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SPRING 2011/5771 VOLUME 23

“I have come into my garden...” – Song of Songs 5:1 For years, a tract along a mountain ridge between East and West Jerusalem was considered a no-man’s land. Despite a history dating back to the time of Abraham, it was perhaps best known as the site of the eruption of the Six Day War and subsequently served as little more than a source of anger and dispute between Arabs and Jews. … then came Richard and Rhoda Goldman. It took foresight, leadership, and an abiding financial commitment, but in time, the Goldmans helped re-form this wasted swath of land into a beautiful, garden fringed park with one of the most spectacular views in all of Israel. And today, in keeping with their vision, the Goldman Promenade continues to draw visitors of all faiths. Thousands come every year… peacefully.

The more people learn to give, the better life they live.

gave, distributing almost $700 million to approximately 2,600 non-profits through their Goldman Fund (including $16 million in grants for Jewish affairs in 2010 alone), placing them among the most generous and consequential philanthropists in the world. However, as central as tzedaka was to their lives, the Goldmans never intended for their charitable organization to “last in perpetuity.” Accordingly, the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund is scheduled to close at the end of 2012, its remaining resources to be divided among foundations created by the next Goldman generation. And yet, perpetuity is precisely what they have accomplished, as their lifelong call to give has imbued their children and their spouses: Doug and Lisa Goldman, John and Marcia Goldman, and Susan and Michael Gelman, as well as each of their eleven grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and countless others who have been inspired by their example. We honor the lives and legacies of Richard and Rhoda Goldman. May their memory be a blessing.

- Richard Goldman It is just one of the innumerable ways in which Richard and Rhoda Goldman made the world a better place. Mr. Goldman, who passed away at 90 on November 29, was most often cited for creating the Goldman Environmental Prize, often referred to as the “Green Nobel.” But his Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund, established in partnership with Mrs. Goldman over sixty years ago, and his work for the San Francisco based Jewish Community Federation, of which he served as a president (1980 -1982), board and Endowment Committee member (1982-2010), literally affected millions in the U.S., in Israel and throughout the world. Though his philanthropic reach was international, San Francisco was his hometown. And it was here, in the Bay Area, where his presence was most greatly felt. He owned and operated one of the most successful insurance companies in northern California, winning the first ever JCF Business Leadership Award. He engaged the next generation of SF Federation campaign donors by doubling the contributions of all first time givers under the age of fifty. He was an active member of Congregation Emanu-El, endowing its senior rabbi position. Among his many major investments in this community’s capital infrastructure, his lead gift to the San Francisco Jewish Community Center was largely responsible for making it the second largest JCC in the country. And he and his wife, who passed away in 1996, contributed so liberally to their alma mater, the University of California, Berkeley, that it renamed its school of public policy after them. The Goldmans were not ones to couch their philanthropy in complicated terms or lofty abstractions. “We always wanted to leave the world a little better than when we found it,” he often said. When they saw a need, they

J E W I S H C O M M U N I T Y F E D E R AT I O N A N D E N D O W M E N T F U N D

The Community Legacy Project: Ensuring the Future of Our Jewish Community Institutions

Not Your Bubbie’s Philanthropy

As we enter the Jewish Community Federation’s (JCF) 100th year, one question repeatedly arises: How strong will the Jewish community be 100 years from now? It is an issue we wrestle with as if it were a Talmudic tractate. But a fact that is difficult to dispute is that without flourishing synagogues, day schools, JCCs and community organizations, the Jewish community, as we know it, will not be. This is why the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund launched the Community Legacy Project (CLP).

A Vital Partnership The CLP is a partnership between the JCF and a diverse group of synagogues and local community organizations. The effort is equipping these institutions with the tools they need to market themselves, secure endowments and self-sustain over the long-term. The initiative is modeled after the phenomenally successful San Diego-based Endowment Leadership Institute program that has already resulted in nearly $200 million in new bequests and planned gifts for its Jewish institutions. And according to JCF Rabbi-in-Residence, Marvin Goodman, the Community Legacy Project is likely to be every bit as successful as its downstate progenitor. “The excitement over the CLP is tremendous!” Goodman says. “And it’s a real partnership. We’re listening to each institution’s leadership teams, and based on what they tell us, we’re giving them one-on-one coaching, marketing materials, financial incentives and concrete guidance on how to ensure their future.” That “guidance” is coming from Bay Area experts in fundraising and infrastructure building who have been hired to serve as coaches to the 17 selected local Jewish organizations. As evidence of Federation’s commitment to the success of this twoyear program, it has backed the CLP with $500,000 from its own Endowment Fund. Moreover, the New York-based Areivim Philanthropic Group has provided a $350,000 matching grant that helped propel the project in motion.

The Future is Now… L’Dor V’Dor! With the graying of the baby boom generation, our country is experiencing a monumental transfer of wealth. Over 40 trillion dollars! More than $1.7 trillion in charitable bequests are expected over the next twenty years. The goal of the CLP is to funnel more of those funds to the Jewish institutions that so greatly need them and to create a culture of Jewish legacy giving to help ensure the future of our schools, synagogues and community organizations. As Bab Freiberg, Director of Strategic Consulting at the JCF, passionately points out, this is largely a matter of showing these organizations how to cultivate more strategically effective relationships with their existing supporters. In other words, she says, “We’re teaching the Jewish community to reach out, reach in, and get into the game in an organized and proactive way.” So, how strong will the Jewish community be 100 years from now? It is a difficult question, indeed. But this much we know: If the Community Legacy Project continues to build on the progress it has already made, the most integral organizations in Jewish life will be receiving bequests, planned gifts, and endowments for generations to come! And that is what makes for a strong, stable, and vibrant future.

There are those for whom philanthropy is a two-step process: choosing a cause and writing a check. The Impact Grant Initiative (IGI) is not for them. The IGI, born in the summer of 2010, is designed specifically for entrepreneurial investor-donors who desire a philanthropic experience that encourages hands-on involvement. And according to Adin Miller, who serves as the initiative’s director of community impact, it is showing every indication of becoming a huge success. “The enthusiasm we’ve been seeing for the IGI has been extraordinary,” Miller says. “We’ve already received more grant applications than even our most aggressive estimates. It’s blown our expectations out of the water! And our impact grant committee is thoroughly engaged in a way that I’ve rarely seen in the non-profit sector.” Many of the 30 members of the first impact grant committee are new to the world of Federation allocations. They are young (average age thirty-eight), ambitious professionals, lay leaders and venture capitalists who are helping to test a new model for the Federation’s grant making process. “It’s been a constant learning experience and things are moving incredibly quickly. But that’s what makes it so exciting,” says steering committee member, Lois Wander. “And I really have to applaud the JCF for bringing in such a diverse group of people and for backing this degree of innovation.” Indeed, the JCF’s Endowment Fund, reflecting its deep commitment to the next generation of Federation donors, has provided the Impact Grant Initiative’s first million dollars in seed funding to be allocated to 6-10 initiatives over 3 years. The IGI committee will meet 6 times, once per month, ending in May 2011. It’s a high-powered, high-responsibility way to learn for these young leaders. This is the JCF’s first foray into so-called venture philanthropy, an increasingly popular philanthropy tactic that employs venture capital strategies such as a focus on measurable results, ongoing board involvement, active utilization of financial, intellectual, and human capital and seeking out innovative ideas. The inaugural grant round will fund inventive local approaches engaging young adults between 21 and 45 in Jewish life in the Bay Area. However, future rounds will likely see new groups of volunteer committee members fund different missions, as determined by the Federation lay leadership. The initiative would likely not even have gotten off the ground without the guidance of Bay Area venture capitalist, Laura Lauder, one of the IGI’s creators and most enthusiastic champions. “First and foremost, we’re cultivating a whole new generation of leaders,” Lauder says. “Our impact grant committee has literally been involved in every step of the grant making process from creating our mission statement to establishing outcome-measuring metrics…. And I think that has a lot to do with how we’ve been able to attract some of the most innovative non-profits in the Bay Area to apply. It’s truly groundbreaking.” The IGI is among the most forward-looking, high-engagement endeavors the Federation has ever supported. And if the initiative continues to progress as expected, it may very well frame future JCF philanthropic strategies.

Ernest Weil

(August 9, 1924 – July 31, 2010)

Ernest Weil was the founder of one of San Francisco’s most well-known and beloved bakeries, Fantasia Confections, located in Laurel Village for more than 40 years. As a young boy growing up in Landau in southern Germany, Ernest spent a great deal of time in the kitchen with his mother, learning how to bake. In 1938, Ernest, age 14, journeyed alone to Cuba aboard the ship The St. Louis, which was turned away from both Cuba and the U.S. Forced to return to Europe, Ernest was allowed into France, at the orphanage Montmorency, and attended the Cordon Bleu Cooking School. In 1940, two weeks before the Nazis invaded Paris, he was on the last ship to leave France, arriving in NY then joining his brothers in San Francisco. He took a job at Blum’s Bakery near Union Square, where he developed the legendary Coffee Crunch Cake. In 1948 he opened Fantasia, his dream bakery, employing the best bakers and most loyal workers. When Fantasia was sold in 1989, Ernest published his famous recipes in Love to Bake Pastry Cookbook, with proceeds benefiting children's organizations. Along with his wife, Margot, he raised four daughters, teaching the importance of family, of giving to those less fortunate, and of accepting all people. These values are what motivated Ernest to establish the Ernest and Margot Weil Philanthropic Fund and an Endowment Fund Gift Annuity. These funds provide critical support for the JCF and for the Frankel Center in Israel, a charity that Ernest founded in 1978 to treat children with learning disabilities. These gifts will help ensure the vitality of the organizations dear to his heart, and perpetuate the values by which he lived his life, creating an everlasting legacy for his children, grandchildren, and community. He will be missed by his wife, Margot Weil, daughters Evie, Susie, Karen, and Sandy; sons-in-law Uri Rote, Charley Lakatos, Mark Morris; grandchildren Michali, Maya, Doron, Jenny, Jeff, Sam and Hanna; and brothers Henry and Lewis Weil.

Jan Reicher, 45, serves as a Jewish Community These are two busy women. Yet, amid all of Federation trustee, as President of its Women’s their obligations (and these are abridged (November 5, 1932 – October 23, 2010) Philanthropy Division, is a cofounder of the lists), there is one priority that neither Jan nor Jewish Community High School of the Bay, and Carol forsake: are endowed Irwin was bornwill in ever Brooklyn, NYThey and moved to San Francisco following service as a medical corpsman in the Air Force. He built a successful textile manufacturing and distribution business, P & B Fabrics, which became is the Immediate Past President of Brandeis Hill Lions of Judah. Day School. Jan and her husband, Yossi, area premier supplier of quilting fabrics around the world, an important resource to independent quilt shops, and also the parents of two school age daughters,a donor of tens of thousands of yards of fabric to groups making quilts for people in need. Adi and Alexandra. Irwin believed in the continuity of the Jewish people and made it his life’s work to ensure it, taking care of The Lions of Judah are an international “Aour lot of people I talk who are in under the of those in need and supporting Jewish institutions that strengthen community. He to was active dozens Carol Weitz, 68, has owned and operated her sisterhood of all ages and walks of life. Their local Jewish communal organizations. Along with his wife, Ann, Irwin impression was a longtime supporter of the JCF, mistaken that becoming a LOJE is company, Weitz Medical Management, since contributions life to Federation sponsored as a generous donor,give passionate solicitor, and active volunteer. From his role as president of Hillel of San only for the wealthy,” says Jan. “And that her husband passed away in 2001. She is Francisco programs educate our children, and the that PJCC, to his service on thealleviate Boards of Wornick Jewish Day School, JCRC, JVS and couldn’t be further from the truth. There are a lot currently the Women’s Philanthropy CampaignCongregation Beth he for leftthe his most markvulnerable on nearly every aspect of Jewish life in the Bay Area. poverty, andJacob, provide of ways to make an endowment and many of Chair, an active member of Congregation Beth members of our community around the world. Irwin’s legacy will help build a strong Jewish community for the future, he took in knowing them don’tand involve anygreat cash pride outlay.” Indeed, Sholom, and a steadfast supporter of AIPAC and The gold pin Lions proudly display symbolizes that his children have taken his example to heart, as active supporters of their local Jewish communities. women have endowed gifts using multiple the American Jewish World Service. Carol also the admired individual and substantial collective strength of Jewish He deeply Ann’s involvement and commitment to the JCF and Jewish community, options ranging from naming the JCF asand a life hasshe a full roster of grandkids to spoil. women today and the action she takes to continues Irwin’s legacy of passionate and dedicated service to the JCF as a committed volunteer, leader, supporter, and friend. insurance beneficiary, to making bequests in ensure the continuity of our Jewish future. their wills, to utilizing assets such as stocks, Irwin is survived by his wife Ann Bear, children Wendy Bear and Rick (Lori) Landgarten, Mike (Stephanie) Landgarten, Sue (Michael) Pearson; grandchildren Rachel and Sarah Bear, Noah, Joshua and Maren Landgarten, Isabel and Zachary Pearson; andor hisreal brother, artwork estate.Jerry.

Irwin Bear

Sisters by choice

Providing a legacy for herself, her family and her community

Ellen’s friends and neighbors became her family. Her friends described her as thoughtful, intelligent, and civic minded. She cared about community, both locally and in Israel, closely following the current events in her homeland. Although she had been a Campaign supporter many years, when Ellen passed away in 2009 at the age of 84, the Federation was pleasantly surprised to learn she left the bulk of a multi-million dollar estate to the Jewish Community Federation. Her life story took her 7,500 miles away from Israel, but her attachment to both her homeland and heritage determined the legacy that she left. Through her endowment, the JCF is able to continue serving the values and causes that were dear to Ellen during her life, providing services in Israel and in her local community, and continuing Raoul’s legacy of assisting children with special needs. She is survived by her friends Orla Fahy, Judy Kivowitz, Mike Tiret, and caretaker and friend Marilyn Johnson.

Lion involvement begins with a financial commitment of $5,000 or more to the Federation’s Annual Campaign. Creating a Lion of Judah Endowment (LOJE) further deepens community impact by establishing an endowed fund of $100,000 or more, ensuring the perpetuation of a donor’s Lion of Judah level Annual Campaign gift.

Spreading the word At times Jan and Carol find themselves fighting against a tide of misinformation, particularly regarding the expense and difficulty of making a legacy gift.

“The truth is that once you make the commitment, becoming a LOJE is incredibly simple…. And I have never met a woman who has regretted it.” Carol’s experience as a LOJE does not only connect her to like-minded women, but acts as a powerful expression of her commitment to tzedakah. “It’s the most meaningful and impactful work I’ve ever done,” Carol says. “The feeling you get when you see up close what your money does is indescribable. And I don’t mean that in a bragging way. It’s just the pride you get from being a Lion.” Historically, the Lion of Judah symbolized strength, honor, and dedication for the Tribe of Judah, the dominant tribe of the Twelve Tribes of Israel. Today Lions collectively continue to reflect those same values by leading their peers through generosity, strength, and vision. Hear them roar!

P H I L A N T H R O P Y Anonymous 163 Rita Choit Adler and Joel D. Adler Richard and Barbara Almond Karen L. Alter David and Beverly Altman Alfred and Hilde Amkraut Fund Joanne and Bernard Arfin Edith and Myron Arrick Fund Fae R. Asher Yetta and Morris Bach Fund Gerson and Barbara Bakar Abraham and Kathlin Bakst Marci Gurwitch Ballin Laurence Jay Bardoff Ralph and Estelle Bardoff Fund Rose and Ralph Barkoff Fund Alvin H. Baum, Jr. Ann L. Bear Miriam and Joel Bennett Dorothy Berelson Berger Endowment Fund Annette M. Berger Marsha Lee and Norman M. Berkman Pauline N. Berkow Warren and Aline Berl Fund Eve Bernstein The Irving and Helen Betz Foundation Michael Bien and Jane Kahn Elizabeth Bing, Ph.D. Simon Blattner Lenore K. Bleadon Judith Gold Bloom Rosalind and David Bloom The Doris and Ben Blum Fund The Betty and John Blumlein Fund Arthur and Helen Bobrove Aviva Shiff Boedecker Jerome I. Braun Margot E. Braun Dr. James B. and Suzanne Becker Bronk Lucille and Arthur Brown Fund Martin and Geri Brownstein Jane and Sumner Burrows Fund Ronald M. Bushman Fund for Camp Tawonga I. D. Caplan Robert and Laura Caplan Mr. and Mrs. Fred B. Cherniss Carole A. Cohen Eve Cohen Herbert A. Cohen Trust Seymour Cohen Harry Cohn Norman Coliver Daniel Levine Cook Scholarship Fund Phyllis and David Cook

Miriam Arfin William Auslen Meryl J. Bach Irwin Bear Jeannette W. Berger Warren Berl Richard Bien Arthur Brown Helene H. Catz William K. Coblentz Dr. Elaine Dallman Ruth K. Debs Robert A. Derzon Edith Dorfman

William and Adele Corvin Fund Robert F. Cowan Leonie J. Darwin Ellen Deck Stan Deck RenĂŠe and Ervin Delman Fund Betty Denenberg Adler Helen Diller Family Foundation Joan Withers Dinner Joan and Richard S. Dinner Philanthropic Fund Annette Dobbs Jill and Martin Dodd Edith and Benjamin Dorfman Fund Dr. Ronald Steven Dunn Fund Maurice and Marguerite Edelstein Esther P. Eisenberg Connie and Albert Eisenstat Dr. Jack and Seena Elfant Carla Emil and Rich Silverstein Jack and Marion Euphrat Fund Barbara Farber Wesley and Bonnie Fastiff Lawrence and Marian Feigenbaum Alan and Gail Feinstein Wayne and Leslee Feinstein Dr. Leland R. Felton Saul A. Fenster Richard Fiedotin Martin Fleisher Dr. Martin Fleishman Susan and David Folkman Eleanor Fraenkel Tom and Myrna Frankel Michael A. Freeman, MD Jill and John Freidenrich Lauren A. Friedman Phyllis K. Friedman Virginia and Jay Friedman Fund Don and Janie Friend Elinor and Eugene Friend Fund Michelle and Robert Friend Peter and Luz M. Frohwein in Memory of Hans and Flore Frohwein John and Florine Galen Claude and Lynn Ganz Marilee Konigsberg Gardner Arthur B. and Miriam Gauss Frances K. Geballe and Theodore H. Geballe Mona and Dan Geller Shoshana and Martin Gerstel Reuben and Ruth Gilbert Fund Louise H. Ginsburg Dr. Abraham and Natalie Goetz Fund Dr. and Mrs. Mitchell Golbus

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recognizes individuals and families who have F e d e r a t i o n ’s J e w i s h C o m m u n i t y E n d o w m e n t F u n d in your will, a remainder interest in a charitab f u n d o r c h a r i t a b l e g i f t a n n u i t y, o r o

Jane Blumberg Goldberg John and Marcia Goldman Juliette Dayan Silver Goldman Lisa and Douglas E. Goldman Marianne Goldman Richard and Rhoda Goldman Jennifer Spitzer Gorovitz Doris Livingston Grasshoff Richard M. and Naomi Green Fund William H. and Frances D. Green Barbara L. and John M. Greenberg Flora Greenhoot Charles Gresham/Sydney Engleberg Fund Arleigh and Eleanore Grossman Fund J. Grossman Ruth Gundelfinger Lisa Gurwitch Peter and Miriam Haas Fund Susan Hamlin Martin and Carol Harband Helen and Arthur Hausman Gideon Hausner Jewish Day School Endowment in Memory of Mary Snyder Heller and Paul Heller Douglas M. and Mary E. Heller Herst Family Foundation Ida G. Hodes Russell and Susan Holdstein Laurence Hootnick Sonya and Stephen Hurst Nancy Igdaloff Aaron Jackson Lois and Robert Jacob Barbara R. Jacobs Gerson and Marilyn Jacobs Dennis and Paula Jaffe Alvin and Phyllis Janklow Gerardo and Priscilla Joffe Valerie Joseph Dennis Judd Lillian Judd Rabbi Douglas and Ellen Kahn Howard R. and Zoe Kahn Ara and Anatoliy Kalika Joel Kamisher Alexander C. Katten

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David M. Katz Lee and Martin Katz Arnold and Ruth Kaufman Charitable Trust Frances Lee Kaufman Julian L. Kaufman Ron and Barbara Kaufman Steve Kaufman Rachel and Wilfred Kay Permanent Endowment Fund in memory of Peisach and Sara Katz and their children: Sholom, Shimon, Sima, Lea, Rachel and Benjamin Morton D. Kirsch Jerome and Meta Kirschbaum Jack and Elisa Klein Emil Knopf Phyllis V. Koch Sidney and Vivian Konigsberg Fund Peter and Carol Kornfeld Fund Jim and Cathy Koshland Larry and Bernis Kretchmar Sigmund and Helen Kriegsman Henriette Landman in honor of Isador and Anna Landman and Jack Landman Adele and Donald Langendorf Jacqueline and Sol Langsam Laura and Gary Lauder Jerry Layne Stephen and Maribelle Leavitt Maryan Lebell Warren G. Lefort Henry and Elizabeth Lehmann Fund Vivian and Leonard Lehmann Sandra and Leonard Leib Claire Elaine Leibowitz Robert and Francine Lent Family Leslie Family Lenore and Lewis B. Levin Adeline Horwich Levine Memorial Fund Julie and David Levine Miriam and Milton Levison Fund Rosanne and Al Levitt Harold L. Levy Fund Harry and Gene Lewin Fund

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JEWISH COMMUNITY ENDOWMENT FUND

Their Memories Will Live on Through Their Lega

Joseph B. Durra Jack S. Euphrat Donald G. Fisher Janet Fisher Ira Forest Max Frank Barbara Frankel Jane Galante Walter Goldenrath

Richard N. Goldman Ronald Goodman Richard M. Green Martha Greenhood Evelyn Haas Alex Inkeles Rachel Kay Hilla Kirschner Elisa Klein

Vivian Konigsberg Sylvia Ladar Virginia Ladensohn Carole J. Landis Barbara Leventhal-Stern Anne Levison Fred Levy Harold L. Levy Harry H. Lewin

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established a permanent fund as part of the d. This legacy can be in the form of a bequest ble trust, donor advised fund, pooled income ther testamentary vehicle. Join us.

Dr. Richard and Martha Pastcan Rosemarie and Alan Paul Fund Steve Peckler The Eda and Joseph Pell Fund Rose Penn Karen Kaufman Perlman Frances Pivnick Dan Porat Karen L. Posner David S. Pottruck and Emily W. Scott Dana Mack Prinz Pritzker Family Amy Rabbino and Neal Rubin Irving and Varda Rabin Rado Family Fund Caroline and Bennett Raffin Bert and Anne Raphael Shirley and Robert Raymer Eli Reinhard Joyce and William Remak Fund Paul and Hilda Richards Leo H. Riegler Joyce Baker Rifkind Caryl Lancet Ritter Paul and Sheri Robbins Carol Seiler Roberts Norman R. Rogers Cindy Rogoway Patricia and Robert Ronald Mark Rosen–Beth Ami Fund in honor of Benny and Rosemary Friedman Herbert and Ilse Rosenbaum Barbara and Richard Rosenberg Eric S. Rosenberg John and Thelma Rosenberg Peter and Lisa Rosenberg H. Glenn Rosenkrantz Gerald B. Rosenstein Martin and Bette Rosenthal Fund Paul and Maureen Roskoph Eva and John Ross Luba R. Ross Alan and Susan Rothenberg Gregg Ivan Bernell Rubenstein Esther Rubin Harry J. Saal and Carol D. Saal Paul and Eleanor Sade Fund Ellen and Jerry Saliman The Sandler Foundation

Helen Lewison Lucille and Henry Libicki Mel and Bettie Lichtman The Linker Family Charles and Julia Lobel Fund Eva T. Lokey Lorry I. Lokey Fern and Bill Lowenberg Susan E. Lowenberg Stanley and Judith Lubman Brian L. Lurie Connie and Bob Lurie Jane R. Lurie Siesel and Howard Maibach Gadi and Marlene Maier Peter and Melanie Maier Alexander M. and June L. Maisin Foundation Susan and Jay Mall Elie and Gerry Marcus Fund Gladys and Larry Marks Lois Marks Marcia Markels Eve and Harvey Masonek Laurie and Laurence May Marlyn G. McClaskey Charles F. and Marilyn Meier Honey and David Meir-Levi The Purple Lady/ Barbara J. Meislin Fund Beryl and Renee Mell Frank G. Meyer Avram Miller Susan and Bill Mirbach Phyllis and Stuart Moldaw Roz and Merv Morris Milton Mosk Judith Moss Eleanor and Laurence Myers Foundation Mark and Jamie Myers Ann and Joseph Nadel Fund Hilda and Manfred Namm Fund Peggy Nathan Robert and Jan Newman Leah Noher Don and Shari Ornstein Bernard and Barbro Osher Adele R. Passalacqua

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George Sarlo Gerry and Lela Sarnat Dorothy and George Saxe Loren and Shelley Saxe Betty and Jack Schafer Ron and Marilyn Schilling Norman and Adrienne Schlossberg Sherry and Howard Schor Janet and Albert Schultz The Lori Ann Schwab Memorial Fund John R. Schwabacher Lauren Gage Segal Donald H. and Ruth F. Seiler Walter S. Selig Janice Selix Doré Selix-Gabby Michael and Daryl Shafran Dana and Gary Shapiro Phyllis and Lawrence J. Shapiro Fund Barry and Esther Sherman Leslie and Dan Shiner Grace Shulman Howard C. and Elizabeth H. Shwiff Nathan and Rebecca Siegel Jordan R. Sills Esther and Richard Sirinsky Jeffrey S. Skoll Emily and Alec Skolnick Fund Harold Skootsky Family Mildred R. Snitzer Vivian R. Solomon Susan and Richard Sorkin Sari R. Spector Joel Spolin and Margot Parker Bruce and Beverly Stamper Joelle Spitzer Steefel Howard M. Steiermann Marlene and Martin Stein Endowment Fund for Jewish Camp and Experience in Israel of Congregation Shomrei Torah Vera and Harold S. Stein, Jr. Anne and David Steirman Elsie M. Stevens Hal Stoll Family Fund Dr. and Mrs. Sherman H. Strauss Bette J. Sussman The Swig Fund for Jewish Community Involvement The Mae and Benjamin Swig Family Fund Roselyne Chroman Swig Steven L. Swig Valli Benesch-Tandler and Robert S. Tandler Dr. and Mrs. Irving B. Tapper Fund Tad Taube Ingrid D. Tauber

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acies to the Jewish Community Endowment Fund

George Maisels Victor L. Marcus Mark M. Morris Pauline Newman-Gordon Richard Orgell Natalie Prager-Hertzmann Edward Robinson Catherine P. Rosen Louise Rosenberg

Theodore Rosenberg Martin Rosenthal Lotte Ross Lottie L. Rothschild Paul Sade Margot Salomonski Ethel Salwen George Saxe S. Jerral Schwartzman

Elizabeth Seelig Theodore R. Seton Albert A. Shansky Barbara B. Shupin Barbara H. Smith Mary Frances Smith Walter R. Steinberg Sylvia C. Sugarman Jeanne S. Tapper

Joel and Fran Teisch Olga Thein Veronica S. Tincher Mary Ann and Bertram Tonkin Fund Ruthellen Toole Charlene and Sid Tuchman Ruth and Charles Tuckman Carol Schussler van Wijnen Dorothy R. Vogel and Walter Vogel Fund Myron and Jerrie Rubenstein Wacholder Fund Joseph and Kathi Wahed Marilyn Yolles Waldman Dr. Samuel and Mrs. Hjordis Waxler Fund Alfred and Lee Weber Fund Esther Y. Wedner Lewis and Helen Weil Fund Janice Weinman Robert and Tita Weir Marilyn and Raymond Weisberg Charles and Barbara Weiss Otto and Idell Weiss Erna and Herman Wertheim Fund The Hans and Susan Wildau Fund Kathy Williams Jacob H. and Celina Wisniewski Fund Michael and Devera Witkin Sheldon and Rhoda Wolfe Sue and Richard Wollack Martin Zankel David R. Zemansky Nina Zentner Mark Zitter and Jessica Nutik Harold and Mary Zlot Alanna Zrimsek and Morton Levin Steven Zuckerman and Debra Meyerson Richard and Jean Zukin

PLEASE NOTE: This list contains names of permanent funds that will come to the Jewish Community Federation’s Endowment Fund at some time in the future, often as testamentary gifts. The donors’ names and their philanthropic goals live on through their endowed legacies. Current through March 1, 2011 We regret any accidental omissions or errors. Kindly send any corrections or updates on how you would like to be listed to jcef@sfjcf.org or call 415.512.6216.

L. Jay Tenenbaum Walter R. Tick Janice Titchell Gary Tobin Lawrence Tomsky Hansi Torczyner Eva Vida Ellen Wexberg Ernest Weil Dorothy Wiseman Spiegelman Jacob H. Wisniewski Beverly Wolfe Harold F. Zimmerman

George Saxe

(February 28, 1921 – July 28, 2010)

George Saxe was a true community leader and visionary who lived by example. After serving in Europe in the U.S. Army during WWII, George married Dorothy Ruby and had three children. They settled in Palo Alto in 1959, where George established a successful real estate development business. George was a dedicated Board member of the Jewish Community Federation and served for many years on its Endowment and Capital Planning Committees. Together with Dorothy, he established the George and Dorothy Saxe Philanthropic Fund of the JCEF, which supported various causes throughout the Jewish community, supporting those in need, advancing education and the arts, and ensuring the future, strength, viability, and richness of Jewish life. George and Dorothy shared a passion for the importance of philanthropy, an example that was set for both of them by their respective parents. He considered his family to be his greatest legacy and was proud to have children and grandchildren who share his values and commitment to the Jewish community. The Saxe children and grandchildren embody his legacy and are active members of the Jewish community and the JCF. The JCF is proud to be working with them to help create and implement their own philanthropic visions and perpetuate George’s legacy George is survived by his wife, Dorothy, son Loren (Shelley), daughter Ellen (Jerry), son Joel (Susan), and grandchildren David, Aaron, Daniel, Dena (Gary), Rebecca and Shira.

Jerry Schwartzman

(June 28, 1929 – July 30, 2010)

Jerry Schwartzman grew up with his five brothers in Lincoln, Nebraska. After serving in the Korean War, he settled in the Peninsula, where he lived most of his adult life. At the urging of his brother, Jerry entered the produce business and made it his career. In 1983, after working for Mendelsohn Zeller for more than two decades, he opened Schwartzman Distributing and took great pride when his son Gary joined him and made it a true family business. Jerry’s name throughout the Jewish community has long been synonymous with gracious, giving, and compassionate. His dedication to Jewish life–for children and adults–is legendary. He and his wife Sunny were also instrumental in starting and supporting Hatikvah House, a Jewish home where developmentally disabled adults can live together in a supportive and caring Jewish environment. He was an active board member of Gideon Hausner Jewish Day School and took nachas (pride) in teaching the Hausner students to blow the shofar. Jerry wanted to ensure that every student who chose to come to Hausner, who was academically qualified, would be offered the opportunity to attend. He established the Schwartzman Family Fund of the JCEF through a gift of mutual funds to do just that. He also designated family members to recommend grants after his lifetime, ensuring the continuity and purposefulness of his gift–from generation to generation. Jerry’s greatest pride came from his family, especially his grandchildren, whose presence made his face always light up with joy. He derived immense pleasure when surrounded by his family at Shabbat dinners and holiday celebrations, including Passover seders. Jerry will be missed and cherished by his wife Sunny Kaplan, children Jeff and Chellie and Gary and Sue, grandchildren Aaron and Danielle Schwartzman, Zachary and Madeline Vidibor, Ben and Joe Schwartzman, and Mathew and Joshua Kaplan.

Ellen Wexberg

(February 15, 1925 – April 18, 2009)

Ellen Wexberg was born in 1925 in the newly-formed British Mandate of Palestine and grew up in Tel Aviv. She lived in a place and time of tremendous historical significance. From the wave of Jewish immigration to Palestine as anti-Semitism grew in Europe, to the establishment of the state of Israel, the events that occurred in her homeland during her lifetime had an enormous impact on her life. Ellen came to the United States in 1939 and graduated from the Bentley School in New York City. She moved to San Francisco and met Raoul Wexberg, and the two married in 1957 at Congregation Emanu-El. Raoul, who moved to San Francisco from Austria, attended City College of San

Francisco and became a social worker for the City of San Francisco Children’s Services. He worked with disabled children for over 30 years and was respected by his co-workers and beloved by the children and families who, with his support, were able to overcome their pain and go on with their lives. The greatest admirer of his work, however, was his wife Ellen, and she made it known to all who knew the couple. She was deeply proud of his appreciation and respect for the feelings of others and was inspired by his service to children and families in need. Raoul passed away unexpectedly in 1986, and Ellen found comfort in her friends and began teaching dance classes. Neither Ellen nor Raoul had any siblings or children, and

Ernest Weil

(August 9, 1924 – July 31, 2010)

Ernest Weil was the founder of one of San Francisco’s most well-known and beloved bakeries, Fantasia Confections, located in Laurel Village for more than 40 years. As a young boy growing up in Landau in southern Germany, Ernest spent a great deal of time in the kitchen with his mother, learning how to bake. In 1938, Ernest, age 14, journeyed alone to Cuba aboard the ship The St. Louis, which was turned away from both Cuba and the U.S. Forced to return to Europe, Ernest was allowed into France, at the orphanage Montmorency, and attended the Cordon Bleu Cooking School. In 1940, two weeks before the Nazis invaded Paris, he was on the last ship to leave France, arriving in NY then joining his brothers in San Francisco. He took a job at Blum’s Bakery near Union Square, where he developed the legendary Coffee Crunch Cake. In 1948 he opened Fantasia, his dream bakery, employing the best bakers and most loyal workers. When Fantasia was sold in 1989, Ernest published his famous recipes in Love to Bake Pastry Cookbook, with proceeds benefiting children's organizations. Along with his wife, Margot, he raised four daughters, teaching the importance of family, of giving to those less fortunate, and of accepting all people. These values are what motivated Ernest to establish the Ernest and Margot Weil Philanthropic Fund and an Endowment Fund Gift Annuity. These funds provide critical support for the JCF and for the Frankel Center in Israel, a charity that Ernest founded in 1978 to treat children with learning disabilities. These gifts will help ensure the vitality of the organizations dear to his heart, and perpetuate the values by which he lived his life, creating an everlasting legacy for his children, grandchildren, and community. He will be missed by his wife, Margot Weil, daughters Evie, Susie, Karen, and Sandy; son-in-laws Uri Rote, Charley Lakatos, Mark Morris; grandchildren Michali, Maya, Doron, Jenny, Jeff, Sam and Hanna; and brothers Henry and Lewis Weil.

Irwin Bear

(November 5, 1932 – October 23, 2010)

Irwin was born in Brooklyn, NY and moved to San Francisco following service as a medical corpsman in the Air Force. He built a successful textile manufacturing and distribution business, P & B Fabrics, which became a premier supplier of quilting fabrics around the world, an important resource to independent quilt shops, and a donor of tens of thousands of yards of fabric to groups making quilts for people in need. Irwin believed in the continuity of the Jewish people and made it his life’s work to ensure it, taking care of those in need and supporting Jewish institutions that strengthen our community. He was active in dozens of local Jewish communal organizations. Along with his wife, Ann, Irwin was a longtime supporter of the JCF, as a generous donor, passionate solicitor, and active volunteer. From his role as president of Hillel of San Francisco and the PJCC, to his service on the Board of Wornick Jewish Day School, JCRC, JVS and Congregation Beth Jacob, he left his mark on nearly every aspect of Jewish life in the Bay Area. Irwin’s legacy will help build a strong Jewish community for the future, and he took great pride in knowing that his children have taken his example to heart, as active supporters of their local Jewish communities. He deeply admired Ann’s substantial involvement and commitment to the JCF and Jewish community, and she continues Irwin’s legacy of passionate and dedicated service to the JCF as a committed volunteer, leader, supporter, and friend. Irwin is survived by his wife Ann Bear, children Wendy and Howard Bear (Juli) and stepchildren Rick (Lori) Landgarten, Mike (Stephanie) Landgarten, Sue (Michael) Pearson; grandchildren Rachel and Sarah Bear, Noah, Joshua and Maren Landgarten, Isabel and Zachary Pearson; and his brother, Jerry

Ellen’s friends and neighbors became her family. Her friends described her as thoughtful, intelligent, and civic minded. She cared about community, both locally and in Israel, closely following the current events in her homeland. Although she had been a Campaign supporter many years, when Ellen passed away in 2009 at the age of 84, Federation staff was pleasantly surprised to learn she left the bulk of a multi-million dollar estate to the Jewish Community Federation. Her life story took her 7,500 miles away from Israel, but her attachment to both her homeland and heritage determined the legacy that she left. Through her endowment, the JCF is able to continue serving the values and causes that were dear to Ellen during her life, providing services in Israel and in her local community, and continuing Raoul’s legacy of assisting children with special needs. She is survived by her friends Orla Fahy, Judy Kivowitz, Mike Tiret, and caretaker and friend Marilyn Johnson.

THE JEWISH COMMUNITY ENDOWMENT FUND

Your Center for Jewish Philanthropy The Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund provides expertise in all areas of philanthropic planning and grant making. The Federation’s programs offer a variety of means for donors to make a difference in improving the quality of life for the Jewish and general communities.

Please Contact Us To: Find out about Endowment services and the Living Legacy Society Mark Reisbaum, Chief Endowment Officer 415.512.6251, MarkR@sfjcf.org

Through planned giving programs, philanthropic services, and

Get philanthropic advisory services and discuss multigenerational philanthropic planning

donor education programs, our Endowment professionals offer

Amy Rabbino, Director of Philanthropic Services

a wide range of advisory services to advance the philanthropic

415.512.6212, AmyR@sfjcf.org

impact of our donors. We offer private consultations that are tailored to the needs of individuals and families, with an eye to

Establish a Donor Advised Fund

transferring values and helping the next generation develop

Ruth Bender, Program Director and Philanthropic Advisor

their philanthropic passion and skill.

415.512.6205, RuthB@sfjcf.org.

For one hundred years, our donors have placed their trust and philanthropic goals. Through the foresight of these donors, the

Establish a Charitable Gift Annuity, bequest, or to find out more about naming the JCF as a beneficiary of a retirement or life insurance plan

Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund meets the

Tamara Wallenstein, Planned Giving Officer

needs of the community today and in the future.

415.512.6217, TamaraW@sfjcf.org

confidence in our ability to partner with them to achieve their

To direct your philanthropic priorities please view a list of community needs on the web at: jewishfed.org/initiatives

Join the Living Legacy Society and Sign The Book of Life

Please tell me more about how I can…

Help ensure the strength, vitality,

Create an endowment

and continuity of the Jewish

Include the JCF in my will

community for generations to

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come by leaving a permanent gift

Create a Charitable Gift Annuity

to the Jewish Community

Find out about other needs in the community

Federation. Your gift along with

I have already provided for the JCF in my estate plan

the gifts of other community members form a lasting legacy of

Please add my name to the Living Legacy Honor roll

Jewish philanthropy enabling the funding of crucial community programs here in the Bay Area, in Israel, and around the world. Your gift will automatically enroll you in the Living Legacy Society where

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your generosity will be recognized for generations to come. As a member, you will be eligible to attend special private events, and hear presentations made by the Bay Area’s leading professional advisors and others.

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You will also be invited to compose a message in The Book of Life, a

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treasured collection of memories that serves as repository of wisdom from

Or clip and return to:

generation to generation.

Mark Reisbaum, Chief Endowment Of ficer Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund

To view more messages from the Book of Life visit

121 Steuar t Street

www.jewishfed.org/explore-federation-view/257/book-of-life

San Francisco, CA 94105 Tel 415.512 .6211

fax 415.495.6635


Your Living Legacy 2011