krueger Eric A. Kuwana & Karen E. Miller-Kuwana Lathrop & Gage LC Law School Admission Council

52 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Linda L. Lee John R. Light & Sharon Koch Light Ronald F. Loewen George A. Lowe & Rosemary Lowe Mon Yin Lung Maureen M. Mahoney Crystal Whitebread Mai Carolyn L. Matthews William P. Matthews Madeleine M. McDonough Christopher K. McKenzie Professor Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer William M. Modrcin Jr. Eric S. Namee & Tracy Lynn Namee John C. Nettels Jr. & Sheila M. Nettels Northern Trust Company Charitable Trust Norton Hubbard Ruzicka & Kreamer LC Timothy M. O’Brien & Melinda Cadle O’Brien Evan J. Olson & Susan Woodin Olson Gary L. Olson & Vicki A. Olson Bernard V. O’Neill Jr. & Marion W. O’Neill Judge James W. Paddock & Ruth Davenport Paddock Payne & Jones Foundation Philip Morris USA Inc. Judge G. Joseph Pierron & Diana Carlin Pierron, Ph.D. Jeanne Gorman Rau & Donald A. Rau Joseph Rebein & Susan Waring Rebein Kenneth W. Reeves III James A. Riedy Michael L. Riggs & Elaine P. Riggs Reginald L. Robinson & Jane McGarey Robinson Joan R. Ruff Bill Sampson Drucilla J. Sampson Kari S. Schmidt Kelley D. Sears & Jane A. Sears Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee PC Professor Jan Bowen Sheldon, Ph.D., J.D., & Dr. James A. Sherman Justice Fred N. Six & Lilian Six Gentra Abbey Sorem & James R. Sorem Jr., Ph.D. Kenneth W. Spain & Cynthia Mullen Spain Shannon L. Spangler & Michael E. Spangler Charles F. Speer & Martha Wright Speer Sprint Foundation

Roger D. Stanton & Judith Duncan Stanton Estate of Kate Stephens Joel A. Sterrett & Dr. Joye Sterrett Cathleen Chandler Stevenson & David A. Stevenson John D. Stewart Peter E. Strand & Sheila C. Strand R. Kent Sullivan S. Lee Taylor Thompson & Knight Foundation Mark R. Thompson & Barbara E. Thompson UMB Bank NA Alleen S.VanBebber Roger K.Viola & Karen S.Viola Judge Kathryn H.Vratil & John W. Hamilton H. Steven Walton & Sandra M. Walton Westar Energy Foundation Professor William E. Westerbeke Whirlpool Foundation Robert D. Wiechman Jr. Dennis P. Wilbert Harriet Stephens Wilson J. Robert Wilson & Marguerite J. Wilson E. Larry Winn III Francis and LaVerne Winterburg Fund Thomas F. Wobker Women in Law Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, Ph.D. Larry Worrall & Beverly Cope Worrall Robert S. Wunsch & Barbara Bateman Wunsch

CAMPANILE ($500 to $999)

Ernest Adelman & Barbara Boley Adelman American Express Charitable Fund American Multi-Cinema Inc. Lynn L. Anderson & La Faun McMurry Anderson Terry Arthur & Virginia Thomas Arthur Corey D. & Tyra C. Babington John F. Baird II Orval F. Baldwin II Frank S. Bangs Jr. The Bank of America Foundation Clayton L. Barker Norman E. Beal & Sally Jenkins Beal John L. Beck Jr. John L. Beck Sr. & Annette W. Beck William Bevan III & Gail M. Bevan Terry A. & Phyllis L. Blaser Ron Bodinson R. Dan & Dale P. Boulware

Charles A. Briscoe Judge Mary Beck Briscoe Jay B. & Michelle B. Brown Martin R. Brown Judge Wesley E. Brown Bryan Cave LLP Phillip C. Buttell Patricia J. & Frank F. Castellano Jerrold L. Cherwin Jr. & Jessica M. Cherwin Karin Pongratz Church Tim Connell ConocoPhillips Kevin M. & Valerie F. Cowan Robert W. Coykendall & Dorothy A. Hirsch J. Richelle Crow-Johnson Nancy M. Dixon Darrell D. Dreiling John D. & Karin M. Dunbar James N. Edmonds Mary Lew Edmonds Charles P. Efflandt Melvin L. Ehrlich Yvette Leerskov Ehrlich Ernst & Young Foundation Farmers Insurance Group Inc. Terry N. Fiske Patrick X. & Susan E. Fowler Robert H. Gale Jr. & Linda C. Gale Hugh W. Gill IV & Ingrid Olson Gill Arch G. Gothard III Andrew F. & Ann Marie Halaby Lewis A. Heaven Jr. & Paula Butz Heaven Husch & Eppenberger LLC Heather A. Jones Gina Kaiser Ramona K. Kantack Edward M. Kaplan Robert F. Kethcart Jennifer Johnson Kinzel Patricia A. Konopka Melissa M. Krueger Jodde Olsen Lanning Justice Edward Larson & Mary L. Larson Cheryl Hagemann Lindeman Curt M. Lindeman Steven K. Linscheid Justin M. Lungstrum & Emily Lungstrum Phyllis Savage Lynn & Randall S. Lynn Kim R. Martens & Glenda Tackett Martens Alson R. & Yona C. Martin Keith U. & Hulda Martin Professor Stephen W. Mazza Professor Stephen R. McAllister Barbara L. McCloud Brian C. McCormally & Kathie Philbrick McCormally Laura McKnight

Debra M. Hart McLaughlin Marie-Bernarde Miller Donald L. Moler Jr. Judith A. Moler Sean J. O’Hara & Amy Cox O’Hara William B. Pendleton Robert C. Perry Paul D. Post & Kay Kelly, LSCSW Hal C. Reed Christy Jensen Rosensteel Nancy Schmidt Roush Richard H. Rumsey & Lorie Dudley Rumsey Judge Gerald L. Rushfelt Security Benefit Group of Companies William H. Seiler Jr. James O. Selzer Neil R. Shortlidge & Renee Sproul Shortlidge James J. & Chirl Ann Sienicki John W. & Carolyn C. Simpson Floyd W. Smith Jr. & Cecilia E. Smith Michael A. Sternlieb Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP Judge David L. Stutzman & Wendy Jo Blank Tenet Healthcare Foundation Todd N. Thompson & Caprice Maxey Thompson Willard B. Thompson & Barbara Lemert Thompson Earl D. & Shirley A. Tjaden Toussaint G. Toole, M.D. Professor Suzanne Valdez Mary A. & Jason M. Walker Kent H. Weltmer Robert J. Werner Robert E. & Mary L. Williams John B. Wilson Margaret Dandurand Wilson Rebecca A. Winterscheidt Cynthia S. Woelk Mark A. Zuschek & Jo Dee Daetwiler Zuschek

CRIMSON & BLUE ($300 to $499)

Frank A. Ackerman AT&T Foundation Ernest C. Ballweg Patricia McCoy Bartley Bion J. Beebe & Vicki Storm Beebe David E. Bengtson & Mary Maloney Bengtson Patricia A. Bennett & Michael G. Haefele Lisa Walter Beran Larry J. & Ann H. Bingham Bradley L. & Judith Lyn Brehm Margaret M. Breinholt Cynthia R. Bryant Charles F. Bunch

Jeffery L. Carmichael Matthew B. & Darcy Cobb Melissa L. Conboy Linda Smith Crist Thomas M. & Barbara B. Dawson Laura A. Denk Diana L. Dietrich Ed W. Dosh Howard E. Dutcher & Jean Spangler Dutcher Max E. Eberhart & Nina Gillig Eberhart Richard L. & Lauren D. English Kent R. Erickson Thomas W. Franchino Jonathan E. Frank Jana Patterson Gagner Thomas P. Garretson & Carole Bomhard Garretson Tony L. & Shawna L. Gehres Steven D. & Lisa A. Gough Edward H. & Julia N. Graham Danford D. & Jennifer Grant Robert W. & Joyce M. Green Paula M. & Chris Hahn Kenneth & Sue Harmon John P. Healy & Cathy Rauch Healy Jeffrey D. Hewett Dean B. Hill Robert B. & Caroline E. Hosford Arthur S. Hubacher International Law Society Topper & Linda D. Johntz Andrew M. Jones Jamie Huffman Jones Professor Pamela Keller & John W. Keller, M.D. John A. Koepke Kraig M. Kohring & Molly Ash Kohring Sharylyn Gelvin Lacey Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy Dennis W. Lloyd Katherine Reeder Lloyd Carl S. Long III & Mary K. Long Donald A. & Diane C. Low David H. & Debi Luce Judson R. Maillie Terry L. & Monica S. Malone Professor Dennis L. Mandsager & Sherrie Koester Mandsager Charles D. Marvine Joyce Rosenberg Marvine Professor Sandra Craig McKenzie Doris K. Nagel Andrew J. Nolan & Sheryl Griffith Nolan Carolyn Boettcher Parmer Sandra J. Patti Larry G. Rapp Brenda Petrie Register & Benton Register Judge Julie A. Robinson

Ross W. & Margaret M. Schimmels J. Stanley & Tommye C. Sexton Floy Lambertson Shaeffer David E. & Kimberly R. Shay Gregory K. & Bronda A. Silvers Carol Zuschek Smith Wayne E. Smith Ann & Mark A. Soderberg John O. Somers & Karen Thiele Somers Byron E. Springer & Marion Peltier Springer A.R. Thomas Monica Schmidt Thompson Thompson, Ramsdell & Qualseth, PA Judge Michael E. Ward & Lissa Leonard Ward Perry D. Warren & Janet Beebe Warren Christian S. & Bridget D. Webb Thomas J. Weilert & Jane Kemezis Weilert Nathan H. & Annette White John R. Wiebke Susan Krehbiel William Gordon J. Williams Roy E. & Merritta J. Williams The Williams Companies Charlene J. & Mark P. Wilson Rebecca Swanwick Yocham & Keith A.Yocham

1865 CLUB ($100 to $299)

Aetna Foundation Inc. Linda Noland Aikins & David M. Aikins Martin K. Albrecht & Shari Feist Albrecht David C. & Priscilla A. All Joshua K. Allen Katherine Benson Allen Collin B. & Dana Altieri Mark A. & Susan E. Andersen Heather Zane Anderson Lincoln W. Anderson John E. Angelo Frederick G. Apt Jr. & Denise C. Apt Gavin W. & Christine J. Armstrong Janet L. Arndt & Roger C. Bain Karen M. Arnold-Burger & Kurt L. Burger John G. Atherton Robert H. Backus Katherine J. Bailes Joel A. Bannister Mark C. Bannister Debra Lee Barnett Curtis G. & Martha G. Barnhill Theresa L. Barr Gerald K. Bates & Sheida Hashemy Bates Donald F. & Catherine Bayer

Jonathan C. & Ruth E. Becker Justice Carol A. Beier & Richard W. Green Olivia A. Bennett Judge Barry A. Bennington & Lynette S. Bennington Marcella R. Bentley-Salmon & David R. Salmon Mark A. Berkley & Jane Booth Berkley Robin C. & Deborah M. Blair Elizabeth A. Blake Anne H. & William R. Blessing Lawrence W. Blickhan Stacia Gressel Boden Alice Boler Bolin Michael S. & Jennifer J. Boohar Karen L. Borell Judge Donald W. Bostwick & Jill Bostwick Aaron J. Breitenbach Gerald W. Brenneman Scott M. Brinkman Mary Stauffer Brownback U.S. Sen. Samuel D. Brownback Misti D. Brumback Mariam Moussa Brunton Ryan C. Brunton Jana R. Budde Steve A.J. Bukaty George A. Burns Michael B. & Holly L. Buser Granville M. Bush IV & Lynne Scheufele Bush Cmdr. Randall S. Butler, retired Duncan R. Butts Jr. Jan Fink Call James P. Callahan Laird S. Campbell & Nancy Cornforth Campbell Mark S. Carder Cardinal Health Foundation Judith Kloster Carlson Jill A. Casado Professor Elizabeth Seale Cateforis & David Cateforis Stephen C. Chambers Jeffrey A. Chanay & Kristin Anderson Chanay City of Leawood Barry A. Clark Carl R. Clark & Marjorie Caterer-Clark Clark, Mize & Linville, Chartered Marc P. Clements Louis A. Cohn & Lora A. Cohn, Ph.D. Stuart R. & Kelley L. Collier Noreen L. Connolly Chad B. & Jill S. Cook Staci L. Cooper Matthew K. & Tammara M. Corbin David L. Corliss & Sarah Roecker Corliss

KU LAW MAGAZINE 53

donor report Robert I. Correales John D. Corse & Andrea Markl Corse, M.D. Carolyn W. Coulson Countrywide Brent N. Coverdale Marshall L. Crowther & Sandra Garvey Crowther, Ed.D. Clark H. Cummins Ellen Maura Curry Joe Custer William E. & Elizabeth Dakan Peter F. Davidson Judge Kathryn E. Davis Nathaniel Davis Jr. LeRoy Lewis DeNooyer Amy M. & Gary W. Decker John P. DeCoursey Anna Marie Dempsey Gary D. & Janice J. Denning Paul M. Dent & Deborah K. Simpson Dent Philip V. Di Zerega Darren M. Dick Michael V. DiPasquale R. Stanley & Doris R. Ditus Michael C. Doering Michael A. Doll Darcy & Jill Domoney Blaine C. Donovan Holly A. Dyer Georgann H. Eglinski & Ronald W. Schorr Rick J. Eichor Justin D. Elkouri Anne Murray Emert Mark T. Emert Stacy Ortega Engels James W. Engler & Marcelyn Graham Engler Parthenia B. & Dan T. Evans Timothy J. & Mary S. Evans Faegre & Benson Foundation Alfred S. Farha, J.D. Pamela Hooper Feinstein & Larry B. Feinstein Bradley R. Finkeldei Patrick R. Ford Amy M. Fowler Drew D. Frackowiak Gregory L. Franken Joni J. Franklin Lucy L. Freeman Donald D. Friend II & Anna Peterson Friend Robert M. Friesen & Anne Ellis Friesen Robert A. & Barbara J. Garrity Mary K. Gates Jon W. & Linda M. Gilchrist Shannon E. Giles James R. & Karen Gilliland A. James Gillmore

54 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Phillip A. & Marlene K. Glenn Mark S. & Sandra Goldman Brian D. & Candace Goodman Roger L. Grandgenett II Wendy M. Green Larry Greenbaum Robert I. & Susan S. Guenthner Hellen L. & Frederick D. Haag Hallmark Corporate Foundation Casey S. Halsey & Paula Bush Halsey Marian S. Hamilton Mark A. & Debra L. Hannah Dave Harder Tina M. Hardin Albert J. Hardy & Patricia Culea Hardy Stephen C. & Melissa B. Harmon Allen D. Harnisch Marilyn M. Harp & Marc A. Quillen, Ph.D. Kurt A. & Kelly R. Harper Anne Fleishel Harris & Wilbur C. Buckheit Richard C. Harris & Jean Waddell Harris Joe A. Harter Thomasina Harvey & Keith Harvey Kent D. & Brenda D. Hatesohl Harold L. Haun Emily R. Haverkamp Christopher C. Haxton & Serese Yvonne Smith-Haxton Charles R. Hay Deanne Watts Hay Jay E. & Melissa M. Heidrick D. Randall & Joyce E. Heilman William H. Hensley & Dana Valdois Hensley William L. Hess & Jane McGrew Hess Bernard J. Hickert Judith Holden Hidalgo David L. Hiebert & Sheridan Dirks Hiebert Dennis J. Highberger Professor Laura J. Hines Patricia K. Hirsch Wyatt A. & Mary Ann Hoch David F. Hokanson Ross A. Hollander Mark D. Hoover James P. Hostetter, M.D., J.D. Stephen J. House Blake Hudson Ryan C. Hudson Craig A. & Antoinette Joyce Hunt Robert C. Hunter & Kimberly Duncan Hunter Evan H. Ice & Jill Redfern Ice Teresa J. James Bruce R. Jeide Norman W. & Ann H. Jeter William W. Jeter

Karen I. Johnson Leslie A. Johnson Donald A. Johnston & Alice Dowell Johnston Peter S. Johnston & Sara Peckham Johnston, M.D. Blythe Ridenour Jones Christopher R. Jones Heather Jones Alan Joseph & Diane Oliver Joseph Patrick J. Kaine Scott D. Kaiser Kraig E. Kannard Kansas Bar Association Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association Kansas University Endowment Association Jennifer M. Kassebaum William A. Kassebaum Thomas W. Keefe Martin J. Keenan & Julie Castelli Keenan Cynthia Lutz Kelly & Robert N. Kelly Nicholas Kemp & Jennifer Booth Kemp, M.D. Stephen M. Kerwick Teresa Roll Kerwick Justice B. King Jr. & Debra King Brenda Roberts Kissam John G. & Elaine R. Kite Judge Peggy Carr Kittel Rick A. Kittel Celeste Holder Kling & Robert Kling, Ph.D. Mark W. Knackendoffel & E. Ann Knackendoffel, Ph.D. Stephen D. & Ellen L. Kort KPMG Foundation James S. Kreamer Clara L. Krentzel Karen S. Kressin Law Office of Daniel H. Diepenbrock, PA Michael E. & Melinda Lazzo Judge Steve A. Leben & Ann E. Warner, M.D. Heather Ann Lee Brian W. Leonard & Elizabeth D.S. Leonard Ann J. Lerner Robert L. Lesh & Edwina Crane Lesh Ronald L. & Joleen M. Leslie Jeffrey Li Charles S. Lindberg & Dolores Goad Lindberg Samuel P. Logan & P. Diane McGrew Bob & Bev Londerholm Robert A. Long & I.M. Mazie Johnson Long Donald H. & Sue C. Loudon Eric V. Love & Jennifer Emerson Love

Todd A. & Kathy D. Luckman Barbara A. Lundin William E. Lupton & Carol A. Lupton Melissa Wangemann Maag Scott W. Mach & Patty Cray Mach Audrey B. Maga単a & Associates PA Michelle Mahaffey Peter T. Maharry Bruce C. Mallonee & LeeAnne Plumb Mallonee Norman G. Manley & Joy Stewart Manley Coy M. Martin Daniel J. Martin, Ed.D. J. Michael Martinez de Andino David R. Maslen Pamela Meador Mattson & Lynn P. Mattson Brian R. Matula Jan Haley Maxwell & Robert S. Maxwell Cindy Brunker McClannahan & John B. McClannahan Professor Joyce A. McCray Pearson & Mitchell D. Pearson Daniel R. & Julie McCune Ann McElhenny John C. McFadden Bettina Toisan McGriggler Philip C. & Jill McKnight Tyler P. McLeod James D. McMullen Leyla Galmarini McMullen Judge Robert S. McQuin & Lorene Gentle McQuin Elizabeth A. Meekins Eric B. Metz Eric Thomas Mikkelson Eric N. Miller Phillip A. & Janet M. Miller Rebecca E. Miller Roland B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller Scott J. Miller Shala Mills Robert B. Misner Eugene E. Mitchell John W. Mitchell Jr. & Margaret Katherine Mitchell Kevin F. & Frances Mitchelson Karen M. Mittel Mobil Retirees Matching Gift Program J. Donel & Polly S. Moore Judge Kathleen P. Moran Stephen R. & Paula M. Morgan Rick G. Morris Paul T. Moxley Virginia H. Murray Lynn Myers Robert B. & Margaret E. Neill N. Royce & Linda L. Nelson Robert I. Nicholson Jr.

John W. Nitcher & Mary Streepy Nitcher James P. Nordstrom Christine McDaniel Novak & Keith Fredrick Novak Mr. & Mrs. Lee M. Novak Robert Edward Nunley Kent G. Nunn & Colleen Johnson Nunn Justice Lawton R. Nuss Arnold C. Nye James J. O’Malley Donna Hauser O’Neal ONEOK Foundation James A. Oppy John J. Osgood Gary W. Owens Robert C. Paden Jr. John C. Pauls Peabody Energy Bethany A. Pendleton L. Robert & Nina M. Pennington Alphonse B. Perkins R. Sam Pestinger Kathryn Pruessner Peters & Stephen D. Peters Donald N. Peterson II Douglas G. Peterson Linda Simpson Peterson Col. John F. Plummer Jr. Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post Eva Powers & Ramon S. Powers, Ph.D. Thomas K. & Sharon Pratt Lynn D. Preheim James L. Prentice Leslie Granger Prentice Sarah E. Preston John A. Price Jacqueline Egr Pueppke Judge James A. Pusateri & Jacqueline A. Pusateri Richard E. Putnam Ronald S. Reuter Christie Frick Reynolds & David O. Reynolds Frances Owing Rice David F. & Linda F. Richards Joseph P. Richardson David A. & Sheila L. Ricke Jennifer Knapp Riggs Peter L. Riggs Marcia Kyle Rinehart & Richard B. Reinhart Brian M. Roberts & Andrea DePaolis Roberts Lauren E. Roberts Thomas J. Robinson Judge David W. Rogers Judge Richard D. Rogers & Cynthia J. Rogers Todd Rogers & Erin McLain Rogers Wendy M. Rohleder-Sook

Gary L. Rohrer & Lee Ann Urban Rohrer Leon E. & Barbara H. Roulier Karen P. Ruckert March M. Runner Judge Janice D. Russell William H. Sanders Jr. John O. & Joann L. Sanderson Stephen L. Sapp & Theresa Barton Sapp William K. Sauck Jr. Michael P. Schaefer Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW Dionne M. Scherff & Thomas R. Crawford Paul M. Schmidt Ralph L. L. Schmidt CPA Robert E. Schulman, Ph.D., & Anne Fink Schulman Lisa M. Schultes & Dan O’Connell John Scurlock Michael K. & Sharon Seck Kathryn A. & Jim Seeberger Steven D. Selbe Bhavi A. Shah Barry M. Shalinsky Emily Cameron Shattil Martin M. Shoemaker Stephen T. Sigler Xavier Simonsen Stephen N. Six & Elizabeth Brand Six Amy Verschoor Skinner Thomas H. & Jeannie E. Slack Judge Allen R. Slater & Kathryn Bohn Slater G. Sid Smith Stanford J. Smith Jr. Steven P. & Deborah J. Smith Wesley F. Smith & Lisa M. Leroux-Smith John P. Smolen Judge Dale L. Somers & Judyanne Somers Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LP Christopher W. Sook David A. Sorenson Jeffrey S. Southard Wesley H. Sowers Jr. Jeff C. Spahn Jr. Keith L. & Jan Stanley Col. Russell A. Stanley, U.S. Air Force, retired Theodore L. & Paula W. Starr John H. Stauffer Jr. & Kathy Stauffer Scott C. Stockwell Darin D. Stowell Marie Parker Strahan & Dennis W. Strahan Gordon B. & Carol Stull Howard T. Sturdevant & Gail Sturdevant

Robert C. & Linda Ann Sturgeon Michael L. Sullivan Robert B. & Patty S. Sullivan Professor Ellen E. Sward Swiss Re Matching Grant Program Jonathon A. Szumny Robert L. Tanner William P. Tanner III Jeffrey C. Tauscher Michael L. Taylor Lee H. Tetwiler & Mari Baird Tetwiler Beverly J. Thomas Gabrielle M. Thompson & Oliver L. Weaver, Ph.D. Patrick H. & Patricia L. Thompson Thomson West Kathryn Marie Timm Stephen M. & Carlene M. Todd Kristen V. Toner Karen L. Torline Paul B. Torline Robert W. Tormohlen Monica D. Tovar-von Waaden Cheryl L. & Shaun P. Trenholm David P. Trevino & Sarah Whitten Tom C. & Christie Triplett Thomas M. & Suzanne F. Tuggle Kimberley H. Tyson Julie L. Unruh Kenneth R. & Annette Van Blaricum Thomas M.Van Cleave III Dr. Betty van der Smissen VedderPrice Kaufman & Kammholz PC Larry S.Vernon John A.Vetter Gene E. & Linda E.Voigts D. Mark von Waaden Sen. John L.Vratil & Teresa C.Vratil Richard Y. Wada & Margaret Anami Wada Kenneth L. Wagner & Lida McNearney Wagner Judge Richard W. Wahl Michael R. Wallace & Mary E. Bartlett Judge Marcia K. Walsh Martha S. Warren David E. Waters Daniel L. & Phyllis Watkins Alan D. Weber Lanette M. Wickham & Frank J. Rebori Charles R. Wilson Professor Melanie D. Wilson Gary A. Winfrey & Sally Nixon Winfrey Will B. Wohlford Kathleen Kopach Woods William S. Woolley Wendel W. & Rhonda Wurst William M.Yanek II Bradley J.Yeretsky

Emily M.Yeretsky Katherine A. Zogleman

NEW FUNDS

BLACKWELL SANDERS DIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP was established through a gift from the law firm of Husch Blackwell Sanders LLP (formerly Blackwell Sanders LLP). The scholarship will assist with fees for the recipient’s second or third academic year. Preference will be given to a law student who has demonstrated a commitment to promoting diversity. Recipients of this scholarship will be known as Blackwell Sanders Legal Diversity Scholars. JOY M. JOHNSON TRUST FOR THE SCHOOL OF LAW was established through a bequest from Joy M. Johnson of Topeka. The fund will be used to provide unrestricted support to address the School of Law’s most urgent annual funding priorities. MEDICAL-LEGAL CLINIC AT THE SOUTHWEST BOULEVARD FAMILY HEALTH CARE CLINIC was established with grant funds from the Health Care Foundation of Kansas City, the Wichita-based Kansas Health Foundation and the Topeka-based Sunflower Foundation: Health Care for Kansans. Law students working in the medical-legal clinic under the supervision of a lawyer join the KU Medical Center’s JayDocs program to assist indigent citizens in the greater Kansas City area. Law students work with individuals to address a wide range of legal problems that affect their health care status and quality of life. PUBLIC INTEREST LAW FUND is a special project undertaken by the KU Law Alumni Board of Governors. Funds provide summer stipends to law students working in unpaid public interest/public sector positions.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 55

donor report SHOOK, HARDY & BACON CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE IN ADVOCACY was established through gifts from the firm of Shook Hardy & Bacon and a number of its lawyers to prepare law students to excel as advocates. The center is co-directed by Dennis Prater, the Connell Teaching Professor of Law at KU, and Stan Davis, a partner at the firm’s Kansas City, Mo., office. The inaugural lecture will be given in January 2009 by the Hon. Robert Henry, chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit. Also that month, the center will sponsor the law school’s first intersession trial skills course on depositions directed by Professor Suzanne Valdez. WAL-MART LEGAL DIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP was established with a gift from the Wal-Mart Legal Department to provide scholarships to students from groups that are underrepresented in the legal profession. KU values diversity in its student body and believes that the intentional creation of a diverse learning environment is essential to achieving the university’s educational mission. The Wal-Mart Scholarship will assist the university and the School of Law in building that diverse community. PAUL YDE LAW AND ECONOMICS FUND was established through a gift from Paul Yde, L’85, and Sarah R. Elder, of University Park, Md., to support teaching, research and scholarly activities that support an increased understanding of the relationship between economic principles and law.

LIBRARY SUPPORT FUNDS

Hazel A. Anderson Law Library Fund Louise Ahlstedt Beebe and Jack E. Beebe Law Library Fund Thomas W. Boone Law School Library Fund Ruth Adair Dyer Law Library Fund Friends of the University of Kansas Law Library Arthur W. Hershberger Memorial Law Book Fund Frank S. Hodge Memorial Library Fund KU Law Library Unrestricted Fund Kate McKay Memorial Book Fund Evart Mills Memorial Book Fund

56 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Douglas D. and Laura L. Wheat School of Law Opportunity Fund

LOAN FUNDS

Kenneth K. Branson & Ezra R. Whitla Memorial Fund Judge Clarence A. Burney Loan Fund John F. Hassig Memorial Loan Fund Law School Loan Fund Glenn E. and Helene Zimmerman McCann Law Scholarship Fund James B. Smith/Philip H. Dawson Student Loan Fund Elaine D. and Arthur L. Sparks Loan Fund James E. & Edna J. Sullivan Law School Loan Fund

MATCHING GIFTS

The School of Law wishes to express its gratitude to the following firms, corporations, foundations and companies whose matching gift programs have enhanced the contributions of individual donors: Aetna Foundation Inc. American Express Charitable Fund American Multi-Cinema Inc. AT&T Foundation The Bank of America Foundation Blackwell Sanders LC The Boeing Company Cardinal Health Foundation Chevron Matching Gift Program ConocoPhillips Countrywide DST Systems Inc. Ernst & Young Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation Faegre & Benson Foundation Farmers Insurance Group Inc. Great-West Life & Annuity Insurance Company Hallmark Corporate Foundation Illinois Tool Works Foundation Kansas University Endowment Association KPMG Foundation Macy’s Foundation Mobil Retiree Matching Gift Program Nationwide Foundation Northern Trust Company Charitable Trust ONEOK Foundation Peabody Energy Philip Morris USA Inc. Security Benefit Group of Companies Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee PC

Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Snell & Wilmer LLP Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP Sprint Foundation Swiss Re Matching Grant Program Tenet Healthcare Foundation Thompson & Knight Foundation Thomson West Vedder Price Kaufman & Kammholz PC Westar Energy Foundation Whirlpool Foundation The Williams Companies

GIFTS RECEIVED IN HONOR OF Law Class of 2007 Keith U. Martin, L’47

GIFTS RECEIVED IN MEMORY OF

Oswald Prentiss Backus III Robert F. Bennett, L’52 Peggy A. Clark Mary Ann Mize Dickinson E.S. Hampton, L’29 Tom Hampton, L’59 Mrs. A. Bryce Huguenin W. Ross Hutton, L’83 C. Frederick Ice, L’24 Mildred Branine Ice Professor Philip C. Kissam Philip C. Lacey, L’74 Kenton J. Mai, L’89 Robert B. McKay Janean Meigs, L’76 Judge Earl E. O’Connor, L’50 Jean A. O’Connor Hortense Casady Oldfather Larry R. O’Neal, L’72 Dale L. Pohl Professor Emeritus William Scott Wesley H. Sowers Sr. Mary Sullivan Steingraeber Judge Nelson Timothy Stephens Samuel Toole Frederick L. Ward, L’87 Professor Emeritus Paul E. Wilson Paul R. Wunsch, L’25

OTHER FUNDS

Richard L. and Suzanne Sedgwick Bond Fund Walter Brauer Faculty Support Fund Daisy E. and Paul H. Brown Elder Law Fund Robert C. Casad Comparative Law Lectureship Class of 1971 Fund Donald L. Cordes School of Law Opportunity Fund Charles L. Decker Fund

Mary Ann Mize Dickinson Memorial Garden Fund G. Gary Duncan Fund Elder Law Program Fund David H. Fisher Law Fund Loren M. Gensman Fund GUF/Law School Unrestricted Kenneth M. and Ruth Elizabeth Hamilton Law Fund Ed and Helen Healy Law School Opportunity Fund Hinkle Elkouri Conference Room Fund Humphrey School of Law Discretionary Fund Ice Family Fund Joy M. Johnson Trust for the School of Law Kansas City Kansas Medical Legal Family Health Project Kansas Defender Project Kansas Law Review Law School Building Fund Law School Dean’s Discretionary Account Law School Media, Law and Policy Program Legal Aid Clinic Fund Linda S. Legg and Lawrence G. Crahan Professionalism Fund James K. Logan Fund Fred B. Lovitch and Michael J. Davis Law Fund Robert B. McKay Memorial Fund Richard F. Mullins Moot Court Competition Fund Judge Edmund L. Page Jurist-in-Residence Program Polsinelli Shalton Welte Suelthaus Fund Don and Ruth Lawless Postlethwaite Fund Public Interest Law Fund Robert A. Schroeder Family Teaching Fellowship Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy Shughart, Thomson & Kilroy Fund Fred N. and Lilian Six Unrestricted Law School Fund James Barclay Smith Fund Snell & Wilmer Courtroom Renovation Fund Judge Nelson Timothy Stephens Lecture Stephenson Lectures in Law and Government Fund Stinson Morrison Hecker Fund Tax Certificate Program Fund Tribal Law & Government Center Fund Gary A. Waldron and Carol A. Foster

Law School Dean Discretionary Fund Gary A. Waldron and Carol A. Foster Law School Fund Douglas D. and Laura L. Wheat School of Law Opportunity Fund Houston Whiteside Fund Dennis P. Wilbert and Joan R. Ruff Fund Paul L. and Florine T. Wilbert Fund Wolfe Family Moot Court Assistance Fund Paul Yde Law and Economics Fund

PRIZES AND AWARDS

Barber Emerson, LC Blue Book Relays Robert F. Bennett Student Award Fund William L. Burdick Prize Mary Anne Chambers Service Award G. Gary Duncan Scholastic Improvement Prize Robert E. Edmonds Prize for Corporation and Securities Law Family Fund Robert C. Foulston and George Siefkin Prizes for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy Hershberger, Patterson, Jones & Roth Energy Law Award Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm, LLC Tax Procedure Award W. Ross Hutton Prize Howard A. and Sue Immel Annual Teaching Award Lloyd M. Kagey Leadership Award Law Class of 1949 Leadership Award Janean Meigs Memorial Award in Law Fund Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership, and Service Award James P. Mize Trial Advocacy Award Dean Frederick J. Moreau Faculty Award Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy Client Counseling Competition Award Larry R. O’Neal/Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Law School Award Fund Payne & Jones Lawyering Program Award Shapiro Award for Best Paper on Law and Public Policy Carl T. Smith Memorial Scholarship Award Sonnenschein Scholars Program C. C. Stewart Award

Susman Godfrey Trial Advocacy Award UMB Bank Excellence in Trust Planning Award

PROFESSORSHIPS

The Centennial Teaching Professorship The Centennial Teaching Professorship was originally established as the Centennial Teaching Fellowship in 1993 to commemorate the 100th year of the University of Kansas School of Law. It was created to honor faculty who are outstanding teachers. From that fellowship, the first Centennial Teaching Professorship was presented at Homecoming in 1996 to Michael Davis, professor and former dean of the school.The Centennial Teaching Professorship has now been permanently endowed with gifts from alumni and friends of the School of Law. Michael J. Davis continues to hold the professorship. The Connell Teaching Professorships in Kansas Law In 1998, O. J. Connell Jr., L’38, and Mary Kathleen Connell established the Connell Teaching Professorships in Kansas Law to support two University Teaching Professorships in specific areas of law with particular application to Kansas in order to increase the knowledge and training of law students and practitioners. John C. Peck, L’74, and Dennis D. Prater, L’73, are the holders of the Connell Teaching Professorships in Kansas Law. The E. S. and Tom Hampton Distinguished Professorship In 1985, the family, law firm and friends of E. S. Hampton, L’29, and Tom Hampton, L’59, established a distinguished professorship in their memories. Keith G. Meyer is holder of the Hampton Professorship. The John H. and John M. Kane Distinguished Professorship Through the generosity of Corrine G. Kane, Louise Miller Kane, Richard Kane, John F. Kane and Henry F. Kane, all of Bartlesville, Okla., the Kane Professorship was created in 1966, honoring John H. Kane, L’1900, and John M. Kane, an alumnus of the School of Engineering. Michael

H. Hoeflich is holder of the Kane Professorship. The Raymond F. Rice Distinguished Professorship in Law This professorship was established in 2003 in honor of Raymond F. Rice who, through the Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Foundation, has significantly benefited the School of Law for many years. Raj Bhala is holder of the Rice Professorship. The John M. Rounds Distinguished Professorship in Law In 1986, John M. Rounds, L’39, of Arroyo Grande, Calif., established an endowed fund to support a distinguished professorship at the School of Law. Chris Drahozal is holder of the Rounds Professorship. The Robert A. Schroeder Distinguished Professorship In 1984, Robert A. Schroeder, L’37, established a distinguished professorship unrestricted in subject matter. The professorship is one of a number of funds provided by the Schroeder family to the school. Martin B. Dickinson is holder of the Schroeder Professorship. The J. B. Smith Distinguished Professorship in Constitutional Law In 2005, Arthur C. Piculell Jr., L’65, and Dee Piculell established the J. B. Smith Professorship in Constitutional Law to honor Dr. Smith’s many years of teaching at the School. Richard E. Levy is the inaugural holder of the Smith Constitutional Law Professorship. The Frank E. Tyler Distinguished Professorship in Law In 1983, the Frank Edwards Tyler Distinguished Professorship in Law was established through gifts to the KU Endowment Association. Tyler was a distinguished Kansas City, Mo., attorney for more than 40 years. The professorship was established in his memory through the generosity of his widow and his legacy was supplemented by funds from his son and daughter-in-law, Frank and Dorothy Bowman Tyler; his former law firm, Dietrich, Davis, Dicus, Rowlands &

Schmitt; and the Law School Professorship Fund. George C. Coggins is holder of the Tyler Professorship. The Robert W. Wagstaff Distinguished Professorship in Law In 1989, Robert W. and Katherine Hall Wagstaff of Mission Hills established the Robert W. Wagstaff Distinguished Professorship in Law. The Wagstaffs’ sons, Robert Hall Wagstaff and Thomas Walton Wagstaff, received their law degrees from the KU School of Law in 1966 and 1972, respectively. Robert L. Glicksman is holder of the Wagstaff Professorship. The Paul E. Wilson Distinguished Professorship in Law The Paul E. Wilson Distinguished Professorship in Law is the second distinguished professorship endowed by the late John M. Rounds, L’39. The Wilson Professorship honors Rounds’ friend and undergraduate classmate, the late Professor Emeritus Paul E. Wilson. Elinor P. Schroeder is holder of the Wilson Professorship. SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS Mark H. Adams Sr. Memorial Scholarship Warren D. Andreas Scholarship in Law Richard A. Barber Scholarship Judge Willard M. and Lucile H. Benton Memorial Scholarship Blackwell Sanders Diversity Scholarship Book Exchange Scholarships Bremyer Summer Intern Scholarship Judge Clayton and Cecile Goforth Brenner Scholarship in Law Claude E. Chalfant Memorial Scholarship John W. and Gertrude Clark Scholarship Claude O. Conkey Memorial Scholarship Glen W. Dickinson Scholarship in Law William and Judy Docking Law Scholarship Port and Mildred Early Scholarship Judge A. M. Ebright Memorial Scholarship Robert E. Edmonds Law School Scholarship

KU LAW MAGAZINE 57

donor report Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch Scholarship Foulston & Siefkin Law Review Scholarship Jordan and Shirley Haines Scholarship Thomas H. Harkness KU Law School Scholarship Darrell L. Havener Scholarship Aldie Haver Memorial Scholarship in Law The Help of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ Scholarship Al J. and Sylvia M. Herrod Law Scholarship Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Scholarship Michael H. Hoeflich and Karen J. Nordheden Scholarship in Law Enos A. Hook Scholarship in Law A. Bryce Huguenin School of Law Scholarship Judge Walter A. Huxman Scholarship Arthur M. Jackson Scholarship in Law Elmer C. Jackson Jr. Scholarship in Law for Black Americans Margaret S. Jeffrey Scholarship Grant in Law The Kansas Women Attorneys Association Jennie Mitchell Kellogg Scholarship Calvin and Janice Karlin Annual Scholarship Dorothy Arlene Bates Kirk Scholarship Law School Class of 1925 Scholarship Law Class of 1953 Scholarship Law School Scholarship John R. Light and Gary Olson Scholarship Robert W. Loyd Scholarship in Law Frank A. Lutz Memorial Scholarship Kenton Mai Memorial Scholarship Minorities in Law Scholarships Harriet and Mancel Mitchell Scholarship in Law John R. Morse Law School Scholarship Ronald C. Newman Scholarship Major Eugene H. Nirdlinger Memorial Scholarship Bernard E. Nordling Scholarship Norton, Hubbard, Ruzicka & Kreamer L.C. Scholarship Judge Earl E. and Jean Ann O’Connor Memorial Scholarship in Law Charles H. Oldfather Scholarship Joseph O. and Mary Louise Parker Scholarship Olin K. and Mary Ruth Petefish School of Law Scholarship

58 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Polsinelli Shalton Welte Suelthaus Diversity Scholarship Charles B. Randall Memorial Scholarship Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Foundation Scholarship Ross Foundation Law School Scholarship Judge M. Kay Royse Scholarship in Law Judge J.C. Ruppenthal Law Scholarship Vivian McAtee Schmidt Scholarship Robert A. and Janet Manning Schroeder Scholarship in Law Elisha Scott Memorial Scholarship Professor William R. Scott Scholarship Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee Law Scholarship J. Frank and Carolyn Henry Shinkle Memorial Scholarship J. Frank Shinkle Student Aid Fund Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Diversity in Law Scholarship Shook, Hardy & Bacon Scholarships Professor Earl B. and Mary Maurine Shurtz Tribal Lawyer Scholarship Clarine Smissman J.D. and Edward Smissman Ph.D. Scholarship in Law Glee and Geraldine Smith Law Scholarship William C. Spangler Memorial Scholarship Judge Robert F. Stadler Memorial Scholarship Evelyn, Richard and Blanche Thompson Scholarship Leslie T. Tupy Memorial Scholarship Voss Kansas Law Scholarship Wal-Mart Legal Diversity Scholarship Frederick L. Ward Memorial Scholarship Willard G. Widder Scholarship Karl T. Wiedemann Scholarship in Law Paul R. Wunsch Scholarship

1947 Keith U. & Hulda Martin Judge Richard D. Rogers & Cynthia J. Rogers Glee S. Smith Jr. & Geraldine Smith

CLASSES

1955 Donald N. Dirks Bob & Bev Londerholm

1939 Estate of James M. Haughey Omer G.Voss & Annabelle K.Voss

1956 Frederick G. Apt Jr. & Denise C. Apt Robert A. & Barbara J. Garrity Judge James W. Paddock & Ruth Davenport Paddock Justice Fred N. Six & Lilian Six Carl E. Stallard

1937 Norman W. & Ann H. Jeter

1940 John D. Stewart 1945 John Scurlock

1949 Robert B. Castor & Gloria Nelson Castor Robert L. Lesh & Edwina Crane Lesh Arnold C. Nye 1950 Laird S. Campbell & Nancy Cornforth Campbell Kenneth & Sue Harmon George A. Lowe & Rosemary Lowe L. Robert & Nina M. Pennington 1951 Richard C. Harris & Jean Waddell Harris Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy Russell B. Taylor Judge Richard W. Wahl 1952 Eugene E. Mitchell Col. Russell A. Stanley, U.S. Air Force, retired Dr. Betty van der Smissen 1953 Constance M. Achterberg John G. Atherton Donald W. Giffin & Esther Brown Giffin Roy E. & Merritta J. Williams J. Robert Wilson & Marguerite J. Wilson 1954 J. Eugene Balloun Larry E. Keenan & Patricia L. Degner-Keenan Charles S. Lindberg & Dolores Goad Lindberg D. Spencer Yohe & Betty Foster Yohe

1957 R. Stanley & Doris R. Ditus Alvin D. Herrington John G. & Elaine R. Kite William B. Pendleton Larry Worrall & Beverly Cope Worrall 1958 Heywood H. Davis & Louise Swigart Davis Richard H. Rumsey & Lorie Dudley Rumsey Judge Gerald L. Rushfelt Donald E. & Nancy S. Stephenson Robert L. Tanner Willard B. Thompson & Barbara Lemert Thompson Robert S. Wunsch & Barbara Bateman Wunsch 1959 John W. Brand Jr. & Barbara Sample Brand Donald L. Cordes Dudley Ann Wall Kirk & James E. Kirk Thomas H. Krueger & Jean Krueger Jack R. Reed 1960 Richard L. Bond & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond Terry N. Fiske Edward H. & Julia N. Graham Justice Edward Larson & Mary L. Larson Gary L. Rohrer & Lee Ann Urban Rohrer Byron E. Springer & Marion Peltier Springer 1961 Alfred S. Farha, J.D. Judge Theodore B. Ice & Sue Harper Ice 1962 Howard E. Dutcher & Jean Spangler Dutcher John E. Hurley Jr. & Jo Sicking Hurley Donald H. & Sue C. Loudon Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd Joel A. Sterrett & Dr. Joye Sterrett Howard T. Sturdevant & Gail Sturdevant 1963 Lawrence W. Blickhan Robert E. Donatelli & Katherine Donatelli Charles H. Hostetler & Julie A. Hostetler

Judge James A. Pusateri & Jacqueline A. Pusateri Roger D. Stanton & Judith Duncan Stanton 1964 Donald D. Adams & Ann Wees Adams Lynn L. Anderson & La Faun McMurry Anderson Robert L. Driscoll & Marilyn Rockwell Driscoll Judge Jerry G. Elliott & Debra S. Duncan Leon E. & Barbara H. Roulier Tom C. & Christie Triplett Robert E. & Mary L. Williams 1965 Ernest Adelman & Barbara Boley Adelman David C. & Priscilla A. All Bradley L. & Judith Lyn Brehm James L. Crabtree Marshall L. Crowther & Sandra Garvey Crowther, Ed.D. Karen I. Johnson Topper & Linda D. Johntz Ronald L. & Joleen M. Leslie 1966 Mark A. Berkley & Jane Booth Berkley Stephen C. Chambers Peter K. Curran & Virginia Schubert Curran Max E. Eberhart & Nina Gillig Eberhart Donald A. Johnston & Alice Dowell Johnston Anne Marie Morgan Stephen M. & Carlene M. Todd Thomas M.Van Cleave III 1967 Judge Barry A. Bennington & Lynette S. Bennington Thomas M. & Barbara B. Dawson John D. & Karin M. Dunbar Robert W. & Joyce M. Green Robert I. & Susan S. Guenthner Albert J. Hardy & Patricia Culea Hardy Harold L. Haun Dean B. Hill Judge J.C. Irvin & Mary Lewis Irvin John R. Light & Sharon Koch Light Floyd R. McHenry William T. Pendergrass Ralph L. L. Schmidt CPA Robert E. Schulman, Ph.D., & Anne Fink Schulman Thomas M. & Suzanne F. Tuggle

1968 Larry D. Armel & JoAnne Armel Norman E. Beal & Sally Jenkins Beal Judge Donald W. Bostwick & Jill Bostwick George L. Catt & Sherrill Lynn Catt Thomas A. & Mary M. Darner Peter F. Davidson Robert B. & Caroline E. Hosford Gary L. Olson & Vicki A. Olson John O. Somers & Karen Thiele Somers David A. Sorenson Wesley H. Sowers Jr. Robert B. & Patty S. Sullivan Charles R. Wilson E. Larry Winn III 1969 Homer P. Appleby Jr. Gavin W. & Christine J. Armstrong Terry Arthur & Virginia Thomas Arthur Ernest C. Ballweg John D. Conderman & Patricia R. Conderman Timothy J. & Mary S. Evans Arch G. Gothard III James P. Nordstrom Ronald S. Reuter Alan W. Roeder A.R. Thomas R. Dean Wolfe & Cheryl L. Wolfe James B. Wright 1970 Frank S. Bangs Jr. William Bevan III & Gail M. Bevan Rick J. Eichor Michael P. Martin Michael J. McNally & Elizabeth Shertzer McNally James A. Oppy Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post G. Sid Smith Keith L. and Jan Stanley Kenneth R. & Annette Van Blaricum John H. & Martha J. White Gary A. Winfrey & Sally Nixon Winfrey 1971 Margaret M. Breinholt Thomas P. Garretson & Carole Bomhard Garretson Ronald R. Kimzey & Emily Cooper Kimzey John H. Mack R. Sam Pestinger Judge G. Joseph Pierron & Diana Carlin Pierron, Ph.D. Losson G. Pike & Leanne Benda Pike John B. Roesler

Bill Sampson Judge Dale L. Somers & Judyanne Somers R. Kent Sullivan Sen. John L.Vratil & Teresa C.Vratil 1972 R. Dan & Dale P. Boulware George A. Burns LeRoy Lewis DeNooyer James R. & Karen Gilliland A. James Gillmore Jerry L. Harrison Robert R. Hiller Jr. Alan Joseph & Diane Oliver Joseph Roland B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller Robert B. Misner N. Royce & Linda L. Nelson Robert I. Nicholson Jr. John A. Price David F. & Linda F. Richards Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith William P. Tanner III Richard Y. Wada & Margaret Anami Wada Kenneth A. & Leann Webb Edward L. Winthrop George W. & Margaret E.Yarnevich 1973 Clifford L. Bertholf Ron Bodinson Judge Mary Beck Briscoe Granville M. Bush IV & Lynne Scheufele Bush Pamela Hooper Feinstein & Larry B. Feinstein Jill S. Ferrel Bruce A. Finzen Barry D. Halpern & Cynthia Zedler Halpern Joe A. Harter William L. Hess & Jane McGrew Hess David L. Hiebert & Sheridan Dirks Hiebert Bruce R. Jeide Gordon A. Jones Edward M. Kaplan Linda L. Lee William E. Lupton & Carol A. Lupton William F. Lyle Jr. Randal J. McDowell & Zelia Taylor McDowell Paul T. Moxley Robert C. Perry Joan R. Ruff John O. & Joann L. Sanderson Michael V. Schaefer Theodore A. Schilling Emily Cameron Shattil Rex N. Shewmake Jr. & Mary Jane Shewmake

Judge Allen R. Slater & Kathryn Bohn Slater Kenneth W. Spain & Cynthia Mullen Spain Nancy J. Spies Judge Marcia K. Walsh Perry D. Warren & Janet Beebe Warren Kent H. Weltmer Dennis P. Wilbert 1974 Paul M. Dent & Deborah K. Simpson Dent Richard E. Dietz & Marsha Merritt Dietz Darrell D. Dreiling Melvin L. Ehrlich James W. Engler & Marcelyn Graham Engler Lawrence C. Gates & Jeanne K. Gates Cary A. Gluesenkamp & Roberta Cooke Gluesenkamp Stephen C. & Melissa B. Harmon Charles R. Hay Joseph J. Hoagland & Norma Decker Hoagland Blake Hudson Norman G. Manley & Joy Stewart Manley Stephen R. & Paula M. Morgan Clay A. Mosberg Lynn Myers Professor John C. Peck & Pamela C. Peck Paul D. Post & Kay Kelly, LSCSW Hal C. Reed Kenneth W. Reeves III Kelley D. Sears & Jane A. Sears William H. Seiler Jr. Michael L. Sullivan Larry S.Vernon Roger K.Viola & Karen S.Viola Douglas D. Wheat & Laura L. Wheat Gaylen R. Williams Thomas F. Wobker 1975 Blake A. Biles Charles A. Briscoe Steve A.J. Bukaty William W. Jeter Donald A. & Diane C. Low Barbara A. Lundin Pamela Meador Mattson & Lynn P. Mattson Phillip A. & Janet M. Miller John R. Morse & Kay Stine Morse Jack E. Salyer Ross W. & Margaret M. Schimmels Floyd W. Smith Jr. & Cecilia E. Smith Theodore L. & Paula W. Starr

KU LAW MAGAZINE 59

donor report Michael A. Sternlieb Cathleen Chandler Stevenson & David A. Stevenson Naomi L. Stuart Gordon B. & Carol Stull Earl D. & Shirley A. Tjaden Judge Kathryn H.Vratil & John W. Hamilton Daniel L. & Phyllis Watkins Thomas J. Weilert & Jane Kemezis Weilert 1976 Donald F. & Catherine Bayer Bion J. Beebe & Vicki Storm Beebe Terry A. & Phyllis L. Blaser James P. Callahan Jill A. Casado Nathaniel Davis Jr. S. Nyles & Mary P. Davis Michael F. Delaney & Kathleen Gibbons Delaney Charles P. Efflandt Steven D. & Lisa A. Gough Cathy Havener Greer William H. Hensley & Dana Valdois Hensley Ross A. Hollander Gina Kaiser David D. Kardell & Virginia Potente Kardell Justice B. King Jr. & Debra King John A. Koepke Professor Dennis L. Mandsager & Sherrie Koester Mandsager Judge Randall H. McEwen & Kamela McIntosh McEwen Judge Kathleen P. Moran David P. Mudrick & Mary Walker Mudrick Bernard V. O’Neill Jr. & Marion W. O’Neill Eva Powers & Ramon S. Powers, Ph.D. Leslie Granger Prentice William M. & Nancy E. Quitmeier Leland E. Rolfs Floy Lambertson Shaeffer Neil R. Shortlidge & Renee Sproul Shortlidge John M. Talley Beverly J. Thomas Monica Schmidt Thompson 1977 Lydia I. Beebe Robin C. & Deborah M. Blair Alice Boler Bolin Karen L. Borell Charles F. Bunch Michael B. & Holly L. Buser David L. Davenport & Sally Nelson Davenport

60 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Ed W. Dosh Jane A. Finn, Ph.D. Allen D. Harnisch Deanne Watts Hay Lewis A. Heaven Jr. & Paula Butz Heaven Calvin J. Karlin Daniel J. Lyons & Maryanne Lyons John C. McFadden Lt. Col. Dwight A. Moore, U.S. Air Force, retired Evan J. Olson & Susan Woodin Olson Kathryn Pruessner Peters & Stephen D. Peters Brenda Petrie Register & Benton Register James A. Riedy Judge Janice D. Russell William H. Sanders Jr. Albert J. Schwartz & Jane Lake Schwartz James O. Selzer J. Stanley & Tommye C. Sexton Professor Jan Bowen Sheldon, Ph.D., J.D., & Dr. James A. Sherman Robert C. & Linda Ann Sturgeon Lee H. Tetwiler & Mari Baird Tetwiler John A.Vetter Alan D. Weber Cynthia S. Woelk Mark A. Zuschek & Jo Dee Daetwiler Zuschek 1978 Phyllis A. Bock Tim Connell Maril Crabtree Michael C. Doering Charles E. Doyle Georgann H. Eglinski & Ronald W. Schorr David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Robert H. Gale Jr. & Linda C. Gale Janet Bass Garlow Alan V. Johnson & Mary Slaughter Johnson Thomas W. Keefe Jennifer Johnson Kinzel William M. Modrcin Jr. John W. Nitcher & Mary Streepy Nitcher Judge Sebastian T. Patti Jeanne Gorman Rau & Donald A. Rau George E. Rider & Jeannene Keaton Rider Jeffrey S. Southard Christopher G. Standlee Martha Braun Wallisch & William J. Wallisch III John R. Wine Jr. & Ellen Sue Wine

Winton A. Winter Jr. & Mary Boyd Winter Stanley N. Woodworth & Nancy G. Woodworth 1979 Anne H. & William R. Blessing Martha J. Coffman & Patrick T. Curtiss Robert W. Coykendall & Dorothy A. Hirsch William E. & Elizabeth Dakan Gary D. & Janice J. Denning Nancy M. Dixon Gene H. Gaede & Jannelle Robins-Gaede Marilyn M. Harp & Marc A. Quillen, Ph.D. Kurt A. & Kelly R. Harper Edward J. Healy & Helen Healy Patricia K. Hirsch Kathleen Clubb Kauffman & Charles M. Kauffman, Ph.D. Col. John F. Plummer Jr. James L. Prentice Larry G. Rapp Nancy Schmidt Roush Barry M. Shalinsky Thomas H. & Jeannie E. Slack Maryann Slattery John H. Stauffer Jr. & Kathy Stauffer Peter E. Strand & Sheila C. Strand Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, Ph.D. 1980 Frank A. Ackerman Judge Martin J. Asher Orval F. Baldwin II Carol Y. & Jeffrey P. Berns Bruce E. Cavitt Stuart R. & Kelley L. Collier Kathleen A. Dillon W. Patrick Haley & Paula McGuire Haley Bernard J. Hickert Judge Janice Miller Karlin Jodde Olsen Lanning Carl S. Long III & Mary K. Long Judson R. Maillie Bruce C. Mallonee & LeeAnne Plumb Mallonee Jan Haley Maxwell & Robert S. Maxwell Ann McElhenny Judge Robert S. McQuin & Lorene Gentle McQuin Eric B. Metz Richard E. Putnam Mark R. Thompson & Barbara E. Thompson Patrick H. & Patricia L. Thompson Alleen S.VanBebber

Michael R. Wallace & Mary E. Bartlett Judge Michael E. Ward & Lissa Leonard Ward Wendel W. & Rhonda Wurst 1981 Rex M. Anderson Steven R. Anderson & Carole Twork Anderson J. Rod Betts Anne E. Burke Jeffery L. Carmichael Daniel D. Crabtree John P. DeCoursey Ralph J. DeZago Darcy & Jill Domoney Paula M. & Chris Hahn Mark A. & Debra L. Hannah Kent D. & Brenda D. Hatesohl Jeffrey D. Hewett Janet M. Justus Ramona K. Kantack Stephen M. Kerwick Clara L. Krentzel Katherine Reeder Lloyd Scott W. Mach & Patty Cray Mach David R. Maslen Cindy Brunker McClannahan & John B. McClannahan J. Donel & Polly S. Moore Susan M. Olander Judge Julie A. Robinson Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW Nan Mills Sigman & Gregory D. Sigman Christine K. Solso Monte A.Vines 1982 Karen M. Arnold-Burger & Kurt L. Burger Carl R. Clark & Marjorie Caterer-Clark Kenneth L. Cole Roy G. Crooks Judge Kathryn E. Davis Parthenia B. & Dan T. Evans Thomas W. Franchino Tony L. & Shawna L. Gehres Timothy J. & Janette K. Grillot Casey S. Halsey & Paula Bush Halsey Mark D. Hinderks & Mary Ann Hinderks Brian T. & Robin K. Howes Kraig E. Kannard Teresa Roll Kerwick Mark W. Knackendoffel & E. Ann Knackendoffel, Ph.D. Ted E. & Nancy A. Knopp Karen S. Kressin John C. Landon

Judge Steve A. Leben & Ann E. Warner, M.D. Terry L. & Monica S. Malone Brian C. McCormally & Kathie Philbrick McCormally Christopher K. McKenzie Kevin F. & Frances Mitchelson Holly Nielsen Justice Lawton R. Nuss James J. O’Malley William K. Sauck Jr. Michael K. & Sharon Seck David G. Seely & Debra Short Seely Stanford J. Smith Jr. Charles F. Speer & Martha Wright Speer Tracey L. Stout Judge David L. Stutzman & Wendy Jo Blank Michael L. Taylor S. Lee Taylor Lawrence L. Tenopir Gabrielle M. Thompson & Oliver L. Weaver, Ph.D. Todd N. Thompson & Caprice Maxey Thompson 1983 Martin K. Albrecht & Shari Feist Albrecht Heather Zane Anderson Lincoln W. Anderson Mary Stauffer Brownback U.S. Sen. Samuel D. Brownback Mark S. Carder Michael A. Doll Drew D. Frackowiak Myron L. Frans D. Randall & Joyce E. Heilman Wyatt A. & Mary Ann Hoch Annette Kline Hollingsworth Judge Peggy Carr Kittel Rick A. Kittel Stephen D. & Ellen L. Kort Quentin E. Kurtz Audrey B. Magaña & Sue Anne Magaña Kim R. Martens & Glenda Tackett Martens Daniel R. & Julie McCune Marie-Bernarde Miller Timothy M. O’Brien & Melinda Cadle O’Brien Kevin L. Petracek & Barbara Stokes Petracek Cathy A. Reinhardt & Norman A. St. Laurent Kari S. Schmidt James J. & Chirl Ann Sienicki Xavier Simonsen Diane Worthington Simpson Gentra Abbey Sorem & James R. Sorem Jr., Ph.D.

Jeff C. Spahn Jr. Kimberly Gee Vines Kenneth L. Wagner & Lida McNearney Wagner H. Steven Walton & Sandra M. Walton Robert J. Werner Rebecca A. Winterscheidt 1984 Robert K. Anderson John E. Angelo Brian L. Becker David E. Bengtson & Mary Maloney Bengtson Jeffrey A. Chanay & Kristin Anderson Chanay Gregory L. Franken Michele Ticknor Gehres Larry Greenbaum Karen Erickson Hosack & Paul Douglas Hosack Stephen J. House Laura Kay Howard Teresa J. James Cynthia Lutz Kelly & Robert N. Kelly Celeste Holder Kling & Robert Kling, Ph.D. Bettina Toisan McGriggler Eric S. Namee & Tracy Lynn Namee Kent G. Nunn & Colleen Johnson Nunn Col. James P. Pottorff Jr. Judith E. Pottorff Christopher S. Raynolds & Abigail Morris Raynolds Michael L. Riggs and Elaine P. Riggs Judge David W. Rogers Alan C. Sobba Alan R. Stetson Scott C. Stockwell Christine Dudgeon Wilson & Lawrence B. Wilson Kathleen Kopach Woods 1985 Robert H. Backus Justice Carol A. Beier & Richard W. Green Michael S. & Jennifer J. Boohar Gerald W. Brenneman Charles W. Cade & Mary Cranford Cade, Ph.D. J. Shawn Chalmers & Leslie Chalmers Melissa L. Conboy Molly A. Daniels Mark M. Deatherage Daniel H. & Paula Diepenbrock Diana L. Dietrich Richard L. & Lauren D. English Patrick R. Ford Rodney D. Fouracre

Peggy Glazzard, Ed.D., J.D., & Charles D. Glazzard, M.D. Martin J. Keenan & Julie Castelli Keenan Michael E. & Melinda Lazzo Donald L. Moler Jr. Judith A. Moler Rick G. Morris John C. Nettels Jr. & Sheila M. Nettels Joseph Rebein & Susan Waring Rebein Joseph P. Richardson Lauren E. Roberts Lisa M. Schultes & Dan O’Connell John W. & Carolyn C. Simpson Paul L.Yde & Sarah R. Elder Daniel M. Zimmerman & Linda Love Zimmerman 1986 Janet L. Arndt & Roger C. Bain Debra Lee Barnett Lisa Walter Beran Martin R. Brown Duncan R. Butts Jr. Kathryn Carter Lucy L. Freeman Mark S. & Sandra Goldman Jason B. Harper Sr. Anne Fleishel Harris & Wilbur C. Buckheit Dr. Don A. Hatfield John P. Healy & Cathy Rauch Healy Judge Michael E. Hegarty Aaron G. Hove & Gayleen Miller Hove Craig A. & Antoinette Joyce Hunt Steven K. Linscheid David H. & Debi Luce Robin J. Miles Steven B. Moore & Kristy Bontrager Moore David A. & Sheila L. Ricke Kathryn Marie Timm William F. Watkins William S. Woolley 1987 Jan Fink Call Barry A. Clark John D. Corse & Andrea Markl Corse, M.D. Ann T. & Robert A. Gutkin Dave Harder Michele A. Kessler Robin E. Kluge Dennis W. Lloyd Donna J. Long Dara Trum Miles Robert Edward Nunley Robert C. Paden Jr. Carolyn Boettcher Parmer

Lynn D. Preheim Walter R. Randall Jr. Reginald L. Robinson & Jane McGarey Robinson David E. Rogers & Sally Hadley Rogers Steven D. Selbe David E. & Kimberly R. Shay Carol Zuschek Smith Wayne E. Smith Shannon L. Spangler & Michael E. Spangler Marie Parker Strahan & Dennis W. Strahan Kimberley H. Tyson Martha S. Warren 1988 Katherine J. Bailes Mark C. Bannister Patricia A. Bennett & Michael G. Haefele Kevin M. Connor & Anne L. Connor David L. Corliss & Sarah Roecker Corliss Clark H. Cummins Patrick X. & Susan E. Fowler Jana Patterson Gagner Jon W. & Linda M. Gilchrist Phillip A. & Marlene K. Glenn Darren R. & Linda J. Hensley William A. Kassebaum Brian W. Leonard & Elizabeth D.S. Leonard Professor Stephen R. McAllister Rebecca E. Miller Shala Mills Sally Tinker Murphy Doris K. Nagel Mr. & Mrs. Lee M. Novak Douglas G. Peterson Thomas J. Robinson Elizabeth A. Schartz Kathryn A. & Jim Seeberger Martin M. Shoemaker Steven P. & Deborah J. Smith Wanda Shumway Temm John R. Wiebke 1989 Jonathan C. & Ruth E. Becker Scott M. Brinkman Maureen Lynch Burke Sharon L. Dickgrafe Thomas J. Drees Stacy Ortega Engels Frederick B. Gould James P. Hostetter, M.D., J.D. Robert C. Hunter & Kimberly Duncan Hunter Dorothy M. Ingalls & Kevin K. Jurrens Jennifer M. Kassebaum

KU LAW MAGAZINE 61

donor report Kevin K. Kelly & Christy Brady Kelly Christopher G. Kelsey James S. Kreamer Phyllis Savage Lynn & Randall S. Lynn Brian K. McLeod Alphonse B. Perkins Donald N. Peterson II Stephen L. Sapp & Theresa Barton Sapp 1990 Mark A. & Susan E. Andersen John W. & Donna R. Barbian Curtis G. & Martha G. Barnhill J. Richelle Crow-Johnson Jane A. Deterding Yvette Leerskov Ehrlich Kent R. Erickson Robert M. Friesen & Anne Ellis Friesen Christopher C. Haxton & Serese Yvonne Smith-Haxton Jennifer Blackshire Hense & John I. Hense Jr. Beth Horth Samuel P. Logan & P. Diane McGrew Maureen M. Mahoney Crystal Whitebread Mai Madeleine M. McDonough Judge Rodney B. Sparkman & Elizabeth D. Sparkman Teresa R. Temme Dietz Robert W. Tormohlen Cheryl L. & Shaun P. Trenholm Robert D. Wiechman Jr. Susan Krehbiel William 1991 Doyle J. Baker Bruce A. Berkley & Kelly Staggenborg Berkley Louis A. Cohn & Lora A. Cohn, Ph.D. Robert I. Correales Anna Marie Dempsey Frances Watkins Douthat Gavin Fritton Hellen L. & Frederick D. Haag Sally Gingerich Kelsey Eric A. Kuwana & Karen E. Miller-Kuwana Brian R. Matula John C. Pauls Linda Simpson Peterson Ronald C. Rundberg Dionne M. Scherff & Thomas R. Crawford Paul M. Schmidt Amy Verschoor Skinner Marcella R. Bentley-Salmon & David R. Salmon 1992 Mary A. Cabrera

62 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Ellen Maura Curry Donald D. Friend II & Anna Peterson Friend Dennis J. Highberger Patrick J. Kaine Nicholas Kemp & Jennifer Booth Kemp, M.D. Kraig M. Kohring & Molly Ash Kohring David Lowden & Dawne Adams Lowden, M.D. J. Michael Martinez de Andino Lucy E. Mason Barbara Cochran Mayfield John W. Mitchell Jr. & Margaret Katherine Mitchell Robert B. & Margaret E. Neill Thomas K. & Sharon Pratt Ann & Mark A. Soderberg David R. Springe Karen L. Torline Paul B. Torline Janet Huck Ward & James E. Ward Lanette M. Wickham & Frank J. Rebori 1993 Jay B. & Michelle B. Brown Marc P. Clements Staci L. Cooper James N. Edmonds Mary Lew Edmonds Shannon E. Giles Evan H. Ice & Jill Redfern Ice Andrew M. Jones Professor Pamela Keller & John W. Keller, M.D. Eric V. Love & Jennifer Emerson Love William W. Mahood III & Michelle Elwell Mahood Daniel J. Martin, Ed.D. Gregory K. Martin Debra M. Hart McLaughlin Gary W. Owens Jere D. Sellers Veronica R. Sellers Stephen N. Six & Elizabeth Brand Six Matthew E. Turner & Jamie Immel Turner 1994 Professor Elizabeth Seale Cateforis & David Cateforis Karin Pongratz Church Kevin M. & Valerie F. Cowan Linda Smith Crist Laura A. Denk Michael J. Disilvestro Holly A. Dyer Roger L. Grandgenett II Kimberly A. Jones Jodi L. Kaus Patricia A. Konopka

Todd A. & Kathy D. Luckman Melissa Wangemann Maag Laura McKnight Eric Thomas Mikkelson Scott J. Miller Maj. Susan E. Mitchell Shon C. Robben & Michelle Travisano Robben Carolyn Wenzel Schott & Gary W. Schott, Ph.D. Gregory K. & Bronda A. Silvers Monica D. Tovar-von Waaden Kevin D. Weakley Gordon J. Williams 1995 Patricia McCoy Bartley Cynthia R. Bryant Patricia J. & Frank F. Castellano Kirt D. DeHaan & Cheryl R. DeHaan Jeffrey R. Emerson Hugh W. Gill IV & Ingrid Olson Gill Danford D. & Jennifer Grant Leslie A. Johnson Tricia M. Knoll Craig T. Lawson Coy M. Martin Joycelyn Lucas Randle Kirsten Larson Richesson D. Mark von Waaden 1996 Judith Kloster Carlson James Alan Donley Alison D. Dunning Joni J. Franklin Andrew F. & Ann Marie Halaby Michelle Mahaffey Charles D. Marvine Joyce Rosenberg Marvine Jay M. McGrath & Angie Wesonig McGrath Philip C. & Jill McKnight Drucilla J. Sampson Stephen T. Sigler Julie L. Unruh Professor Suzanne Valdez Christian S. & Bridget D. Webb Rebecca Swanwick Yocham & Keith A.Yocham 1997 William J. & Rachelle D. Bahr Grant D. & Stephanie J. Bannister Clayton L. Barker Gerald K. Bates & Sheida Hashemy Bates Terrence J. & Kristin S. Campbell Margaret M. Connell Edwin H. & Aramide Fields Sharon E. Greenfield Peter S. Johnston & Sara Peckham Johnston, M.D.

Cheryl Hagemann Lindeman Curt M. Lindeman Carolyn L. Matthews William P. Matthews James D. McMullen Eric N. Miller Virginia H. Murray Christine McDaniel Novak & Keith Fredrick Novak Richard B. Payne Lloyd E. Rigney 1998 Matthew B. & Darcy Cobb Brent N. Coverdale Amy M. & Gary W. Decker Sarah Mayberry Donley Barbara L. McCloud Tyler P. McLeod Andrew J. Nolan & Sheryl Griffith Nolan Brian M. Roberts & Andrea DePaolis Roberts Todd A. Schieffer Wesley F. Smith & Lisa M. Leroux-Smith Jeffrey C. Tauscher 1999 John F. Baird II Cathleen E. Carothers Noreen L. Connolly Darren M. Dick Bradley R. Finkeldei Jonathan E. Frank Brian D. & Candace Goodman Wendy M. Green Judith Holden Hidalgo Mark D. Hoover Arthur S. Hubacher Heather A. Jones Peter T. Maharry Leyla Galmarini McMullen Mindy Patterson McPheeters Jody Lamb Meyer Trey T. Meyer Alok K. & Gina R. Srivastava 2000 Blaine C. Donovan Amy M. Fowler John J. Gates Julie D. Hower Heather Jones Heather Ann Lee Robert D. Lewis Justin M. Lungstrum & Emily Lungstrum Chad S. Nelson J. Michael Porter & Ruth Merz Forrest T. Rhodes Jr. March M. Runner Bhavi A. Shah

2001 Collin B. & Dana Altieri Corey D. & Tyra C. Babington Theresa L. Barr Capt. Michele Stackhouse Bayless Amy Schieferecke Beckstead & Charles A. Beckstead Stacia Gressel Boden Aaron J. Breitenbach Jerrold L. Cherwin Jr. & Jessica M. Cherwin Chad B. & Jill S. Cook Erika K. Knopp & Ryan C. Knopp, M.D. Melissa M. Krueger Stefan J. Padfield Jacqueline Egr Pueppke Wendy M. Rohleder-Sook Karen P. Ruckert Jane L. & Randy K. Williams William M.Yanek II 2002 Joshua K. Allen Katherine Benson Allen Ryan C. Brunton Phillip C. Buttell Timothy A. Glassco Jay E. & Melissa M. Heidrick Blythe Ridenour Jones Christopher R. Jones Mark R. Logan & Elizabeth Kiene Logan Mon Yin Lung Karen M. Mittel Jennifer Knapp Riggs Christopher W. Sook David E. Waters Charlene J. & Mark P. Wilson Bradley J.Yeretsky 2003 Mariam Moussa Brunton Matthew K. & Tammara M. Corbin Ryan M. Eisenbraun Jamie Huffman Jones Scott D. Kaiser Bethany A. Pendleton Sarah M. Ramos Christy Jensen Rosensteel Emie Wiechman Stehley John B. Wilson 2004 Laura K. Brooks & William M. Brooks, Ph.D. Cmdr. Randall S. Butler, retired Jennifer S. and Jay W. Carter Peter T. Donovan Katherine A. & Kenneth R. Harkin Jeffrey Li Benjamin McDaniel & Erin Gough McDaniel

Jeffery Brian Morris John J. Osgood Peter L. Riggs Brian D. Sheern & Stacia Donovan Sheern Christopher L. Steadham Jennifer Malone Stevenson & Ronald P. Stevenson Darin D. Stowell Jason W. Thompson & Karen Schwarzer Thompson Emily R. & Victor A.Vijayakirthi Nathan H. & Annette White Margaret Dandurand Wilson Will B. Wohlford Emily M.Yeretsky 2005 Joel A. Bannister John L. Beck Jr. Elizabeth A. Blake Jack V. Brooks Carolyn W. Coulson Philip V. Di Zerega Anne Murray Emert Mark T. Emert Matthew S. Gough & Caitlin Pike Gough Emily R. Haverkamp Ryan C. Hudson Katrina G. Hull Robert F. Kethcart Elizabeth A. Meekins 2006 Michael V. DiPasquale Sean J. O’Hara & Amy Cox O’Hara Jocilyn B. Oyler Michael P. Schaefer Kristen V. Toner David G.Vermooten Mary A. & Jason M. Walker 2007 Misti D. Brumback Jana R. Budde P. Dan Calderon Crissa Seymour Cook Richard A. Cook II & Morgan Feeney Cook Oscar P. Espinoza Mary K. Gates Rusty E. Glenn Eric R. Gray Tina M. Hardin Ryan J. Huschka Megan Barr Jennings James R. McCullough Emily A. McProud Michael J. Nichols Leena D. Phadke Tucker L. Poling & Alissa N. Bauer Sarah E. Preston

John P. Smolen Natalie M. Stoker Carrie B. Temm Heather O’Hara Tombs David P. Trevino & Sarah Whitten Jamie L. Weese 2008 Justin D. Elkouri Zachary A. Lerner Jeremy G. Mai Stephanie L. Sowers Jonathon A. Szumny Thu T.Vo

FRIENDS

Dean Gail B. Agrawal & Naurang M. Agrawal, M.D. Linda Noland Aikins & David M. Aikins Nancy N. Ashton Teresa A. Badgerow Barber Emerson LC Barristerbooks Inc. John L. Beck Sr. & Annette W. Beck Belin Foundation Olivia A. Bennett Larry J. & Ann H. Bingham Blackwell Sanders LLP Judge Wesley E. Brown Bryan Cave LLP Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad & Sarah McKeighan Casad City of Leawood Clark, Mize & Linville Chartered Mary Kathleen Connell Joe Custer Melinda L. & Barry Len Davis Professor Michael J. Davis & Faye S. Davis Professor Martin B. Dickinson Jr. & Sallie Francis Dickinson Professor Christopher R. Drahozal & Kaye M. Drahozal Terrence & Peggy Dunn Sara E. Feeney-Meyer Foulston Siefkin LLP Katherine Greene & Daniel B. Bentley Marian S. Hamilton Thomasina Harvey & Keith Harvey Melvin M. & Alice Hawk Professor John W. Head & Lucia Orth Head Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City Professor Laura J. Hines Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP David F. Hokanson Joanne Skillman Howard Husch & Eppenberger LLC Elizabeth Ann Hylton

International Law Society Dean Robert H. Jerry II & Lisa Nowak Jerry Joy Morrison Johnson Trust Kansas Bar Association Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association Kansas Health Foundation Kansas Women Attorneys Association Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch Brenda Roberts Kissam KU Public Interest Law Society Sharylyn Gelvin Lacey Lathrop & Gage LC Law Office of Daniel H. Diepenbrock, PA Law School Admission Council Leawood Garden Club Leawood Woman’s Club Inc. Ann J. Lerner Judge James K. Logan & Beverly Jennings Logan Robert A. Long & I.M. Mazie Johnson Long Kelcie L. Longaker Audrey B. Magaña & Associates PA Alson R. & Yona C. Martin Professor Stephen W. Mazza Professor Joyce A. McCray Pearson & Mitchell D. Pearson Bette Frass McDaniel Professor Sandra Craig McKenzie Professor Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer David R. Morris Richard A. & Nancy L. Neal Norton Hubbard Ruzicka & Kreamer LC Donna Hauser O’Neal Sandra J. Patti Payne & Jones Foundation Sally Davis Pokorny Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus PC Jean Humphrey Proffitt & Roy F. Proffitt Barbara Brown Rein & Skip Rein Christie Frick Reynolds & David O. Reynolds The Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Foundation Frances Owing Rice Marcia Kyle Rinehart & Richard B. Reinhart Marie Winterburg Robb & Steven A. Robb Todd Rogers & Erin McLain Rogers Ross Foundation Scotch Industries Inc. Joel M. Shields William M. Shinkle

KU LAW MAGAZINE 63

donor report Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Shughart Thomson & Kilroy, P.C. Betty J. & Richard F. Smith Sonnenschein Scholars Foundation Wesley H. Sowers Sr. Estate of Kate Stephens Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP Joann & Gregory M. Stultz Sandra Bradford Sullivan & Brad Sullivan Professor Ellen E. Sward Thompson, Ramsdell & Qualseth, PA Toussaint G. Toole, M.D. Babs Tuley UMB Bank NA United States District Court Bar Registration Gene E. & Linda E.Voigts Marilyn J. & Gregory L.Vranicar Margie Wakefield Law Offices, PA Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Martha H. Westbrook Professor William E. Westerbeke Harriet Stephens Wilson Professor Melanie D. Wilson Francis and LaVerne Winterburg Fund Jo E. Wochner Women in Law Richard D. Woods & Mary Linna Woods Katherine A. Zogleman

STATES

ALASKA Charles F. Bunch March M. Runner ARIZONA Rex M. Anderson Corey D. & Tyra C. Babington John F. Baird II Frank S. Bangs Jr. Karin Pongratz Church Mark M. Deatherage Blaine C. Donovan Peter T. Donovan Patrick X. & Susan E. Fowler Jonathan E. Frank Peggy Glazzard, Ed.D., J.D., & Charles D. Glazzard, M.D. Andrew F. & Ann Marie Halaby Barry D. Halpern & Cynthia Zedler Halpern Allen D. Harnisch Robert F. Kethcart Melissa M. Krueger Barbara L. McCloud Jay M. McGrath & Angie Wesonig McGrath Emily A. McProud Anne Marie Morgan

64 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Mr. & Mrs. Lee M. Novak Sean J. O’Hara & Amy Cox O’Hara L. Robert & Nina M. Pennington Sarah M. Ramos Kenneth W. Reeves III Joseph P. Richardson Kirsten Larson Richesson Brian M. Roberts & Andrea DePaolis Roberts Thomas J. Robinson Alan W. Roeder Christy Jensen Rosensteel Bhavi A. Shah James J. & Chirl Ann Sienicki Snell & Wilmer LLP Joel A. Sterrett & Dr. Joye Sterrett Robert J. Werner Rebecca A. Winterscheidt ARKANSAS Jamie Huffman Jones Marie-Bernarde Miller Kelley D. Sears & Jane A. Sears Dr. Betty van der Smissen Wal-Mart Stores Inc. CALIFORNIA Brian L. Becker Amy Schieferecke Beckstead & Charles A. Beckstead Lydia I. Beebe J. Rod Betts Chevron Matching Gift Program Matthew B. & Darcy Cobb Countrywide David L. Davenport & Sally Nelson Davenport Nathaniel Davis Jr. Charles E. Doyle Melvin L. Ehrlich Yvette Leerskov Ehrlich Farmers Insurance Group Inc. Edwin H. & Aramide Fields Brian D. & Candace Goodman Thomasina Harvey & Keith Harvey John E. Hurley Jr. & Jo Sicking Hurley Leslie A. Johnson Heather Ann Lee Robert L. Lesh & Edwina Crane Lesh John R. Light & Sharon Koch Light Lucy E. Mason Christopher K. McKenzie Eugene E. Mitchell Gary L. Olson & Vicki A. Olson Leon E. & Barbara H. Roulier Stephen T. Sigler Donald E. & Nancy S. Stephenson Robert L. Tanner Tenet Healthcare Foundation Charlene J. & Mark P. Wilson D. Spencer Yohe & Betty Foster Yohe

COLORADO Frank A. Ackerman Heather Zane Anderson Lincoln W. Anderson Doyle J. Baker Laird S. Campbell & Nancy Cornforth Campbell Molly A. Daniels Philip V. Di Zerega Ryan M. Eisenbraun Terry N. Fiske Rodney D. Fouracre Rusty E. Glenn Arch G. Gothard III Great-West Life & Annuity Insurance Company Cathy Havener Greer Marian S. Hamilton Dave Harder Richard C. Harris & Jean Waddell Harris Judge Michael E. Hegarty Darren R. & Linda J. Hensley Nicholas Kemp & Jennifer Booth Kemp, M.D. Celeste Holder Kling & Robert Kling, Ph.D. Eric V. Love & Jennifer Emerson Love Daniel R. & Julie McCune John B. Roesler Jack E. Salyer Michael V. Schaefer David A. Sorenson Col. Russell A. Stanley, U.S. Air Force, retired Tracey L. Stout Kimberley H. Tyson Thomas M.Van Cleave III Gaylen R. Williams Gordon J. Williams J. Robert Wilson & Marguerite J. Wilson John B. Wilson Margaret Dandurand Wilson CONNECTICUT Aetna Foundation Inc. Ellen Maura Curry Jane A. Finn, Ph.D. Charles S. Lindberg & Dolores Goad Lindberg Hal C. Reed DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Blake A. Biles Diana L. Dietrich Timothy A. Glassco Elizabeth Ann Hylton Kathleen Clubb Kauffman & Charles M. Kauffman, Ph.D. Linda L. Lee James A. Riedy

Karen P. Ruckert Peter E. Strand & Sheila C. Strand FLORIDA Homer P. Appleby Jr. Duncan R. Butts Jr. Thomas W. Franchino Dean Robert H. Jerry II & Lisa Nowak Jerry John R. Morse & Kay Stine Morse Alphonse B. Perkins Col. John F. Plummer Jr. Judge James A. Pusateri & Jacqueline A. Pusateri Barry M. Shalinsky Carl E. Stallard GEORGIA The Bank of America Foundation David D. Kardell & Virginia Potente Kardell Ronald R. Kimzey & Emily Cooper Kimzey Thomas H. Krueger & Jean Krueger John H. Mack Gregory K. Martin Michael P. Martin Floyd W. Smith Jr. & Cecilia E. Smith Nancy J. Spies HAWAII Rick J. Eichor Maj. Susan E. Mitchell Richard Y. Wada & Margaret Anami Wada IDAHO Michele Ticknor Gehres Thomas F. Wobker ILLINIOIS Ernest Adelman & Barbara Boley Adelman Lawrence W. Blickhan Bradley L. & Judith Lyn Brehm James P. Callahan Jerrold L. Cherwin Jr. & Jessica M. Cherwin James W. Engler & Marcelyn Graham Engler Karen Erickson Hosack & Paul Douglas Hosack Illinois Tool Works Foundation Judson R. Maillie Karen M. Mittel Lt. Col. Dwight A. Moore, U.S. Air Force, retired Judge Kathleen P. Moran Rick G. Morris Clay A. Mosberg Sally Tinker Murphy Doris K. Nagel

Northern Trust Company Charitable Trust Judge Sebastian T. Patti Thomas K. & Sharon Pratt Walter R. Randall Jr. Frances Owing Rice Floy Lambertson Shaeffer Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP Toussaint G. Toole, M.D. Vedder Price Kaufman & Kammholz PC Omer G.Voss & Annabelle K.Voss Robert E. & Mary L. Williams Christine Dudgeon Wilson & Lawrence B. Wilson

Norman G. Manley & Joy Stewart Manley Christie Frick Reynolds & David O. Reynolds Forrest T. Rhodes Jr. David A. & Sheila L. Ricke Lloyd E. Rigney Stanford J. Smith Jr. Judge Michael E. Ward & Lissa Leonard Ward

INDIANA Melissa L. Conboy Michelle Mahaffey Robert C. Perry John R. Wiebke

Clay Donna J. Long

IOWA Michael S. & Jennifer J. Boohar Patrick R. Ford Beth Horth Judge J. C. Irvin & Mary Lewis Irvin Amy Verschoor Skinner KANSAS (BY COUNTY) Allen Frederick G. Apt Jr. & Denise C. Apt Alan D. Weber Atchison Judge Martin J. Asher Barton Lisa Walter Beran Larry E. Keenan & Patricia L. Degner-Keenan Martin J. Keenan & Julie Castelli Keenan Kent H. Weltmer Bourbon Blake Hudson Brown Theodore L. & Paula W. Starr Butler David C. & Priscilla A. All Judge Donald W. Bostwick & Jill Bostwick Mary Kathleen Connell Tim Connell Hellen L. & Frederick D. Haag William H. Hensley & Dana Valdois Hensley

Cheyenne John G. & Elaine R. Kite Clark Losson G. Pike & Leanne Benda Pike

Cloud Kathryn Carter Thomas M. & Suzanne F. Tuggle Cowley Lucy L. Freeman Crawford Kevin F. & Frances Mitchelson Kenneth A. & Leann Webb Dickinson Ralph J. DeZago Joycelyn Lucas Randle Douglas Dean Gail B. Agrawal & Naurang M. Agrawal, M.D. Linda Noland Aikins & David M. Aikins Mark A. & Susan E. Andersen Janet L. Arndt & Roger C. Bain Nancy N. Ashton Barber Emerson LC Curtis G. & Martha G. Barnhill Theresa L. Barr Barristerbooks Inc. Patricia McCoy Bartley Jonathan C. & Ruth E. Becker John W. Brand Jr. & Barbara Sample Brand Charles A. Briscoe Judge Mary Beck Briscoe Jack V. Brooks Cmdr. Randall S. Butler, retired Charles W. Cade & Mary Cranford Cade, Ph.D. Terrence J. & Kristin S. Campbell Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad & Sarah McKeighan Casad Professor Elizabeth Seale Cateforis & David Cateforis George L. Catt & Sherrill Lynn Catt

Martha J. Coffman & Patrick T. Curtiss David L. Corliss & Sarah Roecker Corliss Marshall L. Crowther & Sandra Garvey Crowther, Ed.D. Peter K. Curran & Virginia Schubert Curran Professor Martin B. Dickinson Jr. & Sallie Francis Dickinson Kathleen A. Dillon Professor Christopher R. Drahozal & Kaye M. Drahozal DST Systems Inc. Georgann H. Eglinski & Ronald W. Schorr Judge Jerry G. Elliott & Debra S. Duncan Anne Murray Emert Mark T. Emert Bradley R. Finkeldei Janet Bass Garlow Matthew S. Gough & Caitlin Pike Gough Katherine Greene & Daniel B. Bentley Tina M. Hardin Kenneth & Sue Harmon Marilyn M. Harp & Marc A. Quillen, Ph.D. Kent D. & Brenda D. Hatesohl Professor John W. Head & Lucia Orth Head Dennis J. Highberger Professor Laura J. Hines Aaron G. Hove & Gayleen Miller Hove Laura Kay Howard Brian T. & Robin K. Howes Ryan J. Huschka Evan H. Ice & Jill Redfern Ice International Law Society Donald A. Johnston & Alice Dowell Johnston Kansas University Endowment Association Calvin J. Karlin Judge Janice Miller Karlin Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch Professor Pamela Keller & John W. Keller, M.D. Kevin K. Kelly & Christy Brady Kelly Christopher G. Kelsey Sally Gingerich Kelsey Justice B. King Jr. & Debra King Judge Peggy Carr Kittel Rick A. Kittel Karen S. Kressin KU Public Interest Law Society Zachary A. Lerner Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy Kelcie L. Longaker

Donald A. & Diane C. Low Todd A. & Kathy D. Luckman Crystal Whitebread Mai Professor Stephen W. Mazza Professor Stephen R. McAllister Professor Joyce A. McCray Pearson & Mitchell D. Pearson Professor Sandra Craig McKenzie Jody Lamb Meyer Professor Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer Trey T. Meyer Scott J. Miller John W. Nitcher & Mary Streepy Nitcher James J. O’Malley Jocilyn B. Oyler Judge James W. Paddock & Ruth Davenport Paddock Sandra J. Patti John C. Pauls William B. Pendleton Judge G. Joseph Pierron & Diana Carlin Pierron, Ph.D. Sally Davis Pokorny Col. James P. Pottorff Jr. Judith E. Pottorff Cathy A. Reinhardt & Norman A. St. Laurent The Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Foundation Marie Winterburg Robb & Steven A. Robb Reginald L. Robinson & Jane McGarey Robinson Todd Rogers & Erin McLain Rogers Wendy M. Rohleder-Sook Bill Sampson Drucilla J. Sampson Robert E. Schulman, Ph.D. & Anne Fink Schulman Scotch Industries Inc. Brian D. Sheern & Stacia Donovan Sheern Professor Jan Bowen Sheldon, Ph.D., J.D., & Dr. James A. Sherman Gregory K. & Bronda A. Silvers Diane Worthington Simpson Justice Fred N. Six & Lilian Six Stephen N. Six & Elizabeth Brand Six Glee S. Smith Jr. & Geraldine Smith Wesley F. Smith & Lisa M. Leroux-Smith Christopher W. Sook Jeffrey S. Southard Stephanie L. Sowers David R. Springe Byron E. Springer & Marion Peltier Springer Christopher L. Steadham Jennifer Malone Stevenson & Ronald P. Stevenson Scott C. Stockwell

KU LAW MAGAZINE 65

donor report Natalie M. Stoker Robert C. & Linda Ann Sturgeon Professor Ellen E. Sward Jonathon A. Szumny Thompson, Ramsdell & Qualseth, PA Todd N. Thompson & Caprice Maxey Thompson Heather O’Hara Tombs Kristen V. Toner Cheryl L. & Shaun P. Trenholm David P. Trevino & Sarah Whitten Professor Suzanne Valdez David G.Vermooten Thu T. Vo Judge Richard W. Wahl Margie Wakefield Law Offices, PA Perry D. Warren & Janet Beebe Warren Daniel L. & Phyllis Watkins Professor William E. Westerbeke Harriet Stephens Wilson Professor Melanie D. Wilson Winton A. Winter Jr. & Mary Boyd Winter Francis and LaVerne Winterburg Fund Women in Law William M.Yanek II Ellis Mark C. Bannister Thomas J. Drees Norman W. & Ann H. Jeter William W. Jeter Shala Mills Finney Michael C. Doering Gene H. Gaede & Jannelle Robins-Gaede Wendel W. & Rhonda Wurst Ford Michael A. Doll Barbara A. Lundin Franklin Robert W. & Joyce M. Green Michele A. Kessler Geary Audrey B. Magaña & Sue Anne Magaña Audrey B. Magaña & Associates PA Hamilton Robert H. Gale Jr. & Linda C. Gale Harvey A. James Gillmore Judge Theodore B. Ice & Sue Harper Ice

66 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Benjamin McDaniel & Erin Gough McDaniel Arnold C. Nye Johnson Steven R. Anderson & Carole Twork Anderson Larry D. Armel & JoAnne Armel Karen M. Arnold-Burger & Kurt L. Burger Teresa A. Badgerow Katherine J. Bailes J. Eugene Balloun Ernest C. Ballweg Clayton L. Barker Gerald K. Bates & Sheida Hashemy Bates Donald F. & Catherine Bayer Norman E. Beal & Sally Jenkins Beal John L. Beck Jr. John L. Beck Sr. & Annette W. Beck Olivia A. Bennett Patricia A. Bennett & Michael G. Haefele Marcella R. Bentley-Salmon & David R. Salmon Larry J. & Ann H. Bingham Anne H. & William R. Blessing Ron Bodinson Richard L. Bond & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond Gerald W. Brenneman Scott M. Brinkman Jay B. & Michelle B. Brown Misti D. Brumback Mariam Moussa Brunton Ryan C. Brunton Steve A.J. Bukaty Anne E. Burke George A. Burns Michael B. & Holly L. Buser Mark S. Carder Judith Kloster Carlson Jennifer S. & Jay W. Carter Patricia J. & Frank F. Castellano Bruce E. Cavitt J. Shawn Chalmers & Leslie Chalmers City of Leawood Carl R. Clark & Marjorie Caterer-Clark Chad B. & Jill S. Cook Crissa Seymour Cook Richard A. Cook II & Morgan Feeney Cook Matthew K. & Tammara M. Corbin Brent N. Coverdale James L. Crabtree Maril Crabtree Roy G. Crooks Joe Custer Melinda L. & Barry Len Davis

Professor Michael J. Davis & Faye S. Davis John P. DeCoursey Michael F. Delaney & Kathleen Gibbons Delaney Paul M. Dent & Deborah K. Simpson Dent Michael J. Disilvestro Darcy & Jill Domoney James Alan Donley Sarah Mayberry Donley Frances Watkins Douthat Robert L. Driscoll & Marilyn Rockwell Driscoll Terrence & Peggy Dunn Richard L. & Lauren D. English Kent R. Erickson Oscar P. Espinoza Parthenia B. & Dan T. Evans Timothy J. & Mary S. Evans Jill S. Ferrel Drew D. Frackowiak Donald D. Friend II & Anna Peterson Friend Gavin Fritton Robert A. & Barbara J. Garrity Lawrence C. Gates & Jeanne K. Gates Jon W. & Linda M. Gilchrist Shannon E. Giles Eric R. Gray Wendy M. Green Larry Greenbaum Sharon E. Greenfield Paula M. & Chris Hahn Casey S. Halsey & Paula Bush Halsey Mark A. & Debra L. Hannah Stephen C. & Melissa B. Harmon Joe A. Harter Emily R. Haverkamp Melvin M. & Alice Hawk John P. Healy & Cathy Rauch Healy Lewis A. Heaven Jr. & Paula Butz Heaven Jay E. & Melissa M. Heidrick Jennifer Blackshire Hense & John I. Hense Jr. William L. Hess & Jane McGrew Hess Judith Holden Hidalgo Mark D. Hinderks & Mary Ann Hinderks David F. Hokanson Annette Kline Hollingsworth Robert B. & Caroline E. Hosford Joanne Skillman Howard Robert C. Hunter & Kimberly Duncan Hunter Teresa J. James Karen I. Johnson Topper & Linda D. Johntz Blythe Ridenour Jones Christopher R. Jones

Gina Kaiser Kraig M. Kohring & Molly Ash Kohring Patricia A. Konopka Stephen D. & Ellen L. Kort James S. Kreamer Clara L. Krentzel Quentin E. Kurtz Jodde Olsen Lanning Leawood Garden Club Leawood Woman’s Club Inc. Judge Steve A. Leben & Ann E. Warner, M.D. Robert D. Lewis Dennis W. Lloyd Katherine Reeder Lloyd Judge James K. Logan & Beverly Jennings Logan Mark R. Logan & Elizabeth Kiene Logan Samuel P. Logan & P. Diane McGrew Bob & Bev Londerholm Robert A. Long & I.M. Mazie Johnson Long Carl S. Long III & Mary K. Long George A. Lowe & Rosemary Lowe Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd William E. Lupton & Carol A. Lupton Scott W. Mach & Patty Cray Mach Peter T. Maharry William W. Mahood III & Michelle Elwell Mahood Jeremy G. Mai Alson R. & Yona C. Martin Keith U. & Hulda Martin Charles D. Marvine Joyce Rosenberg Marvine Barbara Cochran Mayfield Cindy Brunker McClannahan & John B. McClannahan James R. McCullough Bette Frass McDaniel Madeleine M. McDonough Ann McElhenny Laura McKnight Philip C. & Jill McKnight James D. McMullen Leyla Galmarini McMullen Eric Thomas Mikkelson Eric N. Miller William M. Modrcin Jr. Steven B. Moore & Kristy Bontrager Moore Stephen R. & Paula M. Morgan Richard A. & Nancy L. Neal John C. Nettels Jr. & Sheila M. Nettels Norton Hubbard Ruzicka & Kreamer LC Christine McDaniel Novak & Keith Fredrick Novak Timothy M. O’Brien & Melinda Cadle O’Brien

Donna Hauser O’Neal Bernard V. O’Neill Jr. & Marion W. O’Neill Payne & Jones Foundation Professor John C. Peck & Pamela C. Peck Douglas G. Peterson Kevin L. Petracek & Barbara Stokes Petracek Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post Sarah E. Preston Jeanne Gorman Rau & Donald A. Rau Christopher S. Raynolds & Abigail Morris Raynolds Joseph Rebein & Susan Waring Rebein Jack R. Reed Barbara Brown Rein & Skip Rein Ronald S. Reuter George E. Rider & Jeannene Keaton Rider Jennifer Knapp Riggs Peter L. Riggs Marcia Kyle Rinehart & Richard B. Reinhart Lauren E. Roberts Nancy Schmidt Roush Joan R. Ruff Ronald C. Rundberg Judge Gerald L. Rushfelt Judge Janice D. Russell William H. Sanders Jr. Michael P. Schaefer Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW Dionne M. Scherff & Thomas R. Crawford Todd A. Schieffer Ross W. & Margaret M. Schimmels Ralph L. L. Schmidt CPA Lisa M. Schultes & Dan O’Connell Michael K. & Sharon Seck Jere D. Sellers Veronica R. Sellers David E. & Kimberly R. Shay Rex N. Shewmake Jr. & Mary Jane Shewmake William M. Shinkle Neil R. Shortlidge & Renee Sproul Shortlidge Nan Mills Sigman & Gregory D. Sigman John W. & Carolyn C. Simpson Thomas H. & Jeannie E. Slack Judge Allen R. Slater & Kathryn Bohn Slater Betty J. & Richard F. Smith Carol Zuschek Smith Wayne E. Smith Charles F. Speer & Martha Wright Speer Sprint Foundation

Alok K. & Gina R. Srivastava Keith L. & Jan Stanley Roger D. Stanton & Judith Duncan Stanton John H. Stauffer Jr. & Kathy Stauffer Alan R. Stetson Darin D. Stowell Naomi L. Stuart Joann & Gregory M. Stultz Howard T. Sturdevant & Gail Sturdevant R. Kent Sullivan Robert B. & Patty S. Sullivan Sandra Bradford Sullivan & Brad Sullivan William P. Tanner III Jeffrey C. Tauscher Wanda Shumway Temm Mark R. Thompson & Barbara E. Thompson Earl D. & Shirley A. Tjaden Karen L. Torline Paul B. Torline Robert W. Tormohlen Babs Tuley Alleen S.VanBebber Emily R. & Victor A.Vijayakirthi Marilyn J. & Gregory L.Vranicar Senator John L.Vratil & Teresa C. Vratil Judge Kathryn H.Vratil & John W. Hamilton Michael R. Wallace & Mary E. Bartlett Martha S. Warren David E. Waters William F. Watkins Kevin D. Weakley Christian S. & Bridget D. Webb Jamie L. Weese Martha H. Westbrook Lanette M. Wickham & Frank J. Rebori Dennis P. Wilbert Jane L. & Randy K. Williams E. Larry Winn III Edward L. Winthrop Jo E. Wochner Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, Ph.D. Richard D. Woods & Mary Linna Woods Stanley N. Woodworth & Nancy G. Woodworth Larry Worrall & Beverly Cope Worrall Rebecca Swanwick Yocham & Keith A.Yocham Daniel M. Zimmerman & Linda Love Zimmerman Katherine A. Zogleman

Kingman Roy E. & Merritta J. Williams Robert S. Wunsch & Barbara Bateman Wunsch Labette Ed W. Dosh Timothy J. & Janette K. Grillot Leavenworth Clark H. Cummins Thomas M. & Barbara B. Dawson Joseph J. Hoagland & Norma Decker Hoagland Susan M. Olander Lyon John G. Atherton John O. & Joann L. Sanderson Marshall Terry A. & Phyllis L. Blaser McPherson Jennifer Johnson Kinzel Sharylyn Gelvin Lacey William H. Seiler Jr. Miami Robert I. Nicholson Jr. Lee H. Tetwiler & Mari Baird Tetwiler Mitchell Jerry L. Harrison Morris D. Randall & Joyce E. Heilman Julie D. Hower Jennifer M. Kassebaum William A. Kassebaum John H. & Martha J. White Osborne Bruce A. Berkley & Kelly Staggenborg Berkley Richard E. Dietz & Marsha Merritt Dietz Pottawatomie Kathryn A. & Jim Seeberger Pratt Gordon B. & Carol Stull Kenneth R. & Annette Van Blaricum Reno Donald D. Adams & Ann Wees Adams Darrell D. Dreiling James R. & Karen Gilliland Ronald L. & Joleen M. Leslie William F. Lyle Jr.

Judge Randall H. McEwen & Kamela McIntosh McEwen Rice Granville M. Bush IV & Lynne Scheufele Bush Riley Terry Arthur & Virginia Thomas Arthur William J. & Rachelle D. Bahr Grant D. & Stephanie J. Bannister Barry A. Clark John D. Conderman & Patricia R. Conderman Katherine A. & Kenneth R. Harkin Charles H. Hostetler & Julie A. Hostetler Jodi L. Kaus Mark W. Knackendoffel & E. Ann Knackendoffel, Ph.D. Erika K. Knopp & Ryan C. Knopp, M.D. Shon C. Robben & Michelle Travisano Robben Judge David L. Stutzman & Wendy Jo Blank S. Lee Taylor Gabrielle M. Thompson & Oliver L. Weaver, Ph.D. Russell Kenneth L. Cole Saline Constance M. Achterberg Mark A. Berkley & Jane Booth Berkley Clark, Mize & Linville Chartered Gary D. & Janice J. Denning Peter S. Johnston & Sara Peckham Johnston, M.D. N. Royce & Linda L. Nelson Patrick H. & Patricia L. Thompson George W. & Margaret E.Yarnevich Sedgwick Robert K. Anderson John E. Angelo Debra Lee Barnett Belin Foundation David E. Bengtson & Mary Maloney Bengtson Clifford L. Bertholf Stacia Gressel Boden Aaron J. Breitenbach Judge Wesley E. Brown Jeffery L. Carmichael Jill A. Casado Marc P. Clements Stuart R. & Kelley L. Collier Donald L. Cordes Kevin M. & Valerie F. Cowan

KU LAW MAGAZINE 67

donor report Robert W. Coykendall & Dorothy A. Hirsch William E. & Elizabeth Dakan S. Nyles & Mary P. Davis Amy M. & Gary W. Decker Jane A. Deterding Sharon L. Dickgrafe Holly A. Dyer Max E. Eberhart & Nina Gillig Eberhart Charles P. Efflandt David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Justin D. Elkouri Jeffrey R. Emerson Stacy Ortega Engels Sara E. Feeney-Meyer Foulston Siefkin LLP Gregory L. Franken Joni J. Franklin Thomas P. Garretson & Carole Bomhard Garretson Hugh W. Gill IV & Ingrid Olson Gill Phillip A. & Marlene K. Glenn Steven D. & Lisa A. Gough Robert I. & Susan S. Guenthner Kurt A. & Kelly R. Harper Edward J. Healy & Helen Healy Alvin D. Herrington David L. Hiebert & Sheridan Dirks Hiebert Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Wyatt A. & Mary Ann Hoch Ross A. Hollander Stephen J. House Alan Joseph & Diane Oliver Joseph Kansas Health Foundation Stephen M. Kerwick Teresa Roll Kerwick Robin E. Kluge Tricia M. Knoll Ted E. & Nancy A. Knopp Craig T. Lawson Michael E. & Melinda Lazzo David Lowden & Dawne Adams Lowden, M.D. Terry L. & Monica S. Malone Kim R. Martens & Glenda Tackett Martens Coy M. Martin Carolyn L. Matthews William P. Matthews Brian K. McLeod Mindy Patterson McPheeters Eric B. Metz Eric S. Namee & Tracy Lynn Namee Chad S. Nelson Andrew J. Nolan & Sheryl Griffith Nolan Gary W. Owens Donald N. Peterson II Linda Simpson Peterson Tucker L. Poling & Alissa N. Bauer

68 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Lynn D. Preheim Larry G. Rapp David E. Rogers & Sally Hadley Rogers Ross Foundation Richard H. Rumsey & Lorie Dudley Rumsey Kari S. Schmidt Albert J. Schwartz & Jane Lake Schwartz David G. Seely & Debra Short Seely Steven P. & Deborah J. Smith Ann & Mark A. Soderberg Jeff C. Spahn Jr. Emie Wiechman Stehley Willard B. Thompson & Barbara Lemert Thompson Tom C. & Christie Triplett Larry S.Vernon John A.Vetter Kimberly Gee Vines Monte A.Vines Martha Braun Wallisch & William J. Wallisch III Janet Huck Ward & James E. Ward Robert D. Wiechman Jr. Gary A. Winfrey & Sally Nixon Winfrey Will B. Wohlford William S. Woolley

Melissa Wangemann Maag Jan Haley Maxwell & Robert S. Maxwell Rebecca E. Miller Donald L. Moler Jr. Judith A. Moler David P. Mudrick & Mary Walker Mudrick James P. Nordstrom Justice Lawton R. Nuss Paul D. Post & Kay Kelly, LSCSW Eva Powers & Ramon S. Powers, Ph.D. James L. Prentice Leslie Granger Prentice Judge Julie A. Robinson Judge Richard D. Rogers & Cynthia J. Rogers Leland E. Rolfs Security Benefit Group of Companies Judge Dale L. Somers & Judyanne Somers Lawrence L. Tenopir Jason W. Thompson & Karen Schwarzer Thompson Roger K.Viola & Karen S.Viola Westar Energy Foundation Susan Krehbiel William John R. Wine Jr. & Ellen Sue Wine

Seward Daniel H. & Paula Diepenbrock Law Office of Daniel H. Diepenbrock, PA

Stafford Judge Barry A. Bennington & Lynette S. Bennington

Shawnee Martin K. Albrecht & Shari Feist Albrecht Justice Carol A. Beier & Richard W. Green Mary Stauffer Brownback U.S. Sen. Samuel D. Brownback Jeffrey A. Chanay & Kristin Anderson Chanay J. Richelle Crow-Johnson W. Patrick Haley & Paula McGuire Haley Harold L. Haun Charles R. Hay Deanne Watts Hay Bernard J. Hickert Robert R. Hiller Jr. James P. Hostetter, M.D., J.D. Alan V. Johnson & Mary Slaughter Johnson Joy Morrison Johnson Trust Kansas Bar Association Kansas Women Attorneys Association Cynthia Lutz Kelly & Robert N. Kelly Justice Edward Larson & Mary L. Larson

Sumner Judge Robert S. McQuin & Lorene Gentle McQuin Wabaunsee Russell B. Taylor Wilson Judge David W. Rogers Wyandotte Joshua K. Allen Katherine Benson Allen Robert B. Castor & Gloria Nelson Castor Daniel D. Crabtree Maureen M. Mahoney John C. McFadden Michael J. Nichols Richard B. Payne Kathryn Pruessner Peters & Stephen D. Peters Maryann Slattery United States District Court Bar Registration

KENTUCKY Gary L. Rohrer & Lee Ann Urban Rohrer MAINE Bruce C. Mallonee & LeeAnne Plumb Mallonee MARYLAND Cynthia R. Bryant John D. Corse & Andrea Markl Corse, M.D. Jana Patterson Gagner Jason B. Harper Sr. Patricia K. Hirsch Dorothy M. Ingalls & Kevin K. Jurrens Steven K. Linscheid Robert B. & Margaret E. Neill John P. Smolen Marie Parker Strahan & Dennis W. Strahan Teresa R. Temme Dietz Paul L.Yde & Sarah R. Elder MASSACHUSETTS Maureen Lynch Burke Bethany A. Pendleton Theodore A. Schilling MICHIGAN Martin R. Brown Stephen C. Chambers J. Donel & Polly S. Moore Joel M. Shields Whirlpool Foundation MINNESOTA Bion J. Beebe & Vicki Storm Beebe Faegre & Benson Foundation Bruce A. Finzen Myron L. Frans Bruce R. Jeide Christine K. Solso John O. Somers & Karen Thiele Somers Thomson West Kathryn Marie Timm Mary A. & Jason M. Walker MISSOURI Collin B. & Dana Altieri American Multi-Cinema Inc. Blackwell Sanders LLP Elizabeth A. Blake R. Dan & Dale P. Boulware Laura K. Brooks & William M. Brooks, Ph.D. Bryan Cave LLP P. Dan Calderon Louis A. Cohn & Lora A. Cohn, Ph.D. Kevin M. Connor & Anne L. Connor Staci L. Cooper

Linda Smith Crist Heywood H. Davis & Louise Swigart Davis Judge Kathryn E. Davis Kirt D. DeHaan & Cheryl R. DeHaan Michael V. DiPasquale John D. & Karin M. Dunbar Alison D. Dunning Amy M. Fowler John J. Gates Mary K. Gates Donald W. Giffin & Esther Brown Giffin Hallmark Corporate Foundation Anne Fleishel Harris & Wilbur C. Buckheit Dr. Don A. Hatfield Christopher C. Haxton & Serese Yvonne Smith-Haxton Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City Craig A. & Antoinette Joyce Hunt Husch & Eppenberger LLC Megan Barr Jennings Heather Jones Kimberly A. Jones Janet M. Justus Patrick J. Kaine Scott D. Kaiser Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association

Thomas W. Keefe Lathrop & Gage LC Donald H. & Sue C. Loudon David H. & Debi Luce Phillip A. & Janet M. Miller Roland B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller John W. Mitchell Jr. & Margaret Katherine Mitchell Virginia H. Murray Lynn Myers John J. Osgood Robert C. Paden Jr. Carolyn Boettcher Parmer Peabody Energy Leena D. Phadke Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus PC William M. & Nancy E. Quitmeier John Scurlock Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee PC James O. Selzer J. Stanley & Tommye C. Sexton Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Shughart Thomson & Kilroy, P.C. Sonnenschein Scholars Foundation Kenneth W. Spain & Cynthia Mullen Spain Christopher G. Standlee Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP

GIVING BACK to your alma

mater shows that you appreciate the high-caliber education you received. Gifts of all sizes matter, and 100 percent of your donation supports the area of your choice. By making a $1,000 annual gift to the KU School of Law, you will be recognized as a member of the Deans Club. Making a gift is just a click away—simply visit kugiving.org/givenow. Giving online is easy, fast and secure. What better way to show your passion for KU?

Michael L. Taylor Carrie B. Temm Stephen M. & Carlene M. Todd UMB Bank NA Gene E. & Linda E.Voigts Judge Marcia K. Walsh Charles R. Wilson R. Dean Wolfe & Cheryl L. Wolfe Kathleen Kopach Woods Bradley J.Yeretsky Emily M.Yeretsky

NEW HAMPSHIRE Edward M. Kaplan Xavier Simonsen John M. Talley

MONTANA Phyllis A. Bock Estate of James M. Haughey

NEW MEXICO Robin C. & Deborah M. Blair Dudley Ann Wall Kirk & James E. Kirk Ann J. Lerner Phyllis Savage Lynn & Randall S. Lynn David F. & Linda F. Richards

NEBRASKA Phillip C. Buttell Tyler P. McLeod Jeffery Brian Morris Jacqueline Egr Pueppke Richard E. Putnam Emily Cameron Shattil Michael L. Sullivan NEVADA Alice Boler Bolin Robert I. Correales R. Stanley & Doris R. Ditus Roger L. Grandgenett II

NEW JERSEY Capt. Michele Stackhouse Bayless Carol Y. & Jeffrey P. Berns Margaret M. Connell Ernst & Young Foundation KPMG Foundation

NEW YORK American Express Charitable Fund Noreen L. Connolly Carolyn W. Coulson Peter F. Davidson Donald N. Dirks Justin M. Lungstrum & Emily Lungstrum Dara Trum Miles Robin J. Miles Holly Nielsen

donor report Estate of Kate Stephens Michael A. Sternlieb Swiss Re Matching Grant Program NORTH CAROLINA Robert M. Friesen & Anne Ellis Friesen Robert Edward Nunley William T. Pendergrass Jean Humphrey Proffitt & Roy F. Proffitt Brenda Petrie Register & Benton Register Kenneth L. Wagner & Lida McNearney Wagner James B. Wright

Randal J. McDowell & Zelia Taylor McDowell RHODE ISLAND Professor Dennis L. Mandsager & Sherrie Koester Mandsager A.R. Thomas SOUTH CAROLINA John D. Stewart Thomas J. Weilert & Jane Kemezis Weilert SOUTH DAKOTA William K. Sauck Jr. Nathan H. & Annette White

NORTH DAKOTA Albert J. Hardy & Patricia Culea Hardy

TENNESSEE Carolyn Wenzel Schott & Gary W. Schott, Ph.D.

OHIO Mary A. Cabrera Cardinal Health Foundation Thomas A. & Mary M. Darner Nancy M. Dixon Macy’s Foundation Daniel J. Martin, Ed.D. Nationwide Foundation Stefan J. Padfield

TEXAS AT&T Foundation Joel A. Bannister ConocoPhillips LeRoy Lewis DeNooyer Anna Marie Dempsey James N. Edmonds Mary Lew Edmonds ExxonMobil Foundation Jeffrey D. Hewett Ryan C. Hudson Andrew M. Jones Ramona K. Kantack John A. Koepke John C. Landon Cheryl Hagemann Lindeman Curt M. Lindeman Mon Yin Lung Daniel J. Lyons & Maryanne Lyons Bettina Toisan McGriggler Floyd R. McHenry Michael J. McNally & Elizabeth Shertzer McNally David R. Morris Kent G. Nunn & Colleen Johnson Nunn Evan J. Olson & Susan Woodin Olson R. Sam Pestinger John A. Price Michael L. Riggs & Elaine P. Riggs Stephen L. Sapp & Theresa Barton Sapp Elizabeth A. Schartz Steven D. Selbe Wesley H. Sowers Jr. Cathleen Chandler Stevenson & David A. Stevenson Monica Schmidt Thompson Thompson & Knight Foundation Monica D. Tovar-von Waaden Julie L. Unruh

OKLAHOMA Orval F. Baldwin II Tony L. & Shawna L. Gehres Kraig E. Kannard Pamela Meador Mattson & Lynn P. Mattson Brian R. Matula ONEOK Foundation Gentra Abbey Sorem & James R. Sorem Jr., Ph.D. Wesley H. Sowers Sr. Judge Rodney B. Sparkman & Elizabeth D. Sparkman H. Steven Walton & Sandra M. Walton The Williams Companies OREGON Gavin W. & Christine J. Armstrong Cary A. Gluesenkamp & Roberta Cooke Gluesenkamp J. Michael Porter & Ruth Merz PENNSYLVANIA William Bevan III & Gail M. Bevan Jana R. Budde Jan Fink Call Robert E. Donatelli & Katherine Donatelli Mark S. & Sandra Goldman Law School Admission Council

70 KU LAW MAGAZINE

D. Mark von Waaden Douglas D. Wheat & Laura L. Wheat Cynthia S. Woelk UTAH Paul T. Moxley VERMONT Robert H. Backus Brenda Roberts Kissam VIRGINIA John W. & Donna R. Barbian Margaret M. Breinholt Cathleen E. Carothers Laura A. Denk Darren M. Dick Ann T. & Robert A. Gutkin Dean B. Hill Mark D. Hoover Arthur S. Hubacher Gordon A. Jones Heather A. Jones Eric A. Kuwana & Karen E. Miller-Kuwana Jeffrey Li J. Michael Martinez de Andino Brian C. McCormally & Kathie Philbrick McCormally Elizabeth A. Meekins Robert B. Misner Mobil Retiree Matching Gift Program James A. Oppy Philip Morris USA Inc. Martin M. Shoemaker G. Sid Smith Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith Alan C. Sobba Shannon L. Spangler & Michael E. Spangler Beverly J. Thomas Mark A. Zuschek & Jo Dee Daetwiler Zuschek WASHINGTON Lynn L. Anderson & La Faun McMurry Anderson The Boeing Company Karen L. Borell Pamela Hooper Feinstein & Larry B. Feinstein Frederick B. Gould Edward H. & Julia N. Graham Danford D. & Jennifer Grant Brian W. Leonard & Elizabeth D.S. Leonard WEST VIRGINIA Debra M. Hart McLaughlin

WISCONSIN Howard E. Dutcher & Jean Spangler Dutcher Katrina G. Hull Paul M. Schmidt WYOMING Matthew E. Turner & Jamie Immel Turner SWITZERLAND Alfred S. Farha, J.D. Donors are listed as of June 30, 2008. If omissions or errors have occurred, we express our sincere regret and ask that you bring them to the attention of Sandy Patti by calling (785) 864-9204 or sending e-mail to patti@ku.edu. Corrections will be printed in the next issue of KU Law Magazine. Contributions received after June 30 will appear in the 2008-2009 donor report.

In Memoriam

Jana Lynne Mackey 1982-2008

J

ana Mackey applied to the University of Kansas School of Law to “become a more effective advocate for the people and the issues” that mattered to her. Her hope, selflessness and optimism inspired others at the school, and she has been greatly missed. The second-year law student and ardent advocate for women’s rights was found dead inside her ex-boyfriend’s home on July 3, 2008. An estimated 1,100 mourners attended a celebration of Mackey’s life on July 9 at Liberty Hall in downtown Lawrence. Dean Gail Agrawal noted during her remarks at the service that Mackey would not have measured personal success by the numbers on her paycheck: “Her ‘eyes on the prize-in-thedistance’ gazed not toward Wall Street and large law firms with long names for founding partners, but to a clear we-can-do-it vision of social justice – for women, for gays and lesbians, for all those whose voices were too rarely heard or listened to in the corridors of power,” Agrawal said. “Jana would make a difference, and the large and small steps our society took toward human rights would be the measure of her success.” Mackey volunteered at agencies that served rape victims and survivors of domestic violence. She was a lobbyist for women’s rights organizations in Kansas and was active in state and national political campaigns. She started law school in the fall of 2007 and was involved in the Public Interest Law Society and Women in Law. She was enrolled during the summer in the Paul E. Wilson Defender Project. There she represented her first client, setting aside her passions to advocate for the interests of a federal prisoner who was a repeat perpetrator of violence. “I regret, more than I can say, that we will not come to know the lawyer Jana would have been,” Agrawal said at Mackey’s memorial service. Earlier this month, the Kansas Association for Justice awarded the Paul E. Wilson Advocacy Award to Mackey posthumously. The annual award recognizes a Defender Project intern who has demonstrated outstanding advocacy for a client’s legal claim as well as compassion and respect for the client as an individual.

The Public Interest Law Society and the Student Bar Association have raised more than $2,500 for the Jana Mackey Support for Public Advocacy Fund, which the law school established through the KU Endowment Association at the request of Mackey’s parents. Other donations have come from a wide range of friends, family and members of the law school community. Friends and family have launched a campaign in Mackey’s memory called Eleven Hundred Torches, which encourages 1,100 people to serve others. The campaign’s name symbolizes the number of people who attended Mackey’s memorial service and were asked to pick up the young activist’s torch and carry her work forward. For more information, please visit 1100torches.org. KU LAW MAGAZINE 71

In Memoriam

Andrew John Mullin

T

1974-2008

he University of Kansas School of Law community lost a promising young student in October. Andrew Mullin, whom family and friends remember as encouraging, inquisitive and witty, died Oct. 18, 2008, at his home in Lawrence. Mullin entered KU Law with the Class of 2009 after spending several years as a paralegal. He graduated with distinction with a bachelor’s in English from KU in 1998. He was a Summerfield Scholar and participated in the University Honors Program. Mullin was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, an ac-

72 KU LAW MAGAZINE

ademic honor society, and studied at the American University in Cairo. “Andrew was interested in media and entertainment law and was known by his friends and teachers for his dry wit and ability to turn a phrase,” said Dean Gail Agrawal. “He has been sorely missed by his friends at Green Hall.” At an Oct. 23 memorial service for Mullin in Prairie Village, a reading of thanks captured the many facets of his personality at different stages of his life. There was “Andy the child,” who liked to walk in “sock feet,” feed the fish off the dock at the lake and tie the

dog to his Big Wheel so he could be pulled around. There was “Andrew the brother,” who built snow forts with his younger brother in the winter and provided his sibling constant comfort and friendship. “Andrew the traveler” ventured to Disney World, the Grand Canyon, Mexico and Europe. He studied abroad in Cairo and Turkey. The “inquisitive and clever Andrew” communicated with a dry wit, loved a challenge and read every chance he got. Mullin’s family also characterized him as a humble person who underestimated the depth and breadth of his talent and was open to learning from a diverse range of people. He was “warm, accommodating, genuinely sweet,” they said, and he “left this world wanting his friends and family to know how much he loved and cared for them.”

In Memoriam

Emil C. Anderson Jr., L’53, Mission Hills, Kan., Sept. 28, 2008 Walter B. Ash, L’57, Aurora, Colo., April 29, 2008 Charles A. Bauer, L’37, San Juan Capistrano, Calif., Feb. 10, 2008 John K. Bremyer, L’46, McPherson, Kan., April 17, 2008 Jerald R. Cochran, L’71, Tehachapi, Calif., May 4, 2008 M. Lee Elliott Jr., L’73, Lawrence, Kan., July 12, 2008 Henry A. Goertz, L’84, Bristol, Ind., June 28, 2008 William A. Guilfoyle, L’49, Abilene, Kan., Aug. 6, 2008 Charles R. Hodson, L’50, Perry, Kan., Aug. 22, 2008 Ralph E. Hoke, L’47, Hutchinson, Kan., June 27, 2008 Donald H. Humphreys, L’60, Great Bend, Kan., Aug. 4, 2008 Lt. Col. John B. Hunt, retired, L’83, Leavenworth, Kan., May 27, 2008 Richard W. Hurd, L’49, Kansas City, Mo., July 21, 2008 Walter J. Kennedy Jr., L’56, Shawnee, Kan., April 2, 2008 Charles H. Kimball, L’40, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, Nov. 17, 2007 John E. Lancelot, L’53, Denver, Colo., Feb. 9, 2008 Robert C. Martindell, L’49, Hutchinson, Kan., May 31, 2008 Col. Edward A. Metcalf III, retired, L’49, McAllen, Texas, Jan. 10, 2008 Keith E. Moore, L’58, Overland Park, Kan., May 20, 2008 Wilbur W. Schmidt, L’58, Kansas City, Mo., Aug. 9, 2008 Robert M. Siefkin, L’51, Tucson, Ariz., March 5, 2008 Martha Ann Truman Swoyer, L’52, Oskaloosa, Kan., April 30, 2008 Jess W.Van Ert, L’50, Panorama Village, Texas, Dec. 11, 2007 Gerald L. Wait, L’49, Liberty, Mo., and Kansas City, Mo., June 19, 2008 Richard G. Weaver, L’38, Wichita, Kan., date unknown Lawrence M. Wright, L’66, Keller, Texas, Sept. 11, 2008 Daniel A.Young, L’60, Lawrence, Kan., May 19, 2008 Bruce Warren Zuercher, L’54, Wichita, Kan., April 1, 2008

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT THE US POSTAL SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE BELOW:

ALIGN WITH NO POSTAGE UPPER FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION NECESSARY ALIGN PLEASE CONTACT THE US POSTAL SERVICE RIGHT BILL KEITH IF MAILED WITH REPRESENTATIVE BELOW: MAILPIECE DESIGN ANALYST CORNER IN THE UPPER 816-374-9486 FAX: 816-374-9457 UNITED STATES RIGHT BILL KEITH wkeith@usps.gov MAILPIECE DESIGN ANALYST TO BE USED ONLY WITH FIM - C (Business Reply Mail) CORNER AND ZIP CODE: 816-374-9486 816-374-9457 FOR BUSINESSFAX: REPLY MAIL 66045-9690 CK=5 wkeith@usps.gov CARDS ONLY TO BE USED ONLY WITH FIM - C (Business Reply Mail) AND ZIP CODE: FOR MIN: BUSINESS 3.5" X 5" REPLY MAIL 66045-9690 CK=5 FIRST CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 310 LAWRENCE, KANSAS CARDS ONLY MAX: 4.25" X 6" CAUTION: POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE MIN: 3.5" X 5" USE ONLY FOR ADDRESS BEARING THE ZIP+4 CODE MAX: 4.25" X 6" SEE PUBLICATION 353 FOR PRINTING SCHOOL OF LAW ABOVE. - KU LAW MAGAZINE CAUTION: REQUIREMENTS.

BUSINESS REPLY MAIL

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS USE ONLY FOR ADDRESS BEARING THE ZIP+4 CODE 1 JAYHAWK BLVD ABOVE. SEE PUBLICATION 353 FOR PRINTING REQUIREMENTS. LAWRENCE KS 66045-9690

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION THIS POSITIVE FOR: PLEASE CONTACT PREPARED THE US POSTAL SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE BELOW:

ALIGN WITH LOWER ALIGN RIGHT WITH CORNER LOWER RIGHT CORNER

SCHOOL OF LAW - KU LAWS THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS NO POSTAGE 1 JAYHAWK SCHOOL OF BLVD LAW - KU LAWSNECESSARY IF MAILED LAWRENCE KS 66045-9690 THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

ALIGN WITH UPPER FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ALIGN THIS POSITIVE FOR: PLEASE CONTACT PREPARED THE US POSTAL SERVICE RIGHT BILL KEITH WITH REPRESENTATIVE BELOW: MAILPIECE DESIGN ANALYST CORNER IN THE UPPER 1 JAYHAWK BLVD 816-374-9486 FAX: 816-374-9457 UNITED STATES RIGHT BILL KEITH wkeith@usps.gov LAWRENCE KS 66045-9690 MAILPIECE DESIGN ANALYST TO BE USED ONLY WITH FIM - C (Business Reply Mail) CORNER AND ZIP Created CODE: April 16, 2008 1:00 PM 816-374-9486 FAX: 816-374-9457 (c) 1989-2008 Envelope Manager FOR BUSINESS REPLY MAIL version 3.011.006. 66045-9690 CK=5 wkeith@usps.gov CARDS ONLY BE USED ONLYcourtesy WITH FIM - C (Business Reply Mail) in minutes! Use Envelope Manager's DAZzle Designer toTO create a complete or business reply mail artwork AND ZIP Created CODE: April 16, 2008 1:00 PM (c) 1989-2008 FOR BUSINESS REPLYManager MAIL version 3.011.006. MIN: 3.5" X 5"Envelope 66045-9690 CK=5 FIRST CLASS (800) MAIL 576-3279 PERMIT NO. 310 LAWRENCE, KANSAS CARDS4.25" ONLY www.EnvelopeManager.com MAX: X 6" Use Envelope Manager's DAZzle Designer to create a complete courtesy or business reply mail artwork in minutes! CAUTION: POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE MIN: 3.5" X 5" USE ONLY FOR ADDRESS BEARING THE ZIP+4 CODE www.EnvelopeManager.com (800) 576-3279 MAX: 4.25" X 6" SEE PUBLICATION 353 FOR PRINTING SCHOOL OF LAW ABOVE. - KU LAW MAGAZINE CAUTION: REQUIREMENTS.

BUSINESS REPLY MAIL

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS USE ONLY FOR ADDRESS BEARING THE ZIP+4 CODE 1 JAYHAWK BLVD ABOVE. SEE PUBLICATION 353 FOR PRINTING REQUIREMENTS. LAWRENCE KS 66045-9690 66044-9690

**********************************************************************************

ALIGN WITH LOWER ALIGN RIGHT WITH CORNER LOWER RIGHT CORNER

SIZE: FIM & BARCODE ARE ACTUAL SIZE: DO NOT ENLARGE OR REDUCE! ********************************************************************************** FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ALIGN THIS POSITIVE PREPARED FOR: SCHOOL OF FIMs LAW and - KU LAWS PLEASE CONTACTSpecial THE US care POSTAL SERVICE PLACEMENT: also must be taken to ensure SIZE: FIM & BARCODE DO NOT ENLARGE OR REDUCE! WITH REPRESENTATIVE BELOW: ARE ACTUAL SIZE: THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS NO POSTAGE barcodes are placed properly on the mail piece. Improper size or UPPER FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION NECESSARY 1 JAYHAWK BLVD ALIGN placement ensures piece will not USPS regulations andLAWS THIS POSITIVE PREPARED FOR: SCHOOL OF FIMs LAW and - KU PLEASE CONTACT THEthe USmail POSTAL SERVICE PLACEMENT: Special care also must be meet taken to ensure RIGHT BILL KEITH IF MAILED LAWRENCE KS 66045-9690 WITH REPRESENTATIVE BELOW: defeat their purpose of automation compatibility. THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS MAILPIECE DESIGN ANALYST barcodes are placed properly on the mail piece. Improper size or CORNER IN THE UPPER 1 JAYHAWK BLVD 816-374-9486 FAX: 816-374-9457 placement ensures the mail piece will not meet USPS regulations and UNITED STATES RIGHT BILL KEITH wkeith@usps.gov ********************************************************************************** LAWRENCE KS 66045-9690 defeat theirDESIGN purpose of automation compatibility. MAILPIECE ANALYST TO BE USED ONLY WITH FIM - C (Business Reply Mail) CORNER

AND ZIP Created CODE: April 16, 2008 1:00 PM 816-374-9486 FAX: 816-374-9457 (c) 1989-2008 Envelope Manager FOR BUSINESS REPLY MAIL version 3.011.006. 66045-9690 CK=5 wkeith@usps.gov ********************************************************************************** CARDS ONLY BE USED ONLYcourtesy WITH FIM - C (Business Reply Mail) in minutes! Use Envelope Manager's DAZzle Designer toTO create a complete or business reply mail artwork AND ZIP Created CODE: April 16, 2008 1:00 PM (c) 1989-2008 FOR BUSINESS REPLYManager MAIL version 3.011.006. MIN: 3.5" X 5"Envelope 66045-9690 CK=5 FIRST CLASS (800) MAIL 576-3279 PERMIT NO. 310 LAWRENCE, KANSAS CARDS ONLY www.EnvelopeManager.com MAX: 4.25" X 6" Use Envelope Manager's DAZzle Designer to create a complete courtesy or business reply mail artwork in minutes! CAUTION: POSTAGE WILL BEBE PAID BYBY ADDRESSEE POSTAGE WILL PAID ADDRESSEE MIN: 3.5" X 5" USE ONLY FOR ADDRESS BEARING THE ZIP+4 CODE www.EnvelopeManager.com (800) 576-3279 MAX: 4.25" X 6" ABOVE. SEE PUBLICATION 353 FOR PRINTING SCHOOL OFOF LAW - KU LAW MAGAZINE SCHOOL LAW - KU LAW MAGAZINE CAUTION: REQUIREMENTS.

BUSINESS REPLY MAIL

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS USE ONLY FOR ADDRESS BEARING THE ZIP+4 CODE 1 JAYHAWK BLVD 1 JAYHAWK BLVD ABOVE. SEE PUBLICATION 353 FOR PRINTING REQUIREMENTS. LAWRENCE KSKS 66045-9690 LAWRENCE 66044-9690

**********************************************************************************

SIZE: FIM & BARCODE ARE ACTUAL SIZE: DO NOT ENLARGE OR REDUCE! **********************************************************************************

ALIGN WITH LOWER ALIGN RIGHT WITH CORNER LOWER RIGHT CORNER

KU Law

Alumni News Name: Class: Address:

Phone: E-mail: News/Comments:

KU Law

Address change Name: Class: Position, Firm:

Office Phone: E-mail: Home Address:

KU Law

career services Our firm is anticipating having a position open for:

Part-time law clerk Full-time associate Summer associate Experienced attorney I would be willing to participate in the Career Services Alumni Network (CSAN) and serve as a resource or contact person for law students in my area of expertise, which is:

Name: Firm: Address: Office Phone: E-mail:

Upcoming events 2009 January

29 Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy inaugural lecture

february 06 Human Rights Symposium 13 Tribal Law & Government Conference

MARCH 06 Diversity in Law Banquet

APRIL 03 Return to Green CLE 03 Women in Law Pub Night 18 50/50+ Reunion steve puppe

MAy 02 Deans Club/Medallion dinner 17 Hooding ceremony

PLEASE RECYCLE

Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage Green Hall 1535 W. 15th St. Lawrence, KS 66045-7577

PAID

Lawrence, KS Permit No. 229


KU Law Magazine | Fall 2008