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HARNETT COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA

THE ART OF IT ALL Harnett County Schools embrace creativity

STICKING THEIR NECKS OUT Campbell University’s Fighting Camels score big

Take a tour of Angier’s Gourd Museum

Hike, Bike or Row Your Boat Outdoor adventures are everywhere you look

SPONSORED BY THE HARNETT COUNTY CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE

Paid Advertisement

HARNETT County Schools Mission Statement: The mission of Harnett County Schools is to educate students in a safe environment empowering them to focus on lifelong learning, responsible citizenship and global awareness.

FASTFACTS SCHOOLS- Total Number of Schools Elementary Schools . . . . Middle Schools . . . . . . High Schools . . . . . . . . Alternative Schools . . . .

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27 17 .5 .4 . 1

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. 18,743 . 9,048 . 4,322 . 5,373

ENROLLMENT - THMO Total Students . . Elementary (K-5) . Middle (6-8) . . . . High (9-12) . . . . .

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GRADUATES Total Graduates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 988 LEA Graduation Cohort Rate . . . . . . . . . . . 70% ABCSRECOGNITION  Expected Growth/Gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 High Growth/Gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Safe Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100% ETHNICDISTRIBUTION  -  THMO African American Asian . . . . . . . . Caucasian . . . . . Hispanic . . . . . . Multi-Racial . . . . Native American .

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. 26.9% . 0.5% . 54.1% . 12.0% . 5.5% . 0.9%

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. . 250 13,003 13,544 . . 275

STRONGROOTSANDNEWGROWTH Harnett County is proud of its sense of community and the deep rooted traditions and principles it holds. Our school system was founded on those same principles and schools were (K-12) community based facilities for many years. As the county began to see new growth, more schools were built and communities were integrated as high schools and middle schools were added. Although we continue to grow at a rapid pace, we still find a strong sense of community and pride in our schools today. The tremendous growth has made it necessary to have an aggressive and ongoing building plan in place to add new school sites and continue the updating process of some of the older facilities. Much of the growth in the western part of the county can be attributed to the influx of military families moving to our area through the Base Realignment and Closure Commission (BRAC). We face the challenge of having enough space in schools and classrooms to house all of our students and the system has seen a steady increase of pupils each year. We expect between 500-600 new students this year alone – bringing our student population to over 19,000.

In the past eight years, Harnett County Schools has added six new facilities, including three elementary schools, two middle schools and one high school. Each of these sites was built to address the needs of students today with extensive instructional space, state-of-the-art technology and lab classrooms, and adequate space to ensure safety and security for students, teachers and staff.

TRANSPORTATIONFALL Total Number of Buses . . . Students Transported Daily Miles Traveled Daily . . . . Number of Routes . . . . . .

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FOODSERVICE  -SCHOOLYEARAVERAGE Student Breakfasts Served Daily . . . . . . . 5,371 Student Lunches Served Daily . . . . . . . . 12,569 MEALPRICESBREAKFASTLUNCH Elementary Middle/High Reduced Adults

$1.00 $1.25 $ .30 $1.50

$2.00 $2.15 $ .40 $3.00

Per Pupil Expenditures for 2008 . . . . . . . $1,249 EMPLOYEESOCTOBER Number of Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Number of Administrators . . . . . . . . . . National Board-Certified Teachers (2008) Doctoral Degree Employees . . . . . . . . . State Funded Employees . . . . . . . . . . . Federal Funded Employees . . . . . . . . . . Local Funded Employees . . . . . . . . . . . Total HCS Employees . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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1,222 . . 82 . . 72 . . .6 1,859 . 187 . 223 2,269

THENEWOVERHILLSELEMENTARYSCHOOL

CONSTRUCTIONOFTHENEW BOONETRAILELEMENTARYSCHOOL

There have also been substantial updates and additions to five existing elementary schools to provide updated technology, larger media centers, cafeterias and computer labs. All of these projects, coupled with hard working custodians and maintenance staff members, have produced clean, orderly and safe schools with neat and inviting grounds that serve our students well.

The school system leadership continues to meet the “growth” challenge head on with a new building plan to accommodate the high influx of students. Two elementary schools (Overhills Elementary and Angier Elementary) opened their doors for the 2009-2010 school year. Currently, we have an elementary school under construction that will open for the 2010-2011 school year and three additional projects at existing school sites. Long-range construction plans also include another elementary school, middle school and high school. Updates to existing facilities and the addition of new state-of-the-art schools will provide even better learning environments for our children and quality space for our teachers and staff. The building projects have only helped our team as they strive to provide a future-ready learning experience that will prepare our students to be 21st century leaders!

Visit us online at www.harnett.k12.nc.us

Welcome to

LILLINGTON THE HEART OF HARNETT COUNTY

Recreation ip from ver kayak tr Cape Fear Ri n. to ng lli Li Buckhorn to

The Lillington Parks and Recreations Department offers a variety of opportunities for people of all ages including tennis, basketball, softball, baseball, soccer, cheerleading and football. Senior programs include a stretch and flexibility class and dance lessons. (910) 893-2864 Canoe or kayak rentals and guides are available with Cape Fear River Adventures on South Main Street adjacent to the river. (910) 891-9348 canoes@capefearadventures.com

Pee Wee Football

Fishing, picnicking, hiking, camping and canoeing are available at Raven Rock State Park, located just 15 minutes from Lillington at 3009 Raven Rock Road. (910) 893-4888 A new Lillington Community Center will start construction later this year and will include a computer lab, multipurpose room and fitness center! Visit the Harnett County Library at 601 South Main Street, which includes year round youth reading programs, summer camps, book club and a writer’s group. (910) 893-3446

Health Care The Lillington and surrounding communities are anticipating the arrival of Brightwater Hospital and Biotechnology Park to be located near the intersection of Hw.y 421 and NC 210. Construction is expected to start in 2010. Currently, Lillington is served by Betsy Johnson Memorial Hospital and Central Carolina Hospital. Lillington also offers a neurology and pain management center and several family medical centers, dialysis, optometrist, chiropractor, radiology and dentist offices. The Harnett County Health Department maintains a public health clinic in Lillington. In addition, there is a veterinarian center for your pet!

F.W. Bean Coffee Shop located downtown

Economic Development The Town of Lillington offers a considerably low cost of living to its residents. The low cost of living along with the relatively short distance between Lillington and surrounding metro areas are two factors that have led to a large number of residents commuting to the Raleigh, Fayetteville and Fort Bragg areas. Additionally, the Lillington area is home to six of the 10 major employers in Harnett County; serving approximately 1,600 government, 900 manufacturing and 600 other private sector jobs. In light of such benefits as low cost of living, short commuting distances to urban centers, and a concentration of large local employers, the Lillington area affords a variety of employment and living opportunities to its residents. Despite the economic downturn, Lillington is experiencing significant growth including 1,000 new single family and 300 multifamily units that when complete will more than double the population to approximately 6,700 residents.

Come Visit

Education Lillington is served by Lillington Shawtown Elementary, Harnett Central Middle and Harnett Central High School. In addition to Harnett County’s high quality public school system, the Lillington area also offers two colleges – Campbell University and Central Carolina Community College.

Enjoy Lillington’s small-town atmosphere, shops, dining, lodging and recreational opportunities. Aneta Brewer with the Lillington Chamber of Commerce will be happy to assist you in planning your visit to our area. She can be reached at (910) 893-3751 or contact@ lillingtonchamber.com Lillington fire fighters in original 1928 fire truck

Campbell University is comprised of over 100 undergraduate tracks and concentrations and also offers a Graduate School of Law, Business, Education, Pharmacy and Divinity. Campbell University made the list of The Princeton Review’s “Best Colleges in the Southeast� in part due to the excellent academic programs offered. Articulation agreements with fouryear universities enable Central Carolina Community College graduates to move seamlessly into additional education, if that is their goal. CCCC also offers non-curriculum courses in basic education, technical, vocational, enrichment and general interest areas.

Lillington Town Hall and Senter Family Clock

Cape Fear River

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Need a place to host a meeting or a special event? Call on us! We offer flexible space for up to 80 people, full audiovisual support and full catering services.

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Hampton Inn – Dunn, NC

Enjoy the Hampton Experience While Visiting Harnett County We Love Having You Here!

100 Jesse Tart Circle Dunn, NC 28334 (910) 892-4333 www.dunn.hamptoninn.com

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imagesharnettcounty.com THE DEFINITIVE RELOCATION RESOURCE

What’s On Online nl 2010 EDITION | VOLUME 3 ®

PICTURE PERFECT We’ve added even more of our prize-winning photography to the online gallery. To see these photos, click on Photo Gallery.

HARNETT COUNT Y, NORTH CAROLINA

CO NTE NT S F E AT U R E S

RELOCATION Considering a move to this community? We can help. Use our Relocation Tools to discover tips, including how to make your move green, advice about moving pets and help with booking movers.

FACTS & STATS

10 HIKE, BIKE OR ROW YOUR BOAT Outdoor adventure abounds in beautiful Harnett County.

14 STICKING THEIR NECKS OUT Campbell University’s Fighting Camels score big with students and fans.

D E PA R TM E NT S

Go online to learn even more about:

6 Almanac: a colorful sampling of Harnett County culture

• Schools • Health care

16 Local Flavor

• Utilities

17 Portfolio: people, places and events

• Parks

that define Harnett County

• Taxes

20 Business Feature Images Harnett County is published annually by Journal Communications Inc. and is distributed through the Harnett County Chambers of Commerce and their member businesses. For advertising information or to direct questions or comments about the magazine, contact Journal Communications Inc. at (615) 771-0080 or by e-mail at info@jnlcom.com.

CU S TO M M AG A Z INE M ED I A

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Dunn Area Chamber of Commerce 209 W. Divine St. • Dunn, NC 28335 Phone: (910) 892-4113 • Fax: (910) 892-4071 www.dunnchamber.com VISIT IMAGES HARNETT COUNTY ONLINE AT IMAGESHARNETTCOUNTY.COM ©Copyright 2009 Journal Communications Inc., 725 Cool Springs Blvd., Suite 400, Franklin, TN 37067, (615) 771-0080. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent. Member

23 Biz Briefs 25 Education 27 Health & Wellness 29 Sports & Recreation 31 Arts & Culture: The Art of It All 32 Community Profile: facts, stats and important numbers to know

Inside: Betsy Johnson Regional Hospital special section

Magazine Publishers of America

Member

Custom Publishing Council

Member Dunn Area Chamber of Commerce EDITOR SUSAN CHAPPELL ON THE COVER CAPE FEAR RIVER/ KAYAK AND GEAR COURTESY OF CAPE FEAR RIVER ADVENTURES PHOTO BY TODD BENNETT

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All or part of this magazine is printed with soy ink on recycled paper containing 10% post-consumer waste.

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

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Almanac

A Heart for Art The Harnett County Arts Council’s mission is to promote and support the arts. And it does that by partnering with area organizations that support the visual, performing and literary arts, and those that help preserve the county’s historical and cultural heritage. The council, located at 816 S. Main St. in Lillington, offers classes, does outreach programs and has gallery exhibits featuring a roster of local painters, sculptors, fiber artists and other creative craftspeople. For more details, visit www.harnettarts.org.

The Golden Years Time to slow down? Not quite yet. Active seniors will find plenty to do at Anderson Creek Senior Center. Located in nearby Spring Lake, Anderson Creek offers a variety of health services in addition to day trips to museums, shopping malls or the theater; classes in oil painting and ceramics; an annual trip to the state fair; guest speakers on everything from technology to taxes; a shuttle service for medical appointments; and a flu shot clinic each fall. The center also boasts a Retired Senior Volunteer Program, which is part of a state initiative that links community elders to volunteering needs in the area.

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Fast Facts Q Besides Dunn, the other towns in Harnett County are Angier, Coats, Erwin and Lillington, which is the county seat. Unincorporated communities include Anderson Creek, Buies Creek and Johnsonville.

Right on Course When it’s time to grip it and rip it‚ avid golfers would be hard-pressed to find an area more hospitable to their sport than Harnett County. In fact, it is a golfer’s paradise‚ offering eight challenging golf courses with hilltop vistas and amenable temperatures nearly year-round. Besides the beauty of the links, playing golf in Harnett County is very affordable, and the courses are not overcrowded. For more information, contact the Dunn Area Tourism Authority at www.dunntourism.org.

Q The Dunn Farmers Market is open every Saturday from May through October and sells a variety of produce in addition to plants and crafts. Q The Erwin History Museum documents the history of the small town with old photographs and artifacts. Q The 5.3-mile Dunn-Erwin Rail Trail is popular with outdoor enthusiasts who like to walk, bike and hike. Q There are 27 schools in the Harnett County Schools system. The newest one, Overhills Elementary School, opened in fall 2009.

Multiple Choice Interested in cosmetology? What about criminal justice technology? Those are just two of the possible areas of study at Central Carolina Community College, which offers more than 45 curriculum programs at its three campuses and other instructional locations throughout Chatham, Harnett and Lee counties. The West Harnett Center, located in Western Harnett Industrial Park, tries to meet the needs of local industries. A wide variety of classes are available, including barbering, practical nursing, business administration, esthetics, and laser and photonics technology, to name just a few. Some programs are offered entirely, or in part, via online distance education. For more information, visit www.cccc.edu.

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Past Perfect If the mysteries of history fascinate you, check out the Coats Museum. Located at 109 S. McKinley St., the museum is dedicated to preserving the history of the small community through interpretive exhibits, data banks, genealogies and a chronological history of the area. The museum, which is open on Sundays afternoons and by appointment, also keeps an ongoing record of significant events that are relevant to the history of the families who live in Coats.

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CITY OF DUNN P.O. Box 1065 Dunn, NC 28335 (910) 230-3500 www.dunn-nc.org

DUNN AREA TOURISM AUTHORITY P.O. Box 310 Dunn, NC 28335 (910) 892-3282 www.dunntourism.org

Welcome Home ‌ Conveniently located in the heart of North Carolina, just a short drive to the beach or the mountains. We are situated off of Interstate 95 at Exits 71-75. We offer history, heritage and Southern hospitality, which are evident in our community. Come, visit and stay a while.

Almanac

A Healthy Idea The prognosis is good for the future of health care in Harnett County. Harnett Health Systems central hospital, located in the proposed Brightwater Science and Technology Park, is set to open in 2011 in Lillington. Architectural firm Perkins+Will will design the two-story, 50-bed hospital at a cost of approximately $56 million. The 86,000-squarefoot facility will also have three shared inpatient and outpatient operating rooms and a 24-hour emergency room.

Hometown Hero Gen. William C. Lee is one of Harnett County’s most honored native sons. Lee is considered the Father of the Airborne because he developed the plans for the air invasion of Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944. The general trained to jump with his men but was sent back to the states a few months before the battle due to a heart attack. To honor their “father,” the paratroopers yelled out “Bill Lee!” as they made their jump on that historic day. The General William C. Lee Airborne Museum, located at Lee’s former home at 209 W. Divine St., offers visitors a glimpse back at that history with a variety of exhibits.

Harnett County At A Glance POPULATION (2008 ESTIMATE) Harnett County: 112,030, Dunn: 10,029 LOCATION Harnett County is in central North Carolina, near the junction of interstates 40 and 95.

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What’s Online e Take a virtual tour of Harnett County, courtesy of our awardwinning photographers, at imagesharnettcounty.com.

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BEGINNINGS The county was officially established in 1855 and named for Revolutionary War patriot Cornelius Harnett, a delegate to the Continental Congress. FOR MORE INFORMATION Dunn Area Chamber of Commerce 209 W. Divine St., Dunn, NC 28335 Phone: (910) 892-4113, Fax: (910) 892-4071 www.dunnchamber.com

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Boat

OUTDOOR ADVENTURE ABOUNDS IN BEAUTIFUL HARNETT COUNTY

STORY BY CAROL COWAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY TODD BENNETT

W

hether you prefer to pedal, paddle or simply perambulate, you’ll find plenty of outdoor opportunities in Harnett County. The recent opening of the 5.3-mile Dunn-Erwin Rail Trail puts this area on track with a national trend that is giving old railroad lines new life as trails for bicyclists, hikers and residents who just want to get out and enjoy nature. The crushed stone trail is perfect for walking‚ hiking and biking, and offers scenic variety that includes farm fields‚ a large pond and a couple of bridges that cross the Black River. Potential bird sightings include blue herons‚ white egrets and red-tail hawks. Trailheads are located in both Dunn and downtown Erwin‚ with restaurants and shops at both ends. The Cape Fear River also cuts a path through Harnett County, making the area ideal for water recreation. Harnett County Parks and Recreation Director Alice Powell likes to think of the river as a centerpiece that brings the county together. “It’s like we have a beautiful‚ linear park that goes through the middle of the county‚” she says. And thanks to the new Cape Fear River Trail Park in Erwin, which opened in May 2008, river access is easier than ever. “Many compliments have been given about the water access for paddlers,” says Carl R. Davis II, recreation program supervisor for Harnett County Parks and Recreation. “During the warm weather, the parking lot is full of cars and trucks with kayak and canoe trailers attached. The park is also heavily used by local fisherman Cape Fear River

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Welcome to Coats,

a town made up of folks who have lived here for generations and many newcomers who find it home. We invite you to visit us to learn more about our Town of Coats! • Two stoplights and population of 2,074 • Located near the State Capitol, 13 colleges and universities and US Army Base at Ft. Bragg • Leisurely drive to both beach and mountain areas • Fellowship in churches and be a part of civic organizations • Enjoy our recreational facilities and local schools • Life is good – and that is just what it is here in Coats, come check us out! Pictured here are some of our Town Staff who work to make Coats a good place to call home!

237 N. McKinley St. • P.O . Box 675 • Coats, NC 275 21 Phone: (910) 897-5183 • Fax : (910) 897-2662

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and for afternoon strolls on the walking trails.” Another of the region’s most popular attractions is the 5,000-acre Raven Rock State Park, so named for the spectacular mica schist cliff that juts 150 feet above the surrounding landscape and extends more than a mile along the edge of the Cape Fear River. The park draws more than 12 million visitors each year for hiking, fishing, paddling, biking and camping. In Anderson Creek Township, more than 1,000 acres of rolling woodland and wetlands will soon become Anderson Creek Park. “A master plan has been developed for Anderson Creek Park, which will be used primarily for passive recreation and will include walking trails, equestrian trails, informational kiosks, playgrounds, mountain-biking trails and more,” Davis explains.

A $1.5 million improvement project at Jack Marley Park in Angier includes the addition of another walking trail to the county’s offerings. “We’re making this a walkable community by connecting trails throughout the town,” says Coley Price, Angier town manager. “The park is the central hub.” The lighted walking trail – which connects a new multipurpose field, disc golf course, sand volleyball court, batting cages, two new playgrounds and a skateboard park – makes the park more family-friendly and links to Angier’s Centennial Trail in the downtown district. “This is one of the best things the town’s ever done,” Price says. “It’s brought families together, and it’s a tremendous asset to the community.” In western Harnett County, Barbecue Creek Park also is under renovation.

Info to Know For more information about the variety of recreational activities in Harnett County, visit www.harnett.org/parkrec.

Clockwise below: Raven Rock State Park in Lillington; Dunn-Erwin Rail Trail; Cape Fear River

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Sticking Their

Necks Out FIGHTING CAMELS SCORE BIG AT CAMPBELL UNIVERSITY

PHOTO COURTESY OF SCARBOROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY

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STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN

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The McCall Practice Gym, four concession stands and a designated seating section for season-ticket holders are also on site. University officials expect both Barker-Lane Stadium and the Pope Convocation Center to benefit not only Campbell athletes and students but also residents of Bules Creek and Harnett County. “Having modern facilities such as the stadium and the indoor center will do wonders for our recruiting efforts,” Williamson says. “Many more student-athletes will want to enroll here because of what Campbell University now has to offer.”

TODD BENNETT

ollege football was a lot different when Campbell University – then a junior college – last fielded a team in 1950. But all that changed in 2008, when the Fighting Camels returned to the gridiron. It was in August 2008, when 5,000 football fans packed Barker-Lane Stadium to see Campbell University play its first game in nearly 60 years. The Camels compete in the Pioneer Football League, a Division I non-scholarship league, against universities such as Butler, Davidson, Drake, Jacksonville, Morehead State and San Diego. “In 2007 and 2008, we constructed an excellent football stadium that has a field house, locker rooms, offices and meeting rooms, and we will continue to add onto the stadium in phases,” says Stan Williamson, director of athletics at Campbell University. “The Fighting Camels didn’t have a good first season record-wise in 2008 [1-10], but we will be better in 2009. The main thing is that football is back at Campbell U, and it’s just part of the overall athletic excitement currently taking place throughout the campus.” That excitement includes the second phase of construction at Barker-Lane Stadium that will begin following the 2009 season. Plans include adding more spectator seating along with a permanent press box. “As for other athletics, we are also designing a new running track for this campus and have future plans for upgrades to our soccer, softball and baseball facilities,” Williamson says. “And we are still most proud of our Keith Hills Country Club championship golf course, which makes Campbell University one of the few campuses in the United States that has a 36-hole golf course.” The university also opened the $34 million John W. Pope Jr. Convocation Center in late 2008. It is being used primarily for men’s and women’s basketball, volleyball and wrestling, and features a student fitness area, a weight room for all athletic teams and academic classrooms for the university’s exercise science curriculum. “Before the convocation center, we had a gymnasium that was built in 1950 and had only 954 seats, making it one of the smallest basketball arenas in all of Division I sports,” says Haven Hottel, director of communications and publications for Campbell University. “In comparison, the new center has seating for 3,100 spectators for athletic events and can host 5,000 people for concerts and special events. We already packed the place in May 2009 for graduation ceremonies.” The convocation center houses the Gilbert Craig Gore Arena, which is used for sporting events, concerts, graduations and other special events, and the facility also features the R.P. Holding Sr. Student Fitness Center that has state-of-the art exercise equipment and a climbing wall.

John W. Pope Jr. Convocation Center at Campbell University Left: A Campbell University football game

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PHOTOS BY TODD BENNETT

Local Flavor

The Brass Lantern Steak House in Dunn

Beauty and the Feast WHEN IT COMES TO FOOD, RESTAURANTS IN HARNETT COUNTY HAVE YOU COVERED

D

inner is served in Harnett County – in grand style at several elegant restaurants. If you like a touch of ethnic cuisine, Yamato Japanese House of Steak & Seafood in Dunn is the only place in the county that offers authentic Japanese food. The dining spot features a wide variety of fresh sushi among its many entrée choices, and all of the meals are affordably priced. The lunch dishes begin at $5.50, and dinner entrees are priced from $6.95. Dunn is also home to restaurants such as Heath’s Steakhouse and The Brass Lantern Steak House, which feature dinner choices such as prime rib, filet mignon, lobster tails and a crusty fried shrimp combination. The Brass Lantern also offers side items such as New England clam chowder, onion tanglers and fried mushrooms, and there is a well-stocked bar of wines and imported beer. Dunn also boasts Barrington House – a 1914 mansion that functions as a bed-and-breakfast and a venue for weddings and corporate dinners. In addition, it is open to the public on Thursday and Friday nights, with dinner options that include steak, chicken and seafood selections. In Angier, Simon’z Restaurant opened in 2008, serving lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. And The Family Restaurant, open since 1973, remains a thriving business at its original location on Depot Street in Angier. The eatery serves up pork chops, fried chicken, steak and fresh vegetables. The restaurant’s extra large pancake is also a popular choice. 16

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Meanwhile, Casa Carini Restaurant in Lillington offers customers an Italian dining experience, with dishes that include lasagna, fettuccine Alfredo, mussels marinara, fried calamari and baked ziti. Other options include hot sandwiches, burgers and wraps. Also in Lillington, Ribeyes Steakhouse uses only choice, Omaha-brand, grain-fed beef and serves up various sizes of, you guessed it, rib eye steaks. Other grilled menu items at Ribeyes include chicken breasts, shrimp, pork chops, tuna and salmon. There’s also a salad bar and a children’s menu. – Kevin Litwin

The Family Restaurant in Angier serves up a huge pancake that has been dubbed “the hubcap.”

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Portfolio

Sportsmanlike Conduct FANS WILL FIND GREAT PLACES IN THE AREA TO ENJOY FOOD AND FUN

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ey, sports fans, if you’re looking for a fun place to hang out, there are interesting venues now open in Dunn and Erwin. Zane’s Clubhouse Grille has opened for business in East Pointe Village on East Cumberland Street, just east of the Dunn city limits. Meanwhile, Buffaloe Lanes Family Entertainment Center is operating in Erwin, with 24 lanes for your bowling pleasure. Zane’s caters to sports fans and families looking for a reasonably priced meal. There are several flatscreen televisions tuned to various sporting events, and sports memorabilia decorates the walls.

But the venue also markets itself as a fun restaurant for family dining. The restaurant even has a game room in back for children, and other rooms can be used for birthday parties and other large-group functions. Some of the walls and tabletops feature photographs of local Little League softball and soccer players, as well as pictures of their proud parents. The owners of Zane’s – Carlos and Kathy Rivers – think the photos of local residents help create a feeling of community that customers of all ages can relate to when they visit the restaurant. As for menu items, the food choices

at Zane’s include 10 different flavors of chicken wings, eight different types of hamburgers, St. Louis-style barbecue ribs and side items such as breaded jalapenos and sweet potato fries. Meanwhile, at Buffaloe Lanes, owner Ricky Buffaloe has installed a high-tech scoring system for bowlers that features 42-inch LCD monitors above each of the 24 lanes. Morning, afternoon and night leagues are available, with individual leagues for singles, couples, families, women, men, seniors and youngsters. Buffaloe Lanes also has bowling facilities in Raleigh and Cary.

Buffaloe Lanes in Erwin; Zane’s Clubhouse Grille in Dunn

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Portfolio “There’s Nothing That We Can’t Fix”

JOHNSON’S TRANSMISSION & AUTO SERVICE INC. We can repair any make of automatic transmission, and since we have the exact tools and parts needed, the job is done right the first time! A phone call will make an appointment for an inspection and a complete estimate will be provided BEFORE any repairs are begun. Your car can be picked up by our tow truck if it cannot be driven. We also do engine repair, auto repair and complete diagnostic services. Locally Owned & Operated by Jerry Johnson Mon.-Thur. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Fri. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. 1648 NC Hwy. 55 Dunn, NC 28334 (910) 892-0961 (910) 892-0976 SERVING THE AREA FOR THE PAST 15 YEARS

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Practicing What They Preach

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ozens and dozens of senior citizens attend church each week at Gospel Tabernacle in Dunn. In addition, many of them are involved in other activities that Gospel Tabernacle offers. More than 70 seniors also participate in a program called LIFE, an acronym for Living in Full Effectiveness. The program welcomes all senior congregation members ages 60 and older. “Our LIFE group has two meetings a month. One is a meal fellowship, and the other is a trip that might be to a local attraction or a site that could be quite a distance away,” says Ken Milliken, senior pastor at Gospel Tabernacle. “The group has traveled as far away as New York and Florida. They have a good time.” These special ministries are commonplace at churches here. Spring Branch Baptist also schedules a number of extracurricular programs for senior citizens, while Abundant Life has a motorcycle ministry that features parishioners taking several

out-of-town motorcycle road trips. For younger congregation members, Crossroads Church has a ministry specifically aimed at young children, while Central Baptist Church offers a teen ministry that is housed in a new on-site teen building. “We also have a teen meeting group at Gospel Tabernacle called The Lighthouse, and a fellowship for middle-school kids that is called Junior Lighthouse,” Milliken says. “There is also a discipleship ministry called The Missionettes that allows young girls to get involved with crafts and other related projects.” Milliken adds that Gospel Tabernacle also has a program called The Royal Rangers for boys. “That group is like a Christian Boy Scouts, with camping and adventure trips along with spiritual lessons,” he says. “In addition, our church has a program called The Cross Trainers for disadvantaged youth. We do a lot of ministry work here, as do several of the other churches in Harnett County.” HARNET T COUNT Y

A Salute to the Armed Forces he invasion has already begun. Fort Bragg Army military installation in nearby Fayetteville will grow by approximately 40,000 soldiers, civilian personnel and their families by 2013. Both the U.S. Army Reserve Command and the U.S. Army Forces Command at Fort McPherson in Georgia will be moving their entire operations to Fort Bragg. As a result, the Base Realignment and Closure Regional Task Force in this part of North Carolina estimates that 11 area counties will need to make room for new residents. Harnett County is expected to gain approximately 4,500 new residents by 2013, while Cumberland County is expected to see almost 12,000 newcomers. Fort Bragg and its neighboring Pope Air Force Base are physically located in Cumberland County, and the bases directly border Harnett County to the southwest. An expected 16,600 jobs will be created with the growth at Fort Bragg, with only 4,600 of them being active duty military jobs. The remainder will be civilian and private defense contractor jobs. The BRAC Regional Task Force points out that affordable homes with a variety of options are available in Harnett County, including gated communities such as Anderson Creek Club, Keith Hills at Campbell University and Carolina Lakes. In addition, the new Linden Oaks subdivision is being constructed specifically for military families on North Carolina Highway 87. Meanwhile, the local school system in Harnett County will also feel an impact. County officials estimate that an overall increase in new students will create $130 million in new school needs, primarily in the southern and western areas of the county. – Stories by Kevin Litwin HARNET T COUNT Y

IAN CURCIO

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Business

C’mon Downtown ANGIER, DUNN REVITALIZE THEIR DOWNTOWN DISTRICTS T

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STORY BY KEVIN LITWIN PHOTOGRAPHY BY TODD BENNETT

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ngier officials were excited in 2007 when the North Carolina Department of Commerce granted the community Small Town Main Street status. “The state helped us a lot with defining what we wanted to do with our downtown district, mainly with design suggestions and promotional tips,” says Coley Price, Angier town manager. “It has already resulted in upgrades to sidewalks, landscaping improvements and streetscape enhancements.” Price says that as soon as Angier received its Small Town Main Street designation, a local committee was formed to

meet once a month and share different ideas about how downtown can remain fresh and vital. “One of our primary initiatives was to put together a building façade improvement effort,” Price says. “To our pleasant surprise, the owners of 10 individual buildings have participated in the program, and all 10 of their façade upgrades were completed by June 2009.” As for new businesses, a restaurant and a dentist’s office opened in downtown Angier during 2009, as well as a North Carolina Department of Transportation Division of Motor Vehicles office. “In addition, a park was renovated, and there are four new

Left: Downtown Angier; downtown Dunn

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Business

apartments available for rent,” Price says. “Good things have been happening lately in downtown Angier.” Meanwhile, the city of Dunn has also been busy with recent downtown revitalization efforts, with perhaps the most important piece of news being that a Downtown Dunn Development Corp. has been formed. “Dunn’s downtown never totally dried up over the years like in many other downtowns in small U.S. towns – but it does need a jump-start,” says Dal Snipes, chairman of the Dunn Downtown Development Corp. “We have a good nucleus of shops. Now, we just need more action.” Snipes says that to raise money for improvements, the

“Good things have been happening lately in

nonprofit DDDC has formed a municipal tax district to draw money from downtown establishments. “In other words, downtown business owners are taxing themselves another 12 cents per $100 of evaluation in order to raise money for downtown upgrades,” he says. “It’s an additional burden to downtown building owners, but everyone is on board. We have so far collected $100,000 in tax money that will go solely toward future renovation projects.” Snipes says the DDDC wants to partner with the city of Dunn in the overall beautification of the downtown district. “The city will need to tear up downtown streets for water and sewer replacement as soon as they can find the money, while the DDDC will then install sidewalk brick pavers, lampposts, planters, trees and benches,” he says. “Dunn isn’t a Main Street community because to actually qualify, a community must have a full-time director in place – and that costs money. The $40,000 to $50,000 to fund that position wouldn’t be the best use of our money at this time. So for now, the DDDC will continue to bank the tax money and then oversee nice downtown upgrades when the time is right.” Downtown Angier

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TODD BENNETT

downtown Angier.”

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Biz Briefs BUSINESSES – BOTH LARGE AND SMALL – THAT HELP DEFINE HARNETT COUNTY’S ECONOMIC CLIMATE

Scorecard BUSINESS AT A GLANCE

$559,754 Retail sales ($1,000)

$5,778 GOODFELLAS SIGHT & SOUND Biz: audio and visual equipment retailer Buzz: Sure, Goodfellas Sight & Sound in Erwin sells and installs audio equipment for cars and trucks. But the company also specializes in fiberglass enclosures, window tinting, car alarms, satellite radio, car batteries, and tires and rims. Goodfellas is also responsible for the sound at Erwin’s Movies in the Park, which is held during the summer months. www.goodfellassightandsound.com

TEAMWORKS SOLUTIONS INC. Biz: software and solutions provider Buzz: TeamWORKS specializes in meeting the needs of educational facilities around the country, providing solutions for both higher education institutions and K-12 schools of any size. From data collection and application hosting to software products and on-site training, TeamWORKS helps educational systems work more efficiently. www.gotws.com

Retail sales per capita

$49,451 Accommodations and food services sales ($1,000)

5,674 Total number of firms Source: U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts

MACHINE WELDING & SUPPLY CO. Biz: full-service welding supplier Buzz: For more than 50 years, Machine Welding & Supply Co. in Dunn has been the place to go for welding needs. The company, which was voted as the Dunn Chamber Business of the Year for 2008, has more than 20 locations in North Carolina. The firm rents welding equipment and supplies restaurants with a bulk CO2 program. www.mwsc.com HARNET T COUNT Y

ROARING AARDVARK WEB DESIGN LLC Biz: Web site design Buzz: This Lillington-based business offers a variety of Web services, including Web site design, content management, e-commerce, domain name registration and hosting. Roaring Aardvark also does logos and graphic design for customers, and offers maintenance services for clients’ Web sites. www.roaringaardvark.com I M AG E S H A R N E T T C O U N T Y. C O M

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Business | Economic Profile

HARNETT COUNTY BUSINESS CLIMATE Harnett County is a progressive business community with a dedicated workforce. It is part of the Research Triangle Research Partnership and is close to the North Carolina Biotechnology Center.

Erwin Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 655 Erwin, NC 28339 (910) 897-7300 www.erwinchamber.org

ECONOMIC RESOURCES Angier Area Chamber of Commerce 19 W. Depot St. Angier, NC 27501 (919) 639-2500 www.angierchamber.org Coats Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 667 Coats, NC 27521 (910) 897-6213 www.coatschamber.com Dunn Area Chamber of Commerce 209 W. Divine St. Dunn, NC 28335 (910) 892-4113 www.dunnchamber.com

HARTS 900 S. 9th St. Lillington, NC 27546 (910) 814-4019

Harnett County Economic Development Commission 907 S. Main St. Lillington, NC 27546 (910) 893-7524 Lillington Chamber of Commerce 24 W. Front St. Lillington, NC 27546 (910) 893-3751 www.lillingtonchamber.org Research Triangle Regional Partnership 1000 Trade Drive, Suite 124 RDU International Airport North Carolina 27623 (919) 840-7372 www.researchtriangle.org

CSX Corp. Inc. (877) 744-7279 www.csx.com Nolfolk & Southern Railway (404) 529-1591 www.nscorp.com

TAXES

6.75% Total Sales Tax

MORE EO ONLINE imagesharnettcounty.com g y

TRANSPORTATION Harnett Regional Jetport 615 Airport Road Erwin, NC 28339 (910) 814-2740

The Harnett County Public Library Vision: Supporting the love of reading, the joy of learning and the search for information.

Armtec®products for military aircraft www.armtecdefense.com 601 Main St. Lillington, NC 27546 (910) 893-3446 www.harnett.org/library

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608 E. McNeill St. • Lillington, NC 27546 (910) 814-1222

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Education

A Higher Calling for Many HARNETT COUNTY IS KNOWN FOR TRAINING FUTURE RELIGIOUS LEADERS

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higher power plays an important role in higher education at three colleges and universities in Harnett County. Campbell University, Foundations Bible College and Heritage Bible College all enjoy strong traditions of training people for the ministry. In fact, Campbell University has been providing Christian-based education for 123 years. “In our Divinity School department, we prepare people for positions in careers that include church leadership, social work, chaplains in hospitals and Scripture teachers,” says Michael G. Cogdill, dean of the Campbell University Divinity School. “The enrollment in our Divinity School is always around 100 students, with the ratio usually being about 55 men and 45 women.” Speaking of women, Cogdill says many are being called to be pastors and church leaders these days, with certain denominations more open to the concept than others. “For example, Methodists can have women pastors, and Episcopalians now have women priests,” he says. “We welcome any woman who seeks the ministry. If a woman wants training to become a pastor or any other important position in her church, there is no better place to enroll than Campbell.” The university also opened a graduate school in 1996 and offers four master’s degrees in Christian education, divinity, divinity/business administration and divinity/ community counseling. “There is also one doctoral program being offered – a doctor of ministry degree,” Cogdill says. “Campbell

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University also has a referral placement operation in place to help graduates find jobs. We have a database that lists church-related career openings across the nation.” Meanwhile, Foundations Bible College, which started in 1974, offers a comprehensive study of the Bible and an understanding of historic Christian doctrine. Its campus includes a School of Religion, School of Church History and a School of Christian Education. Heritage Bible College was founded in 1971 with the express purpose to train ministers for the Pentecostal Free Will Baptist Church. But today, its doors are open to any denominational group. “Nowadays, we train students for Assembly of God, Church of God, Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian – anyone who feels like they have a divine calling to go into ministry,” says Dr. Elvin Butts, president of Heritage Bible College. “We have concentrations in pastoral ministry, Christian education, Christian counseling, and worship and music.” The 80 students enrolled at Heritage Bible College can earn four-year bachelor’s degrees in religious education and a number of two-year associate’s degrees. “Our well-trained faculty helps students both academically and practically in their preparation to be church leaders,” Butts says. “We are well known for our quality education, especially judging from the fact that we get calls all the time from church officials in this region and beyond who are looking for youth pastors, music ministers or congregation leaders.” – Kevin Litwin I M AG E S H A R N E T T C O U N T Y. C O M

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Health & Wellness

TODD BENNETT

Owner and physical therapist Sara Morrison works with a client at Total Body Therapy & Wellness.

The Picture of Good Health HARNETT COUNTY OFFERS A RANGE OF MEDICAL SERVICES TO RESIDENTS

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rom pain management and rehabilitation to pediatric and women’s services, comprehensive health care is easy to find in Harnett County. The region’s growing medical sector means residents don’t have to drive far for access to the best physicians and latest treatments. Paving the way toward a healthier Harnett is Harnett Health System, which owns Betsy Johnson Regional Hospital in Dunn. The locally owned, not-for-profit

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health system was formed in 2005 to oversee the creation of a full-service, 50-bed hospital and central campus in Lillington. The new hospital is expected to bring more services and specialists to the region, which already boasts cardiopulmonary, critical care, emergency services, medical imaging, digital mammography, surgical services, and pediatric and women’s health through BJRH. In Lillington, the Neurology & Pain Management Center treats patients

suffering from a variety of physical and neurological disorders, including arthritis, chronic headaches, sleep disorders, carpal tunnel, Alzheimer’s and memory loss. And at Total Body Therapy & Wellness, patients of all ages can receive professional therapeutic care intended to prevent injury, relieve dizziness and balance problems, correct work-related injuries and post-surgery pain. “Our quality of care sets us apart,” says owner and physical therapist Sara Morrison. “We offer a lot of traditional techniques like exercise and massage but combine them with new technology to give people the best care we can.” Morrison’s sport-specific athletic training and weight-loss programs provide clients with customized programs based on individual goals. Yoga classes, prenatal wellness and nutritional consults and supplements also are offered. Most recently, the Lillington center added cold laser therapy to its growing list of services. Recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the painless laser promotes growth of the body’s healthy, healing cells, providing relief from pain associated with joint replacement surgery, fibromyalgia, muscle spasms and migraines. In nearby Angier, patients at the Carolina Regional Radiology Imaging Center have access to the latest imaging technology, including diagnostic, obstetric and vascular ultrasound, MRI and CT scans, mammography, bone densitometry, gastrointestinal imaging and pediatric radiology. Owned and operated by one of the largest radiology practices in North Carolina, the group boasts 21 highly trained, board-certified radiologists, each with a special area of interest. “Our patients come first, and we receive a lot of feedback about how nicely they’re treated,” says Phyllis Hall, site manager for CRR’s Angier Imaging Center. “Because the practice is owned and run by physicians rather than a corporation, it’s their business and they really care about it.” – Melanie Hill I M AG E S H A R N E T T C O U N T Y. C O M

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L.P .S. S

LEE PEST

OLUTIONS

Kenneth Lee, Owner

“The solution to your pest problems!” œV>ÞÊ"ܘi`ÊEÊ"«iÀ>Ìi`ÊUÊ"ÛiÀÊ{äÊ9i>ÀÃʜvÊ Ý«iÀˆi˜Vi º+Õ>ˆÌÞÊ7ˆÌ…œÕÌÊ+ÕiÃ̈œ˜»

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910-892-6312

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Sports & Recreation

A Fresh Air of Distinction AREA PARKS OFFER NEW FACILITIES AND AMENITIES FOR AREA RESIDENTS

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erek McLean might be a bit biased, but he believes Jack Marley Park in Angier is the finest outdoor facility in this part of North Carolina. In fact, the parks and recreation director for the town of Angier says that if local people haven’t seen the park since May 2008, they would not recognize it anymore. “A couple years back, the state awarded us a $500,000 grant, and the town put in another $900,000, so a total of $1.4 million went into a complete renovation of the Marley Park facility,” McLean says. “The project was completed in May 2008, and it is now an incredible outdoor destination that gets a lot of use.” Additions to the park include two new playgrounds, a picnic shelter, a multipurpose athletic complex and a skate park. Further upgrades include refurbishing the tennis courts, installing new lights on an existing multipurpose field, redoing concessions and renovating bathrooms.

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“We also added a walking trail that spans three-quarters of a mile around the existing pond, and there is now a disc golf course as well as a beach volleyball court,” McLean says. “There is also new signage throughout the entire facility, and we redid the entrance area. Jack Marley Park is now a destination for sports tournaments as well as vacationers and residents. It’s quite an amazing recreation spot for a town of 4,300 residents.” Another outdoor jewel in Harnett County that also received a recent $500,000 grant from North Carolina is Barbecue Creek County Park, which is currently the only public park in western Harnett County. It is conveniently located between Western Harnett High School and Western Harnett Middle School, and the park is also home to Western Harnett Youth Recreation. “The $500,000 state grant was matched by the county, so a total of $1 million in additions and upgrades went into the improvement of Barbecue

Creek County Park,” says Carl Davis, program supervisor with Harnett County Parks and Recreation. “The facility can now offer even more leisure and recreation opportunities that enrich the quality of life for our citizens.” The money has allowed the county to install top-grade lighting at the park’s baseball diamonds, tennis courts and multipurpose field. A walking trail, picnic shelter and community building round out the amenities. Meanwhile, a future recreation spot in Harnett County that has received a lot of attention is the proposed Anderson Creek Park. “No specific construction timetable has been set, but what will make Anderson Creek so interesting and exciting is its size at 1,000 acres,” Davis says. “The future park will be able to accommodate walking trails, equestrian trails, mountain bike trails and disc golf. It will be an exciting venture – whenever it happens.” – Kevin Litwin

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Arts & Culture

The Real Art of It All HARNETT COUNTY SCHOOLS SYSTEM UNDERSTANDS THE IMPORTANCE OF THE ARTS

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performances at the Harnett Regional Theatre in Dunn. Honors chorus is offered each year at Campbell University, while marching and concert bands wow crowds with performances at regional and state competitions. At a time when art and music programs are hitting chopping blocks nationwide, Harnett County Schools continues to offer exceptional opportunities to its students. Harmon-Lewis credits a supportive community and school board, as well as generous partnerships with local

businesses and organizations. Harnett Regional Theatre, Campbell University, Cape Fear Friends of the Fine Arts and the Harnett County Arts Council are among the district’s strongest supporters and help provide performance venues, fund field trips and encourage involvement in the arts. “This is an investment in our future,” Harmon-Lewis says. “If we don’t continually teach and share the arts with our young people, who will appreciate them later?” – Melanie Hill

BRIAN M C CORD

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f all the world’s a stage, then students at Harnett County Schools are front and center. From marching band and chorus to theater and fine arts, creative opportunities abound for kids of all ages in this North Carolina community. And few stages shine brighter than Harnett Off Broadway, the district’s multifaceted exhibition of dance, music and arts featuring K-12 students from 26 district schools. “It really peaks an interest in the arts for kids and provides a creative outlet,” says Patricia Harmon-Lewis, director of community schools and public relations. “Not every child is successful in every area, and without these opportunities, some kids don’t get a chance to shine. Seeing art and hearing music opens a world for many students that they’ve never been a part of.” The colorful festival spans two weekends each March and is the culmination of a year’s worth of planning and practice for students and art and music teachers. In the bustling auditoriums of Overhills and Triton high schools, kids take the stage with choral, theatrical and musical performances. There’s also a juried art show, with the winning pieces displayed in administrative buildings the following year. Proceeds from ticket and video sales benefit the Harnett County Business Education Foundation, which funds grants for county educators. “We’re able to not only provide a great fine arts program, but money and resources to teachers for projects they normally wouldn’t be able to do because of money issues,” Harmon-Lewis says. Harnett Off Broadway is just one way students here are encouraged to think outside the box. The district’s annual Very Special Arts Celebration exposes students with disabilities to a variety of performing and visual arts, too. Students also participate in trips to first-class venues such as Raleigh’s Meymandi Concert Hall and see

Arts in Education

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Community Profile

HARNETT COUNTY SNAPSHOT Harnett County is located in the south-central portion of North Carolina. The area is two hours away from the Crystal Coast and less than four hours away from the mountains.

EDUCATION With a population of more than 18,500 students, the Harnett County Schools district boasts a strong connection with the military, local businesses, Campbell University, Central Carolina Community College and community volunteers.

CLIMATE

HEALTH CARE

The coastal plain transitions into the Piedmont region in Harnett County, giving the area four distinct seasons. The climate is temperate for the most part, with only a few days over 90 degrees or below freezing.

Harnett Health System, a locally operated not-for-profit health system, operates the Betsy Johnson Regional Hospital and the soon-tobe-built central hospital. The medical center has been a mainstay in the community for more than 70 years.

29.6 F January Low Temperature

LOCAL UTILITIES

49.8 F

Cable Time Warner, (866) 489-2669

January High Temperature

South River Electric Membership Corp. (800) 338-5530 or (910) 892-8071 Gas Piedmont Natural Gas Co. (800) 752-7504 Water/Sewer Harnett County Public Utilities (910) 893-7575

MORE EO ONLINE imagesharnettcounty.com More facts, stats and community information, including relocation tools and links to resources.

Charter Communications (888) 438-2427

68.5 F

Electricity Central Electric Membership (800) 446-7752

July Low Temperature

89 F

Progress Energy (800) 452-2777

July High Temperature

advertisers visit our

Betsy Johnson Regional Hospital www.bjrh.org Campbell University www.campbell.edu

Hampton Inn www.dunn.hamptoninn.com

Johnson’s Transmission & Auto Service

Saab Barracuda LLC www.saabgroup.com/us

Lee Pest Solutions

South River Electric Membership Cooperative www.sremc.com

Harnett County EDC www.harnett.org

Magnolia Living Center www.thelivingadvantage.com

Dunn Area Tourism Authority www.dunntourism.org

Harnett County Public Library www.harnett.org/library

O’Quinn-Peebles Funeral Home Inc. www.oquinnpeebles.com

Esterline Defense Technologies www.armtecdefense.com

Harnett County Schools www.harnett.k12.nc.us

Realty World www.womblerealtync.com

Dunn Area Chamber of Commerce www.dunnchamber.com

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Faith Education Academy

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Town of Angier www.angier.org Town of Coats www.coatsnc.com Town of Lillington www.lillingtonnc.com

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Ad Index A1 B E TSY J O H N S O N R EG I O N A L H OS P ITA L

18 JOHNSON’S TR ANSMISSION & AU TO S E RV I C E

1 9 C A M P B E L L U N I V E R S IT Y

2 8 L E E P E S T S O LU TI O N S

C2 DUNN AREA C H A M B E R O F CO M M E RC E 8 DUNN AREA TO U R I S M AU T H O R IT Y 24 E S T E R LI N E D E FE N S E T EC H N O LO G I E S

2 6 M AG N O LI A L I V I N G C E N T E R 3 0 O ’Q U I N N - P E E B L E S FUNER AL HOME INC . 1 2 R E A LT Y WO R L D 3 0 SA A B BA R R AC U DA L LC

3 0 FA I TH E D U C ATI O N AC A D E M Y 4 H A M P TO N I N N 2 8 H A R N E T T CO U N T Y E D C 24 H A R N E T T CO U N T Y P U B LI C LI B R A RY 1 H A R N E T T CO U N T Y S C H O O L S

C 4 S O U T H R I V E R E L EC T R I C M E M B E R S H I P CO O P E R ATI V E C 3 TOW N O F A N G I E R 1 2 TOW N O F COATS 2 TOW N O F LI LLI N GTO N

Angier

Old Acquaintances ‌

New Horizons ‌

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Angier offers small-town hospitality while just a short drive offers urban life amenities. Angier is a revitalizing, restorative and refreshing place to live, work and play. If you are searching for a place to unwind and refresh ‌ get acquainted with Angier!

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Images Harnett County, NC: 2010