Issuu on Google+

2007-08 | IMAGESMTSTERLING.COM | VIDEO TOUR ONLINE TM

OF MT. STERLING-MONTGOMERY COUNTY, KY

Sterling Accomplishment City praised as one of America’s 100 Best Communities for Young People

BLACKJACK CIDER & PUMPKIN PATCHES Agri-tourism attractions are reinventing the family farm

BRUSHSTROKE OF GENIUS SPONSORED BY THE MT. STERLING-MONTGOMERY COUNTY INDUSTRIAL AUTHORITY/CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

700 Woodford Dr. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 • (859) 497-8760 • www.montgomery.k12.ky.us

a commitment to student success

A flourishing, full-service school system located in one of the 100 Best Communities for Young People in America The Montgomery County Schools serve students’ varying interests and abilities. In addition to a rigorous academic program, students can extend their education through a variety of national and state-recognized activities. • Nationally recognized programs in music, agriculture, technology, business, marketing, vocational skills, cheerleading and Mock Trial. • Competitive at the state level in academic teams, journalism, musical theatre and athletics. • Other unique opportunities include child care, elementary orchestra and foreign language, dualcredit university courses, adult and community education, health and resource units, Commonwealth Diploma, Work Ethics Seal and so much more!

2007-08 EDITION | VOLUME 8 TM

OF MT. STERLING-MONTGOMERY COUNTY, KY

10 MT. STERLING BUSINESS CO NTE NT S

26 Biz Briefs 28 Chamber Report

F E AT U R E S 10

A STERLING ACCOMPLISHMENT

25

Mt. Sterling has been chosen as one of the country’s 100 Best Communities for Young People – for the second time.

14

BLACKJACK CIDER & PUMPKIN PATCHES Agri-tourism is rapidly changing the way many farmers do business.

18

GOLDEN OPPORTUNITIES Mt. Sterling and Montgomery County are becoming popular with retirees.

33

BRUSHSTROKE OF GENIUS Mt. Sterling artist John Ward contributed to the design of the Kentucky quarter.

33 D E PA R TM E NT S 6 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Mt. Sterling culture

21 Portfolio: people, places and events that define Mt. Sterling

31 Education 34 Sports & Recreation 35 Health & Wellness ON THE COVER Children at Easy Walker Park Photo by Greg Emens

M T. S T E R L I N G

37 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

3

ACTION! ADVENTURE! “IT KEPT ME ON THE EDGE OF MY LAPTOP!”

“MT. STERLING LIKE IT’S NEVER BEEN SEEN BEFORE!”

Images of Mt. Sterling

THE MOVIE STARTS TODAY!

WORLD WIDE WEB SHOWTIMES VALID MONDAY-SUNDAY 24/7

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT ANY RESEMBLANCE TO PLACES, EVENTS OR QUALITY OF LIFE IN MT. STERLING IS PURELY INTENTIONAL!

AT IM AGESMTSTERLING.COM

ONLINE CONTENTS More lists, links and tips for newcomers

IMAGESMTSTERLING.COM

MOVING PICTURES Take a video tour of Mt. Sterling at imagesmtsterling.com.

GET SMART ABOUT LOCAL SCHOOLS Find listings and links to schools, colleges and universities.

Oak Tree Mortgage Proudly Serving Mt. Sterling and Montgomery County with Incomparable Service and Integrity “Sometimes people

SEE HOW THE GARDENS GROW

forget that it is the

Get the dirt on growing seasons, soils and common challenges.

American dream

’CUE & A

to own your own home …

One of the simple pleasures of Southern dining is the down-home barbecue experience. No matter where you go, you’re bound to find barbecue prepared just right-tender, tangy and slowly smoked meat served as ribs, in a sandwich or heaped up on a plate. Get the dish on Kentucky barbecue at imagesmtsterling.com.

NO PLACE LIKE HOME Search for a new home, plus get moving tips and more at realtor.com.

A B O U T TH I S M AGA Z I N E Images of Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is sponsored by the Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Industrial Authority/Chamber of Commerce. In print and online, Images gives readers a taste of what makes Mt. Sterling tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts.

“Find the good – and praise it.”

That’s why we’re here.”

Branching Out To Serve You 124 N. Maysville St. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 499-0001

– Alex Haley (1921-1992), Journal Communications co-founder

jnlcom.com

M T. S T E R L I N G

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

5

Almanac | Mt. Sterling

Homes That Are Sweet Mt. Sterling and Montgomery County are building reputations as places with plenty of housing options. The city and county have choices for any budget, with home prices ranging from about $90,000 to just under $1 million. Since this is the heart of the South, historic homes also abound. “Home options are plentiful in this area,” says Lynn Romano, a local Realtor with Caswell Prewitt Realty, Inc. “We have everything from town homes to subdivisions on golf courses to planned retirement communities.”

Aunt Jemima Lived Here It’s true: Montgomery County native Nancy Green was the woman chosen to portray Aunt Jemima on boxes of the famous pancake mix. Green, who lived from 1834-1923, was selected in 1893 to become one of the first black corporate models in the United States. Born into slavery in Montgomery County, she was handpicked for the trademark role by businessman R.T. Davis. Davis, head of the R.T. Davis Milling Co., bought the pancake formula from a bankrupt milling company, but it was his idea to use a living spokesperson to promote the product. Davis discovered Green in Chicago, and she signed a lifetime contract as spokeswoman for Aunt Jemima at age 59.

6

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

Flying High in Mt. Sterling The Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Airport is the fifth-busiest airport in the state – and it’s also a significant reason why Mt. Sterling was recently named a Top 10 Micropolitan Area by Site Selection magazine. Located on U.S. 60, just two miles west of Mt. Sterling and fives miles east of I-64 off the 101 exit, the airport features a 5,000-foot runway with lighted instrument approach, enabling direct flights by corporate jets. Services offered include pilot flight instruction, aircraft pre-purchase inspections and more. For personal or corporate needs, the airport charters flights anywhere in the country. Scheduled charters run seven days a week with overnight stays, if required. Flights are available to carry up to five people or 1,100 pounds of cargo. Kentucky Airmotive runs the airport, which is a publicly held property. For more information, visit the Web site at www.kentuckyairmotive.com.

M T. S T E R L I N G

Park It Here

Love the Location What makes Woodlands Industrial Park an ideal place for a company to locate its business? “I like to say that our industrial park offers not just one thing – it has everything,” says Sandy Romenesko, executive director of the Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Industrial Authority/Chamber of Commerce. “We are on Interstate 64 and near an airport. There is plenty of land available, and we have a good workforce and business climate in Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County.” Mt. Sterling Tobacco Services is a tenant in the industrial park, which has space for a variety of different businesses. “Woodlands Industrial Park also has the advantage of being less than a half hour from Lexington, Kentucky’s second-largest city,” Romenesko says.

Another fresh-air recreation option is in the works for Mt. Sterling. More than 30 acres are under development next to Mt. Sterling Elementary School to establish a nature trail, picnic grounds and amphitheater. The park is still a couple of years away from completion, with grading and water line installation taking place during 2007. The property is being referred to as Easy Walker Park II for now, but recreation officials say it will be renamed.

Mt. Sterling | At A Glance POPULATION (2005 ESTIMATE) Mt. Sterling: 6,317 Montgomery County: 24,887

;]\bU][S`g 1]c\bg

LOCATION Montgomery County is in north-central Kentucky, 30 miles east of Lexington. BEGINNINGS Hugh Forbes named Mt. Sterling in 1792. He derived the name from an Indian burial mound adjacent to the settlement and the town of Stirling in his native Scotland. Montgomery County was named for Revolutionary War Gen. Richard Montgomery.

60

M O N TG O M E RY 64

Mt. Sterling

60

Camargo

Winchester W nc

Jeffersonville 4 402

460

FOR MORE INFORMATION Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Industrial Authority/Chamber of Commerce 126 West Main St. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-5400 Fax: (859) 498-3947 www.mtsterlingchamber.com

M T. S T E R L I N G

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

7

Almanac | Mt. Sterling

Court Is in Session Mt. Sterling hosts a festival that dates back nearly 200 years. October Court Day takes place on the third Monday in October, with festivities actually beginning the prior Saturday and Sunday. More than 80,000 people from all parts of the country visit the city for the three-day event. Court Day derives from the early 1800s when the Kentucky General Assembly decreed that each county should meet once a month to hold court and decide on business. As years went by, court day became more of a trading day in Montgomery County. Today, the festival features a variety of live music, food, craft booths and an abundance of unusual antiques, collectibles and handmade furniture.

Shop – Dine – Discover Been downtown lately? The Mt. Sterling Downtown Merchants group invites you to take a look at what’s going on. Members meet to discuss how downtown Mt. Sterling can remain vital, with a number of activities and special events planned each year. Two of the annual events planned are a Spring Fling shopping extravaganza and an Open House Christmas Tour. “Our motto is Shop – Dine – Discover, and we want people to become reacquainted with all the unusual shopping opportunities and good restaurants that Mt. Sterling has to offer,” says Roberta Gilbert, spokeswoman with the Mt. Sterling Downtown Merchants and owner of The Plaid Rabbit. “There’s good parking and a scenic setting down here. Come visit us again.”

Fast Facts ■ Mt. Sterling serves as the county seat of Montgomery County. The current courthouse is the sixth to be located in downtown Mt. Sterling. ■ Confederate Gen. John Hunt Morgan captured Mt. Sterling in 1864, and his troops overnight stole $65,000 from Farmers Bank on Main Street. The money has never been found. ■ Kentucky’s largest sycamore tree soars 85 feet above the ground and is rooted on the George Donaldson Farm in Montgomery County. ■ Montgomery County is home to 35 industries that employ more than 5,000 area residents. ■ The Mt. SterlingMontgomery County Airport Fly-In Breakfast & Air Show has been feeding the stomachs and imaginations of participants since the mid-1960s. The event takes place the last Sunday of August.

SEE MORE ONLINE | For more Fast Facts about Mt. Sterling, visit imagesmtsterling.com.

M T. S T E R L I N G

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

9

Ethan Johnson, 5, of Mt. Sterling casts a line at the Easy Walker Park pond.

10

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

M T. S T E R L I N G

A

Sterling Accomplishment REGION’S ‘ECONOMIC ENGINE’ IS NAMED A BEST COMMUNITY FOR YOUNG PEOPLE

STORY BY VALERIE PASCOE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG EMENS

F

or Tony Mellone, the view of Mt. Sterling from the sidelines of the soccer fields at Easy Walker Park is the best in town. The busy soccer coach and father of three boys says the community’s emphasis on children and families, as well as its superior quality of life and strong economy, make it an ideal place to work and live. “Mt. Sterling offers a young family like ours a lot. If you look around, you’ll see the new schools, the parks, the thriving businesses and just a great supportive community,” says Mellone, who relocated to Mt. Sterling over a year ago to work as a human resources manager for Nestlé, one of the area’s largest employers. For the second time, Mt. Sterling has been chosen as one of the country’s 100 Best Communities for Young People by America’s Promise Alliance for Youth, a nod to the area’s dedication to providing a safe and caring environment for children. Mt. Sterling also has received national recognition for its strides in economic development and was recently chosen as a Top 10 Micropolitan Area by Site Selection magazine. With more manufacturing jobs per capita than almost any other community its size in the state, the Mt. SterlingM T. S T E R L I N G

Montgomery County area is enjoying a sustained period of economic prosperity. In addition to being one of only two counties east of Interstate 75 with more people commuting in to work than out, Montgomery County also has seen its average per capita income rise from $21,398 to $22,115 since 2005.

According to Sandy Romenesko, executive director of the Mt. SterlingMontgomery County Industrial Authority/ Chamber of Commerce, expansions at existing companies such as Lexington Metal Systems, Quality Cabinets and Nestle – which produces Hot Pockets frozen entreés at its Mt.

From left, Anthony, David, Evan, Lisa and Tony Mellone enjoy family time.

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

11

Sterling plant – have helped boost the local economy by adding 482 new manufacturing positions over the past two years. “Montgomery County really stands on its own from a business perspective. There’s one county between here and Lexington, so we’re not a bedroom community, even though we’re conveniently located to the Lexington market. We call ourselves the economic engine for this central Kentucky region,” says Romenesko, who helped recruit companies such as the Japanese automotive fuel system components firm, Kyosan Denso Manufacturing of Kentucky, to the area. In an effort to demonstrate the unique character of Mt. Sterling and Montgomery County to locals and newcomers, Romenesko and other area leaders involved with the Chamber of Commerce and Industrial Authority recently began a branding campaign that features a new community pledge emphasizing good citizenship, strong family values and respect for the environment. Curt Steger, president and CEO of Commonwealth Bank, has a copy of the pledge displayed prominently in his office and throughout the bank. “The goal in 2007 is to get the pledge into every business, home, church and school,” says Steger, who also serves as chairman of the board for the Industrial Authority. “It’s our commitment to each other and it links us to future generations.” For young entrepreneurs like Brandi Kratzer, who recently opened a tumbling and cheerleading studio in Mt. Sterling, Montgomery County’s stable economy and strong sense of community means an optimistic outlook for the future. “It feels like I have the support of the entire community behind me and that I can succeed because everyone is pulling for me,” she says. “I don’t think I would have found the same advantages in a larger community.”

Historic downtown Mt. Sterling Inset: Curt Steger, president and CEO of Commonwealth Bank, displays a copy of the community pledge at the bank.

12

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

M T. S T E R L I N G

M T. S T E R L I N G

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

13

Blackjack Cider

&Pumpkin Patches

WES ALDRIDGE

AGRI-TOURISM MAKES THE FAMILY FARM LOOK LIKE A HORSE OF A DIFFERENT COLOR

14

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

M T. S T E R L I N G

STORY BY LAURA HILL

A

n old song once asked, “How you gonna keep ’em down on the farm?” A growing number of Mt. Sterling farmers have found agritourism is the answer. A concept that’s rapidly changing the way many farmers across the country do business, agri-tourism is the diversification of traditional agriculture into specialties that bring visitors – and customers – to the farm from the local area and farther afield. The result is an economic win for small farmers – who have been under the financial gun for years – and the community as well. “People want to see the farmer’s quality of life, their environment,” says Lynda Wilson, director of the Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Tourism Commission. “And this is also a great way to learn. Kids think pumpkins come from a box at the grocery store, but here they can see how things really happen.” Mt. Sterling has seen agri-tourism pick up dramatically in the past few years, says agricultural marketing specialist Crystal Amburgey. “We’ve seen some people who were in tobacco looking to use their land in different ways so they can maintain their farms,” Amburgey says. “Others not in tobacco were looking for some supplemental income. Agri-tourism is becoming very popular around the county.” At Hickory Springs of Montgomery Daylilies, visitors can see flower farming Visitors to Two Sisters Pumpkin Patch will find a corn maze, farm animals and acres of sunflowers, pumpkins and gourds.

M T. S T E R L I N G

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

15

#1 Public Golf Course in Kentucky for 2007 Old Silo is an 18-hole Graham Marsh signature design that has been featured in Golf Magazine and USA Today. Golf Digest ranked Old Silo the #1 Public Course in Kentucky in 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, and the 6th Best New Affordable Course in the United States for 2001. Come experience the natural beauty of a championship course with bentgrass fairways, four sets of tees and white sand bunkers. Old Silo has one of the best practice facilities in the state, featuring a 10,000-square-foot putting green, practice bunker, chipping green and driving range with a spacious bentgrass teeing area.

Host of: 2005 Kentucky Senior Open 2006 Club Car Classic 2007 US Open Qualifier 2007 NAIA Conference Championship 350 Silver Lake Dr. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-4697 Toll-free: (877) OLD SILO

WWW.OLDSILO.COM

After your round, be sure to visit Old Silo Restaurant with its spectacular view overlooking the 18th green. Enjoy outstanding service in a relaxed atmosphere. Socialize with friends around the fireplace and take in the latest PGA Tour event or the big game. Banquet and meeting facilities for parties of up to 150 persons are also available.

341 Silver Lake Dr. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353

An Active Seniors Community Silver Creek is a 450-acre, master-planned and restricted community with beautiful ponds and lakes offering garden homes, town homes and retirement homes. HURRY! We have only nine GARDEN HOME lots remaining and only 17 beautiful GOLF COURSE LOTS ranging in size from 1/2 to 1-acre lots.

(859) 498-0403 • www.silvercreekky.com

worked as a corporate executive. In 2001, the Peakes and another couple planted 2,700 apple trees of 13 varieties, and in 2004 Bramble Ridge Apple Orchard celebrated its first crop. Today it’s an all-things-apple paradise, where agri-tourists come from spring to late fall to tour the farm, pick apples and feast on homemade apple jam and pies, Blackjack cider and Wapples – waffle cones filled with warm apple filling and ice cream. Each April the farm hosts an Arts in the Orchard celebration, and October brings the annual Apple Butter Festival. “With the price of gas as high as it is, people are looking for fun things to do closer to home,” Cindy Peake says. “This is an educational benefit for the community, too, because it helps them understand what has to happen to get food to their tables.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF MT. STERLING-MONTGOMERY COUNTY INDUSTRIAL AUTHORITY/CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

in action. Glen Berger’s G & R Freshwater Shrimp farm sells at farmers’ markets and offers pond-side pickup at shrimp harvest time. Two Sisters Pumpkin Patch is a fall favorite with families who come to explore a corn maze, buy gourds, pumpkins and fall f lower arrangements, and enjoy farm animals. And Townsend’s Sorghum offers strawberries, blackberries, sweet corn and a stocked fishing lake, not to mention its award-winning, homemade sorghum that’s finding a growing niche with area inns and restaurants. When Cindy Peake and her husband, Terry, moved from Chicago to the family farm a few years ago, a scant six or seven apple trees made selling at the local farmers market a brief affair. “People kept saying, ‘Where’s your orchard?’” recalls Cindy Peake, who worked as a teacher while Terry Peake

GREG EMENS

Bramble Ridge Apple Orchard is an allthings-apple paradise. Above: More than 500 varieties of daylilies are available at Hickory Springs of Montgomery Daylilies in Mt. Sterling.

M T. S T E R L I N G

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

17

Golden

Opportunities RETIRING SOON? MONTGOMERY COUNTY IS A GREAT PLACE TO CALL HOME STORY BY LAURA HILL | PHOTOGRAPHY BY GREG EMENS

18

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

built out, the community will have 54 units ranging in size from 1,500 to 5,000 square feet, designed especially for seniors. “It’s something our market studies said we needed in our community,” says Bentley, who has been contacted by people from as far away as California and Florida who are looking for a more affordable and manageable place to retire. “People like the feel of a small-town community, where they are close to everything,” he says. “The quality of life is excellent, the pace is slower, nothing’s crowded.” All-brick homes in the upscale community will be one level and all-electric. A nominal monthly fee will include water, sewage, garbage collection and outside maintenance including yard mowing and exterior maintenance – leaving owners free to enjoy all Montgomery County has to offer.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MT. STERLING-MONTGOMERY COUNTY INDUSTRIAL AUTHORITY/CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

W

hen it comes time to retire, most seniors are looking for the same basic things in a community – livable climate, reasonably priced housing, recreational and cultural opportunities, access to good medical care and a welcoming atmosphere. That may be why Mt. Sterling and Montgomery County are increasingly popular with retirees. Just ask Cliff Stilz, who left full-time work as a banker in Mt. Sterling to stay right here. “Basically, for me, Mt. Sterling has everything I need,” Stilz says. “We’ve got good recreational facilities, two nice golf courses, and we’re close to Lexington to see college sports, great arts and opera and that kind of thing. And we’re relatively affordable.” Stilz goes on to list the other advantages the area holds for retirees: proximity to airports in Cincinnati and Lexington, a great church community, a country club, a beautiful new civic center and Morehead State University’s many opportunities for learning. “It’s a town where total strangers speak to one another on the street and make an effort to welcome new people,” he says. “It truly is a great little town.” Stilz is not alone in his enthusiasm. More and more retirees are finding out what locals have known for years. “There are a lot of amenities here for retired people,” says Sandy Romenesko, executive director of the Mt. SterlingMontgomery County Industrial Authority/Chamber of Commerce. “We’ve got a range of housing options, from under $100,000 to half a million dollars, a great medical climate including an outstanding hospital and the best nursing-home facility, Windsor Care, I’ve ever seen. We have a senior center and lots of senior activities through churches. And if people give us an idea of something they’d like to see, we’ll do it.” Banker Claude Bentley, who developed a 400-acre residential community at Silver Creek, is anticipating the growing interest in Montgomery County as a retirement destination with his new Old Silo Hills Retirement Community. When

Homes in the Silver Creek Retirement Community, built around a golf course, offer single-story living, all-brick construction and more.

M T. S T E R L I N G

Cliff Stiltz at home in Mt. Sterling with his grandson, Jacob

M T. S T E R L I N G

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

19

Working Together For the Good of the Community Mount Sterling – Montgomery County From Left: B.D. Wilson, Montgomery County Judge / Executive, Greg Beam, Mayor of Camargo, Gary Williamson, Mayor of Mt. Sterling and Anthony Henderson, Mayor of Jeffersonville.

K EATH BUILDING SUPPLIES & HOME CENTER Hand and Power Tools • Kitchen and Bath Cabinets Trims and Moldings • Oxygen, Propane and Acetylene Available • Gray Seal Paint

• Insulation

• Plumbing

• Counter Tops

• Windows and Doors

• Sand

• Drywall

• Cement

• Roofing

• Doors

• Hardware

• Delivery Available

• Electrical

• In-house Cabinet Specialist

• Mortar

• Framing Lumber HOUSE PLANS AVAILABLE

1440 Owingsville Rd. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-4130 • Toll-free: (866) 48-KEATH (485-3285) • Fax: (859) 498-9243 E-mail: kbuilding@bellsouth.net • www.keathhomecenter.com

PEACHTREE

DOORS AND WINDOWS

20

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

All Major Credit Cards Accepted

M T. S T E R L I N G

Portfolio

A Sanctuary for the Arts RENOVATED CHURCH WILL HOUSE A PERFORMANCE HALL, GALLERY AND MORE

uch of the community knows it as the historic First United Methodist Church building, built in 1885. But soon the downtown church, complete with restored stained-glass windows and a performance hall instead of a sanctuary, will serve another purpose – as home of the Gateway Regional Center for the Arts. The center will house the Montgomery County Council of the Arts. With help from the city and county governments, the council bought the church in 2004 and is in the midst of a capital campaign to raise money to pay for renovation of the 12,000-squarefoot building. The group has raised $860,000 in donations, pledges and grants, and it needs at least $500,000 more to complete the project. “We want to provide programming and reach communities contiguous to Montgomery County,” says Cay Lane, the council’s executive director. Opportunities will exist in all the arts – visual arts, theater, dance, music and literary ventures. The council’s Gallery for the Arts will be expanding into an area double the size of the current location in a storefront on Main Street. And there will be a larger art shop that will showcase and sell many works by local artists. The Sterling Players Theatre Group will finally have a permanent home in the sanctuary-turned-performance hall. “The performing arts will have a centralized location but will still use some other venues in the community,” Lane says. Part of the church’s upstairs will house rehearsal rooms and an art resource library. The center, which will be accessible to those with disabilities, also will be able to add more children’s programs and art classes. “The community has been very receptive,” Lane says. “The city and county governments understand the need for arts and cultural opportunities.” M T. S T E R L I N G

GREG EMENS

M

With plenty of support from the community, Montgomery County Council of the Arts is renovating a historic church building in downtown Mt. Sterling.

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

21

Portfolio

Take an Art Tour on the Back Roads A

stunning display of quilt blocks can be seen in an art gallery of sorts along Montgomery County’s back roads. The display of five 8-foot quilt blocks on local barns is intended to get Montgomery County residents and tourists off the beaten path. “It’s supposed to get you off the highway and onto the two-lane back roads, to follow the trail of blocks, stop a little, shop along the way,” says Becky Hill, a quilting-supply shop owner who coordinates the Kentucky Quilt Trail-

Montgomery County project with fellow quilter Sharon Johnson. The project is an offshoot of the original quilt trail project in Adams County, Ohio. A barn behind Hill’s quilting-supply shop, Sterling Thimble Quilt Shop, on Maysville Road, was the location of the first quilt block, Churn Dash. Other quilt blocks include LeMoyne Star at Hilltop Farm on Owlingsville Road; Tree of Life at Bramble Ridge Orchard on Osborne Road; Double Pinwheel on New Cut

Road in Jeffersonville; and Star of Hope at Hope Hill Children’s Home on Spencer Pike. Another two are in the works, and Hill says the plan is to have 12 blocks. The quilt blocks, mounted on aluminum signboard with vinyl, are each sponsored by an individual or business. “Ten years from now, they will look just as good,” Hill says. The project has gained a lot of local support. Sign maker Steve Calvert of City Blue worked with the quilters to make the signs. Another company, Clark Energy, hangs them. The Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Tourism Commission is putting together a driving brochure that will contain the location and description of each quilt block. The brochures will be available at Hill’s quilt shop and the Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce, among other locations.

First Church of God 1051 Camargo Rd. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-2973 • www.firstchurchms.org PURPOSE STATEMENT First Church of God Mt. Sterling exists to DELIVER every person in our spheres of influence from the devastation of a life lived apart from God, to DEVELOP them into fully devoted followers of Jesus, and to DEPLOY them in a place of meaningful service that glorifies God. A quilt-block barn on Maysville Road

22

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

M T. S T E R L I N G

Rev. Jeff Perkins in the First Church of God’s permanent food pantry

he Rev. Jeff Perkins wants his church to be known as “the servingest group of people in town.” And his 600member congregation at First Church of God is well on its way. “Jesus came to serve. If we follow Jesus, we should serve,” Perkins says. “I came here four years ago with a vision to see a revival of how this church serves the community. We want to make an impact.” A program called Forty Days of Community began in 2005 at First Church of God. Thirty-seven small groups were formed, each charged with coming up with a mission project outside the church building. One group came up with a community baby shower for unwed pregnant teens. They collected baby clothes and other items and held a baby shower to give out the gear. Another group raised money to grant the wish of a beach trip for a child with a terminal illness; and another started a food pantry for the community with no government affiliation and no hoops to jump through. The food pantry has become a permanent fixture in a room in the church, and it has served about 180 families. “We take their names and don’t ask for anything else,” Perkins says. “A lot of really neat things have come out of that.” Many of the small-group ministries formed in 2005 and led by Joanne McVey remain intact. Some have changed their focus but are still making a difference in the community. In 2006, the church received the Public Service Award from the Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce. “When people think of service, we want them to connect the dots and think of the First Church of God,” Perkins says. “We want to be relevant and make a difference.” M T. S T E R L I N G

PHOTOS BY GREG EMENS

Making a Difference T

Central Kentucky Radiology, PLLC 2365 Harrodsburg Rd., B-125 Lexington, KY 40504

Proud to support the Mt. Sterling community

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

23

The old train depot, a historical landmark, is getting a face-lift.

Students Head Up Renovation I

WHITAKER BANK CORPORATION OF KENTUCKY “Get the Treatment You Deserve”

30 W. Main St. Mt. Sterling (859) 498-3800 Fax: (859) 497-8634 Camargo & Indian Mound (Bypass) ATMs throughout Central Kentucky Time & Temperature: (859) 498-4711

Visit us at www.whitakerbank.com 24

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

t’s not unusual for a group to spearhead the renovation of a historic landmark, and that’s what’s happening with the Mt. Sterling Chesapeake and Ohio (C & O) Train Depot. What is unusual is that high school students – members of Future Business Leaders of America and SkillsUSA chapters at Montgomery County Area Technology Center – proposed the project, secured the funding and are doing the work. The students are working with the Montgomery County Tourism Commission and obtained approval from the Mt. Sterling City Council to do the restoration. They also received $153,000 in state transportation enhancement funds for the project, and they’re trying to raise more funds. The FBLA chapter handles the business side of the project while SkillsUSA uses school time to do the work, which includes new plumbing, wiring and mak ing it accessible for people with disabilities. Student Katie Bowles came to tourism commission Director Lynda Wilson with the idea. “We had the same dream,” says Wilson, who serves as liaison for the project. “It is very dilapidated. The historical society fixed the roof several years ago, but there’s spray paint on the outside, the windows are broken, there’s water in the basement. It’s in the heart of the downtown area, and it needed a lot of care.” The depot will serve as a welcome center and as a trailhead for Rails to Trails. It also will contain a museum and serve as a meeting space for groups. “It may take three to four years to complete,” Wilson says, “but it’s going to touch a lot of students’ lives during that time.” M T. S T E R L I N G

Portfolio

A

group of 25 Montgomery County knitters gets together twice a month to knit and crochet, enjoying each other’s company almost as much as the good deeds they do. Warm Up Montgomery County participants range in age from 45 to 96. The founder, Mary Crouch, estimates they have made nearly 4,500 knitted and crocheted items since Sept. 1, 2001 – afghans and hats for kidney dialysis patients, nursing home residents and patients at the Montgomery County Cancer Center; tiny baby afghans for wrapping stillborn babies at Mary Chiles Hospital; and baby caps for every baby born there. First-time parents enrolled in a county home-visiting service are also treated to baby caps and afghans made by the women, and the ladies have collected new baseball caps for male cancer patients as well. Crouch says the group depends on

M T. S T E R L I N G

donations from the community to sustain their work.“I have to beg to get money to keep it going,” she says. “I’ll go on the ‘Tom and Judy Radio Show’ and beg. The Kiwanis Club and churches have given us monetary donations. Sometimes someone who is given an afghan will donate money for us to make another one.” The women crochet more than knit (it’s faster), and they’re always looking for new members. “I’m in my 60s, and a lot of our members are in their 70s and 80s. I think it’s wonderful when they come and join our group, mix in, and we all accomplish something together.” Crouch says the group, which includes many retired teachers, has bonded. They meet from 9 a.m. to noon, often bringing food to share. “We discuss what’s going on in town,” she says. “We know who’s sick and who we need to help.” − Nancy Humphrey

PHOTOS BY GREG EMENS

Good Works and Good Times

The ladies of Warm Up Montgomery County knit and crochet blankets and hats to warm bodies and hearts.

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

25

GREG EMENS

Business | Biz Briefs

Finderskeepers Market offers an eclectic mix of new and vintage finds.

THEY FIND IT, YOU KEEP IT Shopping alert: Trying to find that one-of-a-kind, collectible antique? New or vintage furniture? Carpets from around the world? Luxury bedding? All that and more can be found at Finderskeepers Market, where owners James Snowden and Randall Terrell have assembled an eclectic mix of just about every thing they can think of under one roof. “It’s something that I’ve done for friends and family since I was a teenager,” Snowden says of his collecting. “I always wanted to have my own shop but was a little afraid. After being a children’s 26

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

librarian for about 12 years, I decided to just go for it.” Since opening in May 2006 in the historic W.T. Hanly House near downtown, Snowden says the community has embraced the new business wholeheartedly. “I think people are really excited that we’re here,” he says. “We’re a little bit different than other shops in the area. We work to make our inventory really unique, so people can find something special every time they come in. And for me, it’s just great to wake up and go to work knowing I’ll enjoy what I’m doing.”

BEYOND THE BOTTOM LINE Need something boxed up? Look no further. Mt. Sterling’s Hoffman Enclosures makes metal boxes of all kinds, and the subsidiary of Pentair Corp. employs more than 300 people. But the company is probably best known in town for its philanthropic efforts. Ask Tom Toland, director of Kentucky operations, what Hoffman Enclosures does for charity, and he can tick off a list that would put some nonprofits to shame. “We’re sponsoring the junior pro football program, a summer camp in Montgomery County,” he says. “We provide T-shirts and footballs with the Hoffman logo on them, so the parents and schools don’t have to buy those things.” The company also has donated $10,000 to the area’s Boy Scout camp so a former cafeteria can be converted into a training center with wireless Internet access and full audio-visual capabilities. Then there’s the $10,000 for renovating the former firehouse downtown to be the new home for the Montgomery County Historical Society; the donation to nearby Gateway Services, which provides a variety of social services to area residents in need; the graphing calculators for McNabb Middle School’s accelerated-math program; the $20,000 donation to help Hope Hill, a children’s home, with additional office space for its foster-care staff. “We’ve got a committee of four people here who look at our budget, see what we have to give away, and then start looking at where we can do the most good for the community,” Toland says. “Then we write grants and get money approved through the foundation, so we’re able to give money in two different ways. We’re very involved with our community.” THEY HAVE GREAT GATES Since 1994, “solutions” has been the watchword at Gateway Manufacturing. The company specializes in a variety of manufacturing and assembling processes, designing a program that meets each customer’s specific needs. Owner Doug Gessford says the company is truly full service, providing purchasing, logistics, engineering support and direct labor. Just what kind of services does the M T. S T E R L I N G

company offer? Anything from electronic assembly and repair to mechanical assembly, packaging, laser engraving and distribution services are available. If it’s something Gateway hasn’t done before, the company will tackle a new service. The goal is to free up customers’ staff members to do other jobs. The company has seen steady growth, with Doug and Carol Gessford, along with co-owner Daryl Eason, opening a new facility in June 2005. There they manufacture items as diverse as the ADVENTURER® series pens and the Guardmaster®/Keepsafe® Juvenile and Pet Gates. Another pen made on site is the PenAgain,™ an ergonomic-designed pen that has been recommended by the Arthritis Foundation for people with severe rheumatoid arthritis. The juvenile and pet gates are sold to large retail chains such as Wal-Mart, True Value hardware and Kroger. Gateway is the only on-shore manufacturer of them in the United States. Working at Gateway is a pretty good deal: Employees with perfect attendance get two weeks’ extra pay every year. After two years, the bonus is a four-day/ three night stay anywhere in the country. These programs have led to more than half the employees logging at least one year of perfect attendance. Oh, and they get to fish in a pond on the property. SUCH SWEET SUCCESS Ruth Tharpe Hunt was onto something in 1921 when she began selling her homemade candies. But even she would be amazed these days at the size and scope of the company she started. Ruth Hunt Candies now produces a wide variety of confections year-round, and since 1993 has been the official candy maker for the Kentucky Derby. This means that while most candy makers are slowing down for the spring and summer months, the Hunt facility is going full tilt, says Tobby Moore, manager. “The Derby happens before it’s unbearably hot, so at least we get that business before it’s too bad,” Moore says. “But we do slow down in the summer when everybody’s switching to ice cream and sodas.” The company moved seven years M T. S T E R L I N G

ago from its longtime location to a new, 15,000-square-foot plant to keep up with demand, and it’s constantly upgrading its equipment, Moore says. In addition to retail sales in Kentucky, the company ships throughout the United States, including filling orders for some high-profile customers. One Christmas, Lady Bird Johnson ordered 60 pounds of chocolate-covered creams for Christmas gifts. And then there are the Derby fans, who aren’t shy about their love of chocolate. “We make an annual Derby version of a chocolate bar for them, and tons and tons of bourbon balls,” he says. “It really has created a new holiday season for us.” HOMETOWN ADVANTAGE Home-improvement shoppers in Mt. Sterling are luckier than most. They have two family-owned stores where their needs – and names – are well known. Keath’s Home Center and McCormick Lumber Co. are longtime

businesses in the city, and they’re the go-to stores for everything from nails to paint. Keath’s has been in business since 1971 and owned by Robert and David Corey since 1991. McCormick’s has been around since 1880 and is on its seventh generation of family members. “People like doing business within the community,” says Janice Miller, office manager of Keath’s. “They like that personal touch.” McCormick’s has been in the same location since the beginning, a site near a creek, which came in handy for the steam engines that once delivered goods. That kind of permanence has been good for the store and the community, says owner Mac McCormick. “When you come to a place like ours, you get a lot more,” he says. “Our people know where everything is, not like the big stores where they just know what’s in their department. And here you can get in and out in 10, 15 minutes. Contractors like that, because time is money.” – Joe Morris

Homeowners Insurance Auto Insurance Business Insurance Life Insurance Workers Compensation Farm Insurance General Liability Insurance Surety Bonds

Proudly representing

and other fine companies

www.hoffman-robertson.com 46 Broadway in downtown Mt. Sterling (859) 498-3410

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

27

Chamber and Industrial Authority officers and staff, from left: Ryan Steger, Chamber presidentelect; Shelby Jones, executive assistant; John Morton, 2007 Chamber president; Sandy Romenesko, executive director; Emma Kennedy, administrative assistant; Kandi Kegley, administrative assistant; Curt Steger, Industrial Authority chairman.

GREG EMENS

Business | Chamber Report

Innovating and Celebrating CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IMPLEMENTS NEW EVENTS, PROGRAMS AND A PLEDGE

F

rom a community-wide pledge to new annual sponsorships, the Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Industrial Authority/Chamber of Commerce recently marked several important firsts. In February 2007, members welcomed the Chamber’s inaugural – and soon to be annual – general membership meeting, gathering on Fat Tuesday at Old Silo Golf Club for a Mardi Gras-themed breakfast. Having expected perhaps 50 members to attend, Chamber officials were thrilled when 75 turned up. “Every time a member joins they’ve asked us, ‘When’s your membership meeting?,’ but until now all we’ve ever had were board meetings,” says Sandy Romenesko, the Chamber’s executive director. “We wanted a venue to inform and educate our members so they would desire to be active and involved.” Members heard reports from committee chairs, networked and enjoyed a community trivia game. The result? “We have people participating now who wouldn’t have if it weren’t for the meeting,” Romenesko says. The Chamber’s first member directory also enjoyed an enthusiastic debut, prompting the publication of a second edition in spring 2007. At 70 pages in a 5-by-7-inch format, it’s a handy compendium members often keep in their cars for quick reference. Streamlining its fundraising solicitations, the Chamber has initiated an Annual Sponsors program that enables it to go to the financial well less often.

28

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

“It seemed as if we were always on the phone asking for support for a golf tournament or $100 for something else, and it was taking a lot of administrative time and effort,” Romenesko says. “We thought a one-time solicitation from the 25 members who tended to give the most would make things easier for everybody. We asked them for $1,500 and thought maybe 15 would respond. It’s amazing, but we actually got 23 members to help.” Perhaps the most far-reaching Chamber effort recently, in partnership with other civic and business leaders, has been the development and distribution of a community pledge for Mt. Sterling. “While we may not possess big-city appeal or be on a beach, we knew we had something special here in Mt. Sterling,” Romenesko says. “We wanted a way to tell others that we are proud of our community and the way people act here.” Soliciting input from the community via newspaper ads and through the schools, meeting once or twice a week, a committee ironed out the wording for a pledge it hopes everyone in the community will adopt. “We want it to be in every home, business, public building, school and restaurant in town, and so far the response has been very good,” Romenesko says. “You think it might be a little thing, but people call us all the time to buy a copy.” Copies of the pledge are available at the Chamber offices. An 8-by-10-inch copy is $5; an 11-by-14-inch copy is $10. – Laura Hill M T. S T E R L I N G

Montgomery County Pledge

Loving God, Loving Others, Serving Others

W

e the citizens of Montgomery County, Kentucky, striving for a progressive community of excellence, do hereby pledge to bind ourselves together by demonstrating our commitment of these shared values: Treating all people with respect Promoting the welfare and safety of every citizen Showing compassion and empathy for the less fortunate Contributing to the community through active service and personal sacrifice Strengthening all levels of government by voting and obeying the laws Pursuing excellence in cultural, educational, career and spiritual opportunities for all generations Respecting and protecting our environment by keeping it clean and beautiful Practicing kindness, honesty and fairness in all our dealings by treating others as we would like to be treated Promoting strong and healthy families

First Baptist a place …

… to worship the God of the universe … to connect with others … to serve the community and the world

Come Join Us! First Baptist Church 925 Woodford Dr. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-5645 www.fbcmtsterling.com

Don’t make a move …

STEVEN TUTTLE Principal Broker 398-1196

without us!

RHONDA TUTTLE Realtor 398-1195

LESA PEYTON Realtor 585-5862

CECIL TUTTLE Office Manager 404-3784

Why pay more to companies who offer less? Come see us for all your real estate needs. No matter if you are a buyer or a seller, we want your business! Just look what we have to offer: 360 degree virtual tours free with every listing – online 24/7 Competitive commission rates mean MORE MONEY in your pocket! Members of LBAR – allowing global exposure with MLS

Believing in doing right, even if we suffer in so doing. We recognize the great responsibility that accompanies the privilege of being a citizen of Montgomery County, Kentucky. Therefore it is for the common good of all that we do hereby solemnly pledge these things.

M T. S T E R L I N G

We pledge to always work with YOU! At Tuttle Realty the customer comes FIRST! 108 Burley Way • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 • Fax: (859) 497-6492 Located on bypass – across from Papa John’s Pizza

(859) 498-0051 www.tuttlerealty.net

Lexington-Bluegrass Association of Realtors®

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

29

Ever dream about moving to the country? Maybe buying a nice home in the woods … or maybe buying a large farm or hobby farm … a nice lot in the country to someday build that dream home … Well, why just dream about it?

We offer competitive fixed and adjustable rates with 15, 20 and 30 year terms – no prepayment penalties – low closing costs, and most all of our loan programs have fast, same day approvals.

Moving to the country could be easier than you think. When you’re ready, remember Farm Credit Services can help make it easier to realize your dreams with our convenient and affordable financing for your home or farm.

We would be glad to visit with you at your convenience and explain the programs available. Stop by and see us or give us a call, and we will come meet you!

Farm Credit Services of Mid-America is a financial lending cooperative that has been serving farmers, agribusiness and rural residents for over 90 years in making their dreams come true with our top quality friendly, financial services. These services include: • Home Loans • Construction Loans • Lot Loans • Country Living: Mini-Farm with Home • Farm Mortgages • Bare Land Tracts

219 Evans Dr. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 • (800) 261-3071 or (859) 498-8618 • www.e-farmcredit.com

“The Experienced Professional Lumber Yard”

We specialize in: Serving homeowners & professionals with knowledge of the products & services we sell. Providing custom millwork & prompt delivery services at competitive prices. 132 S. Queen St. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 jason@mccormicklumbercompany.com

(859) 498-2216 30

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

M T. S T E R L I N G

Education

Building on a Solid Foundation UNIVERSITY AND HIGH SCHOOL ADD NEW TRAINING PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES

M T. S T E R L I N G

PHOTOS BY GREG EMENS

T

wo educational facilities in Mt. Sterling have expanded, bringing not only larger state-of-the-art facilities, but also better educational offerings for students in Montgomery County. Montgomery County High School has undergone a renovation and expansion, and Morehead State University at Mt. Sterling has expanded its home, the Clay Community Center, and added a nursing program. Montgomery County High School has upgraded the learning climate, making the school more energy efficient and secure. “We added space and tied things together,” says Dan Freeman, Ph.D., superintendent of Montgomery County Schools. “Our buildings weren’t connected and were aging. There were many points of entry, and now we have control of the building and who gets in.” In addition to the expansion, the 1,200-student school has a new 48,000square-foot gymnasium that seats 4,250 and can also serve as a large community center for hosting concerts and graduations. The gym shares a concession area and restrooms with the athletic stadium for football and soccer teams, and it’s handicapped accessible. “The vision of our whole school system is to be a hub for the community and for the entire region, like Mt. Sterling has been the economic hub for the region for many years,” Freeman says. In addition to providing a solid educational program and offering university-level courses, the school also has expanded trade and technical training, and it works with both Morehead State University and Maysville Community College to provide dual-credit programs for its students. The school system is also planning expansions at two elementary schools in the near future, Freeman says. Also new to Mt. Sterling is the associate degree in nursing at Morehead State University at Mt. Sterling. Janet Kenney, the school’s director, says it’s the first time the associate degree has been

offered outside the Morehead campus. MSU at Mt. Sterling has 541 students enrolled in all of its programs. With the community’s help, the school opened a 9,500-square-foot expansion in fall 2006 that includes an additional computer lab, a nursing lab, multipurpose room and three additional classrooms. “We are the newest and largest of Morehead’s regional centers, and we’re here for a slightly different population,” Kenney says. The school is primarily a late afternoon-early evening-weekend program. “A significant number of our students work or have families or both,” she says. “Our nursing students can work at least the first two semesters, although by the last two semesters it’s hard to work and do a nursing program.” The first nursing class was admitted in January 2007, and the school expects the number in each class to grow from the current eight to 20 in the future, she says. The average age of the MSU at Mt. Sterling nursing student is 29. “I’m hearing good things about our

nursing program,” Kenney says. “A couple of our students drive from Lexington. Students like our campus. It’s centrally located and smaller. People can get here easily.” – Nancy Humphrey

Jamie Fraley, clinical lab coordinator for Morehead State University at Mt. Sterling Nursing Lab, works with student Jody Keeton in the Fundamentals of Nursing class.

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

31

y. 64

FALCON REALTY

ve. dA

Hinkst on Pik e

w tate H Inters

lan

Hwy. 11

Rag

480 & KY

. Falcon Dr

y. U.S. Hw

“Where the Mountains Meet the Bluegrass”

Garden Springs

This 200-acre, gently rolling parcel is a premier, highly visible location for retail outlets, commercial sites and professional offices. 705 Maysville Rd. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (Off I-64 and Exit 110)

This land is located south of Interstate 64 and east of U.S. 460 interchange (Exit 110). For information please contact Dan Duzyk at (859) 498-0526 or e-mail danduzyk@qx.net.

(859) 498-4680 (859) 498-7161 Fax Townsend Financial Planning is an independent, locally owned financial planning firm offering an extensive array of financial planning services. We work with clients from all income levels, career stages and portfolio sizes. So whether you’ve already accumulated your savings or are just starting a plan, we can help! The initial consultation is provided at no cost or obligation.

Melody W. Townsend, CFP®, AIF® CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™

Contact Us: 601 Terry Dr., Ste. D Mount Sterling, KY 40353

www.daysinnmtsterling.com

Phone: (859) 498-2020 Fax: (859) 274-4122 E-mail: melody@townsendfinancialplanning.com

Learn more at: www.townsendfinancialplanning.com | Registered Investment Advisor—Kentucky |

32

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

M T. S T E R L I N G

Arts & Culture

GREG EMENS

Artist John Ward has turned his hobby into a second profession.

Brushstroke of Genius MT. STERLING ARTIST CONTRIBUTED TO 2001 KENTUCKY QUARTER DESIGN

M

t. Sterling artist John Ward has accomplished something very few people can claim – he contributed to the design of the Kentucky quarter. Not just one, but two images created by Ward were chosen from a pool of 1,800 submissions to place among the final six used in the quarter’s design concept. The state coin bears the image of a thoroughbred horse in a rolling, fenced pasture in front of the Federal Hill

M T. S T E R L I N G

mansion; its inscription reads “My Old Kentucky Home.” Contributing artists were recognized at the quarter’s unveiling in October 2001, held – appropriately – at the Federal Hill mansion in Bardstown. “I felt pretty honored,” Ward says. “It was a once-in-a-lifetime thing.” Contributing to the design of a state quarter may be a once-in-a-lifetime honor, but receiving accolades for his art seems to happen to Ward all the time.

His painting Masters of the Forest, depicting four wolves crossing a snowy landscape, was chosen to grace 50,000 posters for a National Wolf Awareness Week campaign. The American Academy of Equine Art selected Ward’s work for inclusion in a prestigious art show at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington – and Ward’s was the only horse-racing scene. His work was also displayed at a Kentucky National Wildlife art exhibit in Henderson. Ward and his family have called Mt. Sterling home for the past 17 years. “We like being close to the family,” Ward says, “and there are a lot of things to paint. I love to paint horses, and I try to paint central Kentucky.” A senior designer at an architectural, engineering and consulting firm, Ward paints in his spare time at the home he designed to accommodate his upstairs studio and gallery. It was in 1995 that Ward turned his lifelong hobby into a second profession. The first print he sold portrayed bird dogs and quail. Following that came a series of beagle prints that sold like hotcakes. Soon Ward’s art caught the attention of television personalities Dave Shuffett and Tim Farmer, who featured Ward on their shows “Kentucky Life” and “Kentucky Afield.” Before long, clients were coming to him. Today, Ward has been commissioned to create prints for the Boy Scouts of America, the National 4-H Council, Toyota, Ashland Oil, John Deere, the Kentucky League of Cities, Montgomery County and his alma mater, Morehead State University. Ward says he plans to keep up the pace as long as he can see and paint. His success strategy is pretty straightforward. “I love to paint,” he says. “I paint almost every day. I love doing something art-related all the time.” – Carol Cowan I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

33

GREG EMENS

Sports & Recreation

Old Silo Golf Course, designed by Champions Tour player Graham Marsh, is the state’s No. 1-ranked public course.

Golf Courses for a Range of Abilities CHALLENGING COURSES AND SCENIC VIEWS KEEP GOLFERS ON THEIR TEES YEAR-ROUND

L

ooking to spend a day on the links? Public or private, amateur to pro, Mt. Sterling’s golf courses are able to cater to most any need. The Old Silo Golf Club and Mt. Sterling Country Club offer challenging courses with varying levels of play and picture-postcard scenery. Both are consistently ranked on high-quality course lists in the state and stay busy almost year-round. Old Silo – so named because the silo was part of the original farm on which Hole 16 sits – opened Memorial Day 2000 and has been a hit with locals and visitors ever since. “We’re currently ranked No. 1 in the state’s public golf courses, and No. 3 overall,” says Scott Fraser, director of 34

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

golf and general manager at Old Silo. “We draw players all the way from Canada and a lot of northern states, because we’re ready to go about 30 days before their golf season.” The course, designed by Champions Tour player Graham Marsh, sits on 209 acres just off Interstate 64. Its bent grass ensures that it stays green year-round, a feature that has been mentioned in such well-known publications as Golf Digest, Golf Magazine and USA Today. It offers four sets of tees, ranging from 5,509 yards to 6,977 yards, and can handle players of all skill levels. Expansions in the works will take the total number to 7,000 yards, Fraser says. The silo can be viewed from Hole No. 6, which Fraser describes as the

course’s signature hole. “The tee is elevated 95 feet, and it looks down into the valley,” he says. “It’s the first time you actually see the silo, but it’s also just a beautiful view as well.” The views are equally beautiful, and the fairways as challenging, over at the Mt. Sterling Country Club, a privatemembership facility that features a 72-par course with tee length up to 6,824 yards. Opened in 1960, the course was designed by Alex McKay. “Our members like the convenience of our course,” says Scott Beahler, golf pro. “The pace of play is under four hours, and they can play anytime. People like that they’re not married to a tee time here.” Golf’s popularity, coupled with these quality courses, is helping to increase tourism to the area. Old Silo will be home to a U.S. Open qualifier, and it hosts collegiate events as well. The property features the Old Silo Golf Club & Restaurant, making the course a popular spot for wedding receptions, class reunions and other non-golf events. – Joe Morris M T. S T E R L I N G

Health & Wellness

High-Tech With a Personal Touch MARY CHILES HOSPITAL EXPANDS PARKING AND FACILITIES, ADDS NEW EQUIPMENT

M

ention colonoscopy and you’re likely to elicit nervous smiles and a quick change of subject. Though it is a potent weapon in the fight against colon cancer – the nation’s No. 2 cancer killer – the internal exam has been regarded as uncomfortable and avoidable, despite doctors’ recommendations. Now, Mary Chiles Hospital has made the procedure quicker, painless and more accurate with new state-of-the-art equipment, the latest in its continuing improvements in patient care. Narrow-band imaging, as it is called, provides larger and clearer images to physicians using an endoscope, a lighted video camera at the end of a long tube, during colonoscopies and other exams. The improved pictures capture minute details with unparalleled clarity, enabling more accurate diagnoses and shorter exam times. “The main benefit is determining whether something might be precancerous or benign,” says Jennifer NeSmith, Mary Chiles vice president for physician services and marketing. “We’re only the second hospital in Kentucky to have this technology.” Mary Chiles also offers patients deep sedation during the procedure, which makes for a more relaxed patient – monitored by an anesthesia specialist – as the operating physician concentrates on the procedure. Expanding its patient services, the hospital recently renovated a former extended care facility, creating a 15,000square-foot, hospital-based Ambulatory Medical Care Center. Lexington specialists now use the new space for twicemonthly outpatient clinics. A new lab draw station makes it quicker for patients to drop in for lab work. A new registration desk and waiting area now serve the entire hospital, and a conference room is used for community events and educational programs. “The new building also is home to Gateway Regional MRI,

Gateway Physical Therapy and our new sleep lab,” NeSmith says. “Folks can come, get hooked up to a machine and, basically, sleep while they’re evaluated for any sleep disorders they might have. Before this, there was not a sleep lab within 30 miles.” The hospital also has added 72 parking spaces and zoned employee parking so that employees park farthest from the building. “This has helped provide the closest, most convenient parking for patients and their friends and families,” NeSmith says. Add to these improvements new operating towers – computer systems used in the operating room for laparoscopic surgeries– pediatric dentistry services and new certification for the hospital’s mammography unit, and the hospital’s commitment to patients is even clearer. “Our goal is to provide better and more convenient services for our patients so they can be treated locally by people they know and who know them, instead of going out of town,” NeSmith says. “You just get better care from people you meet at the grocery store and at church than from people you’ll never see again.” – Laura Hill

“State-of-the-Art Treatment You Deserve”

Chiropractic Therapy • Massage Therapy • Spinal Rehabilitation • Laser Therapy Family Care • Disc Decompression Treatment • Workplace & Auto Injuries Neurological Testing • Digital Motion X-Ray • Impairment Rating Gentle Effective Treatment For: • Headaches

• Whiplash

• Arm Pain

• Back Pain

• Numbness

• Leg Pain

• Neck Pain Kelly Bays, LMT & Dr. Rob Linton DC, CCST

IDD Therapy 86% Effective In Disc Bulges & Disc Injuries Advance Certification in Whiplash Trauma American Chiropractic Association • Kentucky Association of Chiropractors

GREG EMENS

(859) 499-1009 www.myspinecenter.info Located behind Vinson & Sons, Mt. Sterling MOST INSURANCE ACCEPTED – We file for you! NEW PATIENTS WELCOME

Mary Chiles Hospital’s new Ambulatory Care Center

M T. S T E R L I N G

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

35

Call me today about our full line-up. (Auto. Home. Life. Retirement.)

(859) 498-1977

PAINTS • BLINDS Homeowners/Professionals

TIM MURPHY

Interior/Exterior Paints

1400 Indian Mound Dr. Mt. Sterling

Premium Paints

murphyinc@allstate.com

214 E. Main St. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-9033 (859) 498-2544 Fax www.colorspaint.com

Custom Color Matching

Subject to availability and qualifications. Insurance offered only with select companies. Allstate Insurance Company, Allstate Indemnity Company. Allstate Property and Casualty Insurance Company, and Allstate Life Insurance Company: Northbook, Illinois ©2007 Allstate Insurance Company.

KUBOTA

Residential Commercial Industrial

Architectural Coatings Painting Supplies

BUSH HOG

AMBURGEY’S FARM MACHINERY INC. 530 S. Queen St. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-1113 Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. • Sat. 8 a.m.-12 p.m.

VICON

GEHL

105 Stone Trace Dr. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-4050 • (859) 498-7768 Fax marriott.com/lexms

Sometimes winning a race is not about beating

the other runners.

Save Money. Smell the Flowers.

It’s about honoring survivors and those who’ve lost the battle. It’s about raising funds for research, education, screening and treatment. The Komen Race for the Cure® is about support, not competition. Join us at komen.org or 1.800 I’M AWARE®.

For tips and to compare cleaner, more efficient vehicles, visit

www.epa.gov/greenvehicles. This space provided as a public service. ©2004, The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.

36

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

M T. S T E R L I N G

Community Profile

MT. STERLING SNAPSHOT Montgomery County lies in the Gateway region between the Appalachian Mountains and the bluegrass plains. Mt. Sterling is the county seat – home to some 25,000 residents – and it’s the economic engine for this central Kentucky region. Montgomery County is home to a 65-bed hospital, a regional arts center and 35 industries employing more than 5,000 area residents. Amenities include the Clay Community Center, which is home to the newest and fastest-growing extended campus for Morehead State University.

TRANSPORTATION Highways Major highways serving Mt. Sterling: Interstate 64, U.S. 60 and 460, and state routes 11 and 686. Access to Interstate 75 is available 28 miles west of Mt. Sterling via I-64. An interchange of the Mountain Parkway, which provides access to eastern Kentucky, is located 14 miles west of the city. Thirty trucking firms provide interstate and/or intrastate service to Mt. Sterling.

Air The Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Airport, two miles west of Mt. Sterling, is equipped with a 5,000-foot paved runway with lighted instrument approach. Bluegrass Airport is 40 miles west of Mt. Sterling near Lexington.

Montgomery County Public Schools, Infant-12 First Church of God Christian School, preschool & kindergarten Faith Christian Academy, K-12 Colleges/Universities

EDUCATION

Railroads

Montgomery County’s education system consistently ranks in the top one-third in Basic Skills Achievement scores statewide. The system includes three elementary schools, a nationally recognized middle school and one high school. Special education classes and classes for gifted learners focus on the needs of each child.

The nearest rail service is provided by CSX Transportation in Winchester, 16 miles southwest of Mt. Sterling.

Schools Montgomery Christian Academy Elementary at First Methodist Church, K-5

City Cartage, Kentucky Transportation Services, Sterling Transportation and Thompson Transportation Services Inc. maintain terminals in Mt. Sterling.

Montgomery Christian Academy Middle School at Gateway Christian Church, 6-8

Higher education can be obtained at six nearby institutions: University of Kentucky, Transylvania University, Morehead State University, Eastern Kentucky University, Lexington Community College, Berea College, Maysville Community & Technical College, Georgetown College, Bluegrass Community & Technical College MSU has a new extended campus in the Clay Community Center in Mt. Sterling. THIS SECTION IS SPONSORED BY

The area code for Mt . Sterling is 859.

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

37

The mission of the Montgomery County Public Library is to provide for the recreational reading and informational needs of the citizens, employees and students of Montgomery County.

Visit Our Advertisers Allstate Insurance www.allstate.com Amburgey’s Farm Machinery Caswell Prewitt Realty Inc. www.caswellprewittrealty.com Central Kentucky Radiology Colors Inc. www.colorspaint.com Days Inn Fairfield Inn www.marriott.com/lexms Falcon Realty Farm Credit Services www.e-farmcredit.com First Baptist Church www.fbcmtsterling.com

Services Offered: Books • Paperbacks • Magazines Large Print Books • Bookmobile Outreach • Audio Books • Children’s Programs Interlibrary Loans • Public Computers • Wireless Internet • DVDs VHS • Fax Service • Notary • Genealogy • Local History

First Church of God www.firstchurchms.org Hoffman www.hoffmanonline.com Hoffman & Robertson www.hoffman-robertson.com

Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Library

Keath Home Center www.keathhomecenter.com

241 W. Locust St. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-2404 • Fax: (859) 498-7477 askmtsterlinglibrary@yahoo.com • www.mtsterlinglibrary.com

Linton Spine & Joint Center www.myspinecenter.info Mary Chiles Hospital www.marychiles.org McCormick Lumber Company www.mccormicklumber company.com Montgomery County Schools www.montgomery.kyschools.us Morehead State University www.moreheadstate.edu Mt. Sterling Cellular Mt. Sterling Industrial Authority Mt. Sterling Public Library www.mtsterlinglibrary.com Nestle www.nestleusa.com Oak Tree Mortgage Old Silo Golf Club www.oldsilo.com Peoples Exchange Bank www.pebank.com Townsend Financial Planning www.townsendfinancial planning.com Traditional Bank www.traditionalbank.com Traditional Financial Services www.traditionalbank.com Tuttle Realty www.tuttlerealty.net Whitaker Bank www.whitakerbank.com WMST/AM 1150 Radio www.wmstradio.com

38

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

M T. S T E R L I N G

Community Profile RECREATION Family and individual recreation options include programs offered by the Montgomery County Recreation Commission. Adult and youth softball leagues, tennis, Little League baseball, basketball and soccer are available. The recreation commission also operates two swimming pools and several outdoor parks, including the 68-acre Easy Walker Park in Mt. Sterling. Private/public recreational facilities include the Mt. Sterling Golf & Country Club, Old Silo Golf Club, Downtown Athletic Club and Camp McKee Scout Reservation. The Red River Gorge in Daniel Boone National Forest, with its rugged canyons and natural arches, is less than an hour’s drive.

cash producer is beef cattle. Crops raised include corn, soybeans, sorghum, wheat, hay, barley, peppers and strawberries. Shrimp farming is also prevalent.

BANKS

CLIMATE Avg. annual temperature 54.9 F Avg. annual rainfall, 45.68" Avg. snowfall, 15.7"

INCOME

Commonwealth, 498-5728 Community Trust, 498-5332

Montgomery County, State Per capita

Whitaker, 498-3800

$21,398, $25,657

People’s Exchange, 498-2008

Median household

Traditional, 498-0414

$32,576, 37,369

NEW? MOVING? NEED ANOTHER LINE? Visit Mt. Sterling Cellular where you can establish new service, renew your contract, pay your bill or get a pre-paid phone.

UTILITIES Cable Television Time Warner Communications (888) 683-1000

now you can call anyone in the U.S. anytime from anywhere in the states of Kentucky, Ohio and Indiana for $ 55 per month

Electricity Kentucky Utilities Co. 498-6671 Clark Energy Cooperative Inc., 744-4251 Gas Columbia Gas of Kentucky 744-1832 Delta Natural Gas Co. 744-6171 Telephone AT&T, 1-557-6500 Water Mt. Sterling Water & Sewer 498-0166

AGRICULTURE Tobacco is the leading crop grown by Montgomery County farmers. The second-largest

The area code for Mt . Sterling is 859.

~ nationwide long distance included ~ add select states to your home calling area for only $10 per state per month ~ access to the nation’s largest wireless network

FREE CAR CHARGER ($20 Value) With a new line of service! Select from several FREE phones!

Mt. Sterling Cellular (859) 499-2800 Located next to Mt. Sterling Police Station

Offer requires a two year agreement while supplies last. Certain terms and conditions apply. See representative for details.

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

39

Community Profile ATTRACTIONS Bell House 51 N. Maysville Bramble Ridge Apple Orchard 2726 Osborne Rd, Mt. Sterling 498-9123 Farmer’s Bank Building 12 S. Bank St., Mt. Sterling

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRYMONTGOMERY COUNTY

Information 0.7%

Public Administration 3.7%

Ruth Hunt Candy Co. 550 N. Maysville St., Mt. Sterling 498-0676

Services 25.2%

Transportation/ Utilities/Trade 21.1%

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS WES ALDRIDGE, ANTONY BOSHIER, MICHAEL W. BUNCH, IAN CURCIO, BRIAN M CCORD CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR SHAWN DANIEL

Financial Activities 3.3%

DISTANCE TO MAJOR CITIES Atlanta

393 miles

Baltimore

504 miles

Birmingham, Ala.

437 miles

Chicago

401 miles

Cincinnati

112 miles

Sorghum Making 11620 Main St., Jeffersonville 498-4142

Cleveland

315 miles

Detroit

437 miles

Knoxville, Tenn.

184 miles

Two Sisters Pumpkin Patch 4892 Van Thompson Rd. Mt. Sterling 585-8000

Louisville, Ky.

107 miles

Nashville, Tenn.

248 miles

Pittsburgh

367 miles

St. Louis

367 miles

FOR MORE INFORMATION Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Industrial Authority/ Chamber of Commerce 126 W. Main St. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-5400, Fax: (859) 498-3947 www.mtsterlingchamber.com E-mail: contact@ mtsterlingchamber.com

Sources: www.mtsterlingchamber.com www.mtsterlingtourism.com

40

I M AG E S M T S T E R L I N G . C O M

SENIOR WRITER DIANE BARTLEY STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN, JESSICA MOZO DIRECTORIES EDITORS CAROL COWAN, AMANDA KING, KRISTY WISE CONTRIBUTING WRITERS CAROL COWAN, LAURA HILL, NANCY HUMPHREY, JOE MORRIS, VALERIE PASCOE

SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR SARA SARTIN

Manufacturing 33.6%

Machpelah Cemetery 600 E. Locust St., Mt. Sterling Morgan Station Harpers Ridge Road, Mt. Sterling

SENIOR EDITOR REBECCA DENTON COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, SUSAN CHAPPELL, KIM MADLOM, ANITA WADHWANI

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER TODD POTTER AD PROJECT MANAGER COLIN WRIGHT

Gaitskill Mound Indian Mound Drive Gallery for the Arts 44 E. Main St. Mt. Sterling 498-6264

Contract Construction 4.2%

O F MT. S TE R LI N G - M O NTG O M E RY CO U NT Y, K Y

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS ASST. PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR HAZEL RISNER SENIOR PRODUCTION PROJECT MGR. TADARA SMITH SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, BRITTANY SCHLEICHER, KRIS SEXTON, VIKKI WILLAMS LEAD DESIGNER JESSICA BRAGONIER GRAPHIC DESIGN CANDICE HULSEY, LINDA MOREIRAS, DEREK MURRAY, AMY NELSON WEB DESIGN RYAN DUNLAP WEB PRODUCTION JILL TOWNSEND COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN CORY MITCHELL DIGITAL ASSET MANAGER ALISON HUNTER AD TRAFFIC SARAH MILLER, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY, JILL WYATT CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./PRODUCTION & OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./TRAVEL PUBLISHING SYBIL STEWART EXECUTIVE EDITOR TEREE CARUTHERS MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS MAURICE FLIESS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFF OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA MCFARLAND, LISA OWENS, JACKIE YATES DIRECTOR OF RECRUITING SUZY WALDRIP DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH IT SYSTEMS DIRECTOR MATT LOCKE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR NICOLE WILLIAMS CLIENT & SALES SERVICES MANAGER/ CUSTOM MAGAZINES PATTI CORNELIUS

Images of Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Industrial Authority/Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine,contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Mount Sterling-Montgomery County Industrial Authority/Chamber of Commerce 126 W. Main St. • Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-5400 • Fax: (859) 498-3947 E-mail: contact@mtsterlingchamber.com www.mtsterlingchamber.com VISIT IMAGES OF MT. STERLING-MONTGOMERYCOUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESMTSTERLING.COM ©Copyright 2007 Journal Communications Inc., 361 Mallory Station Road, Ste. 102, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

Magazine Publishers of America

Member

Custom Publishing Council

Member Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County Industrial Authority/Chamber of Commerce

M T. S T E R L I N G

Ad Index

3 6 A l l s tat e I n s u r a n c e

2 2 Fi r s t C h u r c h o f G o d

3 6 A m b u r g e y ’ s Fa r m Mac h i n e ry

3 8 H o ffm a n

27 H o ffm a n & R o b e rts o n

2 0 K e at h H o m e C e n t e r

4 Ca sw e l l P r e wit t R e a lt y, I n c .

2 3 C e n t r a l K e n t u c k y Ra d i o lo gy

3 5 Li n to n Spi n e & J o i n t C e n t e r

3 6 Co lo r s , I n c .

C 2 Ma ry C h i l e s H os pita l

32 Days I n n

3 0 M cco r m i c k Lu m b e r Co.

3 6 Fai r fi e l d I n n

1 M o n tg o m e ry Co u n t y S c h o o l s

32 Fa lco n R e a lt y

3 0 Fa r m C r e d it S e rv i c e s

C 3 M o r e h e a d S tat e U n i v e r s it y

2 9 Fi r s t Bap ti s t C h u r c h

3 9 M t. S t e r li n g C e l lu l a r

Ad Index (cont.)

2 0 M t. S t e r li n g I n d u s t r ia l Au t h o r it y

3 8 M t. S t e r li n g P u b li c Li b r a ry

2 N e s t l e

5 Oak T r e e M o rtgag e

1 6 O l d Si lo G o l f C lu b

3 6 P eo p l e s E xc h a n g e Ba n k

32 Tow n s e n d Fi n a n c ia l P l a n n i n g

2 5 T r a d iti o n a l Ba n k

3 7 T r a d iti o n a l Fi n a n c ia l S e rv i c e s

2 9 T u t t l e R e a lt y

24 W h itak e r Ba n k

3 6 WMST/A m 1 1 5 0 Ra d i o

questions answers

Š 2002 American Cancer Society, Inc.

8 0 0 . A C S . 2 3 4 5 / c a n c e r. o r g

Real Estate in Mt. Sterling

A • LOOK • AT

CASWELL PREWITT REALTY INC.

MEET THE CASWELL PREWITT REALTY TEAM

Omar R. Prewitt

Alfred Blevins

Harold Wilson

Ray McIntosh

Prinicpal Broker Auctioneer 585-2024

Manager Broker 585-1859

Realtor 585-0309

Realtor 585-1363

Serving Montgomery County Since 1965! We hope that you are excited about your move to Mt. Sterling. As a lifelong resident, I know you’ll receive a warm welcome and enjoy being a part of this growing community.

Verl Ingram

Lucile Hardin

Jo Ann Issac

Betty Daniel

Realtor 585-9813

Realtor 585-4178

Realtor 585-1239

Realtor 585-8868

Since 1965, Caswell Prewitt Realty Inc. has established a reputation for honesty and integrity that has made us one of the top real estate companies in the area. Our growth and success reflect our associates’ dedication to the highest standards of real estate practice, and the loyal support of our friends, neighbors and clients in the Mt. Sterling area. Once again, we look forward to meeting you and your families and hope you will feel comfortable to call on us for any reason, no matter how big or small. Sincerely,

Cyndi Collier

Shirley Raisor

Howard Stone

Jessica White

Realtor 585-4094

Realtor 585-5661

Auctioneer (606) 776-3362

Realtor 404-4307

Omar R. Prewitt, Principal Broker

Caswell Prewitt Realty Inc.

Debbie Montgomery

Dave Evans

Lynn Romano

Leonard Guy

Kevin Daniel

Realtor (606) 776-5601

Realtor 274-7526

Realtor 585-4572

Associate Broker 585-5961

Realtor 585-2104

101 N. Maysville St. Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 (859) 498-0208 (859) 498-8638 Fax caswellprewitt@bellsouth.net

www.caswellprewittrealty.com LBAR.com

Member of the Lexington Bluegrass Association of Realtors

Ann Moore

Michael Jehlik

Sharon Stapleton

Jerry Stapleton

Kristie Hafling

Realtor 398-0535

Realtor (859) 556-0014

Associate Broker 585-0306

Realtor 585-0307

Realtor (859) 559-3173


Images Mt. Sterling-Montgomery County, KY: 2007-08