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Together B’Yachad: The Newsletter of Jewish National Fund

www.jnf.org

ISRAEL: Making the

World a

Better Place OF THE WINNER 2011

010 & 2 0 09, 2 r oc k owe AJPA R ell e nce f or E x c Awa r d nal ni z a t io i n O r ga t te rs Newsle

E-mail us at newsletter@jnf.org B'Yachad · 42 East 69th Street New York, NY 10021-5093

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Dear Reader,

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

JNF is changing the conversation about Israel. We are bringing awareness to the rest of the world about the remarkable strides Israel has made in the areas of medicine, technology, agriculture, and many others. This issue highlights a selection of the Jewish National Fund projects that have fostered fruitful collaborations with Israel’s regional partners, yielded valuable research and development that have been exported around the world, and educated communities on modern agricultural techniques that they can incorporate in their home countries. Turn to pages 16-21 to learn more about Israel’s collaboration with Jordan on the eradication of the Mediterranean fruit fly; a transboundary water project that partners the JNF Parsons Water Fund with the European Union and USAID; the experiences of students at the Arava International Center for Agricultural Training; and other exciting partnerships. We hope you enjoy this issue. Send your feedback to newsletter@jnf.org.

11 Volunteer Fire Scouts

The newest Israeli Fire Scouts, trained and eager to join the ranks of brave protectors of the Land of Israel, graduated from their course in a ceremony attended by hundreds.

15 Positively Israel — Did You Know?

\ As part of JNF’s Positively Israel campaign to highlight Israel’s valuable

contributions to the world, here’s a list of some of the exciting developments that come from the land and people of Israel.

16-21 How Israel Makes the World a Better Place

Regards, B’Yachad Editorial Staff

JNF and KKL are partners in some very critical projects that reach across borders, bring countries and communities together, and, quite simply, help make the world a better place. Learn more about our international projects.

B’YACHAD STAFF EDITOR IN CHIEF: Ariel Vered PUBLISHER: Russell F. Robinson EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Jodi Bodner MANAGING EDITOR: Sarit Schonbrun CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Alicia Radford

23 The Next Generation: Giving Back

JNF is proud to have Jewish fraternity AEPi as a partner raising much-needed funds for the Sderot Indoor Recreation Center.

25 Establishing a Lasting Legacy with JNF

Chief Planned Giving Officer Matt Bernstein explains how donors can support JNF’s work with a charitable gift annuity.

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (JNF) began in 1901 as a dream and vision to reestablish a homeland in Israel for Jewish people everywhere. Jews the world over collected coins in iconic JNF Blue Boxes, purchasing land and planting trees until ultimately, their dream of a Jewish homeland was a reality. Today, JNF continues to give all generations a unique voice in building and ensuring the prosperity of the land of Israel through their generosity and partnership with the people of Israel. WINNER OF THE AJPA ROCKOWER AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN ORGANIZATIONAL NEWSLETTERS Printed on recycled paper with vegetable-based ink

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JNF embodies both heart and action; our work is varied in scope but singular in benefit. We strive to bring an enhanced quality of life to all of Israel’s residents, and translate these advancements to the world beyond. JNF is greening the desert with millions of trees, building thousands of parks, creating new communities and cities for generations of Israelis to call home, bolstering Israel’s water supply, helping develop innovative arid-agriculture techniques, and educating both young and old about the founding and importance of Israel and Zionism. JNF is a registered 501(c)(3) organization and United Nations NGO, which continuously earns top ratings from charity overseers. For more information on JNF, call 800.211.1502 or visit jnf.org.

JNF Parsons Water Fund Update A MESSAGE FROM OUR PRESIDENT STANLEY M. CHESLEY

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When most Americans think about water, they meters of effluents (enough to fill the Empire think of quenching their thirst. They do not State Building 530 times), which, if left unthink about water shortages. However, with treated, would contaminate sensitive water population growth and increasing demand on aquifers and increasingly polluted streams, water resources, we must all look to where and even adversely affect the Mediterranean our next gallon of water will come from in the Sea and farming land. Due to Israel’s severe water shortages, recoming years. If you consider water issues from a global cycled effluents have become an important perspective, the picture is daunting. Eighty water resource. The prime goal is to treat countries have water issues that threaten the water to a safe level so it can be used health and economic well-being, while more for all types of agricultural irrigation. Israel than two billion people have no access to currently reuses 75% of its waste water every clean water. year and is, by far, the leadThe world’s population ing country worldwide in this grows by roughly 80 million Israel has proved itself field. By comparison, U.S. individuals each year. This a world leader in both figures are well under 10% dramatic increase is accom- water recycling and nationally. Israel’s recycled panied by worldwide demand effluents constitute 31% of all for water doubling every 21 reuse and shares the the water used for agriculture, years, depletion of ground expertise it has acquired and 18% of the country’s total and surface water supplies, around the world. water needs. Within five years, and increased salinity of land Israel plans to reuse 95% of its and water resources. Freshwater. water withdrawals have tripled over the last The capacity to produce recycled water 50 years, in part due to the escalating use of on such a grand scale is vital, particularly for water for agriculture. Worldwide, agriculture arid or semi-arid countries. Israel enjoys an accounts for 70% of all water consumption, average of only 50 rain days annually, and two compared to 20% for industry and 10% for do- thirds of the country is defined as a desert mestic use. with less than 10” of precipitation in a good Countries resolve water issues through year. When Israel experiences drought spells, desalination and recycling. Water recycling as it has for the past seven years, recycled provides tremendous environmental benefits: water provides a stable, year-round, inexpenit conserves an existing water resource, em- sive source of water for farming and conserves ploys little energy, and disposes of effluents scarce freshwater. safely. By providing an additional source of Promoting water recycling and reuse in water, recycling can decrease the diversion of Israel is a primary focus of the JNF Parsons water from sensitive ecosystems. Water Fund, which supports initiatives that Israel has proved itself a world leader in address the water shortage, issues of water both water recycling and reuse and shares the quality, and trans-boundary challenges. After expertise it has acquired around the world. all, the more we save, the more there is to First and foremost, it is not enough just to drink. treat water. That water must be reused and To learn more about the JNF Parsons Water not merely disposed of in streams, seas or the Fund and its projects, visit jnf.org/water or gutter. contact Pnina Dor at pdor@jnf.org or 212-879Israel annually produces 530 million cubic 9305 ext. 262. n

This past winter I traveled to Israel as I often do. I visited many of our projects—some already in action and enhancing the quality of life of Israel’s residents, some still in their embryonic phase, and some well on their way to completion. Our work is everywhere. No matter where I turned, there we were, making a tangible difference in Israel. I saw the JNF mission come to life: giving every generation of Jews a unique voice in building a prosperous future for the land of Israel and its people. I dined with members of Knesset, had meetings with our project partners, talked politics, determined needs, and looked at the challenges and the opportunities. None of that is out of the ordinary for Jewish National Fund. It’s who we are. It’s what we do. But what was remarkable was seeing our imprint, our impact, through others’ eyes. Everyone knows who we are, what we do, and what we make happen by taking the lead. Whether I was walking through the halls of the Knesset, through the sands of the Arava, or down a newly paved promenade in Be’er Sheva, I felt the respect others have for us, and the influence we wield. We are JNF—your voice in Israel. Be’er Sheva is a whole new city. You can feel the pride she is now taking in herself as you walk along the River Park, across the Pipes Bridge, through Bell Park and down the Old City’s cobblestone streets. It is a palpable pride, evidenced by the largest “green” mall in Israel being built there, the largest amphitheatre being constructed, the 20acre man-made lake being prepared, the Abraham’s Well Visitor Center taking shape, and the new apartment buildings rising against the desert sky. These new apartments are even getting expensive—the result of our success in making Be’er Sheva the capital of the Negev the way she should be. I visited two kibbutzim—Yahel and Ketura—once nearly defunct and now alive and breathing with transformative innovations that are being used around the world, and learned how we are giving the army a new home—in the Negev. We are providing much-needed resources to the residents of the Central Arava as we continue to help them lead the world in agricultural exports, and as we bring employment opportunities to a region characterized by sharp climate changes, extreme topographical conditions, and dramatic natural beauty. A region that is 6% of Israel’s total land mass but is inhabited by just 3,200 people scattered throughout seven communities. It’s what we do. JNF is the catalyst for this wonderful transformation. We are your voice in Israel and it’s being heard loud and clear. Take this information and spread it. Share it and show everyone that JNF is making Israel a better place and Israel in turn is making the world a better place. Your voice is strong. Raise it.

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND

JNF’S MISSION COMES TO LIFE

ANYWHERE ELSE A Blue Box Collector Makes Aliyah THIS WOULD JUST FOR NEARLY TWO DECADES, BE A TREE. JEWISH NATIONAL FUND

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BUT THESE ARE YOUR ROOTS IN THE HOLY LAND Plant a tree with your own hands at the Harvey Hertz-JNF Ceremonial Tree Planting Center at Neot Kedumim, the world’s only biblical landscape reserve. Sign up at jnf.org/treeplanting Be part of the time-honored tradition of planting a tree to honor or memorialize a loved one. Plant trees for all occasions: Birthdays • Holidays • Bar/Bat Mitzvahs Births • Weddings • Anniversaries • In Memory Retirement • Graduation • Housewarming To learn more, visit jnf.org/store or call 800-542-TREE Open an E-Z Tree account and save up to 50%. Visit jnf.org/ez for more information

Ronnie Fields has amassed an impressive collection of tzedakah boxes through passionate explorations throughout place and time. At the beginning of the year, he made aliyah with most of his collection in tow, packing 200 tzedakah boxes into seven suitcases. Born and raised in Georgia, Ronnie has ventured to Israel eight times, including multiple extended stays. His brother, who lives there with his wife and 10 kids, made aliyah over 30 years ago, so it’s no surprise that Ronnie decided on permanency: “Now is the time to go,” he said. For Ronnie, Israel is a passion, a love and a future. He remembers with fondness visiting the JNF-KKL office in Tel Aviv on one of his first trips to Israel and asking for an old JNF tzedakah box. “The lady at the desk looked in the back and pulled out what was a pre-1948 JNF Blue Box,” he said. “It made my day, it made my week!” Searching for tzedakah boxes became a regular part of his trips to Israel. “I started collecting them throughout Israel, visiting kiosks, antique stores, and yeshivas,” said Ronnie. At the Shuk Hapishpeshim market in Jaffa, he would approach vendor after vendor, sifting through the standard flea market finds. He found tzedakah boxes in surprising locations: A fish market in Meah She’arim. On the wall of an old warehouse in Yazne’el, a quaint moshava in the mountainous North District near Tiberias. “It took some time to convince people; sometimes they never even realized that they had boxes!” said Ronnie. “Other times, I’d have to make a donation before they would give me their tzedakah boxes, which were old and broken up. I just had a great time searching and talking to people, wheeling and dealing in markets with all those selling Judaic items. Some I acquired on Ebay as well.” Ronnie knew he couldn’t bring his whole collection with him, which numbered 350 boxes. In keeping with the charitable spirit of the tzedakah boxes, he decided to give away 150 of them to local Jewish schools, including Davis Academy, Hebrew Academy, and Yeshiva Atlanta. It’s his way of passing on the tradition of giving to a new generation of young Jews. To learn more about making aliyah, visit nbn.org.il. To order a JNF Blue Box, go to jnf.org. n

Ronnie with one of his 200 Blue Boxes.

Sderot Rec Center Continues to Impact the Community

MARC KELMAN, VP, CAMPAIGN

Campaign All-Star: Lawrence Cohen FOR LARRY COHEN, JNF IS A CALLING.

A big part of the JNF family for 10 years now, he has demonstrated a tireless dedication to Israel and JNF. His impact on the New England Region, and JNF as a whole, has been profound. That’s what makes Larry Cohen a Campaign All-Star. A Century Council member, Larry currently serves as the President of the New England Region and is a member of the National Board of Directors. The New England board meetings and events are often hosted and sponsored by Larry. “Larry is involved in every aspect of solicitations and board development,” said Sharon Freedman, National Campaign Director. “Thanks to Larry, we have one of the most successful boards in the country. There is even a waiting list to join our board.” A real estate lawyer by trade, Larry recently moved to the prestigious law firm of Nixon Peabody LLC. He is constantly “pitching” JNF wherever he goes, and has introduced many friends and clients to JNF’s high caliber work in Israel. “Larry is, without a doubt, one of the most passionate and dedicated lay leaders that I have ever worked with,” said Freedman. “Not only is he incredibly devoted to improving the quality of life

for all Israelis, he is also bringing JNF to the foreground every day.” Larry has been a driving force behind one of JNF’s largest undertakings, Blueprint Negev, spending countless hours with Be’er Sheva River Park Project Manager Itai Freeman during the project’s inception. Once completed, the Be’er Sheva River Park, a 1,300-acre metropolitan park in the heart of the city, will host a number of attractions including a 23acre man-made lake and a 12,000seat amphitheatre, Israel’s largest such venue. One of Larry’s greatest joys is traveling to Israel, something that he does quite often with JNF. He has chaired numerous missions, recruiting friends and family with him, many of whom have become donors, and even board members. “When Larry travels to Israel, he doesn’t just tour the country,” said JNF Chief Executive Officer Russell F. Robinson. “He absorbs the landscape, the people and all of their details, then comes back to America and is able to uniquely paint a picture of JNF’s vision and connection to the land and people of Israel. Larry is truly a one-of–a-kind fundraiser.” Congratulations to Larry Cohen! n

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children who were enjoying themselves. “For the first time, I saw how the parents fight for the foosball tables—they just use their kids as an excuse!” said Badihi. Contributions to JNF for the Blue Box defray operating and maintenance costs and purchase new toys, games, and equipment. JNF donations were recently used to buy new hockey tables, go-karts, karaoke equipment, soccer goals, and bouncy toys, as well as for repainting and other building improvements. Visit jnf.org/sderot to learn more about the Sderot Indoor Recreation Center and how your support makes a difference. n

Why do you give to JNF? Many of you have been asked this question over and over. For me, as a Jew, I shudder to think of a world in which Israel does not exist. I want and need a strong Israel that my children and future grandchildren can visit and call their homeland. The theme of “never again” echoes in my mind, and I view Israel as a type of insurance policy. While this is considerably important to me, I recognize that it is a somewhat negative slant on things and, to a certain degree, based in fear. But there is another side to this story. I also give to JNF because I believe in a strong, vibrant Israel and want to support the infrastructure. As a businessman, I see Israel as a good, solid venture. The last several years tell this story. While the world has been in a deep recession, Israel’s economy has been strong and unemployment, low. Israel is the location of the one and only Microsoft Development Center outside the United States. The cell phone was invented in Israel; a new tool to better predict earthquakes was developed in Israel; and the Pillcam, a video recording pill that when swallowed allows doctors to examine the digestive system, was invented in Israel. Unfortunately, to many, Israel is thought of first in terms of conflict with a military that often takes lives. What most people don’t realize is that this tiny country actually saves lives—worldwide. Two major multiple sclerosis medications were developed here that are on the worldwide market. Israelis developed a drug that delays Alzheimer’s disease and helps Parkinson’s patients. Israel was the first international responder in Haiti after their earthquake and set up medical clinics to help Japan. It is now in the forefront of the world in land mine removal. In terms of conservation and ecology, Israel leads the world in water recycling, invented the solar water heater, and is making incredible advances in solar technology, which will reduce dependence on oil worldwide. Scientific fish farming, developed in Israel, will counter the loss of historic fishing grounds throughout the world. Israeli agriculturalists train students from developing countries in agricultural economics, financing and marketing, computer training, and growing techniques for vegetables, flowers and orchards. They teach organic and dairy farming so these students can return to their countries of origin with new techniques. But there is a serious problem with what I am telling you. The problem is that while you may already know all these wonderful things the world outside does not. Israel is playing a leading role in preserving a future for the planet earth, and nobody knows about it. The conversation that we hear, if you can call it a conversation, is about the West Bank, Israel’s relationship with the Palestinians, and the latest relay of fighting with Gaza. The time has come to change the conversation and change the way people around the world think of Israel. JNF’s new campaign, Positively Israel, is doing just that. You will be reading more about this innovative approach throughout this issue of B’Yachad. So what can you do to help re-educate the world? Take every opportunity as a donor to let people know that JNF is supporting Israel based on the exciting creativity and ingenuity of a young country on the move to enhance and save lives. Enlighten your friends, family, and colleagues about the amazing strides that have been made and how your money is supporting a forward-thinking nation. Let the younger generations know that it isn’t only about having a secure homeland, but about saving the planet and enhancing the lives of the global community. Be a part of Positively Israel. Learn more. Take action. Visit positivelyisrael.org.

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND

THREE YEARS AGO, the town of Sderot celebrated Purim with the grand opening of JNF’s Sderot Indoor Recreation Center, the largest secure playground and community center in Israel and the world. This wonderful facility has become an integral part of life in a region that has lived with a decade of rocket attacks from nearby Gaza. Play areas double as bomb shelters, ensuring that all occupants can quickly reach safety in the event of a Code Red alert. The center—known in town as “the JNF Blue Box” because of its brightly painted blue exterior— has been visited by over 50,000 children since it opened, and becomes especially crowded on weekends and holidays. Passover was no different. Families from Sderot, Ofakim, Netivot, and the entire western Negev flocked to the Blue Box to enjoy the intermediate days of the holiday. “The center was full of people from all over—so many kids jumping, laughing, smiling, and forgetting the day-to-day challenges of their lives, thanks to JNF and its supporters,” said Alon Badihi, Executive Director of JNF’s Israel office, who stopped by the center during Passover. And it wasn’t just the

CAMPAIGN UPDATE

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND

ACROSS THE COUNTRY FOR INFO ON UPCOMING JNF EVENTS, VISIT JNF.ORG AND CLICK ON “JNF IN YOUR AREA” NEW ENGLAND ZONE

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JNF and Friends of the Arava Institute proudly honored Howie Rodenstein with the Guardian of Israel Award for his devotion to coexistence and peace building. (L-R) JNF President Emeritus and event emcee Ronald Lubin, JNF Boston President Michael Blank, honoree Howie Rodenstein, and Friends of the Arava Institute trustee Bruce Stanger.

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New England board members Ed Hershfield and David Eisenberg, national chair of Team JNF, on the Arava Institute and Hazon Israel Ride.

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(L-R) JNF National Treasurer and Rhode Island President Michael Lederman, Chairman of the New England Board Jeffrey Davis, Boston President Michael Blank, Board of Directors member Jason Chudnofsky, and VP of Campaign Todd Patkin at a board meeting.

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New England board members gathered at the Guardian of Israel event honoring Howie Rodenstein. (L-R) President Emeritus Robert Cohan, New England Zone President Lawrence Cohen, National Campaign Director Sharon Freedman, Boston President Michael Blank, Chairman of the Board Jeffrey Davis, and President Emeritus and event emcee Ronald Lubin. (L-R) Regional Director Sara Hefez, Capital District Board members Robert Ganz, Jim Levine, Jesse Holland, Karen Hausler, Jane Golub, Warren Geisler (back), Susan Farber, Capital District President Ken Segel, Boston President Michael Blank, Capital District Board member Nancie Segel and Patricia Blank at the Walk for Water in Albany.

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(L-R) Israeli Emissary Lt. Colonel (Res.) Ronnie Porat, Morris Maslia, JNF Yerucham 2020 Mission Chair Geri Shatz, Yoram Zvik, Director of Yerucham’s Nativ Program, and Bruce and Barbara Goldberg visited Machtesh Hagadol (Big Crater) on the Yerucham 2020 Mission.

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(L-R) Morris Maslia, Bruce Goldberg, an IDF Lieutenant, JNF Yerucham 2020 Mission Chair Geri Shatz, Barbara Goldberg, and Israeli Emissary Lt. Colonel (Res.) Ronnie Porat, at a community center in Yerucham.

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Melanie Nelkin at a Women’s Campaign for Israel event in Atlanta.

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Devora Borik (right) and her Bellaire High School Hebrew students enjoyed a visit from Southwest Regional Director Julie Malin, who presented the class with a certificate for the trees they planted in the Carmel region.

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Asher Sellouk led a presentation on the history of JNF to a group of students in Houston.

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(L-R) Adam Meltzer, Rebecca Levy, David Levy and Todd Yasbin of JNFuture in Texas took part in the kosher chili cook-off in Austin at Congregation Agudas Achim.

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Major Donor Reception hosts Judy and Bud Levin were presented with an Israeli firefighter’s hat. (L-R) Judy Levin, Teveria Fire Chief Shachar Tzairi, Bud Levin, Ariel Kotler, and Mark Egerman.

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(L-R) Co-chair Barak Lurie, David Williams, Linton Bergsen, and event chair Douglas Williams at the 5th annual LA Breakfast at the Beverly Hilton.

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(Clockwise from left) JNFuture members Dean Solomon, Lisa Elkan, Sam Goldberg, Eric Adler, and Michelle Jackson at the retreat for the JNFuture Leadership Development Program.

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1. (L-R) Cantor Elaine Shapiro, guest speaker Micah Halpern, and Peter Singer at the

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2. (L-R) Micah Halpern, Chandra Kreuzer and Michael Rudd at the Thank You

Canyon Ranch Major Donor thank you event in Miami Beach. reception in Miami Beach.

3. Rosalie and Dr. Horacio Schlaen at a parlor meeting hosted at their home in Hollywood.

4. (L-R) Karin Donziger with her grandson Michael Nield and late husband Michael

Donziger (Z’’L, of blessed memory), a Tree of Life™ Award honoree, at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Jacksonville.

5. Dr. Joe and Wendy Honigman, pictured a few days before traveling to Israel to dedicate their family plaques at the Wall of Honor at Ammunition Hill, at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Jacksonville.

6. Eric Held with his mother, Leslie Held, JNF Jacksonville board member and previous Tree of Life™ Award honoree at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Jacksonville.

7. (L-R) JNF board member Anthony Solomon, Steven Braverman, board member David Braverman, and board member Rabbi Adam Miller at the Naples Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

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(L-R) Hank Greenberg, Judge Norman Krivosha, Gil Block, Diane Block and Dr. Bernie Lublin at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Naples.

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Jeanette and Norman Gould at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at The Peabody Hotel in Orlando.

10. (L-R) Susie Benson-Steenbarger, Tree of Life™ honoree Rabbi Joel Mishkin, and

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(L-R) Anne Manasse and Ruth Margules at a parlor meeting hosted by Barbara and Herb Shear at their home in Palm Beach.

11. Sarasota Tree of Life™ honorees Helen and Len Glaser after receiving their

20. (L-R) Lynn and Joel Klausner, JNF Israel Emissary Ron Bernstein, and Mort and

JNF board members Rabbi James Perman and Nancy Grandis White at the Naples Tree of Life™ Award Dinner. Adeline Silverman at the Sarasota Tree of Life™ Award Dinner. award at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

12. (L-R) Tree of Life™ Award Dinner committee co-chair Susie Benson-Steenbarger, honoree Helen Glaser, and committee co-chair Edie Chaifetz.

Melanie Fishman at a members-only reception held at the BallenIsles Country Club in Palm Beach Gardens.

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Joan and James Anchin at a reception held at Frenchman’s Creek Country Club in Palm Beach Gardens, where featured speaker Zevi Kahanov, National Director of the JNF Parsons Water Fund, spoke about the water crisis in Israel.

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(L-R) Stephen Soble, JNF Parsons Water Fund National Director Zevi Kahanov, and Jeff Amkraut at a breakfast held at Broken Sound Country Club in Boca Raton.

13. (L-R) Alan Dershowitz and Susan Turner at an event for the Alexander Muss High School in Israel held at Stephen Muss’s home in Miami Beach.

14.(L-R) Givatiim Fire Chief Boaz Rakia and Tampa Bay board member Richard Rappaport.

15. Boaz Rakia and Tampa Bay board member Selma Kron at a parlor meeting benefitting Friends of Israel Firefighters.

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(L-R) Julie Houmann, Tree of Life™ honoree Lars Houmann, and Florida Zone President Bruce Gould at the award dinner in Orlando.

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Gale Hillenmeyer and Tree of Life™ honoree John Hillenmeyer at the award dinner in Orlando.

23. (L-R) Celia Jacobs, Isabel Kanefield, and Toby Thierman at the South Florida

Winter Connection breakfast with guest speaker Hal Linden, held at Boca West Country Club.

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(L-R) Dr. Robert Colton, Cantor Elaine Shapiro, Sandra Crain, Cynthia Hertz, Scott Brenner, Jan Silverman, JNF Florida Zone Director Glen Schwartz, Keith Spritz, Bennett Gordon and Dan Mielnicki at a South Palm Beach Board of Directors meeting held at the Boca Grove Plantation Country Club in Boca Raton.

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25.(L-R) Elliot and Helene Brody, Judy Mielnicki, Broadway star Dudu Fisher, and Dan

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Mielnicki at The Negev Concert in Ft. Lauderdale.

26.(L-R) Gerald Sussman, Broadway star Dudu Fisher, Elaine Gelb, Louise and Alan Dabrow, and Dr. Rob Colton at The Negev Concert featuring Dudu Fisher at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts in Ft. Lauderdale.

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27.(L-R) JNF spokesman Hal Linden and Ralph Cohen at a breakfast held at The Century Pines Jewish Center.

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(L-R) Gene Greenberg, JNF CEO Russell Robinson, Melanie Greenberg, Dr. Marc Leitner, and Yoni Leitner at the 10th annual Las Vegas Breakfast.

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(L-R) Rabbi Felipe Goodman and JNF CEO Russell Robinson at the 10 annual Las Vegas Breakfast.

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(L-R) Lara Stone, Rabbi Felipe Goodman, and Las Vegas Board President Bob Dubin at the 10th annual Las Vegas Breakfast.

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(L-R) Louis Gelfand, Mountain States board chair Gene Kay, and board member Paul Gillis at An Evening with Hal Linden, honoring Stan Kamlet on his 80th birthday.

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(L-R) Robyn Loup, Hal Linden, Abe Wagner and Bob Loup at An Evening with Hal Linden, honoring Stan Kamlet on his 80th birthday.

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(L-R) Robin Chotin, Lee Kay and Pam Laverty at An Evening with Hal Linden, honoring Stan Kamlet on his 80th birthday.

(L-R) JNF Campaign Executive Alli Darrow, General Manager of San Francisco Parks & Recreation Phil Ginsburg, and Education Director at Brandeis Hillel Day School San Francisco Debby Artz-Moor at the school’s San Francisco and Marin campuses’ annual tree planting event. (L-R) Dr. Mohamed Al-Nabari (second from left) and Dr. Michael Ben-Eli (third from right) of Project Wadi Attir posed with Northern California and Pacific Northwest Regional Director Aaron Parker (center) and congregants from Congregation Beth Emek in Pleasanton, CA.

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(L-R) Keynote speaker Ambassador Ido Aharoni, Molly Weinberg, and Rachel and Baruch Fogel at a parlor meeting held at the home of Yael and Eyal Aronoff in Orange County.

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(L-R) Regional Director Adele Bilewitz, Makor member Beckie Fischer, keynote speaker Jonathan Adelman, and host Miki Sholkoff at the Orange County Women’s Campaign for Israel event.

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(L-R) Chief Planned Giving Officer Matthew Bernstein presented a Tiffany Blue Box to Cheryl Fey at the Palm Springs Planned Giving Seminar.

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13. (L-R) Event chair Debbie Orgen, guest speaker Jonathan Adelman, and JNF Palm Springs & Desert Region President Allan Nyman at the Palm Springs Dessert in the Desert event.

14 .(L-R) JNF CEO Russell Robinson and Tree of Life™ honorees Sharona and Daniel Feller at Phoenix’s Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

15 .(L-R) Arizona Region President Ann Zinman and event co-chairs Allyn and Bonnie Kluger before the JNF annual Breakfast for Israel.

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(L-R) Sue Waldbaum and Natalie Eisenberg learned to make charoset at a special Women’s Alliance cooking demonstration.

17 .(L-R) Linda Bennett, Cecelia Appelbaum, and Special Israel Emissary from

Jerusalem Avinoam Binder at an event hosted by Sol and Lauren Lizerbram at their home in San Diego.

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(L-R) Bruce Greenhaus, Mayor of Sderot David Bouskila, and San Diego board member Jeff Kaufman at a meeting in San Diego.

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(L-R) Shari Schenk, mayor of Sderot David Bouskila and San Diego board member Lauren Lizerbram at a meeting in San Diego.

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1. Dr. Adrienne Rulnick worked the phones at DC’s annual Green Sunday phone-a-thon in Rockville, MD. reception, personally greeted Ambassador Martin Indyk. and Co-Chair of the Women’s Campaign for Israel Mimi Kress at the Tal Fund fundraiser.

4. (L-R) Earl Raffel, Director of Development for Aleh Negev

8 .Alternative Spring Break alum and Johns Hopkins

1. (L-R) Rick Kruger, JNFuture Co-Chair Seth Wenig, Chicago

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2. (L-R) Scott Levy, Chicago Bear Gabe Carimi, and board

student Alexandra Cohen and Taglit-Birthright Israel alum Michael Schaffer spoke at the Major Donor thank you event in Baltimore.

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Yossi Kahana, Lorraine Raffel, and Dr. Larry Amsterdam at an Aleh Negev event sponsored by Chizuk Amuno Congregation in Baltimore.

5. (L-R) Delaware Lawyers for Israel chair Russell Silberglied,

guest speaker Micah Halpern, and Delaware President Joel Friedlander at a Lawyers for Israel event discussing Israel’s security issues.

6. (L-R) Jerry K. Grossman, Former Ambassador to Israel

Martin Indyk, Susan Grossman, and Dr. Jeffrey Miller at a Mid-Atlantic thank you event where Ambassador Indyk spoke on the Middle East peace process.

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Daniel Vogel with his son Joey, daughters Tali and Ruthie, and wife Julie at DC’s Green Sunday phone-a-thon.

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2. (L-R) Dr. Jeffrey Miller, host of the Major Donor thank you 3. Washington DC Regional Director Stuart Diamant-Cohen

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(L-R) Amy Krupsky, Washington, DC Board President Ken Krupsky, and Maryland Board President Jonathan Fishman. Sheldon Berman and son Elie Berman visited Ammunition Hill in Jerusalem, where they dedicated plaques on JNF’s Wall of Honor to commemorate the military service of Elie as well as Sheldon’s father, Ted Berman.

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(L-R) Jodie Sykes, Gary Raffel, Dr. Ra’anan Gissin, and Lawyers for Israel member Michael Hamburg at a Lawyers for Israel breakfast.

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(L-R) Taglit-Birthright Israel alum Michael Schaffer with Former Ambassador to Israel Martin Indyk at an event in Baltimore.

who discussed her experience in the new Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center Israeli exchange program. (L-R) Southern Ohio Regional President Ron Solomon, Co-Vice Chair of DFI Alan Weber, Yasmin Abu-Ghanem, and Co-Vice Chair of DFI Eugene Minevich.

Bear Gabe Carimi, and Chicago Board President Scott Gendell at JNF’s Evening with Gabe Carimi at Grossinger Autoplex.

member Tracy Treger at JNF’s Evening with Gabe Carimi at Grossinger Autoplex.

7 .(L-R) Moshe Berniker, a pioneer and spokesperson for the Halutza region in Israel, met with Andy and Isa Lefkowitz during his visit to Cleveland.

3. Karen Budin and Rick Kruger presented Ariella Berger

(center), a student at Ida Crown Jewish Academy, with a plaque in honor of her donation of $5,000, which she raised by creating and selling her own artwork through her “Art for the Heart” program.

4. The Bachrach and Wolfson families enjoyed a special JNF

day in Israel with the Ashkelon Fire Department. (L-R, back row) Micah Bachrach, Rita Wolfson, Nathan Bachrach, and Ashkelon fireman; (L-R, middle row) Danielle Wolfson, Marcie Bachrach, Gloria Wolfson, Liora Bachrach, Ken Wolfson, Chana Wolfson, Barry Wolfson, and Laurel Wolfson; (L-R, front row) Arielle Bachrach and Avinoam Binder.

8 .(L-R) JNF Parsons Water Fund National Director Zevi Kahanov and Norm Pressman at a reception held at Norm’s firm, Goldstein & Pressman.

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Wisconsin Board Vice President Linda Silberman manned the JNF booth at a community-wide Chanukah event, where young participants were encouraged to draw pictures related to JNF for a prize.

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(L-R) JNF office volunteer Munsey Mandel was presented with a plaque by Wisconsin Regional Director Sidney Rivkin in recognition of her 20 years of devotion and service to the Wisconsin Region at a special luncheon in her honor.

5. The Kitah Zayin class at Adath Israel Congregation, led by Executive Board member David Gershuny (center, left), thanked Al Miller (center, right) for taking the time to share his experience in Germany during the Holocaust.

6. The Southern Ohio Region held its inaugural Doctors for Israel (DFI) event with keynote speaker Yasmin Abu-Ghanem, a fourth-year Israeli medical student,

(L-R) Past JNF Community Banquet honorees Rabbi Steve Adams and Gail Adams, and daughter Rachel, who is currently serving in the IDF, attended the dedication ceremony of their marker at American Independence Park.

NORTHEAST ZONE

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(L-R) Central New Jersey board member Alyssa Russo, Givataiim Fire Chief Boaz Rakia, and Central New Jersey board member Dan Richter at a “The Carmel Forest: One Year After the Fires” parlor meeting. (L-R) Brad and Melissa Segal and Middle East analyst Ra’anan Gissin at a parlor meeting in Livingston, NJ.

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(L-R) Central New Jersey board members Doris Leibowitz and Marcy Needle and Makor President Mark Rattner at a parlor meeting at Congregation Etz Chaim.

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(L-R) Peter and Mindy Seckel, Geri Shatz, and Mitch Gerson at a parlor meeting in Bucks County.

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(L-R) Janet Widra, Barbara Levenson, and JNF Women’s Alliance Chair Louise Dabrow at a Women’s Campaign for Israel event.

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(L-R) LouAnn Moore Frome and Thea Lorber at JNF’s Women’s Campaign for Israel tour of the Sotheby’s Institute of Art.

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(L-R) Dr. Gail Bauchman, keynote speaker Dr. Nir Barzilai, and Sheryl Buchholtz at a JNF Doctors for Israel event.

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(L-R) Northern New Jersey President Ben Gutmann, Greater New York President Laureine Greenbaum, 9/11 Memorial architect Michael Arad, and Westchester President Larry Frankel at a JNF major donors reception featuring Michael Arad.

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(L-R) Judy Feldman and Marcia Rose Shestack at a Women’s Campaign for Israel event.

Givataiim Fire Chief Boaz Rakia spoke at an insider briefing on the Carmel Forest at Robert Derector Associates. (L-R) Robert Derector, Greater New York Zone Director Michael Feinman, Givataiim Fire Chief Boaz Rakia, FDNY Captain Peter Tronolone, Alan Levine, and JNF Israel Development Director Ariel Kotler.

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(L-R) Former Governor of Pennsylvania Edward G. Rendell introduced the Philadelphia Tree of Life™ honoree David L. Cohen at the Philadelphia Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

Morissa Falk-Freedman and Michael Freedman at the JNFuture Root Society Dinner.

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(L-R) Jessica Levine, JNF CEO Russell Robinson, and Ben Levine at the JNFuture Root Society Dinner.

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(L-R) Executive Vice President of Comcast Corporation David L. Cohen and President of JNF’s Philadelphia Board of Directors Richard S. Cohen at the Philadelphia Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

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(L-R) Hadar Weis, Elior Shiloh, and Jessica Levine at the JNFuture Root Society Dinner.

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Eastern PA Regional Director Marina Furman, Anchor Larry Kane, David L. Cohen, JNF CEO Russell Robinson, and Louise and Alan Dabrow at the Philadelphia Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

GREATER NEW YORK ZONE

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JNF CEO Russell Robinson and Jordana Gutman at the JNFuture Root Society Dinner.

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(L-R) Laureine Greenbaum, Greater New York Zone Director Michael Feinman, and Dr. Ivy Engel at the gala opening of the Farkash Gallery at JNF House.

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(L-R) Shirley Katz Cohen, Barbara Daravan, Rabbi Eric Lankin, Nancy Roberts, Westchester President Larry Frankel, and Harriet Levy at a Veteran’s Day reception held at JNF House.

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(L-R) Ben Gutmann, JNF CEO Russell Robinson, Former JNF Israel Emissary Talia Tzour, Bob Levine, and Jill Janowski.

Israel’s Young Protectors Inducted as Fire Scouts

FIRE SCOUTS

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Tzvia Riven, mother of Elad Riven z”l, with two recent fire scout graduates.

Minister of Public Security Yitzhak Aharonovitch with fire scout graduates.

SET AGAINST THE STATELY TREES OF THE

to do their homework there or just meet with their fellow scouts,” said JNF-FIF liaison Yael Levontin. “It will be theirs.” For Seffi Eisenstein, a 16-year-old recent graduate of the Scouts program from the Beit Shemesh region, the clubhouse is more than just a place for the scouts to gather. “At first, we stepped on the firefighters’ toes a lot. They were happy we were there, but we sometimes felt like visitors,” she said. “When I first heard that we would be getting a clubhouse, I began to feel the responsibility I was given. With our own space, it shows us that the station really takes us seriously, like we are part of the unit.” Finishing 11th grade, Seffi plans to stay on as a scout for the upcoming year. Some of the teens who participate in the Fire Scouts have troubled family lives, and without the program, they would be on the streets. “It teaches responsibility, a chance to be a part of something greater than themselves,” said Levontin, “and that changes their lives.” The program, currently operating in five regions in Israel, aims to create a real sense of collectivity among participating stations. In order to do this, each region sends their scouts on joint overnight trips to the Arava with JNF’s Green Horizons youth group, holiday-themed excur-

Neot Kedumim biblical landscape reserve, the 2012 graduating class of fire scouts gathered together to commemorate the completion of their intensive 40-hour training program. In front of a crowd that included family and friends as well as Tzvia Riven, mother of 16-year-old fire scout Elad Riven, who lost his life in the devastating 2010 Carmel forest fire; Israeli Fire and Rescue Commissioner Shahar Ayalon; Minister of Public Security Yitzhak Aharonovitch; and Eli Peretz, Chief of the Jerusalem District Fire Department; these young volunteers officially became Fire Scouts, trained and prepared to join the ranks of brave protectors of the land of Israel. Following the ceremony, several scouts approached JNF CEO Russell Robinson to offer their thanks for JNF’s contribution to the Friends of Israel Firefighters (FIF) Fire Scouts program. “You are thanking me? We thank you!” Robinson exclaimed. “JNF’s voice in Israel is in the soul of these young protectors of the land and people of Israel. We are honored to be part of this amazing program.” Since the Carmel fire JNF has raised funds to revitalize and expand the Scouts program, which was established in 1959. Recently, a scouts clubhouse was built in the Jerusalem fire station with JNF’s support. “They can come

sions, and tree planting outings. This gives the scouts the opportunity to meet and interact with other participants from around the country. The program has been met with enthusiastic response. Levontin, who has spearheaded its revitalization, finds this very encouraging. “I’d like to provide a clubhouse for all the regions we have currently active and those future ones we hope to establish. But we have a limited budget,” she noted. At the graduation ceremony, Peretz, a former fire scout himself, marveled that the ceremony marked the first time all 350 scouts could be seen together in the same uniform, an image he hopes to continue seeing yearly. Unfortunately, without increased support, the scouts are limited in reaching other regions and at risk of being shut down altogether. “My dream is for these kids to have friends all over the country,” said Levontin. “We can make a scouts community, we can fortify that sense of a united state—an Israeli state—working together to protect one another. This is the scouts, this is Israel.” To learn more about the Fire Scouts program and to donate to Friends of Israel Firefighters (FIF), visit jnf.org/fif. n

Bar Mitzvah Kids Honor the Lost Children of the Holocaust

IT ALL STARTED with

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a simple question: “Can I do something to honor these children?” Seven years ago, Max Levin was in Israel looking for a meaningful project for his bar mitzvah and found it in the Children’s Books at JNF’s Jerusalem office where thousands of gifts from Germany, Poland, Russia and other European countries during the years of 1901 to 1941 were recorded. Thousands were from families honoring their bar mitzvah

at Solomon Schechter Day School of St. Louis, MO. Five years later, he returned to the wall, located in Jerusalem’s American Independence Park. Said Max: “When I visited the wall, I looked at the name of Pinchas Cohen next to mine on the plaque and remembered how lucky I am to be where I am today. I recited Kaddish for Pinchas. At that moment, I understood that if not for me, there would be no one left to remember that Pinchas ever existed.” Currently spending a gap year in Israel, Max is an ambulance volunteer and preparing for the army in the Marva prearmy program. He will be entering a combat unit in the IDF in September, fulfilling a dream of defending the Jewish State. “I am happy to know that other kids feel the same way as I felt, and still feel, of the importance of memory,” Max said. “Memory is the life-blood of the Jewish people. When we give respect and honor for those murdered victims of the Holocaust, we give life to that concept. I look to JNF to help to preserve the past and fulfill my dreams of a meaningful future for the State of Israel. One way of doing that is to fill the B’nai Mitzvah Remembrance Wall with names and give it true meaning.” To learn more about the B’nai Mitzvah Remembrance Wall, visit jnf.org/bnai-mitzvah-wall. n

Arava Institute for Environmental Studies under the auspices of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

is the premier environmental teaching and research program in the Middle East, preparing future Arab and Jewish leaders to cooperatively solve the region’s environmental challenges.

Nature Knows No Borders At the Arava Institute, the idea that nature kn ows no political borders is more than a belief; it is a

fact, a curricu lum, and a way of life.

Kibbutz Ketura 88840 Israel

w w w.arava.org

Photo courtesy of Lindsey Zemler

B’NAI MITZVAH REMEMBERANCE WALL

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Judy, Max and Bud Levin at the B’nai Mitzvah Remembrance Wall.

boys during that period. There weren’t many bat mitzvahs in those days, but there were recordings of girls who were honored on special occasions as well. Most of the children on the pages of the books had been killed in the Holocaust and Max realized that for many, the only evidence of their lives was in those books. That’s when Max had the idea of linking bar and bat mitzvah children in the U.S. to children who died in the Holocaust and may have since been forgotten. “This wall is dedicated to the ‘lost children of the Holocaust’ and memorializes their names and their short time on this earth,” said Max. “I am so proud that this wall is raising money for summer camps in Israel.” The B’nai Mitzvah Remembrance Wall, funded by JNF, contains ceramic tiles available for a $1,800 donation that bear the name of the bar/bat mitzvah child, his/her hometown and date of bar/bat mitzvah, and the name of a child who perished at the hand of the Nazis. In the six years since the wall was dedicated, JNF has raised $216,000 and put approximately 120 tiles up on the wall. Proceeds go towards developing, maintaining and advancing JNF’s five Israel campsites, which are used by children for camping experiences. In 2007, Max visited the wall with his parents to dedicate it and again during a two-week trip with his graduating class

JNFuture Brings Together Tomorrow’s Thought Leaders IT’S AN EXCITING TIME to be a part of JNFuture.

something about it and get involved.” “We are grooming the next generation of thought leaders and facilitators,” said Ben. “It is incumbent upon our generation to find solutions. The solutions that JNF is developing in Israel are relevant to people around the world.” To learn more about JNFuture, visit jnf.org/jnfuture. To sign up for The Summit with JNF, visit jnf.org/summit. n

The Summit with JNF held launch events around the country to promote the exciting Red Rocks Summit in Red Rock, Nevada in 2013.

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us who are passionate about the work of JNF and want to be Jewishly engaged in community and philanthropy. There’s a constant flow of communication among board members.” The Summit, which will take place April 27-29, 2013, will bring the issue of sustainability to the forefront and highlight Israel’s leadership in this arena, primarily through JNF’s achievements in water, agriculture, and creating desert communities. “JNFuture is a great community to connect with other young Jewish professionals who have the common goals of supporting Israel and leading a Jewish life,” said Leah Mendolson, whose company, ICRAVE, an experiential design and branding firm, is involved in the planning of the Red Rock event. “The Summit is bringing together this community for an interesting event where people will learn something, be inspired, and have fun.” Combining food, fitness, and technology, the Summit will be a multi-faceted event that has something for everyone with inspiring speakers, a headliner opening act, and a sustainable lunch out in the desert. Said Leah: “It’s important that people learn more about what’s happening in the environment, learn about the technology in Israel that can be expanded globally and bring awareness to issues so people can be inspired to do

JNFUTURE

Taking a giant leap from holding just a few annual events to chapters forming across the country planning events all year round, JNFuture is coalescing into a formidable movement of motivated young Jewish professionals. At the beginning of the year, the new JNFuture National Board was announced. And planning is underway for The Summit with JNF, a three-day event next spring at Red Rock Casino, Resort & Spa in Las Vegas, Nevada. Identifying the need for a National Board came out of the inaugural JNFuture Leadership Institute Mission (JLIM) in June 2011, which was a huge success. Taking the best leaders from across the country and sending them to Israel, JLIM gave JNF’s team of engaged young professionals a first-hand look at the projects taking place throughout the country. “Many members of the new National Board were on the trip,” said JNFuture founder Ben Jablonski. “The best teams are when everyone is on the same page and there is a shared vision.” “The National Board is important for the next generation of Jewish leaders to establish a foundation for future leadership and organization,” said Danielle Traub, national marketing chair and DC JNFuture chair, “for those of

“POSITIVELY ISRAEL” IN THE HEARTLAND BY CHARLES S. FAX, VP, ISRAEL ACTION

POSITIVELY ISRAEL

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The cornerstone of JNF’s Positively Israel campaign is a speaking tour at colleges and universities throughout the country. The speeches—given by specially trained JNF lay leaders—are intended to impart to this selective and vocal audience the amazing information about Israel reflected in this issue of B’Yachad. Our goal is to change the conversation about Israel to highlight the incredible work that Israel does every day to make the world a better place. On page 5, my friend Marc Kelman details a small selection of Israel’s major contributions to the world; in fact, the list of achievements goes far beyond the confines of these pages, and grows every day. Headlines routinely announce new Israeli breakthroughs in medicine, pharmaceuticals, computer science and engineering, agronomy, defense technology, physics, and on and on. The pioneering spirit embodied by the halutzim over one hundred years ago when they first cultivated the land of Israel today resides in the brains of their descendants, whose intellectual and commercial fields of cultivation span the world and are fertilizing it anew. Recently I gave the Positively Israel speech at Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio, a pastoral venue with a sharp, sophisticated and highly politicized student population. The audience consisted mostly of international relations and history students and faculty—only two of whom had been to Israel, and few if any of whom were Jewish. There was a healthy representation, however, of Arabic students and faculty. While the audience came to argue, they left with a new appreciation for the positive role that Israel plays in the improvement of humankind. And that has been my experience every time I’ve given the speech. That is because virtually all of the information imparted to these bright, opinionated audiences is new, and as they are intellectually honest, they process it. The students and faculty to whom we speak, by and large, have never heard of the miracles displayed throughout the pages of this B’Yachad. In point of fact, most folks, including Jews and Israelis, are woefully uninformed on the modern scientific and technological miracles wrought by Israel every day that are making the world a better place. People of good will, which includes most people, are open to our approach. The challenge is for us to marshal our resources effectively and spread the word as broadly, and as rapidly, as possible. Hopefully, many thousands of college students will soon see Israel in a new, and better, light. That is our goal. Charles S. Fax is Vice President of Israel Action and speaks on campuses across the country as part of JNF’s Positively Israel campaign. Visit positivelyisrael.org to learn how you can get involved.

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Did you know? Israel is changing the world—for the better.

POSITIVELY ISRAEL

Through hard work and determination, this young, desert nation is a global leader in renewable energy, agricultural innovation, and medical breakthroughs that improve quality of life all over the world. This is the conversation that the world must have about Israel. The time has come to show how Israel makes the world a better place.

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These are some of the undeniable contributions Israel has made that benefit us all:

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• Drip irrigation: a method that saves water and fertilizer by allowing water to drip slowly to the roots of plants. This technique, refined in Israel by Simcha Blass and his son, allows agriculturally deficient regions of the world to fight hunger and produce crops from even the most arid land. • Israel designed the airline industry’s most impenetrable flight security systems. U.S. officials now look to Israel for advice on how to handle airborne security threats. • ReWalk: the first commercially viable upright walking assistance tool. After an accident left Israeli entrepreneur Amit Goffer as a quadriplegic, he decided to develop a system that allows wheelchair users to walk, climb stairs and meet the world eye-to-eye. • Israeli scientists developed the first fully computerized, no-radiation diagnostic instrument for breast cancer. • Israel was the first nation in the world to adopt the Kimberly process, the standard that certifies diamonds as “conflict free.” • The only development center that Microsoft maintains outside the U.S. is located in Israel. • PillCam, generated by the Israeli company Given Imagining, is a video recording pill that allows doctors to examine the inside of organs, all the way through the digestive system, without the use of unpleasant painful methods. • When the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya was bombed in 1998, Israeli rescue teams were on the scene within a day and saved three victims from the rubble. • Every year in U.S. hospitals 7,000 patients die from treatment mistakes. An Israeli-developed robotic system ensures proper administration of medications, thus removing human error from medical treatment. • An Israeli company was the first to develop and install a large-scale solar-powered and fully functional electricity generating plant, in southern California’s Mojave Desert.

The list goes on. Learn more at positivelyisrael.org and follow us @positiveisrael.

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ASIAN STUDENTS BRING ISRAELI INNOVATION HOME

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OU MIGHT THINK THAT TU, a slight Vietnamese

man in his twenties, is far from home in the middle of his second year at The Arava International Center for Agriculture Training (AICAT), located in Sapir in Israel’s Central Arava region. But, he is very much at home. A student last year, he has returned this year as a group leader to the more than 100 Vietnamese students (among 450 others from Thailand, Myanmar, Nepal, Laos and Tibet) who have come to this remote part of Israel for professional agricultural training and to live a unique experience that enables them to discover their capabilities and the means for fulfilling their potential. “When I first got here, it was August in the desert,” said Tu. “I didn’t think I could survive. But I fell in love with the place. Everything we learn here, we can bring back to our countries to accommodate our own climates and our own needs, create better yields and earn more money.” Established in 1993, more than 5,000 students have graduated from AICAT which, in addition to classroom instruction, places the students in area farms so they can gain skills through hands-on practical training with Arava farmers. The 10-month program constitutes a full agricultural season during which the students are exposed to modern techniques and methods that are much more advanced than those applied in their countries. They also travel around the

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country, visiting Jerusalem, Golan Heights, Eilat, Tel Aviv and other Israeli sites. The hope is to grow the program to 1,000 students by 2015. “By then we will develop new degrees for them to graduate with,” said Hanni Arnon, the program’s director, “and next year we are starting to work with Cambodia. “What’s really wonderful,” she continued, “is that this helps Israel build relationships with the world. These students are ambassadors of Israel when they graduate. They have fallen in love with the country and its people, and this great feeling, they share with the world.” Additionally, AICAT provides jobs, which helps the Arava economy, and gives farmers much-needed assistance with their crops. “It’s a win-win,” said Arnon. “For every hundred students, five to seven high-level jobs are created in the Arava.” Lectures are conducted in English and translated into students’ native languages by group leaders like Tu. The curriculum covers agriculture, production economics, financial analyzing, post-harvest activities, aquaculture, vegetable and flower growing, plant protection, business methods and entrepreneurship, and much more. “My goal is to go home and make Vietnam more like Israel—inventive and innovative—and the only way to do that is with technology,” said Tu. “As a fellow student said to me,

“My goal is to go home and make

VIETNAM more like ISRAEL —inventive and innovative— and the only way to do that is with

TECHNOLOGY.” ‘In Myanmar they teach us how to use. In Israel they teach us how to think.’” The program’s success is evidenced by Wirin Anthakhaek, who arrived at AICAT in 2002 as a student from Mahasarakham College of Agriculture and Technology in Thailand and remained for four years as a group leader. She returned to Thailand in 2007 and became an instructor at Mahasarakham College. With other AICAT alumni, she established a profitable farming unit with crops that suit the Thai market, under the name The Arava Farm Company. They decided to grow sweet corn with the goal of sending at least 1,000 ears to the market every day. “Altogether we have 12.5 acres,” said Wirin. “We used drip irrigation like we learned in the Arava on four acres, and on the rest we used sprinkler irrigation. Upon comparison we learned that drip is better. It saves water, fertilizer and labor. In the corn field students also conduct experiments to gain more information to better develop their farm. This farm at Mahasarakham College is the best opportunity for Thai students and teachers to learn new technology in agriculture from Israel.” Ambassadors indeed. To learn more about JNF’s Positively Israel campaign, visit positivelyisrael.org. n

“ the importance of working on

to share her know-how with her neighbors, and the world. This is a motivating force that captures the spirit of the Arava Institute’s mission. Located at Kibbutz Ketura in southern Israel on the Israeli-Jordanian border, the Institute is home to an academic program made up of Israelis, Palestinians, Jordanians, North Americans, and college students from around the world, all studying together to create a cadre of environmental leaders in the region. Established in 1996, the Institute houses a very active research department involved in cutting-edge environmental research with Israel’s neighbors. Areas of study include solar and hydrogen technologies and sustainable agriculture in areas with a high salinity factor and very poor water conditions. Transboundary water issues are also a major focus of research with Palestinians and Jordanians and address the many issues of a dearth of clean water in such an arid region. The Institute, along with partners in Jordan and Morocco, is also working on a seed exchange program. Arava alumni have taken the environmental knowledge gained at the Institute and become involved with projects in Israel, the Palestinian Authority, and Jordan. Some of these projects include Israeli and Palestinian alumni building bio-digesters in Palestinian communities that address health, energy, and environmental issues. Others have worked on the rivers that begin in the Palestinian Authority and make their way into Israel. Polluted from both Israeli and Palestinian sources, they can only be restored through cooperation. “I’m looking for cross-border environmental projects to start implementing what I learned at the AIES,” said Adli, a Palestinian student. Another alum is in charge of educational outreach programming for Al Quds University, leading science education for Palestinian high school pupils. Jordanian alumni have created a number of environmental NGOs. Standing in front of a sea of solar panels as they absorbed the heat from the hot desert sun, Suleiman, a Jordanian student, remarked, “During my studies at the Arava Institute, things started to make more sense, specifically the message of the Jordanian-Israeli peace treaty that focuses on working together. The courses at the Institute helped me realize the importance of working on both sides of the border to ensure an environmentally sustainable region for everyone.” Through connections that he established during his studies at the Institute, Suleiman started several environmental projects that are designed to address the needs of the Middle East. He is currently working on solar photovoltaic projects, grey water systems for small communities, environmental and agriculture trainings for local farmers, and energy efficiency awareness and solutions. Jewish National Fund has been a major supporter of the Institute; through the efforts of the Mountain States Region of JNF the Arava Institute is building one of the first carbon neutral dormitories in Israel. The Arava Institute also has a partnership with MASHAV, Israel’s Agency for International Development Cooperation, which was created by thenMinister of Foreign Affairs Golda Meir in 1957. As a result, the Institute is now involved with work in Kenya to provide training in rainwater harvesting and irrigation to farmers in the Sauri village district. MASHAV has also brought representatives from Brazil, China, Kenya, India, Nigeria and Samoa to the Institute to learn about sustainable agriculture in arid climates. To learn more about JNF’s Positively Israel campaign, visit positivelyisrael.org. n

The courses at the Institute helped me realize

BOTH SIDES OF THE BORDER to ensure an

environmentally sustainable

region for EVERYONE.”

SOLVING ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES TOGETHER

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VERY DAY DURING HIS STUDIES, Gonen, an Israeli, stood on the desert campus of the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies (AIES) and looked across the border at the dramatic red mountains of Jordan on the horizon. And with each day, he thought to himself that the people who lived there were less and less foreign to him.

“Sharing dorms and learning with Palestinians, Jordanians, Arabs and Jews from Israel and students from the U.S. was incredibly educational,” he said. “For the first time in my life, I learned how to partner with people in the region and how we could cooperate to make a difference. The ‘other’ is now a partner for common positive goals.” There is a strong belief that Israel has a responsibility

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This is a picture caption.

TEACHING AGRICULTURE TO RWANDA’S CHILDREN

O “If you educate

one person,

that one person can

educate millions. So for me, it’s a DROP,

but with many drops you can CREATE

AN OCEAN.”

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N A VISIT TO HER HOME VILLAGE, Tuyisabe Jeannette, an orphan who is in her fourth year at the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village in Rwanda, took back with her the leaf of a spinach plant grown in one of the village’s greenhouses. Not only did she grow a spinach plant at her home, but she gave leaves to her neighbors to replant, “so I can support the nation,” she said proudly. In a subsistence farming country like Rwanda, if you cannot plant your land— if you are too sick, or too old—then you don’t have any food to eat. It’s for this reason that the study of agriculture is an important component of the AgahozoShalom Youth Village, where students learn about modern agricultural techniques that they can bring back to their home villages. Established in December 2008 by the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) for orphans of the 1994 Rwandan genocide, the village began with 125 children and has grown to 500. “The vision for this project stemmed from the notion that Israel has a lot to offer the world,” said Anne Heyman, the village’s founder. “Rwanda had no systemic solution to the huge orphan problem due to genocide aftereffects. But Israel had one, in the model for villages that housed survivors of the Holocaust. It made sense to include Israeli expertise wherever we could—on the educational front, the IT front, and the agricultural front.” The village’s farm was established by JNF-KKL, which has played a significant role in the development of sustainable agriculture at the village. JNF-KKL has also assisted in the establishment of a forest/horticulture nursery that is used for developing and producing products for the village and operates as an information center for propagation methods and seedling production of various crops. Five state-of-the-art greenhouses are used for experimenting with various crops and educating the students, local farmers and agronomists in best practices. Finally, honey is popular in Rwanda where there is a very traditional way of managing the beehives. JNF-KKL donated beehives for honey production and training in modern beehive management. The goal of the farm is to feed the village’s 650 people and teach kids modern agricultural techniques. In addition, as part of the village’s philosophy of tikkun olam, some students help locals with agriculture as their community service, putting to use the knowledge they learn on the farm. “It is our hope that, with JNF-KKL’s help, our farm will not only provide a renewable source of income for the village but that our children will go back to their home communities and share the many new skills and practices learned at Agahozo-Shalom,” said Anne. “It is also our aim to develop Agahozo-Shalom as a learning center for local farmers and agronomists.” With JNF-KKL’s assistance, the next generation of Rwanda’s modern farmers and agronomists are being educated and trained at Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village. The well-being of both the present and future generations is being secured through these essential programs. “Our kids come from backgrounds that have never been exposed to these methodologies,” said Anne. “It’s great to give them tools to bring back to their villages when they graduate. JNF-KKL has been a wonderful partner from the beginning. I envision us continuing to work together.” Tuyisabe, who came to the school an introverted girl deeply affected by the loss of her parents, has blossomed at Agahozo, which provides its students with a multifaceted learning experience that equips them with essential life skills with which to return to their village at the end of their four years. “I’m really proud to see these kids who were hopeless, now they are leaders,” said Jean Pierre, head of informal education at the school. “If you educate one person, that one person can educate millions. So for me, it’s a drop, but with many drops you can create an ocean.” For more information on the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village, you can visit asyv.org. To learn more about JNF’s Positively Israel campaign, visit positivelyisrael.org. n

“ This project is a model on how to collaborate because at the end of the day, flies and insects DON’T KNOW

BORDERS; they’ll cross from

one side to another.”

MINIMIZING PEST PROBLEMS

IN ISRAEL AND AROUND THE WORLD

P

EST CONTROL MAY SEEM LIKE AN ODD AREA TO

find regional and global collaboration. But thanks to Israel’s leading research and development capabilities, two pervasive pest problems have been solved, which has protected agriculture and forestry industries around the world. Jewish National Fund-Keren Kayemeth LeIsrael’s (JNF-KKL) work with eradicating the Mediterranean fruit fly, or Medfly, problem in the Arava Valley, which spans the Israel-Jordan border, as well as controlling the gall wasp infestation of eucalyptus trees has proven invaluable—regionally and globally. The first project targets the problem of the Medfly, deemed one of the world’s most destructive agricultural pests. In a region where agriculture is the main industry, the Medfly posed a serious threat to the livelihood of the Arava’s residents. The Arava Medfly Eradication Project began in 1998, with technology from the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA). Every week, an Israeli airplane crossed from the Israeli side to the Jordanian side, releasing sterilized male Medflies to eradicate the pests from the Arava Valley. The project has crippled the Medfly population and significantly reduced farmers’ reliance on insecticides. “The biggest damage caused by the Medfly is that it doesn’t let us export to markets like the U.S. and Japan which require certification that agriculture is pest-free,” said Ezra Ravins, mayor of the Central Arava Regional Council. “These markets were not open for our special products. In 2000, we were able to declare the whole Arava Valley free from the Medfly which enabled export to the American markets. We’re still working very hard to open the markets in the Far East, South Korea, and Japan.”

The project has brought Jordanian farmers to Israel to witness its success firsthand and engage with experts and Israeli farmers. It is a prime example of Israel and its neighbors working together to protect their shared region. “This project is a model on how to collaborate because at the end of the day, flies and insects don’t know borders; they’ll cross from one side to another,” said Ezra. “Everybody understands that the only way to get rid of pests and to organize biological control is to work as a region.” Another breakthrough pest control effort involves the eucalyptus gall wasp, which comes from Australia. The gall wasp inhibits the development of mature trees, leading to millions of eucalyptus saplings and young trees wilting in nurseries. JNF-KKL initiated the gall wasp project in 2000, partnering with Professor Isaac Mendel from the Volcani Institute, an agricultural research center in Beit Dagan, Israel. Funded mainly by JNF-KKL Australia, the research revealed that the natural enemy of the gall wasp is the parasitic wasp, whose absence in certain regions is what allowed the gall wasps to spread so quickly. The eucalyptus gall wasp problem affects many countries. The Volcani Institute published a paper on its findings before the wasps had invaded Africa, Asia, and America. Once these populations were affected by the gall wasp problem, the Volcani Institute was inundated with questions about the pest and the solutions. “I was thrilled each time I got a message from different countries—especially remote areas such as Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Bolivia, Madagascar, you name it—thanking us for the information and asking for management advice,” said Prof. Mendel. “When we visited a big eucalyptus nursery in a far-

off district in Thailand, we noticed that the plant protection people keep our publications on-hand as a bible.” In 2008, representatives from Thailand, India, South Africa, Kenya, Uganda, Italy, Brazil, China, Turkey, and Australia traveled to Israel for an international conference on the control of the gall wasp, organized by JNF-KKL and the Volcani Institute. The conference dealt with how to propagate and

Through JNF-KKL’s efforts, the gall wasp has been eradicated.

release two types of parasitic wasps that eradicate the gall wasps and prevent them from multiplying. Said Prof. Mendel: “In the industry of eucalyptus production, it is well-known that Israel brought the solution to the problem by supplying natural enemies to countries who needed it.” To learn more about JNF’s Positively Israel campaign, visit positivelyisrael.org. n

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The project brings together ISRAELIS and PALESTINIANS

at a grassroots level as

STAKEHOLDERS

outside of the

POLITICAL ARENA.”

Hebron

Besor River

Be’er Sheva

RESTORING THE BESOR RIVER

I

SRAEL, A WATER-SCARCE COUNTRY, must deal with many water management challenges. As water knows no boundaries, and a portion of Israel’s limited water resources is shared with its Arab neighbors, sustainable water management requires engaging with neighbors, which in Israel’s case is a challenging exercise. A new transboundary water project will address this challenge, and hopefully, present an opportunity. With the joint support of the JNF Parsons Water Fund, USAID, and the European Union, the Center for Transboundary Water Management at the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies will tackle the goal of restoring the polluted Besor River Drainage Basin. The Institute is one of JNF’s partners in Israel. The Besor River originates in the West Bank near Hebron, flows southwest across the Green Line through Be’er Sheva in the Negev, and enters the Mediterranean Sea at Gaza. This impacts both Palestinians and Israelis: everybody needs better-managed, cleaner water. “The project brings together Israelis and Palestinians at a grassroots level as stakeholders outside of the political arena,” said Zevi Kahanov, National Director of the JNF Parsons Water Fund. This international project, which will consist of data collection, conflict mitigation and research exchanges, represents a true partnership of the three funding agencies who are working towards the same goal. For JNF, the cleaning of the Be’er Sheva River, a section of the Besor River, figures prominently in the development of the

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Be’er Sheva River Park and JNF’s Blueprint Negev campaign to revitalize the Negev. The diverse group of stakeholders also includes Palestinian small business owners and the Bedouin community of the West Bank, as well as residents of the city of Be’er Sheva and its surrounding suburbs and the nature parks and reserves of the Eshkol region. Phase one of the project is to develop a framework for cross-border water basin management. This is something that has never been done before. The task is to identify who is being impacted by the pollution and where it’s located. “Over three years, we hope to identify the constellation of actors who should be involved and lay the groundwork for strategy,” said Dr. Clive Lipchin, who is spearheading the project. “We are looking to create a foundation of what the strategy should be: what should we be doing, who needs to be engaged and how. The next phase will be implementing the framework.” If this project is successful, it will be used as a model that can be emulated elsewhere, which is particularly important given that the vast majority of Israel’s streams originate in the West Bank. To learn more about JNF’s Positively Israel campaign, visit positivelyisrael.org. n

JNF-KKL HAS PARTICIPATED IN MANY IMPORTANT FORUMS AND CONFERENCES AROUND THE WORLD. JNF is a registered NGO with the United Nations and is currently seeking ECOSOC status.

FORUMS/PARTNERSHIPS Middle East Research Cooperation (MERC) United States Forest Service (USFS) United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP)

Rehabilitating Forests in East Timor United Nations International Year of the Forests

UNESCO Man and the Biosphere (MAB) Programme International Water Day – United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) Clean Up the World – UN Environment Program (UNEP)

United Nation’s Educational and Scientific Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

und onnaall FFund tio JeJewwisishh NNaati

ALL NNAATTIONA NCCEE NF EREEN CCOON 22001122

CONFERENCES United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP13/CMP3, Bali, Indonesia United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP15/CMP15, Copenhagen, Denmark United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP 16/CMP6, Cancun, Mexico Conference on Afforestation and Sustainable Forests as a Means to Combat Desertification, Israel International Conference on Combating Desertification, Israel

XII World Forestry Congress, Buenos Aires, Argentina International Conference on the Control of the Eucalyptus Gall Wasp, Israel JNF-KKL International R&D Course on Integrated Pest Management of Fruit and Forest Trees, Israel The Ninth Session of the United Nations Forum on Forests United Nations World Summit for Sustainable Development in Johannesburg, South Africa

Desertification Conference, Bahia Blanca, Argentina

“Inter-ecology 2007 – Environmental Safety of the Mediterranean Region,” Cyprus

International Seminar on Afforestation in Arid and Semi-Arid Zones: Response to Climate Change, Israel

JNF-KKL-South American “Agriculture at the Forefront of Foreign Relations,” Israel

“Fighting Forest Fires” Conference, Seville, Spain

21

United Nations Department of Information (UN-DPI)

JNF.org

International Association of Mediterranean Forests (IAFM)

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Australia

POSITIVELY ISRAEL

African Green Revolution Forum (AGRF)

NATIONAL CONFERENCE COMES ONLY ONCE A YEAR. DON’T MISS OUT! OCTOBER 21 - 22, 2012 • ORLANDO, FL Register at jnf.org/nc or call 212.879.9305 x295

JNF’S DONOR SOCIETIES are reserved for a

select group of people who have demonstrated an enduring commitment to Israel and JNF. In exchange for their support, society members receive exclusive privileges and services.

CAARI

22 JNF.org

Join us today and help build a prosperous future for the land of Israel and its people. Contact Yael Septee Kane at ykane@jnf.org or 212-879-9305 ext. 220 for more information.

A Tribute to CAARI AFTER MORE THAN 30 YEARS

as a primary school teacher, Brenda Seiden’s goal was to visit Israel when she retired. Her first trip was in 1991 with Hadassah during the Gulf War. Her next was in 1993 on JNF’s Canadian American Active Retirees in Israel (CAARI) trip. “We loved it,” she said of herself and her husband. “We liked that we visited so many places and weren’t stationed in one place.” Since her husband passed away almost a decade ago, Brenda, a resident of Newburgh, New York, has participated in CAARI four more times. “I’d go another five times if I was physically able,” she said. To express her gratitude to CAARI Director Susan Horwitz for all that she does, Brenda made a quilt that represented the many aspects of CAARI that make it such a rewarding program. Using a traditional quilt pattern called Around the World, Brenda found fabrics that speak to all the different activities of CAARI participants—volunteer work, sightseeing, camaraderie, and more—during the twomonth visit. “I was overwhelmed by this thoughtful gift,” said Susan. “Brenda is an amazing creative person, and my first thought was how absolutely beautiful this quilt is and what a special gift it is. What really touched me is

Get a jump on the New Year with JNF’s Landscapes of Israel New Year’s Cards. Each boxed set of 12 includes 4 different beautiful images of Israel’s landscapes by world-renowned Israeli artist Avner Moriah. With envelopes. $30.

Brenda Seiden (right) on a CAARI mission.

The inside message reads “Shana Tovah! Wishing You a Happy and Healthy New Year.” The cards also note that “A donation has been made to Jewish National Fund in support of its projects in Israel.” Order at jnf.org

how she selected each piece of material to depict the different aspects of the CAARI program and JNF.” The name of the quilt is “Remembrances.” The center square is a Torah, representing the center of Jewish life and history. A patch of wood and screws represents the building of the kibbutzim in the early days of settling Palestine. Oranges for the oranges that CAARI participants picked for distribution to the needy. A clown fish for the research and development work in the Arava. Bird feathers for the cranes of the Hula Valley. Sand for the Negev Desert, where JNF is developing projects to increase the region’s population and access to water. Since 1983, 2,000 retirees ages 50 and over

The quilt Brenda Seiden made to represent her CAARI experience.

from the U.S. and Canada have spent the winter months in Israel for a unique, fulfilling experience. CAARI will celebrate its 30th anniversary in 2013. Each year the program attracts new and former participants, offering active seniors a selection of two- to sevenweek trip options that include volunteering, touring and a speakers forum that challenges them physically and mentally. The volunteer work includes activities in schools, hospitals, community agencies and JNF forests. Influential speakers from the government, academia, media, arts and military meet with CAARI to enlighten them on a number of subjects. Visiting destinations both popular and off the beaten path, CAARI provides participants with experiences that connect them to the land of Israel and the work of JNF. “I appreciate the consistency of JNF’s programming,” said Brenda. “When you go on a CAARI program, you know you’re going to see JNF installations, be taken out into the countryside, and see live hands-on projects.” One of the volunteer projects that particularly touched Brenda during her visits is her work at Reuth Medical Center, a rehabilitation and chronic care facility in Tel Aviv. “Many of the residents can’t speak, can’t feed themselves, and most are confined to wheelchairs,” she said. “To be able to sit down and talk with them—even if they can’t speak—their eyes and body motions speak. If I can make their day a little brighter, it is very fulfilling and rewarding.” n

The CAARI 30th anniversary trip runs from January 9 – February 28, 2013 with various program options. To find out more about CAARI, visit caarivolunteers.com or call 877-JNF-TOUR.

The Next Generation Gives Back ISRAEL ADVOCACY & EDUCATION

AEPi brothers at Sderot Indoor Recreation Center.

fraternity voted to make JNF one of the frat’s national philanthropies. Committed to giving back to others through philanthropic endeavors and community service, AEPi has over 165 chapters worldwide and is the premier Jewish fraternity. The brothers made a seven-year commitment of $100,000 to JNF and six other recipient organizations, making JNF a proud AEPi partner. The funds raised by AEPi are directed to support the JNF Sderot Indoor Recreation Center. The brothers at Maryland University presented JNF with the first check of $25,000.

JNF’S ALTERNATIVE BREAK

AEPi chapters worldwide have been actively raising money for the JNF Indoor Recreation Center through creative and fun events on their campuses. At Florida International University, the brothers held an “AEPie in the face” event; for $3, students donated money to pie them in the face. In Israel, the AEPi brothers from IDC Herzliya and Hebrew University spent a day at the Sderot Indoor Recreation Center. “It was amazing to see what JNF was able to set up so that the children of Sderot can have a fun and safe place to play,” said Jacob Erickson of IDC Herzliya. After visiting Sderot, the brothers got in touch with the

is an incredible opportunity to perform community service in Israel. Participants volunteer for a week and connect to the land and people in a meaningful way. Learn more at jnf.org/break

Green Horizons youth group, a JNF partner, to find a way to help out the children of Sderot. In the event of rocket attacks, the brothers have volunteered to put together a program to send kids from Sderot to Herzilya for the day. AEPi develops leadership for the future of the American Jewish community. “The brothers of AEPi realize that it is incumbent on us to not only support the State of Israel, but to protect its land and inhabitants, a goal that is directly in line with the mission of JNF,” said Adam Maslia, International Director of Jewish Programming for AEPi. n

23 JNF.org

THE BROTHERS OF ALPHA EPSILON PI (AEPi)

AEPi presented JNF CEO Russell Robinson with a check for $25,000.

A Zionist Childhood Led to Lifelong Support for Israel AS A BOY, MARTIN E. MENDEL

PLANNED GIVING

Martin Mendel (above) committed his life to Israel, serving in World War II as an interpretor and interrogater at the age of 18 (right).

24 JNF.org

attended a Jewish boarding school in Herrlingen, Germany. There, he was influenced by the school’s principal and founder Hugo Rosenthal, who instilled in Martin and his fellow students a love for Israel. A clinical psychologist who helped numerous patients and mentored many professionals, Martin passed away in January 2011, leaving a $1.8 million bequest to Jewish National Fund. His generous gift is being used towards the development of the Be’er Sheva River Park, the centerpiece of JNF’s Blueprint Negev campaign. “I think that Hugo Rosenthal deserves the credit for Martin’s love of Israel,” said Emanuel Rosen, Martin’s cousin and the trustee of his estate. Martin lived a remarkable life. Born in 1925 in Iserlohn, Germany and raised in Menden, Germany, he and his sister were taken by kindertransport to the Netherlands, where they were eventually joined by their parents. In 1940, his family managed to get out of Europe on a ship bound for the United States and

took a Greyhound bus across the country from New York to Los Angeles. Drafted into the Army at the age of 18, Martin was sent to Europe in 1944 as an interpreter and interrogator. While overseas, he discovered that his grandparents, who had survived Theresienstadt concentration camp, were alive and living back in the town of Menden, which was in the British occupied zone. Martin’s mother, Else Mendel, wrote a letter to General Dwight D. Eisenhower to tell her parents’ story and request permission for Martin to visit them, which General Eisenhower granted. Martin visited his grandparents in January 1946 and months later arranged for their immigration to the U.S. Today, Emanuel still has the envelope in which that important letter was mailed. During his retirement years, Martin devoted his time to painting, sculpting, studying, and spending time with friends and family. According to Emanuel, Martin, who visited Israel several times in his life, was always disappointed that his father chose to emigrate to the United States over Palestine. It was through his uncle choosing to go to Palestine that Martin became

For as little as $5,000, you can help achieve your financial goals and those of a nation — Israel. There is more reason than ever to create a charitable gift annuity with Jewish National Fund. JNF offers planned giving opportunities that give you a generous return, the benefit of tax savings, plus recognition in Israel. At the same time, JNF receives much-needed support to continue ensuring the prosperity of the land and people of Israel.

SINGLE-LIFE GIFT ANNUITY* For a confidential AGE 65 70 75 80 85 90 & Over

RATE 5.5% 5.8% 6.4% 7.2% 8.1% 9.5%

illustration, a copy of our brochure on charitable gift annuities or to leave a bequest to JNF in your will, contact one of our planned giving specialists at

Whether you’re a lifetime supporter of JNF or are considering a donation for the first time, the advantages you’ll gain from your gift are real and immediate. Learn more at jnf.org/plannedgiving

800-562-7526 or plannedgiving@jnf.org

*Two life rates will vary. Rates as of print date. Rates are subject to change. Please contact the Planned Giving Department for the most up-to-date information.

EARN UP TO 9.5% ON YOUR MONEY, AND 100% OF A NATION’S GRATITUDE.

familiar with JNF and its work. “Martin believed in JNF’s mission,” said Emanuel. “It had always been his intention to make a bequest to JNF.” n

Investing in the Land of Israel JOSEPH KORN GREW UP WITH ISRAEL AS

Increase Your Income, Save Taxes, Support Israel: A Win-Win Proposal By Matt Bernstein, CFP, JNF Chief Planned Giving Officer A CHARITABLE GIFT

annuity with Jewish National Fund can give you peace of mind and be a source of lifetime income at very attractive rates, while enabling you to provide support for Israel when it’s needed most. Did you know that a charitable gift annuity is a smart choice for a portion of your investments that need to earn income? Interest rates are at historically low levels. Today the 10-year Treasury bond yields less than 1.90% – rates we have not seen since President Eisenhower was in office! This is great news for borrowers, but terrible news for many JNF donors who want to invest their money safely and earn income. JNF can offer our supporters a significantly higher rate than CDs currently offer. When you consider the tax advantages and savings through a tax deduction and potential tax-free income, choosing a charitable gift annuity becomes a very wise investment.

Let’s look at an example: A 75-year-old JNF donor has a $25,000 CD that is maturing this week. The rollover rate she is offered from her bank for another five years is 1.69%. JNF can offer her a lifetime annuity at 6.4% in exchange for her $25,000 charitable contribution. Here are the results: $25,000 $25,000 JNF Gift Annuity CD Rate

1.69%

6.4% (based on her age)

Annual Income

$422.50

$1,600 ($1,275.20 is tax free)*

After-Tax Income $316.87 at 25% Tax Bracket

$1,518.80

After-Tax Rate

6%

1.27%

Charitable Income Tax Deduction

-

$9,187.85

Tax Savings at 25% Tax Bracket

-

$2,296.96

*12.4 years after the start of the annuity, all of the income will become taxable.

Single-Life Take a look at the numbers! A Gift Annuity Rates CD will return 1.27% a year in after-tax income. The JNF gift annuAge Rate ity will return 6% a year in after90+ 9.5% tax income. Plus the donor will 85 8.1% receive an additional $2,296.96 in tax savings because of the chari80 7.2% table income tax deduction. 75 6.4% Equally as important, her gift will help Israel remain secure and 70 5.8% free through the work of JNF. 65 5.5% For as little as $5,000, a JNF charitable gift annuity will provide you with a secure source of income for life, while you support Israel. Contact our award-winning Planned Giving department for a no-obligation consultation. We can show you how the numbers work for your own situation. Call us at 800-562-7526 or reach us through email at plannedgiving@jnf.org. We look forward to hearing from you! n

25 JNF.org

his busy schedule to visit the site of of inspiring in his children a similar the property, research its condition love and appreciation for the land and offer his opinion to the commitand people of Israel. The family tee as to whether or not we should visited a number of JNF projects, pursue the gift further.” including the Carmel Forest, AmeriJoe joined the JNF New Jercan Independence Park, Sderot Insey board 15 years ago. He lives door Recreation Center, Be’er Sheva in Baskin Ridge, NJ with his wife, River Park; met with the fire scouts; Beth, and three children, Samanand went to the Harvey Hertz-JNF tha, Jennifer and David. A member Ceremonial Tree Planting Center at of JNF’s Century Council and PresiNeot Kedumim. dent’s Society, and former PresiAt the American Independence dent of the New Jersey region, he Park, the family unveiled a plaque is also a member of the Budget and in memory of Joe’s dad, and bat Finance Committee. mitzvah plaques for both girls. Joseph Korn and his family. As a real estate developer for al“At the ceremonial planting cenmost 30 years, what most appeals to Joe about Israel is ter, my kids started to see the beauty and significance the land and its capabilities to support its people through of the land,” said Joe. “It was my goal to impress upon its natural resources, and human ingenuity in utilizing them the importance of and need for Israel. My parents them. went through the war and kept faith with the land that “I’ve been planting trees since I was a kid, and been was to become Israel. I wanted to share with my kids that involved in philanthropic giving for 30 years,” he said. “I deep connection and I hope this trip instilled that upon love the land of Israel and want to make sure it’s there them the land, its meaning, its beautiful wonders and the for the next generation. My involvement is on a Zionistic people that make it home.” To learn more about JNF’s missions, or to plan a trip to level as well as a spiritual level.” Joe took his family to Israel this past March in the hopes Israel, visit jnf.org/travel. n

PLANNED GIVING

a part of his life. His parents, David and Maryla, were child Holocaust survivors who came to the United States in the years after the war, and while Joe was growing up, the family traveled to Israel every few years for two months at a time. With his father active in the Soviet Jewry movement, the Jewish homeland was always part of Joe’s daily life. “Because of how I was raised I always feel at home in Israel,” he said. “Now my focus is assisting in the preserving of the land for the next generation.” Joe is a member of JNF’s Investment Committee, which handles all of JNF’s national financial investments and gift annuities and, along with seven other committee members, helps to oversee JNF’s investment portfolio of over $90 million. The Investment Committee manages the money donated to JNF and how it is spent, ensuring that JNF meets its obligation to donors of investing annuities and financial contributions prudently. JNF CFO Mitchel Rosenzweig and the other Investment Committee members often turn to Joe when faced with an offer of a donation involving real estate. “Joe has extensive contacts across the country and his expertise has enabled JNF to successfully close donations involving real property,” said Mitchel. “Joe is willing to take time from

OUT & ABOUT WITH

JNF’S MAJOR DONORS NEW ENGLAND ZONE JNF’S MAJOR DONORS

26

WESTERN ZONE

JNF.org

(L-R) Risa Aronson (President’s Society, Sapphire Society) and Yadira Patkin (World Chairman’s Council, Circle of Sapphire) at a pinning event to celebrate new and existing Sapphire Society members.

(L-R) Joanne Jawitz (Sapphire Society), Israel Emissary for JNF/KKL and National Director of the JNF Parsons Water Fund Zevi Kahanov, and Mark Jawitz at a parlor meeting.

New England Sapphire Society leaders recognized longtime members for their dedication and support. (L-R) Fredda Gordon, with her husband Dan (Century Council, President’s Society), was presented with a plaque from National Campaign Director Sharon Freedman.

Sapphire Society President Amy Parsons (Century Council, Circle of Sapphire) proudly pinned new members. (L-R) Amy Diamond, Laura Davis, Amy Parsons, and Rachel Coben.

Judi Elovitz Greenberg (Sapphire Society) and Roger Klein (President’s Society) welcomed renowned historian, author and professor Jonathan Sarna (center) as the featured speaker at a New England Board of Directors meeting.

(L-R) Mountain States Regional Director Stan Kamlet, Mort and Toby Mower (World Chairman’s Council) Mountain States Board Chair Gene Kay (Century Council), and Louan Kamlet (Sapphire Society) at an Evening with Hal Linden, honoring Stan Kamlet on his 80th birthday.

(L-R) Hal Linden and Mountain States Board Chair Gene Kay (Century Council) at an Evening with Hal Linden, honoring Stan Kamlet on his 80th birthday.

(L-R) Hal Linden and Susan and Alan Cohen (Century Council) at an Evening with Hal Linden, honoring Stan Kamlet on his 80th birthday.

(L–R) Makor speaker Beckie Fischer (Sapphire Society), Vicky Kogan, and Orange County/Long Beach President Cookie Sieger (President’s Society) at the Women’s Campaign for Israel event at the home of Miki Sholkoff.

(L-R) Steven Emerson with Cheryl and Robert Fey (Negev Society) at the annual Palm Springs Love of Israel Dinner.

(L-R) Event chairs Marcia and Rick Stein (Herzl Society) at the annual Palm Springs Love of Israel Dinner.

(L-R) Palm Springs and Desert Region President Allan Nyman, guest speaker and attorney Kimberly Lee, event chair and past Regional President Robert Fey (Negev Society), and JNF Chief Planned Giving Officer Matt Bernstein at the Palm Springs Planned Giving Seminar.

(L-R) Monroe and Peggy Wingate (World Chairman’s Council), and JNF CEO Russell Robinson at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

(L-R) New Sapphire Society member Fran Sachs was pinned by National Sapphire Society Chair Carol Ford at the Sapphire Society thank you breakfast.

(L-R) Sapphire Society members Irene Metz, Sharyn Spillman and Randee Pri-Tal shared their stories of commitment to Israel and JNF at a Sapphire Society thank you breakfast.

(L-R) Charles Fleischer, San Diego Board President Myra Chack Fleischer (Sapphire Society), National VP of College Activists Sol Lizerbram (President’s Society), Lauren Lizerbram (Sapphire Society), National VP of the Negev Society Bill Miller (President’s Society), and Kim Miller (Sapphire Society) enjoyed an event at the home of Dr. Bob and Mia Goldklang at a San Diego parlor meeting with Micah Halpern.

Special JNF Emissary from Jerusalem Avinoam Binder, with Jane Ottenstein (World Chairman’s Council), who received a Sderot Tulip at an event hosted at the home of Sol and Lauren Lizerbram in San Diego.

(L-R) Jack and Judith Lief (Herzl Society) visited with Liora and Avinoam Binder in San Diego.

FLORIDA ZONE

(L-R) Ken Segel (Makor, Century Council, Negev Society), Vivian Grossman (Sapphire Society, Century Council, Negev Society), and Nancy and Frank Gurtman (Century Council, President’s Society) at the Major Donor thank you event in Miami Beach, with guest speaker Micah Halpern, an expert on terrorism, the Middle East and Muslim fundamentalism.

(L-R) Paul Singer (President’s Society), Emily Singer (Sapphire Society, President’s Society), and Florida Zone Director Glen Schwartz at the Major Donor thank you event at Canyon Ranch Resort and Spa in Miami Beach.

David A. Stein (President’s Society) (right) was presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award by Lawrence DuBow at the Jacksonville Tree of Life™ Award Dinner, held at the Jacksonville Jewish Center.

(L-R) Barry and Eunice Zisser (President’s Society) were presented with the Tree of Life™ Award by Dr. Ron Elinoff at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Jacksonville.

(L-R) Fran and Russell Selevan (World Chairman’s Council) with Laura Edwards and Bob Gerzel at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Jacksonville.

JNF’S MAJOR DONORS

(L-R) Ken Segel (Makor, Century Council, Negev Society), Nancie Segel (Sapphire Society, Century Council, Negev Society), guest speaker Micah Halpern, Marni Kriss, and Miami-Dade Board President Ron Kriss (Herzl Society) at the Major Donor thank you event at Canyon Ranch Resort and Spa in Miami Beach.

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(L-R) Tree of Life™ honorees Mordechai and Michal Wiesler (President’s Society) and Hank and Nancy Greenberg (President’s Society) at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at Twin Eagles Country Club in Naples.

Neil and Jeanne Braverman (Century Council, Negev Society) at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Naples.

(L-R) Dr. Mark and Anne Rubin (President’s Society) with JNF spokesperson Hal Linden at the Naples Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

Marty and Paulette Samowitz (President’s Society) received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at Michael’s On East in Sarasota.

(L-R) Tree of Life™ honoree Len Glaser (Herzl Society) with dinner co-chair David Chaifetz (President’s Society).

Israeli Fire Chief Boaz Rakia and Brenda Johnston (Sapphire Society) at a JNF Friends of Israel Firefighters meeting.

(L-R) Ariel Kotler, Dr. Rob and Carol Norman (President’s Society, Century Council) and Givatiim Fire Chief Boaz Rakia at a parlor meeting in Tampa.

(L-R) Ariel Kotler and Givatiim Fire Chief Boaz Rakia presented Nathan Bisk (President’s Society, Century Council) and Michael Bisk with a plaque thanking them for donating a new fire truck.

(L-R) Ariel Kotler and Givatiim Fire Chief Boaz Rakia presented Harvey Hertz (World Chairman’s Council, President’s Society) with an Israeli firefighter helmet.

(L-R) Sy and Debra Israel (Century Council, Negev Society) with Linda and Dr. Randy Poole at the Orlando Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at The Peabody Hotel.

Jack Freeman (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society) received the Guardian of Israel Award at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Orlando. (L-R) JNF Israel Emissary Ron Bernstein, Jack Freeman, Dyanne Awes, and Bruce Gould (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society).

(L-R) Orlando Board of Directors President Jim Riola (President’s Society), Jill Riola (Sapphire Society, President’s Society), Dr. Shari Yudenfreund-Sujka (Sapphire Society), and Dr. Stan Sujka at the Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Orlando. Dr. Yudenfreund-Sujka, a new Sapphire Society member, received her Sapphire pin from Jill Riola.

FLORIDA ZONE

JNF’S MAJOR DONORS

(L-R) JNF Israel Emissary Ron Bernstein, Marian Wiseman (Sapphire Society, President’s Society, Century Council), and Irving Wiseman (President’s Society, Century Council) at a reception held at the BallenIsles Country Club in Palm Beach Gardens.

(L-R) Bill Bernstein (Herzl Society) and Charles Kramer (President’s Society) at a Palm Beach Board of Directors meeting held at the law offices of Shutts & Bowen LLP in West Palm Beach.

(L-R) Vivian Grossman (Sapphire Society, Negev Society, Century Council), Michael Wechsler (President’s Society, Century Council), and Joan Wechsler at a parlor meeting hosted by the Wechslers at their home in Lake Worth.

(L-R) JNF South Florida Regional Director Laura Sherry, Lee Aronson (Sapphire Society, Century Council), Cynthia Hertz (Sapphire Society, Century Council), Rita Wahl (Sapphire Society), Jan Silverman (Sapphire Society), and Florence Friedberg (Sapphire Society) at the Sapphire Society thank you luncheon held at Sundy House in Delray Beach.

(L-R) Vivian Grossman (Sapphire Society, Negev Society, Century Council), Dan Mielnicki, Gail Cohen, Howard DuBosar (Herzl Society), and Cantor Elaine Shapiro (Sapphire Society, President’s Society) at a breakfast held at Broken Sound Country Club in Boca Raton.

(L-R) Sydelle Lazar (Sapphire Society, President’s Society, Century Council), Vivian Grossman (Sapphire Society, Negev Society, Century Council), Michael Lazar (President’s Society, Century Council), and JNF South Florida Regional Director Laura Sherry at a breakfast held at Broken Sound Country Club in Boca Raton.

GREATER NEW YORK ZONE

28 JNF.org (L-R) Beckie Fischer (Sapphire Society), Sharon Gilbert (Sapphire Society), and Debbie Stayman (Sapphire Society, Negev Society, Century Council) at The Negev Concert featuring Dudu Fisher at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts.

(L-R) Rose Boyarsky (Sapphire Society), Hal Linden, and Judi Edelman (Sapphire Society) at a breakfast held at The Century Pines Synagogue.

(L-R) Ofir Fisher with Gisela Klein (Sapphire Society) and Santiago Klein (President’s Society) at a parlor meeting hosted by the Kleins at their home in Ft. Lauderdale.

Andy Ashwal (President’s Society) and his wife Lindsay at JNF’s Women’s Campaign for Israel tour of the Sotheby’s Institute of Art.

(L-R) Steven Shalowitz, Isaac Reshad (Herzl Society) and Ilana Derman at the JNFuture Root Society Dinner.

(L-R) Matthew Herman (Herzl Society) and Asaf Palgi (Herzl Society) at JNFuture’s Garden of Eden at the Gansevoort Park.

Helen Levine (World Chairman’s Council, Circle of Sapphire) and Giselle Ben Dor (Century Council, Negev Society) at a JNF major donor reception featuring Michael Arad.

(L-R) 9/11 Memorial architect Michael Arad and Ed Blank (World Chairman’s Council) at a JNF major donor event.

(L-R) 9/11 Memorial architect Michael Arad and Yvette and Robert Bendahan (Century Council) at a JNF major donor event.

(L-R) Laureine Greenbaum (World Chairman’s Council, Circle of Sapphire) and Dr. Ivy Engel at JNF’s Women’s Campaign for Israel tour of the Sotheby’s Institute of Art.

Luella Stampfer (President’s Society) accepted her plaque for the forest she planted in Israel in honor of her family.

(L-R) Jerry and Janice Rosen and Helen and Bob Levine (World Chairman’s Council) at JNF’s annual Teaneck dinner.

LOS ANGELES ZONE

(L-R) Vera Schoenig (Sapphire Society), Deena Singer (Sapphire Society), and Anne Brown enjoyed brunch at a Sapphire Society reception with speaker Gidi Grinstein.

Louis and Marion Lipofsky (President’s Society, Century Council) with keynote speaker David Siegel (center), Consul General of Israel, at a major donor brunch in Los Angeles.

(L-R) Consul General of Israel in New York Ido Aharoni and Matt Lieberman (President’s Society) at an event at the Kerker home in Atlanta.

(L-R) Atlanta Co-President Mechal Pearl (Sapphire Society), Atlanta Co-President David Birnbrey (Herzl Society), Consul General of Israel in New York Ido Aharoni, and Michael Miller (Century Council, President’s Society) enjoyed an event at the Kerker home in Atlanta.

Marion and Robert Rothstein were all smiles as they celebrated joining the World Chairman’s Council.

MID-ATLANTIC ZONE

JNF’S MAJOR DONORS

(L-R) Robin and David Frank (President’s Society, Century Council), Allen and Marilyn Golden (Circle of Sapphire), Michael Isaacson, Jake Ehrenreich, Alyse Golden and Stuart Berkley (President’s Society, Circle of Sapphire), Helene and Richard Rosenzweig (Sapphire Society), Ernest Zeilberger (President’s Society), and Maureen Lipman at a post-performance meet and greet on the opening night of “A Jew Grows in Brooklyn.”

SOUTHERN ZONE

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Baltimore Executive Committee member Jack Rose (Herzl Society) spent time with Green Horizons youth during his trip to Israel on the National Budget & Finance Committee Mission.

(L-R) Xiuyun Li, Jeffrey Klein (Herzl Society, Century Council), and Dr. Elliot Gorbaty (Herzl Society) enjoyed the Mid-Atlantic Zone major donor thank you event held in Baltimore.

(L-R) DC President Ken Krupsky (President’s Society) presented Wendy and Dr. Jeffrey Miller (Century Council) with a plaque in recognition of their work and commitment to improving dental care at Aleh Negev.

(L-R) Washington, DC Sapphire Society CoChair Gail Kushner, Mitch Berliner (Herzl Society), award-winning author Donna Rosenthal, and Sapphire Society CoChair Debra Moser at a Sapphire Society meeting held at the home of Debra Moser and Mitch Berliner.

(L-R) Dr. Chet Stein (Century Council, Makor, President’s Society) and Leonard Miller (Century Council) at a Washington, DC board meeting.

Washington, DC President Ken Krupsky (President’s Society) and Maryland Major Gifts Chair Ellen Rosenberg (Makor, Sapphire Society) celebrated the campaign progress in Baltimore.

(L-R) Washington, DC President Ken Krupsky (President’s Society) presented Mid-Atlantic Zone Planned Giving Chair Jerry K. Grossman with a plaque of appreciation for all his efforts over the last two years.

(L-R) Maryland Board President Jonathan Fishman (President’s Society), National Campaign Director Diane Scar (Sapphire Society), Mid-Atlantic Zone President Baruch Fellner (President’s Society, Century Council), DC Board President Ken Krupsky (President’s Society), DC Major Gifts Chair Dr. Chet Stein (Century Council, Makor, President’s Society), and Delaware Board President Joel Friedlander (President’s Society) at a MidAtlantic Zone meeting in Baltimore.

(L-R) New Delaware Sapphire Society member Susan Grossman received her Sapphire pin from Maryland Sapphire CoChairs Nanci Seff and Jayne Klein.

(L-R) Russell Smith (Herzl Society), Gary Kushner (Herzl Society, Makor), and Dr. Chet Stein (Century Council, Makor, President’s Society) lit Chanukah candles during a board meeting in Washington, DC.

(L-R) Sapphire Society Co-Chair Jayne Klein and Thank You event host Wendy Miller at a Mid-Atlantic major donor event in Baltimore.

(L-R) Steve Cohen (Herzl Society) and Jeffrey Miller (Century Council) at a MidAtlantic major donor event in Baltimore.

MIDWEST ZONE

JNF’S MAJOR DONORS

(L-R) Consul General of Israel in New York Ido Aharoni enjoyed the hospitality of hosts Sara and Dan Cohan (President’s Society) at a special reception for JNF donors.

(L-R) Event Chair Bruce Werner (Herzl Society), Consul General of Israel in New York Ido Aharoni, Rabbi Sidney Helbraun and Chief Development Officer Rick Krosnick at the Temple Beth-El breakfast.

(L-R) Harold Kaplan (Century Council, JNF Parsons Water Fund National Board) and Chicago Bear Gabe Carimi at Chicago’s “A Night with Gabe Carimi.”

Emma Mayerson, granddaughter of Rhoda (Century Council) and the late Manuel D. Mayerson, visited the Mayerson/ JNF Inclusive Parks project at Nahal HaShofet, a model for future inclusive and accessible parks.

The 5th annual JNF/Judge Carl B. Rubin Legal Society bestowed the Attorney of the Year Award upon Judge Nathaniel R. Jones. (L-R) Louise Roselle (Sapphire Society, Century Council), immediate Past President of the Cincinnati Region and previous Attorney of the Year honoree Al Gerhardstein, previous Attorney of the Year Gil Tamary, keynote speaker Marianna Brown Bettman, previous Attorney of the Year Judge Nathaniel R. Jones, and previous Attorney of the Year and VP of Lawyers For Israel Todd Bailey.

Sapphire Society members joined together at the dedication site of the Sapphire Society cornerstone project, the Negev community of Zuqim. (L-R, back row) Vivian Grossman, Ellen Rosenberg, Marlene Maier, Myra Schack Fleischer, Sharyn Spillman, and Judy Edelman. (L-R, front row) Sheila Scharfman, Alyse Golden Berkley, Nina Paul, Carol Ford Freidkin, Evelyn Spritz, Ann Zinman, and Sharon Gilbert.

NORTHEAST ZONE

30 JNF.org (L-R) Moshe Berniker, a pioneer and spokesperson for the Halutza region in Israel, Ari Jaffe, and Northern Ohio Board President Chuck Whitehill (President’s Society).

Detroit donor Debby Rosen (Herzl Society) displayed the grove plaques commemorating her mother and father, Rita and Ellis Rivkin, of blessed memory.

(L-R) Amy and Gary Stein (Herzl Society), Wisconsin Board Co-President Enid Bootzin Berkovits, Andrew Stein, Samantha Stein, and Brian Avner at the dedication of Enid’s marker in American Independence Park on a family visit to Israel.

In celebration of Tu BiShvat, Rena Safer (Sapphire Society), Wisconsin board member and Israel Advocacy and Education Chairperson, welcomed Congregation Sinai 8th and 9th graders to the Milwaukee JNF office for a presentation on ethics as it relates to the activities and projects of JNF in Israel.

(L-R) Green Sunday Co-Chairs Dr. Steve and Rusti Moffic (Sapphire Society) and Sidney Rivkin, Wisconsin Regional Director, spent a successful day of fundraising to help JNF develop additional water resources in Israel.

Brad Segal (Century Council) and Melissa Segal (Century Council, Sapphire Society) at JNF’s Women’s Campaign for Israel tour of the Sotheby’s Institute of Art.

(L-R) Central New Jersey Zone Director Joel Leibowitz, Susan Gurtman (Sapphire Society), Mark Rattner (Century Council) and Melissa Segal (Century Council, Sapphire Society) at JNF’s Women’s Campaign for Israel tour of the Sotheby’s Institute of Art.

(L-R) Bob Benedon (Makor, Doctors for Israel, President’s Society), Carol Ford (Century Council, President’s Society, Lifetime Sapphire), Sharon Gilbert (Sapphire Society), a dental technician from Aleh Negev, and Chet Stein (Century Council, President’s Society) visited the Aleh Negev Dental Clinic.

(L-R) Bob Benedon (Makor, Doctors for Israel, President’s Society), David Bross (President’s Society, Lawyers for Israel) and Gerrie Rudoler (Sapphire Society, Century Council) at a Southern New Jersey board meeting.

(L-R) Anchor Larry Kane, Charisse Lillie, Daniel K. Fitzpatrick (Negev Society), Kenneth M. Jarin (Herzl Society), David L. Cohen (Negev Society, President’s Society), David B. Pudlin (President’s Society), Fred A. Shabel (President’s Society), William R. Sasso (President’s Society), David Dinenberg, and JNF CEO Russell Robinson at the Philadelphia Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

(L-R) Alan Dabrow (Century Council), David L. Cohen (Negev Society, President’s Society), and JNF CEO Russell Robinson displayed the Tree of Life™ Award at the Philadelphia Tree of Life™ Dinner.

(L-R) Former Philadelphia Board Presidents Joe Wolfson (President’s Society), Jerry Harvitz, Joseph Zuritsky (Century Council) Richard Gering (Herzl Society), Evelyn G. Spritz (Century Council, President’s Society), Alan Dabrow (Century Council), and Robert Zuritsky (Century Council, Negev Society) led the hamotzi, blessing of the bread, at the Philadelphia Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

ALEXANDER MUSS HIGH SCHOOL IN ISRAEL

Students Today, Leaders Tomorrow ALUMNI RETURNING FROM AMHSI

AMHSI prepares students to become successful leaders in our society and Jewish communities worldwide, paving the way for the future of the Jewish community as a whole. Some notable AMHSI alumni include: • Sheryl Sandberg—COO of Facebook—ranked #5 by Forbes in 2011 on the list of the World’s 100 Most Powerful Women. • Wayne Firestone—President of Hillel (international foundation for Jewish college campus life). • OAR band members Marc Roberge and Chris Culos, who attended AMHSI together, and fellow AMHSI alum Benjamin Gershman credit their debut album to their inspirational experience atop Masada. • Noam Neusner and Scott Arogeti—Former White House liaisons to the Jewish community. • Debra Zane—Award-winning Hollywood casting director for movies such as the Twilight Saga, Ocean’s Eleven, and Men In Black. • Robin Dermer—BMI award-winning songwriter and producer. • Lauren Weisberger—Bestselling author of The Devil Wears Prada and other novels. • Matisyahu—Popular recording artist, originally Matthew Miller, who has changed the face of reggae and hip hop music. He has said, “I think that AMHSI was probably the first time in my life I felt that being Jewish was something that was important and that there was something to be discovered.” Though it is difficult to quantify the immediate results of an experiential program, alumni continue to prove that the impact of participating in AMHSI programs can have lifelong effects on participants, who in turn positively impact their communities and our collective future. Today’s AMHSI students will undoubtedly be tomorrow’s generation of Jewish leaders—your rabbi, your doctor, maybe even our country’s future president. n

SESSION December 2012 January 2013 April 2013 Summer 1 2013 Summer 2 2013

DEPART November 27 January 22 April 9 June 18 June 26

RETURN January 22, 2013 March 19 June 4 July 30 August 7

Eight-week and six-week sessions available.

FULL SEMESTER PROGRAM NOW OFFERED For those wanting more than the traditional eight-week AMHSI session, the new full semester program develops a deeper exposure to, and connection with, Israel. Based at the new campus in the Negev, a joint JNF/AMHSI initiative at Eshel Hanassi Youth Village, the full semester session builds upon the core AMHSI curriculum, and also includes additional features such as Hebrew classes (ulpan), mock army training, and a four-day hike across the country from “sea to sea”—the Galilee to the Mediterranean. The semester also includes a week in Poland focused on studying the Holocaust, continuing the AMHSI educational methodology of learning on-site where history took place. Experience history and gain valuable skills and independence that will prepare you for college, all while having an incredible and fun time! Sign up today for an upcoming semester abroad: Fall 2012—August 26 - December 28, 2012 Spring 2013—January 27 - May 31, 2013 Fall 2013—August 25 - December 27, 2013 For more information, visit amhsi.org/semester. To see some of the JLIM highlights at AMHSI, go to amhsi.org/JLIM.

BECOME AN “AMBASSADOR” AND WIN COOL PRIZES If you’re an alum, you already know how unique AMHSI is and you want all your friends and family to have the exceptional AMHSI experience too. Now you can earn rewards for spreading the word. AMHSI has launched a new referral program that gives you the chance to earn points for every student you refer! Even if you are not an alum of AMHSI, you can still be an Ambassador and spread the word about this unique program. You could even win a trip to Israel! For more details, visit www.amhsi.org/ambassador and start referring your friends today!

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consistently use adjectives such as “amazing,” “life–changing,” and “indescribable” when talking about their experience. It is often hard to put their intellectual, emotional, and spiritual journey into words, but when they do, they talk about the impact the program had on them: the new way they see themselves, the world around them, their place in history, and their visions for their futures. Students come back with a new appreciation for Jewish history and heritage and their connection to it. Many students return to their schools with improved grades and parents are impressed by the mature, responsible teenager that returns to them after two months abroad. While each student’s experience is unique, one cannot overlook the important contribution AMHSI has made to the leadership and educational fabric of the North American Jewish community. Over the past 40 years, AMHSI’s 20,000 alumni have gone on to become successful doctors, rabbis, and lawyers—many crediting not only their pursuit of Jewish education and identity, but also their overall academic and professional success to their experience at AMHSI. In a study commissioned by AMHSI and conducted by the Jewish Education Service of North America (JESNA), the AMHSI program was proven to be among the most effective in achieving its goals: • 95% of alumni rated the program as one of the most influential experiences in their lives. • 88% have married a Jewish spouse. • 70% between the ages of 28-49 contribute to Jewish charities. • 65% participate in Jewish/Zionist organizations. • 63% are members of a synagogue (nearly four times the percentage of American Jews belonging to a synagogue, according to the National Jewish Population Survey findings).

UPCOMING SESSIONS ALEXANDER MUSS HIGH SCHOOL IN ISRAEL

AMHSI promotes, builds, and strengthens lifelong bonds between youth and Israel through the study of the history and culture of the people of Israel. AMHSI is a premier academic experience in Israel that prepares students for college and beyond. Since its founding in 1972, AMHSI has successfully impacted over 20,000 students. To learn more, visit amhsi.org or call 800-327-5980.

Experience Israel with JNF ISRAEL @ 65: INDEPENDENCE DAY MISSION | April 14-18, 2013 Celebrate the 65th anniversary of the State of Israel. Travel throughout the country as you follow the path toward Israel’s independence and walk in the footsteps of Israel’s pioneers. First, take part in the moving commemorative activities of Yom Hazikaron, Israel’s Memorial Day. Then, attend the famous ceremony at Mt. Herzl and join Heads of State, dignitaries and leaders at an exclusive celebration in honor of Yom Ha’atzmaut, Israel’s Independence Day.

Upcoming Trips and Missions DISCOVER ISRAEL MISSION

CULINARY, WINE AND ARTS MISSION

October 28 - November 7, 2012

March 1 - 9, 2013

Travel throughout Israel visiting important JNF projects as well as major tourist sites. With 11 days on the ground in Israel, this longer mission offers participants a truly in-depth experience that includes a plethora of interesting, exciting and unique activities.

Explore Israel’s food, wine and culinary scene while experiencing Israel’s arts and cultural institutions. Enjoy cooking lessons with top Israeli chefs, wine tastings with renowned wine connoisseurs, participate in workshops with famous artists and visit important JNF sites.

ARAVA INSTITUTE & HAZON RIDE October 30 - November 6, 2012

Experience More

Join Team JNF and experience Israel from the seat of your bicycle. Travel across Israel with riding routes of 200 – 300 miles over five days.

JNF DAY TOUR Wednesdays

BIRD WATCHING AND NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY MISSION

Only have a day? Leaves from Jerusalem every Wednesday. See the Northern Negev and JNF Projects—a new and unique Israel experience.

February 12 - 21, 2013 Join JNF for a unique experience-perfect for naturalists, nature photographers, bird watchers, or anyone who wants to view Israel’s spectacular ecology first-hand. Visit world-renowned bird sanctuaries, hear from top bird watching experts, take part in a nature photography workshop and more.

CAARI PROGRAM January 9 - February 28, 2013 A 2-8 week program for active retirees that combines community service and traditional sightseeing.

PLUS — Family Trips, B’nai Mitzvah Trips, Groups Tours and More. To register for one of these unique tours of Israel or for more information, contact 877-JNF-TOUR (563-8687) or visit jnf.org/travel


B'YACHAD SPRING 2012