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Page 52 THE JEWISH PRESS  Friday, May 31, 2013 niques that can be used during moments of confusion to reassure and calm.   Dr. David will speak at the Boro Park YMSimply Tzfat will perform in the Young Isra- YWHA, 4912 14th Avenue, on Monday, June 3, el’s of Long Beach Social Hall on Motzei Shab- from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Admission is free. There will bos, June 1, at 10 p.m. For more information, call be separate seating and light refreshments will be served. For more information, contact the Bikur 516-889-2427 or 646-285-5301. Cholim Chesed Organization at 718-438-2020. ***** ***** Bikur Cholim Chesed Organization, ZichaBikur Cholim Chesed Organization, in ron and Alzheimer’s Association have invited world-famous expert Dr. Paula David to talk to partnership with Sharsheret and CancerCare, family caregivers on the topic, “When Yesterday hosts monthly friendship gatherings for frum Becomes Today: Caring for Holocaust Survivors women who are, or have been, in treatment for with Dementia.”  She will focus on practical tips cancer. Its next confidential meeting will take and helpful suggestions to help prevent loved ones place on Tuesday, June 4, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 from going back to times of suffering, offering tech- p.m. at 5216 11th Avenue, and will be free of Upcoming events… New Shmuz App Developments in technology have served to promote Torah in a variety of ways. Advancements in publishing opened up a new world of Torah texts while recordings, whether in cassette, CD, or MP3, allow us to hear shiurim while traveling or in the comfort of our home. Technology is advancing at a rapid pace and while there is rightful concern as to how this technology is being used, the new Shmuz app is a unique illustration of how technology can serve to promote Torah growth – enabling Torah study in a variety of settings. The website features more than 200 shiurim by Rabbi Ben Tzion Shafier on a variety of Torah topics. Until now one could listen on CD or download the shiurim directly from the website. But a new opportunity to access these lectures has just been introduced with the availability of the new Shmuz app, which can be downloaded from the App Store for use with iPhone, iPad or Android, and enables access to hundreds of audio, video and articles from The Shmuz. This includes all 225 Shmuz on the Parshah lectures and The Parshah in Depth, a new series that offers a look at one part of each week’s Torah portion. One simply needs to the App Store or Google Play, and search for “TheShmuz.” For more information about the new app, visit, e-mail Rebbe@ or call 1-866-613-TORAH. Rabbi Shafier’s books can be ordered via the website as well. Measles in Brooklyn charge. At these meetings participants hear interesting guest speakers and have the opportunity to meet others "who understand," while enjoying a light, healthy snack. For more information, leave a message for Shlomis at 718-438-2020, ext. 7432. ***** On June 11, Strategic Fundraising Group LLC will hold two seminars to address novel fund-raising methodologies to help not-for-profits at Congregation Bnai Yeshurun, 641 West Englewood Avenue, Teaneck, NJ. For more information or to make reservations, visit and click on “Events.” Alternatively call 917-923-8573. Advance registration is required. OU Kosher Seminar For Women There is a world of difference between the kosher kitchen in one’s home and the kosher kitchen in a vast catering facility – but one tie binds them: the need to understand the kosher laws to guarantee the highest level of kashrut. With these two types of kitchens in mind, as well as those of industrial plants and restaurants, OU Kosher will present its third Advanced Kashrut Seminar for Women from Monday, August 12, to Friday, August 16, at OU headquarters in New York.  The women’s seminar alternates with a men’s program held in even-numbered years.  Both centers. The first measles vaccine dose should be given at the time of the child’s first birthday, with the second dose administered between the child’s fourth and sixth birthday. In New York City, approximately 91.5% of children between the ages of 19 and 35 months have received at least one measles vaccine. “This has the potential to become a serious epidemic and we commend the Health Department for their swift response in dealing with it,” said Rabbi Yeruchim Silber of the Boro Park Community Council. “At the same time I urge all Boro Park residents to check with their physicians, make sure all immunizations are up to date, and follow any other relevant instructions so that together we can contain this outbreak.” “It is imperative for parents to vaccinate their children against very preventable diseases such as measles, mumps, or rubella,” said State Senator Simcha Felder. “There is no reason anyone – child or adult – should become ill from these or other diseases when medical science has developed a means to prevent such infections. While parents have the right to refuse to vaccinate their children, their decision cannot and should not impinge on the health and well-being of others in their schools, neighborhoods, and communities.” “The health of our children is of the utmost importance,” said Council Member Stephen Levin. “I strongly urge parents to get their children vaccinated against measles once they turn 12 months old and if anyone else in their household is yet to be vaccinated, to get that vaccination done today. Because of the highly contagious nature of measles this will not only protect the health of your family, but also your neighbors.” The Health Department announced last week that it has identified 34 cases of measles in Brooklyn – 27 in Boro Park and seven in Williamsburg – and is urging families to make sure that everyone in their household, including young children, are vaccinated. Doctors are urged to be vigilant and promptly report suspected cases to the agency. All 34 cases involved adults or children who were not vaccinated at the time of exposure due to refusal or delays in vaccination. Some infants who were too young to be vaccinated also contracted measles after being exposed to older, unvaccinated family members. Measles is highly contagious and can spread easily to unprotected individuals through airborne transmission. “Children should be vaccinated against measles when they are 12 months of age,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley. “Vaccinating children will protect them and help protect infants who are too young to be vaccinated by reducing their risk of exposure. Delaying a child’s vaccination increases the risk of contracting measles and infecting others.” As many as one in three children with measles develop complications such as diarrhea, ear infection or pneumonia. Infants under one year of age, people who have a weakened immune system, and non-immune pregnant women are at highest risk of severe illness and complications. Three people infected in this outbreak have had complications. People who contract the measles virus can spread the infection for four days before developing a rash, and for four days after About Measles the rash sets in. Measles is a viral infection characterized by a Measles vaccination is required for admission to New York City’s schools, colleges, and daycare rash, fever (101 to 105 degrees Fahrenheit), cough, programs are under the direction of Rabbi Yosef Grossman, senior educational rabbinic coordinator of OU Kosher. The program is open to women from all segments of the community, with the only requirement being the desire for an enhanced understanding of the kosher laws. Senior OU rabbis will present at the various sessions; field trips to the Sheraton, restaurants, and plants will be an important part of the program. For more information and to apply, contact Avigail Klein at 212-613-8279 or Registration is limited. red eyes, and runny nose. The illness typically lasts five to six days, with a rash that begins on the face and then moves down the body, including the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. Complications from measles can include ear infections, diarrhea, pneumonia, miscarriage, brain inflammation, hospitalization, and even death. Protect Yourself And Your Family From Measles • Babies should receive their first measles shot when they turn one. • Vaccinating older children is the best way to protect children who are too young to get the shot. • If your child is over one years old and has not had the measles shot, it is important to get the child vaccinated as soon as possible to prevent him from getting measles. • Two doses of measles vaccine are required for full protection. Children usually get the second measles shot between ages four and six before going to school. • Older children and adults who have not received two measles shots may be at risk of infection. • Vaccinations are very safe. The benefits far outweigh any risks. Side effects are usually mild, such as soreness where the shot was given. • Be sure that you and your family are fully vaccinated prior to international travel. Outbreaks are occurring in Europe, including the United Kingdom. Measles is found in many parts of the world, including Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. Ask your doctor about vaccinating your children. You can also call 311 to find out where your child can be vaccinated. For more information on measles, visit

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