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Magazine for Alumni & Friends | Fall 2009

storm Shelter from the

KU public interest lawyers protect the vulnerable, defend injustice

Clenching clemency

n

building a mystery

n

Donor report

University Relations

Students study, catch up on the latest news and socialize at the informal commons in Green Hall.

KU Law magazine is published biannually for alumni and friends of the University of Kansas School of Law.

DEAN Gail Agrawal

Green Hall, 1535 W. 15th St. Lawrence, KS 66045-7608 785.864.4550 Fax: 785.864.5054 www.law.ku.edu

Editor & Designer Mindie Paget kulaws@ku.edu 785.864.9205

Contributors Sandy Patti Suzanne Valdez, L’96

Photos Mindie Paget Steve Puppe Spencer Research Library University Relations Wichita Eagle Judy Williams

Contents KU law magazine | Fall 2009

FEATURES

departments 8 ON THE GREEN News briefs: A strange bird in a strange land;

law school named ‘best value’; and more

12 Student News

Awards, graduates and the next generation

17 Faculty kudos Early-career distinction, a new associate

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dean and a Supreme Court victory

17 Faculty Notes

Cover story

shelter from the storm KU public interest lawyers are advocating for cancer patients, people with disabilities and residents of public housing.

Publications, presentations and other notable activities by KU Law faculty

22 Alumni News Distinguished Alumni named; Medallion

donors honored; reunions celebrated

30 Alumni Notes A two-star Army general and the Attorney

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22

pardon power

building a mystery

A law school clinic wins a rare grant of clemency for a man convicted of a civil rights-era crime.

After 28 years as a trial lawyer, a 1977 alumnus seeks a change of venue, swapping the courtroom for the pages of his crime novels.

General’s Honors Program

34 In Memoriam Deaths in the KU Law family 35 Letter from the Dean Message from Dean Gail Agrawal 36 Donor Report Recognition of fiscal year 2009 donors

KU LAW MAGAZINE 1

storm Shelter from the

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KU public interest lawyers protect the vulnerable, defend injustice

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very so often, complete strangers tell Julie Levin how she changed their lives. Levin feels flattered, humbled. Mostly she feels like she has done her job well. For 32 years, Levin has been a legal aid attorney. Her vision of justice and her willingness to fight for it have dramatically altered the face of public housing in Kansas City. But her efforts have resulted in more than safe, clean homes for low-income families. Better dwellings elevate pride. Pride improves self-image. Positive self-image raises expectations. And children grow up believing they can accomplish even their loftiest goals. People – often vulnerable people who cannot help themselves – are the beneficiaries of public interest lawyers like Levin. She is one among many KU Law alumni serving the underserved and advocating for reform in the public interest arena. They work for the common good, often at drastically lower salaries than they could earn in the private sector. They do it because, in their words, it’s “worthwhile,” “rewarding” and “fulfilling.” Here are three of their stories.

By Mindie Paget

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Stimulating the roots Advocate mobilizes volunteers in fight against cancer tories keep Molly Daniels going. Harrowing, courageous, heartbreaking, jubilant stories – and the people who tell them and can’t tell them – fuel her daily work as vice president for field advocacy at the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network. One of her favorite volunteers is a Florida woman who has been on chemotherapy for six years. At some point each year, her insurance runs out and she has to stop treatment until the following year. Another volunteer, a truck driver who lost his job, couldn’t get new insurance for his wife because her cancer created a pre-existing condition. She died – untreated and uninsured. “These volunteers are motivated by their struggles to say, look, I don’t want this happening to anyone else,” said Daniels, L’85. “A lot of them have never done political lobbying before. They get intimidated by it, but it gives them an outlet to fight.” Daniels and the staff at the nonprofit, nonpartisan Cancer Action Network depend on these volunteers to wage battles and win victories that save lives and diminish suffering from cancer. The organization identifies campaigns at the state and federal level, recruits volunteers in every congressional district in the country and teaches them how to talk to legislators and the media. The goal: to put a powerful, persuasive face on a disease that kills more than 1,500 people a day in the United States. “It’s really incredible to meet these people,” Daniels said. “Some we lose; that’s really hard. But some win their battle against cancer. Some are continuing to fight it. As a staff person, it’s extremely motivating. It just makes you push a little harder.” Daniels, who grew up in Wichita, knew when she came to law school that she wanted to do public interest work. She initially focused on elder law, working at Kansas Legal Services and then the Kansas Department on Aging. After about a decade at AARP in Washington, D.C., Daniels joined the Cancer Action Network in 2001. She usually splits her time between D.C. and Denver, but health care reform is keeping her in the nation’s capital this fall.

Molly Daniels, L’85, vice president for field advocacy, American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network

The organization also advocates for smoke-free legislation; increases in state tobacco taxes, with revenue going to smokingcessation programs; designation of cancer research dollars in the federal budget and more. Daniels and her staff spend a great deal of time training volunteers and keeping them engaged. And although she doesn’t perform legal work on a daily basis, she uses tools she picked up at KU Law: thinking quickly; being able to articulate goals, strategies and tactics; translating legislation into simple language. “It’s the kind of job you don’t study for; you just fall into it,” Daniels said. “I just became totally enraptured by political organizing and using constituents to effect social policy change.”’ “These volunteers are motivated by their struggles to Kansas Supreme Court Justice Carol Beier, a fellow 1985 KU Law say, look, I don’t want this happening to anyone else.” graduate, described Daniels as a — Molly Daniels, L’85 “force of nature.” “All of us are lucky that she has “There are so many uninsured people who get cancer. There chosen to apply her considerable skill and limitless enthusiasm are so many underinsured,” Daniels said. “We use their stories. on behalf of those who need her help most,” Beier said. “She A lot of our volunteers have been in the national press because left law school with the same commitment to work in the public that’s the way people are understanding what’s wrong with the interest with which she entered. She has never doubted or current system.” doubled back on that commitment – though she has had many Among the organization’s goals for health care reform are opportunities to do even more well for herself by doing less eliminating the ability to deny coverage because of pre-existing good for others.” conditions and making it illegal to charge people more for Indeed, Daniels has no plans to leave the public interest insurance because they have had cancer. There is also a fight to arena, and she encourages KU Law students to consider the eradicate annual and lifetime limits on benefits. option. “We’ve got a 10-year-old cancer patient who comes and “It’s just really rewarding work,” she said. “It’s nice to lobbies a lot who has already exceeded a million-dollar benefit,” love what you’re doing, to feel good about it, and to be around Daniels said. passionate people.”

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Brick house Public housing champion stands firm to transform shelter, lives he took one look at the homes falling down around her, and Julie Levin knew she had to do something. A few tenants from a Kansas City public housing development told her they wouldn’t let their children outside during the day. They described why, and Levin, a staff attorney at Legal Aid of Western Missouri, went to see for herself. She found vacant, dilapidated buildings with no boards on the windows. She found rats, mice and cockroaches. She found dangerously deteriorated electrical and plumbing systems. She found human waste, drug paraphernalia and evidence of other criminal activity. And like a lawyer with a lawsuit in mind, Levin, L’77, documented it all. The photographs and notes she compiled on that day in 1988 became the launching point for her lawsuit challenging the conditions of public housing in Kansas City. Julie Levin, L’77 As a result of that case, Tinsley v. Kemp (1989), federal district court judge Dean Whipple placed the Housing Authority in receivership and ordered it to devote $125 million to renovating existing public housing and constructing new public housing. Twenty years later, the difference is night and day. Occupancy rates have climbed from 50 percent – the worst in the country – to 97 percent. Crime rates have fallen 42 percent, dropping below the rates for the general Kansas City population. Housing is clean, safe, attractive and affordable. Tenants frequently thank Levin. “If people live in an environment that is healthy and clean and appealing, it changes their self-image and their view of the world and what can happen and the possibilities they have,” Levin said. “When you’re living in a place that’s decrepit and bug-infested and everything’s falling apart and you don’t have much pride in it, you don’t have much pride in yourself.” Levin can’t imagine doing any other kind of work. She came to the University of Kansas in 1974 from Madison, Wis., with a clear path in mind: to study and practice poverty law. She and her husband, Murray, both graduated from the law school in 1977. Julie Levin immediately joined Legal Aid of Western Missouri and has devoted most of her career to public housing issues. In June, the National Legal Aid and Defender Association (NLADA) honored her with the Kutak-Dodds Prize. The award goes to one legal aid attorney nationally each year whose work has promoted the enhancement of human dignity and quality of life for people unable to afford legal representation. It is named, in part, for the late Kenneth Dodds, a fellow 1977 KU Law graduate and friend of the Levins who was known for providing legal services to the disadvantaged. The award comes with a $10,000 prize.

“Levin’s work in Kansas City has been a beacon of hope for those in the public housing system and an example of positive change for those in need across the nation,” said Jo-Ann Wallace, president and CEO of NLADA. In Tinsley, Levin became only the second attorney to force a public housing authority into receivership. The strategy has since been successfully replicated in Washington, D.C., Chester, Pa., New Orleans and several other cities. Levin has also been innovative in her collaboration with the receiver in the Tinsley case and with the administration that currently runs the housing authority. She and a tenant group meet regularly with the authority to provide policy input. “This is very much my day-to-day work,” Levin said. “I easily spend 25 to 30 hours a week on public housing. “It’s very worthwhile work. I had undergraduate degrees in sociology and criminology, and initially I thought I would do something in social work. Then I discovered the law and realized that maybe you can help a few people in social work – or you can change the system and help a lot more.” Levin has also been active in employment law, including arguing a case before the U.S. Supreme Court, Wimberly v. Labor and Industrial Relations Commission of Missouri. The case involved unemployment benefits for mothers who take maternity leave but are terminated before returning to work. Although the court issued an unfavorable verdict, the Missouri Legislature changed the law to correct the problem. “I lost the battle but won the war,” Levin said. That positive perspective keeps Levin charging ahead, advocating for low-income clients who need her help. Another of the lawsuits she filed resulted in an award of more than $1 million in rent rebates for public housing tenants who had been overcharged because of improperly calculated utility allowances. “The stories people told me about the things they could pay off were heart-wrenching. One of my clients said that she finally got to get a washing machine. That would make a big difference in her life,” Levin said. “Another of my clients said she had never been to a restaurant. She was going to take her family to Red Lobster. It had a big impression on me that some of the things we take for granted are things that people have never had.”

Kansas City public housing development Riverview Gardens, before (top) and after (bottom) major renovations imposed by Tinsley v. Kemp

KU LAW MAGAZINE 5

Barry Shalinsky, L’79, director of the self-empowerment team at the Advocacy Center for People with Disabilities in Tampa, Fla.

Vote of confidence Alumnus uses law, advocacy to empower people with disabilities war stories go, the fiasco of Election Day 2008 ranks near the top for Barry Shalinsky. He received word late that morning that 11 nursing home residents who requested absentee ballots never received them. Shalinsky, L’79, works on voter rights issues at the Advocacy Center for Persons with Disabilities in Tampa, Fla. He had to figure out how to help these folks. Florida law allows an individual to pick up absentee ballots for no more than two people. So Shalinsky and his staff would have to find six people to get the absentee ballots, deliver them to the voters and return them to the election supervisor’s office by 7 p.m. But the supervisor’s office claimed it could not issue ballots on Election Day. Knowing that to be false, Shalinsky contacted the Secretary of State’s office to rectify the problem. Meanwhile, the clock was ticking. Time to switch to Plan B: get the voters to the polling place. Another road block arose. The voters were in their 80s and 90s and no longer had valid IDs. An obscure provision in the law allows IDs to be issued by the retirement center. Shalinsky and his staff worked with the nursing home to create 11 IDs in

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45 minutes, found a transportation company with a wheelchairaccessible van and got the voters to the polling place. But when the first woman exhibited signs of confusion, the poll workers didn’t want to give her a ballot because they thought she was incompetent to vote. Only a judge can make that determination, but the poll worker was ready to issue a provisional ballot. The advocate on hand prompted the woman: “You’re here to vote, aren’t you?” “And she said, ‘That’s right. I’m a Democrat, and I’m here to vote for Barack Obama,’” Shalinsky said. “The election worker said, ‘OK, she knows what she’s doing’ and gave her a ballot. We also went to court to get someone’s voting rights restored that the judge had removed who happened to be Republican. It’s not a partisan thing at all. It’s a matter of ensuring people’s right to vote.” Shalinsky realizes there were hundreds of other stifled voters that day that he didn’t know about and couldn’t help. So when he’s not working on individual cases, he works systemically, laying the groundwork in the off-season to help elections run smoothly.

In addition to voter rights issues, Shalinsky also deals with guardianships and economic self-empowerment for people with disabilities. He and his staff worked with legislators to craft a mechanism to reverse unjustified legal guardianships. He has helped people get back on Medicaid when they lose their benefits for receiving a small inheritance, for example, and exceeding the asset limit. Some of his clients have needed those benefits for critical medications or organ transplants. “It’s not at all an exaggeration to say that we’ve saved people’s lives,” Shalinsky said. As far back as he can remember, Shalinsky has been offended by injustice. That sentiment has influenced his career choices, as well as his social and political involvement. During law school at the University of Kansas, he served on Student Senate. As an undergraduate and law student, he advocated alongside fellow members of the East Lawrence Neighborhood Association and KU Young Democrats. After law school, Shalinsky worked in Lawrence as a VISTA volunteer and, later, as a sole practitioner with a reputation for helping the underdog. “I did a lot of things that no one else would do because there just wasn’t money in it,” he said. Shalinsky joined the Tampa office of the Advocacy Center in 2001 after working state jobs at the Kansas Corporation Commission and the Department of Health and Environment, and federal sector jobs at the Social Security Administration and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Tampa has been a perfect fit, professionally and personally. In 2003, Shalinsky married Robin Rosenberg, who was then pro bono counsel for Holland & Knight and now serves as deputy director of Florida’s Children First, a nonprofit legal advocacy organization for at-risk children. “She and I do a lot of collaborative work,” Shalinsky said. “It’s kind of neat to work with your spouse professionally and to have the same kinds of interests.” Shalinsky doesn’t believe there is really a sales pitch for the kind of work he does. “You’ve either got it in your psychology that you’re working for some greater good or you don’t,” he said. You might not amass a fortune, “but you can do OK for yourself and make an incredible difference in the world.”

Stipends help law students experience public interest careers atie Bray feels passionately about animal rights. As an intern at Best Friends Animal Society this summer, the second-year KU Law student put her legal training to work toward that passion. Bray assisted lead counsel for the Animal Legal Defense Fund in drafting an amicus curiae brief in U.S. v. Stevens, a U.S. Supreme Court case involving the sale of dogfighting videos. The Court is considering whether a federal law that criminalizes the sale of depictions of animal cruelty violates the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment. Bray traveled to Washington, D.C., in October to witness oral arguments. She described working on the case as “one of the most noteworthy experiences of my life.” Bray was one of nearly two dozen KU Law students who spent their summers serving community and country in unpaid public interest positions. The law school awarded a record 23 stipends to help cover the students’ living expenses and nurture their propensity toward careers in public interest law. A ranking published last year by National Jurist Magazine put KU Law at 28th in the nation for producing public interest lawyers. And that only reflects the number who took public interest positions straight out of law school. KU Law fosters student exploration of public interest jobs through the Public Interest Law Society; two annual career fairs that feature public sector employers; hands-on educational opportunities in the Legal Aid Clinic, the Project for Innocence & Post-Conviction Remedies and other clinics; and, of course, the public interest stipends. “Volunteering for a public interest organization is a great way to obtain legal experience and make a significant contribution to the community,” said Karen Hester, director of career services at the law school. “With the increase of funding opportunities, working for a nonprofit can seriously be considered by students who may not have been financially able to volunteer in the past.”

In addition to Best Friends Animal Society, this year’s stipend recipients worked for government agencies, legal aid offices, public defenders, prosecutors, judges and human rights organizations at the state, national and international level. Some interned in nearby Topeka, Leavenworth, Ottawa or Kansas City. Others gained crucial experience farther afield – in Illinois, Utah, Pennsylvania and California. Yet another student spent her summer in Geneva. Whether they were conducting legal research, second-chairing trials, counseling victims of abuse or attending WTO Panel hearings, the students all gained invaluable experience and returned to Green Hall feeling inspired – and grateful for the opportunity. Shayla Lewis, a second-year student, interned at Legal Aid of Western Missouri. Part of her work involved visiting inner-Kansas City neighborhoods and drafting beneficiary deeds for people so their properties will have owners after they die. “I would love to do more projects like this to help stabilize Kansas City’s urban core,” said Lewis, a Kansas City, Mo., native. “Working at Legal Aid this summer opened my eyes to the option of a career in public interest.” Second-year student Adil Saleem worked at the American Civil Liberties Union of Kansas and Western Missouri. “It was great to see the projects that I was involved in come to fruition — a story on one project aired on National Public Radio,” he said. “It was a valuable experience, and I am glad to have interned at an organization that does meaningful and fulfilling work.” — By Mindie Paget

KU LAW MAGAZINE 7

green hall news

On the green

U.S. Army Capt. Lawrence Indyk, center, with his wife, Brenda, left, and son, Samuel, present an Afghan-made rug to Dean Gail Agrawal.

Law student, Army veteran gives Afghan-made Jayhawk rug to KU It may look like your average Jayhawk fan gear, but woven into the crimson- and blue-tinged rug at the University of Kansas School of Law is a story of economic development and diplomacy in war-torn Afghanistan. Lawrence Indyk, a third-year KU law student and a captain in the U.S. Army, found himself stationed last year at Bagram Air Field, near Kabul. Each Friday, local merchants held a bazaar, setting up small market stalls just inside the base’s main gate. With U.S. soldiers as their customers, the locals sold electronics, clothing, souvenirs and mementos. Indyk always noticed one particular stall occupied by a woman peddling handmade rugs. He learned that she was a member of the Afghan Women’s Handicraft and Commercial Association, a program supported by the United States in its effort to enhance relations, develop the Afghan economy and elevate the conditions and status of women in Afghan society. He inquired and discovered that

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the woman welcomed commissions. The process was simple. Indyk brought in a picture of the design he wanted her to recreate, selected the size, put down a small deposit and returned a few weeks later to pick up the custom, hand-woven rug. Indyk recently presented his selection – a full-color Jayhawk on a field of black, flanked by the words “Kansas School of Law” – to Dean Gail Agrawal and the law school. The wool rug measures roughly 18 inches square and remains on the same wooden frame on which it was woven. It has been framed and will be displayed prominently in Green Hall.

news briefs By Mindie Paget makes the postgraduate fellowship opportunity available for the May 2009 graduate. “I really believe medical legalpartnerships are the way of the future. Unfortunately, there is a great deal of long-standing animosity between doctors and lawyers,” Arellano said. “Attorneys with health care backgrounds are perfectly suited for working with these partnerships because we know how to navigate both worlds.” The grant seeks to enable the law school to participate in efforts to expand and enhance the medical-legal partnership model in Kansas. The position it creates is the first of its kind in the country. Medical-legal partnerships aim to improve the health and well-being of individuals, children and families by integrating legal assistance into the medical setting. KU Law launched its Family Health Care Legal Services Clinic in January 2008 in partnership with Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care in Kansas City, Kan. Working under faculty and clinic staff supervision, law students provide legal assistance to clients referred to them through the medical clinic, engaging in interviewing, counseling, negotiation and other aspects of the legal process. Arellano earned her bachelor’s in nursing from Texas Christian University, where she was an active member of Army ROTC and Sigma Theta Tau Nursing Honor Society. After graduation, she was an Army Nurse Corps

Alumna becomes first fellow to KU Law’s medical-legal clinic Trinia Arellano was a nurse before she was a lawyer, so she is ideally suited for her first job out of law school. Since September, Arellano has been serving as the first fellow to the law school’s Family Health Care Legal Services Clinic. A three-year grant from the Sunflower Foundation of Topeka

Trinia Arellano, L’09

Officer, gaining clinical and managerial nursing experience, and a legal nurse consultant with Fulbright & Jaworski in its San Antonio office. In law school, Arellano worked as an extern at KU Medical School in the Office of the Assistant Vice Chancellor of Compliance.

KU Law named ‘best value’ in National Jurist ranking The University of Kansas School of Law has been named a Best Value Law School by National Jurist magazine. The school ranked No. 21 out of 65 schools that the magazine says “carry a low price tag and are able to prepare their students incredibly well for today’s competitive job market.” “We are fortunate to have on our faculty great teachers committed to our students’ success and nationally and internationally known legal scholars. All of us share the goal of providing an exceptional legal education that is also an exceptional value,” said Gail Agrawal, dean of the law school. “Over many years, KU Law has prepared excellent lawyers and leaders for Kansas here at home and in our nation’s capitol. We take great pride in the achievements of our students and graduates.” Total tuition and fees for the 20092010 academic year for a first-year Kansas resident are just over $14,400. The magazine derived data for the rankings from the Law School Admissions Council’s “Official Guide to ABAapproved Law Schools” 2009 edition. They looked at tuition, considering only public schools with an in-state tuition of less than $25,000, and private schools with an annual tuition under $30,000. They narrowed the playing field again by including only schools that had an employment rate of at least 85 percent and a school bar passage rate that was higher than their state average. They then ranked the schools, giving greatest weight to tuition, followed closely by employment statistics.

Law grad wins oral advocacy award at Taiwan competition A spring 2009 graduate of the University of Kansas School of Law was deemed the best oral advocate in preliminary rounds at an international moot court competition in May. Beau Jackson earned the honor at the international finals of the European Law Students’ Association Moot Court competition in Taipei. Jackson and his three teammates — Christina Elmore, Ben Sharp and Carrie Bader — qualified for the finals by finishing second in the North American regional round in March. They were the first KU team to make it to the world level of the 7-yearold competition. The day after graduating from law school, the team members departed for Taiwan with high hopes of bringing home a global victory. After a 14-hour flight from Los Angeles, they arrived in Taipei at midnight local time and, thanks to an unlucky draw, had to compete in the first preliminary round at 9 a.m. They squared off against a team from the Universidad de los Andes in Colombia and then Maastricht University in The Netherlands. Each of those teams advanced to the semifinals. Team members also got the opportunity to experience the Taiwanese capital, which is home to nearly 3 million people. “I think we hit everything that our guidebook told us to hit,” Bader said. “We have the most tattered guidebook I’ve ever had after visiting a place.” Highlights included the National Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall and Taipei 101, the world’s tallest completed skyscraper.

Financial markets, globalization scholar visiting on KU faculty A respected voice on financial market reform and globalization joins the University of Kansas School of Law this year as a visiting professor. David A. “Bert” Westbrook, professor of law and Floyd H. & Hilda L. Hurst Faculty Scholar at the University at Buffalo Law School at the State University of New York, taught Contracts this fall and will teach Regulation of the Financial Markets in the spring.

From left: Beau Jackson, Carrie Bader, Christina Elmore and Ben Sharp in Taiwan

His latest book, “Out of Crisis: Rethinking our Financial Markets,” was released last month from Paradigm Publishers. In the book, Westbrook illuminates the intellectual, business and policy errors that led to the current economic downturn. Through legal and political analysis, he shows how the ideologies of the right and left have distorted financial thinking and policy, and then sketches the emergence of a new understanding of risk management and bureaucratic regulation. Westbrook has given talks on globalization, the financial crisis and Westbrook related topics at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, the London School of Economics, HEC Paris, NATO’s Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) in Belgium, the Max Planck Institute in Hamburg, the UN’s World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis, and most leading U.S. universities. He has spoken extensively internationally with sponsorship from the U.S. State Department. Westbrook received his law degree in 1992 from Harvard University, where he was a Ford Fellow, and a bachelor’s in 1988 from Emory University, where he was a Woodruff Scholar.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 9

green hall news

Staff attorney Alice White, left, and Jean Phillips, clinical associate professor of law and director of the Paul E.Wilson Project for Innocence & Post-Conviction Remedies, helped Samuel “Jerry” Hunt file a petition for executive clemency that was recently granted by Gov. Mark Parkinson.

Pardon Power

KU Law clinic wins rare clemency for man convicted of civil rights-era crime By Mindie Paget

F

or 40 years, Samuel “Jerry” Hunt has been burdened by the weight of a 1969 robbery conviction handed down during a racially charged trial. That weight has finally been lifted. With help from KU Law’s Paul E. Wilson Project for Innocence & Post-Conviction Remedies, the former Topeka civil rights activist has been granted executive clemency by Kansas Gov. Mark Parkinson, L’84. The pardon will be announced to the Kansas Legislature in January. “I know I am unable to repay all

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who were involved in this undertaking but convey my personal gratitude to everyone,” Hunt wrote in a thank-you letter to Jean Phillips, clinical associate professor of law and director of the Project. From the beginning of the petition process, Phillips and other staff and students who worked on the case knew that Hunt represented a strong candidate for clemency. His conviction, they argued, turned as much on the racial hysteria of the times as it did on any crime that he may have committed. Race riots, hate crimes and police

brutality against peaceful demonstrators marred the start of the 1960s. President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while campaigning for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was gunned down five years later for his dream of equality. In between, the changes promised in the Civil Rights Act came slowly or not at all – and unrest continued to build. The volatile atmosphere created a tense backdrop for the trial of Hunt and eight other community organizers accused of robbing and coercing two men during an organizational meeting

Playing on fear

Project argued in its petition. “Mr. Hunt only received $230 for his expenses for the October 17 meeting but faced serving time in jail because of the color of his skin.” While released on bond pending appeal, Hunt and several other defendants fled to Africa. Hunt lived in exile in Tanzania until the late 1990s, held a series of jobs, married and had children. He moved his family back to the United States so his children could attend college. Since his return, Hunt has been a loyal and productive employee. Now 68 years old, he wants to live a quiet, normal life in his home country.

The actual charges stemmed from a dispute that occurred during a meeting on Oct. 17, 1968, in Wichita. Andrew Gutierrez, regional director for Joint Action in Community Service, which oversaw the Job Corps program, invited Hunt and fellow activists from Lawrence, Topeka, Kansas City and Wichita to discuss plans for opening Job Corps offices in their respective communities. At the meeting, a disagreement arose Mercy for a fugitive about how the men were to be compenFormer Attorney General Bob Stephan sated for their time and other expenses presided over the trial as a district court related to attending the meeting. judge. He supported Hunt’s petition for Gutierrez later testified during the clemency. trial in Sedgwick County District Court “I have always believed that the that he wrote checks to the men because incendiary times had a role in the decithey threatened him and he feared bodision of the defendants to flee,” Stephan ly harm. Testimony to support coercion, wrote in his letter to the Kansas Parole though, proved inconsisBoard. “I believe that betent and conflicting. In “Justice cannot ing a fugitive in another any case, Jerry Hunt sat country has been punishquietly through the meetment enough. Nothing is to stand if mercy ing. His only fault was be gained by subjecting Mr. being in the same room Hunt to incarceration at this when the alleged intimi- is denied when time. Justice cannot stand dation occurred. Gutiif mercy is denied when errez said he never felt society will not society will not benefit from threatened by Hunt. the strictures of the law.” Nevertheless, all benefit from In 1993, Stephan also nine of the activists were supported clemency for charged with robbery the strictures Leonard Harrison, one of and coercion and tried the other defendants who together in a lengthy trial. of the law.” fled the country. Gov. Joan The prosecution called Finney granted that peti— Bob Stephan, former witnesses to testify that tion, which also originated Kansas attorney general in the Project for Innocence, the defendants’ clothing linked them to a militant under the guidance of KU group known as the Black Guard. The Law Professor David Gottlieb. Other intent, the clemency petition argued, than a late-term pardon by Gov. Kathwas to inflame the jury. The “uniform” in leen Sebelius of a DUI offender, Hunt’s question consisted of fatigue pants and has been the only Kansas clemency dashikis, worn by some of the organizers granted in 16 years. to instill pride and solidarity in inner-city “They’re really, really rare,” Philyouth. Hunt did not wear the clothing. lips said. “They’re politically very Yet the jury found him guilty of dangerous. But if they were ever going third-degree robbery. to grant one, how can you not sympa “The prosecution blatantly played thize with somebody who has never on the fears and prejudices of the jury committed another crime, who has led during a time in American history that a productive life, who was convicted in many people would like to forget,” the the middle of really tense racial times?”

The Wichita Eagle

about the Job Corps program. Instead of trying the defendants on the charges, the prosecution spent most of its time attempting to prove that these nine civil rights activists were black militants.

Samuel “Jerry” Hunt, left, in October of 1968

Anne Rahmeier, L’07, worked on Hunt’s case as a law student enrolled in the Project for Innocence. She conducted interviews with Stephan and people who had been friends with Hunt during his time in Kansas, filling in the gaps of the court transcript, and researched news coverage of the trial. She also helped draft and compile the final petition for clemency, which was filed in 2006 during the Sebelius administration but not granted until Gov. Parkinson took office this year. “In any petition for clemency, the odds of it not being granted are always much higher than any chances of it being granted,” Rahmeier said. “With this in mind, I wanted to conduct the most thorough research possible and provide my best effort to have Jerry’s case accurately portrayed such that clemency would be granted. “I am elated about the news and extremely excited for Jerry.” For his part, Hunt said the success of his petition gave him pause to reflect on the important role that the Project for Innocence plays in seeking justice for all. “I pray that the institution will continue to help others to prepare and guide their petition or documents,” he said, “and receive the same fruitful results.”

KU LAW MAGAZINE 11

green hall news

2008-09 Student Awards & Prizes Order of the Coif Michael Crabb David Britton III Michael Dill Christina Elmore Kelly Foos Lisa Gilbreath Jeremy Graber Justin Hendrix Joshua Hill Cullin Hughes Katie Morgan W. Robert Nelson Bethany Shelton Amanda Sheridan Samuel Wilkerson Lucas Wohlford Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award Julie Larson Justice Lloyd Kagey Leadership Award Lindsey Heinz

Mary Anne Chambers Service Award Lisa Gilbreath

Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm, L.L.C.Tax Procedure Award Michael Dill

James P. Mize Trial Advocacy Award Andrea Morrow

George Gary Duncan Scholastic Improvement Prize Julie Larson

W. Ross Hutton Legal Aid Award Danielle Davey

Payne & Jones Awards Fall 2008: Sean Allen Brian Jansen Milos Jekic Daniel Luppino Evan North Heidi Nowotny Erin Slinker Tomasic Melissa Vancrum

Robert E. Edmonds Prize in Corporation and Securities Law Christopher Colyer Michael Dill Neal Johnson Faculty Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement Christina Elmore Bethany Shelton Family Fund Award Lindsey Heinz

Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership, and Service Award Justin Hendrix

Robert C. Foulston and George Siefkin Prizes for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy First Place Oralist: Bonnie Boryca

C.C. Stewart Award in Law Bethany Shelton

Finalists: Stephanie Lovett, Andrea Morrow and Ryan Schletzbaum

ABA/BNA Award for Excellence in the Study of Labor and Employment Law Ellen Jensby Robert F. Bennett Student Award Beau Jackson William L. Burdick Prize Evan North

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First Place Brief: Shane McCall and Grant Reichert Second Place Brief: Bonnie Boryca and Stephanie Lovett Hershberger, Patterson, Jones & Roth Energy Law Award Shane McCall

Jessup International Law Moot Court In-House Competition Awards Best Oral Argument: Brooke Edenfield Runner-up Best Oral Argument: Jennifer Berry Best Brief Writer: Jennifer Berry Runner-up Best Brief: Drew Cummings Runner-up Best Brief: Brooke Edenfield Kansas Trial Lawyers Association Paul E. Wilson Advocacy Award Richard Klein Larry R. O’Neal/ Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP Law School Award Kelly Foos Law Class of 1949 Award for Leadership Jomana Qaddour Media Law & Policy Award Alexis Zayas Media Law Clinic Award Maria Kaminska Janean Meigs Memorial Award in Law Brutrinia Arellano

Spring 2009: Bree Beasley Nathan Dayani Jake Gontesky Lindsay Grise Evan North Melissa Plunkett Melissa Vancrum Sean Walsh Shapiro Award for Best Paper on Law & Public Policy Helen White Sonnenschein Scholars Award Timothy Olson Ashley Weichman Susman Godfrey Trial Advocacy Award Joanna Labastida UMB Bank Excellence in Trust Planning Award Jeremy Graber

Graduation KU Law

n

May 17, 2009

University Relations

Clockwise from top left: Ameline Gillet and family; Bethany Shelton carrying the law school banner alongside professors Martin Dickinson, center, and Webb Hecker; (L-R) Yih-Cheng Chang, Jin Zhu and Sagun Moye; Earl Lawson; Daniel Runge and his father, Jim Runge.

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green hall news

Meet the class of

a mad scientist devised a way to mash all the members of KU Law’s 1L class into a single super human, it would be a bright, funny, complicated, compassionate, heroic, entertaining, multilingual force to be reckoned with. Its biographical highlights would include debate championships; flute, bagpipe and drum roll acumen; skill in presenting news on the air and on the page; certification as a SCUBA instructor; promotion to Army captain with two Bronze Stars and a Combat Action Badge; attainment of a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry; accomplishment in dance, athletics and martial arts; contribution of thousands of hours

of community service to pregnant teens, domestic violence victims, the hungry and the homeless; the receipt of dozens of academic awards, including designation as a National Merit Scholar; and the ability to speak 11 languages. It could also ride a unicycle and solve a Rubik’s Cube in less than three minutes. Dizzying, right? Well, we’re not hiding this impossible creature in the Wheat Law Library stacks. But the 163 students who began their legal educations in Green Hall this year combine to bring all of these talents and accomplishments to the already diverse law school community. Here is a closer look at the Class of 2012.

Where they’re from

Languages they speak Arabic Chinese French German Italian Kisii Kiswahili Latin Russian Spanish Ukrainian

22 U.S. states

Ecuador

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Italy Egypt

Turkey

Cameroon Kenya

Saudi Arabia Eritrea

South Korea China The Philippines

Top areas of interest 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9)

Business and Commercial Law International Law Criminal Law Public Policy Environmental Law Media Law and Intellectual Property Tax Law Elder Law Tribal Law

Whom do you most admire?

Degree program breakdown JD Two-Year JD for Foreign-Trained Lawyers SJD (Doctor of Juridical Science)

Parents Other family member Other Nelson Mandela Karl Marx Mother Teresa William F. Buckley Franklin D. Roosevelt Anna Julia Cooper Ravi Zacharias Jesus Christ Ho Chi Min

Have you studied abroad?

Do you volunteer?

No Yes

Yes No

Australia, Austria, Belize, Cameroon, China, England, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Mexico, Philippines, Scotland, Spain

Do you own a pet?

Pathway to law school

No Yes Cats Catfish Dogs Horses Parrot Saltwater fish

Fresh from undergrad Out 1-2 years Out 3-5 years More than 5 years More than 10 years

Note

Favorite legal movies “A Few Good Men” “A Time to Kill” “Twelve Angry Men” “The Rainmaker” “Shawshank Redemption”

“Legally Blonde” “To Kill a Mockingbird” “Runaway Jury” “The Client” “The Life of David Gale”

All data except countries of origin, languages spoken and degree program sought was derived from an informal survey of the first-year class. Approximately 60 percent of the class responded to the online poll. This data provides an unscientific snapshot of the backgrounds and interests of 1Ls at KU Law.

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green hall news

Students ‘do the work that lawyers do’ in KU Law’s externship clinic

S

olicitor’s Office, U.S. Department of Labor. Kansas Legal Services. The Pennsylvania Attorney General’s Office. Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation. Kansas Board of Healing Arts. The Arizona Attorney General’s Office. Department of Justice, Executive Office for Immigration Review. Missouri State Public Defender. These offices are just a sampling of the many that offered real-world work experience to KU Law students this past summer through the school’s Externship Clinic. The clinic, which formally began in 2005, provides students with an opportunity to perform legal work under the supervision of a practicing attorney at pre-approved governmental agencies, as well as nonprofit legal services offices and nonprofit public national and international organizations. Students participating in the Externship Clinic are not paid. Rather, they are eligible to earn academic credit for working a specified number of hours per week at their assigned externship placement. There is also an academic component. In addition to the field work, students complete a goals memorandum prior to the start of their placement, maintain a weekly journal of their experiences and write a short reflective paper upon completion of their placement. The Externship Clinic is available to students year-round. During the aca-

Suzanne Valdez

Clinical Associate Professor of Law demic year, students may participate by working in an externship for the equivalent of one eight-hour day per week. Or they may participate in the more intensive summer program, in which they may work up to a 40hour week for as many as 10 weeks. This past summer, approximately 30 students participated in the clinic. Many students worked in or around Kansas City or Topeka, but some traveled to places like Washington, D.C., and other out-of-state locations to gain legal experience. In its short existence, the Externship Clinic already has gained considerable popularity with students. There are many reasons why law students choose to participate. Students like to create their own field placement in an area of law in which they may be interested in working after graduation. Stu-

dents also crave real-world experience after spending hours in the classroom. They want to see the law in action and experience what lawyers do. Probably the biggest reason that students give for participating in the clinic is that they hope the externship will lead to a permanent job after graduation or that their supervising attorney at the field placement will serve as a reference for other job opportunities. Through the Externship Clinic, students have drafted legal documents, memoranda and legislation. They have attended depositions, appeared in court and participated in settlement conferences. They have worked with clients, interviewed witnesses, worked with opposing counsel and helped to develop litigation strategy. All of them have had the opportunity to do the work that lawyers do. At the completion of their respective externships, many students report that they believe they will be better new lawyers because of their participation in the clinic. Indeed, because of the Externship Clinic, these students have gained an invaluable real-world experience, one that has contributed positively and significantly to their legal education. — Suzanne Valdez is director of the Externship Clinic and the Criminal Prosecution Clinic at KU Law.

Find KU Law Magazine, multimedia extras Online You can find a “flippable” electronic version of this magazine, as well as photo galleries, podcasts and videos that complement stories in this issue, online at www.law.ku.edu/kulawmag. Highlights include:

Audio of graduation speeches delivered by Dean Gail Agrawal and Judge Steve Leben, L’82

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n

n

A slideshow of photos from Reunion Weekend and the Deans Club/Medallion Dinner

EXTRAS: Photo galleries from the KU Law

Homecoming Reception, the Black Law Alumni Breakfast, the 1L Mentor Reception and the Barber Emerson Bluebook Relays — and video of Professor Emeritus Francis Heller’s book talk and signing for “Steel Helmet & Mortarboard.”

Faculty Notes Gail Agrawal was a panelist at a conference on “Promoting Diversity in Law School Leadership,” held at Seattle University and co-sponsored by the Society for American Law Teachers. The topic of the panel was “Accepting the Dean’s Job and Key First Steps.” Agrawal has also been appointed by the American Bar Association Section on Legal Education to the committee that plans “new dean’s school,” which is held each May for first-time law deans. Clockwise from top left, Martin Dickinson, Christopher Drahozal, Elizabeth Weeks Leonard, Andrew Torrance, and artist Todd Crespi’s rendering of Stephen McAllister arguing Kansas v. Ventris before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Faculty Kudos Martin Dickinson, the Robert A. Schroeder Distinguished Professor of Law, received the Dean Frederick J. Moreau Award, given annually to the law school faculty member who, in the eyes of law students, has been particularly helpful in advising and counseling students. Dickinson, who served as dean of the law school from 1971 to 1980, teaches Estate Planning and Federal Income Taxation. A highly respected teacher and mentor, Dickinson also received the Moreau Award in 1988, 1995 and 1997. Christopher Drahozal, the John M. Rounds Professor of Law, was appointed this fall as associate dean for research and faculty development. In his new role, Drahozal mentors untenured faculty, encourages and facilitates faculty research, plays an active role in the school’s faculty exchange program and faculty workshop series, and focuses on opportunities to improve visibility of faculty scholarship and enhance the overall intellectual life of the law school. Drahozal’s research focuses on the law and economics of dispute resolution, particularly arbitration. He is serving as an Associate Reporter for the American Law Institute’s Restatement (Third) of the U.S. Law of International Commercial Arbitration and as chair of

the Consumer Arbitration Task Force of the Searle Civil Justice Institute. Elizabeth Weeks Leonard and Andrew Torrance were named Meredith Docking Faculty Scholars, a university-wide award established with a gift from the late Mrs. Meredith Docking to honor faculty members who have distinguished themselves early in their careers. Leonard teaches Health Law and Torts and is director of the Family Health Care Legal Services Clinic. Torrance teaches Biodiversity Law, Food and Drug Law, Intellectual Property Law and Patent Law. Stephen McAllister, L’88 and professor of law, assisted the state of Kansas and Attorney General Steve Six, L’93, in winning a U.S. Supreme Court case last spring. McAllister argued for the state in the case of Kansas v. Ventris in January in his role as Solicitor General of Kansas. In a 7-2 decision issued April 29, the Court held that incriminating statements obtained by a jailhouse informant — obtained in violation of the Sixth Amendment right to counsel — can be used to contradict a criminal defendant’s testimony. McAllister was also selected by the law school as the Robert A. Schroeder Family Teaching Fellow for 2009-2012. The fellowship recognizes teaching excellence.

Raj Bhala continues work on the treatise and teaching textbook “Understanding Islamic Law” (LexisNexis). He finished chapters on Islamic banking and finance, Islamic contract law and Islamic criminal law. He traveled to Brunei, Malaysia and Singapore in July and August to conduct research for the book. Bhala published the following articles: n “Teaching China GATT,” 1 Trade, Law and Development 1 (spring 2009), lead article in the inaugural online and print journal of the National Law University of Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India, www.tradelawdevelopment.com. Bhala was also appointed to the journal’s board of advisers. n “Philosophical, Religious, and Legalistic Perspectives on Equal Human Dignity and U.S. Free Trade Agreements,” 28 Saint Louis University Public Law Review 9 (2008), lead article, symposium by invitation on free trade agreements. n “WTO Case Review 2008,” 26 Arizona Journal of International and Comparative Law 113 (2009). n “Why GATT Matters, Then and Now,” GlobaLaw Quarterly 3-6 (quarter 2, 2009, Thomson Reuters), cover story feature. Bhala also made these presentations: n “The History, Theory, and Practice of Antidumping Law (A Brief Overview, Of Course),” panel on “The Nature and Operation of National Anti-Dumping Laws in a Comparative Approach,” Inter-Pacific Bar Association (IPBA) Annual Meeting, Manila, Philippines, May 2009. n “The Doha Round of World Trade Negotiations and African Interests,” annual “Africa Lecture” of the African Students Union, Kansas State University, March 2009. n “Resurrecting the Doha Round: Devilish Details, Grand Themes, and China Too” (published in the Texas International Law Journal),

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faculty news

symposium on “Trade, Investment, and Regulatory Challenges and Opportunities Associated with China’s Rise as a World Economic and Political Power,” University of Texas School of Law, February 2009. Bhala also presented this paper at the KU Faculty Discussion Club in February. n “Doha Round Schisms: Numerous, Technical, and Deep” (published in the Loyola (Chicago) International Law Journal), Faculty Workshop Series on Comparative Law, Villanova University School of Law, February 2009. Bhala finished first in the 9/11 Patriots Marathon in Olathe, Kan., with a time of 3:38:37. He went on to complete an ultramarathon (31.4 miles). Bhala also ran a half-marathon in April in Lawrence. He finished second in the 45-49 age group with a time of 1:33:39. Robert Casad published the annual supplements for Kansas Code of Civil Procedure Annotated (three volumes) and Jurisdiction and Forum Selection. He also published a memoir, “Coming of Age in Kansas, 1929-1954,” that gives an account of his childhood and the towns he lived in growing up. Joseph Custer has served this year as president of the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries. In February, his chapter submission, “Researching Initiatives and Referendums in Arkansas,” was published in “Exploring Initiative and Referendum Law,” a Haworth Press book. In April, he received the 2009 Open Division LexisNexis/American Association of Law Libraries Paper of the Year Award for “The Truthiness of Thinkable Thoughts Versus the Facts of Empirical Research.” Custer consulted on a pro bono basis with a judge and district attorneys at the Franklin County Courthouse in May concerning an update to their law library. He spoke in July at the American Association of Law Libraries annual meeting in Washington, D.C., on the subject of legal research tools. Since July, Custer has been serving as vice chair for the Law Library Journal and AALL Spectrum Committee. He published “Kansas Legal Research Teachers Manual” (Carolina Academic Press, 2009) in August, with Christopher Steadham as co-author.

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Mike Davis gave a CLE presentation on initiative and referendum issues in early June at the annual convention of the Kansas City Attorneys Association. In July, he began serving on an ad hoc panel of the Greater Kansas City Community Foundation on the delivery of backroom services to other community foundations. In August, he began serving on a special Kansas Judicial Council committee on common interest communities. Martin Dickinson edited the 2009-2010 edition of “Federal Income Tax Code and Regulations: Selected Sections,” published in July by CCH. The book is used at 113 law and business schools across the country. In May, he received the Dean Frederick J. Moreau Award for commitment to student advising. Dickinson was included in both the tax law and the trusts and estates categories in the 2010 edition of The Best Lawyers in America (August). And in March, he testified before the Taxation Committee of the Kansas House of Representatives, supporting changes in the Kansas estate tax. The changes were adopted by the Legislature and signed into law by Gov. Kathleen Sebelius. Christopher Drahozal was named associate dean for research and faculty development at KU Law. He also published the following articles: n “Is There a Flight from Arbitration?” 37 Hofstra Law Review 71 (2008), with Quentin Wittrock. The article was featured in a column in the online Wall Street Journal on June 1. n “Private Ordering and International Commercial Arbitration,” 113 Pennsylvania State Law Review 1031 (2009), for a symposium on “Building the Civilization of Arbitration.” n “Restating the U.S. Law of International Commercial Arbitration,” 113 Pennsylvania State Law Review 1333 (2009), with George Bermann, Jack Coe and Catherine Rogers, for a symposium on “Building the Civilization of Arbitration.” n “Disenchanted? Business Satisfaction with International Arbitration,” 2(5) World Arbitration & Mediation Review 1 (2009). n “Business Courts and the Future of Arbitration,” 10 Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution 491 (2009), for a symposium on “Whither Arbitration?”

n “Buckeye Check Cashing and the Separability Doctrine,” 1 Yearbook on Arbitration and Mediation 55 (2009). n “Franchising, Arbitration, and the Future of the Class Action,” 3 Entrepreneurial Business Law Journal 275 (2009), with Quentin Wittrock, for a symposium on franchising law. Drahozal continued his service as chair of the Consumer Arbitration Task Force of Northwestern University School of Law’s Searle Civil Justice Institute. The task force issued a preliminary report in March on “Consumer Arbitration before the American Arbitration Association,” available at www.searlearbitration.org. Drahozal held a policy briefing on the report on March 11 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., and made a presentation on the study to the Searle Board of Overseers at a meeting at Northwestern Law School on April 29. Drahozal has testified three times before Congress on matters arising out of the Searle study: at a hearing on “Protecting Main Street from Lawsuit Abuse” before the Senate Republican Conference on March 16; at a hearing on “The Federal Arbitration Act: Is the Credit Card Industry Using the Act to Quash Legal Claims?” before the Subcommittee on Commercial and Administrative Law of the House Judiciary Committee on April 28; and at a hearing on “Arbitration or ‘Arbitrary’: The Misuse of Arbitration to Collect Consumer Debts” before the Subcommittee on Domestic Policy of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform on July 22. He also participated in a roundtable workshop on debt collection arbitration and litigation held by the Federal Trade Commission on Aug. 6 in Chicago. In addition to participating in the panel discussion, Drahozal also made a presentation on “Consumer Arbitration and the FAA: A Primer.” Along with the other co-reporters, Drahozal presented preliminary draft No. 2 of the Restatement, Third, of the U.S. Law on International Commercial Arbitration at a May 17 meeting with the members consultative group for the project in Washington, D.C. Drahozal did a presentation on “The Federal Arbitration Act and its Impact on State Arbitration Laws” before 120 state appellate judges and justices at a symposium sponsored

by the National Foundation for Judicial Excellence on July 10 in Chicago. He also spoke on “The Relationship between Law and Economics” at a meeting of the Kansas State University Economics Club on April 21 in Manhattan, Kan. Jelani Jefferson Exum presented scholarly research on issues related to federal sentencing at the Central States Law Schools Association Annual Conference (October 2009); University of Cincinnati College of Law Scholar Exchange Program (October 2009); Law and Society Annual Meeting (May 2009; co-chaired panel); and Southeast/Southwest People of Color Annual Scholarship Conference (March 2009). Exum served as the on-site director of the Istanbul, Turkey, Study Abroad Program during the summer of 2009. While in Istanbul, she presented “Domestic Violence in the United States” at a Bahcesehir University panel on domestic violence (July 2009). She also served as a moderator for the Guantanamo Bay panel on national security and individual liberty at KU Law’s Human Rights Symposium in February. John Head and his wife, Lucia Orth, spent the spring 2009 term (February-June) in northern Italy, where Head taught as a visiting professor at the University of Trento in the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Law at Trento. Head’s teaching fellowship, part of the Fulbright Distinguished Professorships program, was the second one he has been awarded – the first was in 1994 to Beijing. While in Trento, Head taught a course on international economic law and co-taught a course on Chinese law. He also gave lectures at the Roma Tre University in Rome regarding international trade law, and he continued his research and writing for a comparative law textbook titled “Great Legal Traditions.” Head published “General Principles of International Business and Economic Law” (Renmin University Press, 2009) in China – with an accompanying text in Chinese – for use in Chinese law schools. In the fall 2009 term, Head is teaching a course at the Command and General Staff College (CGSC) at Fort Leavenworth, as part of the initial semester of a new KU-CGSC master’s program designed for Army officers.

Head’s course focuses on public international law, with special attention toward the use of force and laws of war. Webb Hecker testified in February before the Kansas House and Senate judiciary committees in support of the Business Entity Transactions Act. In May, he presented “Fiduciary Duties in Business Entities 2009” at KU Law’s annual Recent Developments in the Law CLE program. Laura Hines has been appointed to two American Association of Law Schools committees: the Professional Development Committee (a three-year term) and the planning committee for the Civil Procedure Workshop to be held in 2010. Hines was also invited to contribute an essay to an American Bar Association publication titled, “A Life in the Law: Lessons for Young Lawyers,” edited by Judge William S. Duffy Jr. and Richard Schneider. Hines’ essay is one of 18 by prominent attorneys such as former Attorney General Griffin Bell, former Gov. Roy Barnes and former Solicitor General Paul Clement. Her essay, “The Five Year Itch,” urges young lawyers to remain open to alternate career paths. Mike Kautsch was selected by a committee of his peers to receive the 2008-2009 Immel Award for Teaching Excellence. Pamela Keller assisted in organizing the seventh biennial conference for the Association of Legal Writing Directors, which focused on the “Professionalization of Legal Writing Programs.” The conference was July 16-18 in Kansas City, Mo., and was sponsored by the KU, University of Missouri-Kansas City and Washburn law schools. Stacy Leeds served on the editorial advisory board and was a contributing author for the Encyclopedia of American Indian Policy, Relations, and Law (CQ Press), edited by Finkelman and Garrison. She also made the following presentations: n “Sovereignty and Consequences: Cherokee Legal History and Freedmen Citizenship,” inaugural Fletcher Lecture, Harvard University, May 11, 2009.

n “Recent United States Supreme Court Indian Law Decisions and the Threat to Tribal Economies,” keynote luncheon address to the 2009 Indian Law Clinic Symposium organized by the University of New Mexico Southwest Indian Law Clinic, Washburn University School of Law, University of Denver Sturm College of Law and Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, in cooperation with the University of New Mexico Tribal Law Journal, Albuquerque, N.M., June 9, 2009. n “Proposals for Reduction in Fractionated Ownership,” guest lecture, University of California-Los Angeles School of Law, March 19, 2009. n “Tribal Citizenship Determinations: The Cherokee Freedmen Cases in Tribal and Federal Court,” conference on “Native Americans, Race and the Constitution,” hosted by the American Indian Law Program and the Byron R. White Center for the Study of Constitutional Law at the University of Colorado Law School, Feb. 27, 2009. n “Indian Law 101: How the Law Impacts Native Peoples,” annual conference of the Society of American Indian Government Workers, San Diego, Calif., June 3, 2009. Leeds was appointed to serve on the Diversity Committee of the ABA Section on Legal Education and Admission to the Bar (2009-2010). She was also appointed to the board of directors for the National American Indian Court Judges Association (2009-2010) and the executive board of the AALS Section on Indian Nations and Indigenous Peoples. Leeds is serving on the Chancellor’s Search Committee for the KU provost and is chair of the University Faculty Rights, Privileges and Responsibilities Committee.

Elizabeth Weeks Leonard was named a Meredith Docking Faculty Scholar, a university-wide award to honor faculty who have distinguished themselves in their early careers. She was also elected president of the board of directors of Health Care Access, a safetynet community health care clinic serving the uninsured in Douglas County. Her term runs through 2011. Leonard published “The Public’s Right to Health: When Patient Rights Threaten the Commons,” 86 Washington University Law

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faculty news

Review 1335 (2009); and “Right to Experimental Treatment: FDA New Drug Approval, Constitutional Rights, and the Public’s Health,” 37 Journal of Law Medicine & Ethics 269 (2009) as part of a symposium on “Pharmaceutical Innovation: Law & the Public’s Health.” She also published two invited book reviews: “Public Health Law for a Brave New World,” a review of “Public Health Law: Power, Duty, Restraint,” by Lawrence O. Gostin (University of California Press, 2d ed., 2008), 9 Houston Journal of Health Law & Policy 181 (2009); and a review of “Populations, Public Health, and the Law,” by Wendy E. Parmet (Georgetown University Press, 2009), 30 Journal of Legal Medicine 427 (2009). Leonard made these presentations: n Invited small group discussion facilitator, conference on “Interdisciplinary Collaborative Education: Partnerships Between Law Schools and Health Professions,” Georgia State University College of Law, Atlanta, Ga., September 2009. n “The Individual Mandate,” for a panel on Health Care Challenges for the New Administration, Southeastern Association of Law Schools, annual meeting, Palm Springs, Fla., August 2009. n “State Constitutionalism and the Right to Health Care,” Health Law Professors Conference, Case Western Reserve University School of Law, Cleveland, Ohio, June 2009. n “Teaching ‘Sicko,’” for a panel on Film, Literature, and New Media in Health Law, Law and Society Association, annual meeting, Denver, May 2009. n “State Constitutionalism and the Right to Health Care,” AALS Conference on Clinical Legal Education, Cleveland, Ohio, May 2009; and for a faculty workshop at University of the Pacific-McGeorge School of Law, Sacramento, Calif., April 2009. n Presentation on KU Law’s Family Health Care Legal Service Clinic, at an invited symposium on medical-legal partnerships, Widener University School of Law, Wilmington, Del., April 2009 (with third-year student Trinia Arellano). Richard Levy gave a CLE presentation on constitutional law in June at the Kansas Bar Association’s Annual Survey of the Law. He

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also presented two sessions at the law school’s Recent Developments in the Law CLE in May: “Juvenile Offenders and the Right to a Jury Trial” and “The Impact of Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Alito on the United States Supreme Court.” Levy also participated in a public discussion with Judge Brian Barker, a circuit court judge in London, at the Dole Institute of Politics. In “Constitutionalism Across the Pond: A Constitution Day Dialogue,” Levy and Barker discussed the history of the constitutional traditions in the United States and the United Kingdom, explored constitutional differences and debated the significance of each country’s constitutional features. Levy published a book chapter, “Constitutional Law,” in the Kansas Bar Association’s 2009 Kansas Annual Survey of the Law; and “Introduction: Watch Your Language! The Kansas Law Review Survey of Official English and English-Only Laws and Policies,” appeared at 57 Kansas Law Review 669 (2009). Stephen Mazza participated in the 2009 Critical Tax Conference, an invitation-only event for tax scholars in April at the Maurer School of Law at the University of IndianaBloomington. He presented a work he coauthored with Raquel Alexander and Susan Scholz, both of the KU School of Business. The paper measures empirically the rate of return that U.S.-based multinational corporations received on amounts spent lobbying for a one-time tax benefit for repatriated earnings. According to the research, corporations received, on average, a $220 return for each $1 spent on lobbying. Early results from the study were covered extensively in the media, and stories about the paper appeared in the New York Times, the Boston Herald and the Christian Science Monitor. The paper will be published early next year in the University of Virginia’s Journal of Law and Politics. Stephen McAllister published “Can Congress Create Procedures for the Supreme Court’s Original Jurisdiction Cases?,” 12 The Green Bag 2D 281 (May 2009) and presented “The Supreme Court of the United States” to the Self Graduate Fellows program on Aug. 13 at the Kansas Union, University of Kansas. He presented “Funeral Protest Laws and the First

Amendment” at the annual summer meeting of the National Association of Attorneys General, Colorado Springs, Colo., June 18, 2009. McAllister taught Comparative Freedom of Speech and Religion at the Innsbruck Institute on World Legal Problems, sponsored by St. Mary’s University School of Law, Innsbruck, Austria, July 6-22, 2009. He was co-editor of the KU Athletics Self Study for the NCAA certification process in the spring of 2009. McAllister was also selected by the law school as the Robert A. Schroeder Family Teaching Fellow for 2009-2012. The fellowship recognizes teaching excellence. He also represented the state of Kansas in the U.S. Supreme Court in Kansas v. Ventris, No. 07-1356, in which Kansas prevailed, by a 7-2 vote, on April 29, 2009. Sandra Craig McKenzie gave a presentation on “What Lawyers Can Learn from Artists” at the Friends of the Wheat Law Library annual luncheon on April 8. She attended the Kansas Women Attorneys Association 20th annual conference July 16-18 in Lindsborg, where she donated one of her altered books to the silent auction. McKenzie exhibited artwork in shows at the Lawrence Public Library, Lawrence Art Guild’s 1109 Gallery and the Lawrence Arts Center in June, July, August and September. Keith Meyer made two presentations at the 30th Annual American Agricultural Law Symposium on Sept. 25 in Williamsburg,Va. His topics were “An Update on UCC Developments and Agriculture Interests during 2008 and 2009” and “UCC Developments Dealing with the Sale of Farm Equipment and Farm Products Subject to a Security Interest.” John Peck attended the Annual Institute of the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation as a KU law school trustee, July 21-24 in San Francisco, Calif. He published “Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin in Western China and the State of Kansas in the Western United States,” 18 Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy (Spring 2009), with Burke Griggs and Xue Yunpeng. He also published “Land Description Errors: Recognition, Avoidance, and Consequences,” 78 Journal of the Kansas Bar Association 20

(September 2009) and a chapter on “Water Law” for the KBA Annual Survey of the Law (June 2009). Peck gave a CLE presentation at the annual meeting of the Kansas Bar Association on “Contracts, Land Transactions, Water Law, and Family Law: How these Areas of the Law (The Courses I Teach) Intersect,” June 18 in Overland Park, Kan. He also gave a CLE presentation at KU Law’s Recent Developments in the Law on “Recent Developments in Water Law,” May 28 at KU Law. In mid-March, Peck traveled to San Jose, Costa Rica, where he met with university and government law officials, spoke on comparative law at the University of Costa Rica and visited irrigation farms. Elinor Schroeder facilitated a panel discussion on Feb. 12 as part of the ABA’s Law School Outreach Program. She was a panelist on April 6 in a discussion on the Employee Free Choice Act, sponsored by the Federalist Society, the American Constitution Society and Students for Prosperity. In May, Schroeder made a presentation titled “Employment Law: Alphabet Soup” at KU Law’s annual Recent Developments in the Law CLE. The fourth edition of her two-volume treatise, Employment Law (Thomson/West), was published in August. Schroeder was recognized at the annual AudioReader volunteer appreciation banquet for 10 years of volunteer service to Audio-Reader, KU’s radio reading service for the blind and print disabled. Christopher Steadham published the following books, chapters and articles: n “Kansas Legal Research Teacher’s Manual” (Carolina Academic Press, 2009), with Joseph Custer. n “Ethical Considerations Regarding Lawyer Advertising and Solicitation,” Chapter 10, and “Ethical Concerns Regarding Fees and Billing,” Chapter 7, in Kansas Ethics Handbook (KBA, 2009), with Michael Hoeflich. n “Land Description Errors: Recognition, Avoidance, and Consequences,” 78 (8) Journal of the Kansas Bar Association 20 (2009), with John Peck. Andrew Torrance made a number of presentations in the United States and Europe, includ-

ing Edinburgh, Scotland; Hamburg, Germany; and an invited briefing on intellectual property and biotechnology to the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development at its headquarters in Paris. He also published several articles, including “Open and Proprietary Biological Innovation in Human Genetic Enhancement,” 30 Washington University Journal of Law and Policy 93; “Patent Rights and Civil Wrongs: The ACLU Lawsuit,” Bio-IT World (July 2009); and “Patents and the Regress of Useful Arts.” The latter paper was published in the Columbia Science and Technology Law Review and received significant media attention over the summer. It was mentioned or excerpted in outlets such as Reuters, BusinessWeek, USA Today, Forbes, and BNA’s Patent, Trademark & Copyright Journal. It was also featured in the Austrian Mises Economics Blog and the Daily Kos, an online political community with 2.5 million unique visitors per month. The paper made it into the top 10 list of downloads for all Law and Economics papers submitted to the Social Science Research Network (SSRN) during a period this summer. Torrance co-authored the article with Bill Tomlinson of the University of California, Irvine. Torrance was also named a Meredith Docking Faculty Scholar, a university-wide award to honor faculty who have distinguished themselves in their early careers. Suzanne Valdez published “The Pro Se Litigant Challenge in Kansas State Courts” in the April issue of the Journal of the Kansas Bar Association. In May, she gave a CLE presentation on that topic at KU Law’s Recent Developments in the Law. Valdez was appointed to the steering committee for the Kansas Athletics Inc. Faculty Mentor Program. She also chairs the committee overseeing mentorship of the KU women’s softball team. In May and June, respectively, the Kansas Judicial Council published the forms drafted on the two drafting subcommittees on which she served: protection from abuse and protection from stalking forms, as well as divorce forms. Both sets of forms were approved by the Kansas Supreme Court. In June,Valdez served as a panelist on the self-represented study panel at the Kansas Bar

Association Annual Bar and Judicial Conference in Overland Park, Kan. Stephen Ware testified on arbitration before the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Commercial and Administrative Law, on Sept. 15, and on judicial selection before the Missouri Senate Committee on Governmental Accountability and Fiscal Oversight on March 12. He made presentations at three law schools, discussing judicial selection at the University of Missouri School of Law on Feb. 27; the financial crisis and regulatory responses at Yeshiva University, Cardozo School of Law, on Sept. 30; and judicial selection at Seton Hall University School of Law on Sept. 30. He also spoke on judicial selection to several groups in Kansas and Missouri. Ware published three articles: n0 “The Missouri Plan in National Perspective,” 74 Missouri Law Review 751 (2009). n0 “The Bar’s Extraordinarily Powerful Role in Selecting the Kansas Supreme Court,” 18 Kansas Journal of Law & Public Policy 392 (2009). n0 “The Future of Commercial Arbitration,” 9 Pepperdine Dispute Resolution Law Journal 415 (2009), with Richard Chernick, William F. Rylaarsdam and Thomas J. Stipanowich. Bill Westerbeke taught a study abroad course, Introduction to the American and British Legal Systems, in Cambridge, England, in July. On Aug. 24, he organized a charity golf scramble at Alvamar Country Club for the benefit of the Lawrence Humane Society, raising approximately $13,000 for the shelter. Melanie Wilson published Criminal Procedure, 7th ed. (LexisNexis 2009), co-authored with Joseph G. Cook (Tennessee) and Paul Marcus (William and Mary); and “The Return of Reasonableness: Saving the Fourth Amendment from the Supreme Court,” 59 Case Western Law Review 1 (2008). She also made two presentations: “Police Lies,” at a faculty exchange workshop at the University of Missouri School of Law, Columbia, Mo., April 24, 2009; and “Police Lies and Fear and Loathing in Criminal Law,” 2009 Law & Society Meeting, Denver, May 29, 2009.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 21

alumni news

Building a

mystery

Judy Williams

Trial lawyer writes his way to second career as crime novelist By Mindie Paget

22 KU LAW MAGAZINE

he best trial lawyers are storytellers. But not all of them write crime thrillers on the side. KU Law graduate Joel Goldman, who spent 28 years crafting compelling narratives in the courtroom, has published six novels since 2002. Several have garnered awards, and one has been optioned for film. Goldman’s literary compulsion began with a joke. One of his then law partners complained to him about another partner. Goldman responded by suggesting they write a murder mystery, kill off the jerk in the first chapter and spend the rest of the book figuring out who did it. “It took a few breakfast meetings at which we scribbled some notes before my partner lost interest and I was hooked,” said Goldman, L’77, of Leawood. “Over the years since then, many people have told me that they want to write a book. I tell them the hardest part is starting and that, if they’re meant to be writers, the next hardest part is stopping – because you can’t.” Goldman’s latest book, “The Dead Man” (Pinnacle, April 2009), is the second to feature former FBI special agent Jack Davis. Subjects in a study of the human brain are starting to die exactly as they have dreamed they would die. The billionaire owner of the research foundation conducting the study hires Davis to find out why the nightmares are coming true. His investigation turns up a serial killer inside one of the most advanced research facilities in the world. New York Times best-selling author Robert Crais described the book as “a masterful blend of rock-solid detective work and escalating dread. ‘The Dead Man’ is both a topnotch thriller, and a heart-rending story of loss, courage and second chances.” Those characteristics might also be used to describe Goldman and his protagonist, Jack Davis. A rare movement disorder called tics forced Goldman to leave his law practice in 2006 because the intensity of his work exacerbated his symptoms – shakes, spasms and shutters – and medications did not help. Goldman’s fictional FBI agent develops the same condition and has to adjust to his

new normal, including the loss of his career. “Jack and I share a commitment to not letting our disorder define us and in focusing on the doors that we can open rather than the ones that are closed,” Goldman said. Goldman started his first book in 1992, and it was published in 2002 – “making me a 10-year overnight success,” he quipped. His first four novels were published while he was still practicing. Along the way, Goldman said, he learned to be a better critical self-editor and apply more creativity to his legal writing. But he doesn’t think his legal training was essential to his success as a novelist. “My books are more about the characters – what happens when things go wrong, especially when they think no one is looking – than they are about the plot,” Goldman said. “As a trial lawyer, I had to learn all I could about whatever my cases concerned, whether it was how a business operated or a product was made. That’s Goldman sets all the plot. The clients, the witnesses, the of his books in opposing lawyers, the judge and the his native Kansas jury are the characters, and they aren’t City, where he any different than other people. You was a partner for don’t have to be a lawyer to write 18 years at Husch about them.” Goldman sets Blackwell Sanders. all of his books in his native Kansas City, where he was a partner for 18 years at the law firm now known as Husch Blackwell Sanders. Before that, he was a partner at Shamberg, Johnson, Bergman & Goldman and, earlier, at Schnider, Shamberg and May. He practiced in the areas of torts and business and commercial litigation. “I’ve been away from the practice for almost four years, and I miss it more than when I left,” he said. “I miss the camaraderie and combat, working with clients and being in the courtroom.” Always an avid reader, Goldman’s favorite writers in the mystery and thriller genre include Crais, James Ellroy, Michael Connelly, Sara Paretsky and many others. The next book in the Jack Davis series will be out in September 2010. Don’t expect Goldman’s legal alma mater to make a cameo. “I’d be happy to work the law school into one of my future books,” he said, “as soon as sex and murder make it out of the hornbooks and into the hallways.”

Books by Joel Goldman, L’77

2009 Billionaire Milo Harper wants Jack Davis’ help. People in Harper’s study of the human brain are starting to die exactly as they have dreamed they would die. Harper hires Jack to find out why their nightmares are coming true and protect his foundation.

2008 The lives of three people collide over mass murder at a Kansas City residence that Special Agent Jack Davis has carefully staked out for weeks.

2005 For 15 years, death-row inmate Ryan Kowalczyk denied killing a young couple in their car as their 3-year-old lay sleeping in the back seat. But when his friend Whitney King, who also stood accused, turned against him, his fate was sealed. Attorney Lou Mason uncovers deceipt, corruption and murder while investigating King.

2004 Attorney Lou Mason defends Jordan Hackett on charges she threw nationally syndicated talk-radio shrink Dr. Gina Davenport to her death from an eighth-floor window. To prove Hackett’s innocence, Mason must expose a devastating black-market operation and survive a remorseless psychopath.

2003 Kansas City trial attorney Lou Mason is back … and this time, it’s personal. Hired to defend the accused murderer of Jack Cullan, a local lawyer and political fixer, he finds himself working for a close friend. But as he closes in on a desperate killer, Mason may be setting himself up as the next target.

2002 Richard Sullivan was at the top of his profession, a rainmaker in a powerful Kansas City law firm – until his body washed up on the shores of a Missouri lake. Now questions about his death, and his life, reverberate through a firm that has more to cover up than it ever knew.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 23

Steve Puppe

alumni news

With distinction Three alumni earn law school’s highest honor The Distinguished Alumnus Awards are presented annually to graduates who have distinguished themselves through exemplary service to the legal profession, the community and KU. 24 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Lydia Beebe, L’77 A McPherson native, Lydia Beebe received her journalism degree in 1974 and her law degree in 1977, both from KU. She also received a master’s in business administration in tax from Golden Gate University. Following graduation from law school, Beebe joined the Chevron legal department, where she has held a variety of legal and government affairs positions. Appointed by President George W. Bush, Beebe served on the board of directors of the Presidio Trust from 2003 until 2008. She is president of the Society of Corporate Secretaries and Governance Officers and a member of the KU Law Alumni Board of Governors. Beebe is past president and current advisory board member of the Professional Business Women of California, who presented her with the Breakthrough Award in 1996 for her lasting and vital contributions to business and the community. The San Francisco Business Times has named her one of “the most influential businesswomen in the Bay Area” for nine consecutive years.

Barry Halpern, L’73 Barry Halpern received his bachelor’s with honors from KU in 1971 and his law degree through the school’s two-year accelerated program in 1973. After graduation, Halpern served in the U.S. Air Force Office of the Judge Advocate General. He joined the Phoenix office of Snell & Wilmer in 1978, becoming the second KU alumnus at the firm founded by Frank Snell, a distinguished KU graduate for whom the law school’s courtroom is named. His practice focuses on business and professional litigation, including antitrust, health care and legislative matters. Halpern has established close ties with the law school, bringing a long line of KU law graduates to Snell offices. While maintaining an active trial practice, he also played a key role in spearheading Snell & Wilmer’s growth from a mid-sized Phoenix firm to one of the nation’s best-known regional law firms with eight offices, including the Northern Mexico office opened in 2008 and the early 2009 expansion into downtown Los Angeles. Halpern has balanced his practice with service to the legal community and his legal alma mater, including sitting on the school’s Board of Governors. He has been named in The Best Lawyers in America for more than a decade.

John Jurcyk Jr., L’57 A native of Kansas City, Kan., John Jurcyk graduated from Rockhurst College in 1952 and then served with the U.S. Army in Korea from 1952 to 1954. He received his law degree in 1957 from KU, where he also served as editor-in-chief of the Kansas Law Review. Jurcyk clerked for the late Arthur J. Mellott, chief judge of the U.S. District Court of Kansas, prior to joining McAnany, Van Cleave & Phillips in 1958. He became a partner in 1963 and held many leadership roles through the years, including president, vice president and director. A skilled trial lawyer, Jurcyk tried commercial, employment, negligence, railroad and product liability cases. After 47 years with the firm, he retired in 2005 to serve in the Joe Reardon mayoral administration as senior policy adviser to the mayor/CEO and county administrator for the Unified Government of Wyandotte County, Kansas City, Kan. Jurcyk is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, the American Bar Foundation and the Kansas Bar Foundation, and a member of several local bar associations. He was president of the KU Law Alumni Association of Greater Kansas City and a member of the law school’s Board of Governors. He has received several awards, including the Outstanding Service Award and the Professionalism Award from the Kansas Bar Association.

Who will be next? The school invites nominations for the 2010 Distinguished Alumnus Awards. Since 1964, the school has honored 62 alumni “whose lives have benefited the community and whose noteworthy contributions through the years have brought honor to the School of Law.” Please send a statement explaining how your candidate meets the quoted criteria. Include career and service history and any previous honors. Nominations should be sent by e-mail to: kulawoutreach@ku.edu

or by mail to: Office of the Dean University of Kansas School of Law 1535 W. 15th St. Lawrence, KS 66045-7608 The nomination deadline is Jan. 25, 2010.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 25

alumni news

Top donors recognized for outstanding support of law school

T

he law school honored recipients of the James Woods Green Medallion at a dinner on May 3 at the Adams Alumni Center in Lawrence. The medallion recognizes those whose cumulative contributions to the school exceed $25,000. This year’s honorees are pictured below with their medallions.

Professor Mike Davis & Faye Davis

Michael F. Delaney, L’76 & Kathleen L. Delaney

Barry D. Halpern, L’73 & Cynthia A. Halpern

Larry E. Keenan, L’54

Holly Nielsen, L’82

Joan Ruff, L’73 & Dennis P. Wilbert, L’73

new board of Governors members The Board of Governors serves as the voice of the alumni to the law school. New members below were elected during the Homecoming Reception on Oct. 10. Learn more about the board and its districts at www.law.ku.edu/alumni/board. Vice President/President Elect: Judge Steve Leben, L’82 District 1: Chief Judge Patricia Macke Dick, L’81 District 2: Cathy A. Reinhardt, L’83 District 3: Kevin Yoder, L’02 District 4: Andy Nolan, L’98

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District 5: District 6: District 7: District 8: District 9:

Madeleine McDonough, L’90 Timothy Glassco, L’02 & Dara Trum Miles, L’87 Kelley Sears, L’74 J. Michael Porter, L’00 David Elkouri, L’78 & Andrew Halaby, L’96

Steve Puppe

Members of the KU Law Class of 1959 who attended the 50/50+ Reunion in April were, from left, Clyde Burns, Gerald Cooley, Don Horttor, Jack Reed, John Brand Jr. and Kermit Beal. Dean Gail Agrawal is pictured with the class.

classmates recall traditions, civility of mid-century KU Law during 50/50+ Reunion

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uition was $135, many law students were veterans of military service and the No. 1 song on the Billboard charts was “The Battle of New Orleans” when members of the Class of 1959 received their degrees and left Green Hall. Six 1959 graduates looked back on their time at KU Law during the 50/50+ Reunion on April 18. They shared memories during a video interview with law school staff and, later, during a dinner with alumni representing the classes of 1940, 1944, 1947, 1950, 1951 and 1953-1958. Gerald Cooley, L’59, characterized himself and his classmates as perhaps a bit more serious than students of other times. “Most of us came back from the service, and we were anxious to get it over with and get out and make our first hundred dollars a month, which some months didn’t occur,” he said.

Class members recalled the “very good” faculty that prepared them for the practice of law: J.B. Smith, Bill Scott, Dean Frederick Moreau, Charles Oldfather, Dan Hopson, James Logan and Paul Wilson, also known as “The Big Orange” for his love of orange soda. “A ‘C’ was a wonderful grade from Mr. Scott,” Cooley said. “I think we all remember those who made us work a little harder probably.” Kermit Beal, L’59, remembered the “civility” of the law school. “Everybody was nice to everybody else,” he said. “I think everybody started networking immediately.” Beal’s father came to see him one day at Green Hall and reported that three nice young men approached him and asked if they could help him find something. Beal later said, “I’m not surprised, Dad, that’s just the way it is up there.” “So I came today and got lost,” Beal

said in April. “And I thought, ‘Where is one of those three nice young men?’ Sure enough, a young man came up to me and said, ‘Sir, can I help you find something?’ He gave me good instructions.” A few traditions reportedly ended while the Class of 1959 was in law school. Upperclassmen once carried canes, but that pastime lost steam in the late ’50s. First-year students used to employ ropes to save a large section of seats for upperclassmen at football games, but the university put a stop to that. The steps of Old Green Hall were a favorite gathering place. Law students sang Christmas carols there over the lunch hour during the holiday season. They also jeered at engineering students and admired young women who walked past. “There was a lot of wear and tear on the sidewalk and the street where they would cross over to the other side,” Cooley said.

KU LAW MAGAZINE 27

alumni news

Dottie Ingalls, L’89, Dean Gail Agrawal and Professor Martin Dickinson lead the exit from old Green Hall during the Saturday morning walk to the law school’s former home. Below left: (L-R) Professor Webb Hecker, Barry Shalinsky, L’79, and Gayle Monty (wife of Paul Monty, L’69). Below right: (L-R) Ernie Ballweg and John Conderman, both L’69.

28 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Steve Puppe

Steve Puppe

Reunion Weekend 2009

Steve Puppe

Chuck Frickey, L’69, left, and Dottie Ingalls, L’89, listen to Professor Martin Dickinson talk about the Jimmy Green statue during the Saturday Walk to Old Green Hall.

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amaraderie, nostalgia and hilarity marked KU Law Reunion Weekend. More than 50 alumni from the classes of 1969, 1979, 1984, 1989 and 1999 returned to Lawrence for the festivities. A small group enjoyed a walking tour of the KU campus and lunch high above the KU football field in a Memorial Stadium suite. The centerpiece of the weekend was the class cocktail receptions and all-reunion dinner on Friday evening. Nearly 100 people turned out and took the opportunity to tell stories about their time in Green Hall — the old and the new. Several tales drew laughter, including one about a student who had never missed a day of class. As a practical joke, his classmates chained him to the Jimmy Green statue on the final day of the term. Realizing the hoax, Dean James Logan moved the entire class outside so that the young man’s perfect attendance record remained intact. A Walk to Old Green Hall and a barbecue picnic and carnival on Saturday rounded out the weekend.

Top right: (L-R) Rex Donahey, Liz Kaplan, L’84, and James Borelli, L’89. Above: Professor Martin Dickinson leads a Walk to Old Green Hall, followed closely by Brian McLeod, L’89, center, and Marilyn Harp, L’79, right. Below: (L-R) Scott Kreamer, L’89, Professor Keith Meyer, and Jody and Trey Meyer, both L’99.

Reunion Weekend 2010 will take place Oct. 22-23, 2010, for the classes of 1970, 1980, 1985, 1990 and 2000. Interested in serving on a planning committee for your class? Contact Noelle Uhler at nuhler@ku.edu.

Steve Puppe

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

KU LAW MAGAZINE 29

alumni news

Alumni Notes

Items were received or collected prior to Oct. 16, 2009. Submit your news by e-mail to patti@ku.edu or online at www.law.ku.edu. Click on Alumni and look for Keeping in Touch. KU Law Magazine relies on alumni for the accuracy of information reported.

1950s J. Eugene Balloun, L’54, received the Alliance for Children and Families’ National Family Week Advocacy Award in May. The award is presented to individuals who significantly contribute to state and local advocacy efforts on behalf of vulnerable children and families. In honoring Balloun, the organization recognized his more than 10-year commitment to supporting TLC, as well as his more than 20-year commitment to helping foster families throughout the Kansas City area. Balloun is a partner in the Kansas City, Mo., office of Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP.

1960s Morgan Metcalf, L’65, became the 35th Paul Harris Fellow in the El Dorado Rotary Club at its June 24 meeting. The fellowship honors service to Rotary, profession, community and military. Metcalf served three years in the U.S. Naval Reserves (1965-1968) and as a lieutenant in the Judge Advocate General (JAG) division. He served as Butler County attorney during his legal career and later became a district court judge. Metcalf continues to be active in his community, where he is a member of the Trinity Episcopal Church, president of the Friends of Bradford Memorial Library, and serves on the boards of the El Dorado Community Concert Association and the El Dorado branch of the YMCA. He is also a life member of the KU Alumni Association. Metcalf is the only Rotarian to serve two terms as president of the El Dorado club, with his most recent term being from 2006 to 2007. He has participated in numerous Rotary projects and regularly attends the meetings. Donald A. Johnston, L’66, is a recipient of the University of Kansas Alumni Association 2009 Fred Ellsworth Medallion. He was honored for his service to the university at a private dinner in September in Lawrence. Johnston is executive vice president of Intrust Bank’s Northeast Kansas region. Judge J. C. Irvin, L’67, Shenandoah, Iowa, retired from his full-time duties in the Fourth Judicial District Court in September. Irvin will still preside over the court as a senior judge and will

30 KU LAW MAGAZINE

continue to hear court cases periodically over the next couple of years. He was appointed to the court in 1980 and began hearing cases in 1981. Irvin said he was looking forward to having more free time to pursue his interests in photography and travel.

1970s Lawrence E. (Larry) Meyers, L’73, is the longest serving judge on the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals. He was elected to the court in 1992 and was the first Republican and Court of Appeals justice to be elected to the court, having previously served as an associate justice on the Second Court of Appeals in Fort Worth from 1989 to 1992. During 20 years on the bench, Meyers has authored the second most appellate opinions in Texas, including Elizondo v. State of Texas, which recognized for the first time in non-death penalty cases the concept of “actual innocence.” Meyers will run for re-election in the March Republican primary and, if successful, would stand for re-election in November. He is board certified in criminal law by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization and currently serves as the board’s director and test commissioner in criminal law. He is also a court liaison to the State Bar of Texas’ board of directors. Paul T. Moxley, L’73, has been selected as the Distinguished Lawyer of the Year for 2009 by the Utah State Bar. Moxley has also been appointed to the American Bar Association Standing Committee on the Federal Judiciary. He will serve a three-year term focusing on complex civil litigation and white-collar crime. Moxley practices with the law firm of Parsons Kinghorn Harris in Salt Lake City. Deana S. Peck, L’75, was one of 152 attorneys from the national law firm of Quarles & Brady selected by her peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2010. Peck is in the firm’s Phoenix office and practices in the areas of antitrust law and commercial litigation. Mary Kathleen Babcock, L’76, is with the Episcopal Diocese of Kansas. She was ordained a transitional deacon in the Episcopal Church in June and is to be ordained to the priesthood in 2010.

Ronald M. Johnson, L’76, has joined the Washington, D.C., office of Jones Day as a partner in the firm’s labor and employment practice. Johnson is a nationally prominent labor and employment lawyer representing railroads in litigation and regulatory matters, and is one of the leading Railway Labor Act practitioners in the country. Ross Hollander, L’76, has been selected as one of the country’s most outstanding labor and employment lawyers by Chambers USA 2009. Inclusion in Chambers USA is based on the publication’s independent interviews with both lawyers and clients — with greater emphasis given to client evaluations. Hollander enters the 2009 list “due to his excellent track record and commendable feedback from clients,” according to Chambers USA. Hollander is a partner and shareholder in the Wichita firm of Joseph & Hollander, PA, where his practice focuses primarily on employment law, acting for either plaintiff or defense in discrimination and unlawful discharge cases. Robert M. Fillmore, L’77, has been appointed justice of the Fifth Court of Appeals by Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Fillmore’s term will expire at the next general election. The court presides over Hunt, Kaufman, Dallas, Colin, Rockwall and Grayson counties and handles appeals in all civil, family and criminal cases. Julie Levin, L’77, of Legal Aid of Western Missouri in Kansas City has been named the 2009 Kutak-Dodds Prize winner by the National Legal Aid and Defender Association. The award goes to one legal aid attorney nationally every year whose work has promoted the enhancement of human dignity and quality of life for people unable to afford legal representation. Levin was awarded the prize for her groundbreaking work in transforming public housing in Kansas City, Mo. Jan Sheldon, L’77, professor of applied behavioral science and courtesy professor of law, received a KU College of Liberal Arts and

Sciences’ J. Michael Young Academic Advisor Award. The award honors exemplary advising by a faculty member in each of the three divisions of the College: humanities, natural sciences and social sciences. David L. Wing, L’78, as been elected as a Fellow of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers. Election as a Fellow is the highest recognition by ones colleagues of sustained outstanding performance in the profession, exemplifying integrity, dedication and excellence. Wing is a partner at Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP in Kansas City.

1980s Irma Russell, L’80, a national leader in environmental and energy law and professional responsibility, became the first female dean at the University of Montana School of Law in July. Russell was a visiting professor at KU Law for the spring 2009 semester. Wendell W. Wurst, L’80, of Garden City, has been appointed as a district judge of Kansas’ 25th Judicial District by Gov. Mark Parkinson. Wurst began his career as an attorney at the Calihan Law Firm in Garden City, where he has remained a top attorney for nearly three decades. Wurst practiced in the areas of insurance defense, personal injury, workers’ compensation, criminal law and domestic litigation. He and his wife, Rhonda, have three grown children and are the proud grandparents of a 1-year-old grandson. Anne E. Burke, L’81, of Manson & Karbank, Overland Park, was elected chair of the Kansas Supreme Court Nominating Commission in a statewide election. The commission is charged with the responsibility for evaluating applicants for vacancies on the Kansas Court of Appeals and the Kansas Supreme Court. Burke is the seventh chairperson of the commission and its first female chair. The chair is selected by a statewide vote of all lawyers practicing in Kansas. Mark B. Knowles, L’81, has joined the Dallas law firm of Shackelford, Melton & McKinley LLP, where he is of counsel and will work in the firm’s banking, corporate and public finance, bankruptcy, energy, and real

KU Law alumnus promoted to major general in U.S. Army KU Law alumnus has been selected for promotion to the rank of two-star general in the U.S. Army with an appointment as the Army’s second most senior Judge Advocate in the country. Brig. Gen. Clyde J. “Butch” Tate II assumed the role of Deputy Judge Advocate General on Oct. 1 and will be promoted to major general at an upcoming ceremony. “My promotion is a recognition not so much of past accomplishments but is an indication of future expectations,” Tate said. “In my case, I have had the good fortune to serve with outstanding subordinates and superiors alike, and I am honored and humbled by the vote of confidence that comes with the privilege of continuing to serve the sons and daughters of our nation.” Tate has been on active duty with the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps for 27 years with his wife, Lynn Klotz-Tate, also a KU graduate, by his side. He earned his commission through KU’s Army ROTC program in 1979 and deferred active duty to attend KU Law, graduating in 1982. He currently serves as commander of the U.S. Army Legal Services Agency, which is responsible for representing and defending the Army’s interests in civil matters pending before courts and administrative bodies. He is also chief judge of the Army’s Court of Criminal Appeals, an Article I court with jurisdiction over appeals filed from soldiers convicted at trials by court-martial. In October, he assumed his duties as the Army’s Deputy Judge Advocate General, supporting the Army Judge Advocate General in his mission to deliver worldwide legal support and services to the Army. Tate says the JAG Corps provided him immediate legal experience, “the kind that would take years to accumulate in civilian practice.” “I received broad exposure to a wide variety of jobs and had the per-

sonal satisfaction of knowing that the jobs I’ve had truly made a difference,” he said. Tate has served in a variety of leadership positions, including senior lawyer at the 82nd Airborne Division, the 3rd Armored Corps at Fort Hood and the Multi-National Corps in Iraq; legal adviser to the Army Special Forces Command, the U.S. Special Operations Command and the Army’s Office of Legislative Liaison; and commandant and criminal law professor at the Army’s Legal Center and School, an ABA-accredited law school in Charlottesville, Va. His day-to-day work involves diverse responsibilities. Tate directs the efforts of the Army’s litigation attorneys in their defense of the Army’s interests in federal litigation. He also sits as chief judge of the Army Court of Criminal Appeals. Finally, Tate serves as commander of all those assigned to the U.S. Army Legal Services Agency, which amounts to approximately 500 personnel worldwide. Tate comes from an Army family. His father served 37 years as an infantry officer, including two combat assignments in Vietnam. “I learned early on in life that military service is a privilege,” Tate says. “My family and I serve the greatest force for good in the world: the men, women and families of our Army. In that, there is total goodness.”

KU LAW MAGAZINE 31

alumni news estate groups. In addition to his legal practice, Knowles currently serves on the Legal Opinions Committee for the State Bar of Texas Business Law Section. Bill Colby, L’82, has become general counsel of Truman Medical Center. He was previously a senior fellow at the Center for Practical Bioethics. Colby represented the family of Nancy Cruzan, who lapsed into a persistent vegetative state after a car accident in January 1983. Four years later, her parents sought to have the feeding tubes that kept her alive removed. The case eventually went to the U.S. Supreme Court. After evidence was offered that Cruzan would not have wanted to live “like a vegetable,” the tubes were removed and she died 11 days later. Colby wrote a book about the case and another that addresses end-of-life issues. Colby’s plea before the court ultimately led to the federal constitutional right by patients to refuse unwanted medical treatment. Brig. Gen. Clyde J. “Butch” Tate, L’82, has been selected for promotion to the rank of Major General in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General’s Corps and appointment as Deputy Judge Advocate General. Tate and his wife, Lynn, live in Fort Belvoir, Va. U.S. Sen. Sam Brownback, L’83, received Kansas State University’s College of Agriculture 2009 Distinguished Alumnus Award. Brownback earned a bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics from K-State in 1979. He has been actively engaged in re-opening U.S. beef trade in Asia and increasing markets for Kansas agriculture products. He is also encouraging measures to protect American farmers and food supplies, promoting new energy sources and biotechnologies, and working to revitalize the rural heartland with tax incentives and job creation. Timothy M. O’Brien, L’83, was sworn in as president of the Kansas Bar Association in June at the KBA Board of Governors meeting during the association’s annual meeting in Overland Park. O’Brien is the clerk for the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas. Prior to joining the court in 2008, he was a partner at the law firm of Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP at its offices in Overland Park and Kansas City, Mo. Michele Ticknor Gildner, L’84, and Gary Gildner were married in May. They make their home in Idaho’s Clearwater Mountains.

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Janet Murguia, L’85, received the Kansas and Western Missouri ACLU’s Kurtenbach Racial Justice Award at the Liberty Awards Dinner in October. Murguia is president and CEO of the National Council of La Raza in Washington, D.C. Scott J. Bloch, L’86, is a partner with Tarone & McLaughlin LLP in Washington, D.C., and a principal with SmithBloch PLCC in Kansas City, practicing in complex litigation, class actions, employment and government contracts law. Paula E. Drungole, L’86, was appointed youth court judge, Oktibbeha County, Starkville, Miss., in July. Robert P. Harris, L’87, was one of 152 attorneys from the national law firm of Quarles & Brady selected by his peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America 2010. Harris is in the firm’s Phoenix office and practices in the areas of bankruptcy and creditor-debtor rights law. Mark Bannister, L’88, has become dean of the College of Business at Fort Hays State University. He remains a senior policy fellow at the Docking Institute of Public Affairs and teaches and writes on technology and telecommunications legal issues. For the last 10 years, he has been chair of the department of information networking and telecommunications at Fort Hays State University. Kathy Greenlee, L’88, was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on June 24 to be the new assistant secretary for aging at the Department of Health and Human Services. She will work closely with secretary Kathleen Sebelius, former governor of Kansas, who appointed Greenlee to head the Kansas Department of Aging in 2006. Sebelius said of Greenlee, “I am pleased the Senate has confirmed her today as assistant secretary of aging. She will be an outstanding advocate for older Americans across the country and a valued leader at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.”

1990s Larry Swall, L’90, was recently honored by the Missouri Bar Association as the recipient of two prestigious awards: the 2009 Roger Krumm Family Law Practitioner of the Year Award and the Missouri Bar President’s Award for excellence in the practice of law. Swall was the first and only executive director of the MARCH Mediation Program in Missouri. He was involved in starting and building the Missouri Bar Family Law Conference and was a founding member and past president of the

Missouri Chapter of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts. He is currently chair of the Missouri Bar Family Law Section. John T. Bullock, L’91, Lawrence, has joined Stevens & Brand LLP as a partner. His areas of concentration will be commercial litigation, real estate and construction, regulated industries, constitutional rights, and personal injury. Bullock was previously a partner in the law firm of Coblentz, Patch, Duffy & Bass LLP San Francisco, Calif. Kurt Level, L’92, has returned to Wichita and Koch, where he is associate general counsel for labor and employment, Koch Companies Public Sector LLC. Level moved to Las Vegas in November 2008. He reports that he is happy to be back in Kansas, where it is far more convenient to watch the KU football and basketball games than it was in Las Vegas. Kurt, his wife, Elaine, and their two children live in Andover. R. Patrick Riordan, L’92, is practicing with the newly formed law firm of Riordan, Fincher & Munson PA in Topeka. He is specializing in commercial litigation, business and banking, and contracts. Kyle Elliott, L’93, was appointed chairman of the Kansas Technology Enterprise Corp. at its June board of directors meeting. Elliott is with the law firm of Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP in Kansas City, Mo. Harry H. Herington Jr., L’93, has embarked on a mission to raise awareness of the dangers that law enforcement officers face and the sacrifices made by the families of fallen officers. Herington was a law enforcement officer in Midland, Texas, and Wichita prior to attending law school. He is currently CEO of Olathebased NIC Inc., which manages Web sites and online services for more than 3,000 government agencies in 23 states. A combination of his work-related visits to state capitals, his respect for law enforcement officers and his purchase of a Harley-Davidson motorcycle led Herington to come up with the idea for a nationwide ride: Ride4Cops. He plans to ride his motorcycle to each state capital over the next three years. He began his ride in July in Texas and has since visited five capitals, including Topeka.You can follow the progress of Herington’s nationwide ride at www.ride4cops.com. Brandee L. Caswell, L’98, a partner in the Denver office of Faegre & Benson LLP, has been honored as a prestigious “Forty Under 40” recipient by the Denver Business Journal. The award highlights business leaders under the age of 40 whose professional and commu-

nity contributions are shaping the future of the Denver area. Caswell was recognized for her business leadership, accomplishments and community involvement. Blake H. Reeves, L’98, has been selected as an “Up and Coming Lawyer” for 2009 by Missouri Lawyers Weekly. Reeves is a senior associate at Polsinelli Shughart, where he is in the Kansas City firm’s health care litigation practice. Patrick Johnson, L’99, and wife, Kristan Bina, are pleased to announce the birth of their son, Seth Patrick Johnson, in September 2008. They make their home in Austin, Texas.

2000s Darron C. Farha, L’01,Valparaiso, Ind., joined Valparaiso University’s senior leadership team as vice president and its first university general counsel in the fall of 2009. Farha has extensive experience addressing legal issues in a higher education setting. He was general counsel for Pittsburg State University in Kansas for six years prior to joining Valparaiso. As chief legal counsel, Farha will work closely with the president, board of directors and university administrators on law-related and policymaking issues affecting the institution. He will also have supervisory responsibilities over compliance, risk management and internal auditing functions within Valparaiso University. Jarod Goff, L’01, has been named a member of Baker Sterchi Cowden & Rice LLC, Kansas City, Mo. Goff practices in the areas of aviation, toxic tort, product liability defense, trucking defense, premises liability, civil litigation and complex commercial litigation. Christopher P. Sobba, L’01, has been selected as an “Up and Coming Lawyer” for 2009 by Missouri Lawyers Weekly. Sobba is a partner at Polsinelli Shughart, where he is in the Kansas City firm’s construction litigation practice. Andrew Steinberg, L’01, is the new vice president-revenue for the Kansas City Wizards. Steinberg will oversee all aspects of revenue generation and brand development for the Wizards. The previous seven years, he was with the University of Kansas athletics department, most recently as the associate athletics director for marketing and revenue development. He is a member of the State Bar of Kansas and the U.S. Federal District Court for Kansas. Tim Glassco, L’02, has accepted a position as principal at the Podesta Group, the fastestgrowing public policy firm in Washington, D.C.

alumni chosen for prestigious U.S. Attorney Honors Program othing short of exhilarating. That’s how three recent KU Law alumni described the experience of their first time entering an appearance in a case “on behalf of the United States.” Less than four years out of law school, David Roby, Teresa Schreffler and Wendy Lynn began jobs this fall at the U.S. Department of Justice through the prestigious Attorney General’s Honors Program. The highly competitive program, established during the Eisenhower administration, attracts applicants from the nation’s best law schools for about 150 spots each year and is the only way the department hires entry-level attorneys. “I was given cases and responsibilities from day one,” said Lynn, L’07. “I believe the training and broadbased experience will help me develop as a litigator.” Lynn works in the land acquisition section of the environmental and natural resources division, which acquires land through eminent domain for public purposes such as national parks, construction of federal buildings and national security. She recently traveled to the Pennsylvania crash site of United Airlines Flight 93, the only 9/11 aircraft diverted from its intended target because of the actions of its passengers. “This project is a great example of why I wanted to continue my federal service,” Lynn said. “The work being done by DOJ attorneys will result in a park to honor heroes of 9/11. Being a part of the project is inspiring and fulfilling.” Expectations are high at the DOJ, but seasoned attorneys are always willing to help newcomers meet those expectations, said Roby, L’06, who works for the federal programs branch of the civil division. His office defends the executive branch in civil actions ranging from national security and discrimination cases to constitutional challenges to statutes.

“One of the things about this office that most appealed to me is that the subject matter of the work varies,” Roby said. All three alumni clerked Schreffler for federal judges before entering the Honors Program, which allowed them to experience cases from the court’s point of view. Now they are getting an Roby intense look at the advocate’s viewpoint. “The level of responsibility new honors attorneys are given is astounding,” said Schreffler, L’06, who also works in the federal proLynn grams branch of the civil division. “I don’t draft memos or briefs for more senior attorneys to review and file; I draft things for my own case and file them in my own case. “I’ve been assigned both a mentor and a management mentor, and I can go to them at any point with questions. … But all in all, I carry the ultimate responsibility for handling the cases to which I’ve been assigned.” — Mindie Paget

KU LAW MAGAZINE 33

alumni news Jennifer Knapp Riggs, L’02, and Peter Riggs, L’04, welcomed their second daughter, Riley Elizabeth, in December 2008. Jennifer is practicing with Shook, Hardy & Bacon. Peter left private practice to work for the Commodity Futures Trading Commission in Kansas City, Mo.

Claire joins an older sister, Emma, 5. The Kosters recently relocated from Kansas City, Kan., to Great Bend, where Aidan is executive director of Central Kansas CASA (20th Judicial District), and Chris is a pediatrician with the Great Bend Children’s Clinic.

John E. Rapp, L’03, graduated from the National College for DUI Defense at Harvard in July. Rapp is practicing with Hulnick, Stang & Rapp in Wichita.

Sean O’Hara, L’06, and Amy O’Hara are proud to announce the birth of a baby girl, Ellen Ann, in August in Scottsdale, Ariz. Sean is an associate with the law firm of Snell & Wilmer LLP.

Malissa L. (Hawn) Walden, L’03, and Cassie Pfannenstiel Rodriguez, L’04, opened a new law firm, Walden & Pfannenstiel LLC, in October. The firm is located in Lenexa and is concentrating on bankruptcy, estate planning and domestic issues.

David C. Roby, L’06, joined the U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Programs Branch, in Washington, D.C., as part of the Attorney General’s Honors Program.

Muneer Ahmad, L’04, is an associate with Riling, Burkhead & Nitcher Chtd. in Lawrence.

Xiaomeng Zhang, L’06, recently graduated from the University of Michigan School of Information and is now a reference librarian at the University of Michigan Law Library.

Marcos Barbosa, L’04, has been named a member of Baker Sterchi Cowden & Rice LLC, Kansas City, Mo. Barbosa practices in the areas of product liability, general civil and commercial litigation, as well as toxic tort litigation.

Michael Payne, L’07, and wife, Brooke, are pleased to announce the birth of their first child, daughter Beatrix June, in May. Michael is practicing with Otis, Coan & Peters LLC in Greeley, Colo.

Brooke Robinson Yoder, L’05, completed her work with the John McCain 2008 campaign in June. She served as the lead advance representative for Cindy McCain. Yoder traveled with the campaign, organized and executed political and financial events for the senator and his wife, and served as a liaison to congressional surrogates, state and local party officials, and senior staff. She played a role in major events such as the Presidential Debates, foreign travel and the Republican National Convention.

Liz Rogers, L’07, is practicing with the law firm of Manson & Karbank in Overland Park.

Aidan Loveland Koster, JD/MPA ’06, and her husband, Dr. Chris Koster, welcomed their second child, Claire Edwyna Koster, in April.

Amanda S. Vogelsberg, L’07, has joined the law firm of Henson, Hutton, Mudrick & Gragson LLP in Topeka as an associate attorney. Vogelsberg practices in the areas of general civil litigation, employment discrimination, landlord and tenant law, personal injury, corporate law and criminal law.

Daniel Yoza, L’08, and Natalie Stoker, L’07, were married in August.Yoza is an assistant revisor with the office of the Kansas Revisor of Statutes. Stoker is a clerk for Kansas Supreme Court Justice Dan Biles.Yoza reports that he and Stoker first met at an SBA-sponsored Halloween party. Trinia Arellano, L’09, has been selected to serve as the first fellow to KU Law’s Family Health Care Legal Services Clinic. The post-graduate fellowship program was established with a three-year grant from the Sunflower Foundation of Topeka to enable the law school to participate in efforts to expand and enhance the medical-legal partnership model in Kansas. Brian Hardouin, L’09, Broomfield, Colo., and Kim Duensing are pleased to announce their engagement. They met while attending graduate school at KU and returned to the Broomfield area following their wedding in August. Beau Jackson, L’09, is practicing with the law firm of Adduci, Mastriani & Schaumberg LLP in Washington, D.C. Charles Daniel Miller, L’09, is practicing with The Law Offices of Smith Coonrod LLC in Overland Park.

Luke P. Sinclair, L’08, is practicing with the newly formed law firm of Riordan, Fincher & Munson PA in Topeka. His practice areas include general civil, contracts and commercial law.

Daniel Moskowitz, L’09, accepted a position at Schulman, Treem, Kamikow and Gilden PC in Baltimore, Md.

In Memoriam Thomas E. Allen, L’55, La Quinta, Calif., June 15, 2009

Elmer E. Harvey, L’48, Duluth, Minn., May 28, 2009

The Hon. Harold B. “Hal” Malone, L’58, Wichita, Kan., May 5, 2009

Max C. Opperman, L’89, Topeka, Kan., May 17, 2009

Richard L. Ankerholz, L’54, Lyons, Kan., July 9, 2009

Gerald E. Hertach, L’71, Kansas City, Mo., July 20, 2009

Deanna L. “Dea” Lieber, L’98, Lawrence, Kan., July 17, 2009

John E. Scurlock, L’45, Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 5, 2009

William A. Bonwell Jr., L’52, Wichita, Kan., Sept. 1, 2009

Walter Hiersteiner, Shawnee Mission, Kan., May 2, 2009

Robert H. Miller, L’43, Topeka, Kan., Sept. 9, 2009

Jack C. Stewart, L’52, Wichita, Kan., July 12, 2009

Charles A. Chartier, L’63, Denver, Colo., June 17, 2009

Dick R. Jones, L’62, Wichita, Kan., Oct. 13, 2009

David W. Norburg, L’91, Leawood, Kan., Aug. 6, 2009

Redford J. Wedel, L’55, Springfield, Va., July 28, 2009

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Dear alumni and friends of KU Law, As another year draws to a close, I take this opportunity to thank you for your generosity to KU Law. Despite the economic downturn and news of job losses, salary cuts and uncertainty in the legal profession, a record 160 of you showed your support with a gift at or above the Deans Club level. You were joined by 700 other friends and alumni — spanning 70 years from the classes of 1939 to 2009 — in making a gift to KU Law this fiscal year. You made it possible for us to provide scholarships, to fund public interest stipends, to support faculty members’ research, to enrich our library collection and to host distinguished speakers. You volunteered your time and shared your talent as guest lecturers and panelists, advisory committee members and student mentors. Our students’ legal education has been enriched by your efforts, and we are a better law school because of your generosity to us. On behalf of everyone in Green Hall, I extend our deep gratitude and sincere thanks. Green Hall has been a busy place this fall semester. With the sponsorship of Hovey Williams and Stinson Morrison Hecker, we hosted more than 100 attendees at our third annual conference on biolaw, which was convened by Professor Andrew Torrance and headlined by nationally recognized intellectual property legal expert Roger Milgrim. Our Law Review symposium, “Aggregate Justice: Perspectives Ten Years after Amchem and Ortiz,” organized by Professor Laura Hines, brought legal scholars from Florida State University College of Law, Fordham University School of Law, the University of Oklahoma College of Law and the University of Texas School of Law, as well as the Federal Judicial Center. In the spring, we will host employment law scholars and practicing lawyers for a symposium organized by the Kansas Journal of Law and Public Policy and planned by Professor Elinor Schroeder. Professors Raj Bhala and Keith Meyer are also in the early stages of planning a spring program on trade and agriculture in Kansas. We hope you will join us for upcoming events. This fall also saw the launch of a new Student Success workshop series, developed

through the combined efforts of our offices of Career Services and Student Affairs. We welcomed recent alumna Dani Davey, joined by representatives of KU’s counseling services and the Kansas Lawyers Assistance Program, to talk with first-year students about coping with law school anxiety. KU Law alumnae Cathy Reinhardt and Doni Mooberry presented “Financial Management Bootcamp,” with tips for minimizing and managing law school debt. Alumnus and Snell & Wilmer partner Barry Halpern offered tips on business etiquette for the new lawyer. Our students are competing at the highest levels of legal education and bringing home honors. Expertly coached by clinical professor and KU Law alumna Jean Phillips, third-year law students Bonnie Boryca and Stephanie Lovett-Bowman took second-place honors in the National Criminal Procedure moot court competition, beating Boston College in the semifinal round before being narrowly defeated by Stanford in the final round. In this issue, you will read about three recent graduates selected to participate in the highly competitive Department of Justice honors program. We take great pride in the contributions KU lawyers make to their communities. In this issue you will also read about the life-changing work of KU Law alumni Julie Levin, Molly Daniels and Barry Shalinsky. Many of our current students are preparing to follow in their footsteps. Last summer, 23 students received public interest summer stipends — thanks to your generosity – and provided legal services to underrepresented populations in Ottawa, Topeka, Leavenworth and Kansas City, Kan. They also worked with legal aid in western Missouri, the Illinois Migrant Legal Assistance Project in Carbondale, Ill., and Friends of Farmworkers in Philadelphia. You make our successes possible. In these challenging economic times, your continued support takes on even greater importance as we strive to do more with less and provide a high-quality legal education to today’s law students. Thank you for your commitment and your confidence in us.

letter from the

dean

Gail B. Agrawal Dean and Professor of Law

KU LAW MAGAZINE 35

donor report

With sincere thanks to our donors JAMES WOODS GREEN MEDALLION HONOREES

The James Woods Green Medallion honors donors whose cumulative giving to the University of Kansas School of Law is $25,000 and above. Honorees whose names are italicized are deceased.

INDIVIDUALS Constance M. Achterberg, L’53 Frank A. Ackerman, L’80 J. Eugene Balloun, L’54 Richard A. Barber, L’34 Mrs. Richard A. Barber Lydia I. Beebe, L’77, & Charles E. Doyle, L’78 Blake A. Biles, L’75 Richard L. Bond, L’60, & Suzanne Sedgwick Bond John K. Bremyer, L’46, & Jayne Williamson Bremyer The Hon. Clayton Brenner, L’28 Daisy E. & Paul H. Brown Max & Mary Brown Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad Barkley Clark Gertrude Clark Peggy A. Clark Teresa Blatchley Conkey Mary K. Connell O. J. Connell Jr., L’38 Donald L.Cordes, L’59 Mike & Faye Davis Suzanne M. Decker Michael F. Delaney, L’76, & Kathleen L. Delaney Glen W. Dickinson Professor Martin B. Dickinson, Jr. Carolyn A. Dillon & Richard W. Dillon William R. Docking, L’77, & Judy O. Docking Robert L. Driscoll, L’64 G. Gary Duncan, L’74, & Adrianna D. Gonzales Duncan Ruth Adair Dyer, L’21 Mildred A. Early David S. Elkouri, L’78 Clem Fairchild Dorothy Feir, PhD Bruce A. Finzen, L’73 David H. Fisher, L’38, & Mary Frances Fisher Loren M. Gensman Roland D. Gidney Jr., L’47 Donald W. Giffin, L’53, & Esther Brown Giffin Ernest J. Goppert, L’17 Brian G. Grace, L’67 Jordan L. Haines, L’57, & Shirley Cundiff Haines Barry D. Halpern, L’73, & Cynthia A. Halpern Kenneth M. Hamilton, L���47, & Ruth Hamilton Roberta B. Harkness Minnie I. Harms Edward J. Healy, L’79 Alvin D. Herrington, L’57 Al J. & Sylvia M. Herrod Elma A. Holdeman Alice A. Hook Mrs. A. Bryce Huguenin John E. Hurley Jr., L’62, & Jo Sicking Hurley Elizabeth Ann Hylton The Hon. Theodore B. Ice, L’61, & Sue H. Ice Howard M. Immel, L’38, & Sue Immel Balfour & Margaret Jeffrey Richard Kane Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch Larry E. Keenan, L’54 John M. Kilroy Jr., L’73 Fred C. & Mary Robinson Koch

36 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Thomas G. Kokoruda, L’72 Florence M. Kuske Linda S. Legg, L’75, & Judge Lawrence G. Crahan The Hon. James K. Logan & Beverly Logan Robert W. Loyd, L’62, & Mary Jo Loyd Lyle D. Lutton Jr., L’50, & De Nell T. Lutton Daniel J. Lyons, L’77, & Maryanne Lyons Glenn E. McCann, L’40 Brian K. McLeod, L’89 Eunice H. Melik Col. Edward A. Metcalf III, retired, L’49 George D. Miner, L’22 John R. Morse, L’75 Judge Ronald C. Newman, L’70 Holly Nielsen, L’82 Bernard E. Nordling, L’49, & Barbara A. Nordling Charles H. Oldfather Jr. Hortense Casady Oldfather Bernard V. O’Neill Jr., L’76 The Hon. James W. Paddock, L’56 Marjorie L. Page Robert A. Page, L’53 Mary Louise Parker Diane S. Parrish, L’79 William B. Pendleton, L’57 Mary Ruth Watermulder Petefish Arthur C. Piculell Jr., L’65, & Dee W. Piculell Donald H. Postlethwaite, L’26, & Ruth Lawless Postlethwaite Jean Humphrey Proffitt & Roy F. Proffitt Raymond F. Rice, L’1908, & Ethel Rice John M. Rounds, L’39 The Hon. M. Kay Royse, L’78 Joan R. Ruff, L’73 Bill R. Sampson, L’71 Drucilla J. Sampson, L’96 Elizabeth A. Schartz, L’88 Janet Manning Schroeder Robert A. Schroeder, L’37 Carolyn Henry Shinkle & J. Frank Shinkle, L’41 Mary Maurine Shurtz Leo R. Sissel, L’50 Beatrice Siegel The Hon. Fred N. Six, L’56, & Lilian Six Christopher “Kit” Smith, L’72 Glee S. Smith Jr., L’47, & Geraldine B. Smith Frank L. Snell, L’24 Mary Ellen Stadler Roger D. Stanton, L’63, & Judith Duncan Stanton Kate Stephens The Hon. Donnan Stephenson, L’48, & Patricia Ledyard Stephenson Mikel L. Stout, L’61, & LeAnn R. Stout Edna J. Sullivan & James E. Sullivan, L’29 Willard B. Thompson, L’58 Erma B. & Frank E.Tyler Omer G.Voss, L’39, & Annabele K.Voss Katherine Hall Wagstaff & Robert W.Wagstaff Gary A. Waldron, L’79, & Carol A. Foster Charles R. Wall Professor William E. Westerbeke Douglas D. Wheat, L’74, & Laura L. Wheat Houston L.Whiteside Willard G.Widder, L’49 Karl T. Wiedemann Dennis P. Wilbert, L’73 Paul L.Wilbert, L’38 Susan Scott Wilner R. Dean Wolfe, L’69 Stanley N. Woodworth, L’78 Robert S. Wunsch, L’58, & Barbara Bateman Wunsch Paul Yde, L’85, & Sarah Elder

D. Spencer Yohe, L’54

FIRMS AND FOUNDATIONS Foulston & Siefkin LLP Hampton & Royce LC Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Hite Fanning & Honeyman LLP Morris, Laing, Evans, Brock & Kennedy, Chtd. Polsinelli Shalton Flanigan Suelthaus PC The Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Foundation Ross Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Shughart Thomson & Kilroy PC Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP

DEANS CLUB AMBASSADORS ($10,000 and above) David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Foulston Siefkin LLP Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City Edward J. Healy & Helen Healy Estate of Mrs. A. Bryce Huguenin Macy’s Foundation Polsinelli Shughart PC Jean Humphrey Proffitt & Roy F. Proffitt The Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith Sunflower Foundation: Health Care for Kansans United States District Court Bar Registration Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Douglas D. Wheat & Laura L. Wheat R. Dean Wolfe & Cheryl L. Wolfe D. Spencer Yohe & Betty Foster Yohe

DEANS CLUB BENEFACTORS ($5,000 to $9,999) Dean Gail B. Agrawal & Naurang M. Agrawal, M.D. Lydia I. Beebe Bever Dye Foundation Chevron Humankind Matching Gift Program Mary Kathleen Connell Charles E. Doyle Charles L. Frickey & Diane Paris Frickey Jason B. Harper Sr. Elizabeth Ann Hylton Judge James K. Logan & Beverly Jennings Logan Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd Daniel J. Lyons & Maryanne Lyons Dara Trum Miles Robin J. Miles Holly Nielsen Cathy A. Reinhardt & Norman A. St. Laurent Elizabeth A. Schartz David G. Seely & Debra Short Seely Sonnenschein Scholars Foundation Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP Gary A. Waldron & Carol A. Foster, PhD K. T. Wiedemann Foundation Inc.

DEANS CLUB PATRONS ($3,000 to $4,999) J. Eugene Balloun Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad & Sarah McKeighan Casad Hite Fanning & Honeyman LLP John E. Hurley Jr. & Jo Sicking Hurley Calvin J. Karlin

Judge Janice Miller Karlin Larry E. Keenan & Patricia L. Degner-Keenan Brian K. McLeod John R. Morse & Kay Stine Morse Bill Sampson Drucilla J. Sampson Snell & Wilmer LLP Omer G.Voss & Annabelle K.Voss

DEANS CLUB ($1,000 to $2,999) Constance M. Achterberg Donald D. Adams & Ann Wees Adams Ernest Adelman & Barbara Boley Adelman Altria Group Inc. Lynn L. Anderson & La Faun McMurry Anderson Anonymous Larry D. Armel & JoAnne Armel Orval F. Baldwin II Barber Emerson LC Barristerbooks Inc. John H. Beisner Belin Foundation J. Rod Betts Ron Bodinson William F. Bradley Jr. John W. Brand Jr. & Barbara Sample Brand Anne E. Burke Andrew D. Carpenter Bruce E. Cavitt Walter L. Cofer & Nicola R. Heskett Timothy E. Congrove Tim Connell Daniel D. Crabtree Peter K. Curran & Virginia Schubert Curran Molly A. Daniels David L. Davenport & Sally Nelson Davenport Heywood H. Davis & Louise Swigart Davis James R. Davis II Kimberly Perkins Davis Professor Michael J. Davis & Faye S. Davis R. Steven Davis & Kim Bowen Davis Stanley D. Davis & Kathleen Perkins Mark M. Deatherage Kirt D. DeHaan & Cheryl R. DeHaan Michael F. Delaney & Kathleen Gibbons Delaney Professor Martin B. Dickinson Jr. & Sallie Francis Dickinson Donald N. Dirks Robert E. Donatelli & Katherine Donatelli Professor Christopher R. Drahozal & Kaye M. Drahozal Leo P. Dreyer & Lorry Glawe Dreyer Robert L. Driscoll & Marilyn Rockwell Driscoll Judge Jerry G. Elliott & Debra S. Duncan Ernst & Young Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation Jill S. Ferrel David M. Fey Laura Clark Fey Jane A. Finn, PhD Bruce A. Finzen Jack D. Flesher Myron L. Frans Friends of Jana Mackey Robert H. Gale Jr. Michael L. Galiga & Dana McGlamery Galiga Lawrence C. Gates & Jeanne K. Gates Donald W. Giffin & Esther Brown Giffin Hugh W. Gill IV & Ingrid Olson Gill Timothy A. Glassco

Jeanne Gorman Professor David J. Gottlieb & Rita Sloan Gottlieb Cathy Havener Greer Jonathan H. Gregor Barry D. Halpern & Cynthia Zedler Halpern Nancy Fligg Hampton John E. Hayes III & Suzanne Lafferty Hayes Mark C. Hegarty & Janelle K. Hegarty Jay E. Heidrick & Melissa M. Heidrick Patrick J. Henderson Alvin D. Herrington Mark D. Hinderks & Mary Ann Hinderks Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Charles H. Hostetler & Julie A. Hostetler Mark E. Humphrey & Karen Sanders Humphrey Judge Theodore B. Ice & Sue Harper Ice Illinois Tool Works Foundation Dorothy M. Ingalls & Kevin K. Jurrens Brian A. Jackson Scott D. Kaiser Kansas Women Attorneys Association Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch Matthew D. Keenan & Lori Hickman Keenan Robert F. Kethcart Ronald R. Kimzey & Emily Cooper Kimzey Barbara A. Knops Peter C. Knops Brad Korell & Justin McNulty Thomas H. & Jean Krueger KU Public Interest Law Society Eric A. Kuwana & Karen E. Miller-Kuwana Linda L. Lee Legal Association for Privacy Protection Inc. Christina L. Lewerenz John R. Light & Sharon Koch Light Ronald F. Loewen Mon Yin Lung & Dr. Wai-Yim Ching Maureen M. Mahoney Crystal Whitebread Mai Robert J. McCully & Stacey Diane McCully Madeleine M. McDonough Professor Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer Nicholas P. Mizell & Lisa V. Mizell William M. Modrcin Jr. Deborah Cawley Moeller Michael D. Moeller Adam R. Moore Eric S. Namee & Tracy Lynn Namee Jeffrey S. Nelson & Lisa K. Nelson John C. Nettels Jr. & Sheila M. Nettels Northern Trust Matching Gift Program Norton Hubbard Ruzicka & Kreamer LC Christine McDaniel Novak & Keith Fredrick Novak Evan J. Olson & Susan Woodin Olson Gary L. Olson & Vicki A. Olson Bernard V. O’Neill Jr. & Marion W. O’Neill Judge James W. Paddock & Ruth Davenport Paddock Eugene S. Peck & Laura Fraser Peck Professor John C. Peck & Pamela C. Peck Jason E. Pepe & Jennifer Pepe Robert C. Perry Judge G. Joseph Pierron & Diana Carlin Pierron, PhD Joseph M. Rebein & Susan Waring Rebein Kenneth W. Reeves III James A. Riedy Reginald L. Robinson & Jane McGarey Robinson Scott W. Sayler & Nancy Zarda Sayler Karen Zambri Schutter Stephen M. Schutter Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee PC William H. Seiler Jr. J. Stanley Sexton & Tommye C. Sexton Professor Jan Bowen Sheldon, PhD, JD, & Professor James A. Sherman

John W. Simpson & Carolyn C. Simpson Justice Fred N. Six & Lilian Six Holly Pauling Smith Tina A. Smith Gentra Abbey Sorem & James R. Sorem Jr., PhD Kenneth W. Spain & Cynthia Mullen Spain Shannon L. Spangler & Michael E. Spangler Sprint Foundation Jennifer Stackhouse Roger D. Stanton & Judith Duncan Stanton Mikel L. Stout & LeAnn R. Stout Peter E. Strand & Sheila C. Strand Scott B. Strohm R. Kent Sullivan Professor Ellen E. Sward S. Lee Taylor Thompson & Knight Foundation Mark R. Thompson & Barbara E. Thompson UMB Bank NA Judge Kathryn H.Vratil & John W. Hamilton Michael L. Walden Martha S. Warren Perry D. Warren & Janet Beebe Warren Westar Energy Foundation Professor William E. Westerbeke J. Robert Wilson & Marguerite J. Wilson E. Larry Winn III Francis and LaVerne Winterburg Fund Jean W. Wise & Morris F. Wise, MD Women in Law Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD Stanley N. Woodworth & Nancy G. Woodworth Robert S. Wunsch & Barbara Bateman Wunsch

CAMPANILE CLUB ($500 to $999) Thomas P. & Elizabeth Alongi John F. Baird II The Bank of America Foundation Brandon H. Bauer Norman E. Beal & Sally Jenkins Beal David E. Bengtson & Mary Maloney Bengtson Gene M. & Jan M. Betts Herschel & Joan Betts William Bevan III & Gail M. Bevan R. Dan & Dale P. Boulware Jennifer S. Brannan Martin R. Brown Patricia J. & Frank F. Castellano Donald E. Chambers Kevin M. Connor & Anne L. Connor ConocoPhillips Company Donald L. Creach J. Richelle Crow-Johnson Deloitte Foundation Darrell D. Dreiling James N. Edmonds Mary Lew Edmonds Charles P. Efflandt Melvin L. Ehrlich Yvette Leerskov Ehrlich Daniel C. Estes Farmers Insurance Group Inc. Fleeson, Gooing, Coulston & Kitch Patrick X. & Susan E. Fowler Shelly L. Freeman Jon W. & Linda M. Gilchrist Marci A. Gilligan C. Peter Goplerud III Andrew F. & Ann Marie Halaby John L. Hampton & Carol Fagre Hampton Kenneth & Sue Harmon Jacob A. Hecker & Lori Jorgenson Hecker David R. & Valerie Hederstedt Duane R. & Shirley Hirsch

Robert C. Hunter & Kimberly Duncan Hunter Husch Blackwell Sanders LLP Allen G. Jones Allison L. Jones Carrie E. Josserand Kansas University Endowment Association Jennifer Johnson Kinzel Melissa M. Krueger Timothy J. Kuester Jodde Olsen Lanning Kendra Lewison George A. & Rosemary Lowe Sheila J. Madden Audrey B. & Sue Anne Magaña Keith U. & Hulda Martin Carolyn L. Matthews William P. Matthews Professor Stephen W. Mazza Barbara L. McCloud Brian C. McCormally & Kathie Philbrick McCormally Professor Sandra Craig McKenzie Debra M. Hart McLaughlin M.B. Miller Sean J. O’Hara & Amy Cox O’Hara Payne & Jones Foundation Paul D. Post & Kay Kelly, LSCSW Bobby E. & Vicki L. Potts Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation Hal C. Reed Chris & Debra A. Robe Nancy Schmidt Roush & John M. Roush March M. Runner Judge Gerald L. Rushfelt Brad S. & Mary Frances Russell Scharnhorst Ast & Kennard PC Gerard C. Scott James O. Selzer Neil R. Shortlidge & Renee Sproul Shortlidge James J. & Chirl Ann Sienicki Floyd W. Smith Jr. & Cecilia E. Smith Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP Michael A. Sternlieb Joel A. Sterrett & Dr. Joye Sterrett John D. Stewart Judge David L. Stutzman & Wendy Blank Arturo A. Thompson Willard B. Thompson & Barbara Lemert Thompson Todd N. Thompson & Caprice Maxey Thompson Mary A. & Jason M. Walker Larkin Evans Walsh Matthew S. Walsh Judge Michael E. Ward & Lissa Leonard Ward

CRIMSON AND BLUE CLUB ($300 to $499) Frank A. Ackerman Terry Arthur & Virginia Thomas Arthur Asian American Bar Association of Kansas City John G. Atherton Michael E. Baker Patricia McCoy Bartley Martin W. & Ann M. Bauer Lisa Walter Beran & Gerald W. Beran Jr. Larry J. & Ann H. Bingham Judge Donald W. Bostwick & Jill Bostwick Bradley L. & Judith Lyn Brehm Margaret M. Breinholt Cynthia R. Bryant Mark A. Cole Jr. Melissa L. Conboy Staci L. Cooper Michael T. Crabb Linda Smith Crist Margaret B. Dardess

Peter F. Davidson Max E. Eberhart & Nina Gillig Eberhart Kent R. Erickson Faegre & Benson Foundation Friends of Jana Mackey Thomas P. Garretson & Carole Bomhard Garretson John J. & Carolyn K. Gates Tony L. & Shawna L. Gehres Jeffrey W. Gettler Mark A. Greenfield, MD John P. Healy & Cathy Rauch Healy Dwight D. Henderson Jeffrey D. Hewett Richard G. & Carol A. Hunsucker Topper & Linda D. Johntz Kansas Equality Coalition Inc. Ramona K. Kantack Robert J. & Rebecca J. Knapp John A. Koepke Sharylyn Gelvin Lacey Justice Edward Larson & Mary L. Larson Lathrop & Gage LC Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy Carl S. Long III & Mary K. Long Terry L. & Monica S. Malone Martin, Pringle, Oliver, Wallace & Bauer LLP Charles D. Marvine Joyce Rosenberg Marvine Pamela Meador Mattson & Lynn P. Mattson Professor Stephen R. McAllister Beverly Thomas McMillan Brian Mulhern Robert B. & Margaret E. Neill Jon S. Nunes Christopher B. Phelan Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post Judge Richard D. Rogers & Cynthia J. Rogers Judge Janice D. Russell Ann M. Scarlett Ross W. & Margaret M. Schimmels Carol Zuschek Smith Wayne E. Smith Wesley F. Smith & Lisa M. Leroux-Smith Ann & Mark A. Soderberg Jeff C. Spahn Jr. Thomas W. Stibal Jon A. Strongman A. R. Thomas & Alice Stevinson Thomas Professor Suzanne Valdez John A.Vetter Scott E.Vincent Charles E. & Barbara A. Wetzler Lanette M. Wickham & Frank J. Rebori John R. Wiebke Harry E. Wigner Jr. & Beth A. M. Wigner Susan Krehbiel William The Williams Companies Inc. Shari L. & Kevin L. Wright

1865 CLUB ($100 to $299) Linda Noland Aikins & David M. Aikins Martin K. Albrecht & Shari Feist Albrecht Philip H. & Jeanine R. Alexander David C. & Priscilla A. All Collin B. & Dana Altieri American Multi-Cinema Inc. Heather Zane Anderson Lincoln W. Anderson Frederick G. Apt Jr. & Denise C. Apt Jill R. Arensdorf Gavin W. & Christine J. Armstrong Michael J. Armstrong Linda Y. C. Arnold & Kirk Arnold, MD Greg Ash Katherine J. Bailes Baird Holm LLP

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donor report Valerie L. Baldwin Ernest C. Ballweg Frank S. Bangs Jr. Debra Lee Barnett Gerald K. Bates & Sheida Hashemy Bates Donald F. & Catherine Bayer Bion J. Beebe & Vicki Storm Beebe Daniel A. & Ree A. Belhumeur Olivia A. Bennett Patricia A. Bennett & Michael G. Haefele Victor A. Bergman & Susan D. Bergman, MD Bruce A. Berkley & Kelly Staggenborg Berkley Mark A. Berkley & Jane Booth Berkley John T. Bird Dennis M. Blackwood & Carole A. Cadue-Blackwood Robin C. & Deborah M. Blair Elizabeth A. Blake Carolyn McMinn Blakemore David L. Blakemore Marjorie A. Blaufuss & Larry J. Libeer Anne H. & William R. Blessing Lawrence W. Blickhan Stacia Gressel Boden Alice Boler Bolin Michael S. & Jennifer J. Boohar Karen L. Borell Stephen W. Boyda & U.S. Rep. Nancy E. Boyda Aaron J. Breitenbach Gerald W. Brenneman Roger K. Brown Bryan Cave LLP Amy A. Buchele-Ash Michael B. & Holly L. Buser Granville M. Bush IV & Lynne Scheufele Bush William C. Byrnes & Lisa Bailey Lisbeth French Cabrera & Arnold R. Cabrera, MD Colleen A. Cacy & Peter Akmajian Jan Fink Call James P. Callahan Laird S. Campbell & Nancy Cornforth Campbell Mark S. Carder Judith Kloster Carlson Cathleen E. Carothers Brandee L. Caswell & Brian J. Weakley Elizabeth Seale Cateforis & David Cateforis Stephen C. Chambers Karin Pongratz Church Allan J. & Beth Ellen Cigler James W. Clark Shelley Hickman Clark Marc P. Clements Louis A. Cohn & Lora A. Cohn, PhD Stuart R. & Kelley L. Collier Michael R. Comeau John D. Conderman & Patricia R. Conderman Noreen L. Connolly Chad B. & Jill S. Cook Brett C. Coonrod Brent N. Coverdale Ann E. Cudd & Neal C. Becker Daniel A. Cunningham Ellen Maura Curry Marjorie I. Cuthbert William E. & Elizabeth Dakan Kathy Damron Judge Kathryn E. Davis Nathaniel Davis Jr. Paul F. & Janice B. DeBauge Amy M. & Gary W. Decker John P. DeCoursey Anna Marie Dempsey Paul M. Dent & Deborah K. Simpson Dent Judge Patricia Macke Dick & David A. Dick Bradley Dillon & Tammy Miller Dillon R. Stanley Ditus & Doris R. Ditus Darcy & Jill Domoney

38 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Luke A. Drevets James E. & Annette B. Dudgeon Alison D. Dunning Daniel T. Dutcher Karen A. Dutcher Holly A. Dyer Georgann H. Eglinski & Ronald W. Schorr Nnena N. Egorugwu Rick J. Eichor John R. Eichstadt Justin D. Elkouri Julie A. Elston Jeffrey R. Emerson Tommy L. Emerson Jr. Judge Robert W. Fairchild & Martha Terry Fairchild Benjamin F. Farney & Etta Williams Farney Carly E. Farrell Amy D. Fellows Edwin H. & Aramide Fields Bradley R. Finkeldei Sen. Marci A. Francisco & Joe R. Bickford Gregory L. Franken Joni J. Franklin Lynne A. Friedewald Julia M. Gilmore Gaughan & Michael D. Gaughan Pamela A. Giesen James R. & Karen Gilliland A. James Gillmore Robin Anne Gingerich J. Richard Golub Maryln Lambert Golub Kirk J. Goza Shirley Edmonds Goza Connie M. Grafel Edward H. & Julia N. Graham Leon B. Graves Wendy M. Green Larry Greenbaum Sharon E. Greenfield Gilbert E. Gregory Steven W. Grieb Timothy J. & Janette K. Grillot Nancy Lampton Grube Robert I. & Susan S. Guenthner Elizabeth M. Hafoka Benjamin A. Halpert Shaye B. Halpert Marian S. Hamilton Mark A. & Debra L. Hannah Gary H. & Jeanne M. Hanson Nathan C. & Kim B. Harbur Dave Harder Stephen C. & Melissa Berg Harmon Marilyn M. Harp & Marc A. Quillen, PhD Kathryn L. Harpstrite & Samuel J. Pierron Anne Fleishel Harris & Wilbur C. Buckheit Judge Michael T. Harris Mark C. Hauber William D. Haught Harold L. Haun Charles R. Hay Deanne Watts Hay D. Randall & Joyce E. Heilman Justin A. Hendrix William L. Hess & Jane McGrew Hess Dean B. Hill Patricia K. Hirsch Ross A. Hollander James D. & Karen T. Holt John M. Holt Jr. Suzanne Adams Holt Mark D. Hoover Robert B. & Caroline E. Hosford Stephen J. House Casey O. Housley & Jenny Lynch Housley Aaron G. Hove & Gayleen Miller Hove Evan H. Ice & Jill Redfern Ice Judge J. C. Irvin & Mary Lewis Irvin

Judge Jeffry L. Jack & Susan Lansdell Jack Bruce R. Jeide James C. & Fay H. Johnson Johnson-Wyandotte County NOW Johnson County Bar Association Karen I. Johnson Thomas H. Johnson Donald A. Johnston & Alice Dowell Johnston Peter S. Johnston & Sara Peckham Johnston, MD Andrew M. Jones Andrew T. Jones Heather Jones Alan Joseph & Diane Oliver Joseph Patrick J. Kaine Gina Kaiser Kansas Bar Association Kansas Democratic LGBT Caucus KC Lesbian Gay & Allied Lawyers Martin J. Keenan & Julie Castelli Keenan Pamela Keller & John W. Keller, MD Justice B. King Jr. & Debra King Judge Peggy Carr Kittel Rick A. Kittel Celeste Holder Kling & Robert Kling, PhD Mark W. Knackendoffel & E. Ann Knackendoffel, PhD Ted E. & Nancy A. Knopp LeeAnn Koblitz Kevin C. Koc Ricardo A. Kolster Patricia A. Konopka David J. Kornelis Stephen D. & Ellen L. Kort Craig A. Kovarik Stuart M. Kowalski KU Law Class of 1978 Kip A. Kubin & Leigh Jacobs Kubin Douglas & Shirley Lancaster Greer S. Lang Meredith S. Lang Michael E. & Melinda Lazzo Judge Steve A. Leben & Ann E. Warner, MD Deana I. & Edwin D. Lenkner Professor Elizabeth Weeks Leonard & Thomas L. Leonard Robert L. Lesh & Edwina Crane Lesh Miguel L’Heureux Jeffrey Li Kay Roberts Light Charles S. Lindberg & Dolores Goad Lindberg Samuel P. Logan & P. Diane McGrew Donald A. & Diane C. Low David H. & Debi Luce Barbara A. Lundin William E. Lupton & Carol A. Lupton William A. Lynch & Linda Grinpas Lynch Phyllis Savage Lynn & Randall S. Lynn Scott W. Mach & Patty Cray Mach Bruce C. Mallonee & LeeAnne Plumb Mallonee Coy M. Martin Kelly M. Martucci David R. Maslen Brian R. Matula Jan Haley Maxwell & Robert S. Maxwell Cindy Brunker McClannahan & John B. McClannahan John D. & Paula E. McClung Bettina Toisan McGriggler Lori Connors McGroder Philip C. & Jill McKnight Tyler P. McLeod Charles A. McMonagle & Susan Betts Judge Robert S. McQuin & Lorene Gentle McQuin Tyrone C. Means S. Richard Mellinger Eric B. Metz

Jody Lamb Meyer Trey T. Meyer Eric T. & Margo L. Mikkelson Marilyn G. Miller & Charley L. Looney Judge Paul E. Miller & Julia Brown Miller Phillip A. & Janet M. Miller Roland B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller Gwendelyn Garcia Milligan Thomas H. Mills & Sue Schwartzburg Mills Robert B. Misner Eugene E. Mitchell John W. Mitchell Jr. & Margaret Katherine Mitchell Kevin F. & Frances Mitchelson Karen M. Mittel Donald L. Moler Jr. Judith A. Moler William H. Moore & Kristin Brulez U.S. Rep. Jerry Moran & Robba Addison Moran Judge Kathleen P. Moran Christopher L. & Margaret A. Morgan Stephen R. & Paula M. Morgan James P. Muehlberger & Jayme Klein Muehlberger David W. Murrill N. Royce & Linda L. Nelson Robert I. Nicholson Jr. Tamara L. Niles Stephen E. Noll & Marianne George Noll Donald L. Norman Jr. Darin A. Nugent Judge Robert E. Nugent III & Linda D. Nugent Robert Edward Nunley Kent G. Nunn & Colleen Johnson Nunn Justice Lawton R. Nuss Virginia Nye & Dr. Barry R. Fox Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart PC Rep. Michael R. O’Neal & Cynthia A. Wulfkuhle O’Neal ONEOK Foundation James A. Oppy Other’s Inc. Gary W. Owens Carolyn Boettcher Parmer & David A. Parmer Cari Jo Patterson John C. Pauls Jeffrey D. Peier Sylvia B. & Kathryn D. Penner Alphonse B. Perkins Kathryn Pruessner Peters & Stephen D. Peters Douglas G. Peterson Losson G. Pike & Leanne Benda Pike John A. Potucek II Eva Powers & Ramon S. Powers, PhD Lynn D. Preheim John A. Price Jacqueline Egr Pueppke Larry G. & Dianne J. Rapp Christopher S. Raynolds & Abigail Morris Raynolds Jack R. Reed Sharon M. Reilly Ronald S. Reuter Christie Frick Reynolds & David O. Reynolds Forrest T. Rhodes Jr. David M. Rhodus & Anne Jordan Rhodus David F. & Linda F. Richards Michael S. Richmond Deborah L. Klee Riley & John C. Riley Marie Winterburg Robb & Steven A. Robb Captain Drew G. Roberts Lauren E. Roberts Thomas A. Robinette Jr. & Margaret Shramek Robinett Thomas J. Robinson Judge David W. Rogers Gary L. Rohrer & Lee Ann Urban Rohrer

Tanya E. Rose N. Renee & Jerry D. Roths Karen P. Ruckert Ronald C. Rundberg Irma Stephens Russell & Thomas L. Russell Jr., PhD Rebecca A. Ryan Bonnie S. & David W. Sanderson William K. Sauck Jr. Michael P. Schaefer Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW Dionne M. Scherff & Thomas R. Crawford Robert H. & Michele D. Scherzer George J. Schlagel & Theron Wilson Schlagel Kari S. Schmidt Paul M. Schmidt Paul D. Schumaker, PhD Michael K. & Sharon Seck Kathryn A. & Jim Seeberger Steven D. Selbe Floy Lambertson Shaeffer Bhavi A. Shah Chris & Frank Sharp Glen E. Sharp II & Pamela DeMoss Sharp Emily Cameron Shattil David E. & Kimberly R. Shay Grant C. Shellenberger Eldon J. & Bonnie Shields David P. Siever Nan Mills Sigman & Gregory D. Sigman Diane Worthington Simpson Thomas H. & Jeannie E. Slack Amy Logan Sliva Sloan, Eisenbarth, Glassman, McEntire & Jarboe LLC G. Sid Smith Stanford J. Smith Jr. Martha M. Snyder Alan C. Sobba Christine K. Solso Judge Dale L. Somers & Judyanne Somers David A. Sorenson South & Associates PC Jeffrey S. Southard Wesley H. Sowers Jr. Darrell E. Spain Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP Byron E. Springer & Marion Peltier Springer St. Luke’s South Cardiac Rehab Department Keith L. & Jan Stanley Cathleen Chandler Stevenson & David A. Stevenson Jennifer Malone Stevenson & Ronald P. Stevenson Darin D. Stowell Marie Parker Strahan & Dennis W. Strahan Gordon B. & Carol Stull Patricia M. Stull Howard T. Sturdevant & Gail Sturdevant Michael L. Sullivan Swiss Re Matching Grants Program Linda L. Sybrant Erin E. Syring Robert L. Tanner Jeffrey C. Tauscher Derek T. Teeter Holly L. Hydeman Teeter Textron Matching Gift Program Gabrielle M. Thompson & Oliver L. Weaver, PhD Patrick H. & Patricia L. Thompson Kenneth D. Thomson Kathryn Marie Timm Martha R. Titterington Stephen M. & Carlene M. Todd Kristen V. Toner Robert W. Tormohlen Tom C. & Christie Triplett Thomas M. & Suzanne F. Tuggle

Kimberley H. Tyson UBS Foundation USA Julie L. Unruh Kenneth R. & Annette Van Blaricum Thomas M.Van Cleave III Blake E. Vande Garde & Nicole Copple Vande Garde James D.VanPelt Sen. John L.Vratil & Teresa C.Vratil Judge Richard W. Wahl Ronald A. Wasinger David E. Waters Daniel L. & Phyllis Watkins Teresa G. Webb Thomas J. Weilert & Jane Kemezis Weilert John R. Weist & Zena Monsour Weist David B. Wentz Jennifer Chaulk Wentz Wichita Bar Association Kelli A. Wikoff Professor Melanie D. Wilson Gary A. Winfrey & Sally Nixon Winfrey David L. & Kristin D. Wing Thomas F. Wobker Will B. Wohlford

NEW FUNDS FOULSTON SIEFKIN 2L SCHOLARSHIP was established with a gift from the law firm of Foulston Siefkin LLP, Wichita. This scholarship is to be awarded to a deserving student in his or her second year of law school. FOULSTON SIEFKIN DIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP was established with a gift from the law firm of Foulston Siefkin LLP, Wichita. This scholarship is to be awarded to deserving law students with diverse backgrounds from groups under-represented in the practice of law. The scholarship will be awarded initially to a first-year law student. ANDREW KEENAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP was established with memorial gifts received from law faculty and staff, family and friends of Andrew Keenan, who passed away in January 2005. The scholarship will provide need-based scholarships for Kansas residents in their first year at the KU School of Law. JANA MACKEY SUPPORT FOR PUBLIC ADVOCACY FUND was established with memorial gifts received from law faculty and staff, family and friends of Jana Mackey following her untimely death in July 2008. She was pursuing a legal career as a public interest advocate. The Mackey fund will be used to support public interest causes to which Jana was dedicated during her life. POLSINELLI SHUGHART SCHOLARSHIP was established with gifts from Polsinelli Shughart PC, Kansas City, Mo., and is needbased. A scholarship will initially be awarded to a first-year law student, and is renewable each year for three years, subject to the recipient maintaining a predetermined grade point average for each of the three years. SUZANNE VALDEZ & STEPHEN McALLISTER SCHOLARSHIP was established with a gift from Brad Korell, L’97. The scholarship shall be awarded annually to a second- or third-year law student with first preference given to out-of-state students. Recipients shall have

demonstrated strong qualities of public service and/or community service.

LIBRARY SUPPORT FUNDS Hazel A. Anderson Law Library Fund Louise Ahlstedt Beebe and Jack E. Beebe Law Library Fund Thomas W. Boone Law School Library Fund Ruth Adair Dyer Law Library Fund Friends of the University of Kansas Law Library Arthur W. Hershberger Memorial Law Book Fund Frank S. Hodge Memorial Library Fund KU Law Library Unrestricted Fund Kate McKay Memorial Book Fund Evart Mills Memorial Book Fund Douglas D. and Laura L. Wheat School of Law Opportunity Fund

MATCHING GIFTS Altria Group Inc. American Multi-Cinema Inc. The Bank of America Foundation Chevron Humankind Matching Gift Program CNA Foundation ConocoPhillips Company Deloitte Foundation Ernst & Young Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation Faegre & Benson Foundation Farmers Insurance Group Inc. Illinois Tool Works Foundation Kansas University Endowment Association KPMG Foundation Macy’s Foundation Nationwide Foundation Northern Trust Matching Gift Program ONEOK Foundation Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee PC Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Snell & Wilmer LLP Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP Sprint Foundation State Farm Companies Foundation Swiss Re Matching Grants Program Textron Matching Gift Program Thompson & Knight Foundation Thomson Reuters UBS Foundation USA Westar Energy Foundation The Williams Companies Inc. Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

GIFTS RECEIVED IN HONOR OF Philip P. Frickey Professor Robert L. Glicksman Professor Webb Hecker Professor Michael H. Hoeflich Professor Fred Lovitch Professor Stephen Mazza Robin Miller Professor John C. Peck, L’74 Professor Ellen E. Sward Larry Worrall, L’57

GIFTS RECEIVED IN MEMORY OF Robert F. Bennett, L’52 Mary Anne Chambers, L’81 Peggy A. Clark Mary Ann Mize Dickinson E. S. Hampton, L’29 Thomas W. Hampton, L’59 Walter Hiersteiner Mrs. A. Bryce Huguenin W. Ross Hutton, L’83

C. Frederick Ice, L’24 Mildred Branine Ice Elmer C. Jackson Jr., L’35 Andrew K. Keenan, L’05 Philip C. Lacey, L’74 Jana L. Mackey Kenton J. Mai, L’89 Donald D. Martin Robert B. McKay Janean Meigs, L’76 Andrew J. Mullin Judge Earl E. O’Connor, L’50 Jean Ann O’Connor Larry R. O’Neal, L’72 Judge Robert F. Stadler, L’48 George R. Tiller, MD Frederick L. Ward, L’87 Aaron A. Wilson Jr., L’50

OTHER FUNDS

Richard L. and Suzanne Sedgwick Bond Fund Walter Brauer Faculty Support Fund Daisy E. and Paul H. Brown Elder Law Fund Robert C. Casad Comparative Law Lectureship Class of 1971 Fund Donald L. Cordes School of Law Opportunity Fund Charles L. Decker Fund Mary Ann Mize Dickinson Memorial Garden Fund G. Gary Duncan Fund Elder Law Program Fund David H. Fisher Law Fund Loren M. Gensman Fund GUF/Law School Unrestricted Kenneth M. and Ruth Elizabeth Hamilton Law Fund Ed and Helen Healy Law School Opportunity Fund Hinkle Elkouri Conference Room Fund Humphrey School of Law Discretionary Fund Ice Family Fund Joy M. Johnson Trust for the School of Law Medical-Legal Clinic at the Southwest Boulevard Family Health Care Clinic Kansas Defender Project Kansas Law Review Law School Building Fund Law School Dean’s Discretionary Account Law School Media, Law and Policy Program Legal Aid Clinic Fund Linda S. Legg and Lawrence G. Crahan Professionalism Fund James K. Logan Fund Fred B. Lovitch and Michael J. Davis Law Fund Jana Mackey Support for Public Advocacy Fund Robert B. McKay Memorial Fund Richard F. Mullins Moot Court Competition Fund Judge Edmund L. Page Jurist-in-Residence Program Polsinelli Shalton Welte Suelthaus Fund Don and Ruth Lawless Postlethwaite Fund Public Interest Law Fund Robert A. Schroeder Family Teaching Fellowship Shook, Hardy & Bacon Center for Excellence in Advocacy Shughart, Thomson & Kilroy Fund Fred N. and Lilian Six Unrestricted Law School Fund James Barclay Smith Fund Snell & Wilmer Courtroom Renovation Fund Judge Nelson Timothy Stephens Lecture Stephenson Lectures in Law and Government Fund Stinson Morrison Hecker Fund Tax Certificate Program Fund

KU LAW MAGAZINE 39

donor report Tribal Law & Government Center Fund Gary A. Waldron and Carol A. Foster Law School Dean Discretionary Fund Gary A. Waldron and Carol A. Foster Law School Fund Douglas D. and Laura L. Wheat School of Law Opportunity Fund Houston Whiteside Fund Dennis P. Wilbert and Joan R. Ruff Fund Paul L. and Florine T. Wilbert Fund Wolfe Family Moot Court Assistance Fund Paul Yde Law and Economics Fund

PRIZES AND AWARDS Barber Emerson LC Blue Book Relays Robert F. Bennett Student Award Fund William L. Burdick Prize Mary Anne Chambers Service Award G. Gary Duncan Scholastic Improvement Prize Robert E. Edmonds Prize for Corporation and Securities Law Family Fund Robert C. Foulston and George Siefkin Prizes for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy Hershberger, Patterson, Jones & Roth Energy Law Award Walter Hiersteiner Outstanding Service Award Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm, LLC Tax Procedure Award W. Ross Hutton Prize Howard M. and Sue Immel Annual Teaching Award Lloyd M. Kagey Leadership Award Law Class of 1949 Leadership Award Janean Meigs Memorial Award in Law Fund Samuel Mellinger Scholarship, Leadership, and Service Award James P. Mize Trial Advocacy Award Dean Frederick J. Moreau Faculty Award Larry R. O’Neal/Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Law School Award Fund Payne & Jones Lawyering Program Award Shapiro Award for Best Paper on Law & Public Policy Carl T. Smith Memorial Scholarship Award Sonnenschein Scholars Program C. C. Stewart Award Susman Godfrey Trial Advocacy Fund UMB Bank Excellence in Trust Planning Award

PROFESSORSHIPS Centennial Teaching Professorship Connell Teaching Professorships in Kansas Law E. S. and Tom Hampton Distinguished Professorship John H. and John M. Kane Distinguished Professorship Raymond F. Rice Distinguished Professorship in Law John M. Rounds Distinguished Professorship in Law Robert A. Schroeder Distinguished Professorship J. B. Smith Distinguished Professorship in Constitutional Law Frank E. Tyler Distinguished Professorship in Law Robert W. Wagstaff Distinguished Professorship in Law Paul E. Wilson Distinguished Professorship in Law

SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS Mark H. Adams Sr. Memorial Scholarship Warren D. Andreas Scholarship in Law Richard A. Barber Scholarship Judge Willard M. and Lucile H. Benton Memorial Scholarship

40 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Blackwell Sanders Diversity Scholarship Book Exchange Scholarships Bremyer Summer Intern Scholarship Fund Judge Clayton and Cecile Goforth Brenner Scholarship in Law Claude E. Chalfant Memorial Scholarship John W. and Gertrude Clark Scholarship Claude O. Conkey Memorial Scholarship Glen W. Dickinson Scholarship in Law William and Judy Docking Law School Scholarship Port and Mildred Early Scholarship Judge A. M. Ebright Memorial Scholarship Robert E. Edmonds Law School Scholarship Fleeson, Gooing, Coulson & Kitch Scholarship Foulston Siefkin 2L Scholarships Foulston Siefkin Diversity Scholarship Foulston & Siefkin Law Review Scholarship Jordan and Shirley Haines Scholarship Thomas H. Harkness KU Law School Scholarship Darrell L. Havener Scholarship Aldie Haver Memorial Scholarship in Law The Help of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ Scholarship Al J. and Sylvia M. Herrod Law Scholarship Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Scholarship Michael H. Hoeflich and Karen J. Nordheden Scholarship in Law Enos A. Hook Memorial Scholarship A. Bryce Huguenin School of Law Scholarship Judge Walter A. Huxman Scholarship Arthur M. Jackson Memorial Scholarship Elmer C. Jackson Jr. Scholarship in Law Margaret S. Jeffrey Scholarship Grant in Law Kansas Women Attorneys Association Jennie Mitchell Kellogg Scholarship Calvin and Janice Karlin Annual Scholarship Andrew Keenan Memorial Scholarship Kirk Family Scholarship Dorothy Arlene Bates Kirk Scholarship Law School Class of 1925 Scholarship Law Class of 1953 Scholarship Law School Scholarship Fund John R. Light and Gary Olson Scholarship Robert W. Loyd Scholarship in Law Frank A. Lutz Memorial Scholarship Kenton Mai Memorial Scholarship Minorities in Law Scholarships Harriet and Mancel Mitchell Scholarship in Law John R. Morse Law School Scholarship Ronald C. Newman Scholarship Major Eugene H. Nirdlinger Memorial Scholarship Bernard E. Nordling Scholarship Norton, Hubbard, Ruzicka & Kreamer L.C. Scholarship Judge Earl E. and Jean Ann O’Connor Memorial Scholarship Charles H. Oldfather Scholarship Joseph O. and Mary Louise Parker Scholarship Olin K. and Mary Ruth Petefish School of Law Scholarship Polsinelli Shalton Welte Suelthaus Diversity Scholarship Polsinelli Shughart Scholarship Charles B. Randall Memorial Scholarship Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Scholarships Ross Foundation Law School Scholarship Judge M. Kay Royse Scholarship in Law Judge J. C. Ruppenthal Memorial Scholarship Vivian McAtee Schmidt Law Scholarship Robert A. and Janet Manning Schroeder Scholarships in Law Elisha Scott Memorial Scholarship Professor William R. Scott Scholarship Seigfreid, Bingham, Levy, Selzer & Gee Law Scholarship

J. Frank and Carolyn Henry Shinkle Memorial Scholarship J. Frank Shinkle Student Aid Fund Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Diversity in Law Scholarship Shook, Hardy & Bacon Scholarships Prof. Earl B. and Mary Maurine Shurtz Tribal Lawyer Scholarship Clarine Smissman J.D. and Edward Smissman Ph.D. Scholarship in Law Glee and Geraldine Smith Law Scholarship William C. Spangler Memorial Scholarship Judge Robert F. Stadler Memorial Scholarship Evelyn, Richard and Blanche Thompson Scholarship Leslie T. Tupy Scholarship Suzanne Valdez & Stephen McAllister Scholarship Voss Kansas Law Scholarship Wal-Mart Legal Diversity Scholarship Frederick L. Ward Memorial Scholarship Willard G. Widder Scholarship Karl T. Wiedemann Scholarship in Law Paul R. Wunsch Scholarship

CLASSES 1939 Omer G.Voss & Annabelle K.Voss

Judge James W. Paddock & Ruth Davenport Paddock Justice Fred N. Six & Lilian Six John C. Wesley & Millicent Hunt Wesley 1957 R. Stanley Ditus & Doris R. Ditus Benjamin F. Farney & Etta Williams Farney Alvin D. Herrington Duane R. & Shirley Hirsch 1958 Heywood H. Davis & Louise Swigart Davis Sally Cross Herrington Robert C. & Isabel Howard Judge Gerald L. Rushfelt Robert L. Tanner Willard B. Thompson & Barbara Lemert Thompson James D. VanPelt Robert S. Wunsch & Barbara Bateman Wunsch 1959 John W. Brand Jr. & Barbara Sample Brand Thomas H. & Jean Krueger Jack R. Reed

1945 John Scurlock

1960 Edward H. & Julia N. Graham James C. & Fay H. Johnson Justice Edward Larson & Mary L. Larson Gary L. Rohrer & Lee Ann Urban Rohrer Byron E. Springer & Marion Peltier Springer

1947 Keith U. & Hulda Martin Judge Richard D. Rogers & Cynthia J. Rogers

1961 Judge Theodore B. Ice & Sue Harper Ice Mikel L. Stout & LeAnn R. Stout

1949 Robert L. Lesh & Edwina Crane Lesh

1962 Richard R. Eads & Joann Howell Eads John E. Hurley Jr. & Jo Sicking Hurley Robert W. Loyd & Mary Jo Loyd Joel A. Sterrett & Dr. Joye Sterrett Howard T. Sturdevant & Gail Sturdevant

1940 John D. Stewart

1950 Laird S. Campbell & Nancy Cornforth Campbell Kenneth & Sue Harmon George A. & Rosemary Lowe 1951 Ervin E. Grant & Mary Davis Grant Joe L. Levy & Pat Pote Levy Russell B. Taylor Judge Richard W. Wahl 1952 Eugene E. Mitchell 1953 Constance M. Achterberg John G. Atherton Donald W. Giffin & Esther Brown Giffin J. Robert Wilson & Marguerite J. Wilson 1954 J. Eugene Balloun Larry E. Keenan & Patricia L. Degner-Keenan Charles S. Lindberg & Dolores Goad Lindberg D. Spencer Yohe & Betty Foster Yohe 1955 Donald N. Dirks 1956 Frederick G. Apt Jr. & Denise C. Apt Jerry W. Hannah & Nancy Watson Hannah Kay Roberts Light

1963 Lawrence W. Blickhan Paul F. & Janice B. DeBauge Robert E. Donatelli & Katherine Donatelli Charles H. Hostetler & Julie A. Hostetler Richard G. & Carol A. Hunsucker Roger D. Stanton & Judith Duncan Stanton Charles E. & Barbara A. Wetzler 1964 Donald D. Adams & Ann Wees Adams Lynn L. Anderson & La Faun McMurry Anderson Robert L. Driscoll & Marilyn Rockwell Driscoll Judge Jerry G. Elliott & Debra S. Duncan William D. Haught Bobby E. & Vicki L. Potts Tom C. & Christie Triplett Robert E. & Mary L. Williams 1965 Ernest Adelman & Barbara Boley Adelman David C. & Priscilla A. All Bradley L. & Judith L. Brehm Marshall L. Crowther & Sandra Garvey Crowther, EdD David R. & Valerie Hederstedt Karen I. Johnson Topper & Linda D. Johntz

1966 Mark A. Berkley & Jane Booth Berkley Stephen C. Chambers Peter K. Curran & Virginia Schubert Curran Max E. Eberhart & Nina Gillig Eberhart Charles C. & Pamela V. Hewitt Donald A. Johnston & Alice Dowell Johnston Douglas & Shirley Lancaster Anne Marie Morgan Stephen M. & Carlene M. Todd Thomas M. Van Cleave III 1967 Robert I. & Susan S. Guenthner Harold L. Haun Dean B. Hill Judge J. C. Irvin & Mary Lewis Irvin John R. Light & Sharon Koch Light Thomas M. & Suzanne F. Tuggle 1968 Larry D. Armel & JoAnne Armel Norman E. Beal & Sally Jenkins Beal Judge Donald W. Bostwick & Jill Bostwick Thomas A. & Mary M. Darner Peter F. Davidson Robert B. & Caroline E. Hosford Judge David W. Kennedy Gary L. Olson & Vicki A. Olson Thad & Ellie Sims David A. Sorenson Wesley H. Sowers Jr. E. Larry Winn III 1969 Homer P. Appleby Jr. Gavin W. & Christine J. Armstrong Terry Arthur & Virginia Thomas Arthur Ernest C. Ballweg John D. Conderman & Patricia R. Conderman Charles L. Frickey & Diane Paris Frickey Ronald S. Reuter Alan W. Roeder A. R. Thomas & Alice Stevinson Thomas R. Dean Wolfe & Cheryl L. Wolfe James B. Wright 1970 Frank S. Bangs Jr. William Bevan III & Gail M. Bevan Rick J. Eichor Judge John W. Lungstrum & Linda Ewing Lungstrum Christopher L. & Margaret A. Morgan James A. Oppy Terry R. Post & Karen Henry Post G. Sid Smith Keith L. & Jan Stanley Kenneth R. & Annette Van Blaricum Gary A. Winfrey & Sally Nixon Winfrey 1971 Margaret M. Breinholt Thomas P. Garretson & Carole Bomhard Garretson John L. Hampton & Carol Fagre Hampton Ronald R. Kimzey & Emily Cooper Kimzey Judge G. Joseph Pierron & Diana Carlin Pierron, PhD Losson G. Pike & Leanne Benda Pike John A. Potucek II John B. Roesler Bill Sampson Judge Dale L. Somers & Judyanne Somers R. Kent Sullivan Senator John L.Vratil & Teresa C.Vratil

1972 R. Dan & Dale P. Boulware Le Roy Lewis De Nooyer James R. & Karen Gilliland A. James Gillmore Jerry L. Harrison Dwight D. Henderson Alan Joseph & Diane Oliver Joseph Judge Paul E. Miller & Julia Brown Miller Roland B. Miller III & Holly R. Miller Robert B. Misner N. Royce & Linda L. Nelson Robert I. Nicholson Jr. John A. Price David M. Rhodus & Anne Jordan Rhodus David F. & Linda F. Richards Chris & Debra A. Robe Christopher Smith & Diana P. Smith Kenneth A. & Leann Webb Edward L. Winthrop George W. & Margaret E. Yarnevich 1973 Michael E. Baker Ron Bodinson Granville M. Bush IV & Lynne Scheufele Bush Michael R. Comeau Judge Robert W. Fairchild & Martha Terry Fairchild Jill S. Ferrel Bruce A. Finzen Barry D. Halpern & Cynthia Zedler Halpern Judge Michael T. Harris William L. Hess & Jane McGrew Hess David L. Hiebert & Sheridan Dirks Hiebert Bruce R. Jeide Gordon A. Jones Linda L. Lee William E. Lupton & Carol A. Lupton William F. Lyle Jr. William A. Lynch & Linda Grinpas Lynch Randal J. McDowell & Zelia Taylor McDowell Robert C. Perry Michael S. Richmond Michael V. Schaefer Emily Cameron Shattil Rex N. Shewmake Jr. & Mary Jane Shewmake Kenneth W. Spain & Cynthia Mullen Spain Nancy J. Spies Eric D. & Geri L. Stinson Judge Marcia K. Walsh Perry D. Warren & Janet Beebe Warren 1974 David W. Davis & Rhona Thorington Davis Paul M. Dent & Deborah K. Simpson Dent Richard E. Dietz & Marsha Merritt Dietz Darrell D. Dreiling Leo P. Dreyer & Lorry Glawe Dreyer Melvin L. Ehrlich John R. Eichstadt Lawrence C. Gates & Jeanne K. Gates C. Peter Goplerud III Stephen C. Harmon & Melissa Berg Harmon Charles R. Hay Ronald F. Loewen Stephen R. & Paula M. Morgan Professor John C. Peck & Pamela C. Peck Paul D. Post & Kay Kelly, LSCSW Hal C. Reed Kenneth W. Reeves III George J. Schlagel & Theron Wilson Schlagel William H. Seiler Jr. Eldon J. & Bonnie Shields Michael L. Sullivan Larry S.Vernon Douglas D. Wheat & Laura L. Wheat Gaylen R. Williams Thomas F. Wobker Elaine Oser Zingg & Otto M. Zingg

1975 Philip H. & Jeanine R. Alexander Martin W. & Ann M. Bauer Victor A. Bergman & Susan D. Bergman, MD Stephen W. Boyda & U.S. Rep. Nancy E. Boyda James W. Clark Leon B. Graves David J. Kornelis Donald A. & Diane C. Low Barbara A. Lundin Pamela Meador Mattson & Lynn P. Mattson S. Richard Mellinger Phillip A. & Janet M. Miller Michael C. Moffet & Patricia Russell Moffet John R. Morse & Kay Stine Morse Ross W. & Margaret M. Schimmels Floyd W. Smith Jr. & Cecilia E. Smith Michael A. Sternlieb Cathleen Chandler Stevenson & David A. Stevenson Gordon B. & Carol Stull Judge Kathryn H.Vratil & John W. Hamilton Daniel L. & Phyllis Watkins Thomas J. Weilert & Jane Kemezis Weilert 1976 Donald F. & Catherine Bayer Bion J. Beebe & Vicki Storm Beebe James P. Callahan Jill A. Casado Shelley Hickman Clark Nathaniel Davis Jr. S. Nyles & Mary P. Davis Michael F. Delaney & Kathleen Gibbons Delaney Charles P. Efflandt Grant M. Glenn Cathy Havener Greer Ross A. Hollander Gina Kaiser Justice B. King Jr. & Debra King John A. Koepke Judge Randall H. McEwen & Kamela McIntosh McEwen Beverly Thomas McMillan Tyrone C. Means Judge Kathleen P. Moran Rep. Michael R. O’Neal & Cynthia A. Wulfkuhle O’Neal Bernard V. O’Neill Jr. & Marion W. O’Neill Eva Powers & Ramon S. Powers, PhD Leland E. Rolfs Floy Lambertson Shaeffer Neil R. Shortlidge & Renee Sproul Shortlidge Gerald A. & Patti H. Thorpe 1977 Lydia I. Beebe Robin C. & Deborah M. Blair Alice Boler Bolin Karen L. Borell Michael B. & Holly L. Buser Brett C. Coonrod David Davenport & Sally Nelson Davenport Jane A. Finn, PhD Nathan C. & Kim B. Harbur Deanne Watts Hay Calvin J. Karlin Daniel J. Lyons & Maryanne Lyons Evan J. Olson & Susan Woodin Olson Kathryn Pruessner Peters & Stephen D. Peters James A. Riedy Judge Janice D. Russell William H. Sanders Jr. Albert J. Schwartz & Jane Lake Schwartz James O. Selzer J. Stanley Sexton & Tommye C. Sexton Professor Jan Bowen Sheldon, PhD, JD & Professor James A. Sherman

John A.Vetter Cynthia S. Woelk 1978 Tim Connell R. Steven Davis & Kim Bowen Davis Bradley D. Dillon & Tammy Miller Dillon Charles E. Doyle Georgann H. Eglinski & Ronald W. Schorr David S. Elkouri & Debbi C. Elkouri Lynne A. Friedewald Robert H. Gale Jr. Jeanne Gorman Jennifer Johnson Kinzel KU Law Class of 1978 William M. Modrcin Jr. Virginia Nye & Dr. Barry R. Fox George E. Rider & Jeannene Keaton Rider Jeffrey S. Southard Col. Andrew D. Stewart, USA, retired Martha Braun Wallisch & William J. Wallisch III John R. Wine Jr. & Ellen Sue Wine David L. & Kristin D. Wing Stanley N. Woodworth & Nancy G. Woodworth Cathy Gerlinger Zumbehl & Glenn E. Zumbehl 1979 Anne H. & William R. Blessing William E. & Elizabeth Dakan Steven W. & Jo E. Engelhardt Gene H. Gaede & Jannelle Robins-Gaede Marilyn M. Harp & Marc A. Quillen, PhD Edward J. Healy & Helen Healy Patricia K. Hirsch Sheila J. Madden Larry G. & Dianne J. Rapp Nancy Schmidt Roush & John M. Roush Thomas H. & Jeannie E. Slack Maryann Slattery Thomas W. Stibal Peter E. Strand & Sheila C. Strand Gary A. Waldron & Carol A. Foster, PhD Marie S. Woodbury & Daniel C. Claiborn, PhD 1980 Frank A. Ackerman David W. Andreas Orval F. Baldwin II Carol Y. & Jeffrey P. Berns Carolyn McMinn Blakemore David L. Blakemore William F. Bradley Jr. Bruce E. Cavitt Stuart R. & Kelley L. Collier Margaret B. Dardess Kathleen A. Dillon Lowell A. & Barbara A. Flory J. Richard Golub Maryln Lambert Golub C. Albert Herdoiza Judge Janice Miller Karlin Suzanne R. Kelly-Garrison Jodde Olsen Lanning Carl S. Long III & Mary K. Long Bruce C. Mallonee & LeeAnne Plumb Mallonee Jan Haley Maxwell & Robert S. Maxwell Judge Robert S. McQuin & Lorene Gentle McQuin Eric B. Metz Jeffrey S. Nelson & Lisa K. Nelson Judge Robert E. Nugent III & Linda D. Nugent Richard E. Putnam Irma Stephens Russell & Thomas L. Russell Jr., PhD Linda L. Sybrant

KU LAW MAGAZINE 41

donor report Mark R. Thompson & Barbara E. Thompson Patrick H. & Patricia L. Thompson Judge Michael E. Ward & Lissa Leonard Ward Wendel W. & Rhonda Wurst 1981 Steven R. Anderson & Carole Twork Anderson J. Rod Betts Anne E. Burke Walter L. Cofer & Nicola R. Heskett Daniel D. Crabtree John P. DeCoursey Ralph J. DeZago Judge Patricia Macke Dick & David A. Dick Darcy & Jill Domoney Randy Gardner Mark A. & Debra L. Hannah Jeffrey D. Hewett Ramona K. Kantack Stephen M. Kerwick Stuart M. Kowalski Scott W. Mach & Patty Cray Mach David R. Maslen Cindy Brunker McClannahan & John B. McClannahan Marilyn G. Miller & Charley L. Looney Daphne Nan Muchnic Robert T. Schendel & Cynthia A. Schendel, LSCSW Nan Mills Sigman & Gregory D. Sigman Christine K. Solso 1982 Kenneth L. Cole Roy G. Crooks Judge Kathryn E. Davis Tony L. & Shawna L. Gehres Kirk J. Goza Shirley Edmonds Goza Timothy J. & Janette K. Grillot Gary H. & Jeanne M. Hanson Mark D. Hinderks & Mary Ann Hinderks Wendy M. Jenkins Teresa Roll Kerwick Mark W. Knackendoffel & E. Ann Knackendoffel, PhD Ted E. & Nancy A. Knopp John C. Landon Judge Steve A. Leben & Ann E. Warner, MD Terry L. & Monica S. Malone Brian C. McCormally & Kathie Philbrick McCormally Kevin F. & Frances Mitchelson U.S. Representative Jerry Moran & Robba Addison Moran James P. Muehlberger & Jayme Klein Muehlberger David W. Murrill Holly Nielsen Justice Lawton R. Nuss William K. Sauck Jr. Michael K. & Sharon Seck David G. Seely & Debra Short Seely Stanford J. Smith Jr. Martha M. Snyder Tracey L. Stout Judge David L. Stutzman & Wendy Blank S. Lee Taylor Gabrielle M. Thompson & Oliver L. Weaver, Ph.D. Todd N. Thompson & Caprice Maxey Thompson Mark A. Werner Cindy L. Whitton 1983 Martin K. Albrecht & Shari Feist Albrecht Heather Zane Anderson Lincoln W. Anderson

42 KU LAW MAGAZINE

Diane L. Arnst Rebecca D. Brock Mark S. Carder Peggy A. Elliott Myron L. Frans D. Randall & Joyce E. Heilman Annette Kline Hollingsworth Judge Peggy Carr Kittel Rick A. Kittel Stephen D. & Ellen L. Kort Kip A. Kubin & Leigh Jacobs Kubin Quentin E. Kurtz Audrey B. & Sue Anne Maga単a M.B. Miller Eugene S. Peck & Laura Fraser Peck Jeffrey D. Peier Cathy A. Reinhardt & Norman A. St. Laurent Thomas A. Robinette Jr. & Margaret Shramek Robinett Kari S. Schmidt James J. & Chirl Ann Sienicki Xavier Simonsen Diane Worthington Simpson Amy Logan Sliva Gentra Abbey Sorem & James R. Sorem Jr., Ph.D. Jeff C. Spahn Jr. John B. Swearer Melanie L. Trump Timothy T. Trump Robert J. Werner Wanda Wilkinson Rebecca A. Winterscheidt 1984 Robert K. Anderson David E. Bengtson & Mary Maloney Bengtson Roger K. Brown Daniel T. Dutcher Edward C. & Renee Fensholt Gregory L. Franken Larry Greenbaum John M. Holt Jr. Suzanne Adams Holt Karen Erickson Hosack & Paul Douglas Hosack Stephen J. House Laura Kay Howard Matthew D. Keenan & Lori Hickman Keenan Celeste Holder Kling & Robert Kling, PhD Bettina Toisan McGriggler Eric S. Namee & Tracy Lynn Namee Kent G. Nunn & Colleen Johnson Nunn Governor Mark V. Parkinson Stacy Abbott Parkinson Christopher S. Raynolds & Abigail Morris Raynolds Judge David W. Rogers Gerard C. Scott Chris & Frank Sharp Alan C. Sobba Dell Shanahan Swearer Christine Dudgeon Wilson & Lawrence B. Wilson Kathleen Kopach Woods 1985 Justice Carol A. Beier & Richard W. Green Michael S. & Jennifer J. Boohar Gerald W. Brenneman Charles W. Cade & Mary Cranford Cade, PhD Melissa L. Conboy Molly A. Daniels Mark M. Deatherage Karen A. Dutcher Charles A. Etherington & Joni Walk Etherington Patrick R. Ford Rodney D. Fouracre

Peggy Glazzard, EdD, JD & Charles D. Glazzard, MD Martin J. Keenan & Julie Castelli Keenan Michael E. & Melinda Lazzo Ann Waxman Lopez Robert J. McCully & Stacey Diane McCully Donald L. Moler Jr. Judith A. Moler Rick G. Morris John C. Nettels Jr. & Sheila M. Nettels Joseph M. Rebein & Susan Waring Rebein Lauren E. Roberts John W. Simpson & Carolyn C. Simpson 1986 Janet L. Arndt & Roger C. Bain Debra Lee Barnett Lisa Walter Beran & Gerald W. Beran Jr. Marjorie A. Blaufuss & Larry J. Libeer Martin R. Brown Colleen A. Cacy & Peter Akmajian Kathryn Carter Daniel A. Cunningham Gilbert E. Gregory Jason B. Harper Sr. Anne Fleishel Harris & Wilbur C. Buckheit John P. Healy & Cathy Rauch Healy Aaron G. Hove & Gayleen Miller Hove Mark E. Humphrey & Karen Sanders Humphrey Craig A. & Antoinette Joyce Hunt David H. & Debi Luce Robin J. Miles Donald L. Norman Jr. Scott W. Sayler & Nancy Zarda Sayler Kathryn Marie Timm Gregory J. Wohlleber Judge William S. Woolley 1987 Jan Fink Call Dave Harder James D. & Karen T. Holt Judge Jeffry L. Jack & Susan Lansdell Jack Michele A. Kessler Robin E. Kluge Dara Trum Miles Jennifer M. & James L. Nelson Robert Edward Nunley Carolyn Boettcher Parmer & David A. Parmer Lynn D. Preheim Sharon M. Reilly Reginald L. Robinson & Jane McGarey Robinson David E. Rogers & Sally Hadley Rogers Steven D. Selbe David E. & Kimberly R. Shay Carol Zuschek Smith Wayne E. Smith Shannon L. Spangler & Michael E. Spangler Marie Parker Strahan & Dennis W. Strahan Kimberley H. Tyson Martha S. Warren Brian C. Wright & Valerie Harrington Bryan L. Wright Stephen R. & Elisabeth T. Zane 1988 Eric N. & Bonnie J. Anderson Katherine J. Bailes Mark C. Bannister Patricia A. Bennett & Michael G. Haefele Kevin M. Connor & Anne L. Connor Clark H. Cummins Patrick X. & Susan E. Fowler Shelly L. Freeman Jon W. & Linda M. Gilchrist Thomas H. Johnson

William A. Kassebaum Professor Stephen R. McAllister Shala Mills Danny C. Peare Douglas G. Peterson Jana Price-Davis Thomas J. Robinson Brad S. & Mary Frances Russell Elizabeth A. Schartz Kathryn A. & Jim Seeberger Martin M. Shoemaker Steven P. & Deborah J. Smith Michael B. & Faina D. White John R. Wiebke Shari L. & Kevin L. Wright 1989 Thomas P. & Elizabeth Alongi Sharon L. Dickgrafe Thomas J. Drees Mark V. Dugan & Joy M. Zimmerman Michael L. Galiga & Dana McGlamery Galiga Robert C. Hunter & Kimberly Duncan Hunter Dorothy M. Ingalls & Kevin K. Jurrens Jennifer M. Kassebaum Kevin K. Kelly & Christy Brady Kelly Robert J. & Rebecca J. Knapp Phyllis Savage Lynn & Randall S. Lynn Lori Connors McGroder Brian K. McLeod Alphonse B. Perkins Deborah L. Klee Riley & John C. Riley Tina A. Smith 1990 John W. & Donna R. Barbian J. Richelle Crow-Johnson Jane A. Deterding Yvette Leerskov Ehrlich Kent R. Erickson Mark C. Hegarty & Janelle K. Hegarty Jennifer Blackshire Hense & John I. Hense Jr. Beth Horth Nanette M. Kraus Samuel P. Logan & P. Diane McGrew Maureen M. Mahoney Crystal Whitebread Mai Madeleine M. McDonough Darrell E. Spain Robert W. Tormohlen William P. Turner Susan Krehbiel William 1991 Michael J. Armstrong Greg Ash Katharina E. Babich Doyle Baker Valerie L. Baldwin Bruce A. Berkley & Kelly Staggenborg Berkley Amy A. Buchele-Ash Louis A. Cohn & Lora A. Cohn, PhD Anna Marie Dempsey Frances Watkins Douthat Julie A. Elston Tommy L. Emerson Jr. Gavin Fritton Hellen L. & Frederick D. Haag John E. Hayes III & Suzanne Lafferty Hayes Eric A. Kuwana & Karen E. Miller-Kuwana Brian R. Matula Deborah Cawley Moeller Michael D. Moeller John C. Pauls Ronald C. Rundberg Dionne M. Scherff & Thomas R. Crawford Paul M. Schmidt Amy Verschoor Skinner

Thomas R. & Linda S. Stanton Scott E.Vincent Jennifer Chaulk Wentz 1992 Mary A. Cabrera Timothy E. Congrove Ellen Maura Curry Laura Clark Fey Dennis J. Highberger Patrick J. Kaine Vernon A. Keller Barbara A. Knops Peter C. Knops Barbara Cochran Mayfield John W. Mitchell Jr. & Margaret Katherine Mitchell Robert B. & Margaret E. Neill Matthew C. Queen & Mary A. Queen, MD Roger A. & Piper T. Scholfield-Johnson Ann & Mark A. Soderberg David R. Springe David B. Wentz Lanette M. Wickham & Frank J. Rebori Jean W. Wise & Morris F. Wise, MD 1993 Marc P. Clements Staci L. Cooper James N. Edmonds Mary Lew Edmonds Nnena N. Egorugwu David M. Fey Shannon E. Giles Jonathan H. Gregor Patrick J. Henderson Evan H. Ice & Jill Redfern Ice Andrew M. Jones Pamela Keller & John W. Keller, MD Timothy J. Kuester Eric V. Love & Jennifer Emerson Love Debra M. Hart McLaughlin Gary W. Owens Jere D. Sellers Veronica R. Sellers 1994 Brett A. Brenner Andrew D. Carpenter Elizabeth Seale Cateforis & David Cateforis Karin Pongratz Church Linda Smith Crist Michael J. Disilvestro Holly A. Dyer Nancy Lampton Grube Patricia A. Konopka Craig A. Kovarik Eric T. & Margo L. Mikkelson Scott J. Miller Thomas H. Mills & Sue Schwartzburg Mills Major Susan E. Mitchell Shon C. Robben & Michelle Travisano Robben Carolyn Wenzel Schott & Gary W. Schott, PhD Karen Zambri Schutter Stephen M. Schutter Erin E. Syring Kevin D. Weakley John R. Weist & Zena Monsour Weist Gordon J. Williams Douglass T. Wingo 1995 Patricia McCoy Bartley Cynthia R. Bryant Patricia J. & Frank F. Castellano Kirt D. DeHaan & Cheryl R. DeHaan Jeffrey R. Emerson

Hugh W. Gill IV & Ingrid Olson Gill Tricia M. Knoll Craig T. Lawson Kendra Lewison Coy M. Martin Kelly M. Martucci Joycelyn Lucas Randle Grant C. Shellenberger Scott B. Strohm Tiffany Torgler Wingo 1996 Gregory C. & Debra S. Brownfield Judith Kloster Carlson Alison D. Dunning Joni J. Franklin Andrew F. & Ann Marie Halaby Mark C. Hauber Casey O. Housley & Jenny Lynch Housley Robin J. Kempf & Peter D. Haxton Charles D. Marvine Joyce Rosenberg Marvine Philip C. & Jill McKnight Gwendelyn Garcia Milligan Jon S. Nunes Rebecca A. Ryan Drucilla J. Sampson Julie L. Unruh Professor Suzanne Valdez 1997 William J. & Rachelle D. Bahr Grant D. & Stephanie J. Bannister Gerald K. Bates & Sheida Hashemy Bates Terrence J. & Kristin S. Campbell Edwin H. & Aramide Fields Sharon E. Greenfield Peter S. Johnston & Sara Peckham Johnston, MD Brad Korell & Justin McNulty Carolyn L. Matthews William P. Matthews Christine McDaniel Novak & Keith Fredrick Novak Richard B. Payne Glen E. Sharp II & Pamela DeMoss Sharp 1998 Brandee L. Caswell & Brian J. Weakley Brent N. Coverdale James R. Davis II Kimberly Perkins Davis Amy M. & Gary W. Decker Brian A. Jackson Carrie E. Josserand Marcia L. & Paul M. Knight Barbara L. McCloud Tyler P. McLeod Ann M. Scarlett Wesley F. Smith & Lisa M. Leroux-Smith Jeffrey C. Tauscher 1999 John F. Baird II Jean Moore Block & Rodney B. Block Amy McNally Brown Cathleen E. Carothers Noreen L. Connolly Daniel C. Estes Bradley R. Finkeldei Wendy M. Green Mark D. Hoover Mindy Patterson McPheeters Jody Lamb Meyer Trey T. Meyer Darin A. Nugent Jason E. Pepe & Jennifer Pepe Matthew D. & Jennifer Richards Tanya E. Rose

Rachel B. Rubin Holly Pauling Smith Alok K. & Gina R. Srivastava 2000 Jennifer S. Brannan Valerie Sargent Eckert Amy D. Fellows John J. & Carolyn K. Gates Marci A. Gilligan Lindy S. Grell Julie D. Hower Heather Jones Christina L. Lewerenz Nicholas P. Mizell & Lisa V. Mizell Adam R. Moore Chad S. Nelson J. Michael Porter & Ruth Merz Forrest T. Rhodes Jr. March M. Runner Bhavi A. Shah Jennifer Stackhouse 2001 Collin B. & Dana Altieri Capt. Michele Stackhouse Bayless Amy Schieferecke Beckstead & Charles A. Beckstead Stacia Gressel Boden Aaron J. Breitenbach Chad B. & Jill S. Cook Scott T. Filmore Erika K. Knopp & Ryan C. Knopp, MD Ricardo A. Kolster Melissa M. Krueger Tamara L. Niles Jacqueline Egr Pueppke Karen P. Ruckert Blake E.Vande Garde & Nicole Copple Vande Garde Michael L. Walden Jane L. & Randy K. Williams William M.Yanek II 2002 Timothy A. Glassco Jay E. Heidrick & Melissa M. Heidrick Crystal Nesheim Johnson Mon Yin Lung & Dr. Wai-Yim Ching Karen M. Mittel Captain Drew G. Roberts Jon A. Strongman David E. Waters Bradley J.Yeretsky 2003 Luke A. Drevets Benjamin A. Halpert Scott D. Kaiser Christy Jensen Rosensteel & Ryan Rosensteel Stacey George Sifton John B. Wilson Katherine Bollig Zogleman 2004 Dennis M. Blackwood & Carole A. Cadue-Blackwood Christopher C. Confer Shaye B. Halpert Andrew T. Jones Kevin C. Koc Jeffrey Li Nathan R. Malloy Arlyn Miller Jeffery Brian Morris Sylvia B. & Kathryn D. Penner Jennifer Malone Stevenson & Ronald P. Stevenson

Darin D. Stowell Jason W. Thompson & Karen Schwarzer Thompson Margaret Dandurand Wilson Will B. Wohlford Emily M.Yeretsky Jonathan N. Zerger 2005 Elizabeth A. Blake Jack V. & Jennifer Brooks Kelley Hickman Catlin & John H. Catlin Allison Ross Confer Philip V. Di Zerega Allen G. Jones Robert F. Kethcart Meredith S. Lang Miguel L’Heureux Christopher B. Phelan Martha R. Titterington Katie McClaflin VanWagner Larkin Evans Walsh Matthew S. Walsh 2006 Brandon H. Bauer David L. Dean Carly E. Farrell Jeffrey W. Gettler Jacob A. Hecker & Lori Jorgenson Hecker Bartholomew W. Howk Christopher T. Long William H. Moore & Kristin Brulez Robert L. O’Connor Sean J. O’Hara & Amy Cox O’Hara Michael P. Schaefer Derek T. Teeter Holly L. Hydeman Teeter Arturo A. Thompson Kristen V. Toner Mary A. & Jason M. Walker Kelli A. Wikoff Jason J. & Kristie Zager 2007 P. Dan Calderon Mark A. Cole Jr. Rachel S. Dean Batsheva Glatt & Mitchell S. Trope Steven W. Grieb Elizabeth M. Hafoka Kathryn L. Harpstrite & Samuel J. Pierron Ryan J. Huschka Allison L. Jones James R. McCullough Carrie B. Temm Heather O’Hara Tombs 2008 Daniel A. & Ree A. Belhumeur Katie J. Cheney Justin D. Elkouri Julia M. Gilmore Gaughan & Michael D. Gaughan Blythe Bradley Glemming Thomas P. Maltese David P. Siever Stephanie L. Sowers Cheri B. Whiteside 2009 Brandon O. Bean Michael T. Crabb Justin A. Hendrix Patrick R. Watkins

KU LAW MAGAZINE 43

donor report FRIENDS Dean Gail B. Agrawal & Naurang M. Agrawal, M.D. Linda Noland Aikins & David M. Aikins Lori Allen Allentown Women’s Center Doris Fay Allison Roger Andrews Family Anonymous Anthony Livestock Co. Jill R. Arensdorf Linda Y. C. Arnold & Kirk Arnold, MD Asian American Bar Association of Kansas City Gina Austin-Fresh & Rick Fresh Charles P. & Lynn E. Bain Baird Holm LLP Cheerie L. & David R. Baker Barber Emerson LC Amy L. Barnard Carolyn Barnett Betty Isaacson Baron & Frank Baron Judith A. Barrett & Orville Barrett Jr. Barristerbooks Inc. Bass & Stagemeyer PC Tae K. & Carl G. Battin Helen L. & Warren L. Beavers Nancy Becknell John H. Beisner Belin Foundation Olivia A. Bennett Gene M. & Jan M. Betts Herschel & Joan Betts Bever Dye Foundation Pamela J. & Blaine W. Bickel Larry J. & Ann H. Bingham John T. Bird Kathleen Blubaugh Joan N. & R. Andrew Brandt Cindy J. & Corvas K. Brinkerhoff Hannah E. Britton LeAnn M. & Jerod L. Brown Bryan Cave LLP Chad Butler William C. Byrnes & Lisa Bailey Lisbeth French Cabrera & Arnold R. Cabrera, MD Cardiovascular Consultants PA Professor Emeritus Robert C. Casad & Sarah McKeighan Casad Donald E. Chambeors Allan J. & Beth Ellen Cigler Mary Kathleen Connell Betty A. Copeland Luis R. Corteguera Deborah L. & Jerry L. Cox Donald L. Creach Ann E. Cudd & Neal C. Becker Marjorie I. Cuthbert Kathy Damron Professor Michael J. Davis & Faye S. Davis Stanley D. Davis & Kathleen Perkins Barbara W. Dehlinger Ky Dehlinger Carter A. Denton Professor Martin B. Dickinson Jr. & Sallie Francis Dickinson Shanna & Kurtis J. Dinkel Edward R. & Mary K. Dobbins Sue Dolezal Downtown Dental Group Professor Christopher R. Drahozal & Kaye M. Drahozal Christopher Duderstadt Hilary A. & Glen A. Duderstadt James E. & Annette B. Dudgeon Bonnie L. Dunn Tammy & Craig K. Dunning Cynthia A. Elliott Robert L. & Phyllis A. Erickson

44 KU LAW MAGAZINE

First National Bank Londa & Eugene Fischer Representative Geraldine Flaharty Fleeson, Gooing, Coulston & Kitch Jack D. Flesher Jan E. Foresman Fort Hays State University Foundation Foulston Siefkin LLP Kathy Francis Sen. Marci A. Francisco & Joe R. Bickford Friends of Jana Mackey Hires W. Gage, DVM & Gail Horner Gage Jan S. Garton Bob Gaug Pamela A. Giesen Ameline Gillet Robin Anne Gingerich Professor Robert L. Glicksman & Emily S. Glicksman Professor David J. Gottlieb & Rita Sloan Gottlieb Connie M. Grafel Donna Graves Mark A. Greenfield, MD Leigh Ann Greve Gail M. Grueneberg Janet Hacker Marian S. Hamilton Nancy Fligg Hampton Christi Hansen Melvin M. & Alice Hawk Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City Hilger Insurance Inc. Professor Laura J. Hines Hinkle Elkouri Law Firm LLC Hite, Fanning & Honeyman LLP Cris & Tom Holcomb Margaret A. Holcomb Geraldine Hughbanks Estate of Mrs. A. Bryce Huguenin Husch Blackwell Sanders LLP Elizabeth Ann Hylton Janelle Jennings-Drummond & D. J. Drummond Robert H. Jerry II & Lisa Nowak Jerry Jock’s Nitch Cathie F. Johnson Gayle Johnson Johnson County Bar Association Johnson-Wyandotte County NOW Lee S. Johnson & Janelle Davies Johnson Kansas Bar Association Kansas Democratic LGBT Caucus Kansas Equality Coalition Inc. Kansas Women Attorneys Association Professor Mike Kautsch & Elaine Kautsch KC Lesbian Gay & Allied Lawyers Kenneth & Charlene Keith Kennedy & Coe LLC Derele W. Knepper LeAnn Koblitz Christopher Korth Sherrie C. Kreiser KU Public Interest Law Society Brenda & Jack D. Kuhlmann Sharylyn Gelvin Lacey Greer S. Lang Lathrop & Gage LC Sirpa Lawson Legal Association for Privacy Protection Inc. Sherry & Randy Leiker Deana I. & Edwin D. Lenkner Professor Elizabeth Weeks Leonard & Thomas L. Leonard Ann J. Lerner Greg & Debbie Leschisin Paul T. Lewis Kacey Q. Link

Judge James K. Logan & Beverly Jennings Logan LaVerta M. Logan Bryan E. Luttrell Jeanne Mann Judith & Gerald D. Marten James L. & Patricia J. Martin Martin, Pringle, Oliver, Wallace & Bauer LLP Charles A. Marvin & Betsy Wilson Marvin Juliene A. Maska Professor Stephen W. Mazza Shane J. & Kaelyn M. McCall John D. & Paula E. McClung Professor Sandra Craig McKenzie Charles A. McMonagle & Susan Betts Memorial Lunch Donors Representative Julie M. Menghini & Henry C. Menghini Charlotte Meyer Professor Keith G. Meyer & Janet A. Meyer Timothy A. Miller, Ph.D. & Tamara Dutton Billie P. & Roger J. Mott Deanna M. Mott Diane & Kenneth Mulanax Brian Mulhern Judy L. Nelson Dianne Kem Nicodemus & John L. Nicodemus Stephen E. Noll & Marianne George Noll Norton Hubbard Ruzicka & Kreamer LC Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart PC Darla G. Olivier Donna Hauser O’Neal Mildred J. O’Neal & John W. O’Neal Other’s Inc. Dale B. & Kathryn D. Parke Jane H. Parsons Cari Jo Patterson Sandra J. Patti Payne & Jones Foundation Peoples Bank Polsinelli Shughart PC Gian Giacomo Porcu Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation Debra Prideaux Jean Humphrey Proffitt & Roy F. Proffitt Pamela J. Przybelski Christie Frick Reynolds & David O. Reynolds The Ethel and Raymond F. Rice Foundation Norvin & Janet M. Richards Marie Winterburg Robb & Steven A. Robb Mary Ann Robinson Bernice M. Rohlich & Gerald A. Rohlich Jr. John C. Roper & Valerie Vandenberg Roper Robin L. Rosenberg Jean A. Rosenthal N. Renee & Jerry D. Roths H. David Rybolt Jr. & Barbara Seelig Rybolt Bonnie S. & David W. Sanderson Scharnhorst Ast & Kennard PC Robert H. & Michele D. Scherzer DeeDee & William Schneider Terry R. & Elizabeth A. Schoeni Lori Schrock Schroeder & Schroeder Paul D. Schumaker, PhD Sandra L. Scott

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Susan M. Scott Seekers Sunday School Class Dr. Janet Sharistanian Shook, Hardy & Bacon Foundation Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Sloan, Eisenbarth, Glassman, McEntire & Jarboe LLC Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP Sonnenschein Scholars Foundation South & Associates PC Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP Tonya & Alan Spresser St. Luke’s South Cardiac Rehab Department St. Paul’s Parents Guild Richard S. Starks II & Stephanie A. Starks Static Hair Salon Akiko & William B. Steele Sean R. & Dora B. Stevens Karen R. & Evan R. Stewart Elizabeth D. Stinson Stinson Morrison Hecker LLP Gary C. & Maureen P. Stock Rep. Suzanne Storm Student Bar Association Patricia M. Stull Sunflower Foundation: Health Care for Kansans Professor Ellen E. Sward Helen N. Thayer Sheila M. Thiele Kenneth D. Thomson Belinda L. Tidd Mari Ellen Tucker Frances B. Tutt UMB Bank NA United States District Court Bar Registration University of Kansas Medical Center Auxiliary Inc. Upland Hills Health Frederick V. & Phyl Vance Fern M. & Herbert L.VanGieson Marta V. Vicente Helen & Mark Viehman Leona M.Vocasek Dr. James L.Voogt & Mary Jane Voogt Diane D. Wahto Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Professor Stephen J. Ware Roxie L. Warren Ronald A. Wasinger Teresa G. Webb Professor William E. Westerbeke Wheat State Pizza Inc. Jane Whisman Kathleen A. White Wichita Bar Association K. T. Wiedemann Foundation Inc. Harry E. Wigner Jr. & Beth A. M. Wigner Estate of Aaron A. Wilson Jr. Professor Melanie D. Wilson Francis & LaVerne Winterburg Fund Women in Law Woner, Glenn, Reeder, Girard & Riordan, PA Teresa A. Woody Janice Thomson Workman & Kenton A. Workman Linda G. & Ronald E. Wright John G.Younger, PhD

For a more detailed report, including a geographical donor list, please visit www.law.ku.edu/donors. This report covers fiscal year 2009 (July 1, 2008-June 30, 2009). Please bring omissions or errors to the attention of Sandy Patti at patti@ku.edu or 785.864.9204.

Spencer Research Library/University of Kansas Libraries

The Way We Were

Frank Kirk, L’67, shown here chained to the Jimmy Green statue, lives in Prairie Village and works at Merrill Lynch in Kansas City, Mo.

‘Prisoner’ of law made International news Reunion Weekend story prompted us to dig up this photo from the archives. The image shows Frank Kirk handcuffed to the Jimmy Green statue on the final day of the spring 1967 term. Kirk had never missed a day of class in three years of law school. Determined to botch his perfect record, Kirk’s buddies ensured that he would be stuck outside for his last class before graduation. When Dean James Logan got wind of the joke, he moved the entire class outside. Those are Kirk’s classmates

taking notes on the steps of Green Hall, and that’s the back of Dean Logan’s head as he delivers his trusts lecture. Members of the Class of 1969 remembered the day well and recounted the tale in October during the Reunion Dinner. Another version of this photo ran on the front page of the Lawrence Journal-World, and the story spread to the national and international media, including the New York Post, the Washington Post and papers as far away as London and Paris.

“I had people from all over the world send me the picture,” Kirk said. In a 2006 interview with the Journal of the Kansas Bar Association, Kirk told columnist Matthew Keenan, L’84, that this was the third attempt to detain him from his perfect attendance record. Previously, his classmates had removed his car battery, forcing him to take a cab, and locked the front door of his apartment. He went out a window instead. “You can imagine how concerned I was about making it to the bar exam,” Kirk said.

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KU Law Magazine | Fall 2009