Issuu on Google+

KYLE FRANCIS | UNDERGRADUATE PORTFOLIO

“... since architecture covers the entire field of human life, real functional architecture must be functional mainly from the human point of view. If we look deeper into the processes of human life, we shall discover that technique is only an aid, not a definite and independent phenomenon therein.� Alvar Aalto, The Humanizing of Architecture

Function is a term widely associated with technology and refined technique. But within architecture, where does the need for human interaction play within the function of a building? Sustainability and renewability are paramount and should be designed as such, but what of the human perception? As rational as people attempt to be, there is an element of spiritual necessity required to achieve contentment, an aspect of irrationality required to create order in everyday life. How this aspect manifests itself within architecture is a question that drives me. In my studies I have focused on storytelling and culture to equate human perception to functional architecture.

Kyle Francis Email: kyle.francis89@gmail.com Phone: (206) 349-1802

Education

Experience

Skills Volunteer Work

B.A. Architectural Studies University of Washington

GPA: 3.33

1st Place in HP Kenya Design Build Competition (2013) Vice President’s Honor Roll (2010) 1st Place CS Robot Sumo Competition (2009)

Awards Received:

Finish Line

(Jun 2012- Present)

Sales Associate Consistent top 5 salesmen The UW Rome, Italy Center (Sept 2012 - Dec 2012) Integrated cross-cultural learning into lesson plans. Function with high level of ambiguity Stream Team Member (Oct 2009 - Dec 2010) Environmental Rehabilitation for local parks and streams Research Assistant (June 2009-Aug 2009) Research experience for undergraduates, focusing on renewable resources Research for underwater autonomous vehicle published Avid Tutor (June 2009 - Sept 2009) Tutoring students grades 7-9 in math and science

Proficient in:

Adobe Suite AutoCad Google Sketchup Kerkythea M. Office Rhino Vray 47° North Coordinator [UW architecture Club] (2012-2013) Co-Writer for Blog article for ARCH [BE] Log (2012) Host Rainy Dawg Radio Show [UW radio] (2011-2013) Engineering Club (2008-2010) N.E.R.D. Club (2008-2010)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SAAM ADDITION DOGMA 95 An addition to the Seattle Asian Art Museum (SAAM)

A film Co-Op for Dogma 95 Professionals/students

DESIGN BUILD HP funded Design/Build Competition for a School in Kenya

DERIVE The Uncovering of Urban Fabric Experientially

STRETTA A Cultural Center inspired by Ancient and contemporary Rome

ENVR. OUTLOOK

WRITER’S ROOM

A Center for Environmental Education

A Study of Concept Driven Design

A

D

SAAM D

I

T

I

O

N

Through using Janus, the Roman God of transition and time, the addition’s language suggest movement and progression. A trait that is complementary to the rigid neoclassical language of the existing museum. Through this gesture the addition seeks to tell a story between contemporary and traditional arts and how the two culminate to establish a single whole.

N

1 2 3 4

Connection to Existing Contemporary Art Gallery Dark Gallery Exhibition Space

5 6 7 8 9

1

Library Ancient Art Gallery Classroom Cafe Studio

10 11 12 13 14

Entry Lobby Conservation Lab Office Coat Room

10

7 2

3

8

7

14

L

L

2

A

A

13

5

13

11 13 5

B

B

L

L

9

4 1 12

6

Main Floor

Ground Floor

Basement Floor

The conceptual layouts of the plans are derived from Carl F. Gould’s original plans for the museum. Gould’s design intended to have two courtyards addressing the north side of the Park. This gesture of connection between the park and museum was lost in the final design. The addition proposed sought to reestablish this language by means of two vertical voids servicing circulation.

The second conceptual force for the project is the notion of a dual facade, wherein the Greek God Janus was used as a Muse. Numerous facade sketches were done before establishing a facade aesthetic that would not overpower the surrounding park.

AA

BB

Given the park surroundings, the addition is designed to tightly press against the existing building. This gesture limits any loss of surrounding landscape.

DOGMA 95 This project is a studio work space for local film professionals and students of Dogma 95. To Dissolve the barrier between film and reality, Dogma 95 doctrine is centralized around a film’s immersion into the context of its place. The Project is located within the historical Ballard District in Seattle, WA. Given the cultural significance of the surrounding area, the project is narrative of interaction between the individual and a greater community.

7 6

8

3

4

1st Floor

1 Library 2 Studio

Ground Plan

3 Lobby 4 Courtyard 5 Market Space

Basement Plan

6 Theater 7 Reception/Gallery 8 REC/Green Room

5

1

Connection The intertwining of Public and Private spheres is done through inviting Ballard activities into the negative space shaped by the building. These activities are centered around Ballard’s prominent weekend markets that take place on the street of the project’s location. Thus, through the courtyard, public and private program become interlocked; a situation that parallels the decrees in Dogma 95 doctrine.

2

Public

Private

Material Given the transparency between the methodology used and the final product of Dogma 95 films, wood formed concrete was chosen as the primary building material. Moreover, the rustic brick of the adjacent historical buildings are exposed, further emphasizing the intertwining of the site and program of the building. Moreover, the warm and cool tones of the project are drawn from the hues and textures of the historical and rustic Ballard District.

HP DESIGN/BUILD COMPETITION 1st Place

The program called for the design for a computer lab space for the Halfumbre secondary school in Kenya. The design pulls inspiration from the courtyard vernaculars of Kenya. Moreover, the design is aware that it would be a cultural hub in rural Kenya, thus the space is permeable and flexible. These traits are advantageous for passive heating and cooling, as well as allowing the space to be multifunctional. The competition was team based with a $3000 prize for first place. Teams consisted of Architects, Engineers and Construction Managers.

Given the scarcity of materials and efforts to be cost effective, brick cladding for the building doubles as formwork. This strategy significantly lessens the cost of flat wood, an expensive commodity in rural Kenya.

1) 100% All Natural Daylighting 2) Space left for maximum ventilation when desired 3) Suspended radiant barrier and cloth protects from radiant heat exposure 4) Shuttered metal and reed screens allow for airflow, shading, and security 5) Rain collection for community and students 6) Possibility for PV panels to power computer lab

The project does not have mechanical systems in place, thus it relies entirely on passive heating and cooling. Moreover, given the lack of standard construction practices in the area, numerous elements required detailed drawings, including: windows, doors, and column sections.

DERIVE The Derive is an attempt to understand the lore of a city by venturing, without premonition, through it. This Derive focused on Garibaldi Hill. The site, as with all parts of Rome, was deeply layered with historic events. These historical events are uncovered experientially through wandering through the city fabric following hints and clues that draw one’s attention. Through this phenomenon, the identity of the city fabric is unraveled experientially, not analytically through text and research.

ANITA STATUE

GARIBALDI STATUE

VILLA CORSINI BOTANICAL GARDENS

ACQUA PAOLO ST. PIETRO IN MONTORIO

TEMPIETTO STATION OF THE CROSS FACIST MAUSOLEUM

STRETTA

The program called for a cultural center within the Testaccio district of Rome, Italy. The building pulls from the typology of the adjacent, newly built, market in Testaccio. Moreover, the dialogue between tectonic and stereometric is analogous to the relationship between ancient and contemporary culture

in Italy. The stereometric walls are simple and load bearing, like the bases of Roman culture; yet, the tectonic folds intertwine and carve themselves into the simple mass. This relationship tells the struggle of contemporaneity within a culture that is so heavily reliant on its ancient past.

CULTURAL CENTER Positive Space

TESTACCIO MARKET Negative Space

AA

BB

A

5

1

B

8 12

9

B

13 2 14

6 3

13

10

15

6

7

4

16

11

A

Ground Plan 1 2 3 4

Lobby Calcetto Large Hall Laundromat

1st Floor Plan 5 6 7

Cafe Locker Room Open Labs

2nd Floor Plan

8 9 10 11

Auditorium Gallery Workshop Classroom

3rd Floor Plan 12 13 14 15 16

Film Room REC Room Meeting Space Mediateque Digital Lab

Environmental Outlook

16 min

This outdoor facility is designed to educate young students from 6th12th grade. The building is located in Discovery Park, Seattle’s largest park. The concept is derived from the edge condition between the open grass plains and tree cover. The form straddles this edge condition. This gesture is paramount in the architectural narration of the site conditions experientially to the students inhabiting the building.

8 min

4 min

2 min

Site Conditions

Bounding Box

Building Registration

Program Adjustment

3 1 2

1 Lab 2 Porch 3 Housing

WRITER’S ROOM This was a conceptual exercise in which each student was given a 15 by 25 meter rectangle to design from. Any constructed walls were to be the product of excavation from the site. The space was to be designed for a writer, as his or her innermost sanctum of meditation.

The design focuses on the procession into an inner courtyard space with a reflective pool filled by a trickling waterfall. The room for the writer to work is housed underneath the waterfall overlooking the reflecting pool. This relationship is symbolic of the connection between the mind or the individual, and the greater cosmos or community. The writer is a constant contributor to the greater whole as well as retaining a constant status as its observer. The model was done with Styrofoam formwork and plaster. Tape was applied to the formwork to achieve desired wall textures.

THANK YOU

(206) 349-1802 kyle.francis89@gmail.com


Kyle Francis