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Photography better photos in five easy steps tech trends Bring your yearbook to life Issue 68 | fall 2013

The yearbook room now fits in your

backpack Jostens, the nation’s number-one yearbook company, proudly introduces the first iPad app for yearbook project management and production. The Yearbooker’s Field Kit,™ makes it possible to work on your yearbook while on the go, using an iPad. After all, when does a yearbooker ever stand still? Assign pages and update the ladder during your prep period. Monitor staff progress while watching a soccer game. Manage photographs while watching television at home on the couch. This innovative app syncs up with Yearbook Avenue® for staffs creating yearbooks online with Jostens. Available now for free download from the App Store.

10 Better photos in five easy steps Cover Story: Good photos tell a story, convey emotion and make people want to look at them over and over. Photos are also the single most important element you’ll find in any yearbook. Find out how to take your yearbook photos from good to great.

Welcome to Jostens Adviser & Staff magazine — the largest-circulation magazine in the world devoted entirely to creating and marketing yearbooks. Your subscription is provided compliments of your local Jostens representative.

2  Yearbook adviser is nation’s top teacher “It was one of those moments where you aren’t completely sure it is happening.” That is how Jeff Charbonneau, Zillah High School [WA], described the moment he found out he’d been named National Teacher of the Year.

4  Design inspiration on the go Great yearbook ideas are as close as your tablet or smartphone. The new Look Book Companion App, the electronic version of the popular Gotcha Covered Look Book, lets you browse covers, themes, designs and more, on the go.

5  Trending technology

Cover Photo: “Feel the Roar” Chelsey Burgess, photographer, Sarah Nichols, adviser // Whitney High School [CA] Editor in Chief: Linda Berry Managing Editor: Mary Saracino Art Director: Chris Koshiol Production Artist: Kit Neville

Contributors: Ellen Austin Ava Butzu Jeff Charbonneau Tina Cleavelin John Cutsinger John Dalke John Dent Christiane Flood Liz Flores Julie Goldstein Laurie Hansen

©2013 by Jostens, Inc. [13-0538] Item #3168. All rights reserved. Limited non-commercial reproduction of this publication for educational and classroom use is allowed with appropriate credit to Jostens. Jostens, the Jostens logo, ReplayIt, Personal Yearbook Pages, Image Share, Jostens Ad Services, Jostens Direct Solutions, Jostens Yearbook Avenue, Jostens YearTech, Jostens YearTech Online, Page Surfer, Time Capsule and Yearbook It! are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Jostens, Inc.

Jeff Kocur Deb Lee Jessica Leifheit Gary Lundgren Roberta Manheim Toni Marsh Jim Roller Sara Sausker Margaret Sorrows Toni Sternhagen Dana Wallace Shannon Williams

Send correspondence, change of address, subscription requests and article manuscripts to asmagazine@jostens.com or mail them to: Adviser & Staff magazine ATTN: Linda Berry Jostens, Inc. 3601 Minnesota Drive, Suite 400 Minneapolis, MN 55435

Yearbooks come to life as staffs experiment with new ways of bringing added coverage to their readers. Augmented reality platforms, QR codes and video-enabled Time Capsules are making the yearbook so much more than meets the eye.

20  Gallery

The talent was undeniable when thousands of students entered stunning photographs and professional quality page designs in Jostens photo and design contests last spring. Check out our gallery of outstanding 2013 winners Page 20: Jostens Photo Contest Page 24: Jostens YearTech Online Design Contest Page 26: Jostens/Adobe Design Contest

28  One-minute workshops The Creative Accounts Managers, Jostens traveling yearbook gurus, share rapid-fire information on the latest in yearbooking in one-minute workshops, rounding out this issue.

Yearbook adviser Jeff Charbonneau named the 2013 National Teacher of the Year

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he year ushered in great news for Jeff Charbonneau. In January, this chemistry, physics and engineering teacher at Zillah High School [WA] learned he was one of four finalists for the 2013 National Teacher of the Year award by the Council of Chief State School Officers. The pool of finalists is selected each year from teachers who have been named State and Territorial Teachers of the Year. Charbonneau has spent his entire 12-year teaching career at Zillah High School, where he’s also the school’s yearbook adviser. In early March, Charbonneau flew to Washington D.C. to be interviewed by a 15-member panel, composed of representatives of each of the major educational organizations in the United States, who were charged with selecting the National Teacher of the Year. Sometime later, he got a phone call from Washington State’s Superintendent of Public Instruction, Randy Dorn, stating that he’d been selected for the nation’s top teaching honor. “During the call I think I had Mr. Dorn repeat the news about four times,” Charbonneau said. “It was one of those moments where you aren’t completely sure it is happening. I was in a room by myself when I got the call, and when the call was over, I just sat still for a few minutes and tried to take it all in. Then I let out a quick WOO HOO!” Dorn told him to keep the news a secret until it was officially announced on the CBS This Morning program, in April, the day before President Obama presented the award to him. “I was allowed to tell my wife,” Charbonneau said. “But I had to keep the news secret from everyone else — which meant not talking about it in front of my 6-year-old and 3-year-old, as I knew they would have a hard time not saying anything — and that was hard!” On April 23, Charbonneau joined all of the 2013 State Teachers of the Year at a White House ceremony where they were recognized by President Barack Obama. He describes the experience of being at the White House and meeting the President as being “very surreal.” “President Obama was extremely welcoming and did his

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©2013, David Goehner, Educational Service District 105.

best to make myself and my family feel very comfortable,” he said. “I know it is odd to say about the President of the United States, but he really gave the impression of being a regular guy. I say that with great respect. It was so humbling to be treated so kindly by someone in his position.” Once Charbonneau was able to share his good news with his students and co-workers, their reaction was overwhelmingly positive. “The entire school has been extremely excited and supportive,” he said. “Students had T-shirts made, hung posters all over school; the community held a celebration night. There were multiple assemblies. All in all, I have never seen our school and community this proud.” So, how did a chemistry, physics and engineering teacher end up becoming a yearbook adviser? That seed was planted back in the 1990s. Both Charbonneau and his wife graduated from Zillah High School. In 1995, she was the yearbook editor during her senior year. When they started dating, he ended up hanging around the yearbook adviser’s room. “I accidentally learned quite a bit about the process of creating a yearbook,” he noted. “I started teaching in the fall

President Barack Obama, with Education Secretary Arne Duncan, honors 2013 National Teacher of the Year Jeff Charbonneau, State Teachers of the Year, and Principals of the Year, in the Rose Garden of the White House, April 23, 2013. [official White House photo by Pete Souza]

the pages are much more important.” of 2001, but did not become the yearbook adviser until the Anyone would be rightfully proud to be named the 2008–2009 school year. National Teacher of the Year. Since then, he’s served as the yearbook adviser for five While Charbonneau expressed a tremendous amount of yearbooks. pride at having received such a prestigious honor, he also While some might think it unusual for a science teacher to expresses a deep sense of humility. be a yearbook adviser, Charbonneau sees a close connection “I was truly humbled to know that the President of the between engineering and yearbook. United States, our government, and thereby its citizens, honor “Both utilize time management skills, close attention to and acknowledge the importance of education in our society,” detail, dimensioning and a fundamental understanding of he said. “I firmly believe that this program artistic design principles,” he said. “As such, and similar programs in other nations are when the adviser position came open, I tremendously important. My pride comes jumped at the chance to not only expand from knowing that I represent 3.2 million my skills and continue my own learning, et the bar higher hardworking and dedicated teachers across but I also was looking for a way to show my the United States. It’s about celebrating students that there is a strong correlation than even you that education truly is the profession that between the arts and sciences.” expect them to points to the future. Programs like this one He takes his role as an adviser very reach. Then watch recognize and value that importance.” seriously. As a seasoned teacher with a dozen years “I greatly enjoy giving students an them reach the bar of experience to share, Charbonneau has opportunity to create an authentic document anyway.” some wise words to offer first-year teachers. that will be meaningful to them for years to “In the path to becoming a teacher, come. It is the student’s book, and as such my Jeff Charbonneau remember two things: First, content is role is to give them the tools and resources secondary. Building positive relationships necessary to put together their book. I with students always comes first. Connect enjoy seeing the pride they take in their with your students — learn about them as work — especially when the final pages individuals who should be celebrated for their similarities are submitted.” and their differences. Be genuine in your interest in their Charbonneau is known for using interactive learning backgrounds and utilize the information you learn about them experiences in his science classrooms and he’s applied that in your lessons, as appropriate, to increase the relevance and method to the yearbook too. impact of those lessons; and second — do more, expect more.” “We have several projects that we do within yearbook, He notes that students will work hard for teachers who other than actually working on the book. A few years ago I have taken the time to build relationships with them. had my students go through all of the yearbooks (dating back He also recommends setting high expectations for to 1919 — the school’s first) and digitally scan every page. We then created a website to post all of the images from the books students. “Set the bar higher than even you expect them to reach. Then watch them reach the bar anyway.” for alumni and the greater community to view. As part of that He said that when teachers make content secondary and project, I asked my staffers to read several yearbooks from put relationships first, surprising things happen, “You will be different decades and identify common themes, and to give able to teach to a much greater depth, with more rigor than me their take-away thoughts. The dominant response is that they realize the importance of captions and telling a story; they you ever expected.” don’t know the people in the photographs, so the words on

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Look Book Companion Yearbook inspiration is now as close as your tablet or smartphone This past spring, Jostens launched its Look Book Companion App — the first educational yearbook app for iPads and iPhones. And, it’s totally FREE. Simply download it from the Apple App Store. Search for “Jostens Look Book Companion ’13.” You’ll get a specific version of the app, depending on the device (iPad or iPhone) you’re using. This Look Book Companion App coordinates with the popular Gotcha Covered Look Book, the largest and most comprehensive publication of its kind in the world. The hard-copy, printed “best of the best” annual Look Book features 352 pages of design, coverage, photojournalism and theme ideas reproduced from outstanding yearbooks created by Jostens schools. “Yearbook staffs await the arrival of the print Look Book each year with great anticipation,” said John Dalke, Jostens marketing product manager and editor of both the print and digital editions. “Staffs and yearbook advisers alike love the inspirational ideas, and now they have the content at their fingertips with their iPads and iPhones.” The Look Book Companion App gives yearbook staffs access to creative themes, cool covers, dazzling designs, relevant coverage, storytelling copy and action-packed photography from the most outstanding yearbooks printed by Jostens. Descriptive keywords provided for each design in the print version of the Look Book coordinate with the organizational structure of the Look Book Companion App, making it easy to navigate between print and digital. And, with the app, you can zoom in and study the examples in detail. The app also features instructional videos and bonus content, greatly expanding the educational experience for both advisers and students. Educators who teach yearbook journalism classes and advise

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yearbook staffs are praising the Look Book Companion App. At Frisco High School [TX], journalism instructor Toni Marsh started using the app immediately. “I really like the new app because it allows me to take the Look Book anywhere on my iPad and use it,” Marsh said. “I really like the videos and other instructional content so my students can understand the concepts behind the designs they like.” Toni Sternhagen, math teacher and yearbook adviser at CretinDerham Hall [MN], agrees. “In the past, we would have groups of yearbook staffers huddled around the Look Book marking their favorites with sticky notes,” Sternhagen said. “Now, with the Look Book Companion App, students are looking through the book when they have time and using their favorites within the app itself. At the touch of a finger, students have access to thousands of ideas to give them inspiration.” In addition to the Look Book and Look Book Companion App, Jostens offers a collection of educational resources and classroom tools on its new yearbooklove.com website and hosts yearbook workshops from coast to coast. “The yearbook class is thriving, with more than 75 percent of high schools nationwide producing their yearbooks as part of an elective course,” said Gary Lundgren, Jostens senior customer experience manager. “At Jostens, we don’t just print yearbooks. We help educators make the yearbook experience a valuable one for their students.” According to Lundgren, the yearbook is a project that successfully integrates academic content and the lifelong work habits stressed by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21). “The yearbook class fosters the 4Cs promoted by P21 — critical thinking and problem-solving, creativity and innovation, communication and collaboration,” he said.

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OF YEARBOOKS Share videos, expand coverage and increase interactivity Every day, more and more teens are using mobile devices — smartphones and tablets — to share videos and photos and to stay connected to their friends. Across the country, yearbook staffs are expanding coverage and creating a fun and interactive experience for their buyers by incorporating video into their yearbooks using augmented reality platforms, QR codes and the new ReplayIt video feature. Aurasma is one of several augmented reality platforms that uses image recognition technology to publish “augmented content” — such as videos and 3D animation. Yearbook staffs can use this platform to “transform” the photos on a yearbook spread into videos that can be viewed via mobile devices. The platform is not yearbook-specific. It’s available to anyone — yearbook staffs, businesses, organizations and individuals — who creates an account. Once yearbook readers download the free Aurasma app to their Apple or Android mobile device, they can hold it over the photo on the yearbook spread and play a content-related video on their device. The downside of using this platform is that the videos posted to Aurasma can be accessed only via mobile devices, not via laptops or computers.

With QR codes (quick response codes) a code is embedded into the yearbook pages. Readers download a free app, pass their mobile device over the QR code and watch a video, bringing to life the images on the yearbook spread. Students can also interact with video content on Jostens ReplayIt, a yearbook-specific social media platform. The free ReplayIt app for iPhones, Androids and Windows 8 devices makes it easy to share videos and photos on the go. ReplayIt can also be accessed through a laptop or desktop computer. At the end of the year, all the yearbook content — including videos — that has been uploaded to ReplayIt is sealed into a digital Time Capsule that’s available only to yearbook buyers. In 2014, ReplayIt is launching a Time Capsule mobile app, making it even easier to interact with the story of the year — anytime, anywhere.

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Add a little yearbook magic Story by John Dent, yearbook adviser // Dos Pueblos High School [CA]

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very night, I lie down with my eight-year-old daughter Sarah and we read a chapter of Harry Potter. When I reflect on why we enjoy it so much, I think it is because somewhere inside us, we wish magic were possible. Flying on brooms, changing a person into a toad, avoiding traffic by disapparating, or creating a love potion would be wonderful things to be able to do. I owned a magic kit when I was young and always wanted to be Harry Houdini or David Copperfield. Although I haven’t figured out how to fly, I have found a way to bring still photographs to life just like you see in the Harry Potter movies through a simple mobile app: Aurasma. Every person I have shown it to wants to see more, is awestruck by its ease and power, and asks me: “How did you do that?” When you pass your smart tablet or smartphone over the Dos Pueblos 2013 yearbook, it seems as if the pages come to life. Pictures talk to you and events are heard and experienced in a whole new way.

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Auras

No codes

Last year, if someone would have said to me, “Just go over the pictures in my yearbook and watch them come to life,” I would have said, that’s possible only in Harry Potter. Aurasma is an app that a company in Britain developed for newspapers and other publications to use to try and maintain their buy rates by providing augmented reality. With the readership of newspapers and other print documents declining, what if you could provide the newest, latest, greatest video, right on the printed page? What if, when you pass your phone over the photo, you saw the rest of the story or the latest breaking news about that story. See for yourself. Download the Aurasma app for free. Test it by holding your device over a $20 bill (a great party trick), and say: “I think there is some sort of energy or aura in this $20. I got this new app that checks to see the energy in objects.”

The first thing that people are baffled by is the fact that there are no QR codes, no symbols, no markings whatsoever on the page that indicate that an aura might be there. That is one of the best parts about an aura. My staff has linked more than 100 auras in our book so far. We can continue to add auras as long as we want, and printing a symbol on the page would limit that.

Follow us While companies must pay to have an Aurasma marketing account and create “Super Auras” that can be viewed by installing the app, educators can open a free education account. With an education account, your viewers will need to “follow” and “like” your channel to see your auras. In our case, we used a simple statement in our opening spread, explaining how to follow Dos Pueblos Yearbook 2013 to see the pictures come to life. You could include

See it for yourself The aura attached to this photo in the 2013 Dos Pueblos Images yearbook allowed readers to experience the popular senior lip dub in a whole new way. Follow these steps to see it for yourself: • Download the free Aurasma app to your smartphone or tablet. • Follow the Dos Pueblos yearbook. • To view the aura, frame the viewfinder over the photo.

this as a sticker, or a flyer at distribution, or choose any number of ways to make sure your buyers know to follow you and see the amazing content. Viewers can see which of the yearbook images have an aura when they follow the channel.

Ideas for using augmented reality in your yearbook On your portrait pages you can have shout-outs, senior quotes, individual stories or so much more. Consider charging a small fee for this and save the text on the page. You can delete, change or adjust any video or quote that is inappropriate, unlike a quote that is printed in the book. In personal ads, charge a fee to include videos from their childhood, or a slideshow of pictures. I recommend not using music that is copyright-protected. Allow those students who aren’t always focused on standard yearbook activities to work on this special team that will add video to the book.

Teach your photographers to switch to video on their DSLRs, point-and-shoot cameras or smartphones. Encourage them to capture 30 seconds or a minute at every event, just in case you want to use it later. Partner with the video production program on campus and tell them that you want to include their video in your book. Consider giving credit with titles or printing it in the book. Post pictures from the yearbook or spreads from the book and put auras on them. Then, make it so that when someone taps on the aura, it takes them to your online ordering site for your book. This drives sales and makes it easy for people to click and buy. Put a picture in the school newsletter and add an aura. Add a link to the sales page so that after they watch the video, they can tap and go straight to an order page. Professor Trelawney, the divination teacher from Harry Potter, might not have been the best predictor of the future, but even she would be able to tell you that this is the future of yearbooks.

Aurasma is free for educators Aurasma is owned by Hewlett-Packard, and the company promises to provide free access to all education systems and to provide schools with a fully functional system with great features. To learn more, visit: https://aurasma.zendesk.com/ entries/23458291--I-am-a-school-universitylibrary-museum-or-non-profit-group-Whatoption-is-best-for-me-

How to sign up for a free partner account Aurasma is a free app that anyone can use on their iOS or Android mobile device. A user can set up an Aura using their phone and others can view it by following the channel. However, to create a large-scale program like a yearbook, sign up for the free partner web account at http://www. aurasma.com/partners/. It is free, easy and so worth it!

To view this story with additional step-by-step tips from John Dent, go to yearbooklove.com, your new home for everything yearbook created for advisers and staffs by Jostens. fall 2013 |

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Print and video come together with QR codes T E C H T R E N D S

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im Roller, yearbook adviser, Fort Dorchester High School [SC], and his Patriot staff started adding a video element to their yearbook a decade ago. “We began by authoring CDs,” he said. “And, we later moved to producing and printing our own DVDs.” Over the last three or four years, they’ve incorporated Quick Response (QR) codes into their yearbook. “This enables us to put video content directly in the book, right on the very pages where it is most relevant and most immediate for our readers,” he said. “Our readers simply scan a QR code to access our videos. The codes make is simple to bring the yearbook to life.” Yearbook is about telling the story of the year in the most compelling way possible — capturing memories that will last a lifetime. Videos offer a fun and engaging way to do that. As Roller explained, “In its print form alone, the yearbook simply cannot capture the year in full. Video is our primary form of entertainment. Merging the two just seemed natural to me.” Roller cited two reasons for opting to take a more technologically oriented approach to coverage. “I wanted to offer a more comprehensive look at the year and I hoped the video content would

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SPORTS ACTION | The QR code on this football spread links to a video of season highlights set to music. | Dorchester High School (SC)

help increase sales.” Turns out he was onto something big. “Students love the video content,” he said. “Who wouldn’t? Reliving the football season, pep rallies or homecoming via highlight videos really makes the book all that much better.” While QR codes are most often found in the student life section and the sports section, Roller’s staff has used them throughout their yearbook. “We have also added video to academics, our opening and even in parent ads, which are really cool. Imagine your parent ads complete with video of a toddling high schooler. Brings a tear to every parent’s eye!” Last year, one of the parent ads included a QR code in an ad showcasing twin brothers. Roller said, “The baby footage was great. It was really touching.” He and his staff plan to continue incorporating QR codes into their yearbook. “I like the immediacy that they offer. There you are on the football page, in the moment. Hey, there’s a code. Scan it and in seconds you are watching highlights from the season. I loved making the DVDs and even adding video online, but nothing else offers that sense of immediacy the way QR codes do. That said, I have been looking at some emerging technologies, but I am not sold on them, yet.”

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Solve the top five yearbook photo challenges

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Dominant photos

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Designing for more photos

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Community photo sharing

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2013 Jostens Photo Contest

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Solve the top five year b o o k p ho t o c hal l e ng e s Story by Margaret Sorrows, yearbook adviser // Bryant High School [AR]

Yearbook distribution should be the best day of the year for your staff and student body. Students pour over the yearbook looking for decisive photo moments of themselves, their friends and all the important events of the school year. Students stop on every spread, eyeing every photo, happily reminiscing about the school year. If this is not how students receive your yearbook, then it’s time to improve your photos. It’s the one area students will appreciate more than anything else. After all, students want to see great pictures of their friends and themselves. In this cell phone-camera age, where everybody fancies themselves as photographers, students expect the yearbook staff to take a better photo than they can. It’s a choice you make to have good photos in your yearbook, and you can achieve it. Your students deserve your best effort. Great photos should be timeless. No matter how many times students look at them, they still are amazed at their storytelling moments. They always have a wow factor. Let this be the year you refuse to use a bad photo. Accomplish this goal by solving the photo challenges many yearbook staffs face.

Photography by Bryant High School [AR] students.

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Top five photo challenges

The classroom of the 21st century relies a lot on technology. Here the photographer recognized the light illuminating the two students and shot it between two computer monitors to frame the center of visual interest. [photo by Ashley Collins]

CHALLENGE 1. Not using composition. SOLUTION Analyze your surroundings. Very ordinary shots can be made quite dramatic with the right composition. Look for leading lines, framing, high angle, low angle, repeating patterns, thirds, reaction to an action and natural light. Every photo should have composition, but especially make a conscious effort to use these techniques for academic photos, often the hardest for photographers to make interesting.

In this chemistry lab shot, the photographer used a low angle to highlight the two girls completing an experiment and, for a bonus, waited for the reaction. The low angle lets us see the cheerleader uniforms and equipment needed for the experiment, creating a more interesting photo. [photo by Matti Botti]

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In this “before” shot, the photographer captures the cheerleaders interacting an hour before the big game. The photo shows two girls in an unconventional, relaxed cheerleader moment, adding visual interest. [photo by Wil Chandler]

CHALLENGE 2. M  issing the storytelling shots. SOLUTION Show up early, stay late. No drive-by shooting. You have to be patient. Photography can be a lot like being in the military: hurry up and wait. Too often photographers miss the best shot because they simply weren’t there. For big events like homecoming, rival football games, prom and graduation, there’s so much more than just the event itself. If you really want to tell the story, come early and be the last to leave. Establishing a photo presence early will make your subjects more comfortable with you, letting them relax, giving you access to the best shots. Focus on shooting before, during and after an event.

For this “during” shot, the photographer paid attention to the student section, capturing an intense moment for the rowdy fans. [photo by Brooke Lasley] Fireworks at a football game add visual interest. The game is over and No. 65 pauses to enjoy the win and fireworks show before leaving the field, in this “after” shot. The photographer was smart to move around the field and find the single football player alone with his thoughts. [photo by Parker Pamplin]

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Top five photo challenges

CHALLENGE 3. F  ailure to capture the moment. SOLUTION This happens when the photographer doesn’t get close enough to the center of visual interest. The photographer has to position himself where the photo moment is. That means you have to get close. Use your legs to zoom you to the peak of the action. The photographer should be in a position where the average student with a cell phone can’t go. If you’re taking the same photo any student with a cell phone camera can take, the photo won’t be special. Extend yourself beyond the obvious.

CHALLENGE 4. Taking the same photo year after year. SOLUTION Tell the story of your high school for each particular year. School is basically the same every year. It starts about the same time and important events occur around the same dates. The academic year rattles along, 36 weeks, 180 instructional days. If the photographer doesn’t find the extraordinary in the ordinary, the photos in the yearbook will be the same shots each year and that means a boring yearbook. Shoot vertically and horizontally. Raise the camera above your head. Shoot for the unusual. Who or what looks different, stands out, has a unique look? Embrace all weather conditions. Rain on homecoming is not a disaster. It’s an opportunity to tell that unique story.

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When seniors decide to stage a paint war for the first time ever, the photographer takes a decisive-moment photo as paint flies onto the student wearing sunglasses. The center of visual interest has a different look and obviously shows his involvement in the paint throwing. [photo by Whitney Butler]

Summer band practice occurs every year. Here the photographer paid attention, when the other band members fled to the air-conditioned band room during break, and captured the lone band member who decided to take his break on the field surrounded by instruments. This moment is an extraordinary shot in a very ordinary band practice. [photo by Tiffini Jarvis] | fall 2013

As in many high schools, the football team taking the field for the kickoff is a decisive moment. Here the photographer is positioned exactly in front of the tunnel and lets the action come toward the camera, capturing a flag runner leading the team onto the field. [photo by Whit Pruitt]

Homecoming dress-up days and spirit contests lend themselves to great moments. When the photographer sees a group of students dressed as bananas and competing in shopping cart races, that is a signal to move up close to the peak of the action, focusing the camera on the banana girls and cropping out the distracting background, to capture a great moment. [photo by Bethany Pilcher]

CHALLENGE 5. Not preplanning big events. SOLUTION Know what’s going to happen, do your research. Discuss shooting situations for big events. Too often photographers miss a key moment of the school year because they didn’t know about it or they didn’t know where to stand. Establish relationships with the key organizers. Ask ahead of time what the schedule will be. Shoot close, near and far images of the event. Shoot one-person, two- to three-person, and group shots of big events. These add variety and give page designers choices.

For hunting shots, you have to go where the hunters go. The photographer sought out the hunters, knew when the hunt was and tagged along, shooting a two-person trudge through the flooded land to get to the duck blind. [photo by Charlie Hunnicutt]

The photographer knew exactly when the graduates would throw their caps and was ready, taking a great group shot to showcase the excitement of the end of graduation. [photo by Tiffini Jarvis]

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RALLY | A nicely framed dominant photo stops the action and captures the intensity and emotion of the moment. At the same time, it directs the reader to the center of the spread toward the headline and story presentation. | Bryant High School [AR]

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Dominant photos

Choose carefully when selecting a dominant photo for your spread. Not every image has what it takes to be the center of visual impact. Think of the dominant photo as the star of the show. It has to be strong enough to visually grab the readers and direct them to center stage.

DANCE PARTY | Abandoning a rigid template, this highly impactful spread was designed to display the dramatic photographs. A single image covers the entire spread with six supporting images and text strategically placed on the photo, so that readability does not suffer. | Richardson High School [TX]

SHAKE IT | Although contemporary yearbooks strive to include a lot of photos, sometimes a single image tells the story in a powerful way. In this case, a fun, action-packed image, featuring dozens of students, tells the story better than several smaller photos of the same scene. For maximum readability, the story and the headline are not placed over the people in the image. | St. Elizabeth Catholic High School [ON]

For this “during” shot, the photographer paid attention to the student section, capturing an intense moment for the rowdy fans. [ Photo: Brooke Lasley]

FOCAL POINT | A large and impactful dominant photo is essential for today’s photo-heavy yearbook spreads. This dominant photo is a powerful focal point that grabs the reader and guides the eye to the story presentation and to the smaller photo modules. | James Bowie High School [TX]

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SNOW JOB | A powerful image covers the entire spread with the secondary images and text carefully placed on the background photo so as not to minimize readability. Eye flow was carefully considered as the action of the dominant photo guides the reader directly into the story presentation. The mug shots appearing with the direct quotes are displayed in black and white for contrast. | Shawnee Mission West High School [KS]

FACES | Photos of students become a powerful graphic, allowing the staff to feature 48 additional faces on each chronological spread to visually support its “One Thing” theme. Using black-and-white images creates a unique look and sets the faces apart from the other modules. | Starr’s Mill High School [GA]

WHOLE-BOOK LINK | To greatly expand photographic coverage, a picture strip runs along the bottom of every spread. All of the photographs are identified and tight spacing is used for effective display. For contrast, one photo on each bar features a partial-cut-out background. To make room for the photo strip, the folio tabs are displayed at the top of the pages. | Stillwater Area High School [MN]

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DESIGNing for more photos Great coverage doesn’t happen as an afterthought. Including more students in the book is easier when your pages are designed with coverage in mind. Photo strips, modular design elements and student profiles are a few of the ways staffs can feature more students and tell more stories.

P HOTO graphy

SnapShots | Multiple photo strips tell their own stories while increasing student coverage. The vertical and horizontal placement nicely frames the dominant photo and story presentation to draw readers in. | Kirkwood High School [MO]

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REPLAYIT: An easier way to

expand photo coverage and include more photos in your yearbook

“R

eplayIt allows us to have many more candid shots, encompassing more of the student body.”

Christiane Flood Prairie Ridge High School [IL]

“W

ith ReplayIt, our work is cut in half and we get more students involved in the creation of the yearbook.”

Dana Wallace Horlick High School [WI]

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Visual storytelling is an essential part of every yearbook. But having enough staff photographers to shoot images of all the activities and events of the school year can be a huge challenge. At one time or another, probably every yearbook adviser on the planet has wished they could clone their staff photographers. For many advisers, Jostens ReplayIt is the next best thing. And a whole lot easier. Students, teachers, school staff and parents can upload, view and share photos on the ReplayIt site and view photos others have uploaded, creating a fun and interactive experience. Users can share photos from their Facebook accounts or upload them directly from their computers or mobile devices. The free ReplayIt app for iPhones, Androids and Windows 8 devices makes it even easier to share shots on the go. Christiane Flood, yearbook adviser, Prairie Ridge High School [IL], and her yearbook staff have been using ReplayIt for two years. “It’s an especially great fit for us because we are a yearbook club, not a yearbook class,” she said. “We do not have staff out getting great pictures. ReplayIt allows us to have many more candid shots, encompassing more of the student body.” As Flood noted, today’s students “always

have their phones with cameras with them,” so capturing events as they unfold is second-nature. When these “freelance” citizen photographers upload their images to ReplayIt, yearbook staffs can automatically tap into a wide range of photos they otherwise might not have access to. For Flood, that translates into “better coverage, better candids and more variety.” Flood relies on her yearbook staff to choose which of the uploaded photos are a good fit for their yearbook. At the end of the year, all of the photos on ReplayIt are sealed into a digital Time Capsule that can be accessed only by people who purchase the yearbook. “There are so many great pictures that do not make it into the yearbook,” Flood said. “This provides a great way to allow students additional coverage by having access to all of the thousands of pictures that do not make it into the yearbook.” To increase awareness about ReplayIt, she distributes an information sheet — explaining what the site is and how it works — to parents and athletes at the high school’s “Meet the Team” night, which takes place early in the school year. She gives the same sheet to all club and event sponsors and puts ReplayIt informational business

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The use of social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter to promote student photo submission is producing results at Horlick High School [WI].

ReplayIt Basics cards into the coaches’ and club sponsors’ mailboxes. Flood is hopeful that this will translate into increased book sales as more students see more of their groups and friends covered in the yearbook. Although Dana Wallace, yearbook adviser, Horlick High School [WI], and her staff have been using ReplayIt since the 2012–2013 school year, they didn’t start taking advantage of the social media tool’s full potential until the summer of 2013. After Wallace attended Jostens Adviser University, she came home ready to rock and roll. “The best advice I took away from that conference was to have a social media director on staff who gets the word out about yearbook via Twitter, Facebook and Instagram,” Wallace said. “We decided that this year it would be a great idea to get ReplayIt used by more of our students so that we can have a stronger variety of photos to choose from for our spreads in the yearbook.” A week after that conference, she met with her yearbook editors and set the wheels in motion. “We saw results in just a few days,” she said. “These are the types of photos that we normally would spend much time and effort to find,” Wallace said. “With ReplayIt, our work is cut in half and we get more students involved in the creation of the yearbook, which is, after all, a culmination of memories for them to take with them in the years following high school.” Wallace explained that, in the past, her yearbook staff has encountered some challenges in securing outstanding athletic photos during events at the school.

“With ReplayIt, some parents who tend to capture moments well can share their photos with us with ease,” she said. “And, it makes for a great relationship between the yearbook staff and the community. In turn, that helps us improve ad sales and book sales.” The social media site is good news for Horlick’s students too. “Students seem to be excited about the opportunity to share their photos and get them used in the yearbook,” she said. This enthusiastic response from the student body has proven to ignite excitement in the yearbook staff as well. “The editors have already brainstormed ideas on how to incorporate ReplayIt into the school’s daily announcements so they can get other students involved,” Wallace said. She cites three reasons why yearbook advisers should consider using ReplayIt: student accessibility, ease and participation. “ReplayIt will help increase the knowledge and excitement of the yearbook throughout the school year,” she noted. “It also helps get some students involved who may normally not get into the yearbook.” Wallace’s advice to advisers is straightforward: “Do it. Even if you get only a limited number of uploads the first year, as we did, it gets your staff excited about the book. Once it reaches more and more students, maybe in year two, the student body gets more excited about your product. Your sales will increase, and the student body has yet another creative outlet in which they can share their memories.”

What is ReplayIt? A yearbook-specific social media tool that offers yearbook programs an easy way to expand their photo library by obtaining photos from students, parents and staff. Users can share photos from Facebook or upload from computers or mobile devices. The free ReplayIt app for iPhones, Androids and Windows 8 devices makes mobile uploading quick and easy. The photos are displayed on the school’s ReplayIt site, where students can view favorite images and see new postings throughout the year. They can also “like” photos and participate in surveys and see messages posted by the yearbook staff. How does the staff use the site? Staff members review uploaded photos and select those they want to use in the book. ReplayIt is also a great place to share all the great photos you don’t have room for in the yearbook. If you have 100 football images but can use only 15 in your book, the unused shots can be viewed by everyone on ReplayIt. What happens to the content at the end of the school year? At the end of the year, all the yearbook content — including videos — is sealed into a digital Time Capsule that’s available only to yearbook buyers. Time Capsule mobile app, launching in 2014, will make it even easier to access the story of the year, for years to come.

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| 2 01 3 |  Jostens

More than 5,000 high school and middle school

Photo

student photographers took their best shot and

Contest

narrowed the field down to 95 remarkable

entered the 2013 Jostens Photo Contest. After considering each photo, the three contest judges photos and named this year’s winners.

Grand Prize winner | “Wrestling Mania” Taylor Alderman, photographer Bruce Hula, yearbook adviser Martha House, newspaper adviser Council Grove High School, Council Grove, KS

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The Photo Contest Grand Prize went to Taylor Alderman, a yearbook editor from the small Kansas town of Council Grove, for a photo she took at a high school wrestling match. First to Fifth Place winners were also chosen in each of eight categories: academics, illustration, portrait, graduation, junior high, sports in action, sports sidelines and student life. Here’s what the judges had to say about the winning images in the 2013 Photo Contest: Ellen Austin Media Arts instructor Palo Alto High School [CA] All of the entries we selected as finalists “broke out” in some way and were instantly recognizable to the judges as “wow!” choices. The photographers of these images found new ways to reveal moments that happen again and again (think of standard typical photos of school dances or of a wrestling meet), and they also showed a creative, photographic mind at work. Liz Flores Staff photographer Star Tribune [MN] The first thing that grabs my attention is the content in the image. I look to see if the picture told me a story. I look to see if the photographer took the extra steps to tell the story and not just simply state the obvious. Then I look at the lighting, composition and quality of image. Laurie Hansen Yearbook adviser Stillwater Area High School [MN] I take into consideration the elements of technical proficiency, artistic composition, lighting and subject matter, but the element that stands out from the others is the photo’s ability to convey emotion and capture a moment — the epiphany moment. The epiphany moment is that fraction of a second when the photographer instinctually knows when to trip the shutter. All great photos that really hold a viewer’s attention have that moment.

For grand prize winner, practice pays off Taylor Alderman, Grand Prize winner of the 2013 Jostens Photo Contest, began taking photos when she was a freshman at Council Grove High School [KS]. “My high school has an online newspaper that I began to take pictures for, and that’s how I was introduced to cameras,” said Alderman. Eventually, she joined the high school’s yearbook staff and began taking photos for The Chief. She also became an editor of the yearbook. During her four years, Alderman honed her craft by taking a lot of photographs. “Whenever I would come back from an event, I would have around 200-400 pictures. I learned how to configure the settings by myself by playing around with them and practicing. I have never taken a formal photography class; I merely began taking pictures on my own and I went from there. I definitely improved a lot.” Alderman worked as a waitress at a local restaurant to save money to buy the camera she used to take the Grand Prize winning photo. “After using the school’s cameras for a couple of years, I figured I had enough money saved and I decided I wanted my own. I have an EOS 60D Canon with a Tamron 18-270mm lens. I actually asked a local photographer to order me a camera and lens, because I didn’t know what to order. I did know that I wanted a Canon, because that is what I was used to.” As a photographer for two school publications, Alderman has had ample opportunity to perfect her skills as a sports photographer. “I’m used to taking sports pictures, which is what I enjoy the most. I’ve played around with taking pictures of people doing activities other than sports in school as well. I have also taken some pictures around my backyard for practice.” True to her muse, Alderman’s winning image is a sports action photo. “I was honestly just at another event taking pictures,” she said. “I was taking pictures at a high school home wrestling dual and the wrestling coaches decided to use a spotlight for the dual that night. It was a little tricky getting the settings correct for the lighting, but you have to work with what you have. I remember getting some good shots that night of our team lifting guys in the air and my winning photo happened to be one of them.” Alderman is now a freshman at Kansas State University. She offers this advice to students interested in pursuing photography: “If you feel like taking pictures, take pictures — and take a lot of them!”

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| 2| 02101 031 3| first | first place place winners winners

Graduation | “Pick-n-Powell” Parker Pamplin, photographer Margaret Sorrows, adviser Bryant High School, Bryant, AR

Academics | “Legacy” Brent Kyono, photographer Mark Schwab, adviser Leland High School, San Jose, CA

Sports Sidelines | “Sisterly Bond” Diana Albrecht, photographer Carrie Hansen, adviser Tartan High School, Oakdale, MN

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Portrait | “Drum Major” Emily Hinkle, photographer Lisa McCully, adviser Spartanburg High School, Spartanburg, SC

Student Life | “First Dance” Robert Colletta, photographer Susan Hays, adviser Hononegah High School, Rockton, IL

Middle School | “Bike Ride” Abbie Lopez, photographer Lynne Harward, adviser Crain’s Creek Middle School, Carthage, NC

Sports Action | “After The Catch” Chad Phillips, photographer Kristin Baker, adviser Andover High School, Andover, KS

Illustration | “Face Over Hands” Sandra Kue, photographer Ava Butzu, adviser Grand Blanc High School, Grand Blanc, MI

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More than 1,500 students submitted their best yearbook design in hopes of being named a winner in the 2013 YearTech Online Design Contest. Now in its fifth year, the contest was launched to recognize the outstanding work of an increasing number of staffs that are creating yearbook pages online, using Jostens YearTech Online. The judges awarded one Grand Prize, and one each of First Place, Second Place and

Ava Butzu Grand Blanc High School Grand Blanc, MI

“R

eally good design shows a balance of implementing the basic principles of design with the understanding of how and when to break those rules purposefully. The Grand Prize-winning entry reflected the skills of a burgeoning, future designer.� Ava Butzu contest judge Grand Prize Winner | Hannah Hislop Dos Pueblos High School, Goleta, CA John Dent, yearbook adviser

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Third Place prizes, and four Honorable Mentions. The Grand Prize and First through Third Place winners are showcased in this edition of Adviser & Staff and the other winning online designs are displayed at jostensyearbooks. com and in the 2014 Gotcha Covered Look Book and the Look Book Companion App (for iPad and iPhone). The contest was judged by a team of three high school yearbook advisers:

Julie Goldstein Green Valley High School Henderson, NV

Deb Lee Hudson High School Hudson, WI

Winning design inspired by emotion

First Place Winner | Micahla LeDesma Golden West High School, Visalia, CA David Velasquez, adviser

Second Place Winner | Lisa Xuan Earl Haig Secondary School, North York, ON Claudette Millett-Grant, adviser

Hannah Hislop, yearbook designer at Dos Pueblos High School [CA], is the 2013 YearTech Online Design Grand Prize winner. She credits her father with instilling the importance of pursing creativity. “Despite his full-time job as a software engineer, he always makes time to follow his creative passions,” she said. “He is a musician and songwriter, enjoys painting, can capture a simple moment through a lens and can make the most gorgeous-looking plate of food. My dad has inspired me to pursue these natural gifts and implement them into my day-to-day life.” Hislop joined The Image staff during the 2012–2013 school year. This fall, she’ll be a senior and will once again be on the yearbook staff. From a very young age, Hislop has always loved being creative. “Growing up, I have always loved arts and crafts, playing guitar and piano,” she said. “I love creating my own websites or blogs, experimenting with cooking and baking, taking photographs and simply adding a little part of me to whatever I am a part of or create.” When she joined the yearbook staff, she was thrilled to discover that it was a place where she could be creative. “Designing yearbook spreads is exciting for me because it is a way to express my creativity in a tangible way that will be shared with thousands of students, families and friends.” Hislop noted that one of the highlights of her work on yearbook was “being able to take some pictures, words, and a template and create a spread that was informative, easy-to-understand and visually pleasing. I looked forward to combining the photos I captured at various events, stories I wrote after interviewing the student body, and my ideas into one gorgeous spread of the yearbook.” “I was responsible for taking all the photos, interviewing, and writing the story for the Haunted House event,” she said. “For that spread, we aimed to capture the moments of that event and convey them with a similar, spooky theme. After attending the beloved Dos Pueblos Haunted House for myself and being scared out of my mind, I was able to portray my feelings of the event and morph them into a spread.”

THird Place Winner | Nadia Manivong Southwest Career and Technical Academy, Las Vegas, NV Matt LaPorte, adviser

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2013 Jostens/Adobe Design c

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Judges for the 2013 Jostens/Adobe Design Contest carefully evaluated hundreds of entries before recognizing 14 middle and high school students for their exceptional creativity in yearbook design. The contest, in its ninth year, is jointly sponsored by Jostens and Adobe. Each participant submitted a complete yearbook spread that was designed using Adobe InDesign software. The judges awarded one Grand Prize, and one each of First

Jeff Kocur Hopkins High School Minnetonka, MN

“T

he Grand Prize design used all of the elements necessary for a successful design. There was a good dominant picture, a variety of spacing, good use of white space and good storytelling. All three judges, without question, picked the same winner.� Roberta Manheim contest judge Grand Prize Winner | Zachary Seals Sarah Nichols, yearbook adviser Whitney High School, Rocklin, CA

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Place, Second Place and Third Place prizes, and ten Honorable Mentions. The Grand Prize and First through Third Place winners are showcased in this edition of Adviser & Staff and the other winning online designs are displayed at jostensyearbooks. com and in the 2014 Gotcha Covered Look Book and the Look Book Companion App (for iPad and iPhone). The contest was judged by a team of three high school yearbook advisers:

Jessica Leifheit Castle View High School Castle Rock, CO

Roberta Manheim Walton High School Marietta, GA

Good design takes patience and persistence

First Place Winner | Parker Matthews St. Mark’s School of Texas, Dallas, TX Ray Westbrook, adviser

Second Place Winner | Kaley Moore Stony Point High School, Round Rock, TX Rebecca Plumley, adviser

Zachary Seals, yearbook designer at Whitney High School [CA], is the 2013 Jostens/Adobe Design Contest Grand Prize winner. His interest in design began during his freshman year when he took a mass media class. “Our time in the journalism/ publications class really drew me toward design,” he said. “I began working and designing spreads my sophomore year.” He’s been a member of the Details staff for two years, serving as part of the book’s chronological team. He is currently the yearbook’s design editor. While he acknowledged that the list of people who inspired him in design “could go on for miles,” and he noted that his adviser, Sarah Nichols, and many past editors have “all played a huge role,” he singles out his sister Elyssa as being the biggest influence. “She had taken publications through high school and really pushed me to take the class,” he explained. “She has helped me with every spread and is constantly showing me new things about design and what makes a layout have that perfect look.” What Seals enjoys the most about designing yearbook spreads is finding the perfect spot for every individual package. “I love being able to show off the features of each package while still making the spread look cohesive and drawing most attention to the dominate package.” What he finds most daunting is creating the perfect story. “Really capturing the memories and moments of the event can be challenging and frustrating. Finding the right pictures to show off every detail and giving the reader the full story of every aspect can be the most difficult challenge.” After he graduates in the spring of 2014, Seals hopes to attend Seattle Pacific University and study theology. He encourages students who are interested in designing for their school’s yearbook to go for it. “Don’t stop just because you can’t get a spread to look right or can’t figure out the next step,” he said. “Stick with it. It will grow on you. Never stop trying to learn how to make your spreads look better. Put all you got into it and you’ll keep growing in design.”

THird Place Winner | Millie Dinkel Shawnee Mission East High School, Prairie Village, KS C. Dow Tate, adviser

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One-minute workshops Jostens Creative Accounts Managers share the latest in yearbooking.

Tina

Cleavelin

Creating Your “Type” of Relationship Spend an afternoon walking your local mall and you’ll find many examples of typography that create specific tones for products and businesses. Whether you desire a fun, playful tone or a sophisticated and classy style, the type can make or break the success of your vision. A staff spends a great deal of time developing a tone and personality for its thematic concept, but often neglects the font choice. Fonts have emotional properties that give a concept a specific tone and personality. With this in mind, typefaces establish a relationship with contents as well as with readers. Consider these guidelines when choosing your type. GUIDELINE #1: Readability is the number-one consideration in all design. It’s as simple as that. If you can’t read it, don’t use it. GUIDELINE #2: If you are using more than one font family, use completely contrasting ones. GUIDELINE #3: Become familiar with a typeface as thoroughly as possible before making your decision. Take time to play with type. Using the fonts you’re considering, type some body copy, a caption, a headline, a subhead and your school name in various sizes. Print and post on a wall. Ask yourself which font sets the desired tone and provides the best sense of readability in your publication.

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John

Shannon

Daily Plan-It

Social Media Dos and Don’ts

Cutsinger

The yearbook world revolves around the collection and preservation of invaluable memories — those little things, when added up, always mean a lot. Your readers’ everyday lives are packed full of routines and relationships, action and reaction, people and passions. And those readers are counting on you to capture those moments for them in a meaningful and storytelling way. So their everydays must become your every day. The role and responsibility as a staff member requires that you be a keen observer and an intensive reporter almost 24/7. Daily reporting and taking photographs is the only way your staff can be assured it creates a realistic reflection of the year. The staff achieves the greatest mass appeal when it covers the experiences of its readers and chronicles the important activities and events of the school community. In addition to developing a formal beat system that assigns staff members to specific areas of school and student life to cover on a regular basis, the staff must also be constantly aware of the spontaneous coverage opportunities that present themselves hour by hour. For yearbook staff members, coverage of the daily lives of your readers must become second nature, a routine in its own right. It really is all in a day’s work.

Williams

Social networking is a quickly evolving trend that is here to stay. Smart staffs are maximizing social media to uncover story ideas, photo opportunities and ideas for covering everyone in your book in new and creative ways. Don’t rule out any social media platform. Use Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, ReplayIt and any medium available. Don’t quit. Assign a social media editor, whose job will be to contribute to the online presence each week. Do “push” assignments. Push out timely assignments. For instance, the first week of school, push “Send us pics of your first-day-of-school outfit and give us the cost breakdown.” If you’re using Twitter, create your own hashtag and have students add it to their photos. Do share your actual work. Create a jpg of your page or module and post it. Do become the “go-to” spot online. For example, if the softball team has a game coming up, post “We’ll see you at the game Friday. Athletes — send us photos of your game day face this week.”

Attention like this never gets old. For the fourth time in five years, Jostens is honored to earn the prestigious “Benny” in the Premier Print Awards. Our work on the United States Naval Academy Lucky Bag yearbook is just the latest example of how Jostens is the absolute leader in printing excellence. As well as the biggest prize of the night, Jostens took home 12 additional honors in the School Yearbook category — m   ore than any other company.

Presorted First-Class Mail U.S. Postage Paid Owatonna, MN Permit No. 110

3601 Minnesota Drive Suite 400 Minneapolis, MN 55435

ATTN: YEARBOOK ADVISER

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2014

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PHOTO CONTEST

now ONLINE at jostens.com/photocontest

Students! Explore your creativity and photographic skills while generating amazing content for your yearbook. Entries accepted November 1–March 1, 2014. Grand Prize • $1,000 cash* • Nikon® SLR camera First Place • $500 cash* • Photo accessories from ProMaster ® and other leading brands 2nd to 5th Place • Photo accessories from ProMaster ® and other leading brands

High School Categories: Academics/Community Service Graduation Photo Manipulation and Illustration Portrait Sports/Athletes in Action Sports/Sidelines and School Spirit Student Life/Traditions NIKON is a trademark of Nikon Corporation. Promaster is a trademark of Photographic Research Organization, Inc. Neither Nikon Corporation nor Photographic Research Organization, Inc. is a sponsor of or affiliated with this contest.

Sponsored by: *Awarded in the form of a check.

Middle School/Junior High Category: Any school-related topic, but must be taken by a middle school/junior high student of at least 13 years of age. Note: JPEG and PNG files accepted. File size must be at least 300 dpi and a minimum of 5x6 inches. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Open to legal U.S. residents who are age 13 or older and are middle school, junior high or high school students in grades 6–12 as of the date of entry. See jostens.com/photocontest for official rules.


Adviser & Staff | Fall 2013 | Issue 68