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MT. JULIET/WEST WILSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

What’s Online ine ne Video tour of Cedar Creek Sports Center

GOING THE DISTANCE E-learning program expands

TASTY OPTIONS Creative comfort food hits the spot

A Walk in the Park Upgrades, expansions add to green spaces SPONSORED BY THE MT. JULIET/WEST WILSON COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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MT. J U LIET/ WE ST WIL SON COU NT Y, TE N N E SS E E SENIOR EDITOR REBECCA DENTON COPY EDITOR JOYCE CARUTHERS ASSOCIATE EDITORS LISA BATTLES, SUSAN CHAPPELL, JESSY YANCEY STAFF WRITERS CAROL COWAN, KEVIN LITWIN CONTRIBUTING WRITERS LAURA HILL, JOE MORRIS, ANITA WADHWANI DATA MANAGER CHANDRA BRADSHAW SENIOR INTEGRATED MEDIA MANAGER ELIZABETH WEST SALES SUPPORT MANAGER CINDY HALL SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER BRIAN McCORD STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS JEFF ADKINS, TODD BENNETT, ANTONY BOSHIER, J. KYLE KEENER PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT MANAGER ANNE WHITLOW CREATIVE DIRECTOR KEITH HARRIS ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR CHRISTINA CARDEN PRODUCTION PROJECT MANAGERS MELISSA BRACEWELL, KATIE MIDDENDORF, JILL WYATT SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURA GALLAGHER, KRIS SEXTON, CANDICE SWEET, VIKKI WILLIAMS LEAD DESIGNER ALISON HUNTER GRAPHIC DESIGN ERICA HINES, JESSICA MANNER, JANINE MARYLAND, MARCUS SNYDER WEB IMPLEMENTATION DIRECTOR ANDY HARTLEY WEB DESIGN DIRECTOR FRANCO SCARAMUZZA WEB CONTENT MANAGER JOHN HOOD WEB PROJECT MANAGER YAMEL RUIZ

PICTURE PERFECT We’ve added even more of our prize-winning photography to the online gallery. To see these photos, click on Photo Gallery.

WEB DESIGN CARL SCHULZ WEB PRODUCTION JENNIFER GRAVES COLOR IMAGING TECHNICIAN TWILA ALLEN AD TRAFFIC MARCIA MILLAR, PATRICIA MOISAN, RAVEN PETTY

CHAIRMAN GREG THURMAN PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER BOB SCHWARTZMAN

RELOCATION Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RAY LANGEN SR. V.P./CLIENT DEVELOPMENT JEFF HEEFNER SR. V.P./SALES CARLA H. THURMAN SR. V.P./OPERATIONS CASEY E. HESTER V.P./SALES HERB HARPER V.P./SALES TODD POTTER V.P./VISUAL CONTENT MARK FORESTER V.P./EDITORIAL DIRECTOR TEREE CARUTHERS V.P./CUSTOM PUBLISHING KIM NEWSOM MANAGING EDITOR/BUSINESS BILL McMEEKIN MANAGING EDITOR/COMMUNITY KIM MADLOM PRODUCTION DIRECTOR NATASHA LORENS PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR JEFFREY S. OTTO CONTROLLER CHRIS DUDLEY ACCOUNTING MORIAH DOMBY, DIANA GUZMAN, MARIA McFARLAND, LISA OWENS

VIDEOS

RECRUITING/TRAINING DIRECTOR SUZY SIMPSON DISTRIBUTION DIRECTOR GARY SMITH

In our Interactive section, watch quick videos by our editors and photographers featuring people, places and events.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DIRECTOR YANCEY TURTURICE IT SERVICE TECHNICIAN RYAN SWEENEY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER PEGGY BLAKE SALES SUPPORT RACHAEL GOLDSBERRY SALES/MARKETING COORDINATOR RACHEL MATHEIS EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/SALES SUPPORT KRISTY DUNCAN OFFICE MANAGER SHELLY GRISSOM RECEPTIONIST LINDA BISHOP

FACTS & STATS

CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

Go online to learn even more about: • Schools • Health care • Utilities • Parks • Taxes

LOCAL FLAVOR From the simple to the sublime, the delicious offerings here are guaranteed to satisfy every appetite.

ABOUT THIS MAGAZINE Images gives readers a taste of what makes Mt. Juliet tick – from business and education to sports, health care and the arts.

Images Mt. Juliet/West Wilson County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Mt. Juliet/West Wilson County Chamber of Commerce and its member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Mt. Juliet/West Wilson County Chamber of Commerce 46 West Caldwell Street • Mt. Juliet, TN 37122 Phone: (615) 758-3478 • Fax: (615) 754-8595 www.mtjulietchamber.com VISIT IMAGES MT. JULIET/WEST WILSON COUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESMTJULIET.COM ©Copyright 2009 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

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Member Mt. Juliet/West Wilson County Chamber of Commerce

2010 EDITION | VOLUME 8 ®

MT. JULIET/WEST WILSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

CO NTE NT S

MT. JULIET BUSINESS F E AT U R E S 8 A WALK IN THE PARK Upgrades, expansions and a new greenway add to the city’s green spaces.

20 Here to Stay Companies, industrial sites build on success in Mt. Juliet.

22 Biz Briefs 23 Chamber Report 24 Economic Profile

12 TASTY OPTIONS From fresh gourmet sandwiches to made-from-scratch pizzas, creative comfort food hits the spot.

D E PA R TM E NT S 6 Almanac: a colorful sampling of

14 WHAT’S NOT TO LOVE? Mt. Juliet offers an ideal place to live, work and play.

26 GOING THE DISTANCE Progressive e-learning program expands.

Mt. Juliet/West Wilson County’s culture

16 Portfolio: people, places and events that define Mt. Juliet and West Wilson County

25 Health & Wellness 27 Sports & Recreation 28 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

All or part of this magazine is printed with soy ink on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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ON THE COVER Trees catch the last rays of light as the sun sets along Nonaville Road. Photo by Jeff Adkins

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Connecting with Mt. Juliet has never been easier …

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SIMPLY SEARCH: In a hurry? Find the exact info you need quickly with our enhanced search capabilities.

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SMOOTHER SURFING: Explore the site and interact with us more easily with our reorganized navigation bar.

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JUST THE FACTS: Get a quick snapshot of the community with our greatly enriched Facts and Stats section.

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WATCH AND SHARE: Experience first-hand views of the community in our video gallery, then share them with friends.

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VIRTUAL VIEW: Flip through pages of the digital magazine, an enriched online version of the print publication.

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MOVING MUSTHAVES: Visit our new Relocation Tools section for many useful tips and information to make your transition go smoothly.

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MORE EYE CANDY: Check out our enhanced Photo Gallery for more stunning photos of the community.

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OUTSIDERS WELCOME: Read about the best places to play in this community.

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IN GOOD TASTE: Get the dish on local flavor from favorite restaurants, noted area products and farmers markets in our new Food section.

Turn the pages of our

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LIVE LINKS Hot links allow users to quickly link to other sites for additional information, and an ad index allows you to easily locate local advertisers in the magazine.

SEARCH AND YOU SHALL FIND An easy-to-use search function allows you to ďŹ nd speciďŹ c articles or browse content by subject.

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Almanac

Family Fun Looking for an outing to entertain the whole family? Stop by Cedar Creek Sports Center, which features two 18-hole putt-putt courses, go-karts, batting cages, bumper boats, a golf driving range and more. Cedar Creek, a family-owned business that opened in 1991, also has video games and a concession area. For more information, visit www.cedarcreeksportscenter.com.

What’s Online e Check out the activities at Cedar Creek Sports Center in our quick video. Visit imagesmtjuliet.com.

All That Jazz Music City may be one county over, but Mt. Juliet has its share of excellent musicians. The Jazz Alliance – part of the West Wilson Community Arts Alliance – performs live jazz at community events and other special occasions. The volunteer band has nearly 20 members from Mt. Juliet and the surrounding area, and Joe Thordsen co-directs with Dean Kranhold.

Tee Time Top-notch golfing is easily found at two local courses. Pine Creek Golf Course, on Logue Road, is a par-72, 18-hole public course with Bermuda fairways and bent-grass greens set on 2,156 rolling green acres. Known for its beautifully maintained greens and playability, Pine Creek offers players a log cabin-style clubhouse with seating for 150 and two additional conference rooms. A driving range, putting green, full snack bar, pro shop, locker rooms and an outing pavilion complete the amenities. Windtree Golf Club on Nonaville Road has 18 scenic holes and beautiful views. The course offers five par-5 holes and five par-3 holes. It measures 6,500 yards, with Bermuda fairways and bent-grass greens, and a full clubhouse includes the Grille restaurant, a pro shop and banquet/meeting facilities.

Race for a Reason Each September, about 300 participants take part in the Mt. Juliet 5K, or MJ5K. The citywide charitable walk/run event winds through the Providence MarketPlace area and raises around $4,000 for charity. All proceeds go to different charities each year. In 2009 – the race’s third year – the event benefited two organizations: Buddy Break, a free respite program designed to help caregivers of children with special needs; and Speed the Light, a nonprofit international missions organization that provides vehicles and equipment for missions and relief efforts worldwide. Visit www.mj5k.com for more information.

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Fast Facts Q The Mt. Juliet/West Wilson County Senior Citizens Center offers activities such as overnight trips, sewing, painting, computer classes, line dancing, fitness and tai chi.

Healthy Prognosis Cumberland University in nearby Lebanon plans to offer evening and weekend nursing classes in Mt. Juliet beginning in January 2010. When President Harvill Eaton arrived at Cumberland five years ago, there were about 30 nursing graduates. In 2010 about 90 are expected. Eaton believes the demographic of many nursing students would fit the evening and weekend schedule, and that Mt. Juliet is a convenient location for many who would be interested in the program. Plans are to start with about 25 nursing students and grow from there. Classes will be geared to working students. Visit www.cumberland.edu for more information.

Q The West Wilson Community Arts Alliance promotes, organizes and celebrates cultural arts in the region.

Shop Till You Dine Home to more than 60 stores, restaurants and other businesses, Providence MarketPlace is the largest open-air shopping center between Nashville and Knoxville. Retailers include JC Penney, Books-a-Million, Target, Belk, Petsmart and Kroger as well as many regional and local stores and restaurants. Also home to Providence Cinemas, the retail destination is accessible from Interstate 40 in Mt. Juliet. Visit www.shopprovidencemarketplace.com for more information.

Q The nonprofit Charis Health Center in Mt. Juliet provides health care at a reduced rate for the working uninsured in Wilson County.

Mt. Juliet At A Glance POPULATION (2008 SPECIAL CENSUS) Mt. Juliet: 25,000 Wilson County: 106,000

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LOCATION Mt. Juliet is in Middle Tennessee, 17 miles east of Nashville. BEGINNINGS Mt. Juliet was formed in 1835 and was the last town incorporated in Wilson County. FOR MORE INFORMATION Mt. Juliet/West Wilson County Chamber of Commerce 46 W. Caldwell Street Mt. Juliet, TN 37122 Phone: (615) 758-3478 Fax: (615) 754-8595 www.mtjulietchamber.com

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Check out the festivities at A Toast to Tennessee Wine Festival in our quick video. Visit imagesmtjuliet.com.

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Tim Wood plays with his daughters, Leah, 8, and Annalise, 5, at Charlie Daniels Park’s Planet Playground in Mt. Juliet. Left: A kayaker enjoys a warm summer evening on Old Hickory Lake.

UPGRADES, EXPANSIONS AND A NEW GREENWAY ADD TO CITY’S GREEN SPACES STORY BY CAROL COWAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

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n important part of West Wilson County’s allure is its excellent quality of life, which includes the area’s many family-friendly green spaces and recreational opportunities. The city takes its parks seriously, and a number of major improvements are completed or in the works. After years of planning, the city’s first skate park opened at Charlie Daniels Park in the summer of 2009, complete with half-pipes, ramps, rails and more. The skate park is firstclass, and local skateboarders could hardly wait for it to be finished, says Roger “Rocky” Lee, assistant parks director for the city. M T. J U L I E T

Also at Charlie Daniels Park, a $300,000 expansion of the bustling Mt. Juliet Community Center is under way. The center and surrounding park grounds already provide a host of activities for all ages, such as exercise classes, league basketball, senior citizens bingo, a one-mile outdoor walking track, sand volleyball and tennis courts, picnic pavilions, a gazebo and an outdoor amphitheater. Children also love its 24,000-square-foot fenced Planet Playground. The facilities at Charlie Daniels Park host numerous community events as well, from an annual fashion show to Easter and Halloween celebrations that draw thousands of children. Upon completion, the 2,700-square-foot I M AG E S M TJ U L I E T. C O M

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Clockwise from left: Players take part in a sand volleyball game outside the Mt. Juliet Community Center at Charlie Daniels Park; tennis instructor Dell Pride of the Mt. Juliet Tennis Association teaches lessons on the courts at the Mt. Juliet Community Center; a dog park, Mt. Juliet Bark Park, is a new addition to South Mt. Juliet City Park.

At a Glance Offerings at Mt. Juliet and West Wilson County parks include: Walking trails, picnic pavilions, boating, camping, swimming Skate park, dog park, tennis, volleyball, playgrounds, ball fields, amphitheater

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community center expansion, funded primarily by a donation from the Panattoni Group, will house a new weight room, a new kitchen and a meeting room. Summer 2009 also saw construction begin on the city’s first major greenway project, which got off to a good start with $450,000 in funding from the federal stimulus package. “That money will complete the first two miles of the West Division Greenway Project, which starts at the train station, runs along Division Street and ultimately will end at South Greenhill Road,” says Bob DiSalvo, head of the city’s Parks and Greenway Board. “The total cost to complete the project will be about $1.3 million. We were so excited to get the funding for the first part, and the rest we’re just going to take one step at a time.” At South Mt. Juliet City Park, an acre of parkland was fenced off in 2009 and designated

the Mt. Juliet Bark Park. The dogs couldn’t be happier. “It’s really a big hit with the city,” Lee says. “People seem to love it – and the dogs do too. We put in some benches, planted a few trees and installed a water faucet with a trough that the dogs can drink from. But mostly it’s just a big, open area for dogs to come out and run their little legs off. With the bark park, we’re trying to expand and make South City Park even more inviting for the community.” Another active place is Sgt. Jerry Mundy Memorial Park, a state-of-the-art adult softball complex that also features a walking track and fields used for soccer, youth football, weekend tournaments and more. Nearby state parks, such as Long Hunter State Park and Cedars of Lebanon State Park, offer camping, swimming, boating, hiking and all sorts of family-oriented outdoor recreation. M T. J U L I E T

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Tasty Options CREATIVE COMFORT FOOD HITS THE SPOT

STORY BY ANITA WADHWANI | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

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en years ago, Annie Mochrie says, you could have knocked her over with a feather if you’d told her that she’d wind up as the proprietor of a popular, folksy café in Middle Tennessee, serving sweet tea and chicken salad far away from her native Southern California. Today, Mochrie’s restaurant – the Coffee House Café – is a thriving community gathering spot housed in a renovated, 1920’s-era home on North Mt. Juliet Road. Mochrie, a former actress, owns and runs the cozy café with her husband, Jeff. Known locally for its chickadee wraps (a sandwich made with grapes, pecans and chicken), tuna salad and other gourmet sandwiches, soups, salads and sweet desserts – along with comfortable couches, oversized armchairs and free WiFi – the Coffee House Café is also something of a new bird for Mt. Juliet. “It’s a place to just hang out for hours on end, sip coffee and greet your neighbors,” Mochrie says. The Coffee House Café is among a growing number of newly opened or renovated Mt. Juliet restaurants operated by energetic and enthusiastic restaurateurs focused on offering creatively prepared comfort food in a laid-back atmosphere. Painturos Restaurant has become a destination for families looking for a relaxed night out enjoying

quality homemade pizzas and other Italian specialties. From the meaty Cumberland Calamity Pizza to the cheeseless Big Skinny, with fresh tomatoes, roasted peppers, onions, mushrooms, fresh garlic and grilled chicken, the Mt. Juliet restaurant caters to pizza lovers of all stripes. Owner-brothers Nick and Chad Painter, along with Nick’s wife, Lisa, have created a menu of Italian dishes, pizzas and desserts that convey the flavors and aromas of authentic Italian trattorias in a comfortable, close-to-home location. Also on Lebanon Road, Larriviere’s Restaurant and Catering offers home-cooked and mouth-watering New Orleans fare, such as po’ boys, Hickory Burgers, crawfish wraps and a New Orleans muffaletta. Its signature dessert is white chocolate bread pudding. The restaurant, owned by Doug and Regina Dicke, also offers classic Southern favorites such as fried chicken, squash casserole, cornbread and other traditional dishes. People come for the food, but stay for the live music on weekends. Restaurateurs say they’ve found the key ingredient to successful dining in Mt. Juliet is offering comfort food close to home. “We were excited to move here because of its proximity to Music City,” Mochrie says. “And we’re excited to work here because Mt. Juliet is a wonderful home.”

Clockwise from top left: Owners Jeff and Annie Mochrie run the Coffee House Café in Mt. Juliet; a gourmet veggie wrap from the Coffee House Café; D’s Delight pizza from Painturo’s in Mt. Juliet

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Love? Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Not to

BRIAN McCORD

MT. JULIET OFFERS AN IDEAL PLACE TO LIVE, WORK AND PLAY

Sailboats race on a summer evening at the Hamilton Creek Sailboat Marina Cove on Percy Priest Lake.

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PHOTOS BY JEFF ADKINS

Lance Terwilliger, 5, celebrates scoring a goal with a flying high-five. Right: The Fountain Medical Spa & Boutique

STORY BY JOE MORRIS

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ot too long ago, folks who lived in Mt. Juliet often worked elsewhere – and they typically went out of town to shop and dine as well. Not anymore. Drive through town these days and you’ll find an abundance of restaurant and retail options. With a steady stream of new residents moving into Mt. Juliet, the city has become a convenient and comfortable place to live, work and play. Some newcomers are looking for a relaxing retirement spot or a great place to raise a family, while others find Mt. Juliet to be a prime business location. That’s the case with Harold and Linda Davids, who relocated from California two years ago and opened The Fountain Medical Spa & Boutique, a full-service facility that offers a wide range of health and beauty treatments. “We were immediately impressed with Wilson County,” says Harold Davids. “The atmosphere and warm, inviting attitude of the people was very unlike California. As we observed the rapid growth in the area, we felt that a state-of-the-art medical spa and boutique would be well received. We wanted to provide a quality, upscale facility, like something you would find on Rodeo Drive in Hollywood.” The Davids have been very pleased with The Fountain’s reception, and they hope to continue growing and expanding their offerings. “We are told, and believe, that Wilson County is one of the fastest-growing areas of Tennessee,” they say. “We are delighted to be here, and we anticipate growing with the community.” On the residential side, things are hopping at Lake Providence by Del Webb, where almost 25 percent of what will be a 1,100-unit development has been sold, says Derek Huggett, area sales manager. The residential community for active adults age 55 and older includes a 15-acre lake, an aquatic center, fitness center, a 24,000-square-foot clubhouse, an outdoor amphitheater and more. “We’re finding that because Providence is a

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“We are delighted to be here, and we anticipate growing with the community.” multigenerational master community, people feel like they’re not moving away from anything when they purchase one of our homes,” Huggett says. “We’re hearing that they like being so close to everything, and they still have all the amenities that our community itself offers.” Del Webb appealed to Art and Loyda Henderson, and its proximity to their daughter’s home in Old Hickory was enough for these longtime California residents to make the cross-country trek in 2007. “We used to visit a lot, and we started really looking at moving when this community opened,” says Loyda Henderson. “But we also thought Mt. Juliet was a great place to live – a nice, growing community that was completely different than what we had in California. There’s just so much to offer here. When we visit the West Coast, I can’t wait to get back.” That’s the sort of praise Mayor Linda Elam likes to hear. She says that city officials are working closely with economic-development agencies, residents and the business community to make sure that Mt. Juliet grows successfully and does not overextend itself. “We are making every attempt to transition from a bedroom community of Nashville to an ‘edge city,’” Elam says. “Our vision of an edge city is one in which citizens can live, work and play.” And the city has some big projects in the works, including road improvements and ongoing efforts to create a town center, pulling together government offices and other facilities to create an urban core. I M AG E S M TJ U L I E T. C O M

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Portfolio

Water, Water Everywhere J. PERCY PRIEST AND OLD HICKORY LAKES OFFER BOATING, FISHING AND MORE

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PHOTOS BY JEFF ADKINS

nown as the City Between the Lakes, Mt. Juliet lies between J. Percy Priest Lake on the Stones River and Old Hickory Lake on the Cumberland River. Constructed decades ago by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the lakes add to the area’s quality of life, with abundant recreation opportunities that include swimming, boating, fishing, camping and hunting. Both lakes offer sandy beaches and playgrounds and charge a nominal day-use fee. Fishing and hunting licenses are required by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. J. Percy Priest Lake is known for its land as well as its water. The lake is surrounded by 18,854 acres of public land – and about 10,000 acres of that land are devoted to wildlife management. The lake was created after the completion of the J. Percy Priest Dam in 1968, and today it features one municipal and four commercial marinas. Between 6 million and 7 million visitors flock to the area each year to enjoy the lake and wildlife, and a visitors’ center is open on the west side of the dam on Bell Road. Sailboats are welcome on J. Percy Priest, along with fishing and hunting boats, pleasure boats and personal watercraft. For fishing enthusiasts, the most popular species include largemouth and smallmouth bass, crappie, striped bass, Cherokee bass and white bass. Other fish that can be found here include catfish, bluegill and bream. Old Hickory Lake was created when the Old Hickory Dam became operational in 1957. It attracts between 8 million and 9 million visitors every year. Old Hickory Lake is also a welcome place for pleasure boats, sailboats, personal watercraft and fishing boats, but commercial barges share the waters. Anglers will find a variety of fish including auger, crappie, white bass, black bass, largemouth bass and rockfish. Both J. Percy Priest and Old Hickory lakes are within a 15-minute drive of downtown Nashville.

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Old Hickory Lake is a popular attraction.

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Anthony Lena, a self-taught balloon artist, has been perfecting his skills since age 10. The college freshman performs at special events.

Anthony the Balloon Kid

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nthony Lena says that even when he is 80 years old, he will still be known professionally as Anthony the Balloon Kid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have been entertaining children with balloon art at birthday parties since I was 13, then I added some magic to my act a couple years later,â&#x20AC;? Lena says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a freshman in college and learning the business end of how to make my ballooning career a bigger success throughout my entire life.â&#x20AC;? The Mt. Juliet resident is a May 2009 graduate of Wilson Central High School, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enrolled at Aquinas College in Nashville. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have earned $93,000 in college scholarships, so my four years at Aquinas will all be paid for,â&#x20AC;? Lena says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am majoring in business administration because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m already in show business, so I have the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; part figured out. I just need to learn more about the business aspect.â&#x20AC;? Lena actually started his ballooning career at age 10 when he received a simple balloon kit and hand pump for Christmas, but he showed no real interest at the time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My neighbor saw my kit and asked her mother to get her one, and she ended up making balloon animals â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and that got me interested in the art,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I practiced a lot and did my first show for children at Centennial Hospital in 2003, then worked even harder and ultimately began marketing myself as Anthony the Balloon Kid starting in October 2004.â&#x20AC;? Lena says his business has really been thriving for the past 3-1/2 years, and he was voted Best Birthday Party Entertainer by the readers of Nashville Parent Magazine. He has also won several ballooning contests in recent years, including a national competition where he made a life-size tricycle with a life-size boy sitting on it. It took Lena 11 hours to create that piece. M T. J U L I E T

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Online e See balloon artist Anthony Lena in action in our quick video. Visit imagesmtjuliet.com.

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Portfolio Festival-goers can sample wines from some 20 different wineries at A Toast to Tennessee Wine Festival.

Message in a Bottle

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ere’s a toast to … A Toast. A Toast to Tennessee Wine Festival has been a popular annual event in Mt. Juliet since it began in 2004. More than 20 Tennessee wineries typically participate in the festivities, and as many as 2,000 people attend. “This is the largest wine festival each year to showcase Tennessee wineries on a statewide basis,” says Mark Hinesley, president of the Mt. Juliet-West Wilson County Chamber of Commerce, which sponsors the event. “Winemaking is a burgeoning industry in Tennessee, and A Toast is an ideal opportunity for attendees to sample the many excellent varieties that the Volunteer State has to offer.” The first four years of the outdoor festival took place at Nashville Superspeedway, and it moved in 2008 and 2009 to Nashville Shores water amusement park off Interstate 40. The festivities always take place on a Saturday in mid-May. The 2010 event is slated for May 15 at Nashville Shores from noon to 6 p.m. “Ticket prices are $20 in advance and $25 at the gate, and guests can spend the entire day sipping all of the wines that this event has to offer,” Hinesley says. “Bottles from all of the participating wineries are also for sale – and designated driver non-drinking tickets are available for $10.” A Toast to Tennessee also offers a variety of gourmet foods, live music, artisan vendors, boat cruises along J. Percy Priest Lake, and 20-minute culinary seminars on topics such as cooking with wine and choosing a summer white wine.

What’s Online e Check out A Toast to Tennessee Wine Festival in our quick video. Visit imagesmtjuliet.com.

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Not Tooting Its Own Horn

JEFFREY S. OTTO

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The Music City Star runs to downtown Nashville.

hhh. Here’s some news about the Music City Star commuter rail line. In 2009, Mt. Juliet received the state of Tennessee’s first quiet zone designation, which means that the train’s whistle must stay quiet whenever it approaches road crossings in the city limits. “The train operator still has the option to sound the horn in case of an emergency – if kids are playing on the tracks or if a car is straddling the track – but the horn is to stay silent at all other times,” says Cajun Joyner, assistant public works director for the city of Mt. Juliet. “But to stay silent, the city had to upgrade and meet a lot of standards in order to ensure that the crossings still remained safe.” The Federal Railroad Administration issued those standards to Mt. Juliet, and the city had all upgrades in place by May 2009. The Music City Star commuter rail line began service in 2006, shuttling passengers between Lebanon and a station at Nashville’s downtown Riverfront Park each morning and then returning them to five stations each evening. Stops (in order from the Nashville Riverfront) are Donelson, Hermitage, Mt. Juliet, Martha and Lebanon. An entire round trip is 33 miles. The train offers passengers a less expensive and more environmentally friendly mode of transportation. The Music City Star runs Monday through Friday during peak rush hours, and it makes an evening run on Fridays. Visit www.musiccitystar.org for more information.

Autumn Attractions T

he agritourism industry is growing, and Mt. Juliet is home to two agritourism destinations that specialize in autumn attractions. Breeden’s Orchard & Country Store is a seasonal pick-your-own-fruit business, and it’s located on Beckwith Road. Pumpkin Hill on Benders Ferry Road just off Lebanon Road specializes in its namesake – pumpkins. Breeden’s is open from early September through mid-November and it has been a family-owned business for 33 years. Adults are allowed to go into the orchard in season to pick peaches, while adults and children may pick their own apples. Golden delicious apples can be picked from the trees, but Breeden’s has several varieties for sale in its country store. The country store includes a bakery where customers can buy fresh fried pies or sugar-free fried pies during the fall months. The store also stocks jams, jellies, relishes, honey, sorghum, molasses, syrups, soups, mulling spices, dips, mustards, salsa and salad dressings.

Also available for purchase are apple cider, peach cider, apple slushies and peach slushies. At Pumpkin Hill, the season is short but sweet. Pumpkin Hill is open only three Saturdays and Sundays in October, although group reservations are available in October by request for school groups, family parties and business parties. Night parties and hayrides are also available by appointment. Besides pumpkins, customers can purchase carved jack-o-lanterns, pumpkin pies, cornstalks, hay bales and gourds. Other attractions at Pumpkin Hill include a fall decorating center, working farm animals and nighttime campfires. – Stories by Kevin Litwin

Apples are the main fall attraction at Breeden’s Orchard & Country Store in Mt. Juliet.

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Business

Here to

Stay

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COMPANIES AND INDUSTRIAL SITES BUILD ON SUCCESS IN MT. JULIET STORY BY JOE MORRIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ADKINS

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vailable land, interstate access, build-ready sites and a well-educated workforce make Mt. JulietWest Wilson a prime spot for all kinds of businesses. And once they come, they tend to stay – no matter what. A prime example is S&S Industries. The company, which fabricates insulation products for original equipment manufacturers, is almost 50 years old and has been in Mt. Juliet since the mid-1970s. A fire destroyed its headquarters and manufacturing facility in 2007, but the company didn’t pull up stakes and relocate. Instead, S&S Industries kept its employees on salary while it rebuilt. The new facility – one that’s expandable for the future – opened in 2008. “We really didn’t consider moving anyplace else,” says Nixon Pressley, chief financial officer and general counsel. “This has been a good place for us to operate for so many years, and the fire actually allowed us to move down the street and build with a different layout.” The new facility is about 80,000 square feet, and it gives the company some breathing room. S&S was able to ramp up production and get back to normal pretty quickly. “We’re in a good place in terms of access to the interstate, so this has worked out well for us,” Pressley says. “There’s a lot of growth here, so the area continues to be a good place for us to operate.” That kind of loyalty is the norm in

West Wilson County, says G.C. Hixson, director of the Joint Economic and Community Development Board of Wilson County. It’s a big reason why the area has seen such explosive residential and commercial growth even during a slow economy – and why that growth is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. “If you look at the continual growth here, you can see that there’s a lot in the short term – or one to three years – as well as more coming in over time,” Hixson says. “That’s very unusual, and it shows that there are a lot of opportunities.” He points to strong retail development along the Mt. Juliet Road retail corridor, as well as industrial developments such as Beckwith Farms and its finished spec structures, as examples of strong growth across many sectors. Panattoni Development Co. owns

the 175-acre Beckwith Farms industrial site, which includes three shelled-out buildings totaling 805,000 square feet – and another two phases that could add another 1 million to 1.5 million square feet. “We’re very high on this particular site, because it’s one of the only industrial zone tracts of land left that is utility-served anywhere close to the airport and to Nashville,” says Hayne Hamilton, senior development manager for Panattoni’s Nashville and Memphis offices. “It’s a great infill site, and with the new interchange off I-40, it’s in a great location.” Interest in growing the area only shows that a good decision was made. “The nature of our business is build to suit and build to spec, but we went with all spec for the first phase of this park,” he says. “We think we’ll be adding to it very soon.”

Pete Barce operates a water jet at S&S Industries. Left: A fiberglass gasket made by S&S Industries

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Business

Biz Briefs BUSINESSES – BOTH LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE MT. JULIET/WEST WILSON COUNTY’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard BUSINESS AT A GLANCE

$832,434 Retail sales ($1,000)

$8,906 Retail sales per capita

$89,305 Accommodations and food service sales ($1,000)

9,810 Total number of firms Source: U.S. Census QuickFacts

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PUMP IT UP OF MT. JULIET Biz: Inflatable party zone Buzz: At Pump It Up of Mt. Juliet, children jump into their own private party arenas filled with gigantic inflatables. The festivities continue in a private party room, where the Pump It Up staff can handle everything from pizza to goodie bags. Pump It Up hosts all kinds of events, from birthday parties to fundraisers and team-building events. www.pumpitupparty.com

ACE HARDWARE OF MT. JULIET Biz: Full-service hardware Buzz: At ACE Hardware of Mt. Juliet, customers can find just about anything for their homes under one roof. From lawn and garden tools to paint and building supplies, this locally owned store has it all – including a friendly, knowledgeable staff. Owned by Mt. Juliet resident Nathan Scott, the store is located at 4110 N. Mt. Juliet Road. www.acehardware.com

LUBE MAX EXPRESS Biz: Automobile maintenance Buzz: Founded in Mt. Juliet in 1997, Lube Max Express is owned by Mt. Juliet resident Jeff Graves. This bustling business offers fullservice oil changes and handles maintenance issues such as tune-ups, brake replacements, water pump replacements and more. Fast, friendly and knowledgeable service makes Lube Max Express a hometown favorite. (615) 754-0303

B&R LOGISTICS INC. Biz: Transportation services Buzz: B&R Logistics Inc. provides transportation services to move raw material or finished goods through a supply chain utilizing various modes of transportation. The company also provides transportation logistics consulting services, in which experts review current processes and make recommendations for cost reductions and/or service enhancements. www.brlogisticsinc.com M T. J U L I E T

Business | Chamber Report

Changing With the Economy CHALLENGING FINANCIAL TIMES PROMPT CREATIVE NEW CHAMBER INITIATIVES

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advertising, promotions and programs to raise awareness of the area’s retail choices. The council also brings in guests – such as police officers speaking on law enforcement and security issues – to educate members. Two popular “Chamber Days” promotions before Christmas and Memorial Day proved particularly effective, Hinesley says, offering shoppers a chance to register at 30 local businesses for a $500 shopping spree. Inspired by this new program, chamber members who own homebased businesses asked for something similar, and the Home-Based Business

Council was born. Among the benefits: a chance to network, efforts to raise profiles in the community, and a unique ribbon-cutting ceremony for 16 businesses. Keep an eye open for yet another new chamber council for nonprofit organizations. “We’re always going to be doing new and creative things to help new businesses and new kinds of business,” Hinesley says. “We’ve built momentum with these programs, but we don’t take this for granted and rest on our laurels. Momentum can shift in the other direction with the snap of a finger.” – Laura Hill

BRIAN McCORD

aced with a struggling economy, the Mt. Juliet-West Wilson County Chamber of Commerce didn’t consider a slowdown. Instead, it revved up programs, added staff and tackled several new smallbusiness initiatives. The result? In a year when many chambers saw membership dwindle, this chamber added 40 members in just the first three months of 2009. “We can’t assume our members will automatically renew in this economic climate. Those days are gone,” says chamber President Mark Hinesley. “People don’t think, ‘What have they done for me this year?’ They’re asking what we have done for them this week. We had better give them a good return on their investment, or they are gone.” That return on an investment means more services and extended benefits tailored to individual businesses. The chamber, Hinesley says, is like a church with 500 members, each of whom has joined for a different reason. While acknowledging that the chamber can’t be everything to every member, “if there’s an ‘open for business’ sign, there’s a good chance that someone in that industry is a member of the chamber.” In less than 12 months in 2008-2009, the chamber put into action a half dozen new programs, including “12 at 12” and the chamber tour of homes, and it launched a redesigned, interactive Web site. The chamber also started two new membership-driven, smallbusiness programs that are growing exponentially – the Retail Council and the Home-Based Business Council. “Five or six years ago, you couldn’t buy a pair of men’s socks in Mt. Juliet,” Hinesley jokes. “But over time, the retailers who have joined the chamber have come to represent a larger and larger segment of our membership.” A core group of retailers meets monthly to plan cooperative

The Mt. Juliet-West Wilson County Chamber of Commerce has added half a dozen new programs, launched a redesigned Web site and revved up its membership recruitment efforts in response to challenging economic times.

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Business | Economic Profile

MT. JULIET BUSINESS CLIMATE Pro Mt. Julietâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Body convenient access to interstate and railway transportation make the city an ideal spot for businesses and industries that rely on tourism or the transportation industry for shipping or receiving goods.

Mt. Juliet/West Wilson County Chamber of Commerce 46 W. Caldwell St. Mt. Juliet, TN 37122 (615) 758-3478 www.mtjulietchamber.com

Median Household Income (2006)

1,500

CBRL Group Inc.

972

University Medical Center

900

Median Family Income (2006) Wilson County, $66,660 Tennessee, $49,804 United States, $58,526

State Sales Tax

Performance Food Group

760

Per Capita Income (2008) Mt. Juliet, $35,644

9.25%

Jones Bros. Construction

600

Wilson County Government

579

Lebanon Special School District

480

Music City Star East Corridor Commuter Rail Project www.cityofmtjuliet.org

Nashville Auto Auction

475

LoJac Enterprises

410

Nashville International Airport 1 Terminal Drive, Suite 501 Nashville, TN 37214 (615) 275-1675 www.nashintl.com

Lochinvar Corp.

400

WalMart

400

County Sales Tax

7% Total Sales Tax

TRANSPORTATION

ECONOMIC RESOURCES Joint Economic & Community Development Board of Wilson County 115 Castle Heights Ave. N. Lebanon, TN 37087 (615) 443-1210 www.doingbiz.org Middle Tennessee Industrial Development Association 2108 Westwood Ave. Nashville, TN 37212 (615) 269-5233 www.mtida.org

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Wilson County Schools

Median Household Income (2008) Mt. Juliet, $74,670

Wilson County, $60,278 Tennessee, $40,315 United States, $48,451

MAJOR EMPLOYERS

TAXES

2.25%

INCOME STATISTICS

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Per Capita Income (2006) Wilson County, $35,644 Tennessee, $32,172 United States, $36,714 Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

MORE EO ONLINE imagesmtjuliet.com

GOVERNMENT OFFICES Mt. Juliet City Hall 2425 N. Mt. Juliet Road Mt. Juliet Tennessee 37122 (615) 754-2552 www.cityofmtjuliet.org

More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

Wilson County 228 E. Main St., Room 104 Lebanon, TN 37087 (615) 444-1383 www.wilsoncountytn.com

INDUSTRIAL SITES LINKS www.doingbiz.org www.tvasites.com

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Health & Wellness

JEFF ADKINS

The Gardens at Providence Place provides assisted living for people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Peace of Mind NEW ALZHEIMER’S FACILITY OFFERS SECURE, COMPASSIONATE CARE ON A SMALL SCALE

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ore than four million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, a number expected only to skyrocket as the Baby Boomer generation ages. It’s a degenerative disease that clinicians say destroys brain cells and impairs cognitive function. Ask loved ones, and the description is more emotional: It robs its victims of their memories, their sense of self and, often, their dignity. It also leaves caretaking family members feeling hopeless, exhausted and depleted – and they’re often faced with an agonizing decision about whether and when they should entrust their loved one to strangers.

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That’s where The Gardens at Providence Place comes in. Opened in 2008, the Mt. Juliet residential facility offers assisted living on a small, intimate and compassionate scale for people living with Alzheimer’s disease. “Most family members who finally break down and realize they need assistance or care for a loved one are usually in a highly emotional state – exhausted, worried and upset,” says Chad Sexton, licensed practical nurse and clinical director for The Gardens. “Then they walk through the doors and meet us. They see this combination of a really nice, new, clean facility with all the amenities, close to home, with

such a compassionate staff, and they are so relieved they can finally have some peace of mind,” he says. The Gardens at Providence Place is, by design, able to accommodate only a small number of patients – just 16 at full capacity. The small patient-to-staff ratio is designed to ensure each patient has the attentive care he or she needs. Ten staff members currently work at the facility. The building was designed with the needs of Alzheimer’s patients in mind. Many assisted-living facilities have long corridors and places where residents can wander that are difficult to monitor and frightening or confusing for residents, Sexton says. The Gardens’ facility was designed so that staff can see the entrance to all the residents’ rooms from a central location in the building. And each private room is equipped with motion detectors to help staff determine if a resident is in need of assistance. Sexton says the philosophy of care at the Gardens at Providence Place is grounded in Christian teachings that caregivers are called to do God’s work. But while many staff members are motivated by their Christian faith, Sexton says the care provided is “not forcing Christianity onto any of the residents or families. We simply are informed by our faith. I think it makes us better caregivers.” For Sexton, who has worked at many larger facilities before taking on the job as clinical director of The Gardens, the facility is a relief as well. “We’ve had very little staff turnover here so far,” Sexton says. “And I think it’s because many of the staff, like me, have come from much larger facilities where we witnessed, first-hand, the difficulty in providing adequate care on a big scale. At The Gardens, we’re able to focus on individual patients. It isn’t easy, and my hat is off to my staff that works so hard every day, but we do a good job to ensure that residents have the best quality of life they possibly can have while they are with us.” – Anita Wadhwani I M AG E S M TJ U L I E T. C O M

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Education

Going the Distance SCHOOL DISTRICT EXPANDS SUCCESSFUL E-LEARNING PROGRAM

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Students at each location can see what’s on the teacher’s computer and the interactive board. Students at Watertown High School and at MAP Academy, the district’s alternative high school, were the satellite recipients of the lessons, and they worked under the guidance of a lab facilitator in each school’s computer lab. Multiple features within the desktop video conferencing, such as polling and chatting, allow students to ask questions from onsite or offsite locations. Handheld devices allow students to vote and tabulate the results on the screen. “It’s very interactive,” Clemmons says. “And because it’s recorded, a student who was absent – or one who wants to review the lesson – can go back over it.” By the end of the trial-run semester in May 2009, plans were in the works to greatly expand the system. “We are ready to run with it,” Clemmons says. “We’ll be adding four additional courses in different subject areas in fall 2009, based on school needs.” Other school districts have taken note of the program’s success, and they’re sharing in the benefits. “Part of our responsibility is to do outreach, and we’ve had Trousdale, Clay and DeKalb county students using the program,” Clemmons says. “Districts are now helping one another fulfill requirements, and that’s really neat.” – Joe Morris

PHOTOS BY JEFF ADKINS

fter embracing a statewide initiative and expanding it, the Wilson County School District is becoming a leader in distance learning. The school district has offered summer school online for four years. Students who sign up can do their work from anywhere in the world. All they need is a computer and an Internet connection. And in January 2009, the district started offering distance-learning classes, making it possible for students throughout the district to take advanced and honors courses not offered at their schools using videoconferencing programs. Both programs are part of a statewide initiative called e4TN, which stands for effective and engaging e-learning environment. The district received the three-year distancelearning grant – renewable each year – as a beta-testing rollout along with several other school districts. The coursework is tied into the county’s own online and distance-learning programs, which continue to evolve and expand each year, says Kim Clemmons, supervisor of instructional technology. “We use desktop videoconferencing, so the students are at one school while the teacher is at another,” Clemmons says. “When we began the program, we chose a discrete math class taught by Barbara Hallums at Lebanon High School. We installed a SMART Board [interactive whiteboard], two cameras and two projectors in that room.”

The Wilson County School District started offering distance-learning classes in 2009, and the program is expanding.

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Sports & Recreation

Evan Davis, 6, right, takes part in an i9 Sports soccer game. One of the organization’s main goals is to provide a supportive, positive environment in which kids can compete. More than 800 players are involved in local programs.

Taking a Team Approach i9 SPORTS ORGANIZATION PUTS THE EMPHASIS ON FUN AND POSITIVE EXPERIENCES

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nyone whose child has played youth sports has met the parent with the beet-red face who yells at the kids, the coaches and the refs while running up and down the sidelines. But you won’t see that at i9 Sports games in Mt. Juliet. Hyper-competitive parents, badly organized leagues, ever-changing schedules and kids who spend the summer warming the bench are not part of this unique youth sports organization, where the emphasis is on having fun. “Youth sports doesn’t have to be a bad experience, but often it is,” says Ron Jackson, who owns the only i9 franchise in Middle Tennessee. It’s a business that has grown rapidly since he began it four years ago. “It became a passion for me when my daughter played soccer and we had a terrible experience,” he says. “Instead of complaining, I decided to go into this myself.”

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After researching options, Jackson decided a franchise with I9 – a Tampa-based company that claims 100,000 participants nationwide and 100 franchises in 25 states – was more workable than striking out on his own. The first season yielded only 80 kids, enough for one league. But today, more than 800 area kids are involved in Mt. Juliet’s i9 flag football, dodgeball, soccer, cheerleading and basketball leagues, with a baseball program in the works. The program has even expanded into Williamson County. As for the i9 name, the national organization says it is “insightful, instructional, inspirational, inclusive, integrity-driven, innovative, impassioned, interactive and imaginative.” And it embraces some bedrock principles: that sports should be fun, that winning is not the main goal, that parents and coaches should behave like supportive adults, that every child should play at least part of every game,

that sports should be safe. A particular emphasis is parental involvement – parental involvement of the right kind, that is. Parents must sign a pledge to provide their child support and approval, no matter the outcome of a game. And they promise to model good sportsmanship, not use negative or derogatory language or interfere with the coaches. The approach makes good sense. A 2004 Harris Interactive Youth Query found that of kids who quit playing organized sports, 43 percent said they stopped having fun and 27 percent felt they weren’t good enough to play, a sad commentary – and an inspiration for Ron Jackson. “We wanted to make a difference in our community,” he says. “I set out to change the way people thought about youth sports in our area, and we think it’s working. I want kids to have a good experience in our league, and I want them to tell their friends.” – Laura Hill I M AG E S M TJ U L I E T. C O M

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Community Profile

MT. JULIET SNAPSHOT Mt. Juliet is in West Wilson County, a fast-growing community just 17 miles east of Nashville. The city is experiencing rapid growth in residential and retail development, but it still retains the smalltown feel valued by its residents.

CLIMATE OVERVIEW Located in Middle Tennessee, Mt. Juliet experiences hot summers but very mild winters with little snowfall on average. The areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s topography allows for a lengthy growing season for fruits and vegetables, and all but the least hardy flowers do well in the region.

27.9 F January Low Temperature

45.6 F January High Temperature

69.5 F

students a world-class education that will challenge minds, inspire hopes and encourage learning. Visit www.wcschools.com for more information. Higher education options include Cumberland University in Lebanon and a range of colleges, universities and training programs in nearby Nashville.

MEDICAL SERVICES OVERVIEW University Medical Center in Lebanon is a 257-bed, twocampus acute health-care

facility. The hospital provides 24-hour emergency services, inpatient and outpatient medical and surgical services, along with intensive care, telemetry services and much more. Visit www.universitymedical center.com for details.

INCOME AND HOUSING

$169,000 Average Home Price

$74,670 Household Median Income (2008 Estimate)

July Low Temperature

88.7 F July High Temperature

MORE EO ONLINE imagesmtjuliet.com

EDUCATIONAL OVERVIEW The mission of the Wilson County Schools, in partnership with the community, is to offer

More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

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Competitive Pricing Overnight Turntime

Tennessee Aircraft Co. Inc.

Exchange Available Call or Fax for Scheduling

We overhaul TPE-331 and PT-6 fuel nozzles.

5005 Market Pl. Mt. Juliet, TN 37122 (615) 758-5005 Fax: (615) 758-5501 www.tennairco.com

CRS QTFR-573L

visit our

Friendly, Knowledgeable Service

advertisers Civil Site Design Group Del Webb www.delwebb.com

Tennessee Aircraft Company Inc. www.tennairco.com Two Rivers Ford www.tworiversford.com

Jackson Down Wine & Liquors Jlyn Dsignz www.jlyndsignz.com Rutland Place www.rutlandplaceseniorliving.com

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Check out our great selection of wine, spirits and beer 3183 Lebanon Rd. (615) 232-9008 Located in the Target Shopping Center

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll appreciate our inviting atmosphere and gracious staff Our domestic and imported wine list boasts a selection of over 1,000 wines from 20 different countries

We give case discounts.

University Medical Center www.universitymedicalcenter.com Wilson Bank & Trust www.wilsonbank.com

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Ad Index C 3 C I V I L S IT E D E S I G N G RO U P 5 DEL WEBB C 3 JAC K S O N D OW N W I N E & LI Q U O R S C 3 J LY N DS I G NZ 2 8 R U T L A N D P L AC E C 3 T E N N E S S E E A I RC R A F T CO M PA N Y I N C . C 4 T WO R I V E R S FO R D 2 U N I V E R S IT Y M E D I C A L C E N T E R 1 WILSON BANK & TRUST


Images Mt. Juliet, TN 2010