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Photography MR KYLE ROSS Styling & Concept ANNA VOLOSENKO Creative Direction KAHMARL Hair ATSUSHI TAKITA using BUMBLE & BUMBLE MAU ANDREA CHIU using MAC PRO Model LOU LOU @ PROFILE

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EDITORS NOTE

We’re back! With two covers that manage to embody the vast set of contrasting ideas which have lead us to where we are today, slightly grown and only getting bigger. This time the theme is Revival and we’ve literally dug deep into the closet to find lots of cute moments in time which deserve to be brought back to life. When you think of revival now, you may think of the ‘90s – high top fades, Acid House, Hip Hop and platform trainers. You might even think of vintage clothing. For us, however, revival is more than that; it’s about bringing back the aspects of culture that people forgot – from all eras. Reminiscing on aspects that help to shape where we are now, and remembering the past in our own way. This issue is close to our hearts and we are so proud to bring you our second issue – it’s been a hard, but rewarding experience and the best thing about it all is it can only get better; we have grown up so much since the last issue and I cannot wait for this to evolve into something even more amazing. This issue includes some delightful treats including an interview with creative whirlwind, Daniel Lismore, where we talk Sorapol; dress up and Isabella Blow. We head into the future to visit fashion fembot Alexis Knox, where she is building the perfect man – we call him Nik Thakkar (phwoar!). And, of course, we’ve got some amazing visual content to, with photos from Kyle Ross, Louie Banks and the lovely Phillip Suddick.

A massive thank-you to Passing Clouds, the cute venue in Dalston, without which the Holi shoot would not have been possible Passing Clouds 1 Richmond Road, E8 4AA

Fashion week has dawned upon us – and what better day than the first, to release our second issue. This time round, we have a much more pivotal focus on fashion. Make sure to check in on the website, we’ve worked so hard to bring you some fab content and the layout is looking pretty smokin’. http://www.WeAreCollision.com We’d love to take the time out to thank everyone who was involved in the making of this issue – those who helped to make it that little bit more special. We’ve got a new fashion editor, Anna; plus as usual our photo editor Kyle has been a star. Whitehair Co, BLOW & Pop, you’ve provided some amazing pieces for us to shoot with. You’re all amazing and we lurves you! x

-MELCHI & KAHMARL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & CREATIVE DIRECTOR

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Dress TOPSHOP Shoes OFFICE Long Purple Disk Necklace MARY ME JIMMY PAUL All Other Accessories STYLIST OWN Headpiece STYLIST OWN 10

CONTENTS 01 HOLI Fa s h i o n Ed i to r An n a Volose n ko, te ams u p with Mr. Kyl e Ro s s to b rin g th e fe stival of colou r to life .

COVERS

1 0 P S Y C H E D E L I C STAT ES WeA re C o l l i s i o n gets vintage in a revival with ma s te r mi n d ph otograph e r Lou ie Ban ks. Fe atu rin g i nte r vi e w s w i th Sami Kn ight, T h omas Walke r, Ge org i e Ho b d a y & Lou ie h imse lf. 2 0 D A N I E L L I S M O RE We c a tc h a fe w words with th e eve r-fabu lou s Dani e l L i s mo re , o n e h alf of th e ge n iu s th at is Sorapol. 2 4 N U R EB EL L I O N C re a t i ve d i re c tor Kah marl Gordon bre aks th e r u l e s , i n a fa s h ion e ditorial with P h illip Su ddick 3 8 N I K T H A K K A R & AL EXIS KNOX T h e s e t wo fa sh ion mave ricks get pe rson al an d dis c u s s t h e i n s a n d ou ts of day-to-day life in on e of t h e wo r l d ’s m ost excitin g an d cre ative in du strie s.

N U R E BE LL ION ( P 2 4 )

4 6 VA N E S S A B L A KE COS MET ICS Ed i to r Me l c h i introdu ce s you to Van e ssa Blake C o s met i cs , w ith An n alie se Daye s f rom AN T M. 4 8 R EV I V E , R E C Y CL E, REP L ACE S ta n Fe r n a n do examin e s ou r mode rn obse ssion w i t h p a s t i c h e an d th e cyclical n atu re of tre n ds. 5 0 RYA N H A R C O n e h a l f of t h e award-win n in g produ ct de sign stud i o s te p s u p to te ll u s abou t h is cre ative inf lu e n ce s a n d a d i f fe re nt pe rspe ctive towards art. 52 SPRING FLING A n n a r u n s d own a fe w e sse ntial pie ce s to add to yo u r s p r i n g wardrobe .

PSYC HE D E LIC STAT E S ( P 1 0 )

5 4 A L A D I S P O S I T ION O n l i n e Ed i to r Natalie Ban n e rman gets to grips with t h e hu s b a n d an d wife du o th at are fast be comin g a fo rc e to b e re ckon e d with . 5 6 N O B UL L S H I T G U IDE T O INT ERNING O u r e d i to r- a t- large an d se rial inte rn , Le on ie C u mi s key, te l l s i t h ow it is.

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Melchi Anyinsah melchi@wearecollision.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Kahmarl Gordon kahmarl@wearecollision.com

PUBLISHER Rezwana Uddin rez@wearecollision.com PHOTOGRAPHIC EDITOR Kyle Ross kyle@wearecollision.co.uk

FASHION EDITOR Anna Volosenko anna@wearecollision.com

EDITOR-AT-LARGE Leonie Cumiskey leonie@wearecollision.com

ONLINE EDITOR Natalie Bannerman natalie@wearecollision.com

CULTURE EDITOR Becky Snowden becky@wearecollision.com SUBMISSIONS WeA reC o l l i s i o n i s a p u b l i c a t i o n w h i c h t hrive s t h ro u gh n ew ta l e nt. If yo u a re a n aspiring designer, artist, singer or creative a nd want to c o l l abo ra te w i t h u s o r h a ve your work featured, please do get in touch.

For more information email us at info@wearecollision.com W E A R E C O L L I S I O N . C O M

CONTRIBUTORS Louie Banks, Nik Thakkar, Daniel Lismore, Ben Langmaid, Abi Browning, Michelle Court, Takanori Yamaguchi Drelle Wickham, Alexis Knox, Andrew Aherne, Chantal Weldon, Michael St. John Savva, Phillip Suddick, Atsushi Takita, Andrea Chiu WITHOUT OUR CONTRIBUTORS, WEARECOLLISION WOULDN’T BE HERE TODAY. ON BEHALF OF THE MAGAZINE WE THANK YOU! FROM CONCEPTION TO PUBLISHING, WEARECOLLISION IS A 100% INDEPENDENT PRODUCT, MADE FOR FREE – BECAUSE REAL CREATIVITY SHOULD NEVER BE COMPROMISED BY A PRICE TAG!

WWW.WEARECOLLISION.COM All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or part without permission from the publisher. 12 PUBLISHED 4 TIMES A YEAR BY WEARECOLLISION LIMITED

58 N EW W O R LD ORDER C u l t u re e d i to r B e c k y S n owd e n l ooks at th e possibility of a n e w wo rl d o rd e r, a n d a s ks we a t h e r o r n ot it wou ld re ally be a bad th in g. 61 B EN L A N G M A I D TAL KS FAME We tal k to t h e h i d d e n h a l f of La Rou x, to f in d ou t abou t th e advan ta g e s of s u c c e ss with ou t fame . 62 C H E M I C A L REV IVAL W h at h a p p e n s w h e n yo u ta ke fo u r dru gs, an d re pre se nt th e m as feel i n g s ? T h e C h e mi c a l Revi va l with P h illip Su ddick is reve latory... 70 B A NJ EE W h at i s B a n j e e? Ed i to r- i n - c h i ef Me lch i u se s th e SS1 3 Me at C olle ct i o n to h e l p p a i nt a de scriptive pictu re . 76 A B I B R O W N I N G O N T HROW BACKS D an c e a r t i s t Ra p u n ze l g i ve s u s h e r stan ce on th e mu sic in du stry. 78 J UER G EN T E L L ER : W OO O n l i n e Ed i to r Na ta l i e B a n n e r ma n gets to grips with th e Hu sban d an d W ife d u o t h a t a re fa s t b e c o m min g a force to be re con e d with . 79 C O N T I N UED READING 80 S T O C KIS T S

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PSYCHEDELIC STATES Photography LOUIE BANKS Fashion Editor ANNA VOLOSENKO Hair SAMI KNIGHT using TIGI BEADHEAD MAU THOM WALKER using REVLON Model GEORGIE @ PROFILE Photography Assistants THOMAS DHANENS & SYLVIA DRAZDZIULYTE ALL VINTAGE CLOTHING FROM HOUSE OF LIZA

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BEHIND THE LOOK

SAMI KNIGHT

Whether it be a long flowing ponytail or a short back and sides, hair makes us feel good. Sami Knight is a creative hairstylist who has permed, dyed and crimped everyone from Paloma Faith to Amelia Lily, and we were lucky enough to have him hairstyle our own ‘60s inspired revival shoot! We took some time out to have a good old light natter with him to talk locks; revivals and the future interview by melchi anyinsah Hey Sami, you’re known for your extravagant hair dos and have worked with a variety of publications. With such a huge choice, what do you most enjoy about hairstyling?

What are you working on now? What can we expect from you in the future? I’m working quite a lot with Amelia Lily at the moment - she’s an absolute sweetheart. I love being there watching her journey, it’s a pleasure to be part of. Also lots of editorials with my astoundingly good team; Louie Banks is an incredible photographer who is constantly surprising me. Lucy Wearing rocks my socks every time she paints a new face for my hair to frame. I did a little shoot with photographer Alice Hawkins in LA and Las Vegas over the summer which was really special! I’ve been going on trips with her for years, as we’ve been friends for almost a decade. This was the first time I was able to add a little something from my head onto her canvas. She’s an absolute visionary when it comes to her work, and I loved it… More of that please!! Not sure what the future will bring… It’s always different, which makes it so much fun!

The transformation… It makes me happy when someone is really thrilled with how they look, whether that’s because they’ve never seen themselves that way; or because they look like themselves, but on their best day. It’s a lovely feeling. How does one become a hairstylist? And do you have any wise words for someone who wants to get into hairstyling? My journey was a little more unconventional than most, as I was an apprentice. It might not be the easiest way, but I’m not sure I’d have done it if I had to go to college, and do ‘days in a salon’. Find someone who’s really passionate about hairdressing, and get them to teach you - the passion rubs off.

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A R T

INVINCIBLE &CO BANKS There’s nothing more thrilling than watching creatives get together to make something that’s both visually stunning and fun to produce. Louie Banks is a fantastical photographer who pushes the boundaries of beauty, post-production and colour with his photography boasting a stuffed portfolio with shots for i-D; Dazed & Confused and Wonderland Magazine. Georgina Hobday is a model and Louie’s long term friend; a union that stays unbroken but yields gorgeously different results each time they work together. We caught up with them at our ‘60s Revival shoot for a quick chat about muses; bonds and, of course, revivals. Get into and enjoy!

interveiw melchi anyinsah photography by louie banks

You’ve photographed for many acclaimed publications and shot a plethora of different models; what has been you’re favourite shoot so far? L: I couldn’t possibly single out just one as I have enjoyed so many of them! It’s not always just editorials with models that get me exited though; for example I really enjoyed my photoshoot with Zandra Rhodes for Schon Magazine as she was a lot of fun and is an inspiration. As a photographer with a distinct direction and style; where do you find your inspiration? What do you love to capture and why? L: I find inspiration everywhere, I think a lot of people are really only inspired by a certain amount of things and are quite closed to anything but those. I think my taste is very eclectic so I can find inspiration in art, photography; music; film; somebody on the street; a dream, anything... I do tend to find myself most inspired by era’s though, and the different ideals of what ‘stylish’ is, or ahead of the time from each era. I know you have both worked together a numerous amount of times, how important is the relationship between model and photographer? L: Well as a photographer I think you have to be good at building a quick bond with your subject whoever they are - and putting them at ease, so I think that is a quality a photographer should possess. I also think it makes a real difference when you are comfortable with the subject and the subject trusts you and doesn’t hold back, I 22

Above - Portraits of Georgie taken by Louie Banks, http://louiebanks.com

Would you consider the partnership as an artist and muse type? Do you both feel as if the term ‘Muse’ is still relevant? L: I think it is still relevant. I have had a few muses; a few girls I have photographed many times, and feel are three of my best friends... Elin Amos, Mimi Wade and Georgie, and anybody who knows my work will know this to be true. Of course I also feel that it’s nice to have change in your work, I would never limit myself in any way... So I have my favourites but also love meeting and shooting new people.

first shot Georgie for a fashion style YO!Sushi Campaign when I was 17 and she was 15/16... Georgie how old where you?? G: 16! It was so much fun. L: And we have shot many times since then and also hung out a lot outside of photo shoots, and I know, for me, it makes a huge difference when it comes to taking photos... plus Georgie is an amazing model anyway, so it is a double bonus for me! G: If it’s mega commercial then I guess it doesn’t matter so much. However, if you have a good relationship with the photographer then the pictures are usually more fun and adventurous. You can bounce of each other to create something that’s beautiful to look at.

G: I wouldn’t describe it as such. I’d be honoured to be anyone’s muse though – it’s a hefty title; and in regards to myself and Louie… I just like him; he’s fun and his pictures are great. I enjoy working with him, it doesn’t feel like work...

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FA S H I O N

DANIEL LISMORE words Melchi Anyinsah photography by Mr Kyle Ross

A creative prodigy, an inspiration and all around man-about town. A muse to many such as the up and coming Sorapol (to which Lismore also acts as creative Director); he’s been the main feature at an Exhibition in the Tate Modern and has a hat made for him by British musical Legend Boy George! It doesn’t end there, our Photography editor Mr Kyle Ross went to take some lovely photos – and boy did they have a lot of fun (even Amanda Lepore had to get in on the action and retweet the goings on)… Lismore has so much in the pipeline and he couldn’t wait to share it with us and as your treat, we are going to share it with you! Check online to read the full interview and take in the theatricality that is Daniel Lismore. www.wearecollision.com

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NIK THAKKAR & ALEXIS KNOX photography mr kyle ross

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LONDON’S MOST EXCITING CREATIVE DUO NIK THAKKAR AND ALEXIS KNOX We Are Collision had the pleasure of spending a day with two of London’s finest fashion creatives, Nik Thakkar and Alexis Knox. Both established in their respective trades - creative branding and fashion styling, Nik and Alexis have been bringing a taste of their unique flair and talent to the industry, working with names in fashion and pop from Lagerfeld to Gaultier and Charli XCX to Marina and the Diamonds. Nik and Alexis interviewed each other to find out more about what each of them had in store creatively, their inspirations and ambitions. interview nik thakkar

NIK: Alexis, I know that you’re an immensely multi-faceted woman (DJ, stylist, TV presenter), tell me more about what you do....

to get the low-down on what’s hot and who created it. I’ve partnered with some great brands on projects including Warner Music, Louis Vuitton, Dolce & Gabbana and more. And yes, I have my TV show, which is probably on air if you are reading this! I’m a judge on Fashion One’s Correspondent Search which airs globally in hundreds of counties around the world. I’ve also got a book coming out and a few other projects in the pipeline.

ALEXIS: Well it’s a tricky one! By day I am a freelance fashion stylist, art director and also Fashion Director of international music and fashion magazine Notion. At Notion I get to unleash and create editorial fashion shoots which I push my creativeness to the limits with! And as a freelance fashion stylist, I work with a wide variety of Girl Power pop stars! By night I LOVE to DJ, it’s great because its a chance to get out and see everyone I love.

I want to be

to know what inspired you doing what you’re doing?

ALEXIS: I definitely have a family of fierce dressers! Both my grandmas are beautiful and stylish woman, so I was brought up understanding the power of coordinating your heels and handbag! I was also extremely close to my late grandfather, a really exceptional man who was an entrepreneur so taught me great business from a young age... But he was also a man of impeccable taste, travelling around Europe buying brilliant menswear from Italy and where ever we travelled!

...And I can say the same about you Mr Thakkar - you run a creative brand consultancy, have your own TV show, edit a hugely successful site....what else? NIK: Now you’re flattering me. Yes, I have my consultancy, Nephew London - which develops branded content across fashion and music. I get to work with some incredible people and brands from doing the Diet Coke fashion partnerships (Gaultier, Lagerfeld etc.) to short films, buzz campaigns and brand launches. It’s a really exciting time, especially as fashion and music have never been so closely linked – and like you, I get to tie my two passions together. I also have my digital platform KARLISMYUNKLE.COM - which is a pop couture site hero-ing creatives across the industry. It’s basically the place you go

Nik, I feel like you suddenly landed in London all engines firing...being fierce and fashionable... Did you land with a bang or have you been hiding behind the scenes? NIK: I guess it is a bit of both - I’ve been working behind the scenes a lot over the last few continued on p45 48

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years, but with some incredibly exciting people like Jean Paul Gaultier and Karl Lagerfeld for the Diet Coke collaborations, Dita Von Teese on a Wonderbra project and lots of pop artist like Natalia Kills, VV Brown etc. I think that the fact that I’ve been so heavily involved with a lot of this, means that my credibility within the industry started coming through on a more mainstream level. It’s part of a bigger movement. A lot of behind the scenes creatives are being recognised and appreciated on a consumer level now - particularly in fashion. A lot of this is in part to social media and visual platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest giving creatives their moment to be hailed within the public sphere - a couple of good examples of this are Terry Richardson and Nicola Formichetti. Five years ago, photographers and stylists were never so publicly recognisable, but this has evolved so much and will continue to grow.

clubs, creative agencies etc. It was one of those things that I knew I had to do, bite my tongue and get the job done. There are so many people out there with a really “deserving” attitude who feel like they are owed something, but we all had to start somewhere hardcore and I guess that is my most memorable story. Since then it hasn’t exactly been clean sailing, lots of late nights, 24 hour days, barely any sleep, but I guess I get off on it. The end result is always totally worth it.

Back to the fun stuff! Your work (like mine) is a fusion of fashion and pop. Who are your creative inspirations right now, musically and in fashion? ALEXIS: Ah wow well I have so many- I’m so lucky to genuinely LOVE the artists and designers I work with! I’m really excited about a music video I styled for Charli XCX called You (Ha Ha Ha) - it features lots of girls with attitude and lots of 90s inspired styling! I’m so obsessed with the 90s and also cyber rave culture, so when I do editorials they tend to be of that!

So how exactly did you get started Alexis? ALEXIS: I worked and worked and worked my butt of for free 24/7, I assisted and did everything I could, all when I was supposed to be at friends birthdays, or with family. I have the most understanding friends and family as I really don’t get to see people much. A lot of my friends however are people I also work with, I’m friends with lots of designers and PRs, people who I love but also share the same work ethic and enthusiasm with!

So that’s my inspiration. Your quite an inspirational dresser.... Who will we see you wearing out next? NIK: Thanks Alexis! I like wearing a mixture of emerging designers and classic pieces. I met a design duo called House of Nines during London Collections: Men and am obsessed with their structured shirts, Versace and Jean Paul Gaultier’s AW13-14 collections were also perfection.

I’ve realised Nik I don’t even know how you got started? I know that you’ve worked with all these major clients, but there must have been a time when you were the office skivvy somewhere?

Get to know more about Nik and Alexis at their websites and social pages:

NIK: Yes! I totally was. My first proper industry job was as an intern for a glamorous PR agency. It was mid-Summer and I was loaded up like a donkey with a back pack, two huge Selfridges yellow bags and to top it off a laptop case, each filled to the brim with flyers for an event. I remember stumbling around Central London, dripping in sweat, handing them out to “cool” hair salons, bars,

w w w . n i k t h a k k a r . c o m FACEBOOK.COM/NIKTHAKKAR | @NIKTHAKKAR w w w . a l e x i s k n o x . c o m FACEBOOK.COM/ALEXISKNOX | @ALEXISKNOX

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B E A U T Y

VANESSA BLAKE

It’s very rare to find a company which not only creates virtually guilt-free products, but also consistently strives to find ways of looking after the well-being of their customers and suppliers. Vanessa Blake Cosmetics is in a league of its own when it comes to beauty. It’s perfect for those who want to achieve a professional look, and a surefire musthave for any chemically-conscious beauty junkie! VB Cosmetics provides skin care treatments as well as general make up, so when you’re done for the day and your face needs to breathe, you can choose from a variety of skin care products to keep skin fresh and free from oil and dirt. The range of unique cosmetics encompasses essentials such as liquid foundations with SPF, mineral face powders and shimmering lip glosses. One of the best aspects of the Vanessa Blake line is that they are suited to all skin types and colours – so whether your skin type is dry and pale (like cocaine) or oily and bronzed (like Peter Andre), there is bound to be something to match your skin! Not only that, VB Cosmetics now offer a blending bar where cosmetologists will blend your own bespoke cosmetic suited to your every need and love. The blending bar will blend your lipstick, lip gloss and foundation – they will even keep a record so the next time you come in, you can get a new one mixed in no time! My skin feels amazingly cared for already! words melchi anyinsah

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Photography PHILLIP SUDDICK MAU TIGER LILLY Annaliese Wears Makeup VANESSA BLAKE COSMETICS Top AMI CLUBWEAR

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MILES Photography SARA LOFTWANDER & ALISTAR REDDING Styling ANNA VOLOSENKO Creative Direction MELCHI ANYINSAH MAU SYLVIE Model DIDIER OLIVEIRA

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C U LT U R E

REVIVE RECYCLE REPEAT I’m not about to turn this into an episode of QI, but what I find interesting about the word ‘revival’ is how it is constantly reused and regurgitated within the fashion world. words Stan Fernando

Given that I am a self-confessed soap fan, I’m naturally drawn to how the iconic drama of the 1970s and ‘80s, Dallas, has been married with the aforementioned word. Deben-

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hams is citing ‘the Dallas effect’ as sales see a 110% increase for women’s trouser suits and claim that power dressing is back with a vengeance. Apparently costume jewellery is also back in favour – think big crystals and pearls, giant necklaces and earrings… even statement brooches. The new Dallas is still in its infancy in the UK, but it’s been a big hit – making a change from all the continual misery that Eastenders provides – a perrenial reason for ringing up your local branch of The Samaritans post-viewing. Debenhams also says that, despite the current trend for chunky platform sandals, women have been opting for the more predatory pointy-toed stiletto (as a man, I’m all for a good shoe on a lady), coupled with bold metallics and padded shoulders. Miu Miu, Prada and Roberto Cavalli sent models down the runway in brightly patterned

revival noun 1. an improvement in the condition, strength, or fortunes of someone or something. 2. a restoration to life or consciousness 3. an instance of something becoming popular, active, or important again 4. a new production of an old play or similar work 5. a reawakening of religious fervour, especially by means of evangelistic meetings

three-piece suits and, yes, the high street also followed suit with Topshop and Whistles adopting similar trends. But have we really suddenly gone all gaga for the ‘80s, or is it simply a case of trends spitting out the same old things in different ways? Here’s the thing; the next big revival for 2013 will lead to a high street trickle down of...the 1960s. Again. We’ve been here before, haven’t we? Moschino seem to be leading the vanguard – shorter hemlines, daring exposed mid sections and once again boutique brands and as well as the high street will follow suit. True, there will be a smidgen of originality to such revivals, melding contemporary fabrics with classic cuts, but didn’t we have a big ‘60s revival in the 1990s? Didn’t we have a massive ‘80s comeback in the early noughties?

style, which combines tweed, shirts, bow ties, braces, skinny jeans and ankle boots. Or has he been influenced by the trend forecasters who control what we wear? Who knows. What is apparent, is that revivals are often recycled regurgitations of past glories. Is that a bad thing? No, I think not. It’s not bad that we, the sons and daughters, wear clothes that hark back to the halcyon days in which our parents or even our grandparents wore similar. I, for one, love mixing and matching past and present trends. I recently went through a phase of wearing 1930s style wide, straight-legged trews, much like my late Father did in his youth. The thing is this, there’s really no such thing as a revival of the 1960s, ‘70s, ‘80s or beyond – it’s all about what we like, what we continue to wear and how we all mix and match – it just never goes away. Its all subverted, rearranged, rebranded, renamed or...revived.

As for us men, it seems apt that the current Time Lord, actor Matt Smith, appears to have influenced male fashion with his inimitable 63

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roduct design is integral to our everyday life. We may not realise it, but there is a huge thought process behind all products – from conception, right the way through to the manufacturing, production and marketing methodology. Why is a can the shape it is? Who decided what colour that couch should be? You get the gist! Ryan Harc is comprised of Ryan Yoon and Harc Lee, who are self- proclaimed “nomadic designers”. Finally settling down and setting up a permanent studio in 2009, Yoon & Lee set out to create products that focus on the human aspect of design, rather than design for design’s sake. W.A.C caught up with Ryan Yoon… What inspires you? What are your main driving forces to design? Inspiration is a really attractive word, because it nearly always comes from places we never expected. Sometimes ordinary situations can be great design themes, but we also get inspiration from thrown away, already dead ideas. Coming up with interesting ideas using unpredictable inspiration was one of our daily routines. We are pretty much enjoying it – we know when the inspiration perfectly fits with the characteristics of our ongoing design projects and we can expect superior design outputs. It seems that a passion for seeking good designs leads us to a great finished product.

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How important is industrial and product design? I see, use and consume countless products every day. The products have a huge effect on me – even when I’m not fully aware of this. Today I completed a number of tasks with one tiny machine; my smart phone. I am reminded of the past when I regularly worked with old fashioned, traditional products on my desk. For some people – including me – these products became an essential part of life. They are not just products, but they can be something special, like my favourite precious memories. We see product design as a relationship between products and people. Through the design process, designers develop better ways for products to work for consumers by considering form, interface and function.

RYAN HARC the role of the designer will still be important.

Where do you see the industry going? Everything changes. That’s what histoEverything changes and that’s what history teaches us. These days there are slight changes in typical mass production processes that, for a long time, didn’t change. Simplifying the manufacturing process allows more people to participate in it, especially when we see the success of crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter. Plus, more bespoke products and services that reflect individual consumer tastes have become easier to produce. Someday, we might begin to print out homemade products from our own 3D printers, which sounds like going back to the age before industrialisation. However, even if those 3D printers start to become commonplace household items, 65

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FA S H I O N

SPRING FLING

The winter season is taking its final bow and going away for a few months – I guess that means it’s time to play! You might still need that cosy double breasted jacket, but that doesn’t mean you can’t treat yourself to some beautiful items just in time for the wonderful British springtime. It’s always good to have something to look forward to... A simple, yet effective oversized top from threefloorfashion.com is perfect for the mild weather. You can dress it down with your comfiest denims or combine it with a skirt for a cuter look. The detailing around the collar means you’ll stand out – which is never a bad thing. At £98, it’s kind of steep, but worth the investment. Chic stripes should always have a place in your wardrobe!

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Shoes are important, ladies, and no girl should be deprived of a hot pair of heels. Statement shoes will never fail you, especially not a stunning pair from MIISTA’s SS13 Collection ‘Electromancer’. Better still, they’re available from February 15th, so if you don’t get any decent Valentine’s gifts, you can feel fully justified in treating yourself to these beauties. We’ve all experienced the annoyance of having your phone die on you when you need it most... and it always seems to happen at the worst possible time! Well, a portable charger puts an end to all that stress - charge it at home, stick in in your bag and forget all about it until you need it and it suddenly becomes a total lifesaver. The prints are also really cute! Available from Chic Tweak at £20.60 Unlike real flowers, floral prints just refuse to die. The only revival that consistently springs back to life...well it is spring after all! Put a twist on it with a beautiful appliquéd dress by Hermione de Paula. Available from Liberty and The Shop at Bluebird.

ANNA VOLOSENKO FASHION EDITOR

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CONTRIBUTE TO WEARECOLLISION

The WeAreCollision team are always open to accepting submissions for both online and print features. If you would like to submit email us today – send pitches, ideas or questions to our editorial department. submissions@wearecollision.com 67

À LA DISPOSITION N E W

New York husband and wife design duo Daniel and Lynda Kinne are the founders and brains behind the hot new clothing brand À La Disposition. Known for their excellent tailoring, bespoke silhouettes & avant-garde designs, À La Disposition is fast becoming a recognised name in its own right. Ahead of preparations for London Fashion Week and in the midst of preparing to launch their men’s clothing line, we managed to speak to these two powerhouses and discuss their brand, their inspirations and thoughts on the current fashion industry.

words Natalie Bannerman

FA S H I O N

How & when was À la Disposition founded? We first met at Parsons School of Design in NYC, where we were both studying fashion design. We found we had similar interests and influences and decided to work together on a semester-long project, creating a piece which was then on display at the Parsons fashion exhibition. Working together, we found that our individual strengths complemented each other very well and we have been together ever since.. What separates À la Disposition from many of the other fashion labels out there? It’s difficult to compare ourselves to other brands, but we feel our strength lies in our desire to provide our customers with a great product. It’s important to us that people are happy with the pieces they buy from us and that they enjoy wearing them. We are always looking for ways to improve the collection and strive to keep our pieces innovative and beautiful, while still maintaining their wearability. Your tag line/ethos is - ‘The fusion of form & function’. For those who don’t know what does this mean? In fashion terms, the phrase “à la disposition” refers to a design technique where fabric is designed and created for a single specific garment, so the design is carried through from the silhouette to the fabric to the finished piece. We have summed it up with the phrase, “the fusion of form and function.” This technique is typically only seen in garments produced in couture houses or in museum collections. In terms of our collection, we always design our pieces more like fashion sculpture; something to be seen in the round. We like to experiment with different techniques and manipulate the silhouette while still keeping our pieces wearable so we feel the concept of “the fusion of form and function” very much applies to our collections. 68

ever (which in itself can be seen as a type of conformity). However, there will always be people who are most comfortable standing out from the crowd, wearing something completely amazing or totally outrageous. Whatever the choice; fashion allows people to be themselves, whoever they want to be.

In keeping with the theme of our revival issue, there has been much social commentary that fashion today is repetitive, unoriginal & lacking political influence that was once associated with fashion in previous decades. What are your thoughts on this? It seems to us that in recent years the high street shops have become much more adept at translating styles and trends from high fashion, while at the same time the major design houses are not as willing to take risks or push the boundaries as they have been in the past. The result is more homogeneous fashion, regardless of price point. Fashion, politics and social ideology have historically always been a reflection of one other. While we feel that modern politics are not influenced by fashion, maybe history will judge it differently.

How can we find out more and stay in the loop with all of your latest activities? We recently launched our new eStore (www. aladispositionstore.com) which includes a spread of women’s wear and accessories. The perfume will also be available there once we have the official launch. Even more exciting is our “Runway to Retail” concept for the men’s collection, which allows us to offer a limited edition of pieces fresh off the catwalk. Why wait until next fall when you can own your favourite piece now? We will also continue to offer new pieces throughout the season, so it’s worth checking back with us. The eStore will also contain a blog and it allows people to follow us on Facebook, Twitter or sign up for our newsletter. The site is iPad, Android and mobile friendly.

Would you agree that fashion in the main, is largely uniformed and as a result of social conformism? On some levels yes, and others no. There is the area of fashion that is based around copying; from what you see on your favourite celebrity, to what you read in your favourite fashion magazine, or even what your friends are wearing. On the other hand, being different is now more acceptable than 69

C U LT U R E

NO BULLSHIT GUIDE TO INTERNING So, you wanna be an intern, huh? Haha, as if. Of course you don’t want to be an intern – interning fucking sucks! But chances are that you quite fancy one of those sweeet jobs where going to work doesn’t make you feel like a worthless sack of shit…and sometimes you actually feel like you had a good day! Well, you probably realise by now that, unless you’re incredibly well-connected, smug and privileged, you’re going to have to go and do a bit of slave labour to prove that you’re serious – otherwise, you’re not even going to get a look in. Here are some home truths about interning. words leonie cumiskey

No one gives a fuck about your lame outfit.

So many interning guides seem to stress the importance of ‘looking the part’, which is mostly a load of bollocks. Truthfully, everyone in the office is far too busy to care what you wear, so just wear something smart, practical and comfortable. A lot of internships involve a fair amount of carrying and lifting (returning those huge bags of samples to a PR agency? Sure.) so you’re going to look like a twat and be totally useless if you’ve shown up wearing a fitted suit or some power bitch heels. Having said this, do make sure you always check the dress code before you start.

You probably won’t get a job out of it. Hate to break it to you, but getting a job at the end of your internship is highly unlikely. A lot of the time, organisations will say this to keep their interns motivated and focused. Fuck it, some of them even say it in good faith, but a lot of the time there just isn’t the budget for a new member of staff. In all honesty, I know some totally feckless people who’ve happened to get jobs straight after their internships, but it was simply a case of being in the right place at the right time. You need to view an internship realistically, otherwise you will drive yourself mad overanalysing every staff cut, every ‘well done’, every email, every fond look, every ‘you make the best cup of tea’ and you will begin to slowly feel that you’re turning into some kind of psychopathic deluded stalker. Yep. The best you can hope for at the end of your internship is a good reference, 70

some genuine knowledge, new skills and perhaps a few new useful connections. Focus on those things and it might just keep you sane. It’s also prudent to start looking for a new job once you’re twothirds of the way through your internship.

while you’re at your internship so that you don’t feel like you’re going to get in trouble for not having completed a task.

Wash regularly and get a reasonable amount of sleep.

It’s time to drop all your bad habits from university.

This may sound like an unbelievably obvious point to make, but it’s crazy how many interns go to bed at 3am and then drag themselves into work at 9am looking sloppy because they didn’t have time to shower. You remember how I said that no one gives a shit about your outfit? Well, this is still true, but everyone’s going to care that your personal fragrance seems to be: ‘Sweat, vaguely masked by some kind of cheap scent’. Mmm, nice!

University brings out some really immature qualities in some people. Having to intern five days a week is basically an opportunity to get used to working life. You might only be an intern, but you should still try and act like a professional wherever possible. Maybe it’s time to cut off all those festival wristbands now? They make you look like a bellend anyway.

You should be enjoying yourself too!

Say goodbye to your social life! You might as well just give up drinking for the duration of any internship. It sounds like a total bore but you probably won’t have a lot of choice in the matter – it’s normally a hassle finding money for bus fare when you’re interning, if you end up having one of those nights where you inadvertently blow £100 on sub-standard vodka, taxis and kebabs then you’re going to feel like a total fuckup.

I know I’ve made an intern’s life sound like a hellish existence, but interning is also a way of getting to know the industry you want to work in. If you complete an internship and you’ve had an awful time, it could be that that particular work environment wasn’t right for you; but it could also mean that perhaps your idea of your chosen career path was a little off the mark? Internships give you the chance to get a taste for certain industries without wasting a whole lot of time and training. words Leonie Cumiskey

Don’t be a try-hard. Unless you’ve managed to score one of those cushy numbers where you actually get paid a proper wage, don’t bother doing any of that stuff like taking work home with you or anything like that, which brings me onto my next point…

Don’t be a dosser. It’s hard, but leave all that social media stuff until your lunch break or when you’ve left for the day. Work diligently 71

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C U LT U R E

NEW WORLD ORDER

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he idea of a New World Order (NWO) has been developed, trivialised, altered, ‘begun’ and ‘ended’ for thousands of years. The likes of Winston Churchill and Woodrow Wilson first brought to our attention the shift of power balance and political thought following the two World Wars. It was conceptualised in H G Wells’ book, The New World Order (1940), which envisioned a world that, post-WWII, should become peacekeeping and united. It’s even referenced in the Bible in the form of a One World Government, discussing the state of the Earth in the last years leading up to the ‘Second Coming’ of Christ. Something that significant in the human conscious is bound to be achievable right? I would argue that it is wrong, depending on how you interpret the idea of a NWO. In a positive, ‘Peace and love, man’ way, I think we will never truly achieve this. But in a negative, ‘All hail the [insert vicious dictator here] overlords’ way, it is sort of achievable and we maybe have sort of achieved it. Sort of.

The main idea of a NWO would be to improve the world for good. This form of the NWO can be compared to Communism. On the surface, Communism would work in its pure form, and if this was the form implemented then I would be all for it, but we know from practice that Communism is not perfect and does not successfully work. There will always be someone who rises up and becomes a dictator, living the high life whilst the common people of their country suffer, starve and eventually say ‘Help, help! I’m being repressed!’ and rebel against the Man. Even the countries where Communism still reigns, there are so many problems for the people, as the concept is so far from Marx’s original thesis that it should be called something else.

If the ‘positive’ NWO has not been achieved – yet – then what can we do to achieve it? And, more importantly, do we really WANT to achieve it? If we were to implement a worldwide government and religion, one that everyone must adhere to, on the surface appearing good and peaceful, there will always be flaws somewhere within it. There will always be a power struggle occurring somewhere in the world, as one leader tries to expand his power for one reason or another, and to force one specific ideal on the entire planet, – which differs drastically from nation to nation – it would always lead to some group of people getting a bum deal.

Perhaps there already is a NWO emerging, just not in the ‘world peace’ or ‘authoritarianism’ sense. The world has changed drastically in the past ten or so years. Machines rule our lives, as the majority of the world’s population spend hours of their day using computers, browsing the internet for porn, cats, social media or, if you’re a smarty pants, news (this does not include the Daily Mail, by the way). If we aren’t on our computers, we are on our phones. If we aren’t 73

on them, we will probably be watching TV or playing computer games. This is a generalisation, but you catch my drift. Technology, the Internet in particular, is our government, an authoritarian controller of populations that we have come to depend on. Like all governments, it has its flaws and there are people who break the rules, but it generally does follow the NWO rules. Should we bow down to our Internet overlords or should we try to achieve a better world order for ourselves? Is it even possible to achieve such a thing in the age of technology?

I mentioned with reference to Communism, could never be successful in the long run. As we have seen throughout history, peace is never fully achieved worldwide. There are still issues in terms of religious and political conflict, so in that sense, the NWO would fail. The main idea of a NWO would be to improve the world for good. World leaders are discussing it in the wake of on going wars and hardship, talking of alliances with other nations. Whilst this is all well and good, - David Cameron and Tony Blair know best after all…NOT – it is not possible for us to really achieve the idealistic NWO. Obviously, the Internet overlords don’t help matters. The Internet can use its power for good or for evil – it always seems to err on the side of evil. The evil side launches nuclear weapons, trains terrorists, bullies anyone and everyone more than ever before, and likes to obsess over the lives of celebrities. The positive side teaches people important things, making information available to everyone and his dog.

If we were to enter a true NWO, especially given the world’s current climate, it is frightfully unlikely that it would be a peaceful one as envisioned by those supporters of it. At school I once discussed whether a world where all religions are combined as one would work, and we concluded that it wouldn’t. Whilst a lot of each religions morals are the same (Christianity, Islam and Judaism are pretty similar, give or take, in terms of their moral teachings), they have been interpreted over time to have very different meanings. I mean, Christians and Jews adhere to the Old Testament, yet there has been an on going conflict between these two religions since the birth of Christianity, only heightened during World War Two. Of course, there are the other religions to consider: how would a oneworld religion incorporate a religion that has no God (Buddhism) or a religion with many gods (Hinduism)? Would we include Scientology, or the minor religions? What about Atheists? Different spiritual leaders would argue over which aspects of their religion to prioritise, which to take away and so on. Then, of course, there would be the trouble of implementing such a religion on the entire, 7 billion and growing, world population. Let us not forget that many wars throughout history have been a result of religious conflict, thus trying to force a different type of worship upon people who already have their set religion and will fight those who try to change it, will not work. This then combined with a government rivalling a dictatorship, as

From my perspective, then, it seems that we will never achieve the true NWO as foretold by the Bible or world leaders, but we have achieved a form of it through our modern lifestyles. Of course, this isn’t ideal and I dread to think how the youth of tomorrow will live their lives, and how much more dependent upon technology they will become (I take the film Wall’e to be an accurate prediction of the future where we will be come fat, chair bound beings who do not communicate and cannot move). This is not a good vision of the future to have, and in my opinion any form of religiously (in particular) and politically ‘united’ world is not the answer. It has never been achieved, which clearly means something. If it were to happen in the more positive light, it would have already occurred, but the nature of Man won’t allow it, so until we can figure out a better alternative, just sit back and do what the Internet overlords tell you to do. words becky snowden

Becky is the Culture Editor at WeAreCollision. You can find more of her articles on our website http://wearecollision.co.uk 74

BEN LANGMAID M U S I C

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he inimitable Shakespeare was definitely onto something when he wrote, “Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.” The same could be said in today’s celebrity and fame-obsessed society, but what Shakespeare failed to predict was that today’s great ones often have some great people working with, or behind, them to retain this greatness. It’s not necessarily a bad thing, and the quote certainly wouldn’t be as snappy with this added point, but some people take comfort from the fact that they don’t need to be in the public eye to garner notoriety and success.

electronica duos such as Erasure, Yazoo and Eurythmics. Although we don’t see Ben often, he most certainly isn’t camera shy and nor is he interview shy. The press have dubbed Ben the ‘Banksy of Pop Music’ due to his subtlety and lack of media appearances, which he describes as “a big compliment”. Ben makes a point of saying that, while he enjoys interviews, he prefers when he can talk about the process of making music and shed some light on it. “Often, the press are a little shallow in terms of what they ask,” he explains. When you’re not in the public eye so much it’s easy for other people to get the recognition that you earned; Ben recalls situations where that has happened to him and has some wise words for those who may find themselves in that position: “Get as much out of the situation without dragging it on too long; it’s so destroying if it becomes an untellable situation to resolve and move on from.”

When I say ‘La Roux’, Elly Jackson probably springs to mind – the quirkily androgynous songstress with a penchant for electroclash fashion. However, Jackson is not the sole talent behind La Roux, and the outfit is as dependent on Ben Langmaid as it is on its instantly recognisable vocalist. Ben has been a producer and DJ long before finding success with ‘Bulletproof’, being closely linked to Rollo Armstrong (Faithless) and having released material throughout the ‘90s – a golden age for dance music. We caught up with Ben and had a good old chinwag about creative processes, the perks of success and the drawbacks of fame.

Good news though – Ben has been one busy boy and we can expect a new album from La Roux this year! “It’s taken a long time but I’m really pleased with the writing we’ve done and how much we’ve developed the sound,” he adds. They’ve had another producer involved in the making of the new album, too – a man who’s certainly not one to shy away from fame – Mark Ronson, of course!

As popular as La Roux is, Ben insists that he’s not in it for the money, success or public recognition; for him, “It’s about the work and it’s about the quality of the work. The fame and all of that really isn’t in my interest – it’s about the work being really good.” This is apparent as Ben and Elly continuously push out well-produced and carefully written material, reminiscent of late ‘80s

As for Langmaid, he’s been working on a new duo called ‘The Condors’ – “She sounds like Tina Turner and he sounds like a cross between Peter Gabriel and Stephen Steels; both amazing singers,” he tells us. We can’t wait to hear what else Ben Langmaid turns his attention to... words melchi anyinsah 75

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BANJEE C U LT U R E

“Sweetheart, with that cigarette…you’re giving me a Banjee girl effect.” This was just one of the many famous one-liners from Jennie Livingston’s cultural eye-opener, Paris Is Burning. The category is ‘Banjee Girl Realness’; transgendered females walking a category of how ‘real’ they look – how much they blend in to normal society without getting caught out. If the judges were impressed, you’d get your ‘10s’, and if you beat all the other girls – you’d get a trophy and the love of the crowd.

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stumbled across this film by accident…well, okay, not entirely. I came across Voguing while researching NY based Fashion brand; Hood By Air and I kept seeing references to Paris Is Burning in the comments. I figured I was being sent a not-so-cryptic message, and one very fabulous evening I decided to watch it and I instantly fell in love. The docufilm explores the lives of a select few members of the ever-flamboyant NYC Ballroom Scene.

would adorn long, colourful nails; short and long weaves; tight trousers; Long jumpers; block heels or sports trainers; hooded jackets; door knocker earrings and maybe the odd knock off label – choices being Evisu; Enyce and Tommy Hilfiger. The mix of the feminine and masculine was also a popular choice; the style was referenced and made popular by female artists such as TLC, En Vogue, Aaliyah and Salt ‘N’ Pepa. In recent times, Banjee has left the Ballroom Scene and has become its own subculture, especially in the US. It’s been adopted by those who have had some contact with the Ballroom scene and has rubbed off on them. Banjee now, has more of a punk attitude – a big ‘fuck you’ to mainstream society by acting and dressing in ways that are seen as inappropriate or different to others. Notable pioneers of what I’m going to call ‘Nu-Banjee’ are: Californian rapper and underground fashion icon Brooke Candy, Mela Murder and Robot MoonJuice (members of the NYC collective ‘Prom Queen’) and Azealia Banks – who embodies a slightly more ‘mainstream’ version of Banjee. The Nu-Banjee style is a hybrid of the earlier urban styles mixed with revived and reworked ‘90s looks – high platform creepers, multi-coloured dreadlocks and extravagant body accessories.

A ball is described as a pageant where LGBTQ people of colour go to express themselves and feel total acceptance. Balls are split up into many categories ranging from the extravagantly wild ‘Fem Queen Performance’ to the lustfully pulsating bodies walking in the ‘Sex Siren’ category. Banjee is the Nuyorican (New York and Puerto Rican) term for a man that sleeps with another man, but looks like a hoodrat. However, the word developed itself to replace the word ghetto and is now also used to label a ghetto acting female as well as a ghetto acting male. Just imagine Lil’ Kim, Shanaynay and that long-braided chick from the 1995 film Friday got together in a lesbian romp and somehow made a baby…that’s Banjee. Back in the ‘90s, Banjee didn’t really have a distinct style. It existed in the Urban boroughs of NYC; Harlem, Queens and Brooklyn. People who were classed as Banjee photography Liz Rose van Bokhoven mau Ephie Mwangela hair Anna Anyinsah styling D’relle Khan Wickham

Hair flipping, eye-rolling, gum smacking and hand waving are the common actions of a Banjee girl. She’s independent, takes no shit and will snatch your weave quicker than you can say “Miss Thing”. words & creative direction Melchi Anyinsah 85

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M U S I C

ABI BROWNING

With music sampling on the increase, and the undying love for throwbacks and retro references, it begs the question, “Will there ever be a new golden age for music?” In a digital age awash with new tech- very difficult for new and original acts nology, mainstream producers are in- to break through. creasingly replacing original material with cut and paste samples. We talk to Do you think sampling is necessary, and if singer Abi Browning, better known as so to what extent should an artist include Rapunzel, about music’s golden age. samples in their work? Umm…it’s not necessary. I guess it Hey Abi, Our latest issue is about Reviv- just depends on what sound you’re al, Would you say the music industry is in going for. I personally like a decent need of a Revival? If so how? old school sample, but it doesn’t alYeah, I think it’s in need of a big reviv- ways suit the vibe that you want to al! In fact, I think it’s already started create for the song. – people are getting bored of all the manufactured pop music that’s sat- What period in time would you say was urating the charts. This is why acts the ‘golden age’ for music? And why? like Adele and Mumford & Sons have That’s a hard one, there’s so much done so well internationally, because music that I love from different deit’s great pop music but has emotion cades. I love the Motown era…how and soul. It’s real and honest…some- can you not?! But I think my heart thing that’s seriously lacking in a lot definitely lies with the ‘90s – that’s the of music out there today. I’m not gon- decade I grew up in, and I think peona lie though, I do find myself singing ple will always choose their teenage along to insanely catchy songs like decade as the ‘golden age’ for music. ‘Call Me Maybe’! I guess there’s a place for everything. I would just like to Some would say that like most arts, musee a much more varied selection of sic is cyclical, having a tendency to ‘go genres throughout the charts, not just back’, repeat or reference. Do you agree the usual Rihanna and Taylor Swift with this statement? If so, why do we do tracks. They seem to have a constant this? stream of singles and albums being Yeah, I think everything’s been done released. Fair play to them, they must now. It’s all about recycling and takwork bloody hard…but come on, give ing a bit from whatever inspires you, someone else a chance! I think it’s all and adding your own stamp to it. become about money for labels – it’s hype over substance, which makes it words Kahmarl Gordon

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JUERGEN TELLER [WOO]

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words Leonie Cumiskey

had high hopes for this show at the ICA, which is the prolific photographer’s first solo show in a decade. For those who don’t know, Juergen Teller is a London-based German photographer, who has shot instantly recognisable campaigns for the likes of Marc Jacobs, Helmut Lang, Cèline and Vivienne Westwood. His stark, inimitable style has also captured the likes of Kurt Cobain, Meg White, Marilyn Manson and Björk.

personally thought these images were a little distasteful in their attempts to shock – I felt irritated that the curators had decided to go with something controversial, when they could have chosen some truly haunting images that possessed a little more subtlety. It seemed as though they had strived to create an aesthetic balance by sandwiching these shots of Dame Viv between an image of a kitten and a close-up shot of Kurt Cobain playing guitar. Now, if there are two things I really love, it’s Kurt Cobain and kittens. Frankly, if you don’t like at least one of those things then you’re probably a bit of a moron. But taking a look at either of those images would mean going down some stairs and actually approaching old Viv’s fluorescent growler; an intimidating task. I mean, it’s Vivienne Westwood’s minge! You feel you ought to turn away from it in order to show the great lady a bit of respect, you know?

However, for anyone who was hoping for a beautiful pop culture roundup in a gallery setting, prepare to be disappointed. I should have probably realised this, given that the exhibition is at the ICA (where the focus is obviously more on art, as opposed to fashion and music) and the lead image is an almost abstract image of a child’s foot against a mattress. But that still didn’t stop me from feeling a little glum, having not found what I was looking for.

The Fox Reading Room offers those with a thirst for fashion and editorial shots some respite; the small space is literally crammed full of Juergen Teller’s fashion shots – which range from the infamous to the underrated. If you can get to the exhibition, then I’d recommend going along and making your own mind up. If – having seen it – you still feel like you need a bit more Juergen Teller in your life then you should visit this excellent Tumblr – http://www.juergenteller.tumblr.com, which is maintained by a really dedicated fan of Teller’s work.

Some of the muted images from ‘Irene Im Wald’ are very beautiful, but they are incredibly small and – without wanting to sound like some kind of philistine –I did begin to think, “Once you’ve seen one tree, you’ve seen ‘em all!” Then there was the exhibition’s somewhat contentious pièce de résistance, which seems to have got everyone talking – on a lower mezzanine as you walk into the exhibition are three huge shots of a naked Vivienne Westwood, her pale skin made all the more luminous by Teller’s lens. In one, she sits triumphantly, with her legs splayed. I

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publications and getting my name out there. There is so much in the pipeline, and I can’t wait to get my claws into it. This issue’s theme is REVIVAL - what are your favourite era’s and what would you love to see come back?

P13 - SAMI KNIGHT INTERVIEW This issue is all about revival; what’s your favourite era? And what would you love to make a revival? I love hair from the ‘50s and ‘60s, it sounds very cliché to say that but it’s just so beautiful. People made more of an effort to do their hair. I always hear people saying, “Women in the ‘50s went to their hairdressers every week” which is nonsense; I’m sure many wealthy people did but those with less cash wore rollers and setting nets to bed - that’s really making an effort! We’ve already seen huge revivals from the ‘40s right through to the ‘70s and ‘80s, and now we’re seeing elements of ‘90s hair dotted abut here and there - so I’m not sure I could make that much of a revival for any decade. What I’d be more interested in doing is inspiring women to look after their hair better, and make it work for them! It’s such a huge part of a look and so often forgotten, or fluffed at the last minute. Think about your hair; have a good relationship with your hairdresser; and plan how you want to look every day - not just on special occasions. You never know who’s watching. P18 - LOUIE BANKS & GEORGIE HOBDAY INTERVIEW What can our the both of you

readers in the

expect from near future..?

L: I have lots of exiting shoots coming out that I can’t really talk about... But I’m always giving updates and sneak peeks on my twitter. Watch this space! G: Who knows what the future brings? I’d just love to be successful and for younger models to be able to come to me and ask for advice. I’d like see myself as a role model, until then I will keep on modelling for 93

L: I loved so many aspects of all the era’s between the 20’s to the 80’s, it’s so hard to pick just one! G: I had a huge crush on Nick Carter so I think more guys should go for curtains… HA. Call me strange, I’d also love to see chaps – Christina mildly brought it back; but ugh – I need more! Preferably men with fantastic legs!

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WAC Revival Issue