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Magazine for Alumni & Friends | Fall 2012

More than words Admissions essays speak volumes about where Class of 2015 comes from and where it’s going

Beyond Cold Blood

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Supreme court swearing-in

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Donor REPORT

KU Law Magazine is published biannually for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law. Green Hall, 1535 W. 15th St. Lawrence, KS 66045-7608 785.864.4550 Fax: 785.864.5054 www.law.ku.edu DEAN Stephen Mazza Editor & Designer Mindie Paget kulaws@ku.edu 785.864.9205 Contributors Mike Krings, Sandy Patti, Sarah Shebek, Arturo Thompson Photos Jason Dailey, Nick Krug, Mindie Paget, Bill Petros, Steve Puppe, Earl Richardson, Sarah Shebek, KU University Relations PRINTING Allen Press, Lawrence, KS CORRECTIONS A photo caption in the Spring 2012 issue misidentified the Hon. Mary Beck Briscoe, chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, who helped judge the moot court finals in April. Another story misspelled Chancellor Clarke Wescoe and omitted the name of his wife, Barbara Benton Wescoe, who shared in donating the “Tai Chi Figure” in front of Green Hall.

KU Law supports environmental sustainability by purchasing renewable energy certificates (green tags) through the Bonneville Environmental Foundation that offset carbon emissions from producing the KU Law Magazine.

Letter from the Dean Hillary Nicholas looked into the eyes of ancient Egyptian deities painted on a temple wall in Cairo and knew she wanted to go to law school. Her background in archaeology and her passion for preserving antiquities led her to KU Law, where she hopes to study intellectual property and become a crusader for the protection of cultural artifacts. Hillary is one of four students you’ll meet in this issue who saw a problem in the world, realized her strengths and interests aligned with solving it, and decided pursuing a legal education was the next logical step in becoming the type of advocate who could devise a meaningful solution. Our job is to make sure KU Law fosters an environment where students like Hillary can realize their full potential and springboard into fulfilling careers. That’s why scholarships are the No. 1 priority in our capital campaign – followed by faculty support, program enhancements and building improvements. Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas officially launched in April, and we are well on our way to meeting the law school’s $20 million fundraising goal. Thanks to the amazing generosity of our alumni, we have raised more than $14.7 million. You can learn why some of your fellow KU Law graduates have been inspired to give on pages 34-35 and browse the full donor report for fiscal year 2012 starting on page 36. I like to note that donors whose giving capacities range from less than $100 a year up to $1 million have contributed to the campaign total. Working together, we can provide lasting benefits to future students and ensure that a KU Law degree continues to be synonymous with excellence. Outstanding faculty members constitute a large part of that reputation. We celebrate their research and writing in this issue (page 16), hitting mere highlights of the important contributions they make to legal scholarship and policy. The National Academies commissioned Professor Andrew Torrance to study the field of synthetic biology and recommend how the law should deal with the rapidly evolving science in the years to come. And one of our newest faculty members, Elizabeth Kronk, recently published an article exploring the problems standing in the way of energy development on tribal land and proposing two solutions. This type of scholarship directly benefits our students, who are learning the law from authorities in their respective fields. Being challenged in KU Law classrooms leads students to “think like a lawyer,” a skill that former Kansas Gov. Mark Parkinson, L’84, extolled in his acceptance of the Distinguished Alumni Award (page 27) and one that prepared Larry Welch, L’61, to lead the Kansas Bureau of Investigation for 13 years (page 24). KU Law has been and will continue to be a place where thoughtful advocates and leaders are born.

Stephen Mazza Dean and Professor of Law

Contents KU law magazine | Fall 2012

departments 2 ON THE GREEN News briefs: Casad Lecture; Diplomat’s Forum;

Deposition Skills Workshop enters 5th year; Journey to J.D.

14 Faculty News New faculty; research highlights

4 Cover: MORE Than WORDS Law school admissions essays are applicants’ chance to shine beyond their academic credentials. Four personal statements offer a glimpse into the personalities of the Class of 2015.

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Beyond cold blood Former KBI director Larry Welch, L’61, walks readers step-by-step through history of bureau’s most pivotal cases in new book.

17 Faculty NOTES Publications, presentations and other notable

activities by KU Law faculty

26 Alumni News Medallion donors honored; Distinguished

Alumni named; reunions celebrated

30 Alumni Notes Alumni win awards, change jobs, get married

and welcome new family members

33 In Memoriam Deaths in the KU Law family 36 DONOR REPORT

court Date

Recognition of fiscal year 2012 donors

Seventeen KU Law alumni were sworn in to practice before the Supreme Court of the United States at a June ceremony.

28 WHY I GIVE As the capital campaign surges forward, KU Law alumni talk

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about why they give back to their legal alma mater.

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, 785-864-6414, 711 TTY.

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green hall news

On the green

News briefs by Mindie Paget

Casad Lecture disputes existence of nation state An award-winning expert in comparative law highlighted the importance of the state as a political and legal institution at the second Robert C. Casad Comparative Law Lecture at KU Law. Professor H. Patrick Glenn of McGill University delivered the public lecture “The Cosmopolitan State” on Sept. 14 in Green Hall. In the lecture, Glenn attempted to disprove the idea of a nation state and argued that all states are unique in both populations and laws. “There never has been and there never will be a nation state,” Glenn said. “So it is time we began to face the reality of this situation, that what was essentially a romantic French idea in the 18th century – that ‘la nation’ should have its own legal and political structures – is an idea which has failed.” Glenn has extensive experience in the world of comparative law. He is the former director of the Institute of Comparative SEPTLaw at McGill University and a member of both the Royal Society of Canada and the International Academy of Comparative Law. In 2000, his book “Legal Traditions of the World” (Oxford Glenn University Press, 2000) received the Grand Prize of the International Academy of Comparative Law. And in 2006, he received the Prix Léon-Gérin, a prestigious award from the Quebec government, in recognition of his contributions to comparative law over his career. The lecture series is named in honor of Professor Emeritus Robert Casad, who has been on the KU Law faculty since 1959 and is internationally known for his scholarship in comparative civil procedure. He retired from classroom teaching in 1997 but continues to conduct research and publish books and articles.

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Sean Hagan, general counsel and director of the legal department at the International Monetary Fund, delivers the 2012 Diplomat’s Forum Lecture at KU Law.

Top legal officer at IMF delivers Diplomat’s Forum Catch the full Diplomat’s Forum and Casad lectures at law.ku.edu/multimedia

One of the top executives at the International Monetary Fund offered his view on the key ingredients of a durable solution to the eurozone crisis during the 2012 Diplomat’s Forum Lecture. Sean Hagan, general counsel and director of the legal department at the Washington D.C.-based IMF, delivered “The Eurozone Crisis: Defining the Path to Recovery” on Nov. 1 in Green Hall. “We live very much in a global village, and the interlocking network of trade and finance has brought tremendous benefits, including lifting millions out of poverty, but it has also created many risks,” Hagan said. “And a crisis in one region very quickly spills over into another, including, for example, in the United States.” He cited the following statistics: n About a fifth of U.S. exports go to Europe. n Before the crisis, the U.S. Standard & Poor’s Top 500 companies were earning 20 percent of their profits in Europe, and

European-owned companies employed approximately 3.5 million people in the United States. “The ability of the United States to restore robust growth and job creation after what is perhaps the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression really does depend on how this issue is resolved,” Hagan said. In his view, a sustainable eurozone recovery requires three distinct but interrelated conditions: 1) effective economic adjustment by individual members of the eurozone; 2) external financing to support the adjustment process; and 3) greater integration among eurozone members. The IMF is an organization of 188 countries working to increase financial stability, monetary cooperation and economic growth. In his current position, Hagan advises the Fund’s management, executive board and membership on all legal aspects of its operations. He has also published extensively on the law of the Fund and a broader range of legal issues involving the prevention and resolution of financial crisis.

Journey to J.D. exposes youth to legal education, careers

Deposition Skills Workshop celebrates fifth anniversary When enrollment opened for this year’s Deposition Skills Workshop, the class filled within three minutes. The popularity of the course, which takes place over four days each January, speaks to its value for students as they prepare for careers in practice. The innovative class pairs professor-led lectures with practitioner-led simulations in which students learn the finer points of taking and defending depositions. The workshop enrolled 18 students its first year; 48 students will participate in 2013, the fifth anniversary of the course. Ben Winters, L’12, can attest to the workshop’s practical value. He had been on the job at Gilliland & Hayes in Wichita for just three weeks when a partner assigned him to take his first professional deposition. He reported his experience to Professor Suzanne Valdez, who directs the workshop: “I cannot tell you how much I depended on what we learned in the Deposition Skills Workshop last January. I was so comfortable, and the partner attorney thought I was incredibly poised and confident and did a really good job. I know I couldn’t have done what I just did without that class and without your help in law school, so I wanted to tell you thank you, thank you, thank you!” KU Law now offers two intensive simulation courses – the Deposition Skills Workshop and the Expert Witness Skills Workshop – that allow students to gain hands-on experience in trial advocacy. Veteran attorneys teach both courses, providing invaluable guidance and feedback as students practice their skills with peers.

Sixteen high school students from across the state of Kansas got a taste of law school and careers in the legal profession during the third annual Journey to J.D. in June at KU Law. The camp is designed to support, mentor and encourage diverse students entering their junior year of high school to attend college and, ultimately, law school and pursue legal opportunities in the region. The students experienced a rigorous week of studies and travel, beginning with a team-building exercise at the Adams Campus Outdoor Education Center. They spent three full days in the classroom, learning basic legal principles from current law students serving as teaching assistants. During a trip to Topeka, the students visited the Brown v. Board of Education site, toured the Capitol and a juvenile correctional facility, and dropped

in on the Kansas Judicial Center, where they met with Kansas Appeals Court Judge Karen Arnold-Burger, a 1982 graduate of the law school. They also visited Caleb Stegall, chief counsel to Gov. Sam Brownback and a 2000 graduate of the law school. The students also visited the law school’s Medical-Legal Partnership Clinic, the law firm of Husch Blackwell LLP and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and got a behindthe-scenes tour of Livestrong Sporting Park, home of Kansas City’s professional soccer club, Sporting Kansas City. The law school’s alumni Diversity Council devised the idea for Journey to J.D., its version of the kinds of “pipeline” programs popularly employed by law schools and the legal profession to diversify legal education and the workforce. Major corporate sponsors of the 2012 camp included the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation, Husch Blackwell LLP and Walmart.

Clockwise from top: Group photo silliness at the Journey to J.D. barbecue; Cody Totten of Wamego High School digs into classroom discussion; Jenna Johnson of Erie High School tells fellow campers a little bit about herself during introductions.

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Words More than

Admissions essays speak volumes about 1L class Bucking national trends, the University of Kansas School of Law saw a 19 percent increase in applicants for the entering class of 2012 and enrolled a class whose academic credentials held steady despite a challenging legal market. But statistics alone don’t tell the story of a class whose members are military veterans, collegiate athletes, actors, musicians, health professionals and farm hands. They have traveled the world, volunteered in storm-ravaged cities, worked as translators, and taught in juvenile detention facilities.

Applied

Enrolled

973 141 Median LSAT

157 Median GPA

3.51 43% women

14% minorities

Although their backgrounds are wonderfully diverse, they have at least one thing in common: They view the law as a tool to make a difference in their communities, the world and the lives of others. On the following pages, you’ll meet four of our 1Ls through their application essays — the same way our Admissions Office first met them.

LSAT range: 149-172

We think you will agree that the next generation of KU lawyers holds a great deal of promise.

GPA range: 2.59-4.00

Photos by Jason Dailey

Kansas residents

64%

Average age: 24

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was shortly after I began work as a registered nurse that a sense of dread would always come over me as I pulled my car into the vast empty parking lot of St. John’s Hospital. Flanked by nurses and physicians just arriving for a full night’s work, I’d make the long march toward my respective unit. Once inside, a quick scan of the badge would release a gust of sterile air as the intensive care’s double doors cracked open – a host of mechanical contrivances providing welcome with a chorus of alarms. Questions came with each soulless beep and whistle. “What will my patients be like?” “Am I capable of dealing with the problems that arise?” Or simply, “Can I stay awake?” It seemed that developing a slight nervous nausea prior to work became an inevitable routine that first year. Such trepidation wasn’t always the case. I started in 6A Medical Intensive Care Unit immediately following my graduation from nursing school. For me, the draw of this particular floor was its patient population. The Ozarks, my home, had long suffered from a serious drug problem, and substance abuse was in fact one of MICU’s specialties. I saw in this a noble work: an opportunity to help people change, and to be a solution to a serious problem within my community. Indeed, when the unit manager warned me about this specific patient group, I replied with enthusiasm that these were the very people I desired most to work with. The fact that so many of the people admitted to MICU for drug abuse were of my own generation only hardened my resolve and reaffirmed my growing crusader mentality. These grand goals, however, soon crashed against reality. I quickly realized that there was a hopeless déjà vu to this particular population. Addicts would appear half-dead, recover, then leave, only to reappear a month later noticeably unchanged. And they were all essentially the same. Most were angry, hate-filled, selfish, and unappreciative. Likewise, compassion, understanding, and reasoning (the very cornerstones of nursing) too often proved fruitless – seed thrown among thorns. In this aspect, the work seemed futile. Such frustration was further compounded by the dreadful seriousness of the situation. The destructive effects of such abuse were laid bare and unadulterated. I had worked only two weeks when I packed my first patient into a plastic bag. Sadly, this patient would be but one of many; and, in the wake of such reality shocks, I couldn’t help but feel disillusioned. Thus began the evening routine. Entrenchment eventually proved the cure for my spells of evening nerves. Once established, I found the

“I had worked only two weeks when I packed my first patient into a plastic bag. ... I couldn’t help but feel disillusioned.”

Patrick Springer Hometown Aurora, Missouri Education Associate’s in nursing, Southwest Baptist University, 2009; B.S. in criminology, Missouri State University-Springfield, 2012 Work experience Registered nurse, St. John’s Marian Center and St. John’s Hospital, Missouri SEPTwith Patrick Watch a video interview at youtube.com/kulawschool

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Continued on page 10

I

stood inches from the 2,000-year-old temple wall as SEPT painted Egyptian deities stared back at me, unblinking. I tried to focus on the artifact, which would have been the pride of the Nelson Atkins’ collection back home, but I could not see past the deplorable conditions that surrounded it. I turned around the room taking in the large windows, opened to Cairo’s polluted air, the boxes piled haphazardly along the walls, and the lack of guard or glass to protect the temple wall from curious hands. In that moment, the cultural property debates that had raged in my art history and classics courses came into sharp focus: This was not a dry discussion of law in a classroom in New York City; this was a global question with very real implications. Who decides if a country is fit to care for its antiquities, and who sets the standards? How do we protect artifacts that are already in international museums, and those that are looted from archaeological sites daily? What right do we have to take away the cultural history of a country, and will children learn to respect the past if they are only allowed replicas? These questions stayed with me as I completed my journey through Egypt and grew stronger with each class I took back in the states. I began seeking answers by volunteering with the organization Save Antiquities for Everyone or SAFE, helping to update their Facebook and Twitter pages with important petitions and news about looting and the protection of artifacts. The more I learned about the legal issues facing museums and archaeologists, the more I wanted to know. As the semester progressed I realized my educational background, my interest in art and the history of civilizations, my love of words, critical thinking, and problemsolving were all pointing me in one direction: law school. Pursuing a law degree is not only the logical next step, it is the step that aligns my strengths with my passions and turns both into a challenging and rewarding career. A wide range of courses in the liberal arts have served as an excellent foundation for the study of law. My courses emphasized a close reading of texts, approaching a problem from many angles, sharing and defending one’s thoughts through group discussion, and attempting to understand each viewpoint before coming to a conclusion. Most importantly, every class I took encouraged me to ask questions, to challenge assumptions, and to look past an author or speaker’s biases to gain a deeper understanding of the topic at hand. The importance of questioning long-held traditions became very clear to me in my travels abroad. Traveling

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Watch a video interview with Hillary at youtube.com/kulawschool

Hometown Atchison, Kansas Education B.A. in classics and art history, NYU College of Arts & Science, 2011 Work experience Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia; Egyptian Assistant, Brooklyn Museum

Hillary Nicholas

“I stood inches from the 2,000year-old temple wall as painted Egyptian deities stared back at me, unblinking.”

Continued on page 10

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I

ran away to China. Instead of writing this essay (for the second time), I could be finishing my first year of law school. But here I sit, at my blue plastic desk in Baoji, China, looking out the window of my apartment at the incessant construction going on next door. My soon-to-be neighbor is a massive four-story shopping mall, and as I walked over to my window to count the growing number of floors, I looked back at my desk and felt ... ready. Who wants to be a lawyer, anyway? That’s the question I kept asking myself this time last year. I ran away to China because that question plagued me. I thought on it and thought on it. I thought about America’s litigious society. Behind every lawyer I pictured was a dark shadow, a predator feasting on clients, pumping the last billable opportunity from them while they washed their hands of the names, private details and pricey woes of their prey. I ran away to China because this was the idea in my head. China is a wonderfully frustrating, eye-opening and mind-changing, humbling place to live. As the months passed, I thought less and less about going back to school and more about myself. What I learned was that I love learning. I pored over my old Chinese textbooks, forcibly re-memorizing radicals so I could expand my vocabulary, going over the tones of simple words I’d already learned over and over again so that my pronunciation was understandable. I asked a Chinese co-worker for extra hours of Chinese lessons. It was addictive. The more I learned and improved, the more confidence I gained. Each day became more exciting, and I was hungry for more. It took a while before I saw outside of this tunnel vision, and when I did I realized how much more I wanted. I’ve made some wonderful friends in China. Chinese friends are a gift to treasure because they are the most generous, helpful and forgiving friends one could ask for. But each friendship has given me something I never expected. My Chinese friends have changed how I view the study of history. I accidentally stumbled on this train of thought because my friends and I are mutually curious about one another. Working in a school, I am constantly wondering how our private school compares to Chinese public school. From the testing systems to the class hours to the subjects taught and required reading, I’ve asked an insane number of questions. What my friends told me began to weave together with what I already knew. The more I’ve learned about Chinese academic life, the more I’ve begun to see where and why our worldviews overlap and clash. To understand a Chinese student is to better understand how a Chinese adult views the world. Chinese

“China is a wonderfully frustrating, eye-opening and mind-changing, humbling place to live. ”

Kasey Considine Hometown Dartmouth, Massachusetts Education B.A. in writing and history, Loyola University Maryland, 2011 Work experience Foreign teacher, Aston English School, China SEPT with Kasey Watch a video interview at youtube.com/kulawschool

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Continued on page 10

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In

2011, I applied and was offered admission to SEPT the University of Kansas School of Law, but was unable to secure the financial means to attend classes in the fall. I got married in May 2011, and applied for Adjustment of Status with the United States Citizenship and Immigrations Services, to change my status from that of an F-1 student to that of a permanent resident of the United States. The process of changing my immigration status took several months, and was not completed in time for me to be able to apply for financial aid for the fall semester. Taking out loans as an international student proved too costly and convoluted, so I decided to wait another year and apply again, this time as a permanent resident of the United States, and as a State of Kansas resident. One year was not much of a wait for someone who had been waiting for 10 years to fulfill the dream of going back to law school. Ten years before, in February of 2001, I walked into my first day of class as a law student. The hot Brazilian summer was coming to an end, and I was ready to dedicate my life to my legal studies for the next five years. The fact that I had been one of the brightest students of my high school was validated by my strong performance in the first-ever installment of the federal government’s pilot program of standardized exams, known as ENEM. On account of my ENEM scores, Universidade de Salvador Law School offered me early admission, which even brought a reporter from a local newspaper to the front steps of my high school, where I gave her a brief interview on my recent accomplishments. Although in the Brazilian educational system law is studied at the undergraduate level, most students are only able to gather the necessary credentials to secure a spot after trying for a few cycles. Not me. I was 17, fearless and ready. Or so I thought. My legal career in Brazil lasted three years. I studied hard, and worked part-time as an intern for the Federal Justice System in my state, in a position that was conquered through a gruesomely competitive process. I dedicated what little free time I had to doing some pro bono work in the rural community of Feira de Santana. Deep inside, however, all that early responsibility started to weigh down on me. I needed time to think about my future and consider different professional options, but I did not want to waste all the time and effort I had put into my education up to that point. Not surprisingly, when I was awarded a full scholarship under the Georgia Rotary Student Program, which brings just over 100 international students into Georgia universities every year, I did not hesitate to

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Watch a video interview with Tamara at youtube.com/kulawschool

Hometown Salvador, Brazil Education Master’s in city and regional planning, Clemson University, 2010; B.A. in political science, Armstrong Atlantic State University, 2007 Work experience Program assistant, Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta

Tamara Combs

“Eleven years after the first time I walked into my first day of class as a law student, I feel ready to reclaim my legal career.”

Continued on page 11

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Patrick Springer ICU to be a rewarding experience and gained a true insight into one of the major problems facing our society. For the moment, I relaxed my lofty ideals, and instead took the work for what it was: damage control. Revive, stabilize, and move out. In the process, I learned a key lesson: Concern yourself not with what you can’t change, but with that which you can, and do this to the best of your ability. That’s not to say, though, I was wholly content in this position. I still wanted to hack at the root, yet could only swing at the limbs. It seemed that the patient problems I dealt with on a nightly basis were but the end result of a much greater problem, the solution to which the hospital was incapable of providing. As an ICU nurse, I was simply unable to get under the surface of the present emergency. With this in mind, I returned to school after a year on the job, though not to study nursing. Following a great deal of research, I decided instead to study criminology. To my wife and friends such a change, of course, appeared as a mid20s crisis. They weren’t totally wrong. After countless “midnight-codes,” attending to nauseating situations, and fighting patients endowed with drug-induced strength, there was no denying that I was ready for a change. Above this, however, a study in the causes of crime and delinquency appeared as a way to gain a better understanding of my patients, and seemed far more relevant to my work than any discourse on Florence Nightingale. Indeed, continued work experience, now combined with schooling, began to yield answers and explanations. A pattern emerged among my patients: deviant and criminal backgrounds; mental illness; extreme family dysfunction, violence, and molestation; and parents lost through death, desertion, or imprisonment. Over the past six months, I’ve gained an even greater understanding. This past April, I left Medical Intensive and began work as an RN in a psychiatric and behavioral health clinic. Here, drugs and addiction are the chief issue, and all those underlying patterns I noted while at 6A have

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come to the forefront. With the patients out of bed and off the ventilator, the driving forces behind their addictions now come under direct scrutiny. Likewise, being so deeply involved with such personal issues has revealed the seemingly infinite complexities behind substance abuse. It’s impossible to determine the cause of drug addiction; however, with almost every case, there lies a soured well in the past. I’ve come to realize that, whether self-inflicted or not, this problem is so often the byproduct of a major lapse in justice somewhere unseen. Pursuing a career in law first came to mind following my return to school, as the result of pairing work experience with the study of our criminal justice system. Furthermore, being a personal witness to the catastrophic effects of drug abuse has left me with a passionate desire to see such injustices corrected before they carry all those involved into oblivion. I cannot assert what my position will be upon finishing law school. I can say with certainty, however, that I want to be an advocate for those within my community who suffer under these desperate circumstances. Such terrible issues require great efforts. As a student at the University of Kansas School of Law, as well as a future lawyer, I hope to be a part of that effort.

Hillary Nicholas through Egypt brought the question of cultural property alive, and standing in the beautiful new, and pointedly empty, museum at the base of the Parthenon made the question very real. I want to pursue a legal education at a challenging school that encourages its students to ask questions and seek unconventional answers, and I am excited to know there is such an exceptional school located in my own backyard – the University of Kansas. The university’s concentration in intellectual property law would be an excellent fit for my interests, along with courses such as Law and the Arts, International Trade Law, and Intro to Copyright in Literary and Artistic Works. The questions surrounding intellectual property intrigue me, and the ability to study in Lawrence, a city

I love, at a school I have grown up proud of, would be a fulfilling next step. My background in archaeology has given me the opportunity to travel the world and see firsthand the ability law has to cross borders and encompass many fields of study in one. I am confident that the University of Kansas School of Law is the right school for me, and that my strengths, personality, and interests will make me an excellent addition to the Fall 2012 student body.

Kasey Considine students are hardworking, they are in school far longer than American students, they study English for close to 10 years and, in order to get into not only the best universities, but the best high schools and middle schools, they are tested so thoroughly that even I, a native English speaker, have to look up the grammar points they are required to know. They are required to read the Communist Manifesto. But ask a Chinese person where Cambodia is, and they are confused. They don’t know who Pol Pot is. Ask where Egypt is, and the answer might be America (at least that’s what one of my students offered as an answer). They know so much, yet the world they learn about is so limited. Understanding what they know and what has been important for them to know has been a turning point in my understanding of China. I find it absolutely fascinating. So what does this have to do with law school? Well, to begin with, law is not the predatory shadow behind each lawyer as I previously imagined. Our society may feel like that sometimes. But the care I’ve taken with my Chinese friends to ask them about why they feel and think the way they do is not the same care I’ve take in my own country. American society’s perception of law is not what the study of law is about. I want law because it will be a new and tremendous challenge. I want to study the language of law, how it’s translated, and how that translation shapes our society. I want law because it’ll break me down and open my eyes to things I could never see, the same way China has. I want law because I want to hone my

analytical skills and improve my writing skills. I want law because I want to ask the right questions. I want law because I want to construct an argument that makes me an authority, not just a storyteller. I want law because I want to be trained as a critical thinker. But I want more than law. I want history, too. I want to color in the broad strokes of historical context with first-hand stories about the people who are living now, the people who are experiencing the effects of history as it has already transformed society. I want to dive further into history to see how other worldviews perceive the American worldview. I want the University of Kansas School of Law because I want a depth of understanding other schools can’t offer. I want to join the joint-degree program and earn my J.D. and master’s in East Asian Languages and Cultures because I don’t want my worldview to be limited.

Tamara Combs follow my heart and my mind: I transferred all of my credits to Armstrong Atlantic State University and dove into a completely new life. Living and studying in the United States afforded me the chance to expand my horizons and mature my choices. I learned to dedicate my efforts to both curricular and extracurricular activities, where I often rose to positions of leadership. As I flourished academically, I felt naturally inclined to spend most of my time among diverse people, where I could explore different insights and discover new points of view. Furthermore, I cherished the ease with which my peers and professors engaged in debate and dissected issues. Three years after it started, my rewarding undergraduate experience culminated with a magna cum laude graduation in December 2007. Armed with the broad toolbox of a political scientist, I had the option to follow many career paths, and city and regional planning was one of the most interesting choices. Being inherently interdisciplinary, planning tapped into my passion for seeking different perspectives and avenues to

ameliorate the lives of the least privileged sectors of society by influencing public policy to improve the environment where they live. But beyond technical and professional knowledge that would allow me to become a city planner, graduate school gave me an invaluable set of skills that makes me a competitive candidate for the University of Kansas School of Law. In the planning program at Clemson University, I sharpened my ability to think critically and analytically, and learned to solve problems, synthesize information and build arguments on my feet, while standing in front of an audience of stakeholders. The very large workloads imposed on me not only tested my self-motivation and improved my self-management abilities, but also allowed me to collaborate, and learn to work efficiently both as an individual and as part of a team. When a former professor (and one of the most brilliant people I have ever met) decided to move to Lawrence to accept a job with the University of Kansas starting in the fall of 2011, she encouraged me and my now-husband to apply to a Ph.D. program and pursue a degree under her advising. Deep inside, however, I knew I wanted to go to law school instead. We decided that my husband should take on the offer and start his doctoral studies that fall, and that I should follow my dreams. KU Law is hard to resist: a strong regional university that is proud of its deep commitment to diversity, and whose host city often figures among the 10 best college towns in the nation. Because I intend to concentrate my efforts on topics like land use, energy, environment, public interest and international law, I am especially attracted to KU Law’s offerings in those areas, in particular in environmental and natural resources law and international and comparative law. Furthermore, I am eager to lend my ability to speak Portuguese and Spanish fluently to the Immigration/Asylum Law Clinic, which touches an area of practice that I am just starting to consider. My primary goal after concluding my legal studies is to strengthen the field of city and regional planning with more and better legal advice, seeking ways to

combine legal and planning strategies that promote equity globally. My recent work and involvement in philanthropy both in Douglas County and in the Greater Atlanta region has made me even more passionate about public interest, and about protecting the equitable treatment of the most vulnerable population groups. I desire to carry this deep-seated concern for those who need the most at the core of my development as a lawyer. The unwavering commitment I make every day to tolerance and kindness is the aspect of my character of which I am the most proud. These values were instilled in me during childhood and have never faltered in moments when I was faced with vanity and competitiveness. The understanding and appreciation of what is different comes from the fact that I myself am different: born and raised in another country, ethnically and racially ambiguous (like most Brazilians), fluent in multiple languages and a seasoned world traveler. KU School of Law will benefit from my presence in the upcoming class because my perspective brings in a foreign framework, in the broad sense of the expression. As the differences between me and the other students surface in the halls and classrooms of KU Law, ideas will be oxygenated and old perspectives will be submitted to new analyses, until the truth – a better truth – emerges from this debate. In the end, all that matters is the kindness that allows us to listen and learn from each other, and the tolerance that makes it possible for us to disagree, respectfully. For my unshakeable belief in kindness, and in the diversity that supports its beauty, I am convinced I would be a valuable addition to KU Law’s educational environment. Eleven years after the first time I walked into my first day of class as a law student, I feel ready to reclaim my legal career. This time around, I have the maturity, the work ethic, the communication skills, the professional tact, and the intellectual ripeness I lacked when I was 17. I hope the University of Kansas School of Law will grant me the chance – and the honor – to close the circle.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 11

green hall news

Scenes from Graduation 2012

2011-12 Student Awards & Prizes Order of the Coif Andrew Bergman Michael Bosie James Carter Amy Chang Andrew Dufour Sean Foley Joel Griffiths Richard Jarrold Jill Moenius Matthew Nygaard Martin Rice Eli Rosenberg Logan Rutherford Susan Ryan Scott Wheeler Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award Sean Foley Justice Lloyd Kagey Leadership Award Ganesh Nair Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership, and Service Award Jill Moenius

C.C. Stewart Award in Law Logan Rutherford Robert F. Bennett Student Award Joel Griffiths William L. Burdick Prize Max Ellenbecker David Green Mary Anne Chambers Service Award Adriana Tallman George Gary Duncan Scholastic Improvement Prize Kelsey Barclay Robert E. Edmonds Prize in Corporation and Securities Law Amy Chang Tim Miller Scott Wheeler Faculty Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement Eli Rosenberg Family Fund Award Nathan Lindsey Robert C. Foulston and George Siefkin Prizes for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy Best Advocate: Trent Byquist Finalists: Bri Harris, Britt Lagemann, Rachel Nelson Best Brief: Bruno Simoes, Ryan Thornton Second Place Brief: Trent Byquist, Rachel Nelson

Tonda Hill, Susan Kivuvani and Kaosy Umeh

Hershberger, Patterson, Jones & Roth Energy Law Award Joanne Johnson Hinkle Law Firm Tax Procedure Award Amy Chang W. Ross Hutton Legal Aid Award Michael Kopit Chris Omlid Larry R. O’Neal/Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP Law School Award Anna Smith Law Class of 1949 Award for Leadership Tonda Hill Janean Meigs Memorial Award in Law Leilani Leighton James P. Mize Trial Advocacy Award Nathan Lindsey Eli Rosenberg

Clockwise from top left: Natalie Hull; Carolyn McKune, Professor Jean Phillips, and Lisa Chauvin; Kristin Maun; and Gizachew Emiru. (Photos by Mindie Paget) SEPT

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View more graduation photos at law.ku.edu/photos, and watch graduation videos at youtube.com/kulawschool

Payne & Jones Awards Fall 2011 Paul Cassat Amanda Eastman Max Ellenbecker Scott Goodger Rex Redlingshafer Jr. W. Clark Richardson George Sand Kevin Wempe Spring 2012 David Barclay Jay Berryman Matt Brower Ashlee Green Tom Jensen Chris Mattix Adrien Piercy Shapiro Award for Best Paper on Law & Public Policy Kaiti Smith Carl T. Smith Scholarship Award Robert Williams Andrew Zarda Susman Godfrey Trial Advocacy Award Jill Moenius UMB Bank Excellence in Estate Planning Award Joel A. Griffiths

KU LAW MAGAZINE 13

New faculty

faculty news

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Elizabeth A. Kronk

Corey Rayburn Yung

Associate Professor of Law

Associate Professor of Law

B.S., Cornell University J.D., University of Michigan Law School

B.A., University of Iowa J.D., University of Virginia School of Law

Elizabeth Kronk’s research interests include federal Indian law, tribal law, environmental law and natural resources, and property. Her forthcoming book addresses “Climate Change, Indigenous Peoples, and the Search for Legal Remedies.” She has published widely in her scholarship areas, with articles appearing in the Public Land and Resources Law Review, Idaho Law Review and Pace Environmental Law Review. Kronk serves as an appellate judge for the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians Court of Appeals in Michigan and, in 2010, was selected as an Environmental Justice Young Fellow through the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and U.S.-China Partnership for Environmental Law at Vermont Law School. She practiced environmental, Indian, and energy law with Latham & Watkins and Troutman Sanders in Washington, D.C.

Corey Rayburn Yung’s scholarship focuses on criminal law, sex crimes, and judicial decision-making. His articles have appeared in such leading journals as the Northwestern University Law Review, George Washington Law Review and Boston College Law Review. Yung’s scholarship has been cited by several federal courts, including the United States Supreme Court in Kennedy v. Louisiana. Regularly consulted by the media, Yung has been quoted in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune and Washington Post, among other media outlets. Before entering academia, Yung served as an associate for Shearman & Sterling in New York and spent two years clerking for the Hon. Michael J. Melloy of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit. He regularly assists in sex crime cases and instructs practitioners regarding various criminal law issues.

Quinton D. Lucas

Katie Cronin

Visiting Assistant Professor

Clinical Associate Professor

Chelsi Hayden

A.B., Washington University in St. Louis J.D., Cornell Law School

B.S.W., University of Missouri-Columbia J.D.,Vanderbilt University School of Law

B.A., University of Kansas J.D., University of Kansas School of Law

Quinton Lucas joins the KU Law faculty as the school’s first visiting assistant professor in over 30 years. Prior to entering academia, Lucas practiced commercial litigation with Rouse Hendricks German May in Kansas City, Mo., where he represented clients in government investigations and in trials and appeals in state and federal courts across the country. While at Rouse Hendricks, he also served as a constitutional law instructor at the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing, Kan. After graduating from Cornell Law School, Lucas served as a clerk to the Hon. Duane Benton of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit. His research interests include corporate and financial governance and regulation; corporate criminal liability and sentencing; contracts; and conflict of laws. Lucas teaches Contracts and Business Associations at KU.

Katie Cronin has an extensive background in legal aid, having previously served as the director of medical-legal partnerships for Legal Aid of Western Missouri and as an AmeriCorps member for the Legal Assistance Foundation of Metropolitan Chicago. As project director for medical-legal partnerships at Legal Aid of Western Missouri, Cronin secured a number of significant grants totaling over $1 million. In 2011, she also began work as a fellow for the Ladder to Leadership Program, a national initiative that aims to enhance the leadership capacity of community-based nonprofit health organizations. Cronin recently published an article in the journal Social Work and has one forthcoming in the Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community. She serves as director of the Medical-Legal Partnership Clinic at KU Law.

Chelsi Hayden joined the KU Law faculty as an adjunct Lawyering professor in 2011 and became a fulltime lecturer in law in 2012. Before entering academia, Hayden served as chambers counsel to Judge Carlos Murguia of the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas and as an associate in business litigation for Shook, Hardy & Bacon in Kansas City, Mo. She has extensive experience in civil and criminal law and has litigated both state and federal cases, including for the Kansas Supreme Court. Hayden is also active in the community, serving as vice president of the Kansas Land Trust and board member for the Willow Domestic Violence Center in Lawrence. At KU, she joins a talented team of faculty members who teach essential legal research and writing skills through the school’s first-year Lawyering program.

Lecturer in Law

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faculty news

RESEARCH: Torrance advises National Academies on seemingly sci-fi topic synthetic biology Though it may sound like science fiction, the day is coming when a TV’s pixels are light-emitting yeast organisms, or antibodies can be designed from scratch to seek out and kill cancer cells while leaving healthy cells untouched. When science has the capability of building new genes, cells and life forms from scratch, it’s natural there will be concern about the legal and ethical implications. KU Law Professor Andrew Torrance was commissioned by the National Academies to study the field of synthetic biology and recommend how the law should deal with the rapidly evolving science in the years to come. Torrance, who is also a visiting scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a fellow of the Gruter Institute, was asked to prepare a

report on synthetic biology, standards setting and intellectual property by the National Academies, an independent, nonprofit organization that provides expert advice to Congress and others on science, engineering and medicine. Torrance asked Linda Kahl, a SynBERC Fellow at Stanford University, to

co-author the report. Torrance presented their findings at the National Academies headquarters in Washington, D.C., at the beginning of October. The report will inform the National Academies’ larger study on the topic and is available for free online. “There is considerable interest in knowing if the field has progressed to the point where everyone can agree on a set of beneficial standards,” Torrance said. ���If done right, standards can encourage open innovation, in which it is easy for many people — even amateurs — to participate in the field. A well-governed standards setting process can ensure that no single party can use its patents to dominate others. A prevailing ethos in synthetic biology is democratizing biology and welcoming many into the field to promote better and faster innovation.”

RESEARCH: Kronk offers solutions to spur energy development on tribal land People of nearly all political persuasions agree the United States needs to do more to develop new energy resources. A provision of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 was specifically designed to encourage energy development on tribal land, yet not one tribe has entered an agreement to take on such development. KU Law Professor Elizabeth Kronk has authored an article exploring the problems standing in the way of such energy development on native land and proposing two solutions. Kronk published “Tribal Energy Resource Agreements: The Unintended ‘Great Mischief for Indian Energy Development’ and the Resulting Need for Reform” in the Pace Environmental Law Review as part of a series exploring energy development on native land. Many tribes have expressed interest in developing energy, and the

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federal government has acted in part to help make it a reality. “It’s potentially a win-win situation,” said Kronk, director of KU’s Tribal Law & Government Center. “It would spur economic development for tribes and help address the question of where we, as a country, are going to get our energy.”

To address the fact that no tribes to date have entered into a TERA, Kronk recommends two solutions. The first would be to re-establish federal liability under TERAs. If the federal government is going to mandate environmental review and certain administrative functions, then it should maintain liability, which is consistent with the federal trust responsibility, Kronk said. Plus, many tribes may not be in a financial situation to take on major energy development projects themselves. In the alternative, another option would be to remove all federal requirements of the tribes in TERAs. That would allow for true tribal sovereignty in energy development. “Let’s truly let the tribes be sovereign under this arrangement. Once you have a TERA set, let’s let the tribes make the decisions,” Kronk said.

Faculty Notes Raj Bhala delivered a major panel presentation on “International Finance, Ethics, and the Rule of Law” at the Qatar Law Forum, sponsored by the Emir of Qatar, to an audience of more than 400 lawyers, jurists and scholars from 60 jurisdictions and 20 law schools around the world. He was invited to present by Sir William Blair, a justice on the Queen’s Bench and brother of former British Prime Minister Tony Blair. He presented “Islamic Finance” to the largest law firm in Chile for an audience of roughly 60 lawyers and professors, as well as ambassadors from Egypt and Jordan. While in Chile, he presented a series of lectures at the Heidelberg Center for Latin America for a course in international trade law and social justice. Bhala was appointed to the Editorial Advisory Board of Carolina Academic Press (March 2012). He was also appointed to the board of the BHU Law Journal by Benares Hindu University in Varanasi, India, and the Editorial Advisory Committee of the Latin American Journal of International Trade Law, based in Mexico City. He was quoted extensively in articles by the Topeka Capital-Journal, “Lawmakers urged to address Shariah” (April 15) and “Brownback signs bill that caused Shariah flap” (May 25), and the Kansas City Star, “Shame on Shariah” (June 29). He published the following articles: n “WTO Case Review 2010,” 28 Arizona Journal of International & Comparative Law 239-360 (2011), with Professor David Gantz, University of Arizona. n “Poverty, Islamist Extremism, and the Debacle of Doha Round CounterTerrorism: Part Two of a Trilogy – NonAgricultural Market Access and Services Trade,” 44 Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law, issues 1 & 2 1-81 (2011, War Crimes Research Symposium on International Law in Crisis). n “Poverty, Islamist Extremism, and the Debacle of Doha Round Counter-

Terrorism: Part Three of a Trilogy – Trade Remedies and Facilitation,” 40 Denver Journal of International Law and Policy, 237-320 (2012, 40th Anniversary Symposium Festschrift in honor of Professor Ved P. Nanda, “Perspectives on International Law in an Era of Change”). A second edition of his book, “Dictionary of International Trade Law,” was published by LexisNexis. For the fourth consecutive year, Bhala’s WTO case review, co-authored with Professor David Gantz, University of Arizona, appeared on at least one of the Top 10 SSRN lists of most downloaded articles. He participated in three conference calls on behalf of the Council on Foreign Relations: a call with Ali Akbar Salehi, minister of foreign affairs, Iran, and Moncef Marzouki, president, Tunisia; a call on military strategy and leadership with joint chiefs of staff from the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard; and a national teleconference with Burma’s Nobel Peace Prize-winner Aung San Suu Kyi, hosted by Fareed Zakaria. Mike Davis chaired the ABA accreditation visit to the University of Georgia School of Law on Oct. 2124. He was also re-appointed to the Finance Committee of the ABA Council for Legal Education and Admission to the Bar, and appointed site inspector for St. John’s University School of Law’s foreign summer program in Rome in June. Martin Dickinson gave a presentation on “The 2012 Kansas Tax Act” at Recent Developments in the Law, a CLE program through the University of Kansas School of Law. He also gave CLE presentations on

the tax act on June 7 in Johnson County and June 8 in Wichita. He published the 2012-13 edition of “Federal Income Tax Code and Regulations: Selected Sections” (CCH 2012), which is currently adopted at 124 schools. On June 16, he presented a paper describing the new Kansas income tax law at the Democratic Party of Douglas County’s monthly meeting. And on Aug. 16, he spoke on “The 2012 Kansas Tax Act” and answered questions with former Secretary of Revenue Joan Wagnon. Chris Drahozal published the following: n “Arbitration Clauses in Credit Card Agreements: An Empirical Study,” 9 Journal of Empirical Legal Studies 536 (2012), with Bo Rutledge, Georgia. n “Private Regulation of Consumer Arbitration,” 79 Tennessee Law Review (2012), with Samantha Zyontz, Searle Civil Justice Institute. n “Roundtable on the Future of Arbitration – What Will Change?” Arbitration – The Next Fifty Years: 50th Anniversary Conference, Geneva, 2011, at 183 (Albert Jan van den Berg ed. 2012) (ICCA Congress Series No. 16) (transcript of panel discussion). He also submitted comments to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in response to its Request for Information Regarding Scope, Methods, and Data Sources for Conducting Study of Pre-Dispute Arbitration Agreements on June 18. Together with his co-reporters, he presented Tentative Draft No. 2 of the Restatement (Third) of the U.S. Law of International Commercial Arbitration (chapter 4) at the Annual Meeting of the American Law Institute, Washington, D.C., May 22. With limited exceptions, virtually the entire draft was approved at the meeting. He made the following presentations: n “Legal Change and Form Contracts:

KU LAW MAGAZINE 17

faculty news The Use of Arbitration Clauses After AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion,” at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Law & Economics Association, Washington University School of Law, St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 13; and at a workshop held at KU Law, Sept. 11. n “Empirical Insights on Class Arbitration,” conference on “Collective Redress in the Cross-Border Context,” sponsored by the Hague Institute for the Internationalisation of Law and Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences, The Hague, The Netherlands, June 22. n “The New Restatement on the U.S. Law of International Commercial Arbitration,” International Dispute Resolution Centre, London, June 18. n “Recent Developments in Arbitration Law,” KU Law Recent Developments in the Law CLE program, Lawrence, June 1. n “Arbitration Innumeracy,” Kansas State Economics Club, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kan., April 23. n “Origin and Development of Manifest Disregard of the Law,” inaugural conference of the Atlanta International Law Society, Atlanta, April 16. n “The Economics of Comity,” Economic Analysis of International Law conference, Travemünde Symposium on Law & Economics, Travemünde, Germany, March 30. n “The Choice Between Business Courts and Arbitration in the United States,” at “Competition Between Civil Justice Systems: The Market for Dispute Resolution Systems” seminar, Erasmus School of Law, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, March 29. He participated in a panel discussion on “The Intersection of Arbitration and Justiciability” as part of the Wm. Matthew Byrne Jr. Annual Lecture, Pepperdine University School of Law, Malibu, Calif., March 16. He also attended the National Roundtable on Employment Dispute Resolution at Penn State University, Dickinson School of Law, State College, Pa., on Sept. 7-8, and a research roundtable on “Unlocking the Law” at George Mason University School of Law, Arlington,Va., on Sept. 27-28 (invited). David Gottlieb filed a pro bono brief for the Board of Immigration Appeals in an asylum case on behalf of an immigrant

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from Colombia on March 16. He also filed a pro bono brief for the Board of Immigration Appeals case involving convention against torture on behalf of an immigrant from Mexico. On June 21, two Chinese students he had helped represent through the KU Immigration/Asylum Law Clinic were granted asylum. In April, he spent time in Turkey. He presented on “International Human Rights and Criminal Law” at Bahcesehir University, Istanbul, April 9-12. He also lectured on “An American Perspective on Search and Seizure Law” to a meeting of judges, prosecutors, and bar members in Bursa, Turkey, April 13. He was invited to a Washington, D.C., conference seminar on scientific evidence, sponsored by the Coalition for Progressive Reform, May 16. He presented “Recent Developments in the Law of Professional Responsibility,” for the Recent Developments in the Law CLE program, University of Kansas School of Law, May 31. John Head published a new edition of his international business law coursebook, “Global Business Law: Principles and Practice of International Commerce and Investment.” He also published a book chapter, “Legal Counsel, Legal Analysis, and Legal Limits: The Role of Law and Lawyers in the Asian Development Bank,” in “International Economic Organizations and Law: The Perspective and Role of the Legal Counsel” (Asif H. Qureshi, Xuan Gao eds., Wolters Kluwer, 2012). He submitted two book manuscripts for publication. The first, “Global Legal Regimes to Protect the World’s Grasslands,” is a product of his sabbatical leave project in Fall 2011. The other, “Legal Transparency in Dynastic China: The Legalist-Confucianist Debate and Good Governance

in Chinese Tradition,” is co-authored by recent KU S.J.D. graduate Xing Lijuan. In June, he chaired a panel discussion and presented “Justinian’s Corpus Juris Civilis in Comparative Perspective,” at the 15th annual congress of the Mediterranean Studies Association, Pula, Croatia. In August, he presented a program on global legal regimes to protect the world’s grasslands at a University Forum Series, sponsored by KU’s Ecumenical Campus Ministries, Lawrence, Kan. Webb Hecker was the primary drafter of the Subcommittee on Amendments to the Kansas Revised Limited Liability Company Act, Corporation, Banking and Business Law Section of the Kansas Bar Association. He gave a CLE lecture, “Corporations and LCCs Update,” at the University of Kansas School of Law on June 1. He also presented “Basics of the Business Entities Transactions Act” at the Kansas Bar Association Nuts and Bolts for the Transactional Lawyer, Wichita, April 13. Laura Hines served on the planning committee for the Torts, Environment and Disaster workshop, 2012 AALS Mid-Year Meetings, Berkley, Calif., June 8-12. She also completed the 2012 update to Robert Casad’s book “Jurisdiction and Forum Selection” (Thomson Reuters 2012). Virginia Harper Ho gave the following presentations: n “Regulating Beyond Regulation: State Sponsorship of Corporate Social Responsibility in China,” Columbia Law School Chinese Law Works-in-Progress Workshop, New York, May 9. n “Of Enterprise Principles and Corporate Groups: Does Corporate Law Reach Human Rights,” Law and Society 2012 An-

nual Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii, June 5. She will publish “Corporate Governance as Risk Regulation in China: A Comparative View of Risk Oversight, Risk Management and Accountability” Special Issue: “Comparing Risk Regulation in China and Europe,” European Journal of Risk Regulation (2012). Her article “Beyond Regulation: A Comparative Look at State-Centric Corporate Social Responsibility and the Law in China,” will be published in the Vanderbilt Transnational Law Journal in 2013. She was elected to the Center for East Asian Studies Faculty Advisory Committee for 2012-13. Pamela Keller received KU Law’s Robert A. Schroeder Teaching Fellowship. She will also serve again on the Kansas Bar Association’s Commission on Professionalism Committee and will chair the Association of Legal Writing Directors Teaching Workshop Committee. She published a column, “Substance and Style: Tell the Story of the Professional Lawyer,” in September’s Journal of the Kansas Bar Association. Elizabeth Kronk published the following articles: n “Tightening the Perceived ‘Loophole’: Reexamining ICRA’s Limitation on Tribal Court Punishment Authority,” in “The Indian Civil Rights Act at Forty” (Kristen A. Carpenter, Matthew L. M. Fletcher, and Angela R. Riley, eds., UCLA American Indian Studies Center, 2012). n “Application of Environmental

Justice to Climate Change-Related Claims Bought by Native Nations,” in “Tribes, Land and the Environment” (Sarah Krakoff, Ezra Rosser, eds., Ashgate, 2012) n “Tribal Energy Resource Agreements: The Unintended ‘Great Mischief for Indian Energy Development’ and the Resulting Need for Reform,” 29 Pace Environmental Law Review 811 (2012). n “United States v. Jicarilla Apache Nation: Its Importance and Potential Future Ramifications,” 59 Federal Law 4 (2012). She gave the following presentations: n “Federal Indian Law 101,” CLE presentation for Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP, Kansas City, Mo., Oct. 5. n “United States v. Jicarilla Apache Nation: Related Past Precedent, the Decision and Potential Future Implications,” 12th annual Native Nations Law Symposium, hosted by the Kickapoo Tribe of Kansas, Horton, Kan., Sept. 14. n “Modern Miner’s Canary: The Effects of Climate Change on Indigenous Communities,” AALS Workshop on Torts, Environment & Disaster, Berkeley, Calif., June 10. n “Ethical Issues Presented by the Modern Practice of Agricultural Law,” 6th annual John Huffaker Agricultural Law Course, Lubbock, Texas, June 1. n “Emerging Issues for Energy Development in Indian Country,” University of Montana School of Law Indian Law Week, Missoula, Mont., April 26. n “Tribal Energy Resource Agreements: The Unintended ‘Great Mischief for Indian Energy Development’ and the Resulting Need for Reform,” faculty exchange, University of Oklahoma College of Law, Norman, Okla., April 11. She was awarded the 2011-12 W. Frank Newton Service Award for volunteer service in support of the Texas Tech University Board of Barristers, and appointed chair of the Federal Bar Association Law Student Division Task Force. Along with Mark Dodd, L’06, and Vivien Olsen, she submitted an application to form a Kansas chapter of the Federal Bar Association, which was approved. Rick Levy published a book chapter, “Constitutional Law,” 2012 Kansas Annual Survey 121. He taught Comparative Constitutional Law at the University of Trento, Trento, Italy, April-May. He made

the following presentations: n “The Affordable Care Act and the Future of United States Federalism,” research workshop, University of Trento, Trento, Italy, May. n “The Constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act and the Future of Federal Power,” Recent Developments in the Law CLE program, University of Kansas School of Law, May. n “Health Care Reform and Federal/ State Relations,” at “Constitutional Controversies in the 2012 Elections,” Lawrence Jewish Community Congregation, September. He was an invited participant at a Thomson Reuters Innovation Meeting (West Publishing & Foundation Press), Minneapolis, July. Levy is serving as chair of the SelfStudy Committee for the ABA site visit and accreditation. He was quoted in a Kansas City Star article, “Kansas into ‘uncharted waters’ with remap lawsuit,” on June 27. Quinton Lucas hosted a panel featuring the U.S. attorneys and federal public defenders in the district of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit, Judicial Conference of the 8th Circuit, Kansas City, Mo., August. Stephen Mazza published the 2012 annual supplement to his casebook, “Tax Controversies: Practice and Procedure” (3rd ed., 2009), with Leandra Lederman, and the 4th edition of the “Tax Controversies” statutory companion volume, “Tax Controversies: Statutes, Regulations, and Other Materials” (4th ed. 2013).

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faculty news He taught in the Istanbul summer program, met with the deans at several law schools in Istanbul to discuss KU Law’s LL.M. program, and visited contacts in Ireland in connection with the Limerick summer program. He gave a CLE presentation on the 2012 Kansas Tax legislation and an update on KU Law at the Southwest Bar Meeting, Dodge City, Sept. 10. He also participated in Judges’ Day events in Wichita, Kan., Sept. 27. Steve McAllister was appointed adviser to the American Law Institute’s project Restatement of the Law of American Indians in September. He served as a moderator for “America and Race: The Status of Affirmative Action Under the U.S. Constitution,” as part of the KU Constitution Day Celebration, Dole Institute of Politics, Oct. 2. He also served as co-moderator for “Evaluating Justice Thomas After Twenty Years on the Supreme Court,” a panel discussion, annual meeting of the Southeast Association of Law Schools, Amelia Island, Fla., July 30. He gave the following presentations: n “The Supreme Court’s Health Care Decision and What It All Means,” Lawrence area Inns of Court meeting, Lawrence, Sept. 27. n “PETA v. Kansas State Fair,” Washburn Law School Agricultural Law Society, Topeka, Sept. 24. n “The Bill of Rights and Freedom of Religion,” scholar lecturer for Bill of Rights Institute program for Kansas high school teachers, Kansas City, Kan., Sept. 20. n “Supreme Court Update: Recent Decisions,” CLE program for federal judges and their law clerks in the District of Kansas (with Toby Crouse, L’00), Kansas City, Kan., Sept. 19. n “Stolen Valor: United States v. Alvarez and Free Speech,” Brandeis School of Law Federalist Society chapter, Louisville, Ky., Sept. 18. n “Supreme Court Roundup,” Washburn Law School Federalist Society Chapter, Topeka, Sept. 17.

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n “A Supreme Court Update for State Judges,” Colorado State Judicial Conference,Vail, Colo., Sept. 10. n “Supreme Court Update: Recent and Pending Decisions,” CLE program for the Kansas Bar Association annual meeting (with Toby Crouse), Overland Park, Kan., June 14. n “The Bill of Rights and Free Expression,” scholar lecturer for Bill of Rights Institute program for Kansas high school teachers, Topeka, Kan., June 5-6. n “Supreme Court Update: Recent and Pending Decisions,” at Recent Developments in the Law, a CLE program through KU Law (with Toby Crouse), Lawrence, June 1. n “Section 1983: Analyzing Elements and Immunities at the Dispositive Motion Stage,” CLE presentation for the Kansas Bar Association John E. Shamberg Civil Rights Video CLE Program, videotaped March 29, aired May 11. n “Is the Federal Health Care Law Constitutional?” invited presentation to the Federalist Society Chapter in St. Louis, April 27. n “The Federal Health Care Litigation: A Conversation with Professor McAllister,” invited presentation to the Bridge Group, an association of high-level executives in the legal profession, Kansas City, Mo., April 20. n “Supreme Court Update: Recent and Pending Decisions,” Return to Green Hall CLE program (with Toby Crouse), Lawrence, April 20.

Lou Mulligan, in conjunction with KU Law professors Suzanne Valdez and Chelsi Hayden, and alumni volunteers, offered the first Expert Witness Skills Workshop, a practicum course combining classroom education, simulations and practitioner expertise, in May. The class is a companion to the Deposition Skills Workshop, and both are offered in conjunction with the Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy. Mulligan maintained his role as director of the Shook, Hardy & Bacon

Center for Excellence in Advocacy and assisted with planning “Advocacy Under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure After 75 Years,” a conference with CLE credit. He assisted with the universitywide antihuman trafficking task force and served as a tutorial professor, pre-law adviser and alumni advisory board member for the undergraduate Honors Program. He continued his service on the Executive Committee of the Kansas Bar Association Appellate Section, Kansas Court of Appeals Mediation Study Committee, and the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals CJA Panel. He also assists with pro bono counsel on federal appeals and U.S. Supreme Court matters. He edited the Kansas Bar Association Appellate Section Newsletter (March 2012) and published the following: n Kansas Civil Jury Instruction Companion Handbook (Thomson-West, 2012), with Robert C. Casad. n “The Supreme Court’s Regulation of Civil Procedure: Lessons from Administrative Law,” 59 UCLA Law Review 1188 (June 2012), with Glen Staszewski. n “You Can’t Go Holmes Again,” 107 Northwestern Law Review (2012). n “Standards of Review and Reversibility,” Kansas Bar Association Young Lawyers Forum 2 (Winter 2012). n “Asking the First Question: Reframing Bivens After Minneci,” 90 Washington University Law Review (2013). He gave the following presentations: n “Originalism’s Lack of Influence in Article III Jurisdiction,” Michigan State University College of Law Colloquium, September 2012. n “Kansas Civil Procedure Updates,” Recent Developments in the Law CLE, University of Kansas School of Law, May 2012. n “You Can’t Go Holmes Again,” Boston University Law School Workshop Series, Boston, April 2012. Uma Outka was an invited speaker on the topic of sustainability at the “Our Campus, Our Community, Our Environment” conference, KU Environs Earth Day, Lawrence, Kan., April 23. On April 20, she presented a work-in-progress at a faculty workshop, Case Western Reserve University School of Law.

She participated in and served as a planning committee member for the invitationonly “Practically Grounded: Engaged Scholarship Symposium,” Pace Law School, May 4. She received the KU New Faculty General Research Fund Award for research associated with her workin-progress, “Environmental Law and Fossil Fuels: Barriers to Renewable Energy.” She published “Local Promise for Climate Mitigation: An Empirical Assessment,” 36 William & Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review 635-70 (2012), with Richard Feiock. Joyce McCray Pearson served on the ABA Site Evaluation Team at Florida A&M College of Law, Orlando, Fla., March. She was a moderator and planner for the Black Caucus of the American Association of Law Libraries Conversation, George Strait Annual Scholarship Dinner, AALL Conference, Boston, Mass., July 22. John Peck served as a panelist at a meeting of Engineers without Borders, Black and Veatch, Kansas City, April 16. He participated in a two-day “Comparative Groundwater Law and Policy Program Workshop,” sponsored by Stanford University’s Woods Institute for the Environment, University of Sydney, Australia, June 21-22. He acted as the KU Law trustee to the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law

Foundation annual meeting, Newport Beach, Calif., July 18-21. Peck spoke on the subject of professional obligations to perform competently at the licensing ceremony of the Kansas State Board of Technical Professions, July 13. He also spoke to a group of Ukrainians sponsored by the International Visitors Council of Great Kansas City, “Some Basic Information about Real Estate Law in the U.S.,” Kansas City, Sept. 24. He published “Water Allocation Law and the Oil and Gas Industry in Kansas: An Update to the 1981 Neufeld Article,” 81 Journal of the Kansas Bar Association 22 (September 2012), with Eva N. Neufeld and Adam C. Dees. Joyce Rosenberg presented “Using a Mediation Exercise for Experiential Learning” and led a breakout group, “Workshop on Critiquing Student Work,” at the 15th Biennial Conference of the Legal Writing Institute, Palm Desert, Calif., May 29-June 1. She published a column, “Spell Check Is Not Your Friend (and Other Tips for Effective Proofreading),” in the Journal of the Kansas Bar Association, April 2012. Elinor Schroeder spent the spring semester teaching Comparative Labor Law and Comparative Employment Law in London through the London Law Consortium. A supplement to her publication “Employment Law” (4th ed., Thomson/West 2009) was published in April 2012 with Mark Rothstein, Charles Craver and Elaine Shoben. Andrew Torrance continued to serve as president of the KU Faculty Senate and as a Gruter Institute Fellow. He was one of

the organizers of the AALS Midyear Meeting on Intellectual Property, Cyberlaw, and Biolaw in Berkeley, Calif., and the Second Annual Patent Conference in Boston. He published the following: n “Ideas for Growth: An Essay in Honor of Gordon J. Getty” (invited), published in a bound volume by the Gruter Institute. n “Beauty Fades: An Experimental Study of Federal Court Design Patent Aesthetics,” 19 Journal of Intellectual Property Law 2, October 2012. n “Planted Obsolescence: Synagriculture and the Law,” 48 Idaho Law Review 321, June 2012. He gave the following presentations: n “Biology is Destiny: The Rejection of Biological Patents,” Society for the Evolutionary Analysis of Law Annual Conference, Emory University School of Law, Atlanta, April. n “Planted Obsolescence: Synagriculture and Law,” Idaho Law Review Symposium on “Genetically Modified Organisms: Law and the Global Market,” University of Idaho College of Law, Boise, Idaho, April. n “Beauty by Design: An Experimental Study of Federal Court Aesthetics,” Law and Economics Workshop, University of Notre Dame School of Law, South Bend, Ind., April. n “Innovation Signals in Massive Patent Prosecution Data Sets,” Gruter Institute conference on “Economic Growth: Costs, Causes and Effects,” Squaw Valley, Calif., May. n “Innovation Wetlands,” Gruter Institute conference on “Innovation, Economic Growth and Human Behavior,” Squaw Valley, Calif., May. n “Patterns in Patent Claim Rejections: An Empirical Study Across All USPTO Art Units,” the Second Annual Patent Conference (presenter, co-organizer and co-host), Boston College Law School, Newton, Mass., May. n “Understanding the Prior Commercial Use Defense,” as part of “Prior User Rights & Trade Secrets: A New IP Option to Secure Freedom-to-Operate for Internally-Used Technology in

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faculty news Biotechnology,” 2012 Biotechnology Industry Organization International Convention, Boston, June. n “When Technology Disrupts Law: How Can Intellectual Property, Internet, and Biolaw Adapt?” American Association of Law Schools 2012 Midyear Meeting (co-planner and co-host), Berkeley, Calif., June. n Invited participant, MIT Innovation Lab, MIT Sloan School of Management, Cambridge, Mass., July. n “An Empirical Study of Patent Prosecution Success after the Filing of a Notice of Appeal,” 12th Annual Intellectual Property Scholars Conference, Stanford Law School, Palo Alto, Calif., August. n “Innovation Wetlands,” with Eric von Hippel, 10th International Open and User Innovation Workshop, Harvard Business School, Allston, Mass., August. n “Patent Notices of Appeal: An Empirical Study of Outcomes,” 2012 Canadian Law and Economics Conference, University of Toronto Faculty of Law, Toronto, Ontario, September. n “Nothing Under the Sun that is Made of Man,” 2012 Akron Law School Intellectual Property Scholars Roundtable and Center for Intellectual Property Law and Technology Academic Forum on “The Impact of IP on Public Health,” Akron Law School, Akron, Ohio, October. n “Synthetic Biology: Standards Setting and Intellectual Property” (invited), 2012 Open Science Summit, Mountain View, Calif., October. n “Nothing Under the Sun that is Made of Man” (invited), 2012 Licensing Executives Society Annual Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, October. n “Ideas for Growth” (invited), Gruter Institute conference in honor of the scholarship of Gordon J. Getty, Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif., October. n “Synthetic Biology Standards and Intellectual Property,” symposium on “Management of Intellectual Property in Standard-Setting Processes,” The National Academies, Washington, DC (commissioned report and presentation), October. He was featured in the following news articles: n “Pfizer settles suit involving Celebrex,” NPR Morning Edition, May 2012. n “Will overregulation in Europe stymie synthetic biology?” Forbes opinion editorial, Aug. 29.

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Torrance was invited by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development to speak on “Knowledge Sharing and Intellectual Property,” OECD headquarters, Paris, and the National Academies commissioned him to author a report on “Synthetic Biology Standards.” He was awarded a competitive fellowship to the George Mason Twenty-Eighth Law and Economics Summer Institute. Suzanne Valdez was nominated by Attorney General Derek Schmidt and reconfirmed by the Kansas Senate to serve a second term as chair of the Kansas Crime Victims’ Compensation Board in March. She assisted with KU Law’s first Expert Witness Skills Workshop, May 14-16. She presented “The Ethics of Limited Scope Representation” at KU Law’s Recent Developments in the Law CLE program in May and gave the same presentation at the Southwest Bar Association Annual Meeting and CLE program in Dodge City, Kan., on Sept. 7. She also presented “Crime Victims’ Compensation” for CLE credit as part of a Kansas Legal Services Domestic Violence Training, Kansas Bar Association, Topeka, Kan., Sept. 21. Stephen Ware was elected to the American Law Institute in September. He testified before the Missouri Legislature on the topic of judicial selection, Senate Judiciary SEPT Committee, April 2. He also participated in a debate on judicial selection that was published in the Missouri Business magazine and participated in a panel discussion on the topic in Tallahassee, Fla., Oct 15. Ware published “An Overview of Bankruptcy Law in the United States,”

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9 International Corporate Rescue 320 (2012), and he presented on debtorcreditor law and the financial crisis, University of Denver and University of Colorado chapters of the Federalist Society, Sept. 24-25. Bill Westerbeke published a book chapter, “Torts,” for the Kansas Bar Association’s Annual Survey of Kansas Law (Volume 23, 2012), with Brooke Aziere, L’03. Melanie Wilson was interviewed May 2 on Kansas Public Radio by Steve Kraske on “Up to Date” about her article, “Juror Privacy in the Sixth Amendment Balance,” forthcoming in the Utah Law Review. She previously presented a draft of the article at the University of Iowa College of Law, Iowa City, Iowa, April 6. She completed 2012 updates to “Criminal Procedure, Seventh Edition” (with Joseph G. Cook and Paul Marcus) and “Gilbert Law Summaries, Criminal Procedure” (with Paul Marcus). The University of Kansas selected her as a Senior Administrative Fellow for 2012-13. The program allows selected faculty to explore senior administration within the university without taking time away from teaching, research or service. She served as faculty mentor for KU Law’s Journey to J.D. program in July.

More online Find links to law review articles and more extensive information about KU Law faculty members online at www.law.ku.edu/faculty

Career Services forging stronger connections with students, employers By Arturo Thompson

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hen I returned to KU Law in October 2011 to assume the role of assistant dean for career services, I knew there would be a great deal to learn and big challenges to face. Over the past year, we have made changes in staff; created new programs and eliminated some old ones; initiated an extensive outreach program to employers across the state, region and country; and worked with other departments at the law school and the university to develop a more coordinated and comprehensive set of programs and messages. For students, one major change has been our initial contact. We now typically spend close to an hour with students the first time they meet with us one-on-one. We believe it essential to establishing a meaningful understanding of the students’ interests and for us to assess their communication and networking skills. Almost every one of these inaugural meetings begins with the same three questions: Who are you? Where are you from? How did you get to KU? We see these questions as the start of one extended conversation that will last all three years of law school and beyond – a conversation that may range from personal to professional issues, academics to interviewing. The process is intense and time-consuming, but essential if we want to be able to better match students with potential employers, improve the employment rate over the long haul, and meet our obligations to all stakeholders. This same focus on establishing one-to-one relationships extends to alumni and employers. We believe that before we can say to them that they should hire our students and trust our assessments of them, we have to show our personal commitment. Over the past year, we have made numerous trips across the great state of Kansas, vising alumni, companies, firms and judges from Colby to Liberal, Salina to Wichita, and many places in between. We have visited stakeholders from D.C. to New York, Dallas to Denver. Our message in all cases is clear: We are committed to each of them on an individual basis, we will not ask them to participate in our efforts unless we are willing to put skin

“Almost every one of these inaugural meetings begins with the same three questions: Who are you? Where are you from? How did you get to KU?”

Arturo Thompson, L’06, associate dean for career services, networks with fellow alumni at the 2012 Reunion Weekend reception. Thompson came from private practice in Phoenix to assume leadership of KU Law’s Career Services Office. (Photo by Earl Richardson)

in the game, and we will be back every year to see how we are doing and how we can improve. We have created a Rural and Solo Program designed to promote jobs outside the big five counties in Kansas by giving students a better understanding of how amazing these opportunities and communities can be. Participants are also given skills training, designed to introduce them to the critical business and operations issues involved in opening and maintaining a successful law practice. Recently I added the role of director of diversity and inclusion to my duties, expanding my focus from getting students ready to succeed after school to also fostering the school’s connections to highly qualified diverse and disadvantaged candidates. We have begun to engage with national efforts designed to focus high school students on the potential for a career as a lawyer. We are also in the process of developing an intense, weeklong training program designed to take college freshmen and sophomores through a law school experience, including participating in a moot court competition, and thereby improving the law school’s ability to capture the very best of those diverse students already in the region. On a personal note, it has been a great joy to be back at KU Law, surrounded by friends and colleagues who are all committed to the success of our students and the school. I cannot imagine a better place to be in my career or a better time to be here. I look forward to our shared success and to working with everyone, including you, as we continue to build and improve an institution we love.

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alumni news

‘Beyond Cold Blood’

Larry Welch, L’61, the second-longest-serving director of the Kansas Bureau of Investigation, published the first history of the bureau in September. (Photo by Nick Krug)

Former KBI director Larry Welch, L’61, recounts bureau’s history from Great Depression to BTK By Mindie Paget

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arry Welch’s path to the head of the Kansas Bureau of Investigation began at his childhood desk in the tiny town of St. John, Kansas. That’s where he penned impassioned letters to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover expressing his desire to one day become a special agent. His youthful mind thrilled at the responses he received. In retrospect, he realizes they were just form letters. “They were from different special agents in charge of the Kansas City office, and they pretty much said the same thing through junior high, high school and undergraduate at KU: The best way to get into the FBI is with

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an accounting degree or a law degree,” Welch recalls. “As my wife would attest, the accounting degree didn’t hold much hope for me.” So Welch charted a course toward his dream job with a pit stop at KU Law, where he graduated in 1961 and immediately landed a position with the FBI. Thirtythree years and nine cities later – including eight years as director of the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center in Hutchinson – Welch took the helm of the Kansas Bureau of Investigation and eventually became the bureau’s second-longest-serving director before retiring in 2007.

Throughout his career, Welch developed a deep appreciation for the KBI. He couldn’t understand why no one had written an official history of the organization, so he set out to do just that in his retirement. Still as dedicated a writer as the boy who sent letters to the FBI throughout his youth, he returned to pen and paper to craft his first book, “Beyond Cold Blood: The KBI from Ma Barker to BTK,” released in September by the University Press of Kansas. The 374-page book details the KBI’s participation in major cases from its 1939 inception – a response to a spike in bank robberies and cattle rustling in the wake of the Great Depression – to the first decade of the 21st century, when the bureau helped the Wichita Police Department bring down the state’s most notorious serial killer. Welch selected only the most unique and pivotal cases for the book. His favorite is the case in which 78-year-old cattle rancher Goldie Millar disappeared amid mysterious circumstances in Kiowa County, Kan. Investigators never recovered her remains from her house, which had burned to the ground. Nevertheless, a jury found Goldie’s grandson, Mike Pyle, guilty of her murder. “Today my wife will tell you that if we’re watching ‘Law & Order’ on TV and somebody says, ‘Well you know you can’t get a conviction without a body,’ Shirley will try to beat me to, ‘The heck you can’t,’” Welch says. “Of course now in Kansas we’ve done it eight or nine times, as I recall. But always State v. Pyle is cited. I think that’s really an underappreciated case.” Another one of Welch’s favorites is the Samaritan case, where a judge in Kansas City believed that two young women had been wrongfully convicted of robbing a liquor store in a case that he presided over. He contacted the KBI to see if an agent might agree with him. The two Kansas defendants were later exonerated and released from prison. “That’s justice,” Welch says. “We’re not just out to prosecute people; we’re out to solve the case and to identify and prosecute only the guilty. DNA is a classic example of that. There are a heck of a lot more people eliminated from suspicion or exonerated by DNA than are convicted.” Dennis Rader was not so lucky. It was a KBI scientist, Sindey Schueler, who used DNA to irrefutably connect Rader to eight heinous murders in the Wichita area from 1974 to 1991, thus confirming that Rader and the infamous BTK killer were one and the same. “Then you have to go another step and appreciate the work those Wichita officers did – in pre-DNA days – of collecting and retaining the evidence from those cases that permitted that identification,” Welch says.

Throughout his book, Welch consistently credits the hundreds of agents, sheriffs, police officers, forensic scientists, state officials and civilians who worked for or with the KBI in pursuit of justice. Perhaps the most stalwart of those civilians was Jeanette Stauffer, whose 23-year-old daughter Shannon Martin was murdered in 2001 during a trip to Costa Rica to collect ferns for her honors thesis research at the University of Kansas. Welch sent KBI agent Larry Thomas to the Central American nation, and his work there marked the first time a Kansas law enforcement officer helped investigate and prosecute the killers of a Kansas citizen in a foreign country. Always by his side was Stauffer, who made 17 trips to Costa Rica in her tireless quest to seek justice for her daughter.

“When they shot down those two criminals in front of the Macksville bank, all of a sudden the state exploded with praise and acclaim for the KBI. That case guaranteed the existence of the KBI.” Long before dispatching agents beyond Kansas borders, however, the KBI sealed its future at home, and any history of the bureau would not be complete without two essential cases, Welch says. First is the Macksville bank robbery case. Two years after the Kansas Legislature created the KBI, five career criminals tunneled their way out of the state penitentiary in Lansing, and the attorney general challenged the KBI to capture them. They snared the first three relatively easily. Tracking down the remaining two fugitives involved highrisk undercover police work and, eventually, a shootout in downtown Macksville, Kan., where the KBI had learned the duo planned to rob a bank. “When they shot down those two criminals in front of the Macksville bank, all of a sudden the state exploded with praise and acclaim for the KBI,” Welch says. “That case guaranteed the existence of the KBI.” And then the Clutter case brought the bureau international acclaim, thanks to Truman Capote’s “In Cold Blood,” the best-selling book that recounts the 1959 murders of a Kansas family on their farm near Holcomb. Alvin Dewey, the resident special agent in Garden City, led the KBI’s successful investigation, which eventually yielded the convictions and executions of Richard Hickock and Perry Smith. To this day, the Clutter case remains the KBI’s most famous. While homicide cases have always been the bureau’s

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alumni news

26 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Kelley Sears, L’74

Marie Woodbury, L’79

Medallion honorees The law school honored recipients of the James Woods Green Medallion at a dinner on May 5 in Lawrence. The medallion, named in honor of the law school’s first dean, recognizes those whose cumulative contributions to the school exceed $25,000. This year’s honorees are pictured above with their medallions. Recipients Shannon L. Spangler, L’87, and Michael Spangler; and Roger Johnson, L’67, on behalf of the Arne L. Johnson Family Trust were unable to attend the ceremony.

Steve Puppe

so-called “bread and butter,” the KBI also assists local law enforcement agencies with cases involving kidnapping, rape, methamphetamine, and cybercrimes such as child pornography and identity theft. The more complex the case, Welch says, the more likely local law enforcement will call the KBI for help. As of 2007, 73 percent of all Kansas law enforcement agencies had 10 or fewer full-time officers, and 52 percent had five or fewer, according to the Central Registry of the Kansas Law Enforcement Training Center (KLETC). Welch always did his best to support those struggling agencies via the KBI. During his tenure, the bureau created two additional forensics laboratories, in Pittsburg and Kansas City, and opened another regional office in Pittsburg. The KBI also achieved National Forensic Accreditation on its first try, beating even the FBI to that elusive pinnacle. In response to the brutal rape and murder of Pittsburg State University student Stephanie Schmidt by a convicted rapist, the KBI helped Kansas become the first state to put photos and addresses of registered sex offenders on the Internet. These accomplishments were shepherded by Welch, ever an advocate for the people of Kansas and the state’s law enforcement community. After 25 years in the FBI — some of it spent as the top agent in Wichita, Kan. — and eight years as director of the KLETC before joining the KBI, Welch knew almost every sheriff and police chief in the state. “I don’t think that there is any law enforcement person in the state of Kansas who has more respect from law enforcement people than Larry Welch,” says Bob Stephan, the former attorney general who appointed Welch KBI director in 1994. “I mean he is on a pedestal that is so high it’s almost unbelievable.” Welch often called on his admirers to lobby their legislators for additional resources. The news media were also frequent allies when meth labs, for example, were ravaging Kansas communities and the KBI needed more agents to wage the battle. Of course Welch himself wrote letters to governors, attorneys general, legislators and others to advocate the bureau’s mission. His KU Law education helped prepare him for that task. “I certainly learned a way of thinking and a way of writing – how to use the fewest words to say the most,” he says. “And I know it gave me more confidence.” Welch highly recommends law enforcement as a career option for law students, whose degrees would serve them well in the field or in administration. “My dad was a very quiet-spoken man who seldom gave me advice. When I was in law school, he told me, ‘Find a job that you love, and you’ll never have to work a day in your life.’ I didn’t really appreciate what he meant at the time,” Welch says. “But it turns out I did that three times. I was very, very lucky.”

Alumni earn law school’s highest honor By Sarah Shebek

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t’s not often that the former governor of Kansas and one of the best-known figures in the state’s banking industry are in the same room, but this year’s Distinguished Alumni Award ceremony accomplished just that. Mark Parkinson, L’84, and Charles Hostetler, L’63, received the law school’s highest honor at a ceremony on May 5. Both have forged outstanding careers since turning the tassel as KU Law graduates. And for Parkinson, his success is a credit to the critical thinking skills he honed in the classroom. “We were incentivized not just to look at the obvious, but to look at the things that were nuanced,” he said. “In the real world, people who succeed and make a difference tend to be people who see all the possibilities.” Parkinson has made achievement look easy. He graduated summa cum laude from Wichita State University and continued his strong performance at KU Law, graduating first in his class. He also cultivated an outstanding moot court career, culminating in a first-place team finish in the National Moot Court Competition in New York. Upon graduation, Parkinson started in solo practice before winning a spot in the Kansas House of Representatives and, two years later, the Kansas Senate. He also devoted 10 years to enhancing seniors’ quality of life by opening senior living facilities in Kansas and Missouri. In 2006, Kathleen Sebelius appointed him lieutenant governor, and he became the 45th governor of Kansas when Sebelius left her position for an appointment as secretary of health and human services. “In politics, thinking like a lawyer means that when you walk into a room and two people disagree on 95 percent of topics, you find the 5 percent that they do agree on,” he said. Since Parkinson left government, he has served as president and CEO of the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living, which represents more than

11,000 nursing homes, assisted living residences, and facilities for the care of people with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. “I will cling to my more romantic view that Shakespeare was wrong – the world doesn’t need fewer lawyers,” he said. “In the areas of art and design and public policy and international relations and certainly politics, we don’t need fewer lawyers; we need more people who think like lawyers.” As a graduate of Kansas State University and a lifelong Manhattan resident, Charlie Hostetler felt no initial pull toward Lawrence for law school. Working as a sports reporter in college, he fell in love with Boulder, Colo., on trips covering Wildcat football games and nearly ended up out of state. But cost won out, and he chose KU. “I made one of the best decisions I ever made: I came here for school,” he said. Like Parkinson, Hostetler participated in moot court and served on the Kansas Law Review during his time at KU. After graduation he began a very long and successful career in the banking and insurance industries. “My feeling when I got out of school and I went into business in Manhattan was that I had a great affection for both K-State and KU,” he said. Hostetler has successfully combined his love for both schools over the years. He taught business law and insurance at Kansas State University. He served on the Kansas Board of Regents from 1989 to 1992 and is a past member of KU Law’s Board of Governors. And every spring, he sponsors and hosts a dinner in Manhattan for prospective law students. Loyal to his state as well as his educators, Hostetler dedicated his entire professional career to serving the Manhattan community. He was the former chairman of the First Savings Bank of Manhattan and currently serves as president of Charlson & Wilson Insurance Agency Inc.

Mark Parkinson, L’84, left, and Charles Hostetler, L’63 (Photo by Steve Puppe)

“In the real world, people who succeed and make a difference tend to be people who see all the possibilities.” – Mark Parkinson, L’84 “He has spent a lifetime using his talents, training and treasure to make that community, its institutions, the state that supports him, and in our case, the law school, better places,” said Professor Mike Davis, who introduced Hostetler. Although Hostetler has received a number of accolades throughout his distinguished career, he remains humble in the face of his accomplishments. KU Law is a “special place,” he said, and the honor stood out. “This is one of the nicest things that’s ever happened to me.”

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alumni news

Court date Alumni get intimate look at high court during KU Law swearing-in ceremony

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ith only about 80 cases appearing before the Supreme Court of the United States each year, it’s a difficult feat to step into the nation’s most prestigious courtroom. But not only did a group of KU Law alumni do just that this summer, they also met some of the stars of the Court in person. “We were really treated well to meet both Justice Roberts and Justice Thomas,” said Mauricio Uribe, L’98, a partner at Knobbe Martens Olson & Bear in Seattle. “I was really impressed with how much time both justices took to talk with our group and introduce themselves.” This summer, a group of alumni were granted the ultimate networking opportunity: the chance to be sworn in before the Supreme Court justices, meet them in person, and tour the sacred grounds of the courtroom. Seventeen alumni converged in Washington, D.C., in June for the two-day event, which included

By Sarah Shebek | Photos by Bill Petros

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a rooftop cocktail reception at the W Hotel on Sunday night and the ceremony the next morning. “The Supreme Court has always been the Holy Grail; it’s my favorite building in D.C.,” said Robin Webb, L’96. “So it was more the combination of not only being in the Supreme Court and seeing the inner workings, but then you add in the personalities of the justices and their presence.” The opportunity to be sworn in before the Supreme Court is certainly limited, and KU Law last offered an admission ceremony event in 2003, when Professor Steve McAllister was dean. This time around, Noelle Uhler, director of external relations, did most of the planning, including contacting the entire alumni base a year in advance to gauge interest. “I got an email from Noelle saying that they were going to do another trip, and I said, ‘Oh, I’m going, I’m going.’ And she said, ‘No, it’s in a year,’” said Heather Bussing, employment attorney for Bussing Law. “I was so excited, and it turned out to be absolutely perfect because this is the 25th anniversary of my being admitted to practice and I also turned 50 this year in July.” The event was enticing enough that some alumni made the trip from overseas, including Miao Lin, L’08, and Heiko Heppner, L’08, who both practice at Clifford Chase LLP in Frankfurt, Germany. “I thought it would be a great opportunity to see the Supreme Court from the inside, including the Supreme Court justices, of course,” Heppner said. And alumni certainly got an insider’s perspective. The day of the swearing-in ceremony, the group and their families met in a private room to have breakfast, take photos, and hear from the clerk about the day’s events. Then they filed through rounds of security and into the courtroom for the day’s proceedings. It wasn’t an ordinary day at the Court – the Obamacare decision would soon be issued, and the room was packed. “Right when the clock struck 10, the judges filed out and it was amazing to see that they are just human beings,” Bussing said. “It was a ‘Wizard of Oz’ moment as the little man came out from behind the curtain.” Various groups from across the country took part in the swearing-in ceremony, and McAllister did the motion for the KU Law assembly. Chief Justice Roberts banged the gavel, granting the motion, and after all the groups were admitted, everyone stood, raised their right hands, and swore the oath to the Court. “Being able to enter the Supreme Court room and being there and standing up was very inspiring,” Uribe said. “Having my son hear my name called out was actually my favorite thing.” The proceedings came to a close, but the experience was not over yet. Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Thomas, who has ties to KU Law through former clerk Steve McAllister, took the time to stop and meet everyone back in the lawyer’s lounge. Thomas made sure to have personal conversations with each lawyer in attendance. “He had a lot to say, and he really took some time to

KU Law alumni sworn in to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court in June were (back row) Robert Flynn, Ruth Benien, Mel A. Saferstein, Devin Sikes and John Smolen; (middle row) Mauricio Uribe, Dennis Danella, Phil Winegar, Randolph Starr, Bruce Moore and Heiko Heppner; (front row) Dean Stephen Mazza, Karen Ruckert, Heather Bussing, Miki Kolton, Miao Lin, Robin Webb and Michael Payne. Top left: Chief Justice John Roberts greets alumni after the swearing-in ceremony. Bottom left: Justice Clarence Thomas meets John Smolen, L’07, and his son, Felix. More images online at law.ku.edu/photos.

talk to everyone, which I found very nice of him,” Heppner said. “That was very enjoyable to see that he is basically a normal person like anyone else, even though he has a lot of political power.” After the meet and greet, the group toured the courtroom in depth and heard more about its history. With that, a whirlwind two days drew to a close – but only after providing alumni the experience of a lifetime. “I would very much recommend it,” Uribe said. “Even if you never have the privilege of presenting in front of the Court, it’s such a fantastic experience. And if you can share it with family, it’s a great educational experience.” “It’s just fun to know that now you’re admitted to the Supreme Court, whether you end up practicing or not,” Webb said. “Because of Professor McAllister’s ties to the Court, you as a participant get an insider’s knowledge of the Court and see behind the curtain, so to speak, and that’s not what a lot of individuals get to see.” Although almost 10 years elapsed between Supreme Court admission events, Uhler said the school hopes to start offering the opportunity once every other year. Bussing couldn’t make the original trip in 2003 but had no regrets signing up the second time around: “It’s one of those days where it just feels great to be a lawyer.”

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alumni news

Alumni Notes

Items were received or collected prior to Nov. 1, 2012. Submit your news by e-mail to patti@ku.edu or online at www.law.ku.edu/keep-touch. KU Law Magazine relies on alumni for the accuracy of information reported.

1960s Larry D. Welch, L’61, a Lawrence resident and former KBI director, has written a book on the Kansas Bureau of Investigation’s 73-year history titled “Beyond Cold Blood: The KBI from Ma Barker to BTK” (University Press of Kansas, September 2012). The book profiles a number of Kansas’ most famous crimes. Tim Emert, L’65, has been elected as chairman of the Kansas Board of Regents. Emert, an attorney from Independence, Kan., was appointed to the nine-member board in 2010 by then-Gov. Mark Parkinson and had been serving as vice chairman. His one-year term as chairman began in July 2012. C. Douglas Miller, L’65, a founding member of the University of Florida College of Law Graduate Tax Program and founding director of the University Center for Estate and Elder Law Planning, was named professor of law emeritus upon his retirement. Donald A. Johnston, L’66, has been named a 2012 honoree for the Lawrence Business Hall of Fame and was recognized at a dinner held in September to honor the 2012 class of Outstanding Lawrence Business Leaders. Johnston is executive vice president-Northeast Kansas region at Intrust Bank NA.

1970s Stephen M. Joseph, L’72, a member of the Wichita/ Topeka/Lawrence firm of Joseph, Hollander & Craft LLC, has been honored as Best Lawyers’ 2013 “Lawyer of the Year” for Wichita criminal defense: non-white-collar. Earlier this year, Joseph was recognized by Chambers USA’s general commercial litigation section for his “effective skill set in counseling on cases involving crime, including whitecollar crime.”

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Thomas G. Kokoruda, L’72, has been included in The Best Lawyers in America 2013 for health care law. Kokoruda is practicing in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Polsinelli Shughart PC. Bernard D. Reams Jr., L’72, Ph.D., is professor of law at St. Mary’s University Law School in San Antonio, Texas. For the last 10 years he has been co-director of the law school’s summer program in Innsbruck, Austria – the Institute on World Legal Problems – held at the University of Innsbruck. Reams is also the author of a new book, “Health Care Reform: A Legislative History of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” (William S. Hein & Co., Buffalo, N.Y., 2012). Vic Bergman, L’75, was named Best Lawyer in the category of product liability for Greater Kansas City. Bergman is a partner at Shamberg Johnson & Bergman. A practicing attorney since 1975, he has been on the Best Lawyers list since 1987, but this is the first time he was named “Best of the Best” in his category. The Hon. Jack E. Salyer, L’75, retired as an administrative judge from the federal Merit System Protection Board in March 2006. He is now representing postal and federal employees before that agency. Ross A. Hollander, L’76, president and a member of the Wichita/Topeka/ Lawrence firm of Joseph & Hollander LLC, was recognized in Chambers USA 2012 as among Kansas’ top labor and employment lawyers for his “broad litigation capabilities and expert handling of hotly contested employment disputes.” The Hon. Joseph D. Johnson, L’76, Shawnee County (Kan.) District Court judge, received an honorary Doctor of Laws from Winston-Salem State University at its commencement ceremonies on May 14. Johnson earned his undergraduate degree at WSSU

in 1973. He was appointed as district judge in Shawnee County District Court in 2005 after spending 28 years in private practice and as an assistant public defender. Stanley N. Woodworth, L’78, has been listed among the Best Lawyers in America 2013 for corporate law “Lawyer of the Year.” He practices with Polsinelli Shughart PC in Kansas City, Mo.

1980s David J. Rebein, L’80, has been selected by his peers to serve as the Legacy of Justice Foundation (LoJ) board chair for 2012-13. The not-for-profit organization supports the mission of preserving and enhancing the civil justice system in Kansas in order to protect the rights of Kansans. Rebein has also been chosen by his peers to serve as the 2012-13 Kansas Association for Justice (KsAJ) public affairs chair. He previously served in this position in 2011-12. Rebein is a partner in the Rebein Bangerter Rebein PA law firm with offices in Dodge City, Kan., and Tampa, Fla. John F. Bosch, L’81, has been appointed by Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback as a judge for the 21st Judicial District Court, which consists of Riley and Clay counties. Bosch was the owner of Bosch Law Office PA in Clay Center. Jeffery L. Carmichael, L’81, has been installed as the Kansas Association for Justice’s president for 2012-13. The Kansas Association for Justice is a statewide, not-for-profit professional bar association which champions individual and corporate responsibility and accountability, the right to trial by jury, independence of the judiciary and high standards of ethics. Carmichael is a partner at Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy Chartered in Wichita. Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback, L’82, presented “Economic Growth and Kansas Tax Policy” as the University of Kansas School of Business 2012 Anderson Chandler Lecture in September at the Lied Center.

Julia A. Craft, L’82, Wichita, has become a named partner at Joseph, Hollander & Craft LLC (formerly known as Joseph & Hollander LLC) effective September 2012. Craft joined the firm last year and leads its growing family law division. The firm has offices in Wichita, Topeka and Lawrence, Kan. Daniel McCune, L’83, who practices with Kennedy Childs PC, is listed in the 2012 Best Lawyers in America for legal malpractice law, Denver. McCune is also the 2012-13 president-elect of the Denver Bar Association. Kari Schmidt, L’83, was elected presidentelect of the Wichita Bar Association in 2012. Schmidt is the managing partner at Conlee Schmidt & Emerson LLP. Cynthia Grimes, L’84, has been selected as the new bankruptcy judge for the Western District of Missouri in Kansas City. It is anticipated that she will take the bench in February following the retirement of Judge Jerry Venters. Grimes currently practices with Grimes & Rebein LC in Lenexa, Kan. Christopher J. Rockers, L’84, was installed as the 2012-13 president of the American College of Commercial Finance Lawyers at its annual meeting in March 2012. Rockers previously served as president-elect, vicepresident and secretary of the organization. He is a partner in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Husch Blackwell LLP. Justice Carol A. Beier, L’85, of the Kansas Supreme Court, was inducted into the University of Kansas Women’s Hall of Fame in 2012. Scott Williams, L’85, has joined of counsel in the intellectual property practice group in the St. Louis, Mo., office of Armstrong Teasdale LLP. Williams is a registered U.S. patent and trademark attorney, and his practice focuses on helping both emerging and mature businesses in the development and application of chemical and life sciences technologies. Prior to joining the firm, Williams spent more than 10 years in the pharmaceutical industry as in-house patent counsel at Pharmacia Corporation, Pfizer, Inc., and AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LLP.

Keven M.P. O’Grady, L’87, was appointed by Gov. Sam Brownback to serve as a judge in the 10th Judicial District court in Johnson County, Kan. O’Grady filled the vacancy created by the retirement of Judge Peter V. Ruddick. Previously he was a shareholder in the Overland Park firm of Ferree, Bunn, O’Grady & Rundberg.

1990s Cynthia A. Cook, L’91, has joined the Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, office of Brown PC, a nationwide tax controversy and tax litigation practice. Cook is a former director of the Tarrant County Trial Lawyers Association and a fellow of the Tarrant County Bar Foundation. Joan K. Archer, L’92, has joined the Kansas City, Mo., office of Armstrong Teasdale LLP as a partner and member of the litigation practice group. Archer handles intellectual property and complex litigation matters. Steven C. Henricks, L’92, serves on active duty and was recently promoted to colonel in the U.S. Army’s judge advocate general corps. Henricks currently serves as a prosecutor in the court-martial of U.S. v. Major Nidal M. Hasan. Harry Herington, L’93, CEO and chairman of the board of NIC Inc., was named the 2012 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year for Technology in the Central Midwest region. Herington also recently received the inaugural Charles Shinholser Award for Volunteerism from Concerns of Police Survivors, or COPS, for his support of the families of fallen officers. In 2009 he created Ride4Cops, which has raised more than $150,000 through donations to COPS and other law enforcement-related nonprofit groups. Loren Israel, L’93, joined the Illinois Division of Intercollegiate Athletics staff as assistant director of athletics for compliance in August 2012. Israel oversees quality control and risk management for the DIA. His main responsibilities are to develop programs, educational initiatives and monitoring systems to ensure compliance with federal,

state and university laws and regulations, and to act as the liaison to other university departments. Daniel Martin, L’93, was chosen to become the 10th president of Seattle Pacific University in July 2012. Previously he was the president of Mount Vernon Nazarene University in Mount Vernon, Ohio. Martin also served as executive assistant to the president, vice president for enrollment development, and acting vice president of finance at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, Kan., and as vice president for university advancement at Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego. Christina Dunn, L’94, was appointed by Gov. Sam Brownback as a judge in the Johnson County District Court, 10th Judicial District of Kansas. Dunn practiced with the Olathe firm of Gyllenborg & Dunn, and previously worked as an assistant district attorney in Johnson County. Michelle Roman, L’94, has joined the Kansas City, Mo., office of Husch Blackwell LLP as a banking and finance partner. Prior to joining Husch Blackwell, Roman practiced finance and real estate law with a national full-service law firm in Kansas City. She also practiced at Husch & Epppenberger from 1996 to 2005, a legacy firm of Husch Blackwell. Douglas K. Anning, L’95, has been included in The Best Lawyers in America 2013 for health care law. Anning practices in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Polsinelli Shughart PC. Jon Broz, L’95, has been named vice president and assistant general counsel for litigation at Family Dollar Stores Inc. in Matthews, N.C. Broz was formerly with Lowe’s Companies Inc., where he most recently served as vice president and assistant general counsel for litigation. Kellie Hogan, L’95, received the 2012 Jennie Mitchell Kellogg Attorney of Achievement Award at the Kansas Women Attorneys Association 23rd annual conference in Lindsborg, Kan., in July. This is the highest honor awarded by the KWAA. Nathan J. Muyskens, L’95, has joined Loeb & Loeb as a partner in the firm’s white-collar criminal defense, corporate compliance and investigations practice in Washington, D.C. His practice focuses on criminal antitrust,

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alumni news anticorruption, and securities and commodities enforcement matters. Jeff K. Brown, L’96, was selected as one of the Best Lawyers in America and Best Lawyers in Kansas City in the areas of personal injury litigation – defendants, medical malpractice law – defendants, and appellate practice. Brown practices with the firm of Logan Logan & Watson LC in Prairie Village, Kan., and lives in Olathe with his wife and two sons. Carolyn and William Matthews, both L’97, are pleased to announce the birth of a daughter, Millicent Ann, in August 2012. She joins brother, George, and sister, Beatrice. William Matthews is a partner in the Wichita, Kan., office of Foulston Siefkin LLP. Megan L. Brackney, L’98, was recently elected to the partnership of Kostelanetz & Fink LLP in New York, where she practices in the area of civil and criminal tax controversies. Brackney also is the secretary of the section of taxation of the American Bar Association and the chair of the New York County Lawyers’ Association Committee on Taxation. Tyson M. Avery, L’99, is the senior vice president for global compliance at CBRE Inc. in Los Angeles. Brian D. Goodman, L’99, has been appointed by Experis as managing director for the western region of Experis Finance. Goodman oversees business development and consultant recruitment in the western United States in the areas of risk advisory, tax, and finance and accounting. Experis is the global leader in professional resourcing and project-based solutions and part of ManpowerGroup. Robert Hockett, L’99, professor of law at Cornell University Law School, was welcomed as a new fellow of the Century Foundation, a progressive nonpartisan think tank. The Foundation’s work focuses on issues of equity and opportunity in the United States, and how American values can be best sustained and advanced in a world of more diffuse power. Geoffrey J. Lysaught, L’99, is vice president for strategy and finance at the Heritage Foundation, a research and educational institution that formulates and promotes conservative public policies based on the principles of free enterprise, limited government, individual freedom, traditional Ameri-

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can values, and a strong national defense. Lysaught will also continue as a member of the Board of Overseers for the Searle Civil Justice Institute at George Mason University School of Law.

2000s Heather Jones, L’00, accepted an assistant district attorney position in the Johnson County Attorney’s Office in Olathe, Kan., where she is a section chief of the sex crimes and child abuse division. Jones was formerly the Franklin County Attorney. Michael Porter, L’00, was named to The Best Lawyers in America list for 2013 for litigation – labor and employment. Porter practices with Miller Nash LLP in Portland, Ore. Kelleen Brennan, L’01, has been named vice president, corporate compliance at Universal Technical Institute (UTI) in Scottsdale, Ariz. UTI is the leading provider of postsecondary education for students seeking careers as professional automotive, diesel, collision repair, motorcycle and marine technicians. Betsy Blake, L’05, has accepted a judicial clerkship position with the Hon. Ralph Guy, senior judge for the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, in Ann Arbor, Mich. Megan Winter, L’05, married Matthew Beckman in October 2011 in San Diego, Calif. She is an associate in the San Diego office of Fisher & Phillips LLP, and Matt is director of digital partnerships for The Active Network. Kara Bemboom-Grefrath, L’06, is one of four Rockhurst University alumni recognized for outstanding achievements at the 2012 Family and Alumni Weekend celebration, where she received the Faber Young Alumni Award. She has served on the university’s Kansas City Alumni Council for several years, including two years as the council’s president. Bemboom-Grefrath currently serves as the first young alumni member of the Rockhurst University Leaders Council. She is assistant vice president and assistant general counsel at the Federal Reserve Bank in Kansas City. Carly E. Farrell, L’06, received a Pro Bono Certificate of Appreciation from the Kansas Bar Association during the Installation and

Awards Dinner at the annual meeting in Overland Park, Kan., in June. Farrell is a family law practitioner from Johnson County who is finalizing her mediation certification. She was previously a domestic violence prosecutor with the Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City, Kan. Andrew Kovar, L’07, was appointed by the president of the Kansas Bar Association to serve on the 2012 Kansas Bar Association Annual Survey Committee, along with 12 of the state’s preeminent lawyers and legal scholars in 30 separate subject areas. In August, the committee published the 2012 Kansas Annual Survey of Law, which gives Kansas practitioners a comprehensive survey of legal developments over the previous 12 months in the appellate courts and the legislature. Kovar was re-appointed to the committee for 2013. He practices with Triplett, Woolf & Garretson LLC in Wichita, Kan. Amanda Voth, L’07, is pleased to announce her marriage to Anthony Cook in September 2012 near Goessel. A reception followed in Newton, Kan. Voth is an assistant attorney general in Topeka and teaches criminal procedure for a private Kansas college. Dustin Bradley, L’08, is associate title landman for Chesapeake Energy in Oklahoma City. Bradley previously worked as a staff attorney for the Kansas Department of Transportation in Topeka, Kan. Eugenia Charles-Newton, L’08, began working for Texas Tech University School of Law as a law librarian and professor in legal research in May 2011. Recently, she was nominated for the Texas Tech University President’s Excellence in Diversity and Equity Award. She was also awarded the 2012 American Association of Law Libraries Minority Leadership Development Award. She recently published her first chapter in an upcoming climate change book edited by Elizabeth Kronk and Randall Abate. She has been invited to consult on the Indian Law Collection at Yale Law School. Justin D. Elkouri, L’08, has accepted a position as vice president for corporate development and legal at Texas Premier Resources LLC in Houston.

Owen Grieb, L’08, is with Amazon Tokyo in Japan, where he lives with his wife,Yoko, and their 1-year-old daughter, Mae. He was previously an attorney and management consultant at Deloitte Consulting in Tokyo.

In Memoriam Lynn L. Anderson, L’64, Bellevue, Wash., and Lawrence, Kan., August 26, 2012 Larry A. Clark, L’74, Albuquerque, N.M., October 15, 2012

Kevin Selzer, L’08, has joined Holland & Hart’s Denver office as an associate in its tax practice group. Carrie Bader, L’09, has joined Erise IP, PA in Leawood, Kan., where she is practicing in the field of intellectual property litigation. Bader and her husband are also pleased to announce the birth of their first child, Josephine, in September 2011. Alexis “Ali” Zayas, L’09, is working at the Federal Communications Commission as an attorney adviser through the FCC’s Attorney Honors Program. She has been assigned to work in the media bureau. Anne Smith, L’10, has accepted a position with the Kansas City, Mo., law firm of Shaffer Lombardo Shurin. Kevin Sterk, L’10, has joined Swanson, Martin & Bell LLP’s Lisle, Ill., office, where he focuses his practice on commercial litigation and business disputes, and employment litigation and counseling.

Rodney B. Dyerly, L’57, Chesterton, Ind., June 18, 2012 Judith D. Esrig, L’03, Leawood, Kan., May 21, 2012 James S. Francis, L’57, Tulsa, Okla., August 23, 2012 James P. Fluker, L’59, Kansas City, Mo., August 1, 2012 Brian G. Grace, L’67, Wichita/Shawnee, Kan., October 20, 2012 William P. Higgins, L’54, Wichita, Kan., March 19, 2012 Brenda M. Indyk, L’10, Okinawa, Japan, May 21, 2012 Edmond I. Marks, L’48, Brooklyn, N.Y., August 5, 2012 Ernest McRae, L’49, Wichita, Kan., May 27, 2012 Edward R. Moses III, L’48, Sun City West, Ariz., March 29, 2012

Adam Dees, L’11, and his wife, Alyssa Dees, are pleased to announce the birth of their second daughter, Rachel Mia Dees, in August 2012. Adam is an associate at Vignery & Mason LLC in Goodland, Kan.

Warren C. Neal, L’49, Kansas City, Mo., March 7, 2012

Reid R. Hollander, L’11, has joined Otis, Coan & Peters law offices in Greeley, Colo. His practice will focus on representing clients in real estate and business transactions. He previously worked as a project engineer for some of the world’s largest general contractors.

Dennis E. Shay, L’69, Wichita, Kan., June 10, 2012

Mallory Loudenback, L’11, is an associate at Kastl Law in Dallas. Ryan McAteer, L’11, has joined the Los Angeles office of Polsinelli Shughart LLC as an associate. McAteer, a health care attorney, focuses his practice on health care regulatory compliance, medical staff issues and general corporate governance. Evan North, L’11, accepted a position with the New York-based firm of Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP. North will practice in the firm’s Washington, D.C., office.

Thomas W. Poos, L’73, Wichita, Kan., September 7, 2012

Alan R. Sleeper Jr., L’42, Alden, Kan., August 19, 2012 John Francis (Jack) Steineger, L’49, Kansas City, Kan., May 1, 2012 Otto Russell “Russ” Stites Jr., L’51, Lawrence, Kan., June 2, 2012 Robert H.Thornburgh, L’66, Hiawatha, Kan., November 30, 2011 The Hon. Richard W. Wahl, L’51, Salina, Kan., May 21, 2012 J. Bixby Willis, L’70, Wichita, Kan., April 3, 2012

Andrew T. “Drew” Bergman, L’12, has joined the corporate group in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Husch Blackwell LLP. Kristin Maun, L’12, is serving as an Equal Justice Works AmeriCorps Legal Fellow for the Veterans’ Legal Project at Legal Aid of West Virginia in Martinsburg, W.Va. She is the first Equal Justice Works AmeriCorps Legal Fellow from KU in at least the last 10 years. Ganesh Nair, L’12, is a broker at AON Financial Services Group, AON Risk Insurance Services West Inc., in Denver.

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donor report

Why I give: 1

snapshots of generosity

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“All of us benefited from KU Law being such a strong school. Ideally, we want other people who grow up in similar communities in the state to have that opportunity, too. We want the law school to continue to be a strong school and a great launching pad for graduates to have successful careers.” Lydia Beebe, B.S. 1974, J.D. 1977; and Chuck Doyle, B.S. 1975, J.D. 1978; San Francisco, Calif. $1 million – $500,000 outright, Beebe/ Doyle Family Scholarship and classroom renovation; $500,000 bequest, to enhance their scholarship fund

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“The KU law school has lagged behind its peer institutions in charitable donations for scholarship support, and that has an effect on everything. The better the students you get, the better the job placement you’re going to have. And then, of course, as you place people in higher numbers, you’re going to attract more and even better students.” David Elkouri, B.S. 1975, J.D., 1978; and Debbi Elkouri; Wichita, Kan., and Houston,Texas $800,000 – $300,000 outright and $500,000 bequest, Elkouri Family Scholarship Fund, full-ride renewable scholarships for students from Kansas

“My love of the law and my love of what I do were engendered because of the faculty and the experience I had at the KU law school. It’s benefited me personally, intellectually and financially in ways I hadn’t envisioned when I started law school.” Gary Waldron, B.A. 1970, J.D., 1979; and Carol “Sunny” Foster, M.A., Ph.D., 1978; Laguna Beach, Calif. Up to $50,000 outright for matching gift program that will double qualifying contributions up to $1,000 each 3

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Kristen Toner, L’06, and Kevin Kelly, L’89

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“I benefited greatly from the education I received at KU, both undergraduate and law, and want to do what I can to make it possible for others to benefit. In these days of decreasing state support for our state institutions of higher education, it is especially important that those of us who are able financially support the programs which are important to us, to the school, and to the state and society in general.” Chuck Frickey, B.S. 1966, J.D. 1969; and Diane Frickey; Oberlin, Kan. $30,000 outright and $30,000 charitable gift annuity, Philip P. Frickey Indian Law Fund, in memory of Chuck’s brother

Two KU Law grads are back on campus to help Green Hall reach new heights during the Far Above campaign. Kristen Toner, L’06, and Kevin Kelly, L’89, son of former KU Law Professor Bill Kelly, both transitioned from successful legal careers to become development directors at KU Endowment. Their primary responsibility is building relationships with KU Law alumni and increasing private support for the law school.

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“My family gives to KU Law because of everything it’s given to us. While professional development and career opportunities are important, the personal growth and camaraderie among our KU family really stand out.” Sean J. O’Hara, J.D. 2006, Scottsdale, Ariz. $3,833 lifetime (including firm matches) – approximately $80 a month to reach $1,000 annually to qualify as a Dean’s Club member 5

Meet the Faces of KU Law fundraising

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“Charitable giving is generally important to me because I think it’s both vital to the community and good for the soul to give back. Especially as a student paying in-state tuition, I received a world-class legal education and, therefore, incredible value from KU Law.” Robert Neigert, B.A. 2001, J.D. 2005, Austin,Texas $1,000 outright, a first-time gift that qualifies for the Waldron Matching Gift Program 6

ur work revolves around traveling to where you, our fellow KU Law grads, live and work, and visiting with you oneon-one. We feel privileged to hear stories of old and new Green Hall and the unique road each of you has traveled on your way to law school, as well as your career path following graduation. We are both Lawrence natives, so we also enjoy providing updates on the Green Hall of today. These include a greater emphasis on clinical programs, new initiatives by the offices of admissions and career services, and the increasingly important role development plays in the school’s long-term success. We have already visited with many of you and look forward to visiting with more of you in the months and years ahead. Please feel free to contact us any time with development inquiries or just to say hello: ktoner@kuendowment.org or kkelly@kuendowment.org.

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DONOR REPORT

WITH SINCERE THANKS TO OUR DONORS JAMES WOODS GREEN MEDALLION HONOREES The James Woods Green Medallion honors donors whose cumulative giving to the University of Kansas School of Law is $25,000 & above. Honorees whose names are italicized are deceased. INDIVIDUALS MOST RECENT HONOREES Arne L. Johnson Family Trust Kelley D. Sears, L’74, & Jane A. Sears Shannon L. Spangler, L’87, & Michael E. Spangler Marie S. Woodbury, L’79, & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD PAST HONOREES Constance M. Achterberg, L’53 Frank A. Ackerman, L’80 Donald D. Adams, L’64, & Ann Wees Adams J. Eugene Balloun, L’54 Richard A. Barber, L’34 Mrs. Richard A. Barber Barbara Blake Bath, PhD, & Thomas D. Bath, PhD Lydia I. Beebe, L’77, & Charles E. Doyle, L’78 Blake A. Biles, L’75 Richard L. Bond, L’60, & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond John K. Bremyer, L’46, & Jayne Williamson Bremyer The Hon. Clayton Brenner, L’28 Daisy E. & Paul H. Brown Max & Mary Brown Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad Barkley Clark Gertrude Clark Peggy A. Clark John D. Conderman, L’69, & Patricia R. Conderman Teresa Blatchley Conkey Mary K. Connell O. J. Connell Jr., L’38 Donald L.Cordes, L’59 Professor Mike Davis & Faye Davis Suzanne M. Decker Michael F. Delaney, L’76, & Kathleen L. Delaney Glen W. Dickinson Professor Martin Dickinson & Sallie Dickinson Carolyn A. Dillon & Richard W. Dillon William R. Docking, L’77, & Judy O. Docking Robert L. Driscoll, L’64 Gary Duncan, L’74, & Adrianna D. Gonzales Duncan Ruth Adair Dyer, L’21 Mildred A. Early David S. Elkouri, L’78 Clem Fairchild Dorothy Feir, PhD Bruce A. Finzen, L’73 David H. Fisher, L’38, & Mary Frances Fisher Charles L. Frickey, L’69 Loren M. Gensman Roland D. Gidney Jr., L’47 Donald W. Giffin, L’53, & Esther Brown Giffin Ernest J. Goppert, L’17 Brian G. Grace, L’67 Jordan L. Haines, L’57, & Shirley Cundiff Haines Barry D. Halpern, L’73, & Cynthia A. Halpern Kenneth M. Hamilton, L’47, & Ruth Hamilton

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Roberta B. Harkness Minnie I. Harms Edward J. Healy, L’79 Alvin D. Herrington, L’57 Al J. & Sylvia M. Herrod Elma A. Holdeman Alice A. Hook Mrs. A. Bryce Huguenin John E. Hurley Jr., L’62, & Jo Sicking Hurley Elizabeth Ann Hylton The Hon. Theodore B. Ice, L’61, & Sue H. Ice Howard M. Immel, L’38, & Sue Immel Balfour & Margaret Jeffrey Richard Kane Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch Larry E. Keenan, L’54 John M. Kilroy Jr., L’73 Fred C. & Mary Robinson Koch Thomas G. Kokoruda, L’72 Florence M. Kuske Linda S. Legg, L’75, & The Hon. Lawrence G. Crahan The Hon. James K. Logan & Beverly Logan Robert W. Loyd, L’62, & Mary Jo Loyd Lyle D. Lutton Jr., L’50, & De Nell T. Lutton Daniel J. Lyons, L’77, & Maryanne Lyons Glenn E. McCann, L’40 Brian K. McLeod, L’89 Eunice H. Melik Col. Edward A. Metcalf III, Retired, L’49 Professor Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer Dara Trum Miles, L’87, & Robin J. Miles, L’86 George D. Miner, L’22 John R. Morse, L’75 The Hon. Ronald C. Newman, L’70 Holly Nielsen, L’82 Bernard E. Nordling, L’49, & Barbara A. Nordling Charles H. Oldfather Jr. Hortense Casady Oldfather Bernard V. O’Neill Jr., L’76, & Marion W. O’Neill The Hon. James W. Paddock, L’56 Marjorie L. Page Robert A. Page, L’53 Mary Louise Parker Diane S. Parrish, L’79 Professor John C. Peck, L’74, & Pamela C. Peck William B. Pendleton, L’57 Mary Ruth Watermulder Petefish Arthur C. Piculell Jr., L’65, & Dee W. Piculell Donald H. Postlethwaite, L’26, & Ruth Lawless Postlethwaite Jean Humphrey Proffitt & Roy F. Proffitt Raymond F. Rice, L’1908, & Ethel Rice John M. Rounds, L’39 The Honorable M. Kay Royse, L’78 Joan R. Ruff, L’73, & Dennis P. Wilbert, L’73 Bill R. Sampson, L’71 Drucilla J. Sampson, L’96 Elizabeth A. Schartz, L’88 Janet Manning Schroeder Robert A. Schroeder, L’37 Carolyn Henry Shinkle & J. Frank Shinkle, L’41 Mary Maurine Shurtz Leo R. Sissel, L’50 Beatrice Siegel The Hon. Fred N. Six, L’56, & Lilian Six Christopher Smith, L’72 Glee S. Smith Jr., L’47, & Geraldine B. Smith Frank L. Snell, L’24 Mary Ellen Stadler Roger D. Stanton, L’63, & Judith Duncan Stanton

Kate Stephens The Hon. Donnan Stephenson, L’48, & Patricia Ledyard Stephenson Mikel L. Stout, L’61, & LeAnn R. Stout Peter E. Strand, L’79, & Sheila C. Strand Edna J. Sullivan & James E. Sullivan, L’29 Willard B. Thompson, L’58 Erma B. & Frank E.Tyler Omer G.Voss, L’39, & Annabele K.Voss Katherine Hall Wagstaff & Robert W. Wagstaff Gary A. Waldron, L’79, & Carol A. Foster Charles R. Wall Professor William E. Westerbeke Douglas D. Wheat, L’74, & Laura L. Wheat Houston L.Whiteside Willard G.Widder, L’49 Karl T.Wiedemann Paul L.Wilbert, L’38 Susan Scott Wilner R. Dean Wolfe, L’69 Stanley N. Woodworth, L’78 Robert S. Wunsch, L’58, & Barbara Bateman Wunsch Paul Yde, L’85, & Sarah Elder D. Spencer Yohe, L’54 FIRMS & FOUNDATIONS Foulston & Siefkin LLP Hampton & Royce LC Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Hite Fanning & Honeyman LLP Lathrop & Gage LLP Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy, Chtd. Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus PC The Ethel & Raymond F. Rice Foundation Ross Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC Stinson Morrison Hecker, LLP Wal-Mart Stores Inc. DEANS CLUB AMBASSADORS $10,000 & above Barbara Blake Bath, PhD & Thomas D. Bath, PhD Margaret R. Bath Lydia I. Beebe Charles E. Doyle Professor Christopher R. Drahozal & Kaye M. Drahozal David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Foulston Siefkin LLP Estate of Tom & Roberta Harkness Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City Elizabeth Ann Hylton Arne L. Johnson Family Trust Kellogg’s Corporate Citizenship Fund Scott C. Long Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd Jean Humphrey Proffitt Estate of Roy Proffitt The Ethel & Raymond F. Rice Foundation Karl M. Ruppenthal, PhD Bill Sampson Drucilla J. Sampson Elizabeth A. Schartz Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Richard L. Sias & Jeannette Sias Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith John D. Stewart Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP

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KU LAW MAGAZINE 37

donor report Michele A. Kessler & Owen Harbison Rachel J. Kibler-Melby John A. Koepke Stuart M. Kowalski KPMG Foundation Jason P. & Skye D. Lacey Sharylyn Gelvin Lacey Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy Michael W. Mahaffey Terry L. & Monica S. Malone Charles D. Marvine Joyce Rosenberg Marvine Lynn R. & Anne McDougal Lori Connors McGroder Damian A. Nelson & Amber Basantz Nelson Donald L. Norman Jr. Michael F. Norton Susan Roffman Norton Christine McDaniel Novak & Keith Fredrick Novak Robert E. Nugent III & Linda D. Nugent Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post Thomas K. & Sharon Pratt Larry G. & Dianne J. Rapp Judge Janice D. Russell Judge Robert J. Schmisseur & Donna J. Schmisseur Connor J. Sears Keith C. & Jan M. Sevedge Chris & Frank Sharp David E. & Kimberly R. Shay Amanda C. Sheridan Nan Mills Sigman & Gregory D. Sigman Rachel Emig Simek Justice Fred N. Six & Lilian Six Amy Verschoor Skinner Carol Zuschek Smith Wayne E. Smith Ann & Mark A. Soderberg Jon A. Strongman Beverly Thomas Earl D. & Shirley A. Tjaden Melanie L. Trump Timothy T. Trump Chasitie Burgess Walden Michael L. Walden Judge Marcia K. Walsh Susan Krehbiel William Estate of Aaron A. Wilson Jr. Christine Dudgeon Wilson & Lawrence B. Wilson Jason M. & Kristie Zager 1865 CLUB $100-$299 Layne M. Adams Martin K. Albrecht & Shari Feist Albrecht Philip H. & Jeanine R. Alexander David C. & Priscilla A. All Daniel N. & Melanie W. Allmayer Mark A. & Susan E. Andersen Eric N. & Bonnie J. Anderson Heather Zane Anderson Lincoln W. Anderson John L. Andra David W. Andreas Angela S. Armenta Judge Karen M. Arnold-Burger & Kurt L. Burger Katharina E. Babich Katherine J. Bailes, JD, PhD Baird Holm LLP Ernest C. Ballweg Frank S. Bangs Jr. Mark C. Bannister Clayton L. Barker Jacob W. Bayer Jr. & Leslie Russo Bayer Megan Winterburg Beckman Stephen J. Bednar

38 KU LAW MAGAZINE

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Emily B. Metzger Eric T. & Margo L. Mikkelson C. Douglas & Loralee W. Miller Marilyn G. Miller & Charley L. Looney Roland B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller Scott J. Miller Gwendelyn Garcia Milligan William S. & Peggy Mills Robert B. Misner Kevin F. & Frances Mitchelson William M. Modrcin Jr. Paul J. Mohr Donald L. Moler Jr. Judith A. Moler Claudio E. Molteni Doni L. Mooberry Slough & James A. Slough U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran & Robba Addison Moran Stephen R. & Paula M. Morgan Daniel G. Morris Jeffery B. Morris Paul T. Moxley Daphne Nan Muchnic Kristina B. & Jacob I. Murphree Andrew J. Nazar Kelsey Patterson Nazar Robert B. & Margaret E. Neill N. Royce & Linda L. Nelson Owen K. Newman Tamara L. & R. Lance Niles Bert Nunley Justice Lawton R. Nuss Arnold C. Nye Aaron B. Oleen ONEOK Foundation James A. Oppy Jean C. Owen & Marsha Golub Owen Harlan C. & Vickie Parker Carolyn Boettcher Parmer & David A. Parmer Sandra J. Patti John C. Pauls Kathryn Pruessner Peters & Stephen D. Peters Peter L. & Rita E. Peterson Judge Joe Pierron & Diana Carlin Pierron, PhD Losson G. Pike & Leanne Benda Pike Christel L. Poague Ann J. Premer John A. Price Hal C. Reed Brenda Petrie Register & Benton W. Register Ronald S. Reuter Christie Frick Reynolds & David O. Reynolds Steven A. Rhodes Forrest T. Rhodes Jr. & Tiffany L. Rhodes David F. & Linda F. Richards George E. Rider & Jeannene Keaton Rider Deborah L. Klee Riley & John C. Riley Shon C. Robben & Michelle Travisano Robben Lauren E. Roberts John B. Roesler Judge David W. Rogers Richard D. Rogers & Cynthia J. Rogers Gary L. Rohrer & Lee Ann Urban Rohrer Christy Jensen Rosensteel & Ryan Rosensteel Duane K. Ross G. Hal & Mary Lou Ross Leon E. Roulier & Barbara Hauck Roulier Karen Ruckert Richard H. Rumsey & Lorie Dudley Rumsey Rebecca A. Ryan William H. Sanders Jr. John O. & Joann L. Sanderson William K. Sauck Jr.

Nancy Racunas Saugstad & Lee Saugstad Megan Palmer Scheiderer & Jason Scheiderer Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW Lisa M. Schultes & Dan O’Connell Carol A. Schwinn Security Benefit Group of Companies David G. Seely & Debra Short Seely Jay N. Selanders Steven D. Selbe Bhavi A. Shah Emily Cameron Shattil Andrew R. Shaw Pamela Pratt Shelton & Michael W. Shelton Eldon J. & Bonnie Shields Connie Haynie Sieracki & Paul S. Sieracki Xavier Simonsen Madeline M. Simpson Courtney Pedersen Sipe Judge Allen R. Slater & Kathryn Bohn Slater Amy Logan Sliva Sloan, Eisenbarth, Glassman, McEntire & Jarboe LLC Christopher M. & Alison M. Small Stanford J. Smith Jr. Steven P. & Deborah J. Smith John L. & Diane P. Snyder Christine K. Solso & Robert J. Huber Jeffrey S. Southard David M. Staker & Christina Dunn Staker Col. Russell A. Stanley USAF, Retired Kendra Walker Stark Edwin A. & Sally L. Stene Michael A. Sternlieb Scott C. & Sonja Stockwell Darin D. Stowell Marie Parker Strahan & Dennis W. Strahan Kara Trouslot Stubbs Gordon B. & Carol Stull Robert C. & Linda Ann Sturgeon Michael L. Sullivan R. Kent Sullivan & Phyllis L. Sullivan, DO Linda L. Sybrant Erin E. Syring Tristan C. Tafolla William P. Tanner III Jeffrey C. Tauscher Lawrence L. Tenopir Captain A. R. Thomas & Alice Stevinson Thomas Gabrielle M. Thompson & Oliver L. Weaver, PhD Monica Schmidt Thompson Gerald A. & Patti H. Thorpe Kathryn Marie Timm Tom C. & Christie Triplett Paul R. Turvey & Maria Kepka Turvey Kimberley H. Tyson Union Pacific Corporation Julie L. Unruh Kenneth R. & Annette Van Blaricum Thomas M.Van Cleave III James D.VanPelt Larry S.Vernon Sen. John L.Vratil & Teresa C.Vratil J. Michael Walker & Gayla Hastings Walker Michael R. Wallace & Mary E. Bartlett W. Bernard Whitney Jr. & Renate Baltmanis Whitney Wichita Bar Association Kelli A. Wikoff & Andrew Sittenauer Damon K. Williams Anne B. & John O. Wilson Britton G. Wilson John B. Wilson Margaret Dandurand Wilson Professor Melanie D. Wilson Gary A. Winfrey & Sally Nixon Winfrey

Neal H. & Erin Woodworth Judge Wendel W. Wurst & Rhonda Wurst Bradley J.Yeretsky Emily M. Yeretsky Brenda Yoakum-Kriz Rebecca Swanwick Yocham & Keith A. Yocham Stephen R. & Elisabeth T. Zane Jonathan N. Zerger Katherine Bollig Zogleman NEW FUNDS ACC MID-AMERICA CHAPTER SCHOLARSHIP is an annual scholarship funded by the Association of Corporate Counsel Mid-America Chapter and awarded to a second- or third-year student who plans to pursue a career in corporate law or as corporate counsel. BEEBE/DOYLE FAMILY CLASSROOM FUND was established with a gift from Lydia I. Beebe, L’77, & Chuck Doyle, L’78, of San Francisco, California, to be used for classroom renovation. BEEBE/DOYLE FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established with a gift from Lydia I. Beebe, L’77, and Chuck Doyle, L’78, of San Francisco, California, to provide graduate scholarships for students at the University of Kansas School of Law. ELKOURI FAMILY EXPENDABLE SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established with a gift from David S. Elkouri, L’78, and Debbi C. Elkouri of Wichita, Kansas, and Houston, Texas. The scholarship fund will provide graduate scholarships for students with academic merit at the University of Kansas School of Law on an annual basis for: (1) one full renewable in-state tuition scholarship for a resident of Kansas with excellent academic and extra-curricular qualifications; and (2) to law students who will enhance the quality of students at the School of Law. KANSAS JOURNAL OF LAW & PUBLIC POLICY SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established through an anonymous gift and is a pending-endowed fund which allows five years for the fund to become permanently endowed. Once fully endowed, the fund will provide scholarships to all student members of the Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy. SNELL & WILMER ALUMNI LAW SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP FUND was established with gifts from KU Law graduates practicing with the law firm of Snell & Wilmer LLP & matching gifts from the firm. The scholarship fund will provide graduate scholarships for students with academic merit at the University of Kansas School of Law. LIBRARY SUPPORT FUNDS Hazel A. Anderson Law Library Fund Louise Ahlstedt Beebe & Jack E. Beebe Law Library Fund Thomas W. Boone Law School Library Fund Ruth Adair Dyer Law Library Fund Friends of the University of Kansas Law Library Arthur W. Hershberger Memorial Law Book Fund Frank G. Hodge Memorial Library Fund

KU Law Library Unrestricted Fund Kate McKay Memorial Book Fund Evart Mills Memorial Book Fund Douglas D. and Laura L. Wheat School of Law Opportunity Fund MATCHING GIFTS Altria Group Inc. American Multi-Cinema Inc. The Bank of America Foundation The Boeing Company CNA Foundation ConocoPhillips Company Deloitte Foundation Ernst & Young Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation Faegre Baker Daniels Foundation Hallmark Corporate Foundation Illinois Tool Works Foundation SC Johnson Kansas City Southern Kansas University Endowment Association Kellogg’s Corporate Citizenship Fund Kinder Morgan Foundation KPMG Foundation ONEOK Foundation Security Benefit Group of Companies Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee PC Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Snell & Wilmer LLP Sprint Foundation Thompson & Knight Foundation Thomson Reuters Union Pacific Corporation Wal-Mart Foundation The Williams Companies Inc. Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale & Dorr LLP GIFTS RECEIVED IN HONOR OF Charles L. Frickey, L’69, & Diane Paris Frickey Law Library Staff Professor Steve McAllister Cathy A. Reinhardt, L’83 Anisha Thomas GIFTS RECEIVED IN MEMORY OF Larry J. Austin, L’57 Robert F. Bennett, L’52 John Emerson Blake Sr., L’25 Mary Anne Chambers, L’81 Peggy A. Clark Larry O. Denny, L’67 Mary Ann Mize Dickinson Philip P. Frickey E. S. Hampton, L’29 Thomas W. Hampton, L’59 Barbara A. Harmon, L’85 Sally Horne Harris, L’78 W. Ross Hutton, L’83 C. Frederick Ice, L’24 Mildred Branine Ice Elmer C. Jackson Jr., L’35 Professor Philip C. “Flip” Kissam Philip C. Lacey, L’74 Kenton J. Mai, L’89 Robert B. McKay Janean Meigs, L’76 The Hon. Earl E. O’Connor, L’50 Jean A. O’Connor Roy F. Proffitt Judge Kay Royse, L’78 James J. Stachowiak, PhD Judge Robert F. Stadler, L’48 John Francis (Jack) Steineger, L’49 Frederick L. Ward, L’87 Aaron A. Wilson Jr., L’50

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donor report OTHER FUNDS Beebe/Doyle Family Classroom Fund Richard L. & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond Fund Walter Brauer Faculty Support Fund Daisy E. & Paul H. Brown Elder Law Fund Robert C. Casad Comparative Law Lectureship Class of 1971 Fund Donald L. Cordes School of Law Opportunity Fund Charles L. Decker Fund Mary Ann Mize Dickinson Memorial Garden Fund G. Gary Duncan Fund Elder Law Program Fund David H. Fisher Law Fund Loren M. Gensman Fund GUF/Law School Unrestricted Jordan L. & Shirley Haines Law Faculty Fellowship Kenneth M. & Ruth Elizabeth Hamilton Law Fund Ed & Helen Healy Law School Opportunity Fund Hinkle Elkouri Conference Room Fund Humphrey School of Law Discretionary Fund Ice Family Fund Joy M. Johnson Trust for the School of Law Journey to JD-Diversity Pipeline Program Medical-Legal Clinic at the Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care Clinic Kansas Defender Project Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy Fund Kansas Law Review Law School Building Fund Law School Dean’s Discretionary Account Law School Media, Law & Policy Program Legal Aid Clinic Fund Linda S. Legg & Lawrence G. Crahan Professionalism Fund James K. Logan Fund Fred B. Lovitch & Michael J. Davis Law Fund Jana Mackey Support for Public Advocacy Fund Robert B. McKay Memorial Fund Richard F. Mullins Moot Court Competition Fund John A. Naill School of Law Fund Judge Edmund L. Page Jurist-in-Residence Program Polsinelli Shalton Welte Suelthaus Fund Don & Ruth Lawless Postlethwaite Fund Public Interest Law Fund William O. Rice Law Fund Robert A. Schroeder Family Teaching Fellowship Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy Shughart, Thomson & Kilroy Fund Fred N. & Lilian Six Unrestricted Law School Fund James Barclay Smith Fund Snell & Wilmer Courtroom Renovation Fund Judge Nelson Timothy Stephens Lecture Stephenson Lectures in Law and Government Fund Stinson Morrison Hecker Fund Tax Certificate Program Fund Tribal Law and Government Center Fund Gary A. Waldron and Carol A. Foster Law School Dean Discretionary Fund Gary A. Waldron and Carol A. Foster Law School Fund Douglas D. and Laura L. Wheat School of Law Opportunity Fund Houston Whiteside Fund Dennis P. Wilbert and Joan R. Ruff Fund Paul L. and Florine T. Wilbert Fund Wolfe Family Moot Court Assistance Fund Paul Yde Law and Economics Fund

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PRIZES AND AWARDS American College of Trial Lawyers, Kansas Chapter Award Barber Emerson, LC Blue Book Relays Robert F. Bennett Student Award Fund William L. Burdick Prize Mary Anne Chambers Service Award G. Gary Duncan Scholastic Improvement Prize Robert E. Edmonds Prize for Corporation and Securities Law Family Fund Robert C. Foulston and George Siefkin Prizes for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy Hershberger, Patterson, Jones & Roth Energy Law Award Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award Hinkle Law Firm Tax Procedure Award W. Ross Hutton Prize Howard M. and Sue Immel Annual Teaching Award Lloyd M. Kagey Leadership Award Law Class of 1949 Leadership Award Janean Meigs Memorial Award in Law Fund Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership, and Service Award James P. Mize Trial Advocacy Award Dean Frederick J. Moreau Faculty Award Larry R. O’Neal/Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Law School Award Fund Payne & Jones Lawyering Program Award Shapiro Award for Best Paper on Law & Public Policy Sonnenschein Scholars Program C. C. Stewart Award Susman Godfrey Trial Advocacy Fund UMB Bank Excellence in Trust Planning Award PROFESSORSHIPS Centennial Teaching Professorship Connell Teaching Professorships in Kansas Law E. S. and Tom Hampton Professorship John H. and John M. Kane Distinguished Professorship Raymond F. Rice Distinguished Professorship in Law John M. Rounds Distinguished Professorship in Law Robert A. Schroeder Distinguished Professorship J. B. Smith Distinguished Professorship in Constitutional Law Frank E. Tyler Professorship in Law Robert W. Wagstaff Distinguished Professorship in Law Paul E. Wilson Professorship in Law SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS Mark H. Adams Sr. Memorial Scholarship Association of Corporate Council Mid-America Chapter Scholarship Warren D. Andreas Scholarship in Law Richard A. Barber Scholarship Beebe/Doyle Family Scholarship Judge Willard M. & Lucile H. Benton Memorial Scholarship Berkley Memorial Scholarship in Law Bever Dye Scholarship John Emerson Blake Memorial Scholarship Book Exchange Scholarships Bremyer Summer Intern Scholarship Fund Judge Clayton & Cecile Goforth Brenner Scholarship in Law Claude E. Chalfant Memorial Scholarship John W. and Gertrude Clark Scholarship Claude O. Conkey Memorial Scholarship O.J. Connell Jr. Law Scholarship Glen W. Dickinson Scholarship in Law

William and Judy Docking Law School Scholarship Port & Mildred Early Scholarship Judge A. M. Ebright Memorial Scholarship Elkouri Family Expendable Scholarship Fund Ethics for Good Scholarship Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch Scholarship Foulston Siefkin 2L Scholarships Foulston Siefkin Diversity Scholarship Foulston & Siefkin Law Review Scholarship Jordan & Shirley Haines Scholarship Thomas H. Harkness KU Law School Scholarship Sally Harris Scholarship Darrell L. Havener Scholarship Fund Aldie Haver Memorial Scholarship in Law The Help of Our Lord & Saviour Jesus Christ Scholarship Al J. & Sylvia M. Herrod Law Scholarship Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Scholarship Michael H. Hoeflich & Karen J. Nordheden Scholarship in Law Enos A. Hook Memorial Scholarship Oliver H. Hughes Memorial Scholarship A. Bryce Huguenin School of Law Scholarship Judge Walter A. Huxman Scholarship Arthur M. Jackson Memorial Scholarship Elmer C. Jackson Jr. Scholarship in Law for Black Americans Margaret S. Jeffrey Scholarship Grant in Law KC Lesbian, Gay & Allied Lawyers (KC LEGAL) Scholarship Kansas Women Attorneys Association Jennie Mitchell Kellogg Scholarship Calvin and Janice Karlin Annual Scholarship Andrew Keenan Memorial Scholarship Kirk Family School of Law Dorothy Arlene Bates Kirk Scholarship Law Class of 1953 Scholarship Law School Class of 1925 Scholarship Law School Scholarship Fund Robert W. Loyd Scholarship in Law Frank A. Lutz Memorial Scholarship Kenton Mai Memorial Scholarship Minorities in Law Scholarships Harriet and Mancel Mitchell Scholarship in Law John R. Morse Law School Scholarship Ronald C. Newman Scholarship Major Eugene H. Nirdlinger Memorial Scholarship Bernard E. Nordling Scholarship Gary Olson Scholarship Judge Earl E. and Jean Ann O’Connor Memorial Scholarship Charles H. Oldfather Scholarship Joseph O. and Mary Louise Parker Scholarship Olin K. and Mary Ruth Petefish School of Law Scholarship Polsinelli Shalton Welte Suelthaus Diversity Scholarship Polsinelli Shughart Scholarship Public Interest Summer Stipends Charles B. Randall Memorial Scholarship Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Scholarships Ross Foundation Law School Scholarship Judge M. Kay Royse Scholarship in Law Judge J. C. Ruppenthal Memorial Scholarship Vivian McAtee Schmidt Law Scholarship Robert A. and Janet Manning Schroeder Scholarships in Law Elisha Scott Memorial Scholarship Professor William R. Scott Scholarship Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee Law Scholarship J. Frank and Carolyn Henry Shinkle Memorial Scholarship

J. Frank Shinkle Student Aid Fund Shook, Hardy & Bacon Scholarships Professor Earl B. & Mary Maurine Shurtz Tribal Lawyer Scholarship Clarine Smissman J.D. and Edward Smissman PhD Scholarship in Law Carl T. Smith Memorial Scholarship Glee and Geraldine Smith Law Scholarship Snell & Wilmer Alumni Law School Scholarship William C. Spangler Memorial Scholarship Judge Robert F. Stadler Memorial Scholarship Evelyn, Richard & Blanche Thompson Scholarship Leslie T. Tupy Scholarship Suzanne Valdez and Stephen McAllister Scholarship Voss Kansas Law Scholarship Wal-Mart Legal Diversity Scholarship Frederick L. Ward Memorial Scholarship J. L. Weigand Jr. Notre Dame Legal Education Trust Scholarship Willard G. Widder Scholarship Karl T. Wiedemann Scholarship in Law Paul R. Wunsch Scholarship CLASSES 1939 Omer G.Voss 1940 John D. Stewart 1941 Karl M. Ruppenthal, PhD 1947 Judge Richard D. Rogers & Cynthia J. Rogers 1949 Robert L. Lesh & Edwina Crane Lesh Arnold C. Nye 1950 William B. Beeson Laird S. Campbell & Nancy Cornforth Campbell Kenneth Harmon & Sue Harmon 1951 Richard C. Harris Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy Basil C. & Cecilia Marhofer Russell B. Taylor 1952 G. Hal & Mary Lou Ross Colonel Russell A. Stanley USAF, Retired 1953 Constance M. Achterberg John G. Atherton Donald W. Giffin & Esther Brown Giffin J. Robert Wilson & Marguerite J. Wilson 1954 J. Eugene Balloun Larry E. Keenan & Patricia L. Degner- Keenan Charles S. Lindberg & Dolores Goad Lindberg Richard L. Sias & Jeannette Sias D. Spencer Yohe 1955 Donald N. Dirks Bob & Bev Londerholm

1956 Robert A. & Barbara J. Garrity Judge James W. Paddock & Ruth Davenport Paddock Justice Fred N. Six & Lilian Six Carl E. Stallard 1957 R. Stanley Ditus James R. & Mary L. Hanson Alvin D. Herrington Duane R. Hirsch & Shirley Hirsch John G. & Elaine R. Kite Larry Worrall & Beverly Cope Worrall 1958 Heywood H. Davis & Louise Swigart Davis Richard H. Rumsey & Lorie Dudley Rumsey Willard B. Thompson & Barbara L. Thompson James D. VanPelt Robert S. Wunsch & Barbara Bateman Wunsch 1959 John W. Brand Jr. & Barbara Sample Brand Thomas H. Krueger & Jean Krueger Edwin A. & Sally L. Stene 1960 Barton Brown Edward H. & Julia N. Graham Judge Edward Larson & Mary L. Larson Gary L. Rohrer & Lee Ann Urban Rohrer Byron E. Springer & Marion Peltier Springer 1961 Pauline Peppercorn Dye N. William Hines Jr. & Jean S. Hines Judge Theodore B. Ice & Sue Harper Ice Mikel L. Stout & LeAnn R. Stout 1962 Richard R. Eads & Joann Howell Eads Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd Joel A. Sterrett & Dr. Joye Sterrett 1963 Lawrence W. Blickhan Gary E. & Elfriede Cooper Robert E. Donatelli & Katherine Donatelli Charles H. Hostetler & Julie A. Hostetler Richard G. & Carol A. Hunsucker John W. & Dee Dee Jordan Roger D. Stanton & Judith Duncan Stanton 1964 Donald D. Adams & Ann Wees Adams Robert L. Driscoll & Marilyn Rockwell Driscoll William D. Haught Leon E. Roulier & Barbara Hauck Roulier Tom C. & Christie Triplett Robert E. & Mary L. Williams 1965 Ernest Adelman & Barbara Boley Adelman David C. & Priscilla A. All Tom Bennett Marshall L. Crowther & Sandra Garvey Crowther, EdD David R. Hederstedt & Valerie Hederstedt Karen I. Johnson Topper Johntz Jim L. & Mary Ann Lawing Ronald L. & Joleen M. Leslie C. Douglas & Loralee W. Miller

W. Bernard Whitney Jr. & Renate Baltmanis Whitney 1966 Stephen C. Chambers Peter K. Curran & Virginia Schubert Curran Max E. Eberhart & Nina Gillig Eberhart C. Andrew Graham & Constance Fox Graham Donald A. Johnston & Alice Dowell Johnston Douglas & Shirley Lancaster Thomas M.Van Cleave III 1967 Barry A. & Lynette S. Bennington John D. & Karin M. Dunbar Robert W. & Joyce M. Green Robert I. & Susan S. Guenthner Harold L. Haun Dean B. & Noni B. Hill Judge J. C. Irvin & Mary Lewis Irvin Duane K. Ross Ralph L. L. Schmidt CPA Thomas M. & Suzanne F. Tuggle J. Michael Walker & Gayla Hastings Walker 1968 Larry D. Armel & JoAnne Armel Judge Donald W. Bostwick & Jill Bostwick Lance W. Burr George L. Catt & Sherrill Lynn Catt Peter F. Davidson Robert B. & Caroline E. Hosford William S. & Peggy Mills C.J. Poirier Wesley H. Sowers Jr. 1969 Terry Arthur & Virginia Thomas Arthur Ernest C. Ballweg Timothy J. & Mary S. Evans Charles L. Frickey & Diane Paris Frickey Ronald S. Reuter Captain A. R. Thomas & Alice Stevinson Thomas R. Dean Wolfe & Cheryl L. Wolfe 1970 Frank S. Bangs Jr. William Bevan III & Gail M. Bevan Rick J. Eichor Philip C. Lacey & Nancy Owens Lacey Michael J. McNally & Elizabeth Shertzer McNally James A. Oppy Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post Kenneth R. & Annette Van Blaricum Gary A. Winfrey & Sally Nixon Winfrey 1971 Jean C. Owen & Marsha Golub Owen Peter L. & Rita E. Peterson Judge Joe Pierron & Diana Carlin Pierron, PhD Losson G. Pike & Leanne Benda Pike John B. Roesler Bill Sampson R. Kent Sullivan & Phyllis L. Sullivan, DO Sen. John L.Vratil & Teresa C.Vratil 1972 F. Richard & Regina Y. Bernasek George A. Burns William P. Coates Jr. & Kathryn Hillyard Coates Le Roy Lewis De Nooyer James R. & Karen Gilliland Jerry L. Harrison & Julie Brown Harrison Robert R. Hiller Jr. & Patty Kostreles Hiller

Alan Joseph & Diane Oliver Joseph Thomas G. Kokoruda & Polly Kokoruda Roland B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller Robert B. Misner Jane Porter Murphy & Barry L. Murphy, MD N. Royce & Linda L. Nelson Robert I. Nicholson Jr. John A. Price David F. & Linda F. Richards Chris & Debra A. Robe Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith William P. Tanner III Kenneth A. & Leann Webb Edward L. Winthrop George W. & Margaret E.Yarnevich 1973 Clifford L. Bertholf Terry D. Bertholf & Linda Beebe Bertholf Granville M. Bush IV & Lynne Scheufele Bush Michael R. Comeau Pamela Hooper Feinstein & Larry B. Feinstein Bruce A. Finzen Barry D. Halpern & Cynthia Zedler Halpern William L. Hess & Jane McGrew Hess David L. Hiebert & Sheridan Dirks Hiebert Bruce R. Jeide Gordon A. Jones Edward M. Kaplan John M. Kilroy Jr. & Margaret A. Kilroy Paul T. Moxley Dale W. & Cindy L. Rufenacht John O. & Joann L. Sanderson Michael V. Schaefer Emily Cameron Shattil Rex N. Shewmake Jr. & Mary Jane Shewmake Judge Allen R. Slater & Kathryn Bohn Slater Kenneth W. Spain & Cynthia Mullen Spain Nancy J. Spies Judge Marcia K. Walsh Perry D. Warren & Janet Beebe Warren Kent H. Weltmer 1974 Stephen J. Bednar David W. Davis & Rhona Thorington Davis Paul M. Dent & Deborah K. Simpson Dent Dennis A. & Sheila G. Dietz Richard E. Dietz & Marsha Merritt Dietz Leo P. Dreyer & Lorry Glawe Dreyer Melvin L. Ehrlich John R. Eichstadt Lawrence C. Gates & Jeanne K. Gates William C. Gibb Stephen C. Harmon & Melissa Berg Harmon Charles R. Hay Larry D. Leonard Stephen R. & Paula M. Morgan Professor John C. Peck & Pamela C. Peck Paul D. Post & Kay Kelly, LSCSW Hal C. Reed Kenneth W. Reeves III Darry G. & Charlotte A. Sands Kelley D. Sears & Jane A. Sears William H. Seiler Jr. Eldon J. & Bonnie Shields Michael L. Sullivan Larry S.Vernon Roger K.Viola & Karen S.Viola Douglas D. Wheat & Laura L. Wheat Elaine Oser Zingg & Otto M. Zingg 1975 Philip H. & Jeanine R. Alexander Martin W. Bauer & Ann M. Bauer

Victor A. Bergman & Susan D. Bergman, MD Stephen W. & Nancy E. Boyda Judge Henry W. Green Jr. William W. & Nancy Jeter David J. Kornelis Donald A. & Diane C. Low Barbara A. Lundin & Lawrence P. Daniels Michael W. Mahaffey Pamela Meador Mattson & Lynn P. Mattson S. Richard Mellinger Michael C. Moffet & Patricia Russell Moffet John R. Morse & Kay Stine Morse Floyd W. Smith Jr. & Cecilia E. Smith Michael A. Sternlieb Naomi L. Stuart Gordon B. & Carol Stull Earl D. & Shirley A. Tjaden 1976 Bion J. Beebe & Vicki Storm Beebe Jill A. Casado Nathaniel Davis Jr. S. Nyles & Mary P. Davis Michael F. Delaney & Kathleen Gibbons Delaney Elaine M. Esparza Kenneth W. Gaines Nancy E. Gibb Grant M. Glenn Cathy Havener Greer Ross A. Hollander Gina Kaiser John A. Koepke Judge Kent Lynch Professor Dennis L. Mandsager & Sherrie Koester Mandsager David P. Mudrick & Mary Walker Mudrick Bernard V. O’Neill Jr. & Marion W. O’Neill Leland E. Rolfs Floy Lambertson Shaeffer Neil R. Shortlidge & Renee Sproul Shortlidge Robert S. & Marcia K. Streepy Beverly Thomas Monica Schmidt Thompson Gerald A. & Patti H. Thorpe 1977 Lydia I. Beebe Robin C. & Deborah M. Blair Alice Boler Bolin Karen L. Borell Judge Michael B. Buser & Holly L. Buser Jane A. Finn, PhD Nathan C. & Kim B. Harbur Deanne Watts Hay Paul B. Henrion II & Rebecca A. Henrion Calvin J. Karlin Daniel J. Lyons & Maryanne Lyons Russell L. & Sandra S. Muse Evan J. Olson & Susan Woodin Olson Kathryn Pruessner Peters & Stephen D. Peters Cecelia Woods Pollara Brenda Petrie Register & Benton W. Register James A. Riedy Judge Janice D. Russell William H. Sanders Jr. Judge Robert J. Schmisseur & Donna J. Schmisseur J. Stanley Sexton & Tommye C. Sexton Professor Jan Bowen Sheldon, PhD & Professor James A. Sherman Robert C. & Linda Ann Sturgeon John A.Vetter Cynthia S. Woelk 1978 Phyllis A. Bock

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donor report Tim Connell Timothy R. Cork & Janice Irwin Cork Ruth C. Curtis R. Steven Davis & Kim Bowen Davis Charles E. Doyle David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Dan L. Fager Lynne A. Friedewald Robert H. Gale Jr. & Linda C. Gale Jeanne Gorman Elizabeth A. Harris Eugene E. Irvin Jennifer Johnson Kinzel William M. Modrcin Jr. George E. Rider & Jeannene Keaton Rider Jeffrey S. Southard Col. Andrew D. Stewart, USA, Retired Martha Braun Wallisch & William J. Wallisch III Anne B. & John O. Wilson John R. Wine Jr. & Ellen Sue Wine Winton A. Winter Jr. & Mary Boyd Winter Stanley N. Woodworth & Nancy G. Woodworth 1979 Dale W. & Linda L. Bell Anne H. & William R. Blessing Steven W. Brown & Martha Gans Brown Martha J. Coffman & Patrick T. Curtiss Robert W. Coykendall Gene H. Gaede & Jannelle Robins-Gaede Marilyn M. Harp & Marc A. Quillen, PhD Edward J. Healy & Helen Healy John C. & Cynthia L. Hickey Alan G. Metzger Paul J. Mohr Larry G. & Dianne J. Rapp Kurt A. Schoeb Malinda Bronfman Schoeb Barry M. Shalinsky Peter E. Strand & Sheila C. Strand Gary A. Waldron & Carol A. Foster, PhD Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD 1980 Frank A. Ackerman David W. Andreas Orval F. Baldwin II Jacob W. Bayer Jr. & Leslie Russo Bayer Carol Y. & Jeffrey P. Berns John P. Bowman & Katie-Pat Bowman William F. Bradley Jr. & Roberta Harding Bruce E. Cavitt Stuart R. & Kelley L. Collier Charles D. Dedmon Kathleen A. Dillon Brian P. Dunn Bernard J. Hickert Ralph R. Inman & Sandra Wood Inman Judge Janice Miller Karlin Jacqueline K. Levings Sheila C. & John N. Maksimowicz Judge Bruce C. Mallonee & LeeAnne Plumb Mallonee Judge Robert S. McQuin & Lorene Gentle McQuin Eric B. Metz Emily B. Metzger Jeffrey S. Nelson & Lisa K. Nelson Judge Robert E. Nugent III & Linda D. Nugent Judge Michael F. Powers & Judith F. Powers Linda L. Sybrant Mark R. Thompson & Barbara E. Thompson Michael R. Wallace & Mary E. Bartlett Judge Wendel W. Wurst & Rhonda Wurst

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1981 Steven R. Anderson & Carole Twork Anderson J. Rod Betts Anne E. Burke Lynn Deal Cockle Walter L. Cofer & Nicola R. Heskett Daniel D. Crabtree John P. DeCoursey Judge Patricia Macke Dick & David A. Dick Darcy Domoney & Jill Weiss Domoney Mark A. & Debra L. Hannah Kent D. & Brenda D. Hatesohl Gregory S. Herzog Jeffrey D. Hewett Stephen M. Kerwick Stuart M. Kowalski Ralph E. Lewis II Scott W. Mach & Patty Cray Mach David R. Maslen Cindy Brunker McClannahan & John B. McClannahan Marilyn G. Miller & Charley L. Looney Daphne Nan Muchnic Patrick E. Peery & Cheryl Messer Peery Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW Nan Mills Sigman & Gregory D. Sigman Christine K. Solso & Robert J. Huber 1982 Daniel N. & Melanie W. Allmayer Judge Karen M. Arnold-Burger & Kurt L. Burger Kenneth L. Cole Roy G. Crooks Tony L. & Shawna L. Gehres Timothy J. & Janette K. Grillot Casey S. Halsey & Paula Bush Halsey Gary H. & Jeanne M. Hanson Kristian E. & Kathy Hedine Mark D. Hinderks & Mary Ann Hinderks Brian T. & Robin K. Howes Teresa Roll Kerwick Mark W. Knackendoffel & E. Ann Knackendoffel, PhD Ted E. & Nancy A. Knopp John C. Landon Judge Steve A. Leben & Ann E. Warner, MD Mary W. Lehoczky & John Lehoczky III Sara McKie Lewis Terry L. & Monica S. Malone P. Anne McDonald & Robert Wilshire Christopher K. McKenzie & Manuela Albuquerque Kevin F. & Frances Mitchelson U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran & Robba Addison Moran Holly Nielsen Justice Lawton R. Nuss William K. Sauck Jr. Michael K. Seck & Sharon K. Mossman David G. Seely & Debra Short Seely Stanford J. Smith Jr. Tracey L. Stout S. Lee Taylor Lawrence L. Tenopir Gabrielle M. Thompson & Oliver L. Weaver, PhD 1983 Layne M. Adams Martin K. Albrecht & Shari Feist Albrecht Heather Zane Anderson Lincoln W. Anderson Richard L. Cram Michael A. Doll Drew D. Frackowiak Myron L. Frans George D. Giddens Jr

Catherine S. Hauber Judge David W. Hauber D. Randall & Joyce E. Heilman Wyatt A. & Mary Ann Hoch Judge Peggy Carr Kittel Rick A. Kittel M.B. Miller Timothy M. O’Brien & Melinda Cadle O’Brien Eugene S. Peck & Laura Fraser Peck Kevin L. Petracek & Barbara Stokes Petracek Cathy A. Reinhardt & Norman A. St. Laurent Keith C. & Jan M. Sevedge James J. & Chirl Ann Sienicki Xavier Simonsen Amy Logan Sliva Gentra Abbey Sorem & James R. Sorem Jr., PhD Melanie L. Trump Timothy T. Trump Madi Thornton Vannaman & Robbie Vannaman H. Steven Walton & Sandra M. Walton Robert J. Werner Rebecca A. Winterscheidt 1984 David E. Bengtson & Mary Maloney Bengtson Barbara D. Bleisch Bert & Lorie M. Braud Gregory L. Franken Larry Greenbaum Karen Erickson Hosack & Paul Douglas Hosack Stephen J. House Teresa J. James Matthew D. Keenan & Lori Hickman Keenan Celeste Holder Kling & Robert Kling, PhD James W. Lusk & Nancy Niles Lusk Eric S. Namee & Tracy Lynn Namee James P. Pottorff Jr. Judith E. Pottorff Steven L. Rist Judge David W. Rogers Chris & Frank Sharp Pamela Pratt Shelton & Michael W. Shelton Douglas L. Stanley & Sheryl A. Stanley Alan R. Stetson Scott C. & Sonja Stockwell Christine Dudgeon Wilson & Lawrence B. Wilson 1985 Justice Carol A. Beier & Richard W. Green Michael S. & Jennifer J. Boohar Gerald W. Brenneman J. Shawn Chalmers & Leslie Chalmers Connie R. DeArmond Mark M. Deatherage Dennis V. Denney Daniel H. Diepenbrock & Paula Diepenbrock Charles A. Etherington & Joni Walk Etherington Patrick D. Gaston & Mary-Ann C. Gaston Peggy Glazzard, EdD, JD Martin J. Keenan & Julie Castelli Keenan Robert J. McCully & Stacey Diane McCully Nancy L. Mitchell & David W. Mitchell, PhD Donald L. Moler Jr. Judith A. Moler Rick G. Morris Lauren E. Roberts Lisa M. Schultes & Dan O’Connell John W. Simpson & Carolyn C. Simpson Randall J. Snapp & Beth Bertelsmeyer Snapp

Mark J. White & Margaret A. Justus 1986 Marjorie A. Blaufuss & Larry J. Libeer Wendy E. Brazil Paula E. Drungole Mark S. & Sandra Goldman Gilbert E. Gregory Robert J. Hack Anne Fleishel Harris John P. Healy & Cathy Rauch Healy Craig A. & Antoinette Joyce Hunt Steven K. Linscheid David H. & Debi Luce Colonel Karen E. Mayberry Robin J. Miles Kristina B. & Jacob I. Murphree Donald L. Norman Jr. Scott W. Sayler & Nancy Zarda Sayler Kathryn Marie Timm 1987 Kim M. Berger Jan Fink Call Barry A. Clark John D. Corse & Andrea Markl Corse, MD Dave Harder James D. & Karen T. Holt Michele A. Kessler & Owen Harbison Robin E. Kluge Dara Trum Miles Bert Nunley Carolyn Boettcher Parmer & David A. Parmer Jay N. Selanders Steven D. Selbe David E. & Kimberly R. Shay Carol Zuschek Smith Wayne E. Smith Shannon L. Spangler & Michael E. Spangler Marie Parker Strahan & Dennis W. Strahan Kimberley H. Tyson Martha S. Warren Stephen R. & Elisabeth T. Zane 1988 Eric N. & Bonnie J. Anderson Katherine J. Bailes, JD, PhD Mark C. Bannister Ralph E. Bellar Jr. Patricia A. Bennett & Michael G. Haefele Kevin M. Connor & Anne L. Connor Clark H. Cummins Patrick X. & Susan E. Fowler Perry L. Franklin Jana Patterson Gagner & David W. Gagner Gregory M. Garvin Jon W. & Linda M. Gilchrist Phillip A. & Marlene K. Glenn S. Andrew Heidrick Charlene Holzmeister Katharine Irvin William A. Kassebaum Michael F. Norton Mr. & Mrs. Lee M. Novak Bradley S. & Mary Frances Russell Elizabeth A. Schartz Kathryn A. & James T. Seeberger Steven P. & Deborah J. Smith Kendra Walker Stark Michelle Worrall Tilton Michael B. & Faina D. White Shari L. & Kevin L. Wright 1989 Laura J. Bond & Fred L. Bond III Sharon L. Dickgrafe Thomas J. Drees Dean D. & Diana L. Garland

Dorothy M. Ingalls & Kevin K. Jurrens Jennifer M. Kassebaum Kevin K. Kelly Phyllis Savage Lynn & Randall S. Lynn James M. Marion Lori Connors McGroder Brian K. McLeod Claudio E. Molteni Susan Roffman Norton Alphonse B. Perkins Douglas R. Richmond Deborah L. Klee Riley & John C. Riley Tina A. Smith 1990 Mark A. & Susan E. Andersen John W. & Donna R. Barbian Kenneth R. Bruner Shelli Crow-Johnson & Lyndon M. Johnson Yvette Leerskov Ehrlich Kent R. & Lisa R. Erickson Richard E. Felton Mark C. Hegarty & Janelle K. Hegarty Maureen M. Mahoney Crystal Whitebread Mai Leah M. Mason & Michael B. Mason II Madeleine M. McDonough Lisa Ford Robertson Margaret McShane Rowe & Tom Rowe Jr. Susan Krehbiel William 1991 Katharina E. Babich Doyle Baker Daniel S. & Kirstin R. Bangerter Bruce A. Berkley & Kelly Staggenborg Berkley Louis A. Cohn & Lora A. Cohn, PhD Robert I. Correales Gavin Fritton Elizabeth Polka Garvin Hellen L. & Frederick D. Haag John E. Hayes III & Suzanne Lafferty Hayes Tedrick A. Housh III Eric A. Kuwana & Karen E. Miller-Kuwana Scott C. Long Brian R. Matula Deborah Cawley Moeller Michael D. Moeller John C. Pauls Connie Haynie Sieracki & Paul S. Sieracki Amy Verschoor Skinner 1992 Brent J. Burtin & Theresa O’Connor Burtin Mary A. Cabrera Lecia L. Chaney Timothy E. Congrove Angela K. Conway Vernon A. Keller Nicholas Kemp & Jennifer Booth Kemp, MD Barbara A. Knops Peter C. Knops Robert B. & Margaret E. Neill Thomas K. & Sharon Pratt Paul A. Rupp Ann & Mark A. Soderberg Kara Trouslot Stubbs Karen L. Torline Paul B. Torline Lanette M. Wickham & Frank J. Rebori Jean W. Wise & Morris F. Wise, MD 1993 Jay B. & Michelle B. Brown Staci L. Cooper James N. Edmonds Mary Lew Edmonds Shannon E. Giles

Jonathan H. Gregor Toni J. Hanretta Evan H. Ice & Jill Redfern Ice Professor Pamela Keller & John W. Keller, MD Eric V. Love & Jennifer Emerson Love William W. Mahood III & Michelle Elwell Mahood Gregory K. Martin Debra M. Hart McLaughlin Brian J. Schulman Jamie Levine Schulman Jere D. Sellers Veronica R. Sellers Joseph D. Serrano Elizabeth McJimsey Souder & Wallace W. Souder Jr. 1994 LoAnn Quinn Burt & Kevin T. Burt Andrew D. Carpenter Professor Elizabeth Seale Cateforis & Professor David Cateforis Allyson M. & R. Todd Christman Christopher S. Cole Kevin M. & Valerie F. Cowan Michael J. Disilvestro Linda Powell Gilmore & Darin Gilmore Judge Kenton T. Gleason & Angela M. Gleason Kimberly A. Jones Wayne B. Klawier & Patricia Theiler Klawier Patricia A. Konopka Melissa Wangemann Maag & Jared S. Maag Laura McKnight Eric T. & Margo L. Mikkelson Scott J. Miller Todd M. Richardson Shon C. Robben & Michelle Travisano Robben Karen Zambri Schutter Stephen M. Schutter John L. & Diane P. Snyder Chris S. Stachowiak Erin E. Syring Kevin D. Weakley 1995 Patricia McCoy Bartley Eric F. Broucek Cynthia R. Bryant Patricia J. & Frank F. Castellano Alicia Talbert Holmes & Damon G. Holmes Terri Goodman Howard Leslie A. Johnson Tricia M. Knoll Coy M. Martin Michelle Ray Matheson David M. Staker & Christina Dunn Staker Jennifer Vath Gregory T. & Kelly D. Wolf 1996 Christine Dougherty Broucek Gregory C. & Debra S. Brownfield J. Craig Cartwright & Angela Power Cartwright Alison D. Dunning Andrew F. Halaby & Ann M. Halaby Lana M. Knedlik Sara Lechtenberg-Kasten Julia Michelle Mahaffey Charles D. Marvine Joyce Rosenberg Marvine Gwendelyn Garcia Milligan Doni L. Mooberry Slough & James A. Slough Damian A. Nelson & Amber Basantz Nelson Rebecca A. Ryan

Drucilla J. Sampson Nancy Racunas Saugstad & Lee Saugstad Julie L. Unruh Rebecca Swanwick Yocham & Keith A. Yocham 1997 William J. & Rachelle D. Bahr Grant D. & Stephanie J. Bannister Clayton L. Barker Terrence J. & Kristin S. Campbell Edwin H. & Aramide Fields Michael R. Gould Peter S. Johnston & Sara Peckham Johnston, MD Brad Korell & Justin McNulty John C. Martin Carolyn L. Matthews William P. Matthews Christine McDaniel Novak & Keith Fredrick Novak Lloyd E. Rigney 1998 John L. Andra Brent N. & Michel Coverdale Brian A. Jackson Marcia L. & Paul M. Knight Barbara L. McCloud Amy E. & Ronald D. Morgan Andrew J. Nolan & Sheryl Griffith Nolan Jeffrey C. Tauscher 1999 John F. Baird II & Julie A. Baird Noreen L. Connolly Dustin J. Denning Bradley R. Finkeldei Jonathan E. Frank & Christine Frank Judith Holden Hidalgo Heather A. Jones Jody Lamb Meyer Trey T. Meyer Jason E. Pepe & Jennifer Pepe Holly Pauling Smith Greg B. Walker 2000 Jennifer S. Brannan Michael G. Donohue Elizabeth G. Forman John J. & Carolyn K. Gates Marci A. Gilligan James T. Grogan Jodi M. Grogan Julie D. Hower David B. & Ellen Jones Heather A. Jones Christopher M. Joseph Jason P. & Skye D. Lacey Stephen J. Lautz Justin M. Lungstrum & Emily Lungstrum Patricia E. McComas Christopher M. & Jennifer K. McHugh Adam R. Moore Chad S. Nelson J. Michael Porter & Ruth Merz Forrest T. Rhodes Jr. & Tiffany L. Rhodes Bhavi A. Shah Jennifer Stackhouse Yanping Wang 2001 Joshua N. Barker Maj. Michele Stackhouse Bayless Chad B. & Jill S. Cook Erika K. Knopp & Ryan C. Knopp, MD Melissa M. Krueger Tamara L. & R. Lance Niles

Jacqueline Egr Pueppke Karen Ruckert Travis L. Salmon Christopher P. Sobba Michael L. Walden Jane L. & Randy K. Williams 2002 Joshua K. Allen Katherine Benson Allen Rich Federico Jonathan M. Freed & Jeni Przytula Freed Amy Boller Fritton Timothy A. Glassco Jay E. Heidrick & Melissa M. Heidrick Molly Westering Hunter & Mark Hunter Crystal Nesheim Johnson, JD Blythe Ridenour Jones Christopher R. Jones Mark R. Logan & Elizabeth Kiene Logan Mon Yin Lung Ann J. Premer Rachel Emig Simek Jon A. Strongman Chasitie Burgess Walden Damon K. Williams Bradley J.Yeretsky 2003 Scott D. Kaiser Christopher C. Randle Christy Jensen Rosensteel & Ryan Rosensteel Elizabeth A. Schanou John B. Wilson Jennifer L.Yaneris Katherine Bollig Zogleman 2004 Sarah Martin Castro Courtney M. Harness Robert J. & Melissa G. Hingula James M. & Heather M. Johnson Jeffrey Li Jeffery B. Morris Owen K. Newman Sylvia B. Penner Darin D. Stowell Paul R. Turvey & Maria Kepka Turvey Brian L. Williams & Arie Jones Williams Margaret Dandurand Wilson Emily M.Yeretsky Jonathan N. Zerger 2005 Megan Winterburg Beckman Elizabeth A. Blake Philip V. DiZerega Anne Murray Emert Mark T. Emert Daniel C. Gibb Matthew S. Gough & Caitlin Pike Gough Katrina G. Hull Robert F. Kethcart & Stephanie A. Kethcart Sarah T. Lepak Clayton D. Lewis Elizabeth A. Meekins Andrew J. Nazar Kelsey Patterson Nazar Kyungjoo Park Connor J. Sears Christopher M. & Alison M. Small 2006 Jesse E. Betts Matthew M. Dwyer Corey A. Johnson & Danielle M. Johnson, PhD Lydia H. Krebs

KU LAW MAGAZINE 43

donor report Timothy A. Liesmann Robert L. & Lisa O’Connor Sean J. O’Hara & Amy Cox O’Hara David E. Rowe Megan Palmer Scheiderer & Jason Scheiderer Kristen V. Toner & Ryan M. Toner Mary A. & Jason M. Walker Kelli A. Wikoff & Andrew Sittenauer Jason M. & Kristie Zager 2007 Christopher S. Abrams Angela S. Armenta P. Dan Calderon Mark A. Cole Jr. & Laura Pummill Cole Crissa Seymour Cook Zachary R. Dyer & Erica Hummel Dyer Oscar P. Espinoza Leena Phadke Fry & Joshua A. Fry M. Katie Gates Calderon Steven W. Grieb Ryan J. Huschka Aaron B. Oleen Jessica J. Radke John P. Smolen Guillermo G. Zorogastua 2008 Daniel A. & Ree A. Belhumeur Tadd C. Blair Bernard J. Craig Justin D. Elkouri Matthew D. Franzenburg Adam J. Gasper Kathryn O’Hara Gasper Zachary A. Lerner Thomas P. Maltese J. Nolan McWilliams Matthew D. Mentzer & Anne Glavinich Mentzer Christel L. Poague David P. Siever Jeffrey J. Williams Britton G. Wilson 2009 Ashlyn N. Buck Christopher P. Colyer Jerald J. Cook Danielle N. Davey Michael E. Dill Lisa Gilbreath Justin A. Hendrix Cullin B. Hughes & Natalie Adams Hughes Beau A. Jackson Neal D. Johnson Rachel J. Kibler-Melby Alicia M. Kirkpatrick Kelcie L. Longaker Daniel G. Morris Andrew R. Shaw Amanda C. Sheridan 2010 Eric W. Foss Captain Joshua B. Goetting & Renee Klinges Goetting Christopher C. Grenz Blake T. Hardwick Alison P. Lungstrum Sean L. McLaughlin Parag M. Mehta Steven A. Rhodes Matthew T. Schoonover 2011 Matthew P. Hurt Joseph M. Jarvis

44 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Milos J. Jekic Courtney Pedersen Sipe Erin T. Slinker Tomasic Tristan C. Tafolla Neal H. & Erin Woodworth 2012 Darren K. Angell James E. L. Carter Amy Chang Joseph F. Leiker Jill E. Moenius Madeline M. Simpson FRIENDS Gail B. Agrawal, JD & Naurang M. Agrawal, MD Altria Group Inc. American Multi-Cinema Inc. Armstrong Teasdale LLP Asian American Bar Association of Kansas City Association of Corporate Counsel, Mid-America Chapter Baird Holm LLP The Bank of America Foundation Barber Emerson LC Barbara Blake Bath, PhD & Thomas D. Bath, PhD Margaret R. Bath Belin Foundation Lynda S. & Brian J. Bentler Mary Ann Bernard Bever Dye Foundation Larry J. & Ann H. Bingham Mary Beth & Michael J. Blake The Boeing Company Jane F. & James R. Bonk Estate of Wesley Brown Judge Wesley E. Brown Bryan Cave LLP Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad & Sarah M. Casad Cerner Corporation Martha V. & Timothy W. Clark Lisa M. & Steven W. Cline CNA Foundation ConocoPhillips Company Barbara L. Cooke Professor Michael J. Davis & Faye S. Davis Stanley D. Davis & Kathleen Perkins Eleanor F. DeArmond Deloitte Foundation James M. Dickinson, MD & Holly A. Dickinson Professor Martin B. Dickinson Jr. & Sallie Francis Dickinson District of Kansas Court Family Professor Christopher R. Drahozal & Kaye M. Drahozal Pamela A. Dunn Kathryn M. Dwyer & David E. Dwyer Ernst & Young Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation Faegre Baker Daniels Foundation Cindy & Thomas Jon Felgate First Heartland Foundation Inc. Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch A. Anne Foster Foulston Siefkin LLP Lee M. & Kitty Fowler Diane M. & Leo B. Frerker Professor David J. Gottlieb & Rita Sloan Gottlieb Kathleen M. Halling Hallmark Corporate Foundation Marian S. Hamilton Nancy Fligg Hampton Estate of Tom & Roberta Harkness Roy T. & Nila V. Harmon

Professor John W. Head & Lucia Orth Head Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City Hinkle Law Firm LLC Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Hovey Williams LLP Michael B. Hurd PA Husch Blackwell LLP Elizabeth Ann Hylton Illinois Tool Works Foundation Elmer C. Jackson III & Audrey L. Jackson Theresa L. Jefferson & Andrew J. Jefferson, MD Arne L. Johnson Family Trust Johnson County Bar Association SC Johnson Kansas Bar Association Kansas Bar Foundation Kansas City Metropolitan Bar Association Kansas City Southern Kansas University Endowment Association Kansas Women Attorneys Association Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch KC Lesbian, Gay & Allied Lawyers Kellogg’s Corporate Citizenship Fund Kinder Morgan Foundation Michael C. Kirk & Julia Turtle Kirk Brenda Roberts Kissam KPMG Foundation KU Alumni Association KU Public Interest Law Society Sharylyn Gelvin Lacey Lathrop & Gage LLP Deana I. & Edwin D. Lenkner Levy & Craig Lewis, Rice & Fingersh LC Judge James K. Logan & Beverly Jennings Logan Sandra K. Malone Martin, Pringle, Oliver, Wallace & Bauer LLP Charles A. Marvin & Betsy Wilson Marvin Dean Stephen W. Mazza Lynn R. & Anne McDougal Kathryn E. McIntyre Metropolitan Court Reporters Inc. Professor Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer Jane M. & Patrick J. Miramontez Terry L. Needham & L. Kent Needham Barbara A. Nordling Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart PC ONEOK Foundation Karen & Tim Page Harlan C. & Vickie Parker Stephanie A. Pasas-Farmer, PhD Sandra J. Patti Payne & Jones Chartered Payne & Jones Foundation Robert B. Porter & Odie Brant Porter Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation Jean Humphrey Proffitt Estate of Roy Proffitt Allison Reeve Christie Frick Reynolds & David O. Reynolds The Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Foundation Betty J. Rickard Robin L. Rosenberg Marcia Ann Russ Professor Elinor P. Schroeder Carol A. Schwinn Bill H. Scofield, EdD Security Benefit Group of Companies Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee PC Madison & Lila Self Graduate Fellowship Andrea & Duncan M. Sensenich Rebecca Sesler & Douglas R. Worgul

Shawnee Mission West Dance Team Booster Club Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Sloan, Eisenbarth, Glassman, McEntire & Jarboe LLC Snell & Wilmer LLP SNR Denton LLP Carol J. Snyder Eleanor Spencer Sprint Foundation Margaret Leisy Steineger Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP Sunflower Foundation: Health Care for Kansans Professor Ellen E. Sward Thompson & Knight Foundation Thomson Reuters UMB Bank NA Union Pacific Corporation United States District Court Bar Registration Wal-Mart Foundation Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Professor Stephen J. Ware & Katherine L. Ware Judge David J. Waxse & Judy C. Pfannenstiel Professor William E. Westerbeke Lucinda White Wichita Bar Association The Williams Companies Inc. Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale & Dorr LLP Estate of Aaron A. Wilson Jr. Professor Melanie D. Wilson Francis & LaVerne Winterburg Fund Carol S. & Ty A. Winters William J. Wochner & Jo E. Wochner Brenda Yoakum-Kriz Freda Zeko

MORE ONLINE For a more detailed report, including a geographical donor list, please visit www.law.ku.edu/donors. This report covers fiscal year 2012 (July 1, 2011 - June 30, 2012). Please bring omissions or errors to the attention of Sandy Patti, patti@ku.edu or 785.864.9204.

Homecoming & Reunion Weekend 2012

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22 Law Journal Symposium

16 Moot Court Finals

11 Deans Club/Medallion Dinner

20 50/50+ Reunion

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26 Return to Green CLE

18 Hooding Ceremony

MARCH 01 Tribal Law & Government Conference 01 Diversity in Law Banquet

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KU Law Magazine | Fall 2012